WorldWideScience

Sample records for anomalous compressive behavior

  1. Anomalous compression behavior of germanium during phase transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Xiaozhi [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Tan, Dayong [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academic of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ren, Xiangting [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); Yang, Wenge, E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); High Pressure Synergetic Consortium (HPSynC), Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); He, Duanwei, E-mail: yangwg@hpstar.ac.cn, E-mail: duanweihe@scu.edu.cn [Institute of Atomic and Molecular Physics, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610065 (China); Institute of Fluid Physics and National Key Laboratory of Shockwave and Detonation Physic, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Mao, Ho-Kwang [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research (HPSTAR), Shanghai 201203 (China); High Pressure Synergetic Consortium (HPSynC), Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie Institution of Washington, Washington, DC 20015 (United States)

    2015-04-27

    In this article, we present the abnormal compression and plastic behavior of germanium during the pressure-induced cubic diamond to β-tin structure transition. Between 8.6 GPa and 13.8 GPa, in which pressure range both phases are co-existing, first softening and followed by hardening for both phases were observed via synchrotron x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. These unusual behaviors can be interpreted as the volume misfit between different phases. Following Eshelby, the strain energy density reaches the maximum in the middle of the transition zone, where the switch happens from softening to hardening. Insight into these mechanical properties during phase transformation is relevant for the understanding of plasticity and compressibility of crystal materials when different phases coexist during a phase transition.

  2. Anomalous Solubility Behavior of Several Acidic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Avdeef

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The “anomalous solubility behavior at higher pH values” of several acidic drugs originally studied by Higuchi et al. in 1953 [1], but hitherto not fully rationalized, has been re-analyzed using a novel solubility-pH analysis computer program, pDISOL-XTM. The program internally derives implicit solubility equations, given a set of proposed equilibria and constants (iteratively refined by weighted nonlinear regression, and does not require explicit Henderson-Hasselbalch equations. The re-analyzed original barbital, phenobarbital, oxytetracycline, and sulfathiazole solubility-pH data of Higuchi et al. is consistent with the presence of dimers in saturated solutions. In the case of barbital, phenobarbital and sulfathiazole, anionic dimers, reaching peak concentrations near pH 8. However, oxytetracycline indicated a pronounced tendency to form a cationic dimer, peaking near pH 2. Under the conditions of the original study, only barbital indicated a slight tendency to form a salt precipitate at pH > 6.8, with a highly unusual stoichiometry (consistent with a slope of 0.55 in the log S – pH plot: K+ + A2H- + 3HA D KA5H4(s. Thus the “anomaly” in the Higuchi data can be rationalized by invoking specific aggregated species.

  3. Streamlined Modeling for Characterizing Spacecraft Anomalous Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, B.; Swann, D.

    2011-09-01

    Anomalous behavior of on-orbit spacecraft can often be detected using passive, remote sensors which measure electro-optical signatures that vary in time and spectral content. Analysts responsible for assessing spacecraft operational status and detecting detrimental anomalies using non-resolved imaging sensors are often presented with various sensing and identification issues. Modeling and measuring spacecraft self emission and reflected radiant intensity when the radiation patterns exhibit a time varying reflective glint superimposed on an underlying diffuse signal contribute to assessment of spacecraft behavior in two ways: (1) providing information on body component orientation and attitude; and, (2) detecting changes in surface material properties due to the space environment. Simple convex and cube-shaped spacecraft, designed to operate without protruding solar panel appendages, may require an enhanced level of preflight characterization to support interpretation of the various physical effects observed during on-orbit monitoring. This paper describes selected portions of the signature database generated using streamlined signature modeling and simulations of basic geometry shapes apparent to non-imaging sensors. With this database, summarization of key observable features for such shapes as spheres, cylinders, flat plates, cones, and cubes in specific spectral bands that include the visible, mid wave, and long wave infrared provide the analyst with input to the decision process algorithms contained in the overall sensing and identification architectures. The models typically utilize baseline materials such as Kapton, paints, aluminum surface end plates, and radiators, along with solar cell representations covering the cylindrical and side portions of the spacecraft. Multiple space and ground-based sensors are assumed to be located at key locations to describe the comprehensive multi-viewing aspect scenarios that can result in significant specular reflection

  4. The anomalous yield behavior of fused silica glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, W.; Heyden, S.; Conti, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2018-04-01

    We develop a critical-state model of fused silica plasticity on the basis of data mined from molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The MD data is suggestive of an irreversible densification transition in volumetric compression resulting in permanent, or plastic, densification upon unloading. The MD data also reveals an evolution towards a critical state of constant volume under pressure-shear deformation. The trend towards constant volume is from above, when the glass is overconsolidated, or from below, when it is underconsolidated. We show that these characteristic behaviors are well-captured by a critical state model of plasticity, where the densification law for glass takes the place of the classical consolidation law of granular media and the locus of constant-volume states defines the critical-state line. A salient feature of the critical-state line of fused silica, as identified from the MD data, that renders its yield behavior anomalous is that it is strongly non-convex, owing to the existence of two well-differentiated phases at low and high pressures. We argue that this strong non-convexity of yield explains the patterning that is observed in molecular dynamics calculations of amorphous solids deforming in shear. We employ an explicit and exact rank-2 envelope construction to upscale the microscopic critical-state model to the macroscale. Remarkably, owing to the equilibrium constraint the resulting effective macroscopic behavior is still characterized by a non-convex critical-state line. Despite this lack of convexity, the effective macroscopic model is stable against microstructure formation and defines well-posed boundary-value problems.

  5. Parsing anomalous versus normal diffusive behavior of bedload sediment particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathel, Siobhan; Furbish, David; Schmeeckle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Bedload sediment transport is the basic physical ingredient of river evolution. Formulae exist for estimating transport rates, but the diffusive contribution to the sediment flux, and the associated spreading rate of tracer particles, are not clearly understood. The start-and-stop motions of sediment particles transported as bedload on a streambed mimic aspects of the Einstein–Smoluchowski description of the random-walk motions of Brownian particles. Using this touchstone description, recent work suggests the presence of anomalous diffusion, where the particle spreading rate differs from the linear dependence with time of Brownian behavior. We demonstrate that conventional measures of particle spreading reveal different attributes of bedload particle behavior depending on details of the calculation. When we view particle motions over start-and-stop timescales obtained from high-speed (250 Hz) imaging of coarse-sand particles, high-resolution measurements reveal ballistic-like behavior at the shortest (10−2 s) timescale, followed by apparent anomalous behavior due to correlated random walks in transition to normal diffusion (>10−1 s) – similar to Brownian particle behavior but involving distinctly different physics. However, when treated as a ‘virtual plume’ over this timescale range, particles exhibit inhomogeneous diffusive behavior because both the mean and the variance of particle travel distances increase nonlinearly with increasing travel times, a behavior that is unrelated to anomalous diffusion or to Brownian-like behavior. Our results indicate that care is needed in suggesting anomalous behavior when appealing to conventional measures of diffusion formulated for ideal particle systems.

  6. Anomalous freezing behavior of nanoscale liposomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spangler, E. J.; Kumar, P. B. S.; Laradji, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the finite size of one-component liposomes on their phase behavior is investigated via simulations of an implicit-solvent model of self-assembled lipid bilayers. We found that the high curvature of nanoscale liposomes has a significant effect on their freezing behavior. While...

  7. Utilizing Weak Indicators to Detect Anomalous Behaviors in Networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Egid, Adin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    We consider the use of a novel weak in- dicator alongside more commonly used weak indicators to help detect anomalous behavior in a large computer network. The data of the network which we are studying in this research paper concerns remote log-in information (Virtual Private Network, or VPN sessions) from the internal network of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The novel indicator we are utilizing is some- thing which, while novel in its application to data science/cyber security research, is a concept borrowed from the business world. The Her ndahl-Hirschman Index (HHI) is a computationally trivial index which provides a useful heuristic for regulatory agencies to ascertain the relative competitiveness of a particular industry. Using this index as a lagging indicator in the monthly format we have studied could help to detect anomalous behavior by a particular or small set of users on the network.

  8. Anomalous Elastic Behavior in hcp- and Sm-Type Dysprosium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tschauner, Oliver; Grubor-Urosevic, Ognjen; Dera, Przemyslaw; Mulcahy, Sean R. (UNLV); (UC)

    2012-04-11

    The compression behavior of elemental dysprosium in the hcp- and the Sm-type phases has been examined under hydrostatic pressure. Sm-type Dy has been found about 1% denser than the hcp phase. This increase in density is due to c-axis contraction in Sm-type Dy, whereas the a-axis even expands compared with the hcp-phase. Both the hcp- and the Sm-type phases show an inversion in the pressure derivative of the c/a ratio. For hcp-Dy this inversion is very sharp with minimal c/a at 2.5 GPa. At the same pressure, the compression behavior of hcp-Dy changes abruptly from dominantly c-axis compression to almost isotropic compression with slightly softer S{sub 11}. The bulk modulus increases at this point by a factor of {approx}2. Both hcp- and Sm-type Dy exhibit a crossover from highly anisotropic compression mostly along the c-axis to almost isotropic compression. We discuss these anomalies with respect to a possible Lifshitz transition and structural soft modes.

  9. Compressive behavior of fine sand.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Bradley E. (Air Force Research Laboratory, Eglin, FL); Kabir, Md. E. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Song, Bo; Chen, Wayne (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN)

    2010-04-01

    The compressive mechanical response of fine sand is experimentally investigated. The strain rate, initial density, stress state, and moisture level are systematically varied. A Kolsky bar was modified to obtain uniaxial and triaxial compressive response at high strain rates. A controlled loading pulse allows the specimen to acquire stress equilibrium and constant strain-rates. The results show that the compressive response of the fine sand is not sensitive to strain rate under the loading conditions in this study, but significantly dependent on the moisture content, initial density and lateral confinement. Partially saturated sand is more compliant than dry sand. Similar trends were reported in the quasi-static regime for experiments conducted at comparable specimen conditions. The sand becomes stiffer as initial density and/or confinement pressure increases. The sand particle size become smaller after hydrostatic pressure and further smaller after dynamic axial loading.

  10. Anomalous behaviors during infiltration into heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarão Reis, F. D. A.; Bolster, D.; Voller, V. R.

    2018-03-01

    Flow and transport in heterogeneous porous media often exhibit anomalous behavior. A physical analog example is the uni-directional infiltration of a viscous liquid into a horizontal oriented Hele-Shaw cell containing through thickness flow obstacles; a system designed to mimic a gravel/sand medium with impervious inclusions. When there are no obstacles present or the obstacles form a multi-repeating pattern, the change of the length of infiltration F with time t tends to follow a Fickian like scaling, F ∼t1/2 . In the presence of obstacle fields laid out as Sierpinski carpet fractals, infiltration is anomalous, i.e., F ∼ tn, n ≠ 1/2. Here, we study infiltration into such Hele-Shaw cells. First we investigate infiltration into a square cell containing one fractal carpet and make the observation that it is possible to generate both sub (n 1/2) diffusive behaviors within identical heterogeneity configurations. We show that this can be explained in terms of a scaling analysis developed from results of random-walk simulations in fractal obstacles; a result indicating that the nature of the domain boundary controls the exponent n of the resulting anomalous transport. Further, we investigate infiltration into a rectangular cell containing several repeats of a given Sierpinski carpet. At very early times, before the liquid encounters any obstacles, the infiltration is Fickian. When the liquid encounters the first (smallest scale) obstacle the infiltration sharply transitions to sub-diffusive. Subsequently, around the time where the liquid has sampled all of the heterogeneity length scales in the system, there is a rapid transition back to Fickian behavior. An explanation for this second transition is obtained by developing a simplified infiltration model based on the definition of a representative averaged hydraulic conductivity.

  11. Phase transitions and anomalous compressibility in 1-2-2 Iron-based superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhoya, Walter O.

    compressibility and a concurrent tetragonal to collapsed tetragonal (T-cT) isostructural phase transition in 1-2-2 parents of iron-based superconductors. We showed that the anomaly is a common phenomenon for pure and doped ThCr2Si2 type pnictides of the type AT2As2 (A= divalent alkaline earth or rare earth element Ba, Ca, Sr, Eu; T=transition metal). We determine a general relation for predicting isostructural T-cT phase transition pressure for any 1-2-2 pnictide given its ambient pressure volume. Our work suggests that the collapsed tetragonal phase is non-superconducting. We have establish how onset of pressure induced superconductivity (TConset) in 1-2-2 parent materials depends on the compression behavior of As-Fe-As tetrahedral bond angles, tetragonal lattice parameter c, Fe2As2 layer thickness and As-As inter-atomic bond distance for parent 1-2-2 materials. The evolution of pressure driven tetragonal distortion, quantitative crystallographic parameters and pressure-volume equation of state for 1-2-2 materials under high pressures are presented up to 70 GPa and low temperatures down to 4 K.

  12. Observation of Anomalous Resistance Behavior in Bilayer Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanping; Lew, Wen Siang; Liu, Zongwen

    2017-12-01

    Our measurement results have shown that bilayer graphene exhibits an unexpected sharp transition of the resistance value in the temperature region 200~250 K. We argue that this behavior originates from the interlayer ripple scattering effect between the top and bottom ripple graphene layer. The inter-scattering can mimic the Coulomb scattering but is strongly dependent on temperature. The observed behavior is consistent with the theoretical prediction that charged impurities are the dominant scatters in bilayer graphene. The resistance increase with increasing perpendicular magnetic field strongly supports the postulate that magnetic field induces an excitonic gap in bilayer graphene. Our results reveal that the relative change of resistance induced by magnetic field in the bilayer graphene shows an anomalous thermally activated property.

  13. Error Resilient Video Compression Using Behavior Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacco R. Taal

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Wireless and Internet video applications are inherently subjected to bit errors and packet errors, respectively. This is especially so if constraints on the end-to-end compression and transmission latencies are imposed. Therefore, it is necessary to develop methods to optimize the video compression parameters and the rate allocation of these applications that take into account residual channel bit errors. In this paper, we study the behavior of a predictive (interframe video encoder and model the encoders behavior using only the statistics of the original input data and of the underlying channel prone to bit errors. The resulting data-driven behavior models are then used to carry out group-of-pictures partitioning and to control the rate of the video encoder in such a way that the overall quality of the decoded video with compression and channel errors is optimized.

  14. Electric Shocks Resulting in Seismic Animal Anomalous Behaviors (SAABs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeya, Motoji; Takaki, Shunji; Takashimizu, Dan

    1996-03-01

    Electric field effects on fish and worms have been studied assuming that the seismic animal anomalous behaviors (SAABs) witnessed prior to the Hansin Earthquake were caused by seismic electric current. Japanese minnows, guppies and loaches responded to the current and aligned perpendicular to the field direction and earthworms swarmed, which are forms of SAABs, at a current density of J=0.1˜1 A/m2 presumably to reduce the effects of the field, F. A mathematical model of a fault was used to express the seismic stress, σ(t) corresponding to a fault displacement, D(t). An electromagnetic model of a fault, where a bound charge density, q which compensate the piezoelectric polarization, appears due to the release of seismic stress is used to derive dq/dt=-α(dσ/dt)-q/ɛρ, F=q/ɛ and J=F/ρ'. Using the piezoelectric coefficient, α, dielectric constant, ɛ and the resistivity, ρ of bedrock granite and ρ' of water gives J=1 A/m2 in concordance with the experiments.

  15. Anomalous behavior of the ionosphere before strong earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi Naidu, P.; Madhavi Latha, T.; Madhusudhana Rao, D. N.; Indira Devi, M.

    2017-12-01

    In the recent years, the seismo-ionospheric coupling has been studied using various ionospheric parameters like Total Electron Content, Critical frequencies, Electron density and Phase and amplitude of Very Low Frequency waves. The present study deals with the behavior of the ionosphere in the pre-earthquake period of 3-4 days at various stations adopting the critical frequencies of Es and F2 layers. The relative phase measurements of 16 kHz VLF wave transmissions from Rugby (UK), received at Visakhapatnam (India) are utilized to study the D-region during the seismically active periods. The results show that, f0Es increases a few hours before the time of occurrence of the earthquake and day time values f0F2 are found to be high during the sunlit hours in the pre-earthquake period of 2-3 days. Anomalous VLF phase fluctuations are observed during the sunset hours before the earthquake event. The results are discussed in the light of the probable mechanism proposed by previous investigators.

  16. Detecting Anomalous Trajectories and Behavior Patterns Using Hierarchical Clustering from Taxi GPS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulong Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous taxi trajectories are those chosen by a small number of drivers that are different from the regular choices of other drivers. These anomalous driving trajectories provide us an opportunity to extract driver or passenger behaviors and monitor adverse urban traffic events. Because various trajectory clustering methods have previously proven to be an effective means to analyze similarities and anomalies within taxi GPS trajectory data, we focus on the problem of detecting anomalous taxi trajectories, and we develop our trajectory clustering method based on the edit distance and hierarchical clustering. To achieve this objective, first, we obtain all the taxi trajectories crossing the same source–destination pairs from taxi trajectories and take these trajectories as clustering objects. Second, an edit distance algorithm is modified to measure the similarity of the trajectories. Then, we distinguish regular trajectories and anomalous trajectories by applying adaptive hierarchical clustering based on an optimal number of clusters. Moreover, we further analyze these anomalous trajectories and discover four anomalous behavior patterns to speculate on the cause of an anomaly based on statistical indicators of time and length. The experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively detect anomalous trajectories and can be used to infer clearly fraudulent driving routes and the occurrence of adverse traffic events.

  17. Compression behavior of delaminated composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, Scott O.; Springer, George S.

    1989-01-01

    The response of delaminated composite plates to compressive in-plane loads was investigated. The delaminated region may be either circular or elliptical, and may be located between any two plies of the laminate. For elliptical delaminations, the axes of the ellipse may be arbitrarily oriented with respect to the applied loads. A model was developed that describes the stresses, strains, and deformation of the sublaminate created by the delamination. The mathematical model is based on a two dimensional nonlinear plate theory that includes the effects of transverse shear deformation. The model takes into account thermal and moisture induced strains, transverse pressures acting on the sublaminate, and contact between the sublaminate and plate. The solution technique used is the Ritz method. A computationally efficient computer implementation of the model was developed. The code can be used to predict the nonlinear-load-strain behavior of the sublaminate including the buckling load, postbuckling behavior, and the onset of delamination growth. The accuracy of the code was evaluated by comparing the model results to benchmark analytical solutions. A series of experiments was conducted on Fiberite T300/976 graphite/epoxy laminates bonded to an aluminum honeycomb core forming a sandwich panel. Either circles or ellipses made from Teflon film were embedded in the laminates, simulating the presence of a delamination. Each specimen was loaded in compression and the strain history of the sublaminate was recorded far into the postbuckling regime. The extent of delamination growth was evaluated by C-scan examination of each specimen. The experimental data were compared to code predictions. The code was found to describe the data with reasonable accuracy. A sensitivity study examined the relative importance of various material properties, the delamination dimensions, the contact model, the transverse pressure differential, the critical strain energy release rate, and the relative

  18. Degree-strength correlation reveals anomalous trading behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Qian; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Wang, Zhao-Yang

    2012-01-01

    Manipulation is an important issue for both developed and emerging stock markets. Many efforts have been made to detect manipulation in stock markets. However, it is still an open problem to identify the fraudulent traders, especially when they collude with each other. In this paper, we focus on the problem of identifying the anomalous traders using the transaction data of eight manipulated stocks and forty-four non-manipulated stocks during a one-year period. By analyzing the trading networks of stocks, we find that the trading networks of manipulated stocks exhibit significantly higher degree-strength correlation than the trading networks of non-manipulated stocks and the randomized trading networks. We further propose a method to detect anomalous traders of manipulated stocks based on statistical significance analysis of degree-strength correlation. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is effective at distinguishing the manipulated stocks from non-manipulated ones. Our method outperforms the traditional weight-threshold method at identifying the anomalous traders in manipulated stocks. More importantly, our method is difficult to be fooled by colluded traders.

  19. Anomalous scaling of passive scalar fields advected by the Navier-Stokes velocity ensemble: effects of strong compressibility and large-scale anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonov, N V; Kostenko, M M

    2014-12-01

    The field theoretic renormalization group and the operator product expansion are applied to two models of passive scalar quantities (the density and the tracer fields) advected by a random turbulent velocity field. The latter is governed by the Navier-Stokes equation for compressible fluid, subject to external random force with the covariance ∝δ(t-t')k(4-d-y), where d is the dimension of space and y is an arbitrary exponent. The original stochastic problems are reformulated as multiplicatively renormalizable field theoretic models; the corresponding renormalization group equations possess infrared attractive fixed points. It is shown that various correlation functions of the scalar field, its powers and gradients, demonstrate anomalous scaling behavior in the inertial-convective range already for small values of y. The corresponding anomalous exponents, identified with scaling (critical) dimensions of certain composite fields ("operators" in the quantum-field terminology), can be systematically calculated as series in y. The practical calculation is performed in the leading one-loop approximation, including exponents in anisotropic contributions. It should be emphasized that, in contrast to Gaussian ensembles with finite correlation time, the model and the perturbation theory presented here are manifestly Galilean covariant. The validity of the one-loop approximation and comparison with Gaussian models are briefly discussed.

  20. Origin of anomalous cryogenic magnetic behavior in a Ni-Mn-based magnetic shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, X. M.; Cong, D. Y.; Liss, K.-D.; Qu, Y. H.; Ma, L.; Suo, H. L.; Wang, Y. D.

    2017-03-01

    The origin of the anomalous low-temperature staircase-like magnetization behavior in magnetic shape memory alloys, which has been commonly observed in a large variety of materials, has been remaining a mystery since it was discovered. Here, we elucidate the underlying mechanism for such anomalous magnetic behavior via tracing the structural evolution during applying magnetic fields at 4 K in an archetypal Ni-Mn-based magnetic shape memory alloy, by in-situ neutron diffraction technique. We found that it is the magnetic-field-induced structural transformation occurring at this extremely low temperature (far below martensitic transformation temperature) that is responsible for the anomalous low-temperature magnetic behavior. It is believed that this transformation proceeds by a succession of discrete steps, accounting for the abrupt jumps on the magnetization curve. The present study provides deep insights into the interplay between magnetism and structure in magnetic shape memory alloys, and it is also instructive for understanding the anomalous staircase-like magnetization behavior in other materials undergoing a magnetostructural transition.

  1. Anomalous behavior of 1/f noise in graphene near the charge neutrality point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeshita, Shunpei; Tanaka, Takahiro; Arakawa, Tomonori; Kobayashi, Kensuke [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Matsuo, Sadashige [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan); Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Nakaharai, Shu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito [WPI-MANA, NIMS, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Moriyama, Takahiro; Ono, Teruo [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan)

    2016-03-07

    We investigate the noise in single layer graphene devices from equilibrium to far-from equilibrium and found that the 1/f noise shows an anomalous dependence on the source-drain bias voltage (V{sub SD}). While the Hooge's relation is not the case around the charge neutrality point, we found that it is recovered at very low V{sub SD} region. We propose that the depinning of the electron-hole puddles is induced at finite V{sub SD}, which may explain this anomalous noise behavior.

  2. Compression Behavior of Single-Layer Graphenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Frank, Otakar; Tsoukleri, G.; Parthenios, J.; Papagelis, K.; Riaz, I.; Jalil, R.; Novoselov, K. S.; Galiotis, C.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 6 (2010), s. 3131-3138 ISSN 1936-0851 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : buckling * compression * graphene Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 9.855, year: 2010

  3. Compression Behavior of High Performance Polymeric Fibers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kumar, Satish

    2003-01-01

    Hydrogen bonding has proven to be effective in improving the compressive strength of rigid-rod polymeric fibers without resulting in a decrease in tensile strength while covalent crosslinking results in brittle fibers...

  4. Suppression of anomalous synchronization and nonstationary behavior of neural network under small-world topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boaretto, B. R. R.; Budzinski, R. C.; Prado, T. L.; Kurths, J.; Lopes, S. R.

    2018-05-01

    It is known that neural networks under small-world topology can present anomalous synchronization and nonstationary behavior for weak coupling regimes. Here, we propose methods to suppress the anomalous synchronization and also to diminish the nonstationary behavior occurring in weakly coupled neural network under small-world topology. We consider a network of 2000 thermally sensitive identical neurons, based on the model of Hodgkin-Huxley in a small-world topology, with the probability of adding non local connection equal to p = 0 . 001. Based on experimental protocols to suppress anomalous synchronization, as well as nonstationary behavior of the neural network dynamics, we make use of (i) external stimulus (pulsed current); (ii) biologic parameters changing (neuron membrane conductance changes); and (iii) body temperature changes. Quantification analysis to evaluate phase synchronization makes use of the Kuramoto's order parameter, while recurrence quantification analysis, particularly the determinism, computed over the easily accessible mean field of network, the local field potential (LFP), is used to evaluate nonstationary states. We show that the methods proposed can control the anomalous synchronization and nonstationarity occurring for weak coupling parameter without any effect on the individual neuron dynamics, neither in the expected asymptotic synchronized states occurring for large values of the coupling parameter.

  5. TargetVue: Visual Analysis of Anomalous User Behaviors in Online Communication Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Nan; Shi, Conglei; Lin, Sabrina; Lu, Jie; Lin, Yu-Ru; Lin, Ching-Yung

    2016-01-01

    Users with anomalous behaviors in online communication systems (e.g. email and social medial platforms) are potential threats to society. Automated anomaly detection based on advanced machine learning techniques has been developed to combat this issue; challenges remain, though, due to the difficulty of obtaining proper ground truth for model training and evaluation. Therefore, substantial human judgment on the automated analysis results is often required to better adjust the performance of anomaly detection. Unfortunately, techniques that allow users to understand the analysis results more efficiently, to make a confident judgment about anomalies, and to explore data in their context, are still lacking. In this paper, we propose a novel visual analysis system, TargetVue, which detects anomalous users via an unsupervised learning model and visualizes the behaviors of suspicious users in behavior-rich context through novel visualization designs and multiple coordinated contextual views. Particularly, TargetVue incorporates three new ego-centric glyphs to visually summarize a user's behaviors which effectively present the user's communication activities, features, and social interactions. An efficient layout method is proposed to place these glyphs on a triangle grid, which captures similarities among users and facilitates comparisons of behaviors of different users. We demonstrate the power of TargetVue through its application in a social bot detection challenge using Twitter data, a case study based on email records, and an interview with expert users. Our evaluation shows that TargetVue is beneficial to the detection of users with anomalous communication behaviors.

  6. Computational Study on the Anomalous Fluorescence Behavior of Isoflavones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyhan, S.M.; Gotz, A.W.; Ariese, F.; Visscher, L.; Gooijer, C.

    2011-01-01

    Isoflavones are known to show fluorescence with intensities that depend strongly on the solvent properties and exhibit Stokes' shifts as large as 1.4 eV. While some of this behavior can be explained by (excited state) deprotonation, this mechanism does not apply for all isoflavones. The aim of this

  7. Anomalous lattice compression and magnetic ordering in CuO at high pressures: A structural study and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlenko, D. P.; DruŻbicki, K.; Kichanov, S. E.; Lukin, E. V.; Liermann, H.-P.; Glazyrin, K. V.; Savenko, B. N.

    2017-02-01

    The structural and magnetic properties of multiferroic CuO have been studied by means of neutron and x-ray powder diffraction at pressures up to 11 and 38 GPa, respectively, and by first-principles theoretical calculations. Anomalous lattice compression is observed, with enlargement of the lattice parameter a , reaching a maximum at P = 13 GPa , followed by its reduction at higher pressures. The lattice distortion of the monoclinic structure at high pressures is accompanied by a progressive change of the oxygen coordination around Cu atoms from the square fourfold towards the octahedral sixfold coordination. The pressure-induced evolution of the structural properties and electronic structure of CuO was successfully elucidated in the framework of full-electronic density functional theory calculations with range-separated HSE06, and meta-generalized gradient approximation hybrid M06 functionals. The antiferromagnetic (AFM) ground state with a propagation vector q = (0.5 , 0 , -0.5 ) remains stable in the studied pressure range. From the obtained structural parameters, the pressure dependencies of the principal superexchange magnetic interactions were analyzed, and the pressure behavior of the Néel temperature as well as the magnetic transition temperature from the intermediate incommensurate AFM multiferroic state to the commensurate AFM ground state were evaluated. The estimated upper limit of the Néel temperature at P = 38 GPa is about 260 K, not supporting the previously predicted existence of the multiferroic phase at room temperature and high pressure.

  8. Anomalous compression and new high-pressure phases of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, Sergey V.; Trots, Dmytro M.; Kurnosov, Alexander V.; Morgenroth, Wolfgang; Liermann, Hanns-Peter; Dubrovinsky, Leonid

    2013-09-01

    We report results of a powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) study of vanadium sesquioxide, V2O3, under pressurization in a neon pressure-transmitting medium up to 57 GPa. We have established a bulk modulus value for corundum-type V2O3 of B0 = 150 GPa at B‧ = 4. This bulk modulus value is the lowest among those known for the corundum-type-structured oxides, e.g. Al2O3, α-Fe2O3, Cr2O3, Ti2O3, and α-Ga2O3. We have proposed that this might be related to the difference in the electronic band structures: at room temperature V2O3 is metallic, but the above corundum-structured sesquioxides are semiconducting or insulating. Around ˜21-27 and ˜50 GPa we registered changes in the XRD patterns that might be addressed to phase transitions. These transitions were sluggish upon room-temperature compression, and hence we additionally facilitated them by the laser heating of one sample. We have refined the XRD patterns of only the first high-pressure phase in an orthorhombic lattice of a Rh2O3(II)-type. Our findings significantly extend the knowledge of the P-T phase diagram of V2O3 and advance the understanding of its properties. We speculate that the elastic properties of V2O3 can be closely linked to its electronic band structure and, consequently, we propose that slightly doped V2O3 (e.g. with Cr) could be a potential candidate for systems in which the bulk modulus value may be remarkably switched by moderate pressure or temperature.

  9. Investigation of Sludge Batch 3 (Macrobatch 4) Glass Sample Anomalous Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bannochie, C. J.; Bibler, N. E.; Peeler, D. K.

    2005-01-01

    Two Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) glass samples from Sludge Batch 3 (SB3) (Macrobatch 4) were received by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) on February 23, 2005. One sample, S02244, was designated for the Product Consistency Test (PCT) and elemental and radionuclide analyses. The second sample, S02247, was designated for archival storage. The samples were pulled from the melter pour stream during the feeding of Melter Feed Tank (MFT) Batch 308 and therefore roughly correspond to feed from Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Batches 306-308. During the course of preparing sample S02244 for PCT and other analyses two observations were made which were characterized as ''unusual'' or anomalous behavior relative to historical observations of glasses prepared for the PCT. These observations ultimately led to a series of scoping tests in order to determine more about the nature of the behavior and possible mechanisms. The first observation was the behavior of the ground glass fraction (-100 +200 mesh) for PCT analysis when contacted with deionized water during the washing phase of the PCT procedure. The behavior was analogous to that of an organic compound in the presence of water: clumping, floating on the water surface, and crawling up the beaker walls. In other words, the glass sample did not ''wet'' normally, displaying a hydrophobic behavior in water. This had never been seen before in 18 years SRNL PCT tests on either radioactive or non-radioactive glasses. Typical glass behavior is largely to settle to the bottom of the water filled beaker, though there may be suspended fines which result in some cloudiness to the wash water. The typical appearance is analogous to wetting sand. The second observation was the presence of faint black rings at the initial and final solution levels in the Teflon vessels used for the mixed acid digestion of S02244 glass conducted for compositional analysis. The digestion is composed of two stages, and at both the

  10. Computer simulation of the anomalous elastic behavior of thin films and superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, D.

    1992-10-01

    Atomistic simulations are reviewed that elucidate the causes of the anomalous elastic behavior of thin films and superlattices (the so-called supermodulus effect). The investigation of free-standing thin films and of superlattices of grain boundaries shows that the supermodulus effect is not an electronic but a structural interface effect intricately connected with the local atomic disorder at the interfaces. The consequent predictions that (1) coherent strained-layer superlattices should show the smallest elastic anomalies and (2) the introduction of incoherency at the interfaces should enhance all anomalies are validated by simulations of dissimilar-material superlattices. 38 refs, 10 figs

  11. Microscopic Origins of the Anomalous Melting Behavior of Sodium under High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshet, Hagai; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Kühne, Thomas D.; Behler, Jörg; Parrinello, Michele

    2012-03-01

    X-ray diffraction experiments have shown that sodium exhibits a dramatic pressure-induced drop in melting temperature, which extends from 1000 K at ˜30GPa to as low as room temperature at ˜120GPa. Despite significant theoretical effort to understand the anomalous melting, its origins are still debated. In this work, we reconstruct the sodium phase diagram by using an ab initio quality neural-network potential. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reentrant behavior results from the screening of interionic interactions by conduction electrons, which at high pressure induces a softening in the short-range repulsion.

  12. A Visual Analytics Approach for Detecting and Understanding Anomalous Resident Behaviors in Smart Healthcare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifang Liao

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available With the development of science and technology, it is possible to analyze residents’ daily behaviors for the purpose of smart healthcare in the smart home environment. Many researchers have begun to detect residents’ anomalous behaviors and assess their physical condition, but these approaches used by the researchers are often caught in plight caused by a lack of ground truth, one-sided analysis of behavior, and difficulty of understanding behaviors. In this paper, we put forward a smart home visual analysis system (SHVis to help analysts detect and comprehend unusual behaviors of residents, and predict the health information intelligently. Firstly, the system classifies daily activities recorded by sensor devices in smart home environment into different categories, and discovers unusual behavior patterns of residents living in this environment by using various characteristics extracted from those activities and appropriate unsupervised anomaly detection algorithm. Secondly, on the basis of figuring out the residents’ anomaly degree of every date, we explore the daily behavior patterns and details with the help of several visualization views, and compare and analyze residents’ activities of various dates to find the reasons why residents act unusually. In the case study of this paper, we analyze residents’ behaviors that happened over two months and find unusual indoor behaviors and give health advice to the residents.

  13. Deformation Behavior of Human Dentin under Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Zaytsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Deformation behavior of a human dentin under compression including size and rate effects is studied. No difference between mechanical properties of crown and root dentin is found. It is mechanically isotropic high elastic and strong hard tissue, which demonstrates considerable plasticity and ability to suppress a crack growth. Mechanical properties of dentin depend on a shape of samples and a deformation rate.

  14. Experimental study on behavior of GFRP stiffened panels under compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankeri, Pradeep; Ganesh Mahidhar, P. K.; Prakash, S. Suriya; Ramji, M.

    2015-03-01

    Glass Fiber Reinforced Polymer (GFRP) materials are extensively used in the aerospace and marine industries because of their high strength and stiffness to weight ratio and excellent corrosion resistance. Stiffened panels are commonly used in aircraft wing and fuselage parts. The present study focuses on the behavior of composite stiffened panels under compressive loading. With the introduction of stiffeners to unstiffened composite plates, the structural stiffness of the panel increases resulting in higher strength and stiffness. Studies in the past have shown that the critical structural failure mode under compressive loading of a stiffened composite panel is by local buckling. The present study attempts to evaluate the mechanical behavior of composite stiffened panels under compression using blade stiffener configuration and in particular on the behavior of the skin- stiffener interface through experimental testing. A novel test fixture is developed for experimental testing of GFRP stiffened panels. A non-contact whole field strain analysis technique called digital image correlation (DIC) is used for capturing the strain and damage mechanisms. Blade stiffeners increased the strength, stiffness and reduced the out-of plane displacement at failure. The failure of both the unstiffened and stiffened panels was through local buckling rather than through material failure. DIC was able to capture the strain localization and buckling failure modes.

  15. Influence of compression parameters on mechanical behavior of mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogaça, Davi Novaes Ladeia; da Silva, William Soares; Rodrigues, Luciano Brito

    2017-10-01

    Studies on the interaction between direction and degree of compression in the Texture Profile Analysis (TPA) of cheeses are limited. For this reason the present study aimed to evaluate the mechanical properties of Mozzarella cheese by TPA at different compression degrees (65, 75, and 85%) and directions (axes X, Y, and Z). Data obtained were compared in order to identify possible interaction between both factors. Compression direction did not affect any mechanical variable, or rather, the cheese had an isotropic behavior for TPA. Compression degree had a significant influence (p food, particularly cheese. The precise choice of the instrumental test configuration is essential for achieving results that represent the material analyzed. The method of manufacturing is another factor that may directly influence the mechanical properties of food. This can be seen, for instance, in stretched curd cheese, such as Mozzarella. Knowledge on such mechanical properties is highly relevant for food industries due to the mechanical resistance in piling, pressing, manufacture of packages, and food transport, or to melting features presented by the food at high temperatures in preparation of several foods, such as pizzas, snacks, sandwiches, and appetizers. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Anomalous Hall effect and magnetoresistance behavior in Co/Pd1−xAgx multilayers

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Z. B.

    2013-02-13

    In this paper, we report anomalous Hall effect (AHE) correlated with the magnetoresistance behavior in [Co/Pd1-xAg x]n multilayers. For the multilayers with n = 6, the increase in Ag content from x = 0 to 0.52 induces the change in AHE sign from negative surface scattering-dominated AHE to positive interface scattering-dominated AHE, which is accompanied with the transition from anisotropy magnetoresistance (AMR) dominated transport to giant magnetoresistance (GMR) dominated transport. For n = 80, scaling analysis with Rs ∝ρ xx γ yields γ ∼ 3.44 for x = 0.52 which presents GMR-type transport, in contrast to γ ∼ 5.7 for x = 0 which presents AMR-type transport. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  17. Large Negative Thermal Expansion and Anomalous Behavior on Compression in Cubic ReO 3 -Type A II B IV F 6 : CaZrF 6 and CaHfF 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hancock, Justin C.; Chapman, Karena W.; Halder, Gregory J.; Morelock, Cody R.; Kaplan, Benjamin S.; Gallington, Leighanne C.; Bongiorno, Angelo; Han, Chu; Zhou, Si; Wilkinson, Angus P.

    2015-06-09

    CaZrF6 and CaHfF6 display much stronger negative thermal expansion (NTE) (alpha(L100 K) similar to -18 and -22 ppm K-1, respectively) than ZrW2O8 and other corner-shared framework structures. Their NTE is comparable to that reported for framework solids containing multiatom bridges, such as metal cyanides and metal-organic frameworks. However, they are formable as ceramics, transparent over a wide wavelength range and can be handled in air; these characteristics can be beneficial for applications. The NTE of CaZrF6 is strongly temperature-dependent, and first-principles calculations show that it is largely driven by vibrational modes below similar to 150 cm(-1). CaZrF6 is elastically soft with a bulk modulus (K-300K) of 37 GPa and, upon compression, starts to disorder at similar to 400 MPa. The strong NTE of CaZrF6, which remains cubic to <10 K, contrasts with cubic CoZrF6, which only displays modest NTE above its rhombohedral to cubic phase transition at similar to 270 K. CaZrF6 and CaHfF6 belong to a large and compositionally diverse family of materials, A(II)B(IV)F(6), providing for a detailed exploration of the chemical and structural factors controlling NTE and many opportunities for the design of controlled thermal expansion materials.

  18. Anomalous behavior in ZnMgO thin films deposited by sol-gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Amanpal, E-mail: m.gooley@elsevier.com [Department of Electronic Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119 (India); Hybrid Microcircuit Group, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI)/Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani-333031 (India); Kumar, Dinesh [Department of Electronic Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119 (India); Khanna, P.K. [Hybrid Microcircuit Group, Central Electronics Engineering Research Institute (CEERI)/Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Pilani-333031 (India); Kumar, Anuj; Kumar, Mukesh [Department of Electronic Science, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra-136119 (India); Kumar, Mohit [Research Group Life Science Automation-Technologies, Center for Life Science Automation, Rostock-18119 (Germany)

    2011-06-30

    The magnesium doped zinc oxide is a promising optical material to enhance the luminescence for possible application in solid state lighting. Magnesium doped zinc oxide thin films (Zn{sub 0.85}Mg{sub 0.15}O) were deposited by sol-gel route on p-type silicon and annealed at different temperatures in oxygen environment for an hour. The doping of magnesium in zinc oxide was confirmed by X-Ray diffraction and the samples were found to have wurtzite crystal structure with (002) preferred orientation. The films were characterized by Hall-effect, atomic force microscopy, UV-VIS spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and work function measurements. The different studies exhibited an anomalous behavior for the film annealed at 900 deg. C. The Hall effect, work function measurements and UV-VIS spectroscopy indicated that the resistivity, work function and optical band gap increased as a function of annealing temperature (from 300 deg. C to 700 deg. C) however these parameters were found to decrease for the films annealed above 700 deg. C. The particle size increased with the annealing but for the samples annealed at 900 deg. C, the shape of the grains changed and became elongated like fibers as observed by the atomic force microscopy. The PL measurements displayed the existence of oxygen vacancies defects for the samples annealed at and above 600 deg. C. The possible mechanism for this anomaly has been discussed in this work.

  19. Fractional and fractal dynamics approach to anomalous diffusion in porous media: application to landslide behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelloni, Gianluca; Bagnoli, Franco

    2016-04-01

    In the past three decades, fractional and fractal calculus (that is, calculus of derivatives and integral of any arbitrary real or complex order) appeared to be an important tool for its applications in many fields of science and engineering. This theory allows to face, analytically and/or numerically, fractional differential equations and fractional partial differential equations. In particular, one of the several applications deals with anomalous diffusion processes. The latter phenomena can be clearly described from the statistical viewpoint. Indeed, in various complex systems, the diffusion processes usually no longer follow Gaussian statistics, and thus Fick's second law fails to describe the related transport behavior. In particular, one observes deviations from the linear time dependence of the mean squared displacement ⟨x2(t)⟩ ∝ t, (1) which is characteristic of Brownian motion, i.e., a direct consequence of the central limit theorem and the Markovian nature of the underlying stochastic process [1-17]. Instead, anomalous diffusion is found in a wide diversity of systems and its feature is the non-linear growth of the mean squared displacement over time. Especially the power-law pattern, with exponent γ different from 1 ⟨ ⟩ x2(t) ∝ tγ, (2) characterizes many systems [18, 19], but a variety of other rules, such as a logarithmic time dependence, exist [20]. The anomalous diffusion, as expressed in Eq. (2) is connected with the breakdown of the central limit theorem, caused by either broad distributions or long-range correlations, e.g., the extreme statistics and the power law distributions, typical of the self-organized criticality [42, 43]. Instead, anomalous diffusion rests on the validity of the Levy-Gnedenko generalized central limit theorem [21-23]. Particularly, broad spatial jumps or waiting time distributions lead to non-Gaussian distribution and non-Markovian time evolution of the system. Anomalous diffusion has been known since

  20. Topological characteristics underpin intermittency and anomalous transport behavior in soil-like porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, M.; Morales, V.; Willmann, M.; Jerjen, I.; Kaufmann, R.; Dentz, M.

    2016-12-01

    Continuum models of porous media are based on the validity of the Darcy equation for fluid and Fick's law for scalar fluxes on a representative elementary volume. Fluctuations of pore-scale flow and scalar transport are averaged out and represented in terms of effective parameters such as hydrodynamic dispersion. However, the intermittent behavior of pore-scale flow impacts on the nature of particle and scalar transport, and it determines the way dissolved substances mix and react. The understanding of the origin of these processes is of both fundamental and practical importance in applications ranging from reactive transport in groundwater flow to diffusion in fuel cells or biological systems. A central issue in porous medium flow is therefore to relate intermittent behavior of Lagrangian velocity at pore scale imposed by the complex pore network geometry to transport properties at larger scales. Lagrangian measurements in porous systems are nonetheless scarce and most experimental techniques do not provide access to all three velocity components. In this contribution we report 3D measurements of Lagrangian velocity in soil-like porous media. We complement these measurements with detailed X-ray scans of the pore network. We find sharp velocity transitions close to pore throats, and low flow variability in the pore bodies, which gives rise to stretched exponential Lagrangian velocity and acceleration distributions characterized by a sharp peak at low velocity and a superlinear evolution of particle dispersion. We demonstrate that porosity and pore size distribution alone cannot explain the observed features of the flow. Rather, anomalous transport is better interpreted in terms of how pores of various geometries are interconnected. We reproduce the main observations using a continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model revealing the main features that control the system and showing the potential of this simple model to capture transport in complex geometries.

  1. Effects of Concentrical Partial (Local) Compression on the Structural Behavior of Concrete Filled Steel Tubular Column

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaganesh, S.; Raja Murugadoss, J.; Ganesh Prabhu, G.; Jegan, J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this present paper is to investigate the structural behavior of square and circular Concrete Filled Steel Tubular (CFST) stub columns subjected to axial partial/local compression. The experimental parameters were local compression area and section type. Among the twelve specimens, six specimens were tested under full compression and the remaining six specimens were tested under local compression. The experimental observation indicated that the failure pattern of the CFST colu...

  2. On mean square displacement behaviors of anomalous diffusions with variable and random orders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hongguang; Chen Wen; Sheng Hu; Chen Yangquan

    2010-01-01

    Mean square displacement (MSD) is used to characterize anomalous diffusion. Recently, models of anomalous diffusion with variable-order and random-order were proposed, but no MSD analysis has been given so far. The purpose of this Letter is to offer a concise derivation of MSD functions for the variable-order model and the random-order model. Numerical results are presented to illustrate the analytical results. In addition, we show how to establish a variable-random-order model for a given MSD function which has clear application potentials.

  3. Spectral Behavior of Weakly Compressible Aero-Optical Distortions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Edwin; Wang, Kan; Wang, Meng; Jumper, Eric

    2016-11-01

    In classical theories of optical distortions by atmospheric turbulence, an appropriate and key assumption is that index-of-refraction variations are dominated by fluctuations in temperature and the effects of turbulent pressure fluctuations are negligible. This assumption is, however, not generally valid for aero-optical distortions caused by turbulent flow over an optical aperture, where both temperature and pressures fluctuations may contribute significantly to the index-of-refraction fluctuations. A general expression for weak fluctuations in refractive index is derived using the ideal gas law and Gladstone-Dale relation and applied to describe the spectral behavior of aero-optical distortions. Large-eddy simulations of weakly compressible, temporally evolving shear layers are then used to verify the theoretical results. Computational results support theoretical findings and confirm that if the log slope of the 1-D density spectrum in the inertial range is -mρ , the optical phase distortion spectral slope is given by - (mρ + 1) . The value of mρ is then shown to be dependent on the ratio of shear-layer free-stream densities and bounded by the spectral slopes of temperature and pressure fluctuations. Supported by HEL-JTO through AFOSR Grant FA9550-13-1-0001 and Blue Waters Graduate Fellowship Program.

  4. A comprehensive model for the compressive behavior of asphalt concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Nelson H.

    Mechanistic performance prediction of asphalt concrete pavements has been a goal for the pavement industry for some time. A comprehensive material model is essential for such predictions. This dissertation illustrates the development, calibration and validation of a comprehensive constitutive material model for asphalt concrete in unconfined and confined compression. A continuum damage-based viscoelastic model is extended with viscoplasticity. Thermodynamic principles, an elastic-viscoelastic correspondence principle and internal state variables quantify degradation by accounting for linear viscoelasticity and any non-linear viscoelasticity with cumulative damage. Viscoplastic effects are addressed separately. Two distinctly different strain-hardening viscoelastic models were investigated. A more capable multiaxial model with primary-secondary hardening improved upon the original uniaxial. These characteristics enable the whole model to decompose total strain into individual response components of viscoelasticity, viscoplasticity and damage. Separate laboratory tests were required to measure and calibrate the individual response components. The calibration tests include small-strain dynamic modulus tests for undamaged viscoelastic properties, cyclic creep and recovery tests for viscoplastic properties, and constant rate of strain tests for damage properties. All tests were performed at appropriate temperatures and loading rates. An extensive set of validation tests was used to confirm each model, which were very different from the calibration conditions to evaluate the models' capabilities. The predictions at these different conditions indicate that the comprehensive model can realistically simulate a wide range of asphalt concrete behavior. Recommendations are given based on lessons learned in the laboratory experiments and analyses of the data generated.

  5. High strain-rate compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of selected polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yokoyama T.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present paper deals with constitutive modeling of the compressive stress-strain behavior of selected polymers at strain rates from 10−3 to 103/s using a modified Ramberg-Osgood equation. High strain-rate compressive stress-strain curves for four different commercially available extruded polymers are determined on the standard split Hopkinson pressure bar. The low and intermediate strain-rates compressive stress-strain relations are measured in an Instron testing machine. The five parameters for the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation are determined by fitting to the experimental compressive stress-strain data using a least-squares fit. The compressive stress-strain curves at three different strain rates derived from the modified Ramberg-Osgood models are compared with the experimental results. It is shown that the compressive stress-strain behavior during loading process can be successfully predicted by the modified Ramberg-Osgood equation.

  6. Multiaxial and dynamic compression behaviors of low-density porous materials and their constitutive equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Atsushi; Nagaki, Shigeru

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, uniaxial compression tests are conducted for studying the nonlinear deformation behaviors of a porous material during compression. The results of uniaxial compression tests at some constant strain rates indicate that the plateau stress, which is the stress level in the plateau region, shows strain-rate dependency. In the compression tests by varying the strain rates, it is revealed that the strain-rate dependency relates to the behavior of well-known overstress phenomena. Therefore, the viscoplastic constitutive equation derived by Perzyna is adopted to simulate the uniaxial compression and to represent the strain-rate dependency. A comparison of experimental and simulation results shows that the overstress phenomenon during the compression of the material can be simulated by using the viscoplastic constitutive equation. The multiaxial behavior of the material is also observed for the designing. Equibiaxial pre-strained compression tests are adopted for the observation of the characteristics. The results of these tests show that the pre-strain causes the porous material to harden, and the extent of the hardening depends on the amount of change in the total volume of the material. The multiaxial behaviors of the porous material are simulated by using the constitutive equations incorporating the structure transformation of the porous material, and these results also indicate the effect of volume change on the compression behavior.

  7. Effects of Concentrical Partial (Local Compression on the Structural Behavior of Concrete Filled Steel Tubular Column

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jayaganesh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this present paper is to investigate the structural behavior of square and circular Concrete Filled Steel Tubular (CFST stub columns subjected to axial partial/local compression. The experimental parameters were local compression area and section type. Among the twelve specimens, six specimens were tested under full compression and the remaining six specimens were tested under local compression. The experimental observation indicated that the failure pattern of the CFST column with partial compression is fairly different from the CFST column subjected to full compression. The confinement provided by the circular section is quite different than the confinement provided by the square section, when the CFST column is subjected to axially local compression. It was found that the elastic modulus (stiffness and the ultimate bearing capacity of the CFST column decreased with the increase in local compression ratio. The circular and square CFST columns subjected to partial/local compression achieved an ultimate strength of 4.45% and 14.15%, respectively, less than that of the columns subjected to full compression. From the above observation, it can be inferred that the structural performance of the CFST column is significantly influenced by the local area compression ratio and this effect should be taken into account in design models.

  8. Anomalous lattice behavior of vanadium pentaoxide (V2O5): X-ray diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering and ab initio lattice dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Baltej; Gupta, Mayanak Kumar; Mishra, Sanjay Kumar; Mittal, Ranjan; Sastry, P U; Rols, Stephane; Chaplot, Samrath Lal

    2017-07-21

    We present structural and dynamical studies of layered vanadium pentaoxide (V 2 O 5 ). The temperature dependent X-ray diffraction measurements reveal highly anisotropic and anomalous thermal expansion from 12 K to 853 K. The results do not show any evidence of structural phase transition or decomposition of α-V 2 O 5 , contrary to the previous transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) experiments. The inelastic neutron scattering measurements performed up to 673 K corroborate the result of our X-ray diffraction measurements. The analysis of the experimental data is carried out using ab initio lattice dynamics calculations. The important role of van der Waals dispersion and Hubbard interactions in the structure and dynamics is revealed through ab initio calculations. The calculated anisotropic thermal expansion behavior agrees well with temperature dependent X-ray diffraction. The mechanism of anisotropic thermal expansion and anisotropic linear compressibility is discussed in terms of calculated anisotropy in the Grüneisen parameters and elastic coefficients. The calculated Gibbs free energy in various phases of V 2 O 5 is used to understand the high pressure and temperature phase diagram of the compound.

  9. Anomalous behavior of the magnetic hyperfine field at 140Ce impurities at La sites in LaMnSi2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domienikan, C.; Bosch-Santos, B.; Cabrera-Pasca, G. A.; Saxena, R. N.; Carbonari, A. W.

    2018-05-01

    Magnetic hyperfine field has been measured in the orthorhombic intermetallic compound LaMnSi2 with perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy using radioactive 140La(140Ce) nuclear probes. Magnetization measurements were also carried out in this compound with MPSM-SQUID magnetometer. Samples of LaMnSi2 compound were prepared by arc melting the component metals with high purity under argon atmosphere followed by annealing at 1000°C for 60 h under helium atmosphere and quenching in water. X-ray analysis confirmed the samples to be in a single phase with correct crystal structure expected for LaMnSi2 compound. The radioactive 140La (T1/2 = 40 h) nuclei were produced by direct irradiation of the sample with neutrons in the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor at IPEN with a flux of ˜ 1013 n cm-2s-1 for about 3 - 4 min. The PAC measurements were carried out with a six BaF2 detector spectrometer at several temperatures between 10 K and 400 K. Temperature dependence of the hyperfine field, Bhf was found to be anomalous. A modified two-state model explained this anomalous behavior where the effective magnetic hyperfine field at 140Ce is believed to have two contributions, one from the unstable localized spins at Ce impurities and another from the magnetic Mn atoms of the host. The competition of these two contributions explains the anomalous behavior observed for the temperature dependence of the magnetic hyperfine field at 140Ce. The ferromagnetic transition temperature (TC) of LaMnSi2 was determined to be 400(1) K confirming the magnetic measurements.

  10. On the compressive behavior of an FDM Steward Platform part

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nectarios Vidakis

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Acrylonitrile–butadiene–styrene (ABS is commonly used material in the fused deposition modeling (FDM process. In this work, ABS and ABS plus parts were built with different building parameters and they were tested according to the ASTM D695 standard. Compression strength results were compared to stock ABS material values. The fracture surfaces of selected specimens were examined under a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM, to determine the failure mode of the filament strands. Following this a Steward Platform part was tested under compression in a tensile testing machine. The experimental results were employed to develop a finite element model of the Steward Platform part, in order to determine the maximum force the part can withstand. The Finite Element Model results were in good agreement with the values measured in the Steward Platform part compressive tests, demonstrating that the model developed is reliable. In these experiments, it was found that ABS parts build with a larger layer thickness showed lower compressive strength, which ABS plus did not show. ABS specimens on average developed about half the compressive strength of the ABS plus specimens, while the ABS plus specimens showed lower compressive strength values than stock ABS material.

  11. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Cheol Lee

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter. In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress–strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  12. Compressive Behavior of Fiber-Reinforced Concrete with End-Hooked Steel Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Cheol; Oh, Joung-Hwan; Cho, Jae-Yeol

    2015-03-27

    In this paper, the compressive behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete with end-hooked steel fibers has been investigated through a uniaxial compression test in which the variables were concrete compressive strength, fiber volumetric ratio, and fiber aspect ratio (length to diameter). In order to minimize the effect of specimen size on fiber distribution, 48 cylinder specimens 150 mm in diameter and 300 mm in height were prepared and then subjected to uniaxial compression. From the test results, it was shown that steel fiber-reinforced concrete (SFRC) specimens exhibited ductile behavior after reaching their compressive strength. It was also shown that the strain at the compressive strength generally increased along with an increase in the fiber volumetric ratio and fiber aspect ratio, while the elastic modulus decreased. With consideration for the effect of steel fibers, a model for the stress-strain relationship of SFRC under compression is proposed here. Simple formulae to predict the strain at the compressive strength and the elastic modulus of SFRC were developed as well. The proposed model and formulae will be useful for realistic predictions of the structural behavior of SFRC members or structures.

  13. Modified mortar pad behavior in the transfer of compressive stresses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Ditz

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This research aims to analyze the compressive stress transfer between precast concrete elements using cement mortar pads modified with polypropylene fibers, styrene-butadiene latex and heat-expanded vermiculite. The stress transfer analyses are performed interleaving a cementbearing pad between two concrete blocks, subjecting the entire specimen to different compressive load tests. The parameters analyzed in the tests are: surface roughness (using bosses on the bonded phase of different thicknesses, compressive strength with monotonic and cyclic loadings. The main results obtained in this study are: a the presence of pad increased the strength in 24% for thicknesses of imperfections of 0.5 mm and approximately 12% for smooth faces blocks; b gain of effectiveness of the bearing pad when the concrete strength was reduced; c for cyclic loading, the bearing pad increased in 48% the connections strength.

  14. Anomalous thermal expansion, negative linear compressibility, and high-pressure phase transition in ZnAu2(CN) 4 : Neutron inelastic scattering and lattice dynamics studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mayanak K.; Singh, Baltej; Mittal, Ranjan; Zbiri, Mohamed; Cairns, Andrew B.; Goodwin, Andrew L.; Schober, Helmut; Chaplot, Samrath L.

    2017-12-01

    We present temperature-dependent inelastic-neutron-scattering measurements, accompanied by ab initio calculations of the phonon spectra and elastic properties as a function of pressure to quantitatively explain an unusual combination of negative thermal expansion and negative linear compressibility behavior of ZnAu2(CN) 4 . The mechanism of the negative thermal expansion is identified in terms of specific anharmonic phonon modes that involve bending of the -Zn-NC-Au-CN-Zn- linkage. The soft phonon at the L point at the Brillouin zone boundary quantitatively relates to the high-pressure phase transition at about 2 GPa. The ambient pressure structure is also found to be close to an elastic instability that leads to a weakly first-order transition.

  15. Application of Image Processing to Predict Compressive Behavior of Aluminum Foam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sanghoon

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available An image processing technique was used to model the internal structure of aluminum foam in finite element analysis in order to predict the compressive behavior of the material. Finite element analysis and experimental tests were performed on aluminum foam with densities of 0.2, 0.25, and 0.3 g/cm3. It was found that although the compressive strength predicted from the finite element analysis was higher than that determined experimentally, the predicted compressive stress-strain curves exhibited a tendency similar to those determined from experiments for both densities. However, the behavior of the predicted compressive stress-strain curves was different from the experimental one as the applied strain increased. The difference between predicted and experimental stress-strain curves in a high strain range was due to contact between broken aluminum foam walls by the large deformation.

  16. Experimental investigation on yield behavior of PMMA under combined shear–compression loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjun Zhang

    Full Text Available The work experimentally studies the yielding behavior of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA at three different loading rates through a developed combined shear–compression test technique which contains a universal materials testing machine, mental blocks with double beveled ends (combined shear–compression loading setup and a column sleeve made of Teflon. The results show that the failure loci agree well with theoretical predictions involving the strain rate dependence, which indicates the validity of this test method. Additionally, the experimental data enrich the previous experimental work about polymer yielding surface in the principle stress space. Keywords: PMMA, Mechanical properties, Engineering plastic, Combined shear–compression, Yield surface

  17. Compression behavior of a ferritic-martensitic Cr-Mo steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zhenbo; Mishin, Oleg; Pantleon, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    in the flow stress is observed if interrupted compression tests are performed with loading and holding steps. Two work-hardening stages with work-hardening rates decreasing linearly with the flow stress are identified and interpreted in terms of the KocksMecking model. The microstructural evolution......The compression behavior of a ferritic-martensitic Cr-Mo steel is characterized for strain rates ranging from 10-4 s-1 to 10-1 s-1 and engineering strains up to 40%. Adiabatic heating causes a reduction in flow stress during continuous compression at a strain rate of 10-1 s-1. No reduction...

  18. STUDIES ON THE BEHAVIOR OF THE SINTERED MATERIAL BASED ON IRON POWDER TO MECHANICAL COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina IONICI

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Compression test at low temperature is 130-150 K range and the conditions set out in the technical execution of the tests carried out at low temperatures. As observed with MS do not behave traction to mechanical stress as compact material. The pore structure of the MS presence influence the mechanical behavior of which have been found in the case of mechanical compression test at room temperature.

  19. Compression of the trigeminal ganglion produces prolonged nociceptive behavior in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Dong K; Lim, Eun J; Kim, Byung C; Yang, Gwi Y; Lee, Min K; Ju, Jin S; Han, Seung R; Bae, Yong C

    2009-07-01

    The present study is the first demonstration of prolonged nociceptive behavior in the trigeminal region following compression of the trigeminal ganglion in rats. Experiments were carried out on male Sprague-Dawley rats mounted onto a stereotaxic frame under pentobarbital sodium anesthesia. For compression of the trigeminal ganglion, a 4% agar solution (8microl) was injected into the trigeminal ganglion through a stainless steel injector (24 gauge), which extended 2mm beyond the end of a guide cannula (21 gauge). Following agar injection, the injector and guide cannula were removed. In the control group, rats were sham operated without agar injection. Air-puff thresholds (mechanical allodynia), pin prick responses (mechanical hyperalgesia), and spontaneous scratching behavior were examined 3 days before surgery and at 3, 7, 10, 14, 17, 21, 24, 30, and 40 days after surgery. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures ANOVA followed by multiple group comparisons using the LSD post-hoc test. Air-puff thresholds significantly decreased after compression of the trigeminal ganglion. Mechanical allodynia was established within 3 days and lasted beyond postoperative day 24. Mechanical hyperalgesia was also evident 3 days after compression and persisted until the 40th postoperative day. Although mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia appeared bilaterally, the ipsilateral side was significantly more sensitive. Intraperitoneal treatment with carbamazepine significantly blocked mechanical allodynia produced by compression of the trigeminal ganglion. These findings suggest that prolonged nociceptive behavior following compression of the trigeminal ganglion may mimic trigeminal neuralgia in this animal model.

  20. Anomalous Scaling Behaviors in a Rice-Pile Model with Two Different Driving Mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Duanming; Sun Hongzhang; Li Zhihua; Pan Guijun; Yu Boming; Li Rui; Yin Yanping

    2005-01-01

    The moment analysis is applied to perform large scale simulations of the rice-pile model. We find that this model shows different scaling behavior depending on the driving mechanism used. With the noisy driving, the rice-pile model violates the finite-size scaling hypothesis, whereas, with fixed driving, it shows well defined avalanche exponents and displays good finite size scaling behavior for the avalanche size and time duration distributions.

  1. Anomalous behavior in the crossover between the negative and positive biaxial nematic mesophases in a lyotropic liquid crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Erol; Reis, Dennys; Figueiredo Neto, Antonio M

    2014-05-19

    A novel quaternary lyotropic liquid-crystalline mixture of dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DDTMABr)/sodium bromide/1-dodecanol/water, presenting the biaxial nematic phase (NB ) in addition to two uniaxial discotic (ND) and calamitic (NC) nematic ones, was synthesized. The partial phase diagram of this new mixture was constructed as a function of the DDTMABr molar-fraction concentration. The phase transitions from uniaxial to biaxial nematic phases were studied by means of the temperature dependence of the optical birefringence. In a particular region of the phase diagram, anomalous behavior was observed in the crossover from N-B to N+b: the contrast of the conoscopic fringes, which allows the birefringence measurements, almost vanishes, and the sample loses its alignment. This behavior, which was not observed before in lyotropics, was interpreted as a decrease in the mean diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy (Δχ) of the sample, which was related to the shape anisotropy of the micelles. Small-angle X-ray scattering measurements were performed to evaluate the micellar shape anisotropy; these revealed that this mixture presented a smaller shape anisotropy than those of other lyotropic micellar systems presenting the NB phase. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Functional behavior of the anomalous magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ} samples showing the paramagnetic Meissner effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, F.T., E-mail: fabio.dias@ufpel.edu.br [Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Vieira, V.N.; Garcia, E.L. [Instituto de Física e Matemática, Universidade Federal de Pelotas, Caixa Postal 354, 96010-900, Pelotas, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Wolff-Fabris, F.; Kampert, E. [Dresden High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, 01314, Dresden (Germany); Gouvêa, C.P. [National Institute of Metrology, Quality and Technology (Inmetro), Material Metrology Division, 25250-020, Duque de Caxias, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Schaf, J. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Obradors, X.; Puig, T. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona, CSIC, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193, Bellaterra (Spain); Roa, J.J. [Departamento de Ciencia de Materiales e Ingeniería Metalúrgica, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya, 08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    Highlights: • Paramagnetic Meissner effect observed up to 5T in FCC and FCW measurements. • Time effects evidenced by irreversibilities between FCC and FCW measurements. • Strong time effects causing an anomalous paramagnetic relaxation. • Paramagnetic relaxation governed by different flux dynamics in different intervals. • An interpretative analysis to identify the flux dynamics in the relaxation process. - Abstract: We have studied the functional behavior of the field-cooled (FC) magnetic relaxation observed in melt-textured YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-δ} (Y123) samples with 30 wt% of Y{sub 2}Ba{sub 1}Cu{sub 1}O{sub 5} (Y211) phase, in order to investigate anomalous paramagnetic moments observed during the experiments. FC magnetic relaxation experiments were performed under controlled conditions, such as cooling rate and temperature. Magnetic fields up to 5T were applied parallel to the ab plane and along the c-axis. Our results are associated with the paramagnetic Meissner effect (PME), characterized by positive moments during FC experiments, and related to the magnetic flux compression into the samples. After different attempts our experimental data could be adequately fitted by an exponential decay function with different relaxation times. We discuss our results suggesting the existence of different and preferential flux dynamics governing the anomalous FC paramagnetic relaxation in different time intervals. This work is one of the first attempts to interpret this controversial effect in a simple analysis of the pinning mechanisms and flux dynamics acting during the time evolution of the magnetic moment. However, the results may be useful to develop models to explain this interesting and still misunderstood feature of the paramagnetic Meissner effect.

  3. A constitutive model of porous SMAs considering tensile-compressive asymmetry behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingfei; Dui, Guansuo; Xie, Benming; Xue, Lijun

    2014-04-01

    A constitutive model of the macroscopic behaviors of porous shape memory alloys (SMA) is developed in this work. A yield function for porous SMAs considering both the effect of hydrostatic stress and the tensile-compressive asymmetry is proposed. Combining the constitutive model of dense SMAs and the macroscale and microscale analysis, the evolution equation for the overall transformation strain is then derived. Examples for the response of both dense SMA and porous Ni-Ti SMA subjected to uniaxial tension and compression loads are supplied. Good agreement between the numerical prediction results and the published experimental data is observed. Numerical result shows that the yielding stresses, loop width and length, strain-hardening behaviors of porous SMAs under pure tensile and pure compressive are different. Importantly, the transformation initiation stress is much closer to the experiment result than simulated by Zhao et al. (2005). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Investigation of compression behavior of PE/EVA foam injection molded parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Roberto

    2017-10-01

    The main objective of the presented work is to evaluate the compression behavior of a polymeric foam blend by using a robust framework for the testing sequence of foaming injection molded parts, with the aim of establishing a standard testing cycle for the evaluation of new matrix material. The research purpose is to assess parameters influencing compression behavior and give useful suggestions for the implementation of a finite element analysis. The polymeric blend consisted of a mixture of low density polyethylenes (LDPEs), a high-density polyethylene (HDPE), an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) and an azodicarbonamide (ADC). The thermal, rheological and compression properties of the blend are fully described, as well as the injection molding process for two specimen types.

  5. Compression deformation behaviors of sheet metals at various clearances and side forces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modeling sheet metal forming operations requires understanding of plastic behaviors of sheet metals along non-proportional strain paths. The plastic behavior under reversed uniaxial loading is of particular interest because of its simplicity of interpretation and its application to material elements drawn over a die radius and underwent repeated bending. However, the attainable strain is limited by failures, such as buckling and in-plane deformation, dependent on clearances and side forces. In this study, a finite element (FE model was established for the compression process of sheet specimens, to probe the deformation behavior. The results show that: With the decrease of the clearance from a very large value to a very small value, four defects modes, including plastic t-buckling, micro-bending, w-buckling, and in-plane compression deformation will occur. With the increase of the side force from a very small value to a very large value, plastic t-buckling, w-buckling, uniform deformation, and in-plane compression will occur. The difference in deformation behaviors under these two parameters indicates that the successful compression process without failures for sheet specimens only can be carried out under a reasonable side force.

  6. Anomalous transient leaching behavior of metals solidified/stabilized by pozzolanic fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camacho, Lucy Mar; Munson-McGee, Stuart H.

    2006-01-01

    This study presents observations on the transient leaching behavior of chromium, cadmium, and aluminum that were solidified/stabilized by pozzolanic fly ash. These three metals were selected since they were present in a simulated waste stream generated by an evaporator during plutonium purification and also because the minimum solubility of these metals occurs at significantly different pHs. The transient pH behavior of the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) leachate showed a monotonic increase for all cases, but the equilibrium value was affected by process conditions. The transient leachate concentration behavior showed curves with one or two local maxima for some cases and curves with a monotonic increase for other cases. Data from the leaching experiments was compared to the solubility curves for the hydroxides of each metal since it was assumed that the highly alkaline conditions inside the fly ash waste would cause the metals to precipitate as hydroxides after initially dissolving in the acidic leaching solution. It was found that of the three metals, only cadmium followed the solubility curve for pure hydroxide solutions or for fly ash systems currently reported in the literature

  7. Anomalous behavior of visible light active TiO2 for the photocatalytic degradation of different Reactive dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navneet; Shahi, Satwant Kaur; Singh, Vasundhara

    2015-11-01

    Nanocrystalline undoped, N-doped, N and metal codoped titania with different particle size, surface area, anatase phase content, crystallinity, band gap and zeta potential were synthesized by the sol-gel method. The photocatalytic activities of the synthesized TiO2 powders were compared by employing four different Reactive dyes. The order of photocatalytic activity observed for Reactive Red 198 dye (RR 198) was undoped = N,Cu codoped = N-doped > N,Fe codoped TiO2, Reactive Blue 4 dye (RB 4) was N,Cu codoped > N,Fe codoped > N-doped > undoped TiO2, Reactive Black 5 dye (RB 5) was N,Cu codoped* > undoped > N-doped > N,Fe codoped TiO2 and negligible degradation was observed for Reactive Orange 16 dye (RO 16). In this paper, the anomalous trend of the photocatalytic activity of various photocatalysts for the degradation of a particular class of dyes has been observed and accounted for based upon three parameters: mechanism of degradation, physicochemical properties of the catalyst and adsorption behavior based on the zeta potential. It was concluded that apart from these parameters, the substrate-specificity of the catalyst is also of equal importance in developing new catalysts for the photodegradation of dyes present in textile effluents.

  8. Significance of Anomalous Anterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery-Posterior Inferior Cerebellar Artery Common Trunk Compression in Microvascular Decompression for Hemifacial Spasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimano, Hiroshi; Kondo, Akinori; Yasuda, Soichiro; Inoue, Hiroto; Morioka, Jun; Miwa, Hiroshi; Kawakami, Osamu; Murao, Kenichi

    2016-08-01

    The anterior inferior cerebellar artery-posterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA-PICA) common trunk anomaly is reportedly one of the most common vessel variants in the posterior circulation, but reports of hemifacial spasm (HFS) associated with AICA-PICA common trunk are very rare. In the present study, we describe methods of microvascular decompression (MVD) for HFS caused by AICA-PICA common trunk compression. Among 159 patients who underwent MVD for HFS, 16 patients had compression of the root exit zone by the AICA-PICA common trunk anomaly. The types of compression were classified into 2 groups: common trunk artery compression group and branching vessel compression group. The common trunk artery compression group consisted of 11 patients (69%), and the branching vessel compression group consisted of 5 patients (31%). The rostral branch (feeding the original AICA territory) coursed between the seventh and eighth cranial nerves in 5 patients, and in 13 patients (81%), the offending vessel harbored perforators around the root exit zone. Among 16 patients, 14 (87.5%) required interposition of the common trunk or the branching vessel, and in 2 patients, decompression was completed by the transposition method. Fifteen patients experienced sufficient results, and 1 had severe residual spasm. Transient facial palsy developed in 2 patients. No patients encountered recurrence. Reports concerning decompression methods of AICA-PICA common trunk anomaly are very rare. The tortuosity of the common trunk and perforators from the offending vessel make the usual repositioning of the offending artery much more difficult, and adequate decompression techniques are required for successful MVD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Spin quenching assisted by a strongly anisotropic compression behavior in MnP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Fei; Wang, Di; Wang, Yonggang; Li, Nana; Bao, Jin-Ke; Li, Bing; Botana, Antia S.; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul; Chung, Duck Young; Chen, Jiuhua; Wan, Xiangang; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Yang, Wenge; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2018-02-01

    We studied the crystal structure and spin state of MnP under high pressure with synchrotron X-ray diffraction and X-ray emission spectroscopy. MnP has an exceedingly strong anisotropy in compressibility, with the primary compressible direction along the b axis of the Pnma structure. X-ray emission spectroscopy reveals a pressure-driven quenching of the spin state in MnP. First-principles calculations suggest that the strongly anisotropic compression behavior significantly enhances the dispersion of the Mn d-orbitals and the splitting of the d-orbital levels compared to the hypothetical isotropic compression behavior. Thus, we propose spin quenching results mainly from the significant enhancement of the itinerancy of d electrons and partly from spin rearrangement occurring in the split d-orbital levels near the Fermi level. This explains the fast suppression of magnetic ordering in MnP under high pressure. The spin quenching lags behind the occurrence of superconductivity at ~8 GPa implying that spin fluctuations govern the electron pairing for superconductivity.

  10. Mechanical Behavior of Red Sandstone under Incremental Uniaxial Cyclical Compressive and Tensile Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial experiments were carried out on red sandstone specimens to investigate their short-term and creep mechanical behavior under incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading. First, based on the results of short-term uniaxial incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading experiments, deformation characteristics and energy dissipation were analyzed. The results show that the stress-strain curve of red sandstone has an obvious memory effect in the compressive and tensile loading stages. The strains at peak stresses and residual strains increase with the cycle number. Energy dissipation, defined as the area of the hysteresis loop in the stress-strain curves, increases nearly in a power function with the cycle number. Creep test of the red sandstone was also conducted. Results show that the creep curve under each compressive or tensile stress level can be divided into decay and steady stages, which cannot be described by the conventional Burgers model. Therefore, an improved Burgers creep model of rock material is constructed through viscoplastic mechanics, which agrees very well with the experimental results and can describe the creep behavior of red sandstone better than the Burgers creep model.

  11. Investigation on the Behavior of Rigid Polyvinylchloride Pipes Subjected to Uniaxial Compression Loads

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah A.N. Alhamati; Abdul H. Ghazali; Jamalodin Norzaie; Norzaie A. Mohammed; Mohd R.A. Kadir

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the capability of rigid Polyvinylchloride (PVC-U) pipes to sustain axial loads. The behavior of PVC-U pipes specimens subjected to short-term uniaxial compression loads was experimentally investigated. Results of the load-displacement tests on pipes of different wall thickness, diameter and specimen heights were recorded. The experimental test results show that the PVC-U pipes are capable of supporting loads greater than the required design lo...

  12. Experimental Research on Internal Behaviors of Caved Rocks under the Uniaxial Confined Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-jiang Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As main composition of longwall gob, caved rocks’ behaviors and their impacts under compression crucially influence strata control, subsidence, associated resources extraction, and many other aspects. However, current researches are based on a whole sample, due to looseness of caved rocks and limitation of observation technology. In this paper, an experiment system was built to investigate internal behaviors of caved rocks’ sample, under the uniaxial confined compression, including movement and breakage behavior by the digital image processing technologies. The results show that the compression process of caved rocks could be divided into two stages by relative density. Boundary effect and changes of voids and contact pressure among caved rocks lead to different movement law in different position in sample’s interior. A stratification phenomenon of breakage was discovered, which presents breakage concentration in the middle of the sample. The nonlinear movement and shear dislocation induced by shifts among caved rocks are the reason of the breakage stratification phenomenon. This phenomenon would have an effect on the permeability and seepage research of similar medium.

  13. Unconventional ordering behavior of semi-flexible polymers in dense brushes under compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milchev, Andrey; Binder, Kurt

    2014-06-07

    Using a coarse-grained bead-spring model for semi-flexible macromolecules which form a polymer brush, the structure and dynamics of the polymers were investigated, varying the chain stiffness and the grafting density. The anchoring conditions for the grafted chains were chosen such that their first bonds were oriented along the normal to the substrate plane. The compression of such a semi-flexible brush by a planar piston was observed to be a two-stage process: for a small compression the chains were shown to contract by "buckling" deformation whereas for a larger compression the chains exhibited a collective (almost uniform) bending deformation. Thus, the stiff polymer brush underwent a 2nd order phase transition of collective bond reorientation. The pressure, required to keep the stiff brush at a given degree of compression, was thereby significantly smaller than for an otherwise identical brush made of entirely flexible polymer chains! While both the brush height and the chain linear dimensions in the z-direction perpendicular to the substrate increased monotonically with an increase in the chain stiffness, the lateral (xy) chain linear dimensions exhibited a maximum at an intermediate chain stiffness. Increasing the grafting density led to a strong decrease of these lateral dimensions which is compatible with an exponential decay. Also the recovery kinetics after removal of the compressing piston were studied, and were found to follow a power-law/exponential decay with time. A simple mean-field theoretical consideration, accounting for the buckling/bending behavior of semi-flexible polymer brushes under compression was suggested.

  14. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-12-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An explicit formula is derived for the transport coefficient, which is related to the diffusion constant, as dependent on the Brownian step time, and the anomalous diffusion exponent. The model makes it possible to deduce anomalous diffusion properties from experimental data obtained even for short time periods and to estimate the transport coefficient in systems for which the diffusion behavior has been investigated. The results were confirmed for both sub and super-diffusion.

  15. Behavior of concrete cylinders confined by a ferro-geopolymer jacket in axial compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothay Heng

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is beneficial to utilize geopolymers for their potential properties to rehabilitate concrete structures. These properties include high adhesion to Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC concrete even at low degrees of interfacial roughness, high durability and good fire resistance. This paper introduces use of a ferro-geopolymer jacket to strengthen concrete columns. It is a kind of jacket constructed with a geopolymer mortar reinforced with a wire mesh. This study was conducted to investigate the behavior of concrete cylinders confined with a ferro-geopolymer jacket in axial compression. OPC concrete cylinders with 100 mm diameter and 200 mm height were fabricated. High calcium fly ash-based geopolymer mortar, activated with sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3, cured at a temperature of 25 ºC was used. Ferro-geopolymer jackets with a25 mm thickness, were reinforced with 1, 2 and 3 layers of expanded metal mesh and cast around concrete cylinders. The study results revealed that the compressive load carrying capacity and axial stiffness of concrete cylinders were improved. A monolithic failure mode was obtained as a result of a strong adhesion between the geopolymer and the concrete core. Enhancement of compressive load carrying capacity of the jacketed concrete cylinders was caused by a combination of a confinement effect and the compressive load resistance of the jacket transferred from concrete core through bonding.

  16. Elastic behavior of MFI-type zeolites: 3 - Compressibility of silicalite and mutinaite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quartieri, Simona, E-mail: squartieri@unime.it [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Messina, Viale Ferdinando Stagno d' Alcontres 31, 98166 Messina S. Agata (Italy); Arletti, Rossella [Dipartimento di Scienze Mineralogiche e Petrologiche, Via Valperga Caluso 35, 10125 Torino (Italy); Vezzalini, Giovanna [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Universita di Modena e Reggio Emilia, Via S. Eufemia 19, 41100 Modena (Italy); Di Renzo, Francesco [Institut Charles Gerhardt de Montpellier, UMR 5253 CNRS-UM2-ENSCM-UM1, 8 rue Ecole Normale, 34296 Montpellier (France); Dmitriev, Vladimir [Swiss-Norwegian Beam Line at ESRF, BP220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France)

    2012-07-15

    We report the results of an in-situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study - performed using silicone oil as 'non-penetrating' pressure transmitting medium - of the elastic behavior of three zeolites with MFI-type framework: the natural zeolite mutinaite and two silicalites (labeled A and B) synthesized under different conditions. While in mutinaite no symmetry change is observed as a function of pressure, a phase transition from monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) to orthorhombic (Pnma) symmetry occurs at about 1.0 GPa in the silicalite samples. This phase transition is irreversible upon decompression. The second order bulk moduli of silicalite A and silicalite B, calculated after the fulfillment of the phase transition, are: K{sub 0}=18.2(2) and K{sub 0}=14.3 (2) GPa, respectively. These values makes silicalite the most compressible zeolite among those up to now studied in silicone oil. The structural deformations induced by HP in silicalite A were investigated by means of complete Rietveld structural refinements, before and after the phase transition, at P{sub amb} and 0.9 GPa, respectively. The elastic behaviors of the three MFI-type zeolites here investigated were compared with those of Na-ZSM-5 and H-ZSM-5, studied in similar experimental conditions: the two silicalites - which are the phases with the highest Si/Al ratios and hence the lowest extraframework contents - show the highest compressibility. On the contrary, the most rigid material is mutinaite, which has a very complex extraframework composition characterized by a high number of cations and water molecules. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure behavior of silicalite compressed in silicone oil: projection of the structure along the [0 1 0] direction at Pamb(a), 0.9 GPa (b). (c) Comparison of the unit-cell volume variations as a function of pressure for mutinaite, H-ZSM5, Na-ZSM5, silicalite A, and silicalite B compressed in silicone oil. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray powder

  17. Two-phase behavior and compression effects in the PEFC gas diffusion medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Partha P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kang, Qinjun [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schulz, Volker P [APL-LANDAU GMBH; Wang, Chao - Yang [PENN STATE UNIV; Becker, Jurgen [NON LANL; Wiegmann, Andreas [NON LANL

    2009-01-01

    A key performance limitation in the polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), manifested in terms of mass transport loss, originates from liquid water transport and resulting flooding phenomena in the constituent components. A key contributor to the mass transport loss is the cathode gas diffusion layer (GDL) due to the blockage of available pore space by liquid water thus rendering hindered oxygen transport to the active reaction sites in the electrode. The GDL, therefore, plays an important role in the overall water management in the PEFC. The underlying pore-morphology and the wetting characteristics have significant influence on the flooding dynamics in the GDL. Another important factor is the role of cell compression on the GDL microstructural change and hence the underlying two-phase behavior. In this article, we present the development of a pore-scale modeling formalism coupled With realistic microstructural delineation and reduced order compression model to study the structure-wettability influence and the effect of compression on two-phase behavior in the PEFC GDL.

  18. Axial compression behavior of concrete masonry wallettes strengthened with cement mortar overlays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. L. De Oliveira

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of a series of axial compression tests on concrete block wallettes coated with cement mortar overlays. Different types of mortars and combinations with steel welded meshes and fibers were tested. The experimental results were discussed based on different theoretical approaches: analytical and Finite Element Method models. The main conclusions are: a the application of mortar overlays increases the wall strength, but not in a uniform manner; b the strengthening efficiency of wallettes loaded in axial compression is not proportional to the overlay mortar strength because it can be affected by the failure mechanisms of the wall; c steel mesh reinforced overlays in combination with high strength mortar show better efficiency, because the steel mesh mitigates the damage effects in the block wall and in the overlays themselves; d simplified theoretical methods of analysis as described in this paper can give satisfactory predictions of masonry wall behavior up to a certain level.

  19. Modeling the buckling behavior of carbon nanotubes under simultaneous combination of compressive and torsional loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motevalli, B.; Montazeri, A.; Tavakoli-Darestani, R.; Rafii-Tabar, H.

    2012-09-01

    A number of studies have been performed on the mechanical and deformational properties of carbon nanotubes under different loading conditions, such as compression, tension, torsion, bending, and hydrostatic pressure. However, in practical applications, such as in nanotube-reinforced nanocomposites, these different loading conditions are present simultaneously. We employ molecular dynamics simulation to compute the behavior and deformation properties of carbon nanotubes under combined application of compression and torsion. The buckling properties and the corresponding mode shapes are investigated, for the first time, for different rotational and axial displacement rates. It is found that the critical loads and the buckling deformations strongly depend upon the ratio of these displacement rates. Finally, a relationship between the shear and normal stresses is established, which can be used for determining the stress limits when designing practical carbon nanotube-based systems in which combined loads may be applied.

  20. Development of optimization models for the set behavior and compressive strength of sodium activated geopolymer pastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillenwarth, Brian Albert

    As large countries such as China begin to industrialize and concerns about global warming continue to grow, there is an increasing need for more environmentally friendly building materials. One promising material known as a geopolymer can be used as a portland cement replacement and in this capacity emits around 67% less carbon dioxide. In addition to potentially reducing carbon emissions, geopolymers can be synthesized with many industrial waste products such as fly ash. Although the benefits of geopolymers are substantial, there are a few difficulties with designing geopolymer mixes which have hindered widespread commercialization of the material. One such difficulty is the high variability of the materials used for their synthesis. In addition to this, interrelationships between mix design variables and how these interrelationships impact the set behavior and compressive strength are not well understood. A third complicating factor with designing geopolymer mixes is that the role of calcium in these systems is not well understood. In order to overcome these barriers, this study developed predictive optimization models through the use of genetic programming with experimentally collected set times and compressive strengths of several geopolymer paste mixes. The developed set behavior models were shown to predict the correct set behavior from the mix design over 85% of the time. The strength optimization model was shown to be capable of predicting compressive strengths of geopolymer pastes from their mix design to within about 1 ksi of their actual strength. In addition to this the optimization models give valuable insight into the key factors influencing strength development as well as the key factors responsible for flash set and long set behaviors in geopolymer pastes. A method for designing geopolymer paste mixes was developed from the generated optimization models. This design method provides an invaluable tool for use in future geopolymer research as well as

  1. Deformation Behavior of Sub-micron and Micron Sized Alumina Particles in Compression.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Chandross, Michael E.; Carroll, Jay; Mook, William; Boyce, Brad; Kotula, Paul Gabriel; McKenzie, Bonnie Beth; Bufford, Daniel Charles; Hall, Aaron Christopher.

    2014-09-01

    The ability to integrate ceramics with other materials has been limited due to high temperature (>800degC) ceramic processing. Recently, researchers demonstrated a novel process , aerosol deposition (AD), to fabricate ceramic films at room temperature (RT). In this process, sub - micro n sized ceramic particles are accelerated by pressurized gas, impacted on the substrate, plastically deformed, and form a dense film under vacuum. This AD process eliminates high temperature processing thereby enabling new coatings and device integration, in which ceramics can be deposited on metals, plastics, and glass. However, k nowledge in fundamental mechanisms for ceramic particle s to deform and form a dense ceramic film is still needed and is essential in advancing this novel RT technology. In this wo rk, a combination of experimentation and atomistic simulation was used to determine the deformation behavior of sub - micron sized ceramic particle s ; this is the first fundamental step needed to explain coating formation in the AD process . High purity, singl e crystal, alpha alumina particles with nominal size s of 0.3 um and 3.0 um were examined. Particle characterization, using transmission electron microscopy (TEM ), showed that the 0.3 u m particles were relatively defect - free single crystals whereas 3.0 u m p articles were highly defective single crystals or particles contained low angle grain boundaries. Sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited ductile failure in compression. In situ compression experiments showed 0.3um particles deformed plastically, fractured, and became polycrystalline. Moreover, dislocation activit y was observed within the se particles during compression . These sub - micron sized Al 2 O 3 particles exhibited large accum ulated strain (2 - 3 times those of micron - sized particles) before first fracture. I n agreement with the findings from experimentation , a tomistic simulation s of nano - Al 2 O 3 particles showed dislocation slip and

  2. Temperature dependence of dynamic behavior of commercially pure titanium by the compression test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Su Min; Seo, Song Won; Park, Kyoung Joon; Min, Oak Key

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of a Commercially Pure Titanium (CP-Ti) is investigated at high temperature Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) compression test with high strain-rate. Tests are performed over a temperature range from room temperature to 1000 .deg. C with interval of 200 deg. C and a strain-rate range of 1900∼2000/sec. The true flow stress-true strain relations depending on temperature are achieved in these tests. For construction of constitutive equation from the true flow stress-true strain relation, parameters for the Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is determined. And the modified Johnson-Cook equation is used for investigation of behavior of flow stress in vicinity of recrystallization temperature. The modified Johnson-Cook constitutive equation is more suitable in expressing the dynamic behavior of a CP-Ti at high temperature, i.e. about recrystallization temperature

  3. Anomalous behavior of cutoff rigidity variation in the region of the Mexico station during a magnetic superstorm on 20 November 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Pchelkin

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The pioneering storm-time model of magnetospheric magnetic field T01S made possible trajectory calculations for the events of giant magnetic storms. We have performed such calculations for a unique magnetic storm on 20 November 2003. In our previous paper, Belov et al. (2005, dedicated to the magnetospheric effects of cosmic rays (CR during this storm, we revealed an anomalous behavior of a cutoff rigidity variation at the Mexico station. Here, by trajectory calculations, we demonstrate that this peculiarity persists in the latitudinal and longitudinal curves of cutoff rigidity (Rc for both quiet and storm-time conditions and thus should be considered as physically meaningful.

  4. Understanding compressive deformation behavior of porous Ti using finite element analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Sandipan; Khutia, Niloy [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur (India); Das, Debdulal [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur (India); Das, Mitun, E-mail: mitun@cgcri.res.in [Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India); Balla, Vamsi Krishna [Bioceramics and Coating Division, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, Kolkata (India); Bandyopadhyay, Amit [W. M. Keck Biomedical Materials Research Laboratory, School of Mechanical and Materials Engineering, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 (United States); Chowdhury, Amit Roy, E-mail: arcbesu@gmail.com [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur (India)

    2016-07-01

    In the present study, porous commercially pure (CP) Ti samples with different volume fraction of porosities were fabricated using a commercial additive manufacturing technique namely laser engineered net shaping (LENS™). Mechanical behavior of solid and porous samples was evaluated at room temperature under quasi-static compressive loading. Fracture surfaces of the failed samples were analyzed to determine the failure modes. Finite Element (FE) analysis using representative volume element (RVE) model and micro-computed tomography (CT) based model have been performed to understand the deformation behavior of laser deposited solid and porous CP-Ti samples. In vitro cell culture on laser processed porous CP-Ti surfaces showed normal cell proliferation with time, and confirmed non-toxic nature of these samples. - Highlights: • Porous CP-Ti samples fabricated using additive manufacturing technique • Compressive deformation behavior of porous samples closely matches with micro-CT and RVE based analysis • In vitro studies showed better cell proliferation with time on porous CP-Ti surfaces.

  5. Understanding compressive deformation behavior of porous Ti using finite element analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Sandipan; Khutia, Niloy; Das, Debdulal; Das, Mitun; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Chowdhury, Amit Roy

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, porous commercially pure (CP) Ti samples with different volume fraction of porosities were fabricated using a commercial additive manufacturing technique namely laser engineered net shaping (LENS™). Mechanical behavior of solid and porous samples was evaluated at room temperature under quasi-static compressive loading. Fracture surfaces of the failed samples were analyzed to determine the failure modes. Finite Element (FE) analysis using representative volume element (RVE) model and micro-computed tomography (CT) based model have been performed to understand the deformation behavior of laser deposited solid and porous CP-Ti samples. In vitro cell culture on laser processed porous CP-Ti surfaces showed normal cell proliferation with time, and confirmed non-toxic nature of these samples. - Highlights: • Porous CP-Ti samples fabricated using additive manufacturing technique • Compressive deformation behavior of porous samples closely matches with micro-CT and RVE based analysis • In vitro studies showed better cell proliferation with time on porous CP-Ti surfaces

  6. On the Resonant Behavior of a Weakly Compressible Water Layer During Tsunamigenic Earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecioni, Claudia; Bellotti, Giorgio

    2018-01-01

    Tsunamigenic earthquakes trigger pressure waves in the ocean, given the weak compressibility of the sea water. For particular conditions, a resonant behavior of the water layer can occur, which influences the energy transfer from the sea-bed motion to the ocean. In this paper, the resonance conditions are explained and analyzed, focusing on the hydro-acoustic waves in the proximity of the earthquake area. A preliminary estimation of the generation parameters (sea-bed rising time, velocity) is given, by means of parametric numerical simulations for simplified conditions. The results confirm the importance of measuring, modeling, and interpreting such waves for tsunami early detection and warning.

  7. Compressive creep behavior of alloys based on B2FeAl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantravadi, N.; Vedula, K.; Gaydosh, D.; Titran, R.H.

    1986-01-01

    Alloys based on FeAl are attractive alternate materials for environmental resistance at intermediate temperatures. Addition of small amounts of Nb, Hf, Ta, Mo, Zr, and B were shown to improve the compressive creep of this alloy at 1100 K. Boron, in particular, was found to have a synergistic effect along with Zr in providing properties substantially better than the binary alloy. This improvement seems to be related to the higher activation energy found for this alloy, suggesting a modification in the diffusion behavior due to the alloying additions

  8. Improving The Voided Reinforced Concrete Beams Behavior by Strenthining The Compression Zone Concrete Using Polyvinyl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Hasan Ali Al-Salim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available  Determining dimensions of  continuous RC beam depend on the critical span. Practically, changing the dimensions of others spans is difficult. So that, this work aimed to discuss the possibility of adding voids within the beams which its dimensions are more than required in order to reduce the cost and dead load. The selected percent of voids to volume of  tested  beams was 10%.  The shape of voids was a first variable (spherical voids or conic voids. Also, the alteration in behavior when a (5cm concrete layer thickness of compression zone was replaced with a concrete layer modified with adding polyvinyl alcohol (PVA was investigated, as a second variable. After testing six samples, the result showed that the failure criteria of normal concrete voided beams is transformed from flexural behavior to shear behavior, while the failure criteria of control solid specimen was flexure behavior. Also, the modified beams failed in flexural behavior except the beam with conic voids failed in shear behavior. Corresponding to this transform, the ultimate load varied in the same manner. Where, the normal concrete voided beams failed with lesser ultimate load than control solid beam of about (6.4% and 18.3% for spherical and conic voids, respectively. While, the ultimate load of modified concrete beams is increased of about (13.8%, 5.4% and 3.1% for solid beam, spherical and conic voided beams respectively in comparing control specimen.

  9. Thermomechanical behavior of thermoset shape memory polymer programmed by cold-compression: Testing and constitutive modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoqiang; Xu, Wei

    2011-06-01

    Programming is a key process for thermally activated stress or strain recovery of shape memory polymers (SMPs). Typically, programming requires an initial heating above the glass transition temperature ( Tg), subsequent cooling below Tg and removal of the applied load, in order to fix a temporary shape. This work adopted a new approach to program thermoset SMPs directly at temperatures well below Tg, which effectively simplified the shape fixing process. 1-D compression programming below Tg and free shape recovery of a thermoset SMP were experimentally investigated. Functional stability of the shape fixity under various environmental attacks was also experimentally evaluated. A mechanism-based thermoviscoelastic-thermoviscoplastic constitutive model incorporating structural and stress relaxation was then developed to predict the nonlinear shape memory behavior of the SMP trained below Tg. Comparison between the prediction and the experiment showed good agreement. The structure dependence of the thermomechanical behavior of the SMP was further discussed through a parametric study per the validated constitutive model. This study validates that programming by cold-compression is a viable alternative for thermally responsive thermoset SMPs.

  10. Anomalous behavior in temporal evolution of ripple wavelength under medium energy Ar{sup +}-ion bombardment on Si: A case of initial wavelength selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garg, Sandeep Kumar [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India); Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Cuerno, Rodolfo [Departamento de Matematicas and Grupo Interdisciplinar de Sistemas Complejos (GISC), Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Kanjilal, Dinakar [Inter-University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Som, Tapobrata, E-mail: tsom@iopb.res.in [Institute of Physics, Sachivalaya Marg, Bhubaneswar 751 005 (India)

    2016-06-14

    We have studied the early stage dynamics of ripple patterns on Si surfaces, in the fluence range of 1–3 × 10{sup 18} ions cm{sup −2}, as induced by medium energy Ar{sup +}-ion irradiation at room temperature. Under our experimental conditions, the ripple evolution is found to be in the linear regime, while a clear decreasing trend in the ripple wavelength is observed up to a certain time (fluence). Numerical simulations of a continuum model of ion-sputtered surfaces suggest that this anomalous behavior is due to the relaxation of the surface features of the experimental pristine surface during the initial stage of pattern formation. The observation of this hitherto unobserved behavior of the ripple wavelength seems to have been enabled by the use of medium energy ions, where the ripple wavelengths are found to be order(s) of magnitude larger than those at lower ion energies.

  11. Compressive pre-stress effects on magnetostrictive behaviors of highly textured Galfenol and Alfenol thin sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia R. Downing

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Fe-Ga (Galfenol and Fe-Al (Alfenol are rare-earth-free magnetostrictive alloys with mechanical robustness and strong magnetoelastic coupling. Since highly textured Galfenol and Alfenol thin sheets along orientations have been developed with magnetostrictive performances of ∼270 ppm and ∼160 ppm, respectively, they have been of great interest in sensor and energy harvesting applications. In this work, we investigate stress-dependent magnetostrictive behaviors in highly textured rolled sheets of NbC-added Fe80Al20 and Fe81Ga19 alloys with a single (011 grain coverage of ∼90%. A compact fixture was designed and used to introduce a uniform compressive pre-stress to those thin sheet samples along a [100] direction. As compressive pre-stress was increased to above 100 MPa, the maximum observed magnetostriction increased 42% in parallel magnetostriction along the stress direction, λ//, in highly textured (011 Fe81Ga19 thin sheets for a compressive pre-stress of 60 MPa. The same phenomena were observed for (011 Fe80Al20 (maximum increase of 88% with a 49 MPa compressive stress. This trend is shown to be consistent with published results on the effect of pre-stress on magnetostriction in rods of single crystal and textured polycrystalline Fe-Ga alloy of similar compositions, and single crystal data gathered using our experimental set up. Interestingly, the saturating field (Hs does not vary with pre-stresses, while the saturating field in rod-shaped samples of Fe-Ga increases with an increase of pre-stress. This suggests that for a range of compressive pre-stresses, thin sheet samples have larger values of d33 transduction coefficients and susceptibility than rod-shaped samples of similar alloy compositions, and hence they should provide performance benefits when used in sensor and actuator device applications. Thus, we discuss potential reasons for the unexpected trends in Hs with pre-stress, and present preliminary results from tests conducted

  12. Axial compression behavior and partial composite action of SC walls in safety-related nuclear facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai

    Steel-plate reinforced concrete (SC) composite walls typically consist of thick concrete walls with two exterior steel faceplates. The concrete core is sandwiched between the two steel faceplates, and the faceplates are attached to the concrete core using shear connectors, for example, ASTM A108 steel headed shear studs. The shear connectors and the concrete infill enhance the stability of the steel faceplates, and the faceplates serve as permanent formwork for concrete placement. SC composite walls were first introduced in the 1980's in Japan for nuclear power plant (NPP) structures. They are used in the new generation of nuclear power plants (GIII+) and being considered for small modular reactors (SMR) due to their structural efficiency, economy, safety, and construction speed. Steel faceplates can potentially undergo local buckling at certain locations of NPP structures where compressive forces are significant. The steel faceplates are usually thin (0.25 to 1.50 inches in Customary units, or 6.5 to 38 mm in SI units) to maintain economical and constructional efficiency, the geometric imperfections and locked-in stresses induced during construction make them more vulnerable to local buckling. Accidental thermal loading may also reduce the compressive strength and exacerbate the local buckling potential of SC composite walls. This dissertation presents the results from experimental and numerical investigations of the compressive behavior of SC composite walls at ambient and elevated temperatures. The results are used to establish a slenderness limit to prevent local buckling before yielding of the steel faceplates and to develop a design approach for calculating the compressive strength of SC composite walls with non-slender and slender steel faceplates at ambient and elevated temperatures. Composite action in SC walls is achieved by the embedment of shear connectors into the concrete core. The strength and stiffness of shear connectors govern the level of

  13. Brittle Creep Failure, Critical Behavior, and Time-to-Failure Prediction of Concrete under Uniaxial Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingchong Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the time-dependent brittle deformation behavior of concrete as a main building material is fundamental for the lifetime prediction and engineering design. Herein, we present the experimental measures of brittle creep failure, critical behavior, and the dependence of time-to-failure, on the secondary creep rate of concrete under sustained uniaxial compression. A complete evolution process of creep failure is achieved. Three typical creep stages are observed, including the primary (decelerating, secondary (steady state creep regime, and tertiary creep (accelerating creep stages. The time-to-failure shows sample-specificity although all samples exhibit a similar creep process. All specimens exhibit a critical power-law behavior with an exponent of −0.51 ± 0.06, approximately equal to the theoretical value of −1/2. All samples have a long-term secondary stage characterized by a constant strain rate that dominates the lifetime of a sample. The average creep rate expressed by the total creep strain over the lifetime (tf-t0 for each specimen shows a power-law dependence on the secondary creep rate with an exponent of −1. This could provide a clue to the prediction of the time-to-failure of concrete, based on the monitoring of the creep behavior at the steady stage.

  14. Effects of HfO{sub 2}/Co interface and Co/HfO{sub 2} interface on anomalous Hall behavior in perpendicular Co/Pt multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Shao-Long [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yang, Guang [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Teng, Jiao, E-mail: tengjiao@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Guo, Qi-Xun; Liu, Yi-Wei; Li, Xu-Jing [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Yu, Guang-Hua, E-mail: ghyu@mater.ustb.edu.cn [Department of Materials Physics and Chemistry, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Anomalous Hall effect in perpendicular Co/Pt multilayers is studied. • Thermally stable AHE feature is obtained in [Pt/Co]{sub 3}/HfO{sub 2}/Pt multilayers. • Good thermal stability is due to enhanced intrinsic and side-jump contributions. - Abstract: Effects of the HfO{sub 2}/Co interface and the Co/HfO{sub 2} interface on thermal stability of anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in perpendicular Co/Pt multilayers have been studied. It is observed that thermally stable AHE behavior cannot be obtained in perpendicular Co/Pt multilayers with the HfO{sub 2}/Co interface, mainly due to Co-Pt interdiffusion during annealing. In contrast, thermally stable AHE feature is observed in perpendicular Co/Pt multilayers with the Co/HfO{sub 2} interface despite Co-Pt interdiffusion, which is owing to the enhancement of the side jump and intrinsic contributions to the AHE through interfacial modification after annealing.

  15. Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) injury induces chronic facial pain and susceptibility to anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, D N; Kniffin, T C; Zhang, L P; Danaher, R J; Miller, C S; Bocanegra, J L; Carlson, C R; Westlund, K N

    2015-06-04

    Our laboratory previously developed a novel neuropathic and inflammatory facial pain model for mice referred to as the Trigeminal Inflammatory Compression (TIC) model. Rather than inducing whole nerve ischemia and neuronal loss, this injury induces only slight peripheral nerve demyelination triggering long-term mechanical allodynia and cold hypersensitivity on the ipsilateral whisker pad. The aim of the present study is to further characterize the phenotype of the TIC injury model using specific behavioral assays (i.e. light-dark box, open field exploratory activity, and elevated plus maze) to explore pain- and anxiety-like behaviors associated with this model. Our findings determined that the TIC injury produces hypersensitivity 100% of the time after surgery that persists at least 21 weeks post injury (until the animals are euthanized). Three receptive field sensitivity pattern variations in mice with TIC injury are specified. Animals with TIC injury begin displaying anxiety-like behavior in the light-dark box preference and open field exploratory tests at week eight post injury as compared to sham and naïve animals. Panic anxiety-like behavior was shown in the elevated plus maze in mice with TIC injury if the test was preceded with acoustic startle. Thus, in addition to mechanical and cold hypersensitivity, the present study identified significant anxiety-like behaviors in mice with TIC injury resembling the clinical symptomatology and psychosocial impairments of patients with chronic facial pain. Overall, the TIC injury model's chronicity, reproducibility, and reliability in producing pain- and anxiety-like behaviors demonstrate its usefulness as a chronic neuropathic facial pain model. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Influence of local strain on twinning behavior during compression of AZ31 magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, H.T.; Godfrey, A.; Zheng, J.P.; Liu, W.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of local strain state on twinning behavior during compression of AZ31 magnesium alloy was investigated, making use of a micro-grid method to correlate the local strain tensor with observations of twinning using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Eight prism samples were used to get deformation zones subjected to different strain states. The strain distribution across the whole sample surface was measured with the micro-grid method and the results show that the local strain states exhibit much variation, with zones subjected to large shear strain as well as zones subjected to little shear strain. Samples were compressed at room temperature and detailed EBSD measurements were taken in two zones, where one zone was subject to only small shear strains and the other was subject to large shear strains. Twin variant selection was then analyzed with respect to both stress-based (Schmid factor) and strain-based criteria. The former was found to provide the best explanation for the observed pattern of twinning

  17. Compressive Deformation Behavior of Thick Micro-Alloyed HSLA Steel Plates at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee J.-H.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The hot deformation behavior of a heavy micro-alloyed high-strength low-alloy (HSLA steel plate was studied by performing compression tests at elevated temperatures. The hot compression tests were carried out at temperatures from 923 K to 1,223 K with strain rates of 0.002 s−1 and 1.0 s−1. A long plateau region appeared for the 0.002 s−1 strain rate, and this was found to be an effect of the balancing between softening and hardening during deformation. For the 1.0 s−1 strain rate, the flow stress gradually increased after the yield point. The temperature and the strain rate-dependent parameters, such as the strain hardening coefficient (n, strength constant (K, and activation energy (Q, obtained from the flow stress curves were applied to the power law of plastic deformation. The constitutive model for flow stress can be expressed as σ = (39.8 ln (Z – 716.6 · ε(−0.00955ln(Z + 0.4930 for the 1.0 s−1 strain rate and σ = (19.9ln (Z – 592.3 · ε(−0.00212ln(Z + 0.1540 for the 0.002 s−1 strain rate.

  18. The role of fabric in the large strain compressive behavior of human trabecular bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlebois, Mathieu; Pretterklieber, Michael; Zysset, Philippe K

    2010-12-01

    Osteoporosis-related vertebral body fractures involve large compressive strains of trabecular bone. The small strain mechanical properties of the trabecular bone such as the elastic modulus or ultimate strength can be estimated using the volume fraction and a second order fabric tensor, but it remains unclear if similar estimations may be extended to large strain properties. Accordingly, the aim of this work is to identify the role of volume fraction and especially fabric in the large strain compressive behavior of human trabecular bone from various anatomical locations. Trabecular bone biopsies were extracted from human T12 vertebrae (n=31), distal radii (n=43), femoral head (n=44), and calcanei (n=30), scanned using microcomputed tomography to quantify bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and the fabric tensor (M), and tested either in unconfined or confined compression up to very large strains (∼70%). The mechanical parameters of the resulting stress-strain curves were analyzed using regression models to examine the respective influence of BV/TV and fabric eigenvalues. The compressive stress-strain curves demonstrated linear elasticity, yielding with hardening up to an ultimate stress, softening toward a minimum stress, and a steady rehardening followed by a rapid densification. For the pooled experiments, the average minimum stress was 1.89 ± 1.77 MPa, while the corresponding mean strain was 7.15 ± 1.84%. The minimum stress showed a weaker dependence with fabric as the elastic modulus or ultimate strength. For the confined experiments, the stress at a logarithmic strain of 1.2 was 8.08 ± 7.91 MPa, and the dissipated energy density was 5.67 ± 4.42 MPa. The latter variable was strongly related to the volume fraction (R(2)=0.83) but the correlation improved only marginally with the inclusion of fabric (R(2)=0.84). The influence of fabric on the mechanical properties of human trabecular bone decreases with increasing strain, while the role of volume fraction remains

  19. Triaxial quasi-static compression and creep behavior of bedded salt from southeastern New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansen, F.D.

    1979-11-01

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a series of triaxial quasi-static compression and creep tests on specimens of bedded salt recovered at depth intervals of 1953 to 1954 and 2711 to 2722 feet in AEC Hole No. 7 in southeastern New Mexico. The primary objective was the determination of the deformational characteristics of the salt for prescribed stress and temperature states under quasi-static and time-dependent conditions. The test conditions encompassed confining pressures of 500 and 2000 psi, differential axial stresses of 1500, 3000 and 4500 psi, temperatures of 23 and 100 0 C, and time durations of several hours to ten days. The data analysis was confined primarily to power law fits to the creep strain-time measurements and to an evaluation of the principal strain ratio behavior for the various test conditions and axial strain magnitudes

  20. Computer-aided study of the mechanical behavior of the jaw bone fragments under uniaxial compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana V.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the calculated results of the mechanical behavior of simulative bone mesovolumes under uniaxial compression with their architectonics corresponding to the human jaw bone fragments. The results of the calculation show that changes in the structure and mineral content of the bone fragments can lead to the change of their prevailing deformation response. New effective parameters were introduced to reflect the character of the distribution of stresses and strains in the bone mesovolumes. Implants are to be created and selected to correspond to the offered parameters and longitudinal modulus of elasticity of bone mesovolumes in order to maintain the stress and strain state existing in bone macrovolume during the implantation and in order to avoid bone restructuring through its borderline resorption.

  1. Dynamic Recrystallization Behavior of AISI 420 Stainless Steel under Hot Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Di, H. S.; Misra, R. D. K.

    2015-04-01

    Hot deformation behavior of AISI 420 stainless steel was studied under hot compression tests in the temperature range of 950 to 1150 °C and strain rates of 0.01 s-1 and 0.1 s-1. The study indicates that higher deformation temperature makes the peak stress pronounced and the occurrence of DRX is detected by inflection point in the work hardening rate vs. flow stress (θ-σ) plot, irrespective of the shape of flow stress curve. Local misorientation (ML) was calculated to reveal the local change in the crystal orientation. The distribution of ML suggested that the process of DRX reduces the local misorientation during hot deformation. The critical stress for initiation of DRX under different deformation conditions was determined by setting the derivative of the third order polynomial to θ-σ plot. A good linear relationship between critical stress (σc) & critical strain (ɛc) and Zener-Hollomon parameter was established.

  2. A Study of the Crystallization, Melting, and Foaming Behaviors of Polylactic Acid in Compressed CO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chul B. Park

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The crystallization and melting behaviors of linear polylactic acid (PLA treated by compressed CO2 was investigated. The isothermal crystallization test indicated that while PLA exhibited very low crystallization kinetics under atmospheric pressure, CO2 exposure significantly increased PLA’s crystallization rate; a high crystallinity of 16.5% was achieved after CO2 treatment for only 1 min at 100 °C and 6.89 MPa. One melting peak could be found in the DSC curve, and this exhibited a slight dependency on treatment times, temperatures, and pressures. PLA samples tended to foam during the gas release process, and a foaming window as a function of time and temperature was established. Based on the foaming window, crystallinity, and cell morphology, it was found that foaming clearly reduced the needed time for PLA’s crystallization equilibrium.

  3. "Invar"-like behavior in compressed Fe7C3 with implication for deep carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Li, J.; Ikuta, D.

    2014-12-01

    Iron carbide Fe7C3 has recently emerged as a leading candidate component of the inner core because it is likely the first phase to solidify from a liquid containing iron and a small amount of carbon, and previous studies suggest that it provides a good match for the density of the inner core under relevant conditions. Pressure-induced magnetic transitions have been observed in Fe7C3 (Chen et al., 2012). The pressure of the ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition remains controversial and its effect on equation of state (EoS) is unclear, thus introducing uncertainties in estimating the density of Fe7C3 under inner core pressures. Here we report the lattice parameters and unit cell volume of hexagonal Fe7C3 at 300 K and up to 70 GPa, obtained through synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements using a diamond anvil cell. The experiments used fine powder of Fe7C3 that was synthesized in the multi-anvil apparatus at the University of Michigan. The sample was embedded in neon pressure medium together with Au powder and ruby spheres as additional pressure markers. We observed significant softening at 5~8 GPa, similar to the reported "invar"-like behavior in Fe-Ni alloy (Dubrovinsky et al., 2001). For comparison, the compression curve of iron in the same loading turned out to be smooth as expected, which confirms that the abnormal behavior in Fe7C3 compression curve is due to its own property change and not an artifact. The new data allow us to establish the equation-of-state (EoS) of Fe7C3 and then estimate the density of Fe7C3 at inner core conditions. References: Chen, B., Gao, L.L., Lavina, B., Dera, P., Alp, E.E., Zhao, J.Y., Li, J., 2012. Magneto-elastic coupling in compressed Fe7C3 supports carbon in Earth's inner core. Geophys Res Lett 39. Dubrovinsky, L., Dubrovinskaia, N., Abrikosov, I.A., Vennstrom, M., Westman, F., Carlson, S., van Schilfgaarde, M., Johansson, B., 2001. Pressure-induced invar effect in Fe-Ni alloys. Phys Rev Lett 86, 4851-4854.

  4. RHEOLOGICAL DEFORMATION BEHAVIOR MODEL OF SUGAR DOUGH IN THE CONDITIONS OF MONOAXIAL COMPRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. O. Magomedov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. The knowledge of regularities of deformation behavior of the processed confectionery masses with certain rheological properties allows to calculate parameters of shaping process and to select processing equipment for its carrying out. The article studies the obtaining of the rheological equation of deformation behavior of sugar dough in the conditions of monoaxial compression which is realized in sugar cookies dough pieces formation processes. The results of the pilot studies confirming adequacy of the offered rheological equation are presented. The behavior of an elastic-, viscous- and plastic body in the conditions of quasistatic test for creeping during which the set size is tension, and the measured one is relative deformation is considered. The main rheological properties of sugar dough received experimentally are given. Values of rheological constants are received and it is revealed that at 95% confidential probability, the rheological equation for the general deformation of an elastic-, viscous- and plastic body adequately describes experimental data. The maximum fault thus makes 2,3%. It is established that dough pieces shaping processes from the sugar dough possessing visco- and plastic properties should be realized at an external tension (power impact from the forming body which exceeds a limit of fluidity of the dough formed. The level of external tension, as well as the duration of its influence (that is formation duration should be chosen taking into account the residual deformations in the processed mass which guarantee giving of a certain geometrical form and drawing on a surface of dough pieces. The rheological model of sugar dough allows to predict its deformation behavior in the formation conditions, and to calculate the parameters of sugar dough formation process.

  5. Sorption Behavior of Compressed CO2 and CH4 on Ultrathin Hybrid Poly(POSS-imide) Layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raaijmakers, Michiel; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Wiese, M.; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck Edwin

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of compressed gases into thin polymeric films is essential for applications including gas sensors and membrane based gas separation. For glassy polymers, the sorption behavior is dependent on the nonequilibrium status of the polymer. The uptake of molecules by a polymer is generally

  6. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  7. Axial Compression Behavior of a New Type of Prefabricated Concrete Sandwich Wall Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qun, Xie; Shuai, Wang; Chun, Liu

    2018-03-01

    A novel type of prefabricated concrete sandwich wall panel which could be used as a load-bearing structural element in buildings has been presented in this paper. Compared with the traditional sandwich panels, there are several typical characteristics for this wall system, including core columns confined by spiral stirrup along the cross-section of panel with 600mm spacing, precast foamed concrete block between two structural layers as internal insulation part, and a three-dimensional (3D) steel wire skeleton in each layer which is composed of two vertical steel wire meshes connected by horizontally short steel bar. All steel segments in the panel are automatically prefabricated in factory and then are assembled to form steel system in site. In order to investigate the structural behavior of this wall panel, two full-scale panels have been experimentally studied under axial compressive load. The test results show that the wall panel presents good load-bearing capacity and integral stiffness without out-of-plane flexural failure. Compared to the panel with planar steel wire mesh in concrete layer, the panel with 3D steel wire skeleton presents higher strength and better rigidity even in the condition of same steel ratio in panels which verifies that the 3D steel skeleton could greatly enhance the structural behavior of sandwich panel.

  8. Behavioral measures of cochlear compression and temporal resolution as predictors of speech masking release in hearing-impaired listeners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregan, Melanie J.; Nelson, Peggy B.; Oxenham, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Hearing-impaired (HI) listeners often show less masking release (MR) than normal-hearing listeners when temporal fluctuations are imposed on a steady-state masker, even when accounting for overall audibility differences. This difference may be related to a loss of cochlear compression in HI listeners. Behavioral estimates of compression, using temporal masking curves (TMCs), were compared with MR for band-limited (500–4000 Hz) speech and pure tones in HI listeners and age-matched, noise-masked normal-hearing (NMNH) listeners. Compression and pure-tone MR estimates were made at 500, 1500, and 4000 Hz. The amount of MR was defined as the difference in performance between steady-state and 10-Hz square-wave-gated speech-shaped noise. In addition, temporal resolution was estimated from the slope of the off-frequency TMC. No significant relationship was found between estimated cochlear compression and MR for either speech or pure tones. NMNH listeners had significantly steeper off-frequency temporal masking recovery slopes than did HI listeners, and a small but significant correlation was observed between poorer temporal resolution and reduced MR for speech. The results suggest either that the effects of hearing impairment on MR are not determined primarily by changes in peripheral compression, or that the TMC does not provide a sufficiently reliable measure of cochlear compression. PMID:24116426

  9. Anomalous X-Ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendin, G.

    1979-01-01

    The availability of tunable synchrotron radiation has made it possible systematically to perform x-ray diffraction studies in regions of anomalous scattering near absorption edges, e.g., in order to derive phase information for crystal structure determination. An overview is given of recent experimental and theoretical work and discussion of the properties of the anomalous atomic scattering factor, with emphasis on threshold resonances and damping effects. The results are applied to a discussion of the very strong anomalous dispersion recently observed near the L3 edge in a cesium complex. Also given is an overview of elements and levels where similar behavior can be expected. Finally, the influence of solid state and chemical effects on the absorption edge structure is discussed. 64 references.

  10. Anomalous x-ray scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendin, G.

    1979-01-01

    The availability of tunable synchrotron radiation has made it possible systematically to perform x-ray diffraction studies in regions of anomalous scattering near absorption edges, e.g. in order to derive phase information for crystal structure determination. An overview is given of recent experimental and theoretical work and discuss the properties of the anomalous atomic scattering factor, with emphasis on threshold resonances and damping effects. The results are applied to a discussion of the very strong anomalous dispersion recently observed near the L 3 edge in a cesium complex. Also given is an overview of elements and levels where similar behavior can be expected. Finally, the influence of solid state and chemical effects on the absorption edge structure is discussed. 64 references

  11. Analysis of micromechanical and microstructural effects on compression behavior of unidirectional composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caiazzo, A. A.; Sullivan, B. J.; Rosen, B. W.

    1993-04-01

    It is analytically demonstrated that the compressive strength of unidirectional carbon fiber composites is very sensitive to slight misalignments between the fiber directional and applied loads. Stresses in the matrix due to axial compressive loads cause a reduction in matrix and composite shear stiffness at the point of incipient instability. This reduced shear stiffness results in unidirectional composite compressive strengths which are lower than predicted using elastic microfilament buckling theory. A general nonlinear finite element approach to predicting shear mode instability failure in two- and three-phase fiber composite materials is presented. Using this approach, the effects of local microstructural parameters can be included in compression strength prediction.

  12. Compressive behavior of Sulcata Tortoise’s carapace at high rate of deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongpairojcosit, Nadda; Glunrawd, Chinnawit; Jearanaisilawong, Petch

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic compressive response of tortoise carapace at high rate of deformation. Disk specimens are cut from carapace and compressed using Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB) technique. The steel bar system together with a copper pulse shaper generate an incident wave that can achieve a constant rate of deformation within the specimens. The results show increasing compressive modulus and compressive strength compared to the quasi-static data of carapace. The strain waves on the incident and the transmission bars from finite element analysis based on the experimental setup agree with the test data.

  13. Compression Behavior of Confined Columns with High-Volume Fly Ash Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Won Yoo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of fly ash in ordinary concrete provides practical benefits to concrete structures, such as a gain in long-term strength, reduced hydration heat, improved resistance to chloride, and enhanced workability. However, few studies with high-volume fly ash (HVFA concrete have been conducted that focus on the structural applications such as a column. Thus, there is a need to promote field applications of HVFA concrete as a sustainable construction material. To this end, this study investigated the compressive behavior of reinforced concrete columns that contain HVFA with a 50 percent replacement rate. Six columns were fabricated for this study. The study variables were the HVFA replacement rate, tied steel ratio, and tie steel spacing. The computed ultimate strength by the American Concrete Institute (ACI code conservatively predicted the measured values, and, thus, the existing equation in the ACI code is feasible for confined RC columns that contain HVFA. In addition, an analysis model was calibrated based on the experimental results and is recommended for predicting the stress-strain relationship of confined reinforced concrete columns that contain HVFA.

  14. Role of Inelastic Transverse Compressive Behavior and Multiaxial Loading on the Transverse Impact of Kevlar KM2 Single Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramani Sockalingam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available High-velocity transverse impact of ballistic fabrics and yarns by projectiles subject individual fibers to multi-axial dynamic loading. Single-fiber transverse impact experiments with the current state-of-the-art experimental capabilities are challenging due to the associated micron length-scale. Kevlar® KM2 fibers exhibit a nonlinear inelastic behavior in transverse compression with an elastic limit less than 1.5% strain. The effect of this transverse behavior on a single KM2 fiber subjected to a cylindrical and a fragment-simulating projectile (FSP transverse impact is studied with a 3D finite element model. The inelastic behavior results in a significant reduction of fiber bounce velocity and projectile-fiber contact forces up to 38% compared to an elastic impact response. The multiaxial stress states during impact including transverse compression, axial tension, axial compression and interlaminar shear are presented at the location of failure. In addition, the models show a strain concentration over a small length in the fiber under the projectile-fiber contact. A failure criterion, based on maximum axial tensile strain accounting for the gage length, strain rate and multiaxial loading degradation effects are applied to predict the single-fiber breaking speed. Results are compared to the elastic response to assess the importance of inelastic material behavior on failure during a transverse impact.

  15. Behavior of sandwich panels subjected to bending fatigue, axial compression loading and in-plane bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Haley Aaron

    This thesis investigates experimentally and analytically the structural performance of sandwich panels composed of glass fibre reinforced polymer (GFRP) skins and a soft polyurethane foam core, with or without thin GFRP ribs connecting skins. The study includes three main components: (a) out-of-plane bending fatigue, (b) axial compression loading, and (c) in-plane bending of sandwich beams. Fatigue studies included 28 specimens and looked into establishing service life (S-N) curves of sandwich panels without ribs, governed by soft core shear failure and also ribbed panels governed by failure at the rib-skin junction. Additionally, the study compared fatigue life curves of sandwich panels loaded under fully reversed bending conditions (R=-1) with panels cyclically loaded in one direction only (R=0) and established the stiffness degradation characteristics throughout their fatigue life. Mathematical models expressing fatigue life and stiffness degradation curves were calibrated and expanded forms for various loading ratios were developed. Approximate fatigue thresholds of 37% and 23% were determined for non-ribbed panels loaded at R=0 and -1, respectively. Digital imaging techniques showed significant shear contribution significantly (90%) to deflections if no ribs used. Axial loading work included 51 specimens and examined the behavior of panels of various lengths (slenderness ratios), skin thicknesses, and also panels of similar length with various rib configurations. Observed failure modes governing were global buckling, skin wrinkling or skin crushing. In-plane bending involved testing 18 sandwich beams of various shear span-to-depth ratios and skin thicknesses, which failed by skin wrinkling at the compression side. The analytical modeling components of axially loaded panels include; a simple design-oriented analytical failure model and a robust non-linear model capable of predicting the full load-displacement response of axially loaded slender sandwich panels

  16. Viscoelastic behavior of basaltic ash from Stromboli volcano inferred from intermittent compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, A. K.; Miwa, T.; Okumura, S.; Uesugi, K.

    2017-12-01

    After ash-dominated Strombolian eruption, considerable amount of ash falls back to the volcanic conduit forming a dense near-surface region compacted by weights of its own and other fallback clasts (Patrick et al., 2007). Gas accumulation below this dense cap causes a substantial increase in pressure within the conduit, causing the volcanic activity to shift to the preliminary stages of a forthcoming eruption (Del Bello et al., 2015). Under such conditions, rheology of the fallback ash plays an important role because it controls whether the fallback ash can be the cap. However, little attention has been given to the point. We examined the rheology of ash collected at Stromboli volcano via intermittent compression experiments changing temperature and compression time/rate. The ash deformed at a constant rate during compression process, and then it was compressed without any deformation during rest process. The compression and rest processes repeated during each experiment to see rheological variations with progression of compaction. Viscoelastic changes during the experiment were estimated by Maxwell model. The results show that both elasticity and viscosity increases with decreasing porosity. On the other hand, the elasticity shows strong rate-dependence in the both compression and rest processes while the viscosity dominantly depends on the temperature, although the compression rate also affects the viscosity in the case of the compression process. Thus, the ash behaves either elastically or viscously depending on experimental process, temperature, and compression rate/time. The viscoelastic characteristics can be explained by magnitude relationships between the characteristic relaxation times and times for compression and rest processes. This indicates that the balance of the time scales is key to determining the rheological characteristics and whether the ash behaves elastically or viscously may control cyclic Strombolian eruptions.

  17. Numerical study of one-dimensional compression of granular materials. I. Stress-strain behavior, microstructure, and irreversibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Mohamed Hassan; Roux, Jean-Noël; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Brisard, Sébastien; Bornert, Michel

    2017-03-01

    The behavior of a model granular material, made of slightly polydisperse beads with Hertz-Mindlin elastic-frictional contacts, in oedometric compression (i.e., compression along one axis, with no lateral strain) is studied by grain-level numerical simulations. We systematically investigate the influence of the (idealized) packing process on the microstructure and stresses in the initial, weakly confined equilibrium state, and prepare both isotropic and anisotropic configurations differing in solid fraction Φ and coordination number z . Φ (ranging from maximally dense to moderately loose), z (which might vary independently of Φ in dense systems), fabric and force anisotropy parameters, and the ratio K0 of lateral stresses σ2=σ3 to stress σ1 in the compression direction are monitored in oedometric compression in which σ1 varies by more than three orders of magnitude. K0 reflects the anisotropy of the assembling process and may remain nearly constant in further loading if the material is already oedometrically compressed (as a granular gas) in the preparation stage. Otherwise, it tends to decrease steadily over the investigated stress range. It is related to force and fabric anisotropy parameters by a simple formula. Elastic moduli, separately computed with an appropriate matrix method, may express the response to very small stress increments about the transversely isotropic well-equilibrated states along the loading path, although oedometric compression proves an essentially anelastic process, mainly due to friction mobilization, with large irreversible effects apparent upon unloading. While the evolution of axial strain ɛ1 and solid fraction Φ (or of the void ratio e =-1 +1 /Φ ) with axial stress σ1 is very nearly reversible, especially in dense samples, z is observed to decrease (as previously observed in isotropic compression) after a compression cycle if its initial value was high. K0 relates to the evolution of internal variables and may exceed 1 in

  18. Compressive behavior of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jun, Xie; Zhang, Yannian; Shan, Chunhong

    2017-10-01

    The present study was conducted to obtain a better understanding of the variation rule of mechanical properties of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition using compression tests. A total of 5 specimens were processed in a high-temperature chamber. After that, the specimens were tested subjected to axial load. The parameter mainly considered time of thermal aging processing for specimens. The results of compression tests show that the specimens after thermal aging processing are more probably brittle failure than the standard specimen. Moreover, the exposure of steel plate, cracks and other failure phenomena are more serious than the standard specimen. The compressive capacity, ultimate compressive strength, compressive elastic modulus of the laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads decreased dramatically with the increasing in the aging time of thermal aging processing. The attenuation trends of ultimate compressive strength, compressive elastic modulus of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition accord with power function. The attenuation models are acquired by regressing data of experiment with the least square method. The attenuation models conform to reality well which shows that this model is applicable and has vast prospect in assessing the performance of laminated neoprene bridge bearing pads under thermal aging condition.

  19. Compressive behavior of pervious concretes and a quantification of the influence of random pore structure features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deo, Omkar; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2010-01-01

    Research highlights: → Identified the relevant pore structure features of pervious concretes, provided methodologies to extract those, and quantified the influence of these features on compressive response. → A model for stress-strain relationship of pervious concretes, and relationship between model parameters and parameters of the stress-strain relationship developed. → Statistical model for compressive strength as a function of pore structure features; and a stochastic model for the sensitivity of pore structure features in strength prediction. - Abstract: Properties of a random porous material such as pervious concrete are strongly dependent on its pore structure features, porosity being an important one among them. This study deals with developing an understanding of the material structure-compressive response relationships in pervious concretes. Several pervious concrete mixtures with different pore structure features are proportioned and subjected to static compression tests. The pore structure features such as pore area fractions, pore sizes, mean free spacing of the pores, specific surface area, and the three-dimensional pore distribution density are extracted using image analysis methods. The compressive stress-strain response of pervious concretes, a model to predict the stress-strain response, and its relationship to several of the pore structure features are outlined. Larger aggregate sizes and increase in paste volume fractions are observed to result in increased compressive strengths. The compressive response is found to be influenced by the pore sizes, their distributions and spacing. A statistical model is used to relate the compressive strength to the relevant pore structure features, which is then used as a base model in a Monte-Carlo simulation to evaluate the sensitivity of the predicted compressive strength to the model terms.

  20. Effects of Leaching Behavior of Calcium Ions on Compression and Durability of Cement-Based Materials with Mineral Admixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, An; Chao, Sao-Jeng; Lin, Wei-Ting

    2013-01-01

    Leaching of calcium ions increases the porosity of cement-based materials, consequently resulting in a negative effect on durability since it provides an entry for aggressive harmful ions, causing reinforcing steel corrosion. This study investigates the effects of leaching behavior of calcium ions on the compression and durability of cement-based materials. Since the parameters influencing the leaching behavior of cement-based materials are unclear and diverse, this paper focuses on the influence of added mineral admixtures (fly ash, slag and silica fume) on the leaching behavior of calcium ions regarding compression and durability of cemented-based materials. Ammonium nitrate solution was used to accelerate the leaching process in this study. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis were employed to analyze and compare the cement-based material compositions prior to and after calcium ion leaching. The experimental results show that the mineral admixtures reduce calcium hydroxide quantity and refine pore structure through pozzolanic reaction, thus enhancing the compressive strength and durability of cement-based materials. PMID:28809247

  1. Dynamic Behavior of AA2519-T8 Aluminum Alloy Under High Strain Rate Loading in Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olasumboye, A. T.; Owolabi, G. M.; Odeshi, A. G.; Yilmaz, N.; Zeytinci, A.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, the effects of strain rate on the dynamic behavior, microstructure evolution and hence, failure of the AA2519-T8 aluminum alloy were investigated under compression at strain rates ranging from 1000 to 3500 s-1. Cylindrical specimens of dimensions 3.3 mm × 3.3 mm (L/D = 1) were tested using the split-Hopkinson pressure bar integrated with a digital image correlation system. The microstructure of the alloy was assessed using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Results showed that the dynamic yield strength of the alloy is strain rate dependent, with the maximum yield strength attained by the material being 500 MPa. The peak flow stress of 562 MPa was attained by the material at 3500 s-1. The alloy also showed a significant rate of strain hardening that is typical of other Al-Cu alloys; the rate of strain hardening, however, decreased with increase in strain rate. It was determined that the strain rate sensitivity coefficient of the alloy within the range of high strain rates used in this study is approximately 0.05 at 0.12 plastic strain; a more significant value than what was reported in literature under quasi-static loading. Micrographs obtained showed potential sites for the evolution of adiabatic shear band at 3500 s-1, with a characteristic circular-shaped surface profile comprising partially dissolved second phase particles in the continuous phase across the incident plane of the deformed specimen. The regions surrounding the site showed little or no change in the size of particles. However, the constituent coarse particles were observed as agglomerations of fractured pieces, thus having a shape factor different from those contained in the as-received alloy. Since the investigated alloy is a choice material for military application where it can be exposed to massive deformation at high strain rates, this study provides information on its microstructural and mechanical responses to such extreme loading condition.

  2. Hot Ductility and Compression Deformation Behavior of TRIP980 at Elevated Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mei; Li, Haiyang; Gan, Bin; Zhao, Xue; Yao, Yi; Wang, Li

    2018-02-01

    The hot ductility tests of a kind of 980 MPa class Fe-0.31C (wt pct) TRIP steel (TRIP980) with the addition of Ti/V/Nb were conducted on a Gleeble-3500 thermomechanical simulator in the temperatures ranging from 873 K to 1573 K (600 °C to 1300 °C) at a constant strain rate of 0.001 s-1. It is found that the hot ductility trough ranges from 873 K to 1123 K (600 °C to 850 °C). The recommended straightening temperatures are from 1173 K to 1523 K (900 °C to 1250 °C). The isothermal hot compression deformation behavior was also studied by means of Gleeble-3500 in the temperatures ranging from 1173 K to 1373 K (900 °C to 1100 °C) at strain rates ranging from 0.01 s-1 to 10 s-1. The results show that the peak stress decreases with the increasing temperature and the decreasing strain rate. The deformation activation energy of the test steel is 436.7 kJ/mol. The hot deformation equation of the steel has been established, and the processing maps have been developed on the basis of experimental data and the principle of dynamic materials model (DMM). By analyzing the processing maps of strains of 0.5, 0.7, and 0.9, it is found that dynamic recrystallization occurs in the peak power dissipation efficiency domain, which is the optimal area of hot working. Finally, the factors influencing hot ductility and thermal activation energy of the test steel were investigated by means of microscopic analysis. It indicates that the additional microalloying elements play important roles both in the loss of hot ductility and in the enormous increase of deformation activation energy for the TRIP980 steel.

  3. Deformation Behavior and Evolution of Microstructure and Texture During Hot Compression of AISI 304LN Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rout, Matruprasad; Biswas, Somjeet; Ranjan, Ravi; Pal, Surjya Kanta; Singh, Shiv Brat

    2018-03-01

    Deformation behavior of hot-rolled AISI 304 LN austenitic stainless steel was studied by hot axisymmetric compression tests at 1173 K, 1273 K, and 1373 K (900 °C, 1000 °C, and 1100 °C) at strain rates of 0.01, 0.1, and 1 s-1. The flow curves were examined to understand the deformation characteristics. The influence of Zener-Holloman parameter was analyzed using appropriate constitutive models. The activation energy for deformation was found to be 473 kJ/mol. Quantitative microstructural analysis was carried out using Electron backscattered diffraction. Compression at 1173 K (900 °C) at all true strain rates gave rise to partially dynamic recrystallized microstructure with strong α-fiber texture. The deformation texture is characterized by the formation of Brass component, and partial dynamic recrystallization (DRX) led to the development of Goss, S, and ube components. Necklace structure of small equiaxed recrystallized grains could be observed surrounding the large, elongated deformed grains. Compressions at 1273 K and 1373 K (1000 °C and 1100 °C) resulted in fully recrystallized microstructure consisting of mostly Σ3 and Σ9 coincidence site lattice high-angle boundaries. Compression at 1273 K (1000 °C) leads to the formation of low-intensity diffused α-fiber. DRX was confirmed by the presence of Goss, S, Cube, and rotated Cube components. Compression performed at 1373 K (1100 °C) resulted in nearly random texture with traces of α-fiber and prominent Cube/rotated Cube components. The microstructures of the 1173 K (900 °C)-compressed samples were partitioned using grain size and misorientation criteria to quantify DRX.

  4. Thermal Effects on the Compressive Behavior of IM7/PET15 Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sandra Polesky

    2003-01-01

    The effect of changing operating temperature on the compressive response of IM7/PETI5 composite laminates is investigated within this paper. The three temperatures evaluated for this study were 129 C, 21 C, and 177 C, a spectrum from cryogenic to an elevated operating temperature. Laminate compressive strength property testing was conducted using the Wyoming Combined Load Compression fixture to generate strength data at the three operating temperatures of interest for several lay-ups. A three-dimensional finite element analysis model of a [90/0]8s composite laminate subject to compressive loading is developed. The model is used to study the key attributes of the laminate that significantly influence the state of stress in the laminate. Both the resin rich layer located between lamina and the thermal residual stresses present in the laminate due to curing are included in the analysis model. For the laminate modeled, the effect of modeling temperature dependent material properties was determined to be insignificant for the operating temperatures studied. Simply using the material properties measured at the operating temperature of interest was sufficient for predicting stresses accurately in a linear analysis for the current problem. The three-dimensional analysis results revealed that the application of an applied compressive axial load in the 0-degree direction decreased the interlaminar stresses present in the laminate initially due to curing. Therefore, failure was concluded not be attributable to the interlaminar stresses in the composite laminate being studied when a compressive load is applied. The magnitude of the measured laminate compressive strength change with a change in temperature is concluded to be dominated by the change in the lamina compressive axial strength with a change in temperature.

  5. Anomalous phase behavior and apparent anharmonicity of the pump-probe signal in a two-dimensional harmonic potential system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taneichi, T.; Kobayashi, T.

    2007-01-01

    Discussion on wavelength dependent 'anharmonic' effects in a pump-probe signal for a system of wavepacket on one- and two-dimensional harmonic potentials was given. The Fourier power spectrum of the signal, calculated for a model composed of a three-state electronic system coupled to a set of displaced harmonic oscillators, depends on the pulse duration. Condition under which the wavepacket motion in the harmonic potential substantially deviates from that of the classical point mass is derived. The Fourier power spectrum has enhanced components with frequencies of harmonics even in a system composed of ideally harmonic potentials. Utility of the Fourier analysis of the spectrum for clarification of the squeezed molecular vibrational state is discussed. Calculated oscillatory behavior in phase of a pump-probe signal, as a function of probe frequency, was discussed in terms of a two-dimensional effect on a pump-probe signal

  6. Study of twinning behaviors of rolled AZ31 magnesium alloy by interrupted in situ compressive tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, Dewen; Liu, Tianmo; Shi, Dongfeng; Chen, Huicong; Chen, Hongbing

    2016-01-01

    In this paper rolled AZ31 magnesium alloy was deformed by interrupted in situ compressive tests. Compressive and re-compressive tests were conducted along rolling direction (RD). It is discovered that the yield strength of re-compression is enhanced due to grain refinement by {10–12} tensile twins. Twinning activation and evolution are evidenced by electron backscatter diffraction. Correlations with grain orientation and boundary misorientation are observed in the region of twins that arise at grain boundaries. The distributions of grain boundary misorientation associated with twin nucleation are mapped. It is found that nucleation of twin is mainly controlled by the initial texture, and is more easy at low misorientation grain boundaries. The growth of twins depend on two modes: the thickening of the existing twin lamellae and new twins is nucleated at grain boundary. With increasing compressive strain, the growth and coalescence of twins eventually encompassed the whole grain. Meanwhile, the basal texture is weaker after compression due to the propagation and coalescence of tensile twins.

  7. Compressive Creep Behavior of NEXTEL(TradeMark) 720/Alumina Ceramic Matrix Composite at 1200 Degrees C in Air and in Steam Environment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Szymczak, Neil R

    2006-01-01

    ...) 720/Alumina ceramic matrix composite at 1200 deg. C in air and 100% steam environments. The effects of creep loading history on the tensile and compressive material behavior will also be examined...

  8. Mechanical Behavior of 3D Crack Growth in Transparent Rock-Like Material Containing Preexisting Flaws under Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu-Dan Tang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical behavior of 3D crack propagation and coalescence is investigated in rock-like material under uniaxial compression. A new transparent rock-like material is developed and a series of uniaxial compressive tests on low temperature transparent resin materials with preexisting 3D flaws are performed in laboratory, with changing values of bridge angle β (inclination between the inner tips of the two preexisting flaws of preexisting flaws in specimens. Furthermore, a theoretical peak strength prediction of 3D cracks coalescence is given. The results show that the coalescence modes of the specimens are varying according to different bridge angles. And the theoretical peak strength prediction agrees well with the experimental observation.

  9. Influence of dynamic compressive loading on the in vitro degradation behavior of pure PLA and Mg/PLA composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuan; Qi, Chenxi; Han, Linyuan; Chu, Chenglin; Bai, Jing; Guo, Chao; Xue, Feng; Shen, Baolong; Chu, Paul K

    2017-12-01

    The effects of dynamic compressive loading on the in vitro degradation behavior of pure poly-lactic acid (PLA) and PLA-based composite unidirectionally reinforced with micro-arc oxidized magnesium alloy wires (Mg/PLA) are investigated. Dynamic compressive loading is shown to accelerate degradation of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. As the applied stress is increased from 0.1MPa to 0.9MPa or frequency from 0.5Hz to 2.5Hz, the overall degradation rate goes up. After immersion for 21days at 0.9MPa and 2.5Hz, the bending strength retention of the composite and pure PLA is 60.1% and 50%, respectively. Dynamic loading enhances diffusion of small acidic molecules resulting in significant pH decrease in the immersion solution. The synergistic reaction between magnesium alloy wires and PLA in the composite is further clarified by electrochemical tests. The degradation behavior of the pure PLA and PLA matrix in the composite under dynamic conditions obey the first order degradation kinetics and a numerical model is postulated to elucidate the relationship of the bending strength, stress, frequency, and immersion time under dynamic conditions. We systematically study the influence of dynamic loading on the degradation behavior of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. Dynamic compressive loading is shown to accelerate degradation of pure PLA and Mg/PLA. The synergistic reaction between magnesium alloy wires and PLA in the composite is firstly clarified by electrochemical tests. The degradation behavior of the pure PLA and PLA matrix in the composite under dynamic conditions obey the first order degradation kinetics. Then, a numerical model is postulated to elucidate the relationship of the bending strength, stress, frequency, and immersion time under dynamic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Buckling Behavior of Compression-Loaded Quasi-Isotropic Curved Panels with a Circular Cutout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilburger, Mark W.; Britt, Vicki O.; Nemeth, Michael P.

    1999-01-01

    Results from a numerical and experimental study of the response of compression-loaded quasi-isotropic curved panels with a centrally located circular cutout are presented. The numerical results were obtained by using a geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis code. The effects of cutout size, panel curvature and initial geo- metric imperfections on the overall response of compression-loaded panels are described. In addition, results are presented from a numerical parametric study that indicate the effects of elastic circumferential edge restraints on the prebuckling and buckling response of a selected panel and these numerical results are compared to experimentally measured results. These restraints are used to identify the effects of circumferential edge restraints that are introduced by the test fixture that was used in the present study. It is shown that circumferential edge restraints can introduce substantial nonlinear prebuckling deformations into shallow compression-loaded curved panels that can results in a significant increase in buckling load.

  11. Compressive behavior of energy-saving fired facing brick composite wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Kai; Wu, Cai

    2018-03-01

    The energy-saving fired facing brick composite wall has a broad development prospects due to its merits of thermal insulation, energy conservation, beautiful, and natural. The construction and characteristics of this wall are introduced and analyzed in this paper. Experimental studies of samples are also conducted to investigate its compressive performance. The results show that the energy-saving fired facing brick composite wall has high compressive capacity. It has considerable application prospect, the study in this paper provides foundation to further studies.

  12. Experimental Study and Modelling of Poly (Methyl Methacrylate) and Polycarbonate Compressive Behavior from Low to High Strain Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Qoubaa, Z.; Colard, L.; Matadi Boumbimba, R.; Rusinek, A.

    2018-03-01

    This paper concerns an experimental investigation of Polycarbonate and Poly (methyl methacrylate) compressive behavior from low to high strain rates. Experiments were conducted from 0.001/s to ≈ 5000/s for PC and from 0.001/s to ≈ 2000/s for PMMA. The true strain-stress behavior is established and analyzed at various stain rates. Both PC and PMMA mechanical behavior appears as known, to be strain rate and temperature dependent. The DSGZ model is selected for modelling the strain-stress curves while the yield stress is reproduced using the cooperative model and a modified Eyring equation based on Eyring first process theory. All the three models predictions are in agreement with experiments performed on PC and PMMA.

  13. Anomalous top magnetic couplings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-11-09

    Nov 9, 2012 ... Corresponding author. E-mail: remartinezm@unal.edu.co. Abstract. The real and imaginary parts of the one-loop electroweak contributions to the left and right tensorial anomalous couplings of the tbW vertex in the Standard Model (SM) are computed. Keywords. Top; anomalous. PACS Nos 14.65.Ha; 12.15 ...

  14. Static compressive strength prediction of open-hole structure based on non-linear shear behavior and micro-mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wangnan; Cai, Hongneng; Li, Chao

    2014-11-01

    This paper deals with the characterization of the strength of the constituents of carbon fiber reinforced plastic laminate (CFRP), and a prediction of the static compressive strength of open-hole structure of polymer composites. The approach combined with non-linear analysis in macro-level and a linear elastic micromechanical failure analysis in microlevel (non-linear MMF) is proposed to improve the prediction accuracy. A face-centered cubic micromechanics model is constructed to analyze the stresses in fiber and matrix in microlevel. Non-interactive failure criteria are proposed to characterize the strength of fiber and matrix. The non-linear shear behavior of the laminate is studied experimentally, and a novel approach of cubic spline interpolation is used to capture significant non-linear shear behavior of laminate. The user-defined material subroutine UMAT for the non-linear share behavior is developed and combined in the mechanics analysis in the macro-level using the Abaqus Python codes. The failure mechanism and static strength of open-hole compressive (OHC) structure of polymer composites is studied based on non-linear MMF. The UTS50/E51 CFRP is used to demonstrate the application of theory of non-linear MMF.

  15. Structural phase transition causing anomalous photoluminescence behavior in perovskite (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}[PbI{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yangui, A. [Groupe d’Etudes de la Matière Condensée, UMR CNRS 8653-Université de Versailles Saint Quentin En Yvelines, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Laboratoire de Physique Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Route de Soukra km 3.5 BP 1171, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Pillet, S. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, Résonance Magnétique et Modélisations, UMR-CNRS 7036, Institut Jean Barriol, Université de Lorraine, BP 239, 54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy (France); Mlayah, A. [Centre d’Elaboration de Matériaux et d’Etudes Structurales (CEMES), CNRS UPR 8011-Université de Toulouse, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig 31055, Toulouse, Cedex 4 (France); Lusson, A.; Bouchez, G.; Boukheddaden, K., E-mail: Younes.abid@fss.rnu.tn, E-mail: kbo@physique.uvsq.fr [Groupe d’Etudes de la Matière Condensée, UMR CNRS 8653-Université de Versailles Saint Quentin En Yvelines, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Triki, S. [Laboratoire de Chimie, Electrochimie Moléculaires, Chimie Analytique, UMR CNRS 6521-Université de Bretagne Occidentale, BP 809, 29285 Brest (France); Abid, Y., E-mail: Younes.abid@fss.rnu.tn, E-mail: kbo@physique.uvsq.fr [Laboratoire de Physique Appliquée, Faculté des Sciences de Sfax, Route de Soukra km 3.5 BP 1171, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2015-12-14

    Optical and structural properties of the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite-type (C{sub 6}H{sub 11}NH{sub 3}){sub 2}[PbI{sub 4}] (abbreviated as C{sub 6}PbI{sub 4}) were investigated using optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and x-ray diffraction measurements. Room temperature, optical absorption measurements, performed on spin-coated films of C{sub 6}PbI{sub 4}, revealed two absorption bands at 2.44 and 3.21 eV. Upon 325 nm (3.815 eV) laser irradiation, strong green PL emission peaks were observed at 2.41 eV (P1) and 2.24 eV (P2) and assigned to free and localized excitons, respectively. The exciton binding energy was estimated at 356 meV. At low temperature, two additional emission bands were detected at 2.366 eV (P3) and a large band (LB) at 1.97 eV. The former appeared only below 40 K and the latter emerged below 130 K. The thermal dependence of the PL spectra revealed an abnormal behavior accompanied by singularities in the peak positions and intensities at 40 and 130 K. X-ray diffraction studies performed on powder and single crystals as a function of temperature evidenced significant changes of the interlayer spacing at 50 K and ∼138 K. Around 138 K, a commensurate to incommensurate structural phase transition occurred on cooling. It involves a symmetry breaking leading to a distortion of the PbI{sub 6} octahedron. The resulting incommensurate spatial modulation of the Pb–I distances (and Pb–I–Pb angles) causes a spatial modulation of the band gap, which is at the origin of the emergence of the LB below ∼130 K and the anomalous behavior of the position of P1 below 130 K. The change of the interlayer spacing in the 40-50 K range may in turn be related to the significant decrease of the intensity of P2 and the maximum emission of the LB. These results underline the intricate character of the structural and the PL properties of the hybrid perovskites; understanding such properties should benefit to the design of optoelectronic devices with

  16. Structural phase transition causing anomalous photoluminescence behavior in perovskite (C6H11NH3)2[PbI4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yangui, A.; Pillet, S.; Mlayah, A.; Lusson, A.; Bouchez, G.; Boukheddaden, K.; Triki, S.; Abid, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Optical and structural properties of the organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite-type (C 6 H 11 NH 3 ) 2 [PbI 4 ] (abbreviated as C 6 PbI 4 ) were investigated using optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and x-ray diffraction measurements. Room temperature, optical absorption measurements, performed on spin-coated films of C 6 PbI 4 , revealed two absorption bands at 2.44 and 3.21 eV. Upon 325 nm (3.815 eV) laser irradiation, strong green PL emission peaks were observed at 2.41 eV (P1) and 2.24 eV (P2) and assigned to free and localized excitons, respectively. The exciton binding energy was estimated at 356 meV. At low temperature, two additional emission bands were detected at 2.366 eV (P3) and a large band (LB) at 1.97 eV. The former appeared only below 40 K and the latter emerged below 130 K. The thermal dependence of the PL spectra revealed an abnormal behavior accompanied by singularities in the peak positions and intensities at 40 and 130 K. X-ray diffraction studies performed on powder and single crystals as a function of temperature evidenced significant changes of the interlayer spacing at 50 K and ∼138 K. Around 138 K, a commensurate to incommensurate structural phase transition occurred on cooling. It involves a symmetry breaking leading to a distortion of the PbI 6 octahedron. The resulting incommensurate spatial modulation of the Pb–I distances (and Pb–I–Pb angles) causes a spatial modulation of the band gap, which is at the origin of the emergence of the LB below ∼130 K and the anomalous behavior of the position of P1 below 130 K. The change of the interlayer spacing in the 40-50 K range may in turn be related to the significant decrease of the intensity of P2 and the maximum emission of the LB. These results underline the intricate character of the structural and the PL properties of the hybrid perovskites; understanding such properties should benefit to the design of optoelectronic devices with targeted properties

  17. Effects of Wavenumber and Chirality on the Axial Compressive Behavior of Wavy Carbon Nanotubes: A Molecular Mechanics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Kawachi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of wavenumber and chirality on the axial compressive behavior and properties of wavy carbon nanotubes (CNTs with multiple Stone-Wales defects are investigated using molecular mechanics simulations with the adaptive intermolecular reactive empirical bond-order potential. The wavy CNTs are assumed to be point-symmetric with respect to their axial centers. It is found that the wavy CNT models, respectively, exhibit a buckling point and long wavelength buckling mode regardless of the wavenumbers and chiralities examined. It is also found that the wavy CNTs have nearly the same buckling stresses as their pristine straight counterparts.

  18. Hot Deformation Behavior and a Two-Stage Constitutive Model of 20Mn5 Solid Steel Ingot during Hot Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Liu

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available 20Mn5 steel is widely used in the manufacture of heavy hydro-generator shaft forging due to its strength, toughness, and wear resistance. However, the hot deformation and recrystallization behaviors of 20Mn5 steel compressed under a high temperature were not studied. For this article, hot compression experiments under temperatures of 850–1200 °C and strain rates of 0.01 s−1–1 s−1 were conducted using a Gleeble-1500D thermo-mechanical simulator. Flow stress-strain curves and microstructure after hot compression were obtained. Effects of temperature and strain rate on microstructure are analyzed. Based on the classical stress-dislocation relationship and the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization, a two-stage constitutive model is developed to predict the flow stress of 20Mn5 steel. Comparisons between experimental flow stress and predicted flow stress show that the predicted flow stress values are in good agreement with the experimental flow stress values, which indicates that the proposed constitutive model is reliable and can be used for numerical simulation of hot forging of 20Mn5 solid steel ingot.

  19. Hot Deformation Behavior and a Two-Stage Constitutive Model of 20Mn5 Solid Steel Ingot during Hot Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Ma, Qing-Xian; Luo, Jian-Bin

    2018-03-16

    20Mn5 steel is widely used in the manufacture of heavy hydro-generator shaft forging due to its strength, toughness, and wear resistance. However, the hot deformation and recrystallization behaviors of 20Mn5 steel compressed under a high temperature were not studied. For this article, hot compression experiments under temperatures of 850-1200 °C and strain rates of 0.01 s -1 -1 s -1 were conducted using a Gleeble-1500D thermo-mechanical simulator. Flow stress-strain curves and microstructure after hot compression were obtained. Effects of temperature and strain rate on microstructure are analyzed. Based on the classical stress-dislocation relationship and the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization, a two-stage constitutive model is developed to predict the flow stress of 20Mn5 steel. Comparisons between experimental flow stress and predicted flow stress show that the predicted flow stress values are in good agreement with the experimental flow stress values, which indicates that the proposed constitutive model is reliable and can be used for numerical simulation of hot forging of 20Mn5 solid steel ingot.

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A total of 8 numbers of cylinder specimens are cast and tested in 1000 kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM and also modeled in ANSYS. The enhancement of compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of SFRC specimen is achieved up to 17% and 146%, respectively, compared to respective plain concrete specimen. Results gathered from finite element analyses are validated with the experimental test results by identifying as well as optimizing the controlling parameters to make FE models. Modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, density, and shear transfer coefficients for open and closed cracks are found to be the main governing parameters for successful model of plain concrete and SFRC in FE platform. After proper evaluation and logical optimization of these parameters by extensive analyses, finite element (FE models showed a good correlation with the experimental results.

  1. Analyzing the compressive behavior of porous Ti6Al4V by X-ray microtomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, Iván; Jimenez, Omar; Flores, Martín [Departamento de Ingeniería de Proyectos, Universidad de Guadalajara, Jalisco (Mexico); Olmos, Luís, E-mail: luisra24@gmail.com [Instituto de Investigaciones en Ciencias de la Tierra (INICIT), Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Michoacán (Mexico); Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier; Gárnica, Pedro [Instituto Tecnológico de Morelia, Michoacán (Mexico); Bouvard, Didier [Science et Ingénierie des Matériaux et Procédés (SIMaP), Université Grenoble Alpes (France)

    2017-11-15

    Samples with 40% vol. of pores and a pore size distribution between 100 and 500 μm were produced by powder metallurgy from Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Sintering was performed at 1300 °C during one hour in an inert Argon atmosphere in a vertical dilatometer. The compressive strength and the porosity of these samples was investigated before and after compression tests through X-ray microtomography. The values of the elastic modulus (8GPa) and yield strength (80MPa) are within the range of those used in bone implants. Porosity leads to greater deformation whereas fracture of compacts occurs perpendicularly to the applied load. It was determined that the origin of the failure is generated by rupture of interparticle necks and, large pores enhance the propagation of cracks. (author)

  2. Analyzing the compressive behavior of porous Ti6Al4V by X-ray microtomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Iván; Jimenez, Omar; Flores, Martín; Olmos, Luís; Vergara-Hernández, Héctor Javier; Gárnica, Pedro; Bouvard, Didier

    2017-01-01

    Samples with 40% vol. of pores and a pore size distribution between 100 and 500 μm were produced by powder metallurgy from Ti6Al4V alloy powders. Sintering was performed at 1300 °C during one hour in an inert Argon atmosphere in a vertical dilatometer. The compressive strength and the porosity of these samples was investigated before and after compression tests through X-ray microtomography. The values of the elastic modulus (8GPa) and yield strength (80MPa) are within the range of those used in bone implants. Porosity leads to greater deformation whereas fracture of compacts occurs perpendicularly to the applied load. It was determined that the origin of the failure is generated by rupture of interparticle necks and, large pores enhance the propagation of cracks. (author)

  3. Anomalous tensoelectric effects in gallium arsenide tunnel diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseeva, Z.M.; Vyatkin, A.P.; Krivorotov, N.P.; Shchegol' , A.A.

    1988-02-01

    Anomalous tensoelectric phenomena induced in a tunnel p-n junction by a concentrated load and by hydrostatic compression were studied. The anomalous tensoelectric effects are caused by the action of concentrators of mechanical stresses in the vicinity of the p-n junction, giving rise to local microplastic strain. Under the conditions of hydrostatic compression prolate inclusions approx.100-200 A long play the role of concentrators. Analysis of irreversible changes in the current-voltage characteristics of tunnel p-n junctions made it possible to separate the energy levels of the defects produced with plastic strain of gallium arsenide.

  4. Electromechanical behavior of a novel dielectric elastomer sensor for compressive force detection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junjie; Mao, Guoyong; Huang, Xiaoqiang; Zou, Zhanan; Qu, Shaoxing; Wang, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Dielectric elastomers (DEs) have been extensively studied as DE actuators, DE generators, and DE sensors. Compared with DE actuators and generators, DE sensing application has the advantage that it is no need for high voltage. However, to realize the high sensitivity of the DE sensor, a well-designed structure is essential. A typical DE sensor consists of DE membrane covered by compliant electrodes on both sides. Expanding in the area and shrinking in the thickness of DE membrane subjected to external force will lead to the increasement of the capacitance. We propose a novel DE sensor to detect compressive force. The DE sensor consists of three layers. The two layers of outside can penetrate each other to deform the middle layer and achieve high sensitivity for compressive force measurement. This sensor consists of a series of sensor elements made of DE membrane with out-of-plane deformation. Each sensor element experiences highly inhomogeneous large deformation to obtain high sensitivity. We conduct the experiment to optimize the performance of the sensor element, and also the corresponding theoretical analysis is developed. The effects of the prestretches and the aspect ratios of the sensor element on the sensitivity are achieved. The soft sensor composed of a series of such sensor elements may comply with complicated surfaces and can be used to detect both the total value and the distribution of the compressive force exerted on the surface. Furthermore, the reliability of the sensor element is studied by additional experimental investigation. The experiment shows that the sensor element operates steadily after 2000 cyclic loadings. This study provides guidance for the design and performance analysis of soft sensors. This work has been published in the Journal of Applied Mechanics, 82(10), No. 101004 (2015).

  5. Thermophysical behavior of St. Peter sandstone: application to compressed air energy storage in an aquifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erikson, R.L.

    1983-12-01

    The long-term stability of a sandstone reservoir is of primary importance to the success of compressed air energy storage (CAES) in aquifers. The purpose of this study was to: develop experimental techniques for the operation of the CAES Porous Media Flow Loop (PMFL), an apparatus designed to study the stability of porous media in subsurface geologic environments, conduct experiments in the PMFL designed to determine the effects of temperature, stress, and humidity on the stability of candidate CAES reservoir materials, provide support for the CAES field demonstration project in Pittsfield, Illinois, by characterizing the thermophysical stability of Pittsfield reservoir sandstone under simulated field conditions.

  6. Compressive loading unloading behavior of nuclear graphite grades of different forming method and raw cokes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, Sehwan; Hong, Seongdeok; Kim, Yongwan

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear graphite is used for core structural components and neutron moderators in high temperature gas-cooled reactors. As graphite is a brittle material fail at relatively low strains (e.g., ∼0.5% in tension and ∼2% in compression), cracking of these components can occur throughout the life of the reactor under the influence of thermal and mechanical stresses. While a lot of studies have been performed on the fracture of graphite, most studies have been concerned on crack initiation and propagation, with little concerns on the damage processes that lead to the very first stage of crack initiation. In this study, the graphite damage processes before the main crack formation were investigated based on the microstructure change during load relaxation. For this, 4-1/3 notched flexure strength test specimens made of nuclear graphite grades IG-110, NBG-18 and PCEA of different forming methods (isotropic molding, vibrational molding and extrusion, respectively) and ingredients (coke, binder) were subjected to 10 cyclic compressive loading-unloading, and the changes in the microstructure of notch-tip areas were examined by X-ray tomography

  7. Strain Rate Dependent Behavior and Modeling for Compression Response of Hybrid Fiber Reinforced Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Ibrahim

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper investigates the stress-strain characteristics of Hybrid fiber reinforced concrete (HFRC composites under dynamic compression using Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB for strain rates in the range of 25 to 125 s-1. Three types of fibers - hooked ended steel fibers, monofilament crimped polypropylene fibers and staple Kevlar fibers were used in the production of HFRC composites. The influence of different fibers in HFRC composites on the failure mode, dynamic increase factor (DIF of strength, toughness and strain are also studied. Degree of fragmentation of HFRC composite specimens increases with increase in the strain rate. Although the use of high percentage of steel fibers leads to the best performance but among the hybrid fiber combinations studied, HFRC composites with relatively higher percentage of steel fibers and smaller percentage of polypropylene and Kevlar fibers seem to reflect the equally good synergistic effects of fibers under dynamic compression. A rate dependent analytical model is proposed for predicting complete stress-strain curves of HFRC composites. The model is based on a comprehensive fiber reinforcing index and complements well with the experimental results.

  8. Sorption Behavior of Compressed CO2 and CH4 on Ultrathin Hybrid Poly(POSS-imide) Layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raaijmakers, Michiel J T; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Wiese, Martin; Wessling, Matthias; Nijmeijer, Arian; Benes, Nieck E

    2015-12-09

    Sorption of compressed gases into thin polymeric films is essential for applications including gas sensors and membrane based gas separation. For glassy polymers, the sorption behavior is dependent on the nonequilibrium status of the polymer. The uptake of molecules by a polymer is generally accompanied by dilation, or swelling, of the polymer material. In turn, this dilation can result in penetrant induced plasticization and physical aging that affect the nonequilibrium status of the polymer. Here, we investigate the dilation and sorption behavior of ultrathin membrane layers of a hybrid inorganic-organic network material that consists of alternating polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane and imide groups, upon exposure to compressed carbon dioxide and methane. The imide precursor contains fluoroalkene groups that provide affinity toward carbon dioxide, while the octa-functionalized silsesquioxane provides a high degree of cross-linking. This combination allows for extremely high sorption capacities, while structural rearrangements of the network are hindered. We study the simultaneous uptake of gases and dilation of the thin films at high pressures using spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. Ellipsometry provides the changes in both the refractive index and the film thickness, and allows for accurate quantification of sorption and swelling. In contrast, gravimetric and volumetric measurements only provide a single parameter; this does not allow an accurate correction for, for instance, the changes in buoyancy because of the extensive geometrical changes of highly swelling films. The sorption behavior of the ultrathin hybrid layers depends on the fluoroalkene group content. At low pressure, the apparent molar volume of the gases is low compared to the liquid molar volume of carbon dioxide and methane, respectively. At high gas concentrations in the polymer film, the apparent molar volume of carbon dioxide and methane exceeds that of the liquid molar volume, and

  9. Contact Behavior of Composite CrTiSiN Coated Dies in Compressing of Mg Alloy Sheets under High Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S. Yang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hard coatings have been adopted in cutting and forming applications for nearly two decades. The major purpose of using hard coatings is to reduce the friction coefficient between contact surfaces, to increase strength, toughness and anti-wear performance of working tools and molds, and then to obtain a smooth work surface and an increase in service life of tools and molds. In this report, we deposited a composite CrTiSiN hard coating, and a traditional single-layered TiAlN coating as a reference. Then, the coatings were comparatively studied by a series of tests. A field emission SEM was used to characterize the microstructure. Hardness was measured using a nano-indentation tester. Adhesion of coatings was evaluated using a Rockwell C hardness indentation tester. A pin-on-disk wear tester with WC balls as sliding counterparts was used to determine the wear properties. A self-designed compression and friction tester, by combining a Universal Testing Machine and a wear tester, was used to evaluate the contact behavior of composite CrTiSiN coated dies in compressing of Mg alloy sheets under high pressure. The results indicated that the hardness of composite CrTiSiN coating was lower than that of the TiAlN coating. However, the CrTiSiN coating showed better anti-wear performance. The CrTiSiN coated dies achieved smooth surfaces on the Mg alloy sheet in the compressing test and lower friction coefficient in the friction test, as compared with the TiAlN coating.

  10. Contact Behavior of Composite CrTiSiN Coated Dies in Compressing of Mg Alloy Sheets under High Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T S; Yao, S H; Chang, Y Y; Deng, J H

    2018-01-08

    Hard coatings have been adopted in cutting and forming applications for nearly two decades. The major purpose of using hard coatings is to reduce the friction coefficient between contact surfaces, to increase strength, toughness and anti-wear performance of working tools and molds, and then to obtain a smooth work surface and an increase in service life of tools and molds. In this report, we deposited a composite CrTiSiN hard coating, and a traditional single-layered TiAlN coating as a reference. Then, the coatings were comparatively studied by a series of tests. A field emission SEM was used to characterize the microstructure. Hardness was measured using a nano-indentation tester. Adhesion of coatings was evaluated using a Rockwell C hardness indentation tester. A pin-on-disk wear tester with WC balls as sliding counterparts was used to determine the wear properties. A self-designed compression and friction tester, by combining a Universal Testing Machine and a wear tester, was used to evaluate the contact behavior of composite CrTiSiN coated dies in compressing of Mg alloy sheets under high pressure. The results indicated that the hardness of composite CrTiSiN coating was lower than that of the TiAlN coating. However, the CrTiSiN coating showed better anti-wear performance. The CrTiSiN coated dies achieved smooth surfaces on the Mg alloy sheet in the compressing test and lower friction coefficient in the friction test, as compared with the TiAlN coating.

  11. The Mechanical and Reaction Behavior of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 under Impact and Quasi-Static Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-yi Huang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quasi-static compression and drop-weight test were used to characterize the mechanical and reaction behavior of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 composites. Two kinds of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 composites were prepared with different mass of PTFE, and the reaction phenomenon and stress-strain curves were recorded; the residuals after reaction were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results showed that, under quasi-static compression condition, the strength of the materials is increased (from 37.1 Mpa to 77.2 Mpa with the increase of PTFE, and the reaction phenomenon occurred only in materials with high PTFE content. XRD analysis showed that the reaction between Al and Fe2O3 was not triggered with identical experimental conditions. In drop-weight tests, PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 specimens with low PTFE content were found to be more insensitive by high-speed photography, and a High Temperature Metal Slag Spray (HTMSS phenomenon was observed in both kinds of PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 composites, indicating the existence of thermite reaction, which was confirmed by XRD. In PTFE/Al/Fe2O3 system, the reaction between PTFE and Al precedes the reaction between Al and Fe2O3.

  12. The role of Nd on the microstructural evolution and compressive behavior of Ti–Si alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Zhaohua; Zhan, Yongzhong; She, Jia

    2013-01-01

    The rare earth (RE) added Ti–Si alloys are potential candidates for lightweight structural materials, especially in high-temperature fields, but up to now related fundamental information is still rare. In this work, samples of Ti–8Si–5Nd, Ti–13Si–5Nd, and Ti–20Si–5Nd are designed to investigate the effect of RE element Nd on the microstructural evolution and compressive properties of the Ti–Si alloys. Experimental results indicate that all the samples are composed of α-Ti, β-Ti, Nd and Ti 5 Si 3 phases according to the XRD patterns. The Ti–8Si–5Nd alloy shows a typical hypoeutectic structure with primarily precipitated bulky Ti 5 Si 3 and Nd. Ti–13Si–5Nd alloy has lamellar eutectic structure and the Ti–20Si–5Nd alloy exhibits a coarsened homogeneous primary Nd, Ti 5 Si 3 precipitation and microcrystalline eutectic structure. The added Nd and primarily-precipitated Nd 5 Si 3 particles work as inoculants and refine the grain size of Ti 5 Si 3, because of their similar hexagonal structure, atomic bond and atomic distribution of the outer crystal surface. The refined grain size and homogeneous distribution of Ti 5 Si 3 phases in the Nd added Ti–Si alloys (especially the hypoeutectic alloy) are effective to improve the mechanical properties. The Ti–8Si–5Nd alloy exhibits the best plasticity (14.545%) and compressive strength (1191 MPa) among the three samples and shows good potential for structural materials.

  13. A study of the anisotropy and tension/compression behavior of human cervical tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kristin M; Socrate, Simona; Paskaleva, Anastassia; House, Michael

    2010-02-01

    The cervix plays a crucial role in maintaining a healthy pregnancy, acting as a mechanical barrier to hold the fetus in utero during gestation. Altered mechanical properties of the cervical tissue are suspected to play a critical role in spontaneous preterm birth. Both MRI and X-ray data in the literature indicate that cervical stroma contains regions of preferentially aligned collagen fibers along anatomical directions (circumferential/longitudinal/radial). In this study, a mechanical testing protocol is developed to investigate the large-strain response of cervical tissue in uniaxial tension and compression along its three orthogonal anatomical directions. The stress response of the tissue along the different orthogonal directions is captured using a minimal set of model parameters generated by fitting a one-dimensional time-dependent rheological model to the experimental data. Using model parameters, mechanical responses can be compared between samples from patients with different obstetric backgrounds, between samples from different anatomical sites, and between the different loading directions for a single specimen. The results presented in this study suggest that cervical tissue is mechanically anisotropic with a uniaxial response dependent on the direction of loading, the anatomical site of the specimen, and the obstetric history of the patient. We hypothesize that the directionality of the tissue mechanical response is primarily due to collagen orientation in the cervical stroma, and provides an interpretation of our mechanical findings consistent with the literature data on preferential collagen alignment.

  14. Comportamento mecânico dos grãos de feijão submetidos a compressão Mechanical behavior of bean grains under compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Resende

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Verificar a influência do teor de água nos valores da força máxima de compressão para deformações fixas e determinar o módulo proporcional de deformidade de grãos de feijão submetidos a compressão em três diferentes posições, foram os principais objetivos que estimularam o presente trabalho. Para isto, utilizaram-se grãos de feijão com teores de água variando de 0,13 a 0,45 (b.s. comprimidos uniaxicialmente, entre duas placas paralelas, na direção de suas três dimensões essenciais. A partir dos resultados obtidos, conclui-se que a força de compressão necessária para deformar o feijão diminui com o aumento do teor de água, sendo maior para a direção perpendicular à divisão dos cotilédones (posição natural de repouso. O módulo proporcional de deformidade aumenta com a redução do teor de água e da deformação do produto, obtendo-se valores para a faixa de umidade estudada, entre 1,7 x 10(7 a 71,3 x 10(7 Pa, dependendo da posição do grão.This work aims to determine the effect of soybean grain moisture content upon the maximum compression force values for fixed deformations and to determine the proportional deformity modulus under different compression positions. Edible beans with 0.45 to 0.13 (d.b. moisture content were compressed uniaxialy between two parallel plates towards their three main axes. From the results it was concluded that the compression force decreased with moisture content increase, and the highest value corresponded to the direction perpendicular to cotyledon division (repose position. The proportional deformity modulus increases with the reduction of moisture content and with the deformation of the product, presenting values, for the studied moisture content, between 1.7 x 10(7 to 71.3 x 10(7 Pa, depending on grain position.

  15. Mechanical and time-dependent behavior of wood-plastic composites subjected to tension and compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott E. Hamel; John C. Hermanson; Steven M. Cramer

    2012-01-01

    The thermoplastics within wood—plastic composites (WPCs) are known to experience significant time-dependent deformation or creep. In some formulations, creep deformation can be twice as much as the initial quasi-static strain in as little as 4 days. While extensive work has been done on the creep behavior of pure polymers, little information is available on the...

  16. Anomalous carbon nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasparian, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented from a bubble chamber experiment to search for anomalous mean free path (MFP) phenomena for secondary multicharged fragments (Zsub(f)=5 and 6) of the beam carbon nucleus at 4.2 GeV/c per nucleon. A total of 50000 primary interactions of carbon with propane (C 3 H 8 ) were created. Approximately 6000 beam tragments with charges Zsub(f)=5 and 6 were analyzed in detail to find out an anomalous decrease of MFP. The anomaly is observed only for secondary 12 C nuclei

  17. Chiral anomalous dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadofyev, Andrey; Sen, Srimoyee

    2018-02-01

    The linearized Einstein equation describing graviton propagation through a chiral medium appears to be helicity dependent. We analyze features of the corresponding spectrum in a collision-less regime above a flat background. In the long wave-length limit, circularly polarized metric perturbations travel with a helicity dependent group velocity that can turn negative giving rise to a new type of an anomalous dispersion. We further show that this chiral anomalous dispersion is a general feature of polarized modes propagating through chiral plasmas extending our result to the electromagnetic sector.

  18. Anomalous Gonadal Arteries in Relation to the Renal Vein: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in ovarian arteries on the right side; 37 (64%) of testicular arteries and 3 (27%) of ovarian arteries on the left side. Partial occlusion or compression of the renal vein due to the arching gonadal arteries could result in varicocele and hypertension. The knowledge of such anomalous is useful in surgery and human anatomy

  19. Anomalous behavior of B1g mode in highly transparent anatase nano-crystalline Nb-doped Titanium Dioxide (NTO thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subodh K. Gautam

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Niobium doping and size of crystallites on highly transparent nano-crystalline Niobium doped Titanium Dioxide (NTO thin films with stable anatase phase are reported. The Nb doping concentration is varied within the solubility limit in TiO2 lattice. Films were annealed in controlled environment for improving the crystallinity and size of crystallites. Elemental and thickness analysis were carried out using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and cross sectional field emission scanning electron microscopy. Structural characteristics reveal a substitutional incorporation of Nb+5 in the TiO2 lattice which inhibits the anatase crystallites growth with increasing the doping percentage. The micro-Raman (MR spectra of films with small size crystallites shows stiffening of about 4 cm−1 for the Eg(1 mode and is ascribed to phonon confinement and non-stoichiometry. In contrast, B1g mode exhibits a large anomalous softening of 20 cm−1 with asymmetrical broadening; which was not reported for the case of pure TiO2 crystallites. This anomalous behaviour is explained by contraction of the apical Ti-O bonds at the surface upon substitutional Nb5+ doping induced reduction of Ti4+ ions also known as hetero-coordination effect. The proposed hypotheses is manifested through studying the electronic structure and phonon dynamics by performing the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS and temperature dependent MR down to liquid nitrogen temperature on pure and 2.5 at.% doped NTO films, respectively.

  20. Anomalous Hall effect

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nagaosa, N.; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, S.; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 2 (2010), s. 1539-1592 ISSN 0034-6861 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 51.695, year: 2010

  1. Beta Function and Anomalous Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that it is possible to determine the coefficients of an all-order beta function linear in the anomalous dimensions using as data the two-loop coefficients together with the first one of the anomalous dimensions which are universal. The beta function allows to determine the anomalous...

  2. Phase behavior of olive and soybean oils in compressed propane and n-butane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. M. Ndiaye

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to report the experimental data and thermodynamic modeling of phase equilibrium of binary systems containing soybean and olive oils with propane and n-butane. Phase equilibrium experiments were carried out using the static synthetic method in a high-pressure variable-volume view cell in the temperature range from 30 to 70ºC and varying the solvent overall composition from 5 to 98 wt%. Vapor-liquid, liquid-liquid and vapor-liquid-liquid phase transitions were observed at relatively low pressures. The Peng-Robinson and the SAFT equations of state without any binary interaction parameters were employed in an attempt at representing the phase behavior of the systems. Results show the satisfactory performance of SAFT-EoS in predicting qualitatively all phase transitions reported in this work.

  3. Three-Dimensional Finite Element Analysis of Compressive Behavior of Circular Steel Tube-Confined Concrete Stub Columns by New Confinement Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akbar Haghinejada

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper presents a nonlinear analysis of axially loaded steel tube-confined concrete (STCC stub columns with new confinement relationships. For this aim, a 3-D finite element model of STCC columns using ABAQUS program is developed and validated against the experimental data. Proper material constitutive models are proposed and the confinement parameters of confined concrete are determined by matching the numerical results via trial and error. The parameters considered for quantitative verification of the FE model include five different factors indicating the behavior of STCC columns: compressive strength corresponding to steel yielding point, initial peak strength and ultimate strength as well as longitudinal to circumferential stress ratio of steel tube at steel yielding point and initial peak point. For the qualitative verification, the axial and lateral stress-strain relationships of STCC columns are taken into account. The comparison results indicate that the model can accurately predict the compressive behavior of STCC stub columns. Finally, a parametric study is also performed to evaluate the effect of tube diameter-to-wall thickness ratio (D/t, concrete compressive strength (fc and steel yield strength (fy on the compressive behavior of STCC columns. According to the results of the parametric study, the interface shear stress and lateral confining pressure are not affected by fc while significantly increase with decreasing D/t.

  4. Anomalous behavior of B{sub 1g} mode in highly transparent anatase nano-crystalline Nb-doped Titanium Dioxide (NTO) thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gautam, Subodh K., E-mail: subodhkgtm@gmail.com, E-mail: fouran@gmail.com; Ojha, S.; Singh, Fouran, E-mail: subodhkgtm@gmail.com, E-mail: fouran@gmail.com [Material Science Group, Inter University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi -110067 (India); Gautam, Naina [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi - 110023 (India); Singh, R. G. [Department of Physics, Bhagini Nivedita College, Delhi University, Delhi– 110043 (India); Shukla, D. K. [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore 452017 (India)

    2015-12-15

    The effect of Niobium doping and size of crystallites on highly transparent nano-crystalline Niobium doped Titanium Dioxide (NTO) thin films with stable anatase phase are reported. The Nb doping concentration is varied within the solubility limit in TiO{sub 2} lattice. Films were annealed in controlled environment for improving the crystallinity and size of crystallites. Elemental and thickness analysis were carried out using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and cross sectional field emission scanning electron microscopy. Structural characteristics reveal a substitutional incorporation of Nb{sup +5} in the TiO{sub 2} lattice which inhibits the anatase crystallites growth with increasing the doping percentage. The micro-Raman (MR) spectra of films with small size crystallites shows stiffening of about 4 cm{sup −1} for the E{sub g(1)} mode and is ascribed to phonon confinement and non-stoichiometry. In contrast, B{sub 1g} mode exhibits a large anomalous softening of 20 cm{sup −1} with asymmetrical broadening; which was not reported for the case of pure TiO{sub 2} crystallites. This anomalous behaviour is explained by contraction of the apical Ti-O bonds at the surface upon substitutional Nb{sup 5+} doping induced reduction of Ti{sup 4+} ions also known as hetero-coordination effect. The proposed hypotheses is manifested through studying the electronic structure and phonon dynamics by performing the near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and temperature dependent MR down to liquid nitrogen temperature on pure and 2.5 at.% doped NTO films, respectively.

  5. Influence of Tension-Compression Asymmetry on the Mechanical Behavior of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy Sheets in Bending

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ping; Beeh, Elmar; Friedrich, Horst E.

    2016-03-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising materials for lightweight design in the automotive industry due to their high strength-to-mass ratio. This study aims to study the influence of tension-compression asymmetry on the radius of curvature and energy absorption capacity of AZ31B-O magnesium alloy sheets in bending. The mechanical properties were characterized using tension, compression, and three-point bending tests. The material exhibits significant tension-compression asymmetry in terms of strength and strain hardening rate due to extension twinning in compression. The compressive yield strength is much lower than the tensile yield strength, while the strain hardening rate is much higher in compression. Furthermore, the tension-compression asymmetry in terms of r value (Lankford value) was also observed. The r value in tension is much higher than that in compression. The bending results indicate that the AZ31B-O sheet can outperform steel and aluminum sheets in terms of specific energy absorption in bending mainly due to its low density. In addition, the AZ31B-O sheet was deformed with a larger radius of curvature than the steel and aluminum sheets, which brings a benefit to energy absorption capacity. Finally, finite element simulation for three-point bending was performed using LS-DYNA and the results confirmed that the larger radius of curvature of a magnesium specimen is mainly attributed to the high strain hardening rate in compression.

  6. The global existence and large time behavior of smooth compressible fluid in an infinitely expanding ball, III: The 3-D Boltzmann equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Huicheng; Zhao, Wenbin

    2018-01-01

    This paper is a continuation of the works in [35] and [37], where the authors have established the global existence of smooth compressible flows in infinitely expanding balls for inviscid gases and viscid gases, respectively. In this paper, we are concerned with the global existence and large time behavior of compressible Boltzmann gases in an infinitely expanding ball. Such a problem is one of the interesting models in studying the theory of global smooth solutions to multidimensional compressible gases with time dependent boundaries and vacuum states at infinite time. Due to the conservation of mass, the fluid in the expanding ball becomes rarefied and eventually tends to a vacuum state meanwhile there are no appearances of vacuum domains in any part of the expansive ball, which is easily observed in finite time. In the present paper, we will confirm this physical phenomenon for the Boltzmann equation by obtaining the exact lower and upper bound on the macroscopic density function.

  7. Experimental Investigation on the Fracture Behavior of Black Shale by Acoustic Emission Monitoring and CT Image Analysis during Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y.; Li, C. H.; Hu, Y. Z.

    2018-01-01

    Plenty of mechanical experiments have been done to investigate the deformation and failure characteristics of shale; however, the anisotropic failure mechanism has not been well studied. Here, laboratory Uniaxial Compressive Strength (UCS) tests on cylindrical shale samples obtained by drilling at different inclinations to bedding plane were performed. The failure behaviors of the shale samples were studied by real-time acoustic emission (AE) monitoring and post-test X-ray computer tomography (CT) analysis. The experimental results suggest that the pronounced bedding planes of shale have a great influence on the mechanical properties and AE patterns. The AE counts and AE cumulative energy release curves clearly demonstrate different morphology, and the `U' shaped curve relationship between the AE counts, AE cumulative energy release and bedding inclination was first documented. The post-test CT image analysis shows the crack patterns via 2D image reconstructions, an index of stimulated fracture density is defined to represent the anisotropic failure mode of shale. What is more, the most striking finding is that the AE monitoring results are in good agreement with the CT analysis. The structural difference in the shale sample is the controlling factor resulting in the anisotropy of AE patterns. The pronounced bedding structure in the shale formation results in an anisotropy of elasticity, strength, and AE information from which the changes in strength dominate the entire failure pattern of the shale samples.

  8. Anomalous Diffusion Near Resonances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Tanaji; /Fermilab

    2010-05-01

    Synchro-betatron resonances can lead to emittance growth and the loss of luminosity. We consider the detailed dynamics of a bunch near such a low order resonance driven by crossing angles at the collision points. We characterize the nature of diffusion and find that it is anomalous and sub-diffusive. This affects both the shape of the beam distribution and the time scales for growth. Predictions of a simplified anomalous diffusion model are compared with direct simulations. Transport of particles near resonances is still not a well understood phenomenon. Often, without justification, phase space motion is assumed to be a normal diffusion process although at least one case of anomalous diffusion in beam dynamics has been reported [1]. Here we will focus on the motion near synchro-betatron resonances which can be excited by several means, including beams crossing at an angle at the collision points as in the LHC. We will consider low order resonances which couple the horizontal and longitudinal planes, both for simplicity and to observe large effects over short time scales. While the tunes we consider are not practical for a collider, nonetheless the transport mechanisms we uncover are also likely to operate at higher order resonances.

  9. Anomalous dissolution of metals and chemical corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DRAGUTIN M. DRAZIC

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview is given of the anomalous behavior of some metals, in particular Fe and Cr, in acidic aqueous solutions during anodic dissolution. The anomaly is recognizable by the fact that during anodic dissolutionmore material dissolves than would be expected from the Faraday law with the use of the expected valence of the formed ions. Mechanical disintegration, gas bubble blocking, hydrogen embrittlement, passive layer cracking and other possible reasons for such behavior have been discussed. It was shown, as suggested by Kolotyrkin and coworkers, that the reason can be, also, the chemical reaction in which H2O molecules with the metal form metal ions and gaseous H2 in a potential independent process. It occurs simultaneously with the electrochemical corrosion process, but the electrochemical process controls the corrosion potential. On the example of Cr in acid solution itwas shown that the reason for the anomalous behavior is dominantly chemical dissolution, which is considerably faster than the electrochemical corrosion, and that the increasing temperature favors chemical reaction, while the other possible reasons for the anomalous behavior are of negligible effect. This effect is much smaller in the case of Fe, but exists. The possible role of the chemical dissolution reacton and hydrogen evolution during pitting of steels and Al and stress corrosion cracking or corrosion fatigue are discussed.

  10. Numerical Analysis of Joule Heating Behavior and Residual Compressive Stress around Crack Tip under High Electric Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Jin-Chee Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the Joule heating effect and residual compressive stress near the crack tip under the electro-thermo-structural coupling state. For the crack tip field, the compressive condition is important for retarding or stopping the crack growth.

  11. Biaxial compression test technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansard, E. T.

    1975-01-01

    Fixture and technique have been developed for predicting behavior of stiffened skin panels under biaxial compressive loading. Tester can load test panel independently in longitudinal and transverse directions. Data can also be obtained in combined mode.

  12. BDI behavior evaluation of an upgraded Monju core and a demonstration core. (1) Plans for the out of pile bundle compressive tests for large diameter pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Shoichi; Haga, Hiroyuki; Katsuyama, Kozo; Uwaba, Tomoyuki; Maeda, Koji; Nishinoiri, Kenji

    2012-07-01

    The life of FBR (Fast Breeder Reactor) fuel assembly is restricted by BDI (Bundle-Duct Interaction). Therefore, it is very important to carry out the out pile bundle compressive tests which can imitate BDI, in order to evaluate BDI behavior. The target of the conventional BDI behavior was small diameter pins (φ6.5mm) for fuel pellets which were used with the assembly of Monju (the Monju prototype fast breeder reactor) etc. Furthermore by an upgraded Monju core and a demonstration core, adoption of large diameter pins for the holler annular pellets is planned. Therefore, it was necessary to carry out BDI evaluation of a large diameter pin. Then, the plans for out of pile bundle compressive test for large diameter pins were are reported. (author)

  13. Deficient Behavioral Inhibition and Anomalous Selective Attention in a Community Sample of Adolescents with Psychopathic Traits and Low-Anxiety Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Jennifer E.; Newman, Joseph P.; Bates, John E.; Goodnight, Jackson; Dodge, Kenneth A.; Pettit, Gregory S.

    2005-01-01

    Socialization is the important process by which individuals learn and then effectively apply the rules of appropriate societal behavior. Response modulation is a psychobiological process theorized to aid in socialization by allowing individuals to utilize contextual information to modify ongoing behavior appropriately. Using Hare's (1991)…

  14. Fractal model of anomalous diffusion

    OpenAIRE

    Gmachowski, Lech

    2015-01-01

    An equation of motion is derived from fractal analysis of the Brownian particle trajectory in which the asymptotic fractal dimension of the trajectory has a required value. The formula makes it possible to calculate the time dependence of the mean square displacement for both short and long periods when the molecule diffuses anomalously. The anomalous diffusion which occurs after long periods is characterized by two variables, the transport coefficient and the anomalous diffusion exponent. An...

  15. New detailed holocene paleomagnetic records with anomalous geomagnetic field behavior in Argentina Nuevos registros paleomagnéticos holocenos detallados con comportamiento anómalo del campo magnético terrestre en Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo G Nami

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Detailed palaeomagnetic studies were performed in several archaeological and geological sections dated with diverse relative and absolute methods. Data from 360 cores obtained in eight sites across eastern Argentina are reported. Characteristic remanence magnetization directions were determined by progressive alternating field demagnetization. Remanence directions showed anomalous geomagnetic field behavior far from the present magnetic field bearing oblique normal, oblique reverse and reverse polarities for the latest Pleistocene and Holocene, as well as evidence of possible field excursions recorded in several stratigraphic sections spanning ~11-0.5 kya. Computed virtual geomagnetic poles from those directions tend to be concentrated over North America, Europe, Eastern Asia, Africa and Australia. The hypothesis of the anomalous geomagnetic field directions is probably related with 14C fluctuations and solar activity.Se realizaron estudios paleomagnéticos detallados en varias secciones sedimentarias arqueológicas y geológicas fechadas con diversos métodos de datación absoluta y relativa. Se reportan resultados obtenidos de 360 muestras recogidas en ocho sitios localizados en el este de Argentina. La magnetización remanente característica fue determinada por desmagnetización progresiva utilizando campos alternos. Las direcciones remanentes mostraron conductas anómalas del campo geomagnético lejanas al campo actual mostrando polaridades oblicuas normales, oblicuas reversas y reversas con evidencia de posibles excursiones geomagnéticas registradas en varias secciones con un lapso temporal de ~11-0.5 kya. Los polos geomagnéticos virtuales computados a partir de las direcciones tienden a concentrarse sobre Norteamérica, Europa, Este de Asia, África y Australia. Se discute la hipótesis que la conducta anómala del campo magnético terrestre probablemente se relacione con las fluctuaciones de la producción de 14C y la actividad solar.

  16. "Compressed" Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Reeves, Galen; Gastpar, Michael

    2010-01-01

    The field of compressed sensing has shown that a sparse but otherwise arbitrary vector can be recovered exactly from a small number of randomly constructed linear projections (or samples). The question addressed in this paper is whether an even smaller number of samples is sufficient when there exists prior knowledge about the distribution of the unknown vector, or when only partial recovery is needed. An information-theoretic lower bound with connections to free probability theory and an upp...

  17. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Ibna Zahid, Zubayer

    2016-01-01

    Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE) platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A tot...

  18. Experimental and Numerical Analysis of the Compressive and Shear Behavior for a New Type of Self-Insulating Concrete Masonry System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abu-Bakre Abdelmoneim Elamin Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The developed study aimed at investigating the mechanical behavior of a new type of self-insulating concrete masonry unit (SCMU. A total of 12 full-grouted wall assemblages were prepared and tested for compression and shear strength. In addition, different axial stress ratios were used in shear tests. Furthermore, numerical models were developed to predict the behavior of grouted specimens using simplified micro-modeling technique. The mortar joints were modeled with zero thickness and their behavior was applied using the traction–separation model of the cohesive element. The experimental results revealed that the shear resistance increases as the level of precompression increases. A good agreement between the experimental results and numerical models was observed. It was concluded that the proposed models can be used to deduct the general behavior of grouted specimens.

  19. Anomalous Dimensions of Conformal Baryons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pica, Claudio; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We determine the anomalous dimensions of baryon operators for the three color theory as function of the number of massless flavours within the conformal window to the maximum known order in perturbation theory. We show that the anomalous dimension of the baryon is controllably small, within...

  20. Anomalous hydrodynamics in two dimensions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Anomalous hydrodynamics; gauge anomaly; gravitational anomaly. PACS No. 47.10.ab. The chiral anomaly has played a ubiquitous role in modern physics. It has found appli- cations in several diverse fields like quantum wires, quantum Hall effect, chiral magnetic effect and anomalous hydrodynamics, to name ...

  1. Fracture generation in human vertebrae under compression loading: The influence of pedicle preservation and bone mineral density on in vitro fracture behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraxenberger, Michael; Schröder, Christian; Geith, Tobias; Büttner, Andreas; von Schulze-Pellengahr, Christoph; Birkenmaier, Christof; Müller, Peter E; Jansson, Volkmar; Wegener, Bernd

    2018-01-01

    Fractured vertebral bodies are a common and wide spread health issue. The purpose of this study was to develop a standardized method to experimentally generate compression fractures in vertebral bodies. The influence of the pedicles has been investigated with regards to the fracture behavior. The correlation between bone mineral density (BMD), the cause of fractures and the fracture behavior was investigated. Twenty-one fresh frozen human lumbar spines were examined for bone mineral density (BMD) by means of quantitative computed tomography (qCT). All soft tissue was removed, vertebrae were carefully separated from each other and the exposed cranial and caudal endplates were covered with a thin layer of resin to generate a plane and homogeneous surface. A total of 80 vertebral bodies were tested until fracture. A good positive correlation was found between BMD, fracture compression force and stiffness of the vertebral body. No significant differences were found between the fractures generated in vertebral bodies with and without pedicles, respectively. Our model represents a consolidation of already existing testing devices. The comparative measurement of the BMD and the fracture behavior shows validity. In contrast to other authors, the force was applied to the whole vertebral body. Furthermore the upper and lower plates were not parallelized and therefore the natural anatomic shape was imitated. Fracture behavior was not altered by removing the pedicles.

  2. Optically Anomalous Crystals

    CERN Document Server

    Shtukenberg, Alexander; Kahr, Bart

    2007-01-01

    Optical anomalies in crystals are puzzles that collectively constituted the greatest unsolved problems in crystallography in the 19th Century. The most common anomaly is a discrepancy between a crystal’s symmetry as determined by its shape or by X-ray analysis, and that determined by monitoring the polarization state of traversing light. These discrepancies were perceived as a great impediment to the development of the sciences of crystals on the basis of Curie’s Symmetry Principle, the grand organizing idea in the physical sciences to emerge in the latter half of the 19th Century. Optically Anomalous Crystals begins with an historical introduction covering the contributions of Brewster, Biot, Mallard, Brauns, Tamman, and many other distinguished crystallographers. From this follows a tutorial in crystal optics. Further chapters discuss the two main mechanisms of optical dissymmetry: 1. the piezo-optic effect, and 2. the kinetic ordering of atoms. The text then tackles complex, inhomogeneous crystals, and...

  3. Effects of focused ion beam milling on the compressive behavior of directionally solidified micro-pillars and the nanoindentation response of an electro-polished surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Sang Hoon; Bei, Hongbin; Miller, Michael K; Pharr, George Mathews; George, Easo P

    2009-01-01

    Focused ion beam (FIB) milling is the typical way in which micro-pillars are fabricated to study small-scale plasticity and size effects in uniaxial compression. However, FIB milling can introduce defects into the milled pillars. To investigate the effects of FIB damage on mechanical behavior, we tested Mo-alloy micro-pillars that were FIB milled following directional solidification, and compared their compressive response to pillars that were not FIB milled. We also FIB milled at glancing incidence a Mo-alloy single-crystal surface, and compared its nanoindentation response to an electro-polished surface of the same crystal. Consequences for the interpretation of data obtained from FIB milled micro-pillars are discussed

  4. On the Influence of the Heat Treatment Temperature on the Superelastic Compressive Behavior of the Ni-Rich NiTi Shape Memory Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Fraj, B.; Gahbiche, A.; Zghal, S.; Tourki, Z.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, the relationship between the heat treatment temperature and the thermomechanical behavior of the Ni-rich NiTi shape memory alloy was experimentally investigated. Thermal analysis was performed through a differential scanning calorimetry experiments, and the NiTi superelastic effect was exhibited through loading/unloading compression cycle. It was found that the transformation temperatures and the compressive mechanical response are strongly affected by the heat treatment temperatures. The stress-induced phase transformation was characterized through the relationship between the heat treatment temperature and transformation stresses, elastic moduli and the deformation level upon loading. Subsequently, the evolution of the mechanical hysteresis loops and the mechanical dissipated energy was discussed. The obtained findings are supported by hardness measurements. To better understand the global tendency of the various phase transformation stages, the critical stress-temperature diagram was provided for different proposed heat treatment temperatures.

  5. High Strain Rate Compressive Behavior of Polyurethane Resin and Polyurethane/Al2O3 Hollow Sphere Syntactic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dung D. Luong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyurethane resins and foams are finding extensive applications. Seat cushions and covers in automobiles are examples of these materials. In the present work, hollow alumina particles are used as fillers in polyurethane resin to develop closed-cell syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are tested for compressive properties at quasistatic and high strain rates. Strain rate sensitivity is an important concern for automotive applications due to the possibility of crash at high speeds. Both the polyurethane resin and the syntactic foam show strain rate sensitivity in compressive strength. It is observed that the compressive strength increases with strain rate. The energy absorbed up to 10% strain in the quasistatic regime is 400% higher for the syntactic foam in comparison to that of neat resin at the same strain rate.

  6. Anomalous conductivity-type transition sensing behaviors of n-type porous α-Fe2O3 nanostructures toward H2S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Quanyi; Li Limiao; Yin Xiaoming; Liu Shuang; Li Qiuhong; Wang Taihong

    2011-01-01

    Porous urchin-like α-Fe 2 O 3 nanostructures with n-type semiconducting properties were used as gas sensing materials. Interestingly, it was observed abnormal n-p transition sensing behavior induced by the variation of working temperature and p-n transition sensing behavior related to the increase of H 2 S concentration. Large density of unstable surface states resulting from high surface-to-volume ratio would be beneficial for the formation of a surface inversion layer and account for the n-p transition. Furthermore, the as-prepared sensor showed good H 2 S sensing performances with short response/recovery time within 5/10 s, and relatively low detection limit of 1 ppm. These results help us to understand the sensing mechanism of α-Fe 2 O 3 and hint the potential application of the as-prepared sensor in monitoring H 2 S.

  7. Anomalous Hall effect and Nernst effect in itinerant ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyasato, T.; Abe, N.; Fujii, T.; Asamitsu, A.; Onose, Y.; Onoda, S.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) in many ferromagnetic metals including pure metals, oxides, and chalcogenides, are studied to obtain unified understandings of their origins. We show the universal behavior of anomalous Hall conductivity σ xy as a function of longitudinal conductivity σ xx over six orders of magnitude, which is well reproduced by a recent theory assuming both the intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the AHE. ANE is closely related with AHE and gives us further information about the electronic state in the ground state of ferromagnets. The temperature dependence of transverse Peltier coefficient α xy shows almost similar behavior among various ferromagnets, and this behavior is expected from a conventional Boltzmann transport theory

  8. Anomalous Hall effect and Nernst effect in itinerant ferromagnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asamitsu, A.; Miyasato, T.; Abe, N.; Fujii, T.; Onose, Y.; Onoda, S.; Nagaosa, N.; Tokura, Y.

    2007-01-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) in many ferromagnetic metals including pure metals, oxides, and calcogenides, are studied to obtain unified understandings of their origins. We show the universal behavior of anomalous Hall conductivity σ xy as a function of longitudinal conductivity σ xx over six orders of magnitude, which is well reproduced by rigorous unified theory assuming both intrinsic and extrinsic contributions to the AHE. ANE is closely related with AHE and gives us further information about the electronic state in the ground state of ferromagnets. The temperature dependence of transverse Peltier coefficient α xy shows almost similar behavior among various ferromagnets and this behavior is expected from a conventional Boltzmann transport theory

  9. Anomalous transport in heterogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horbach, Jürgen; Siboni, Nima H.; Schnyder, Simon K.

    2017-08-01

    The diffusion dynamics of particles in heterogeneous media is studied using particle-based simulation techniques. A special focus is placed on systems where the transport of particles at long times exhibits anomalies such as subdiffusive or superdiffusive behavior. First, a two-dimensional model system is considered containing gas particles (tracers) that diffuse through a random arrangement of pinned, disk-shaped particles. This system is similar to a classical Lorentz gas. However, different from the original Lorentz model, soft instead of hard interactions are considered and we also discuss the case where the tracer particles interact with each other. We show that the modification from hard to soft interactions strongly affects anomalous-diffusive transport at high obstacle densities. Second, non-linear active micro-rheology in a glass-forming binary Yukawa mixture is investigated, pulling single particles through a deeply supercooled state by applying a constant force. Here, we observe superdiffusion in force direction and analyze its origin. Finally, we consider the Brownian dynamics of a particle which is pulled through a two-dimensional random force field. We discuss the similarities of this model with the Lorentz gas as well as active micro-rheology in glass-forming systems.

  10. Compression-Based Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Rezagah, Farideh Ebrahim; Jalali, Shirin; Erkip, Elza; Poor, H. Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Modern compression algorithms exploit complex structures that are present in signals to describe them very efficiently. On the other hand, the field of compressed sensing is built upon the observation that "structured" signals can be recovered from their under-determined set of linear projections. Currently, there is a large gap between the complexity of the structures studied in the area of compressed sensing and those employed by the state-of-the-art compression codes. Recent results in the...

  11. Anomalous Micellization of Pluronic Block Copolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Amanda; Ryu, Chang Y.

    2014-03-01

    Poly(ethylene oxide) - poly(propylene oxide) - poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymers, commercially known as Pluronics, are a unique family of amphiphilic triblock polymers, which self-assemble into micelles in aqueous solution. These copolymers have shown promise in therapeutic, biomedical, cosmetic, and nanotech applications. As-received samples of Pluronics contain low molecular weight impurities (introduced during the manufacturing and processing), that are ignored in most applications. It has been observed, however, that in semi-dilute aqueous solutions, at concentrations above 1 wt%, the temperature dependent micellization behavior of the Pluronics is altered. Anomalous behavior includes a shift of the critical micellization temperature and formation of large aggregates at intermediate temperatures before stable sized micelles form. We attribute this behavior to the low molecular weight impurities that are inherent to the Pluronics which interfere with the micellization process. Through the use of Dynamic Light Scattering and HPLC, we compared the anomalous behavior of different Pluronics of different impurity levels to their purified counterparts.

  12. Anomalous Hall effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaosa, Naoto; Sinova, Jairo; Onoda, Shigeki; MacDonald, A. H.; Ong, N. P.

    2010-04-01

    The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) occurs in solids with broken time-reversal symmetry, typically in a ferromagnetic phase, as a consequence of spin-orbit coupling. Experimental and theoretical studies of the AHE are reviewed, focusing on recent developments that have provided a more complete framework for understanding this subtle phenomenon and have, in many instances, replaced controversy by clarity. Synergy between experimental and theoretical works, both playing a crucial role, has been at the heart of these advances. On the theoretical front, the adoption of the Berry-phase concepts has established a link between the AHE and the topological nature of the Hall currents. On the experimental front, new experimental studies of the AHE in transition metals, transition-metal oxides, spinels, pyrochlores, and metallic dilute magnetic semiconductors have established systematic trends. These two developments, in concert with first-principles electronic structure calculations, strongly favor the dominance of an intrinsic Berry-phase-related AHE mechanism in metallic ferromagnets with moderate conductivity. The intrinsic AHE can be expressed in terms of the Berry-phase curvatures and it is therefore an intrinsic quantum-mechanical property of a perfect crystal. An extrinsic mechanism, skew scattering from disorder, tends to dominate the AHE in highly conductive ferromagnets. The full modern semiclassical treatment of the AHE is reviewed which incorporates an anomalous contribution to wave-packet group velocity due to momentum-space Berry curvatures and correctly combines the roles of intrinsic and extrinsic (skew-scattering and side-jump) scattering-related mechanisms. In addition, more rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments based on the Kubo and Keldysh formalisms are reviewed, taking into account multiband effects, and demonstrate the equivalence of all three linear response theories in the metallic regime. Building on results from recent experiment and theory, a

  13. Anomalous conductivity-type transition sensing behaviors of n-type porous {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures toward H{sub 2}S

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao Quanyi; Li Limiao; Yin Xiaoming; Liu Shuang [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, and State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Li Qiuhong, E-mail: liqiuhong2004@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, and State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Wang Taihong, E-mail: thwang@hnu.cn [Key Laboratory for Micro-Nano Optoelectronic Devices of Ministry of Education, and State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2011-04-25

    Porous urchin-like {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures with n-type semiconducting properties were used as gas sensing materials. Interestingly, it was observed abnormal n-p transition sensing behavior induced by the variation of working temperature and p-n transition sensing behavior related to the increase of H{sub 2}S concentration. Large density of unstable surface states resulting from high surface-to-volume ratio would be beneficial for the formation of a surface inversion layer and account for the n-p transition. Furthermore, the as-prepared sensor showed good H{sub 2}S sensing performances with short response/recovery time within 5/10 s, and relatively low detection limit of 1 ppm. These results help us to understand the sensing mechanism of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and hint the potential application of the as-prepared sensor in monitoring H{sub 2}S.

  14. Effect of ischemic compression for cervicogenic headache and elastic behavior of active trigger point in the sternocleidomastoid muscle using ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafari, Mehdi; Bahrpeyma, Farid; Togha, Mansoureh

    2017-10-01

    To investigate the effect of ischemic compression on clinical outcomes of a cervicogenic headache and elastic behavior of myofascial trigger points. Randomized, controlled trial. Outpatient headache clinic. 19 subjects with a cervicogenic headache originating from myofascial trigger point within the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Subjects were randomized in treatment group (n = 9) and control group (n = 10). Subjects in the treatment group received 4 sessions of ischemic compression in the myofascial trigger point region. Headache intensity, frequency, and duration, trigger point elastic modulus, trigger point area, pressure tolerance, and pressure pain threshold were assessed before and after treatment. Subjects in the treatment group compared with those in control group showed significant improvements in headache intensity (P = 0.002), headache frequency (P = 0.005), headache duration (P = 0.015), pressure tolerance (P trigger point area (P = 0.017). Changes in myofascial trigger point elastic modulus did not reach a significant level (P > 0.05). The improvements in outcome measures suggest that ischemic compression may be effective in subjects with a cervicogenic headache associated with a myofascial trigger point in the sternocleidomastoid muscle. Data suggests that biomechanical properties of MTrP and severity of headache symptoms are not directly linked, and other mechanisms could be more influential in contributing to symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effect of the volume fraction and viscosity on the compression and tension behavior of the cobalt-ferrite magneto-rheological fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shokrollahi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this work is to investigate the effects of the volume fraction and bimodal distribution of solid particles on the compression and tension behavior of the Co-ferrite-based magneto-rheological fluids (MRFs containing silicon oil as a carrier. Hence, Co-ferrite particles (CoFe2O4 with two various sizes were synthesized by the chemical co-precipitation method and mixed so as to prepare the bimodal MRF. The X-Ray Diffraction (XRD analysis, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR, Laser Particle Size Analysis (LPSA and Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM were conducted to examine the structural and magnetic properties, respectively. The results indicated that the increase of the volume fraction has a direct increasing influence on the values of the compression and tension strengths of fluids. In addition, the compression and tension strengths of the mixed MRF sample (1.274 and 0.647 MPa containing 60 and 550 nm samples were higher than those of the MRF sample with the same volume fraction and uniform particle size of 550 nm.

  16. A finite element-based machine learning approach for modeling the mechanical behavior of the breast tissues under compression in real-time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Martínez, F; Rupérez-Moreno, M J; Martínez-Sober, M; Solves-Llorens, J A; Lorente, D; Serrano-López, A J; Martínez-Sanchis, S; Monserrat, C; Martín-Guerrero, J D

    2017-11-01

    This work presents a data-driven method to simulate, in real-time, the biomechanical behavior of the breast tissues in some image-guided interventions such as biopsies or radiotherapy dose delivery as well as to speed up multimodal registration algorithms. Ten real breasts were used for this work. Their deformation due to the displacement of two compression plates was simulated off-line using the finite element (FE) method. Three machine learning models were trained with the data from those simulations. Then, they were used to predict in real-time the deformation of the breast tissues during the compression. The models were a decision tree and two tree-based ensemble methods (extremely randomized trees and random forest). Two different experimental setups were designed to validate and study the performance of these models under different conditions. The mean 3D Euclidean distance between nodes predicted by the models and those extracted from the FE simulations was calculated to assess the performance of the models in the validation set. The experiments proved that extremely randomized trees performed better than the other two models. The mean error committed by the three models in the prediction of the nodal displacements was under 2 mm, a threshold usually set for clinical applications. The time needed for breast compression prediction is sufficiently short to allow its use in real-time (<0.2 s). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flomenbom, Ophir

    2010-01-01

    Renewal-anomalous-heterogeneous files are solved. A simple file is made of Brownian hard spheres that diffuse stochastically in an effective 1D channel. Generally, Brownian files are heterogeneous: the spheres' diffusion coefficients are distributed and the initial spheres' density is non-uniform. In renewal-anomalous files, the distribution of waiting times for individual jumps is not exponential as in Brownian files, yet obeys: ψ α (t)∼t -1-α , 0 2 >, obeys, 2 >∼ 2 > nrml α , where 2 > nrml is the MSD in the corresponding Brownian file. This scaling is an outcome of an exact relation (derived here) connecting probability density functions of Brownian files and renewal-anomalous files. It is also shown that non-renewal-anomalous files are slower than the corresponding renewal ones.

  18. Compression embedding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, M.T. II; Handel, T.G.; Bradley, J.N.

    1998-07-07

    A method and apparatus for embedding auxiliary information into the digital representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique and a method and apparatus for constructing auxiliary data from the correspondence between values in a digital key-pair table with integer index values existing in a representation of host data created by a lossy compression technique are disclosed. The methods apply to data compressed with algorithms based on series expansion, quantization to a finite number of symbols, and entropy coding. Lossy compression methods represent the original data as ordered sequences of blocks containing integer indices having redundancy and uncertainty of value by one unit, allowing indices which are adjacent in value to be manipulated to encode auxiliary data. Also included is a method to improve the efficiency of lossy compression algorithms by embedding white noise into the integer indices. Lossy compression methods use loss-less compression to reduce to the final size the intermediate representation as indices. The efficiency of the loss-less compression, known also as entropy coding compression, is increased by manipulating the indices at the intermediate stage. Manipulation of the intermediate representation improves lossy compression performance by 1 to 10%. 21 figs.

  19. Anomalous magnetoresistance in amorphous metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuz'menko, V.M.; Vladychkin, A.N.; Mel'nikov, V.I.; Sudovtsev, A.I.

    1984-01-01

    The magnetoresistance of amorphous Bi, Ca, V and Yb films is investigated in fields up to 4 T at low temperatures. For all metals the magnetoresistance is positive, sharply decreases with growth of temperature and depends anomalously on the magnetic field strength. For amorphous superconductors the results agree satisfactorily with the theory of anomalous magnetoresistance in which allowance is made for scattering of electrons by the superconducting fluctuations

  20. Axial-Compressive Behavior, Including Kink-Band Formation and Propagation, of Single p-Phenylene Terephthalamide (PPTA Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Grujicic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanical response of p-phenylene terephthalamide (PPTA single fibers when subjected to uniaxial compression is investigated computationally using coarse-grained molecular statics/dynamics methods. In order to construct the coarse-grained PPTA model (specifically, in order to define the nature of the coarse-grained particles/beads and to parameterize various components of the bead/bead force-field functions, the results of an all-atom molecular-level computational investigation are used. In addition, the microstructure/topology of the fiber core, consisting of a number of coaxial crystalline fibrils, is taken into account. Also, following our prior work, various PPTA crystallographic/topological defects are introduced into the model (at concentrations consistent with the prototypical PPTA synthesis/processing conditions. The analysis carried out clearly revealed (a formation of the kink bands during axial compression; (b the role of defects in promoting the formation of kink bands; (c the stimulating effects of some defects on the fiber-fibrillation process; and (d the detrimental effect of the prior compression, associated with fiber fibrillation, on the residual longitudinal-tensile strength of the PPTA fibers.

  1. Some observations of an anomalous excitation behavior of chromium emission lines in an argon radio-frequency powered glow discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2003-01-01

    The emission characteristics of some chromium atomic lines in an radio-frequency powered glow discharge plasma (r.f.-GDP) are investigated by means of the excitation temperature estimated from their Boltzmann plots. It was found that such behavior depends on the drive frequency as well as the pressure of argon. Departures of the Boltzmann plots from a linear relationship are observed when the driving frequency exceeds 10 MHz, whereas the plots are well fitted to a straight line at driving frequencies of 3.56 and 6.78 MHz. Similarly, the Boltzmann plot deviates from a linear relationship when the argon pressure is reduced. The experimental observations show that the effect is mainly due to the fact that the intensities of the Cr I lines having excitation energies in the range of 4.1-4.2 eV are enhanced and therefore do not follow a linear regression expected from those of the other Cr I lines. It is therefore speculated that, in addition to thermodynamic excitation processes through electron collision, some additional excitation channels could exist under particular discharge conditions in the r.f.-GDP pointing to a potentially selective excitation of the 4.1-eV chromium lines

  2. Systematic Serendipity: A Method to Discover the Anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Daniel; Walkowicz, Lucianne

    2018-01-01

    One of the challenges in the era of big data astronomical surveys is identifying anomalous data, data that exhibits as-of-yet unobserved behavior. These data may result from systematic errors, extreme (or rare) forms of known phenomena, or, most interestingly, truly novel phenomena that has historically required a trained eye and often fortuitous circumstance to identify. We describe a method that uses machine clustering techniques to discover anomalous data in Kepler lightcurves, as a step towards systematizing the detection of novel phenomena in the era of LSST. As a proof of concept, we apply our anomaly detection method to Kepler data including Boyajian's Star (KIC 8462852). We examine quarters 4, 8, 11, and 16 of the Kepler data which contain Boyajian’s Star acting normally (quarters 4 and 11) and anomalously (quarters 8 and 16). We demonstrate that our method is capable of identifying Boyajian’s Star’s anomalous behavior in quarters of interest, and we further identify other anomalous light curves that exhibit a range of interesting variability.

  3. Anomalous Dispersion of the S1 Lamb Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The S1 mode of the Lamb spectrum of an isotropic plate exhibits negative group velocity in a narrow frequency domain. This anomalous behavior is explained analytically by examining the slope of each mode first in its initial state and then near its turning points.

  4. Effect of Ca and CaO on the microstructure and hot compressive deformation behavior of Mg–9.5Zn–2.0Y alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, T.Y.; Lim, H.K.; Kim, W.J.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effect of adding 0.3 wt% Ca to a Mg–9.5Zn–2.0Y alloy with icosahedral (I) phase (Mg 3 Zn 6 Y) was examined. The Ca alloying was done by two different routes, either through a master alloy produced with Mg and CaO (which is convenient from the points of view of safety and cost) or by direct addition of powdered Ca to the molten alloy. The small addition of Ca (CaO) effectively increased the ignition temperature of the alloys (by about 90 K), which is promising for fire suppression and safe handling with the molten alloys, but it led to the formation of Ca 2 Mg 5 Zn 13 phase at grain boundaries or interdendritic interfaces, causing partial melting and intergranular cracking during compressive deformation near ∼615 K. As a result, the upper limit of hot workability temperature decreased to 598 K, which is lower than that of the Mg–9.5Zn–2.0Y alloy by 125 K. The cast Mg–9.5Zn–2.0Y–0.3Ca alloys prepared using the two different routes exhibited high similarity in ignition temperature, chemical composition, microstructure, hot compressive behaviors and processing maps, indicating that the use of CaO is as effective as the use of Ca in producing the same quality of Ca containing Mg alloys. The flow stresses during hot compressive deformation and the activation energy for plastic flow remained unaffected by the Ca (CaO) alloying, but decreased the strain rate sensitivity at high strain rates over 10 −3 s −1 due to the initiation of either power-law breakdown or partial melting by adiabatic heating. Because of this, the Ca containing alloy lost hot workability at high strain rates by comparison to the Ca-free alloy.

  5. Anomalous couplings at LEP2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayolle, D.

    2002-01-01

    In its second phase, LEP has allowed to study four fermion processes never observed before. Results are presented on the charged triple gauge boson couplings (TGC) from the W-pair, Single W and Single γ production. The anomalous quartic gauge couplings (QGC) are constrained using production of WWγ, νν-barγγ and Z γγ final states. Finally, limits on the neutral anomalous gauge couplings (NGC) using the Z γ and ZZ production processes are also reported. All results are consistent with the Standard Model expectations. (authors)

  6. Anomalous temperature behavior of Sn impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haskel, D.; Shechter, H.; Stern, E.A.; Newville, M.; Yacoby, Y.

    1993-01-01

    Sn impurities in Pb and Ag hosts have been investigated by Moessbauer effect and in Pb by x-ray-absorption fine-structure (XAFS) studies. The Sn atoms are dissolved up to at least 2 at. % in Pb and up to at least 8 at. % in Ag for the temperature ranges investigated. The concentration limit for Sn-Sn interactions is 1 at. % for Pb and 2 at. % for Ag as determined experimentally by lowering the Sn concentration until no appreciable change occurs in the Moessbauer effect. XAFS measurements verify that the Sn impurities in Pb are dissolved and predominantly at substitutional sites. For both hosts the temperature dependence of the spectral intensities of isolated Sn impurities below a temperature T 0 is as expected for vibrating about a lattice site. Above T 0 the Moessbauer spectral intensity exhibits a greatly increased rate of drop-off with temperature without appreciable broadening. This drop-off is too steep to be explained by ordinary anharmonic effects and can be explained by a liquidlike rapid hopping of the Sn, localized about a lattice site. Higher-entropy-density regions of radii somewhat more than an atomic spacing surround such impurities, and can act as nucleation sites for three-dimensional melting

  7. Identifying Anomalous Port-Specific Network Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Backscatter 4.3 6.2 1.3 Connection Attempt 4.3 7.6 3.3 User Non-Web activity 3.9 22.0 11.9 SYN flood 3.6 9.0 4.4 Beaconing (Non-443) 3.6 20.5 5.0 Large...flagged events are composed of suspicious events such as beaconing (keep- alives on non-standard ports), SYN floods , scanning, and large data...systems. A port is an integer value between 0 and 65535 that represents a logical connection place for Transmission Control Protocol ( TCP ) and User

  8. Diffraction anomalous fine structure using X-ray anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Yuji; Kuwajima, Shuichiro

    1998-01-01

    A use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effects for structure investigation has recently been developed by using synchrotron radiation. One of the interesting method is the observation of anomalous fine structure which arise on diffraction intensity in energy region of incident X-ray at and higher than absorption edge. The phenomenon is so called Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS). DAFS originates in the same physical process an that of EXAFS: namely photoelectric effect at the corresponding atom and the interaction of photoelectron waves between the atom and neighboring atoms. In contrast with EXAFS, the method is available for only the crystalline materials, but shows effective advantages of the structure investigations by a use of diffraction: one is the site selectivity and the other is space selectivity. In the present study, demonstrations of a use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effect for the superstructure determination will be given for the case of PbZrO 3 , then recent trial investigations of DAFS in particular on the superlattice reflections will be introduced. In addition, we discuss about Forbidden Reflection near Edge Diffraction (FRED) which is more recently investigated as a new method of the structure analysis. (author)

  9. Serviceability and Prestress Loss Behavior of SCC Prestressed Concrete Girders Subjected to Increased Compressive Stresses at Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    There are limited measurements documented in the literature related to long-term prestress losses in self-consolidated concrete (SCC) members. Recorded test data has shown variations in mechanical property behavior of SCC compared to conventional HSC...

  10. A variable-order fractal derivative model for anomalous diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xiaoting

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper pays attention to develop a variable-order fractal derivative model for anomalous diffusion. Previous investigations have indicated that the medium structure, fractal dimension or porosity may change with time or space during solute transport processes, results in time or spatial dependent anomalous diffusion phenomena. Hereby, this study makes an attempt to introduce a variable-order fractal derivative diffusion model, in which the index of fractal derivative depends on temporal moment or spatial position, to characterize the above mentioned anomalous diffusion (or transport processes. Compared with other models, the main advantages in description and the physical explanation of new model are explored by numerical simulation. Further discussions on the dissimilitude such as computational efficiency, diffusion behavior and heavy tail phenomena of the new model and variable-order fractional derivative model are also offered.

  11. Scaling theory for anomalous semiclassical quantum transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena-Junior, M. I.; Macêdo, A. M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum transport through devices coupled to electron reservoirs can be described in terms of the full counting statistics (FCS) of charge transfer. Transport observables, such as conductance and shot-noise power are just cumulants of FCS and can be obtained from the sample's average density of transmission eigenvalues, which in turn can be obtained from a finite element representation of the saddle-point equation of the Keldysh (or supersymmetric) nonlinear sigma model, known as quantum circuit theory. Normal universal metallic behavior in the semiclassical regime is controlled by the presence of a Fabry-Pérot singularity in the average density of transmission eigenvalues. We present general conditions for the suppression of Fabry-Pérot modes in the semiclassical regime in a sample of arbitrary shape, a disordered conductor or a network of ballistic quantum dots, which leads to an anomalous metallic phase. Through a double-scaling limit, we derive a scaling equation for anomalous metallic transport, in the form of a nonlinear differential equation, which generalizes the ballistic-diffusive scaling equation of a normal metal. The two-parameter stationary solution of our scaling equation generalizes Dorokhov's universal single-parameter distribution of transmission eigenvalues. We provide a simple interpretation of the stationary solution using a thermodynamic analogy with a spin-glass system. As an application, we consider a system formed by a diffusive wire coupled via a barrier to normal-superconductor reservoirs. We observe anomalous reflectionless tunneling, when all perfectly transmitting channels are suppressed, which cannot be explained by the usual mechanism of disorder-induced opening of tunneling channels.

  12. Prediction of the Stress-Strain Behavior of Open-Cell Aluminum Foam under Compressive Loading and the Effects of Various RVE Boundary Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamidi Ghaleh Jigh, Behrang; Farsi, Mohammad Ali; Hosseini Toudeshky, Hossein

    2018-04-01

    The prediction of the mechanical behavior of metallic foams with realistic microstructure and the effects of various boundary conditions on the mechanical behavior is an important and challenging issue in modeling representative volume elements (RVEs). A numerical investigation is conducted to determine the effects of various boundary conditions and cell wall cross sections on the compressive mechanical properties of aluminum foam, including the stiffness, plateau stress and onset strain of densification. The open-cell AA6101-T6 aluminum foam Duocel is used in the analyses in this study. Geometrical characteristics including the cell size, foam relative density, and cross-sectional shape and thickness of the cell walls are extracted from images of the foam. Then, the obtained foam microstructure is analyzed as a 2D model. The ligaments are modeled as shear deformable beams with elastic-plastic material behavior. To prevent interpenetration of the nodes and walls inside the cells with large deformations, self-contact-type frictionless interaction is stipulated between the internal surfaces. Sensitivity analyses are performed using several boundary conditions and cells wall cross-sectional shapes. The predicted results from the finite element analyses are compared with the experimental results. Finally, the most appropriate boundary conditions, leading to more consistent results with the experimental data, are introduced.

  13. In Situ Mechanical Behavior of Mineral Crystals in Human Cortical Bone under Compressive Load Using Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Bijay; Almer, Jon D.; Dong, X. Neil; Wang, Xiaodu

    2012-01-01

    Mineral crystals, the major strength-bearing component of bone, are aligned in longitudinal bone with (00l) axes preferentially along the longitudinal axis, which in concert with crystal anisotropy leads to macroscopic anisotropy in mechanical behavior. Thus, it is of great interest to delineate the contributions of different subsets of mineral crystals as a function of orientation, on the bulk mechanical behavior of bone. Using a unique synergistic approach combining a progressive loading scheme and synchrotron X-ray scattering techniques, human cortical bone specimens were loaded in compression to examine the in situ mechanical behavior of mineral crystals as the function of orientation. The orientation distribution of mineral crystals was quantitatively estimated by measuring the X-ray diffraction intensity from the crystallographic (002) plane in different orientations. In addition, the average longitudinal (c-axis), transverse (a-axis), and shear strains of the subset of mineral crystals aligned in each orientation were determined by measuring the lattice deformation in the crystals normal to three distinct crystallographic planes (i.e. 002, 310, and 213). The experimental results indicated that the in situ strain and stress of mineral crystals varied with orientation. The normal strain and stress exerted on the longitudinally aligned mineral crystals were markedly greater than those on the transversely oriented crystals, whereas the shear stress reached a maximum for the crystals aligned in ±30° with respect to the loading direction, which coincided with the long axis of bone. The maximum principal strain and stress were observed in the mineral crystals oriented along the loading axis, with a similar trend observed in the maximum shear strain and stress. By examining their in situ behavior, the contribution of mineral crystals to load bearing and the bulk behavior of bone are discussed. PMID:22982959

  14. Anomalous diffusion without scale invariance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanyga, A [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bergen, Allegaten 41, N5007 Bergen (Norway)

    2007-05-25

    Asymptotic behaviour of a new class of anomalous diffusion equations for subdiffusive transport defined in terms of generalized distributed fractional-order time derivatives is considered. The effect of slowly varying factors on the scaling function of asymptotic solutions is demonstrated. The origin of slowly varying scaling factors in the CTRW models is discussed.

  15. Anomalous rostral lumbosacral root emergence from the thecal sac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peyster, R.G.; Parghi, A.; Siegal, T.; Hershey, B.L.; Yablon, J.; Jaffe, S.

    1989-01-01

    Anomalous rostral lumbosacral root emergence (AARE) has important clinical implications and has received little attention. The authors have studied the occurrence of this anomaly and presentation of cases in which it was paramount in causing radiculopathy. AARE was noted with the following occurrence rates in 500 cases: L3, 0%; L4, 1%; L5, 9%, and S1, 16%. In ARRE, the roots lie laterally between the superior facet and the annulus and are subject to compression by minimal disk bulging or facet hypertrophy. One must track the individual nerve roots on lumbar CT and MR imaging to detect this subtle condition

  16. The structural origin of anomalous properties of liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Anders; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2015-12-01

    Water is unique in its number of unusual, often called anomalous, properties. When hot it is a normal simple liquid; however, close to ambient temperatures properties, such as the compressibility, begin to deviate and do so increasingly on further cooling. Clearly, these emerging properties are connected to its ability to form up to four well-defined hydrogen bonds allowing for different local structural arrangements. A wealth of new data from various experiments and simulations has recently become available. When taken together they point to a heterogeneous picture with fluctuations between two classes of local structural environments developing on temperature-dependent length scales.

  17. Shearing and compression behavior of end-grafted polyelectrolyte brushes with mono- and trivalent counterions: a molecular dynamics simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Qianqian; Zuo, Chuncheng; Li, Lujuan; He, Hongwei

    2010-01-01

    We investigate polyelectrolytes end-grafted on two apposing walls using molecular dynamics simulation techniques. Monovalent and trivalent counterions are explicitly treated. Under normal compression, the osmotic pressure is examined in detail by decomposing it into various virial terms. It has been found that at small wall separations the increase in the osmotic pressure can be ascribed to the increase in the short-range virial term. At large wall separations, a negative osmotic pressure is observed in trivalent systems. Moreover, we study the effect of lateral shear on the density profiles of monomers and counterions, the net charge distribution, the local pressure tensor, the degree of interpenetration and the friction coefficient. At large shear ratios, the electrostatic interactions are weakened at the interface between two brushes. It is worth noting that although the magnitudes of the normal and shear stress components for the trivalent case are significantly lesser than those for the monovalent case, the friction coefficient is larger in the trivalent systems

  18. Compressed Counting Meets Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ping; Zhang, Cun-Hui; Zhang, Tong

    2013-01-01

    Compressed sensing (sparse signal recovery) has been a popular and important research topic in recent years. By observing that natural signals are often nonnegative, we propose a new framework for nonnegative signal recovery using Compressed Counting (CC). CC is a technique built on maximally-skewed p-stable random projections originally developed for data stream computations. Our recovery procedure is computationally very efficient in that it requires only one linear scan of the coordinates....

  19. Diametral compression behavior of biomedical titanium scaffolds with open, interconnected pores prepared with the space holder method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifvianto, B; Leeflang, M A; Zhou, J

    2017-04-01

    Scaffolds with open, interconnected pores and appropriate mechanical properties are required to provide mechanical support and to guide the formation and development of new tissue in bone tissue engineering. Since the mechanical properties of the scaffold tend to decrease with increasing porosity, a balance must be sought in order to meet these two conflicting requirements. In this research, open, interconnected pores and mechanical properties of biomedical titanium scaffolds prepared by using the space holder method were characterized. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and permeability analysis were carried out to quantify the porous structures and ascertain the presence of open, interconnected pores in the scaffolds fabricated. Diametral compression (DC) tests were performed to generate stress-strain diagrams that could be used to determine the elastic moduli and yield strengths of the scaffolds. Deformation and failure mechanisms involved in the DC tests of the titanium scaffolds were examined. The results of micro-CT and permeability analyses confirmed the presence of open, interconnected pores in the titanium scaffolds with porosity over a range of 31-61%. Among these scaffolds, a maximum specific surface area could be achieved in the scaffold with a total porosity of 5-55%. DC tests showed that the titanium scaffolds with elastic moduli and yield strengths of 0.64-3.47GPa and 28.67-80MPa, respectively, could be achieved. By comprehensive consideration of specific surface area, permeability and mechanical properties, the titanium scaffolds with porosities in a range of 50-55% were recommended to be used in cancellous bone tissue engineering. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. BEHAVIOR OF DIFFERENT FOODS IN THE STANDARD SHEAR COMPRESSION CELL OF THE SHEAR PRESS AND THE EFFECT OF SAMPLE WEIGHT ON PEAK AREA AND MAXIMUM FORCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczesniak, Alina S; Humbaugh, Philip R; Block, Harry W

    1970-07-01

    Twenty-four foods (encompassing fruits, vegetables, meat, bread, cheese and rice) were tested in the Allo Kramer Shear Press at various weight levels ranging from those needed to cover the bottom of the cell to those required for a complete fill. The relationship between maximum force values and sample weight was found to be different for different foods. Products could be grouped into three general categories: those exhibiting a constant force to weight ratio (e.g. white bread, sponge cake), those exhibiting a continuously decreasing force to weight ratio (e.g. raw apples, cooked white beans), and those exhibiting a constant force, independent of sample weight, beyond a certain cell fill level (e.g. canned beets, canned and frozen peas). Fitting the observed behavior into mathematical models allows to infer that extrusion, in addition to the previously recognized shear and compression, plays an important role in the behavior of foods in the standard cell of the Shear Press, and that most foods are subject to various combinations of these forces. The contribution of extrusion was confirmed by actual extrusion tests. Peak areas showed an exponential relationship to sample weight following the equation A = l0 a W b . Some evidence was obtained that exponents a and b are related to the amount and the general type of resistance offered by the food.

  1. The dynamic compressive behavior and constitutive modeling of D1 railway wheel steel over a wide range of strain rates and temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jing

    Full Text Available The dynamic compressive behavior of D1 railway wheel steel at high strain rates was investigated using a split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB apparatus. Three types of specimens, which were derived from the different positions (i.e., the rim, web and hub of a railway wheel, were tested over a wide range of strain rates from 10−3 s−1 to 2.4 × 103 s−1 and temperatures from 213 K to 973 K. Influences of the strain rate and temperature on flow stress were discussed, and rate- and temperature-dependent constitutive relationships were assessed by the Cowper-Symonds model, Johnson-Cook model and a physically-based model, respectively. The experimental results show that the compressive true stress versus true strain response of D1 wheel steel is strain rate-dependent, and the strain hardening rate during the plastic flow stage decreases with the elevation of strain rate. Besides, the D1 wheel steel displays obvious temperature-dependence, and the third-type strain aging (3rd SA is occurred at the temperature region of 673–973 K at a strain rate of ∼1500 s−1. Comparisons of experimental results with theoretical predictions indicate that the physically-based model has a better prediction capability for the 3rd SA characteristic of the tested D1 wheel steel. Keywords: Railway wheel steel, SHPB, Strain rate, Temperature effect, Strain aging

  2. Anomalous electrical conductivity of nanoscale colloidal suspensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Padhy, Sourav

    2008-10-28

    The electrical conductivity of colloidal suspensions containing nanoscale conducting particles is nontrivially related to the particle volume fraction and the electrical double layer thickness. Classical electrochemical models, however, tend to grossly overpredict the pertinent effective electrical conductivity values, as compared to those obtained under experimental conditions. We attempt to address this discrepancy by appealing to the complex interconnection between the aggregation kinetics of the nanoscale particles and the electrodynamics within the double layer. In particular, we model the consequent alterations in the effective electrophoretic mobility values of the suspension by addressing the fundamentals of agglomeration-deagglomeration mechanisms through the pertinent variations in the effective particulate dimensions, solid fractions, as well as the equivalent suspension viscosity. The consequent alterations in the electrical conductivity values provide a substantially improved prediction of the corresponding experimental findings and explain the apparent anomalous behavior predicted by the classical theoretical postulates.

  3. Magnetic effects in anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blume, M.

    1992-01-01

    Spectacular enhancements of magnetic x-ray scattering have been predicted and observed experimentally. These effects are the result of resonant phenomena closely related to anomalous dispersion, and they are strongest at near-edge resonances. The theory of these resonances will be developed with particular attention to the symmetry properties of the scatterer. While the phenomena to be discussed concern magnetic properties the transitions are electric dipole or electric quadrupole in character and represent a subset of the usual anomalous dispersion phenomena. The polarization dependence of the scattering is also considered, and the polarization dependence for magnetic effects is related to that for charge scattering and to Templeton type anisotropic polarization phenomena. It has been found that the strongest effects occur in rare-earths and in actinides for M shell edges. In addition to the scattering properties the theory is applicable to ''forward scattering'' properties such as the Faraday effect and circular dichroism

  4. Colligative properties of anomalous water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everett, D H; Haynes, J M; McElroy, P J

    1970-06-13

    Investigations of the phase behaviour on freezing and subsequent melting and of other properties indicate that anomalous water is a solution containing a fixed amount of relatively involatile material in normal water. There seems to be no need to postulate the existence of a new polymer of water in such solutions. If only water and silica are present, the properties are consistent with those of a silicic acid gel.

  5. Horizon universality and anomalous conductivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gürsoy, Umut [Institute for Theoretical Physics and Spinoza Institute, Utrecht University,3508 TD Utrecht (Netherlands); Tarrío, Javier [Departament de Física Fonamental and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, ES-08028, Barcelona (Spain)

    2015-10-08

    We show that the value of chiral conductivities associated with anomalous transport is universal in a general class of strongly coupled quantum field theories that admit a gravitational holographic dual in the large N limit. Our result only applies to theories in the presence of external gauge fields with no dynamical gluon fields. On the gravity side the result follows from near horizon universality of the fluctuation equations, similar to the holographic calculation of the shear viscosity.

  6. Ultimate Load Capacity and Behavior of Thin-Walled Curved-Steel Square Struts, Subjected to Compressive Load

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Mohammad Reza Mortazavi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available There have been some experimental tests on hollow curved-steel struts with thin-walled square sections, in order to investigate their general behavior, particularly their capacity for bearing differing loads. One set of square tubes are cold-formed into segments of circular arcs with curvature radii, equal to 4000 mm. Different lengths of curved struts are fabricated so as to cover a practical range of slenderness ratios. The struts tests were pin-ended and had slenderness ratios, based on the straight length between ends ranging from 31-126. The cold-forming operation induces initial inelastic behavior and associated residual stresses. There is, therefore, an interaction among material effects, such as the strain hardening capacity, the Bauschinger effect, strain aging, and residual stresses, together with the significant geometrical effect of the initial curvature, caused by the cold-forming operation. Eventually the results from three series of tests, which are taken on fully-aged and stress-relief-annealed square curved struts, are compared. The variations in load carrying response are discussed.

  7. Structural feature controlling superconductivity in compressed BaFe2As2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Wenge; Jia, Feng-Jiang; Tang, Ling-Yun; Tao, Qian; Xu, Zhu-An; Chen, Xiao-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Superconductivity can be induced with the application of pressure but it disappears eventually upon heavy compression in the iron-based parent compound BaFe 2 As 2 . Structural evolution with pressure is used to understand this behavior. By performing synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction measurements with diamond anvil cells up to 26.1 GPa, we find an anomalous behavior of the lattice parameter with a S shape along the a axis but a monotonic decrease in the c-axis lattice parameter with increasing pressure. The close relationship between the axial ratio c/a and the superconducting transition temperature T c is established for this parent compound. The c/a ratio is suggested to be a measure of the spin fluctuation strength. The reduction of T c with the further increase of pressure is a result of the pressure-driven weakness of the spin-fluctuation strength in this material

  8. Compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xenaki, Angeliki; Mosegaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Sound source localization with sensor arrays involves the estimation of the direction-of-arrival (DOA) from a limited number of observations. Compressive sensing (CS) solves such underdetermined problems achieving sparsity, thus improved resolution, and can be solved efficiently with convex...

  9. Emergence of Anomalous Transport in Stressed Rough Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Brown, S.; Alves da Silva, J.; Juanes, R.

    2015-12-01

    Fluid flow and tracer transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the geosciences, and therefore has been extensively studied. Geologic fractures, however, are always under significant overburden stress. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through rough-walled fractures in a fundamental way, studies of anomalous tracer transport at the scale of individual fractures have so far ignored the potential role of confining stress.Here, we report the emergence of anomalous (non-Fickian) transport through a rough-walled fracture as a result of increasing the normal stress on the fracture. We generate fracture surfaces with fractal roughness, and solve the elastic contact problem between the two surfaces to obtain the 3D fracture geometry for increasing levels of normal stress. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed rough fracture. We observe a transition from Fickian to anomalous transport as the normal stress on the fracture increases.We show that the origin of this anomalous transport behavior can be traced to the self-organization of the flow field into a heterogeneous structure dominated by preferential channels and stagnation zones, as a result of the larger number of contacts in a highly stressed fracture. We also propose a spatial Markov model that reproduces the transport behavior at the scale of the entire fracture with only three physical parameters. Our results point to a heretofore unrecognized link between geomechanics and anomalous particle transport in fractured media. Finally, we show preliminary laboratory experiment results that confirm our findings. (a) Magnitude of the volumetric flux at each discretization grid block at low stress. (b) Magnitude of the volumetric flux for a highly stressed fracture. Values are normalized with the mean volumetric flux.

  10. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Anitori, Laura; Baraniuk, Richard; Maleki, Arian; Otten, Matern; van Rossum, Wim

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate Message Passing (CAMP) algorithm, we demonstrate that the behavior of the CFAR processor is independent of the combination with the non-linear recovery and therefore its performance can be predicted us...

  11. Demographic fluctuations in a population of anomalously diffusing individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olla, Piero

    2012-02-01

    The phenomenon of spatial clustering induced by death and reproduction in a population of anomalously diffusing individuals is studied analytically. The possibility of social behaviors affecting the migration strategies has been taken into exam, in the case that anomalous diffusion is produced by means of a continuous time random walk (CTRW). In the case of independently diffusing individuals, the dynamics appears to coincide with that of (dying and reproducing) Brownian walkers. In the strongly social case, the dynamics coincides with that of nonmigrating individuals. In both limits, the growth rate of the fluctuations becomes independent of the Hurst exponent of the CTRW. The social behaviors that arise when transport in a population is induced by a spatial distribution of random traps have been analyzed. © 2012 American Physical Society

  12. Anomalously elastic intermediate phase in randomly layered superfluids, superconductors, and planar magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Priyanka; Goldbart, Paul M; Narayanan, Rajesh; Toner, John; Vojta, Thomas

    2010-08-20

    We show that layered quenched randomness in planar magnets leads to an unusual intermediate phase between the conventional ferromagnetic low-temperature and paramagnetic high-temperature phases. In this intermediate phase, which is part of the Griffiths region, the spin-wave stiffness perpendicular to the random layers displays anomalous scaling behavior, with a continuously variable anomalous exponent, while the magnetization and the stiffness parallel to the layers both remain finite. Analogous results hold for superfluids and superconductors. We study the two phase transitions into the anomalous elastic phase, and we discuss the universality of these results, and implications of finite sample size as well as possible experiments.

  13. Effects of aging on the shape memory and superelasticity behavior of ultra-high strength Ni54Ti46 alloys under compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaya, I.; Tobe, H.; Karaca, H.E.; Basaran, B.; Nagasako, M.; Kainuma, R.; Chumlyakov, Y.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of aging on the shape memory and superelasticity behavior of a Ni-rich Ni 54 Ti 46 (at%) alloy. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and compression test (thermal cycling under stress and superelasticity) were carried out after 3 h agin;g from 450 °C to 600 °C. The alloys show recoverable shape memory effect with transformation strains of about 1% and narrow hysteresis under high stress levels. The work output of 14.1 Jg −1 was observed at an ultra-high stress level of 1500 MPa after 600 °C 3 h aging. 450 °C 3 h aging resulted in a very narrow temperature hysteresis of 8°C under an ultra-high stress level of 1500 MPa. At room temperature, the superelastic response with 4% total strain was obtained even when high stress level of 2000 MPa is applied after 550 °C 3 h aging.

  14. Constitutive Equation and Hot Compression Deformation Behavior of Homogenized Al–7.5Zn–1.5Mg–0.2Cu–0.2Zr Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianliang He

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The deformation behavior of homogenized Al–7.5Zn–1.5Mg–0.2Cu–0.2Zr alloy has been studied by a set of isothermal hot compression tests, which were carried out over the temperature ranging from 350 °C to 450 °C and the strain rate ranging from 0.001 s−1 to 10 s−1 on Gleeble-3500 thermal simulation machine. The associated microstructure was studied using electron back scattered diffraction (EBSD and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The results showed that the flow stress is sensitive to strain rate and deformation temperature. The shape of true stress-strain curves obtained at a low strain rate (≤0.1 s−1 conditions shows the characteristic of dynamic recrystallization (DRX. Two Arrhenius-typed constitutive equation without and with strain compensation were established based on the true stress-strain curves. Constitutive equation with strain compensation has more precise predictability. The main softening mechanism of the studied alloy is dynamic recovery (DRV accompanied with DRX, particularly at deformation conditions, with low Zener-Holloman parameters.

  15. Influence of compressive load conditions and thickness on the two-way shape memory behavior in tube-shaped NiTi alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Young Ik; Shin, Dong Kil; Lee, Jung Ju; Lee, Chang Ho

    2012-01-01

    The two-way shape memory behavior of Ni 55 Ti 45 was investigated to develop a tube-shaped NiTi actuator which could generate a large amount of force. The two-way shape memory effect (TWSME) was induced by thermal cycling under various amounts of constant compressive stress. Six specimens with the same outer diameter and different thickness were used to apply the TWSME to an actuator. A fast saturation tendency of the recovery strain was shown through training at each level of constant stress, after which the two-way shape memory strain was quantitatively measured during thermal cycling for each level of applied stress. From the results, the maximum two-way strain value was obtained after training at a constant level of stress and then decreased thereafter. In addition, the two-way strain was found to depend on the thickness of the tube-shaped specimen. All specimens could be divided into two groups depending on the rate of increase in the two-way strain. After two-way strain was obtained, the two-way recovery stress was measured to verify the performance of the sample as an actuator. The results showed that the two-way recovery stress behavior was similar to the two-way strain; if the optimal thickness of the specimen and the stress applied for training are used for the development of the TWSME, tube-shaped NiTi using the TWSME can replace one-way shape memory alloys. (paper)

  16. Speech Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry D. Gibson

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Speech compression is a key technology underlying digital cellular communications, VoIP, voicemail, and voice response systems. We trace the evolution of speech coding based on the linear prediction model, highlight the key milestones in speech coding, and outline the structures of the most important speech coding standards. Current challenges, future research directions, fundamental limits on performance, and the critical open problem of speech coding for emergency first responders are all discussed.

  17. Anomalous Hall effect in polycrystalline Ni films

    KAUST Repository

    Guo, Zaibing

    2012-02-01

    We systematically studied the anomalous Hall effect in a series of polycrystalline Ni films with thickness ranging from 4 to 200 nm. It is found that both the longitudinal and anomalous Hall resistivity increased greatly as film thickness decreased. This enhancement should be related to the surface scattering. In the ultrathin films (46 nm thick), weak localization corrections to anomalous Hall conductivity were studied. The granular model, taking into account the dominated intergranular tunneling, has been employed to explain this phenomenon, which can explain the weak dependence of anomalous Hall resistivity on longitudinal resistivity as well. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Anomalous gauge theories as constrained Hamiltonian systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, T.

    1989-01-01

    Anomalous gauge theories considered as constrained systems are investigated. The effects of chiral anomaly on the canonical structure are examined first for nonlinear σ-model and later for fermionic theory. The breakdown of the Gauss law constraints and the anomalous commutators among them are studied in a systematic way. An intrinsic mass term for gauge fields makes it possible to solve the Gauss law relations as second class constraints. Dirac brackets between the time components of gauge fields are shown to involve anomalous terms. Based upon the Ward-Takahashi identities for gauge symmetry, we investigate anomalous fermionic theory within the framework of path integral approach. (orig.)

  19. Kinetic studies of anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    1990-11-01

    Progress in achieving a physics-based understanding of anomalous transport in toroidal systems has come in large part from investigations based on the proposition that low frequency electrostatic microinstabilities are dominant in the bulk (''confinement'') region of these plasmas. Although the presence here of drift-type modes dependent on trapped particle and ion temperature gradient driven effects appears to be consistent with a number of important observed confinement trends, conventional estimates for these instabilities cannot account for the strong current (I p ) and /or q-scaling frequently found in empirically deduced global energy confinement times for auxiliary-heated discharges. The present paper deals with both linear and nonlinear physics features, ignored in simpler estimates, which could introduce an appreciable local dependence on current. It is also pointed out that while the thermal flux characteristics of drift modes have justifiably been the focus of experimental studies assessing their relevance, other transport properties associated with these microinstabilities should additionally be examined. Accordingly, the present paper provides estimates and discusses the significance of anomalous energy exchange between ions and electrons when fluctuations are present. 19 refs., 3 figs

  20. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1989-12-01

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  1. Anomalous behavior of soft mode attenuation in the incommensurate phase in Cd2Nb2O7, K2SeO4 and Rb2ZnBr4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenskij, G.A.; Kolpakova, N.N.; Sher, E.S.; Brzhezina, B.

    1986-01-01

    Moderation of soft mode attenuation in the incommensurate phase in Cd 2 Nb 2 O 7 , K 2 SeO 4 and Rb 2 ZnBr 4 is observed at temperature drop and anomalous jump-like decrease of integral intensity of the soft mode under transition to the low-temperature commensurate phase. Anomalous behaviour of the soft mode is explained by wave amplitudon contribution (q=0) in Raman spectrum of the first order and composite tone (wave amplitudon (q=0) +- wave phase (q=K i )) in Raman spectrum of the second order. Relative contribution of the phase wave (q=K i ) to soft mode attenuation can be estimated supposing that wave amplitudon attenuation is G A ∼ (T i -T) -1 . ΔG f max makes up approximately 6 cm -1 in Cd 2 Nb 2 O 7 and approximately 3 cm -1 in K 2 SeO 4 and Rb 2 ZnBr 4 at temperatures above T c . In the low-temperature phase the soft mode corresponds to the wave amplitudon (q=0) in the Raman spectrum of the first order at T c - 26 K) in Cd 2 Nb 2 O 7 , T c - 13 K) in K 2 SeO 4 and T c - 163 K) in Rb 2 ZnBr 4

  2. Anomalous osmosis resulting from preferential absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Staverman, A.J.; Kruissink, C.A.; Pals, D.T.F.

    1965-01-01

    An explanation of the anomalous osmosis described in the preceding paper is given in terms of friction coefficients in the glass membrane. It is shown that anomalous osmosis may be expected when the friction coefficients are constant and positive provided that the membrane absorbs solute strongly

  3. Ghost anomalous dimension in asymptotically safe quantum gravity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eichhorn, Astrid; Gies, Holger

    2010-01-01

    We compute the ghost anomalous dimension within the asymptotic-safety scenario for quantum gravity. For a class of covariant gauge fixings and using a functional renormalization group scheme, the anomalous dimension η c is negative, implying an improved UV behavior of ghost fluctuations. At the non-Gaussian UV fixed point, we observe a maximum value of η c ≅-0.78 for the Landau-deWitt gauge within the given scheme and truncation. Most importantly, the backreaction of the ghost flow onto the Einstein-Hilbert sector preserves the non-Gaussian fixed point with only mild modifications of the fixed-point values for the gravitational coupling and cosmological constant and the associated critical exponents; also their gauge dependence is slightly reduced. Our results provide further evidence for the asymptotic-safety scenario of quantum gravity.

  4. Soft theorems from anomalous symmetries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-tin; Wen, Congkao

    2015-12-01

    We discuss constraints imposed by soft limits for effective field theories arising from symmetry breaking. In particular, we consider those associated with anomalous conformal symmetry as well as duality symmetries in supergravity. We verify these soft theorems for the dilaton effective action relevant for the a-theorem, as well as the one-loop effective action for N=4 supergravity. Using the universality of leading transcendental coefficients in the α' expansion of string theory amplitudes, we study the matrix elements of operator R 4 with half maximal supersymmetry. We construct the non-linear completion of R 4 that satisfies both single and double soft theorems up to seven points. This supports the existence of duality invariant completion of R 4.

  5. Soft theorems from anomalous symmetries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yu-tin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, National Taiwan University,Taipei 10617, Taiwan, ROC (China); Wen, Congkao [I.N.F.N. Sezione di Roma “Tor Vergata”,Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Roma (Italy)

    2015-12-22

    We discuss constraints imposed by soft limits for effective field theories arising from symmetry breaking. In particular, we consider those associated with anomalous conformal symmetry as well as duality symmetries in supergravity. We verify these soft theorems for the dilaton effective action relevant for the a-theorem, as well as the one-loop effective action for N=4 supergravity. Using the universality of leading transcendental coefficients in the α{sup ′} expansion of string theory amplitudes, we study the matrix elements of operator R{sup 4} with half maximal supersymmetry. We construct the non-linear completion of R{sup 4} that satisfies both single and double soft theorems up to seven points. This supports the existence of duality invariant completion of R{sup 4}.

  6. Dinotor model for anomalous nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillejo, L.; Goldhaber, A.S.; Jackson, A.D.; Johnson, M.B.

    1986-01-01

    The simplest version of the MIT bag model implies the existence of metastable toroidal bags, with large radius proportional to the enclosed baryon number, and small radius comparable to that of an ordinary nucleon (we refer to those toroidal bags as dinotors). Considerations of various possible instabilities, and of the effects of quark interactions through intermediate gluons, suggest that the metastability is still valid when the model is treated more realistically. These results might provide an explanation for reports of anomalously large interaction cross sections of secondary fragments (''anomalons'') observed in visual track detectors. However, it appears that the most likely characteristics of toroidal bags would not be compatible with those of anomalons, and would not be as easy to detect in emulsions. copyright 1986 Academic Press, Inc

  7. Anomalous transport in mirror systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    As now being explored for fusion applications confinement systems based on the mirror principle embody two kinds of plasma regimes. These two regimes are: (a) high-beta plasmas, stabilized against MHD and other low frequency plasma instabilities by magnetic-well fields, but characterized by non-Maxwellian ion distributions; (b) near-Maxwellian plasmas, confined electrostatically (as in the tandem mirror) or in a field-reversed region within the mirror cell. Common to both situations are the questions of anomalous transport owing to high frequency instabilities in the non-maxwellian portions of the plasmas. This report will summarize the status of theory and of experimental data bearing on these questions, with particular reference to the high temperature regimes of interest for fusion power

  8. Anomalous Lorentz and CPT violation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkhamer, F. R.

    2018-01-01

    If there exists Lorentz and CPT violation in nature, then it is crucial to discover and understand the underlying mechanism. In this contribution, we discuss one such mechanism which relies on four-dimensional chiral gauge theories defined over a spacetime manifold with topology ℛ3 × S 1 and periodic spin structure for the compact dimension. It can be shown that the effective gauge-field action contains a local Chern-Simons-like term which violates Lorentz and CPT invariance. For arbitrary Abelian U(1) gauge fields with trivial holonomies in the compact direction, this anomalous Lorentz and CPT violation has recently been established perturbatively with a Pauli-Villars-type regularization and nonperturbatively with a lattice regularization based on Ginsparg-Wilson fermions.

  9. High pressure induced phase transition and superdiffusion in anomalous fluid confined in flexible nanopores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bordin, José Rafael; Krott, Leandro B.; Barbosa, Marcia C.

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of a confined spherical symmetric anomalous fluid under high external pressure was studied with Molecular Dynamics simulations. The fluid is modeled by a core-softened potential with two characteristic length scales, which in bulk reproduces the dynamical, thermodynamical, and structural anomalous behavior observed for water and other anomalous fluids. Our findings show that this system has a superdiffusion regime for sufficient high pressure and low temperature. As well, our results indicate that this superdiffusive regime is strongly related with the fluid structural properties and the superdiffusion to diffusion transition is a first order phase transition. We show how the simulation time and statistics are important to obtain the correct dynamical behavior of the confined fluid. Our results are discussed on the basis of the two length scales

  10. Anomalous water diffusion in salt solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yun; Hassanali, Ali A.; Parrinello, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of water exhibits anomalous behavior in the presence of different electrolytes. Recent experiments [Kim JS, Wu Z, Morrow AR, Yethiraj A, Yethiraj A (2012) J Phys Chem B 116(39):12007–12013] have found that the self-diffusion of water can either be enhanced or suppressed around CsI and NaCl, respectively, relative to that of neat water. Here we show that unlike classical empirical potentials, ab initio molecular dynamics simulations successfully reproduce the qualitative trends observed experimentally. These types of phenomena have often been rationalized in terms of the “structure-making” or “structure-breaking” effects of different ions on the solvent, although the microscopic origins of these features have remained elusive. Rather than disrupting the network in a significant manner, the electrolytes studied here cause rather subtle changes in both structural and dynamical properties of water. In particular, we show that water in the ab initio molecular dynamics simulations is characterized by dynamic heterogeneity, which turns out to be critical in reproducing the experimental trends. PMID:24522111

  11. The s-d Transition in Compressed Lanthanum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMahan, A.K.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt; Johansson, B.

    1981-01-01

    Calculations of the pressure-volume isotherms for FCC La have been carried out up to pressures of 2 Mbars and temperatures up to 3.4 eV, using the self-consistent linear-muffin-tin-orbital method. The isothermal bulk modulus shows an anomalous stiffening over the pressure range 320-560 kbars, due...... calculations using this Gruneisen parameter are in good agreement with experiment and reproduce the anomalous stiffening observed in the shock compression data for La. While the authors also find both significant overlap of the rare-gas cores and melting to occur in the vicinity of the shock anomaly...

  12. Comportamento de cilindros de carbono/epóxi submetidos a cargas compressivas axiais Mechanical behavior of carbon/epoxy cylinders under axial compressive loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Gonçalves

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Para estruturas utilizadas no setor aeroespacial, os requisitos de baixo peso, alta resistência e rigidez, além de estabilidade dimensional, têm propiciado o aumento da utilização de materiais compósitos nas suas manufaturas. Em particular, cascas cilíndricas ou estruturas construídas pela junção de cilindros de paredes finas, confeccionadas em fibra de carbono e resina epóxi, são amplamente utilizadas neste tipo de aplicação. Neste trabalho, um programa experimental foi desenvolvido para determinar as tensões de falha, os módulos de elasticidade e o modo de falha de 47 cilindros com diâmetro interno de 40 mm e espessura nominal de 0,6 mm (com exceção de 2 corpos de prova, fabricados em carbono/epóxi, quando submetidos a cargas compressivas uniaxiais. Os espécimes testados possuíam diferentes razões entre comprimento e diâmetro (variando de 2,50 a 11,25 e seqüências de laminação variadas (orientações de camadas. Os resultados dos ensaios foram comparados aos obtidos em análises realizadas com programas de elementos finitos e os fatores que influenciaram o comportamento mecânico destes cilindros foram analisados.The requirements of low weight and dimensional stability, combined with high strength and stiffness, for aerospace structures has prompted an increasing use of fiber reinforced materials in manufacturing such structures. In particular, carbon/epoxy cylinders have been widely used in aerospace applications. In this work, an experimental program was developed to determine failure loads, modulus of elasticity and failure modes of 47 carbon/epoxy cylinders shells under compressive loads. The specimens tested had several different length/diameter (from 2.50 to 11.25 ratios and laminate lay-up. These results were compared to the analytical results from finite element code and the most important factors influencing the mechanical behavior of this type of structure were analyzed.

  13. Anomalous dispersion enhanced Cerenkov phase-matching

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczyk, T.C.; Singer, K.D. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Physics; Cahill, P.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01

    The authors report on a scheme for phase-matching second harmonic generation in polymer waveguides based on the use of anomalous dispersion to optimize Cerenkov phase matching. They have used the theoretical results of Hashizume et al. and Onda and Ito to design an optimum structure for phase-matched conversion. They have found that the use of anomalous dispersion in the design results in a 100-fold enhancement in the calculated conversion efficiency. This technique also overcomes the limitation of anomalous dispersion phase-matching which results from absorption at the second harmonic. Experiments are in progress to demonstrate these results.

  14. Mechanisms of anomalous dispersion in flow through heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyukhova, Alina; Dentz, Marco; Kinzelbach, Wolfgang; Willmann, Matthias

    2016-11-01

    We study the origins of anomalous dispersion in heterogeneous porous media in terms of the medium and flow properties. To identify and quantify the heterogeneity controls, we focus on porous media which are organized in assemblies of equally sized conductive inclusions embedded in a constant conductivity matrix. We study the behavior of particle arrival times for different conductivity distributions and link the statistical medium characteristics to large-scale transport using a continuous time random walk (CTRW) approach. The CTRW models particle motion as a sequence of transitions in space and time. We derive an explicit map of the conductivity onto the transition time distribution. The derived CTRW model predicts solute transport based on the conductivity distribution and the characteristic heterogeneity length. In this way, heavy tails in solute arrival times and anomalous particle dispersion as measured by the centered mean square displacement are directly related to the medium properties. These findings shed light on the mechanisms of anomalous dispersion in heterogeneous porous media, and provide a basis for the predictive modeling of large-scale transport.

  15. Compression limits in cascaded quadratic soliton compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Bang, Ole; Krolikowski, Wieslaw

    2008-01-01

    Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency.......Cascaded quadratic soliton compressors generate under optimal conditions few-cycle pulses. Using theory and numerical simulations in a nonlinear crystal suitable for high-energy pulse compression, we address the limits to the compression quality and efficiency....

  16. An application of fractional calculus to anomalous diffusion and imaging in inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonocore, Salvatore

    In recent years several studies have shown that field transport phenomena in media with non-homogeneous properties are characterized by unconventional behaviors. These processes, usually denoted as anomalous transport phenomena, are accurately described by fractional order mathematical models, whereas the classical integer order models fail to capture their properties. There are several examples of anomalous diffusion throughout the different fields of physics, such as wave propagation and diffusion processes in viscoelastic and heterogeneous media (e.g. soil, porous materials, etc.) fluid flow in porous media, non classical heat transfer. In particular, the diffusion processes in heterogeneous materials have shown to develop anomalous features characterized by non-local behavior due to the onset of long-range interactions. While integer order transport models are not able to explain these effects, fractional order models have shown to be able to capture these phenomena. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the occurrence of anomalous transport mechanisms associated to wave-like fields propagating in highly scattering media and to diffusive fields propagating in inhomogeneous media. Anomalous diffusion models are applicable to complex and inhomogeneous environments where classical diffusion theory ceases to be valid. Anomalous diffusion shows a nonlinear time dependence for the mean-squared displacement, and predicts stretched exponential decay for the temporal evolution of the system response. These unique characteristics of anomalous diffusion enable to probe complex media, with an approach that is not permitted by classical diffusion imaging. The behavior of the initial wave-like field turning into a diffused one will be governed by a classical or anomalous diffusive mechanism depending on the density of the medium. In this work this conversion phenomenon will be studied via a combination of stochastic molecular and fractional continuum models in order to

  17. The compression behavior of blödite at low and high temperature up to ~10GPa: Implications for the stability of hydrous sulfates on icy planetary bodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Comodi, Paola; Stagno, Vincenzo; Zucchini, Azzurra; Fei, Yingwei; Prakapenka, Vitali

    2017-03-01

    Recent satellite inferences of hydrous sulfates as recurrent minerals on the surface of icy planetary bodies link with the potential mineral composition of their interior. Blödite, a mixed Mg-Na sulfate, is here taken as representative mineral of icy satellites surface to investigate its crystal structure and stability at conditions of the interior of icy bodies. To this aim we performed in situ synchrotron angle-dispersive X-ray powder diffraction experiments on natural blödite at pressures up to ~10.4 GPa and temperatures from ~118.8 K to ~490.0 K using diamond anvil cell technique to investigate the compression behavior and establish a low-to-high temperature equation of state that can be used as reference when modeling the interior of sulfate-rich icy satellites such as Ganymede. The experimentally determined volume expansivity, α, varies from 7.6 (7) 10-5 K-1 at 0.0001 GPa (from 118.8 to 413.15 K) to 2.6 (3) 10-5 K-1 at 10 GPa (from 313.0 to 453.0 K) with a δα/δP coefficient = -5.6(9)10-6 GPa-1 K-1. The bulk modulus calculated from the least squares fitting of P-V data on the isotherm at 413 K using a second-order Birch - Murnaghan equation of state is 38(5) GPa, which gives the value of δK/δT equal to 0.01(5) GPa K-1. The thermo-baric behavior of blödite appears strongly anisotropic with c lattice parameter being more deformed with respect to a and b. Thermogravimetric analyses performed at ambient pressure showed three endotherms at 413 K, 533 K and 973 K with weight losses of approximately 11%, 11% and 43% caused by partial dehydration, full dehydration and sulfate decomposition respectively. Interestingly, no clear evidence of dehydration was observed up to ~453 K and ~10.4 GPa, suggesting that pressure acts to stabilize the crystalline structure of blödite. The data collected allow to write the following equation of state, V(P, T) = V

  18. Tunneling Anomalous and Spin Hall Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos-Abiague, A; Fabian, J

    2015-07-31

    We predict, theoretically, the existence of the anomalous Hall effect when a tunneling current flows through a tunnel junction in which only one of the electrodes is magnetic. The interfacial spin-orbit coupling present in the barrier region induces a spin-dependent momentum filtering in the directions perpendicular to the tunneling current, resulting in a skew tunneling even in the absence of impurities. This produces an anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents in the nonmagnetic electrode when a bias voltage is applied across the tunneling heterojunction. If the barrier is composed of a noncentrosymmetric material, the anomalous Hall conductance and spin Hall currents become anisotropic with respect to both the magnetization and crystallographic directions, allowing us to separate this interfacial phenomenon from the bulk anomalous and spin Hall contributions. The proposed effect should be useful for proving and quantifying the interfacial spin-orbit fields in metallic and metal-semiconductor systems.

  19. Anomalous effects of dense matter under rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu-Guang; Nishimura, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2018-02-01

    We study the anomaly induced effects of dense baryonic matter under rotation. We derive the anomalous terms that account for the chiral vortical effect in the low-energy effective theory for light Nambu-Goldstone modes. The anomalous terms lead to new physical consequences, such as the anomalous Hall energy current and spontaneous generation of angular momentum in a magnetic field (or spontaneous magnetization by rotation). In particular, we show that, due to the presence of such anomalous terms, the ground state of the quantum chromodynamics (QCD) under sufficiently fast rotation becomes the "chiral soliton lattice" of neutral pions that has lower energy than the QCD vacuum and nuclear matter. We briefly discuss the possible realization of the chiral soliton lattice induced by a fast rotation in noncentral heavy ion collisions.

  20. Anomalous Flux Quantization in a Hubbard Ring with Correlated Hopping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrachea, Liliana; Aligia, A. A.; Gagliano, E.

    1996-06-01

    We solve exactly a generalized Hubbard ring with twisted boundary conditions. The magnitude of the nearest-neighbor hopping depends on the occupations of the sites involved and the term which modifies the number of doubly occupied sites tAB = 0. Although η-pairing states with off-diagonal long-range order are part of the degenerate ground state, the behavior of the energy as a function of the twist rules out superconductivity in this limit. A small tAB breaks the degeneracy and for moderate repulsive U introduce superconducting correlations which lead to ``anomalous'' flux quantization.

  1. ON THE SOURCE OF ASTROMETRIC ANOMALOUS REFRACTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, M. Suzanne [Department of Natural and Environmental Sciences, Western State Colorado University, 128 Hurst Hall, Gunnison, CO 81230 (United States); McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, MSC07 4220, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States); Pier, Jeffrey R., E-mail: mstaylor@western.edu [Division of Astronomical Sciences, NSF 4201 Wilson Blvd, Arlington, VA 22230 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    More than a century ago, astronomers using transit telescopes to determine precise stellar positions were hampered by an unexplained periodic shifting of the stars they were observing. With the advent of CCD transit telescopes in the past three decades, this unexplained motion, termed 'anomalous refraction' by these early astronomers, is again being observed. Anomalous refraction is described as a low-frequency, large angular scale ({approx}2 Degree-Sign ) motion of the entire image plane with respect to the celestial coordinate system as observed and defined by astrometric catalogs. These motions, of typically several tenths of an arcsecond amplitude with timescales on the order of 10 minutes, are ubiquitous to ground-based drift-scan astrometric measurements regardless of location or telescopes used and have been attributed to the effect of tilting of equal-density layers of the atmosphere. The cause of this tilting has often been attributed to atmospheric gravity waves, but this cause has never been confirmed. Although theoretical models of atmospheric refraction show that atmospheric gravity waves are a plausible cause of anomalous refraction, an observational campaign specifically directed at defining this relationship provides clear evidence that anomalous refraction is not consistent with the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. The source of anomalous refraction is found to be meter-scale, slowly evolving quasi-coherent dynamical structures in the boundary layer below 60 m above ground level.

  2. Parametric probability distributions for anomalous change detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Foy, Bernard R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wohlberg, Brendt E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Scovel, James C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    The problem of anomalous change detection arises when two (or possibly more) images are taken of the same scene, but at different times. The aim is to discount the 'pervasive differences' that occur thoughout the imagery, due to the inevitably different conditions under which the images were taken (caused, for instance, by differences in illumination, atmospheric conditions, sensor calibration, or misregistration), and to focus instead on the 'anomalous changes' that actually take place in the scene. In general, anomalous change detection algorithms attempt to model these normal or pervasive differences, based on data taken directly from the imagery, and then identify as anomalous those pixels for which the model does not hold. For many algorithms, these models are expressed in terms of probability distributions, and there is a class of such algorithms that assume the distributions are Gaussian. By considering a broader class of distributions, however, a new class of anomalous change detection algorithms can be developed. We consider several parametric families of such distributions, derive the associated change detection algorithms, and compare the performance with standard algorithms that are based on Gaussian distributions. We find that it is often possible to significantly outperform these standard algorithms, even using relatively simple non-Gaussian models.

  3. Plasma heating by adiabatic compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.A. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    These two lectures will cover the following three topics: (i) The application of adiabatic compression to toroidal devices is reviewed. The special case of adiabatic compression in tokamaks is considered in more detail, including a discussion of the equilibrium, scaling laws, and heating effects. (ii) The ATC (Adiabatic Toroidal Compressor) device which was completed in May 1972, is described in detail. Compression of a tokamak plasma across a static toroidal field is studied in this device. The device is designed to produce a pre-compression plasma with a major radius of 17 cm, toroidal field of 20 kG, and current of 90 kA. The compression leads to a plasma with major radius of 38 cm and minor radius of 10 cm. Scaling laws imply a density increase of a factor 6, temperature increase of a factor 3, and current increase of a factor 2.4. An additional feature of ATC is that it is a large tokamak which operates without a copper shell. (iii) Data which show that the expected MHD behavior is largely observed is presented and discussed. (U.S.)

  4. Anomalous origin of coronary artery: the role of multislice CT Angiography: a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabelo, Daniel Rocha; Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous origin of coronary arteries is a relatively rare entity and can present different clinical forms. Recently, CT angiography of the coronary arteries have demonstrated an important role in the diagnosis and management of these anomalies. We present the case of a young female without significant comorbidities who presented with cardiopulmonary arrest, being revived by a team of customer service mobile emergency. After completion of multislice CT angiography of the coronary arteries was observed anomalous origin of left main coronary artery in the right coronary artery, no signs of extrinsic compression. Patient received a defibrillator and had an uneventful follow-up performed. Multislice CT angiography is minimally invasive diagnostic methods to detect the origin and trajectory of the coronary arteries, allowing an alternative to cardiac catheterization for evaluation of patients with anomalous origin of coronary arteries. (author)

  5. Anomalous origin of coronary artery: the role of multislice CT Angiography: a case report and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabelo, Daniel Rocha; Barros, Marcio Vinicius Lins; Nunes, Maria do Carmo Pereira; Siqueira, Maria Helena Albernaz, E-mail: marciovlbarros@uol.com.br [Hospital Mater Dei, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2012-07-15

    Anomalous origin of coronary arteries is a relatively rare entity and can present different clinical forms. Recently, CT angiography of the coronary arteries have demonstrated an important role in the diagnosis and management of these anomalies. We present the case of a young female without significant comorbidities who presented with cardiopulmonary arrest, being revived by a team of customer service mobile emergency. After completion of multislice CT angiography of the coronary arteries was observed anomalous origin of left main coronary artery in the right coronary artery, no signs of extrinsic compression. Patient received a defibrillator and had an uneventful follow-up performed. Multislice CT angiography is minimally invasive diagnostic methods to detect the origin and trajectory of the coronary arteries, allowing an alternative to cardiac catheterization for evaluation of patients with anomalous origin of coronary arteries. (author)

  6. Anomalous magnetohydrodynamics in the extreme relativistic domain

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The evolution equations of anomalous magnetohydrodynamics are derived in the extreme relativistic regime and contrasted with the treatment of hydromagnetic nonlinearities pioneered by Lichnerowicz in the absence of anomalous currents. In particular we explore the situation where the conventional vector currents are complemented by the axial-vector currents arising either from the pseudo Nambu-Goldstone bosons of a spontaneously broken symmetry or because of finite fermionic density effects. After expanding the generally covariant equations in inverse powers of the conductivity, the relativistic analog of the magnetic diffusivity equation is derived in the presence of vortical and magnetic currents. While the anomalous contributions are generally suppressed by the diffusivity, they are shown to disappear in the perfectly conducting limit. When the flow is irrotational, boost-invariant and with vanishing four-acceleration the corresponding evolution equations are explicitly integrated so that the various physic...

  7. Anomalous biceps origin from the rotator cuff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samik Banerjee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Variations in the origin of the long head of biceps tendon (LHBT have been described in literature; however, its clinical significance remains uncertain. We describe in this report, the history, physical examination and the arthroscopic findings in a patient who had an anomalous origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff, resulting in restriction of range of motion. This anomalous origin of the long head of biceps tendon causing capsular contracture and restriction of movements leading to secondary internal impingement, has not been extensively reported in the literature. Shoulder arthroscopists should be aware that, although, an uncommon clinical condition, the aberrant congenital origin of the LHBT from the rotator cuff can rarely become pathologic in middle age and lead to shoulder dysfunction. In such cases, release of the anomalous band may be required, along with the treatment of other concomitant intraarticular pathologies in the glenohumeral joint.

  8. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theiler, James; Matsekh, Anna M.

    2010-04-01

    A family of subtraction-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQbased anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and special cases of it are equivalent to canonical correlation analysis and optimized covariance equalization. What whitened TLSQ offers is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  9. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    CERN Document Server

    Jegerlehner, Friedrich

    2017-01-01

    This research monograph covers extensively the theory of the muon anomalous magnetic moment and provides estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. The muon anomalous magnetic moment is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. In addition, quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. Perspectives fo...

  10. Fractional diffusion equations and anomalous diffusion

    CERN Document Server

    Evangelista, Luiz Roberto

    2018-01-01

    Anomalous diffusion has been detected in a wide variety of scenarios, from fractal media, systems with memory, transport processes in porous media, to fluctuations of financial markets, tumour growth, and complex fluids. Providing a contemporary treatment of this process, this book examines the recent literature on anomalous diffusion and covers a rich class of problems in which surface effects are important, offering detailed mathematical tools of usual and fractional calculus for a wide audience of scientists and graduate students in physics, mathematics, chemistry and engineering. Including the basic mathematical tools needed to understand the rules for operating with the fractional derivatives and fractional differential equations, this self-contained text presents the possibility of using fractional diffusion equations with anomalous diffusion phenomena to propose powerful mathematical models for a large variety of fundamental and practical problems in a fast-growing field of research.

  11. Anomalous Hall effect from vortex motion in high-Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.L.; Yang, T.J.

    1994-01-01

    In this work, the unusual Seebeck effect is taken into consideration in explaining the possible origin of the anomalous Hall effect for high-T c superconductors. Combining Maki's theory of transport entropy and Tinkham's theory of resistive transition, we explain why the anomalous Hall effect can be observed in high-T c superconductors, but is absent in most conventional superconductors. The behavior of ρ xy (H,T) in our theory is qualitatively consistent with experiments. In addition, our theory not only predicts that ρ xy will become positive from ρ xy xy |∝ρ xx 2 in the region of ρ xy xy will diminish with increasing defect concentration

  12. Anomalous magnetoresistance in Fibonacci multilayers.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, L. D.; Bezerra, C. G.; Correa, M. A.; Chesman, C.; Pearson, J. E.; Hoffmann, A. (Materials Science Division); (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte)

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigated magnetoresistance curves in quasiperiodic magnetic multilayers for two different growth directions, namely, [110] and [100]. We considered identical ferromagnetic layers separated by nonmagnetic layers with two different thicknesses chosen based on the Fibonacci sequence. Using parameters for Fe/Cr multilayers, four terms were included in our description of the magnetic energy: Zeeman, cubic anisotropy, bilinear coupling, and biquadratic coupling. The minimum energy was determined by the gradient method and the equilibrium magnetization directions found were used to calculate magnetoresistance curves. By choosing spacers with a thickness such that biquadratic coupling is stronger than bilinear coupling, unusual behaviors for the magnetoresistance were observed: (i) for the [110] case, there is a different behavior for structures based on even and odd Fibonacci generations, and, more interesting, (ii) for the [100] case, we found magnetic field ranges for which the magnetoresistance increases with magnetic field.

  13. Anomalous swelling of multilamellar lipid bilayers in the transition region by renormalization of curvature elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callisen, Thomas Hønger; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1994-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering is used to determine the temperature dependence of the lamellar repeat distance in an aqueous multilamellar solution of phospholipid bilayers. A thermal anomaly in the swelling behavior is observed at the bilayer phase transition. The anomalous behavior can be suppr......Small-angle neutron scattering is used to determine the temperature dependence of the lamellar repeat distance in an aqueous multilamellar solution of phospholipid bilayers. A thermal anomaly in the swelling behavior is observed at the bilayer phase transition. The anomalous behavior can...... be suppressed by varying the lipid acyl-chain length or by alloying with a molecular stiffening agent. The experimental results are explained in terms of renormalization of the bilayer curvature elasticity and by using a theory of repulsive interlamellar undulation forces....

  14. Anomalous reactive transport in porous media: Experiments and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Yaniv; Dror, Ishai; Scher, Harvey; Berkowitz, Brian

    2015-05-01

    We analyze dynamic behavior of chemically reactive species in a porous medium, subject to anomalous transport. In this context, we present transport experiments in a refraction-index-matched, three-dimensional, water-saturated porous medium. A pH indicator (Congo red) was used as either a conservative or a reactive tracer, depending on the tracer solution pH relative to that of the background solution. The porous medium consisted of an acrylic polymer material formed as spherical beads that have pH-buffering capacity. The magnitude of reaction during transport through the porous medium was related to the color change of the Congo red, via image analysis. Here, we focused on point injection of the tracer into a macroscopically uniform flow field containing water at a pH different from that of the injected tracer. The setup yielded measurements of the temporally evolving spatial (local-in-space) concentration field. Parallel experiments with the same tracer, but without reactions (no changes in pH), enabled identification of the transport itself to be anomalous (non-Fickian); this was quantified by a continuous time random walk (CTRW) formulation. A CTRW particle tracking model was then used to quantify the spatial and temporal migration of both the conservative and reactive tracer plumes. Model parameters related to the anomalous transport were determined from the conservative tracer experiments. An additional term accounting for chemical reaction was established solely from analysis of the reactant concentrations, and significantly, no other fitting parameters were required. The measurements and analysis emphasized the localized nature of reaction, caused by small-scale concentration fluctuations and preferential pathways. In addition, a threshold radius for pH-controlled reactive transport processes was defined under buffering conditions, which delineated the region in which reactions occurred rapidly.

  15. Unveil Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Xiteng

    2013-01-01

    We discuss the applicability of compressed sensing theory. We take a genuine look at both experimental results and theoretical works. We answer the following questions: 1) What can compressed sensing really do? 2) More importantly, why?

  16. A Compressive Superresolution Display

    KAUST Repository

    Heide, Felix

    2014-06-22

    In this paper, we introduce a new compressive display architecture for superresolution image presentation that exploits co-design of the optical device configuration and compressive computation. Our display allows for superresolution, HDR, or glasses-free 3D presentation.

  17. Microbunching and RF Compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, M.; Migliorati, M.; Ronsivalle, C.; Ferrario, M.; Vaccarezza, C.

    2010-01-01

    Velocity bunching (or RF compression) represents a promising technique complementary to magnetic compression to achieve the high peak current required in the linac drivers for FELs. Here we report on recent progress aimed at characterizing the RF compression from the point of view of the microbunching instability. We emphasize the development of a linear theory for the gain function of the instability and its validation against macroparticle simulations that represents a useful tool in the evaluation of the compression schemes for FEL sources.

  18. Hyperspectral data compression

    CERN Document Server

    Motta, Giovanni; Storer, James A

    2006-01-01

    Provides a survey of results in the field of compression of remote sensed 3D data, with a particular interest in hyperspectral imagery. This work covers topics such as compression architecture, lossless compression, lossy techniques, and more. It also describes a lossless algorithm based on vector quantization.

  19. Compression test assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kariotis, A. H. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A compression test assembly is described which prevents buckling of small diameter rigid specimens undergoing compression testing and permits attachment of extensometers for strain measurements. The test specimen is automatically aligned and laterally supported when compressive force is applied to the end caps and transmitted to the test specimen during testing.

  20. 'Complexity' and anomalous transport in space plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Tom; Wu Chengchin

    2002-01-01

    'Complexity' has become a hot topic in nearly every field of modern physics. Space plasma is of no exception. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the sporadic and localized interactions of magnetic coherent structures are the origin of 'complexity' in space plasmas. The intermittent localized interactions, which generate the anomalous diffusion, transport, and evolution of the macroscopic state variables of the overall dynamical system, may be modeled by a triggered (fast) localized chaotic growth equation of a set of relevant order parameters. Such processes would generally pave the way for the global system to evolve into a 'complex' state of long-ranged interactions of fluctuations, displaying the phenomenon of forced and/or self-organized criticality. An example of such type of anomalous transport and evolution in a sheared magnetic field is provided via two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. The coarse-grained dissipation due to the intermittent triggered interactions among the magnetic coherent structures induces a 'fluctuation-induced nonlinear instability' that reconfigures the sheared magnetic field into an X-point magnetic geometry (in the mean field sense), leading to the anomalous acceleration of the magnetic coherent structures. A phenomenon akin to such type of anomalous transport and acceleration, the so-called bursty bulk flows, has been commonly observed in the plasma sheet of the Earth's magnetotail

  1. Anomalous Hall conductivity: Local orbitals approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Středa, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 4 (2010), 045115/1-045115/9 ISSN 1098-0121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * Berry phase correction * orbital polarization momentum Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2010

  2. Intrinsic anomalous Hall effect and local polarizabilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Středa, Pavel; Jonckheere, T.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 11 (2010), 113303/1-113303/4 ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/08/0551 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : orbital polarization momentum * Berry phase correction * anomalous Hall effect Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.772, year: 2010

  3. Anomalous Seebeck coefficient in boron carbides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aselage, T.L.; Emin, D.; Wood, C.; Mackinnon, I.D.R.; Howard, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    Boron carbides exhibit an anomalously large Seebeck coefficient with a temperature coefficient that is characteristic of polaronic hopping between inequivalent sites. The inequivalence in the sites is associated with disorder in the solid. The temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient for materials prepared by different techniques provides insight into the nature of the disorder

  4. On the photon anomalous magnetic moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez Rojas, Hugo

    2006-01-01

    It is shown that, due to radioactive corrections, the photon exhibits a nonzero anomalous magnetic moment whenever it has a nonzero perpendicular momentum component to an external constant magnetic field. Its behaviour is discussed near the first threshold of pair creation. The results might be interesting due to its astrophysical consequenc

  5. Total least squares for anomalous change detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theiler, James P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Matsekh, Anna M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A family of difference-based anomalous change detection algorithms is derived from a total least squares (TLSQ) framework. This provides an alternative to the well-known chronochrome algorithm, which is derived from ordinary least squares. In both cases, the most anomalous changes are identified with the pixels that exhibit the largest residuals with respect to the regression of the two images against each other. The family of TLSQ-based anomalous change detectors is shown to be equivalent to the subspace RX formulation for straight anomaly detection, but applied to the stacked space. However, this family is not invariant to linear coordinate transforms. On the other hand, whitened TLSQ is coordinate invariant, and furthermore it is shown to be equivalent to the optimized covariance equalization algorithm. What whitened TLSQ offers, in addition to connecting with a common language the derivations of two of the most popular anomalous change detection algorithms - chronochrome and covariance equalization - is a generalization of these algorithms with the potential for better performance.

  6. Anomalous transport and neutral beam heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, C.; Capes, H.

    1982-01-01

    Principal results of the Tokamak experiment simulations with Makokot are presented. The study of the density evolution and the temperature-density sawtooth oscillations suggest the use of generalized anomalous fluxes. This new empirical model is applied for TFR and JIPP T-II and some projections are given for the JET. (author)

  7. Anomalous dark growth rings in black cherry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Long; David W. Trimpey; Michael C. Wiemann; Susan L. Stout

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous dark growth rings have been observed in black cherry (Prunus serotina) sawlogs from northwestern Pennsylvania making the logs unsuitable for veneer products. Thirty-six cross sections with dark rings, each traceable to one of ten stands, were obtained from a local mill and sections were dated and annual ring widths were measured. One or...

  8. Anomalous Hall effect in disordered multiband metals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kovalev, A.A.; Sinova, Jairo; Tserkovnyak, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 105, č. 3 (2010), 036601/1-036601/4 ISSN 0031-9007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : anomalous Hall effect * spintronics Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.621, year: 2010

  9. Anomalous VVH interactions at a linear collider

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We examine, in a model independent way, the sensitivity of a linear collider to the couplings of a light Higgs boson to a pair of gauge bosons, including the possibility of CP violation. We construct several observables that probe the various possible anomalous couplings. For an intermediate mass Higgs, a collider operating ...

  10. Bunburra Rockhole: A New Anomalous Achondrite

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bland, P.A.; Spurný, Pavel; Greenwood, R.C.; Towner, M.C.; Bevan, A.W.R.; Bottke jr., W.F.; Shrbený, Lukáš; McClafferty, T.; Vaughan, D.; Benedix, G.K.; Franchi, I.A.; Hough, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 72, Supplement (2009), A34-A34 ISSN 1086-9379. [Annual Meeting of the Meteoritical Society /72./. Nancy, 13.06.2009-18.06.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : Bunburra Rockhole * anomalous achondrite Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.253, year: 2009

  11. Anomalous transport effects and possible environmental symmetry ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-05-06

    May 6, 2015 ... The heavy-ion collision provides a unique many-body environment where local domains of strongly interacting chiral medium may occur and in a sense allow environmental symmetry 'violation' phenomena. For example, certain anomalous transport processes, forbidden in usual medium, become possible ...

  12. Examination of anomalous self-experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raballo, Andrea; Parnas, Josef

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence points to the clinical and heuristic value of anomalous subjective experiences (ASEs) for the characterization of schizophrenia spectrum vulnerability and early detection purposes. In particular, a subgroup of ASEs, entailing basic disorders of self-awareness (self-diso...

  13. Anomalous Levinson theorem and supersymmetric quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boya, L.J.; Casahorran, J.; Esteve, J.G.

    1993-01-01

    We analyse the symmetry breaking associated to anomalous realization of supersymmetry in the context of SUSY QM. In this case one of the SUSY partners is singular; that leads to peculiar forms of the Levinson theorem relating phase shifts and bound states. Some examples are exhibited; peculiarities include negative energies, incomplete pairing of states and extra phases in scattering. (Author) 8 refs

  14. Anomalous transport phenomena in px+i py superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songci; Andreev, A. V.; Spivak, B. Z.

    2015-09-01

    Spontaneous breaking of time-reversal symmetry in superconductors with the px+i py symmetry of the order parameter allows for a class of effects which are analogous to the anomalous Hall effect in ferromagnets. These effects exist below the critical temperature, T anomalous Hall thermal conductivity, the polar Kerr effect, the anomalous Hall effect, and the anomalous photo- and acousto-galvanic effects.

  15. Anomalous Transport in Natural Fracture Networks Induced by Tectonic Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, P. K.; Lei, Q.; Lee, S.; Dentz, M.; Juanes, R.

    2017-12-01

    Fluid flow and transport in fractured rock controls many natural and engineered processes in the subsurface. However, characterizing flow and transport through fractured media is challenging due to the high uncertainty and large heterogeneity associated with fractured rock properties. In addition to these "static" challenges, geologic fractures are always under significant overburden stress, and changes in the stress state can lead to changes in the fracture's ability to conduct fluids. While confining stress has been shown to impact fluid flow through fractures in a fundamental way, the impact of confining stress on transportthrough fractured rock remains poorly understood. The link between anomalous (non-Fickian) transport and confining stress has been shown, only recently, at the level of a single rough fracture [1]. Here, we investigate the impact of geologic (tectonic) stress on flow and tracer transport through natural fracture networks. We model geomechanical effects in 2D fractured rock by means of a finite-discrete element method (FEMDEM) [2], which can capture the deformation of matrix blocks, reactivation of pre-existing fractures, and propagation of new cracks, upon changes in the stress field. We apply the model to a fracture network extracted from the geological map of an actual rock outcrop to obtain the aperture field at different stress conditions. We then simulate fluid flow and particle transport through the stressed fracture networks. We observe that anomalous transport emerges in response to confining stress on the fracture network, and show that the stress state is a powerful determinant of transport behavior: (1) An anisotropic stress state induces preferential flow paths through shear dilation; (2) An increase in geologic stress increases aperture heterogeneity that induces late-time tailing of particle breakthrough curves. Finally, we develop an effective transport model that captures the anomalous transport through the stressed fracture

  16. Anomalous energy transport in hot plasmas: solar corona and Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaufume, P.

    1992-04-01

    Anomalous energy transport is studied in two hot plasmas and appears to be associated with a heating of the solar corona and with a plasma deconfining process in tokamaks. The magnetic structure is shown to play a fundamental role in this phenomenon through small scale instabilities which are modelized by means of a nonlinear dynamical system: the Beasts' Model. Four behavior classes are found for this system, which are automatically classified in the parameter space thanks to a neural network. We use a compilation of experimental results relative to the solar corona to discuss current-based heating processes. We find that a simple Joule effect cannot provide the required heating rates, and therefore propose a dimensional model involving a resistive reconnective instability which leads to an efficient and discontinuous heating mechanism. Results are in good agreement with the observations. We give an analytical expression for a diffusion coefficient in tokamaks when magnetic turbulence is perturbing the topology, which we validate thanks to the standard mapping. A realistic version of the Beasts' Model allows to test a candidate to anomalous transport: the thermal filamentation instability

  17. Detecting anomalous traders using multi-slice network analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Qian; Shen, Hua-Wei; Cheng, Xue-Qi; Zhang, Yuqing

    2017-05-01

    Manipulation is an important issue for both developed and emerging stock markets. Many efforts have been made to detect manipulation in stock market. However, it is still an open problem to identify the fraudulent traders, especially when they collude with each other. In this paper, we focus on the problem of identifying anomalous traders using the transaction data of 8 manipulated stocks and 42 non-manipulated stocks during a one-year period. For each stock, we construct a multi-slice trading network to characterize the daily trading behavior and the cross-day participation of each trader. Comparing the multi-slice trading network of manipulated stocks and non-manipulated stocks with their randomized version, we find that manipulated stocks exhibit high number of trader pairs that trade with each other in multiple days and high deviation from randomized network at correlation between trading frequency and trading activity. These findings are effective at distinguishing manipulated stocks from non-manipulated ones and at identifying anomalous traders.

  18. Anomalous transport and stochastic processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balescu, R. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1996-03-01

    The relation between kinetic transport theory and theory of stochastic processes is reviewed. The Langevin equation formalism provides important, but rather limited information about diffusive processes. A quite promising new approach to modeling complex situations, such as transport in incompletely destroyed magnetic surfaces, is provided by the theory of Continuous Time Random Walks (CTRW), which is presented in some detail. An academic test problem is discussed in great detail: transport of particles in a fluctuating magnetic field, in the limit of infinite perpendicular correlation length. The well-known subdiffusive behavior of the Mean Square Displacement (MSD), proportional to t{sup 1/2}, is recovered by a CTRW, but the complete density profile is not. However, the quasilinear approximation of the kinetic equation has the form of a non-Markovian diffusion equation and can thus be generated by a CTRW. 16 refs., 3 figs.

  19. Compressible effect algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudder, Stan

    2004-08-01

    We define a special type of additive map J on an effect algebra E called a compression. We call J(1) the focus of J and if p is the focus of a compression then p is called a projection. The set of projections in E is denoted by P(E). A compression J is direct if J( a) ≤ a for all a ɛ E. We show that direct compressions are equivalent to projections onto components of cartesian products. An effect algebra E is said to be compressible if every compression on E is uniquely determined by its focus and every compression on E has a supplement. We define and characterize the commutant C(p) of a projection p and show that a compression with focus p is direct if and only if C(p) = E. We show that P(E) is an orthomodular poset. It is proved that the cartesian product of effect algebras is compressible if and only if each component is compressible. We then consider compressible sequential effect algebras, Lüders maps and conditional probabilities.

  20. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Esben Rune; Satti, Srinivasa Rao; Tiedemann, Peter

    2008-01-01

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  1. Compressing Binary Decision Diagrams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rune Hansen, Esben; Srinivasa Rao, S.; Tiedemann, Peter

    The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to ......-2 bits per node. Empirical results for our compression technique are presented, including comparisons with previously introduced techniques, showing that the new technique dominate on all tested instances.......The paper introduces a new technique for compressing Binary Decision Diagrams in those cases where random access is not required. Using this technique, compression and decompression can be done in linear time in the size of the BDD and compression will in many cases reduce the size of the BDD to 1...

  2. Effects of elastic anisotropy on mechanical behavior of intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, M.H.

    1991-01-01

    Fundamental aspects of the deformation and fracture behavior of ordered intermetallic compounds are examined within the framework of linear anisotropic elasticity theory of dislocations and cracks. The orientation dependence and the tension/compression asymmetry of yield stress are explained in terms of the anisotropic coupling effect of non-glide stresses to the glide strain. The anomalous yield behavior is related to the disparity (edge/screw) of dislocation mobility and the critical stress required for the dislocation multiplication mechanism of Frank-Read type. The slip-twin conjugate relationship, extensive faulting, and pseudo-twinning (martensitic transformation) at a crack tip can be enhanced also by the anisotropic coupling effect, which may lead to transformation toughening of shear type

  3. Generation of pulse trains with high-repetition-rate in anomalous dispersion decreasing fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobko, Dmitry A.; Okhotnikov, Oleg G.; Sysoliatin, Alex A.; Zolotovskii, Igor O.

    2014-03-01

    Optical pulse generation and compression have been numerically studied in anomalous dispersion decreasing fibers (DDF). We show that evolution of modulation instability observed with chirped wave packets in tapered fibers produces the mechanism for generation of ultra-short pulses with high repetition rates. The role of modulation instability and Raman self-scattering has been also discussed. The simulations show that pulse chirping enhances self-Raman scattering at early stages of pulse propagation and improves compression of the generated pulses. It is also shown that the presence of amplitude and frequency modulation of the seed wave provide essential impact on the pulse train formation. The new method for increasing the pulse train repetition rate through frequency modulation of the seed wave has been proposed.

  4. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X Z; Matsui, Y; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-08-25

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La(0.69)Ca(0.31)MnO(3), leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a "colossal" AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings.

  5. Precise quantization of anomalous Hall effect near zero magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bestwick, A. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fox, E. J. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kou, Xufeng [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Pan, Lei [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Wang, Kang L. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Goldhaber-Gordon, D. [Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-05-04

    In this study, we report a nearly ideal quantum anomalous Hall effect in a three-dimensional topological insulator thin film with ferromagnetic doping. Near zero applied magnetic field we measure exact quantization in the Hall resistance to within a part per 10,000 and a longitudinal resistivity under 1 Ω per square, with chiral edge transport explicitly confirmed by nonlocal measurements. Deviations from this behavior are found to be caused by thermally activated carriers, as indicated by an Arrhenius law temperature dependence. Using the deviations as a thermometer, we demonstrate an unexpected magnetocaloric effect and use it to reach near-perfect quantization by cooling the sample below the dilution refrigerator base temperature in a process approximating adiabatic demagnetization refrigeration.

  6. Anomalous Magnetic Excitations of Cooperative Tetrahedral Spin Clusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prsa, K.; Rønnow, H.M.; Zaharko, O.

    2009-01-01

    An inelastic neutron scattering study of Cu2Te2O5X2 (X=Cl, Br) shows strong dispersive modes with large energy gaps persisting far above T-N, notably in Cu2Te2O5Br2. The anomalous features: a coexisting unusually weak Goldstone-like mode observed in Cu2Te2O5Cl2 and the size of the energy gaps can...... cannot be explained by existing theories, such as our mean-field or random-phase approximation. We argue that our findings represent a new general type of behavior due to intercluster quantum fluctuations and call for development of a new theoretical approach....

  7. Anomalously large anisotropic magnetoresistance in a perovskite manganite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Run-Wei; Wang, Huabing; Wang, Xuewen; Yu, X. Z.; Matsui, Y.; Cheng, Zhao-Hua; Shen, Bao-Gen; Plummer, E. Ward; Zhang, Jiandi

    2009-01-01

    The signature of correlated electron materials (CEMs) is the coupling between spin, charge, orbital and lattice resulting in exotic functionality. This complexity is directly responsible for their tunability. We demonstrate here that the broken symmetry, through cubic to orthorhombic distortion in the lattice structure in a prototype manganite single crystal, La0.69Ca0.31MnO3, leads to an anisotropic magneto-elastic response to an external field, and consequently to remarkable magneto-transport behavior. An anomalous anisotropic magnetoresistance (AMR) effect occurs close to the metal-insulator transition (MIT) in the system, showing a direct correlation with the anisotropic field-tuned MIT in the system and can be understood by means of a simple phenomenological model. A small crystalline anisotropy stimulates a “colossal” AMR near the MIT phase boundary of the system, thus revealing the intimate interplay between magneto- and electronic-crystalline couplings. PMID:19706504

  8. Anomalous growth of HfAl3 in thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lever, R.F.; Howard, J.K.; Chu, W.K.; Smith, P.J.

    1977-01-01

    Anomalous growth of HfAl 3 is observed on 400degreeC annealing of evaporated thin-film samples consisting of 900 A aluminum, on 1000 A hafnium, 6000 A aluminum and SiO 2 substrates. A continuous layer of HfAl 3 forms at the aluminum--hafnium interface nearer the surface, but not at the deeper interface. The surface HfAl 3 layer then continues to grow, fed by diffusion of underlying aluminum through the intervening hafnium layer. Needlelike precipitates of HfAl 3 are formed along the underlying aluminum grain boundaries. Observations are made by nuclear backscattering, Auger electron spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Similar behavior is observed in Al--Zr--Al layers

  9. Is Information Science an Anomalous State of Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollnagel, E.

    1980-01-01

    This paper looks at some of the problems in information science from the experience with similar problems in psycho logy. The apparent need for a set of rigorous definitions of the basic concepts is discussed, and it is argued that although this is necessary for the natural sciences...... it is not necessary for sciences which concern themselves with behavioral phenomena which have a prior description in natural language. It is further argued that information science should be more interested in uncertainty than in information, and it is shown how the Anomalous State of Knowledge (ASK) paradigm may...... be used to describe itself, hence also informa tion science. It is finally concluded that by turning to problems of uncertainty and lack of information, rather than information, information science may avoid many of the mistakes made by psychology....

  10. Anomalous superconductivity in the tJ model; moment approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads Peter; Rodriguez-Nunez, J.J.

    1997-01-01

    By extending the moment approach of Nolting (Z, Phys, 225 (1972) 25) in the superconducting phase, we have constructed the one-particle spectral functions (diagonal and off-diagonal) for the tJ model in any dimensions. We propose that both the diagonal and the off-diagonal spectral functions...... Hartree shift which in the end result enlarges the bandwidth of the free carriers allowing us to take relative high values of J/t and allowing superconductivity to live in the T-c-rho phase diagram, in agreement with numerical calculations in a cluster, We have calculated the static spin susceptibility......, chi(T), and the specific heat, C-v(T), within the moment approach. We find that all the relevant physical quantities show the signature of superconductivity at T-c in the form of kinks (anomalous behavior) or jumps, for low density, in agreement with recent published literature, showing a generic...

  11. Anomalous flux quantization in a hubbard ring with correlated hopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrachea, L.; Aligia, A.A.; Gagliano, E. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina)

    1996-06-01

    We solve exactly a generalized Hubbard ring with twisted boundary conditions. The magnitude of the nearest-neighbor hopping depends on the occupations of the sites involved and the term which modifies the number of doubly occupied sites {ital t}{sub {ital AB}}=0. Although {eta}-pairing state with off-diagonal long-range order are part of the degenerate ground state, the behavior of the energy as a function of the twist rules out superconductivity in this limit. A small {ital t}{sub {ital AB}} breaks the degeneracy and for moderate repulsive {ital U} introduce superconducting correlations which lead to {open_quote}{open_quote}anomalous{close_quote}{close_quote} flux quantization. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  12. Compressive Deformation Behavior of Open-Cell Cu-Zn-Al Alloy Foam Made Through P/M Route Using Mechanically Alloyed Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnwal, Ajay Kumar; Mondal, D. P.; Kumar, Rajeev; Prasanth, N.; Dasgupta, R.

    2018-02-01

    Cu-Zn-Al foams of varying porosity fractions using mechanical alloyed powder have been made through powder metallurgy route. Here, NH4 (HCO3) was used as a space holder. Mechanically alloyed Cu-Zn-Al is made using a planetary ball mill taking the ratio of Cu/Zn/Al = 70:25:5 (by weight ratio). The ball/powder ratios were varied in the four ranges 10:1, 15:1, 20:1, and 25:1. Green compacts of milled powder and space holder samples were sintered at three stages at three different temperatures 350, 550, and 850 °C for 1 h at each stage. The crystalline size and particle size as a function of ball/powder ratios were examined. The compressive deformation responses of foams are varied with relative density and the ball/powder ratio. The plateau stress and energy absorption of these foams increase with an increase in relative density but decreases with increase in ball/powder ratio, even though crystalline size decreases. This has further been explained on the basis of particle morphology as a function of ball/powder ratio.

  13. Anomalous Cherenkov spin-orbit sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, Sergey

    2011-02-01

    The Cherenkov effect is a well-known phenomenon in the electrodynamics of fast charged particles passing through transparent media. If the particle is faster than the light in a given medium, the medium emits a forward light cone. This beautiful phenomenon has an acoustic counterpart where the role of photons is played by phonons and the role of the speed of light is played by the sound velocity. In this case the medium emits a forward sound cone. Here, we show that in a system with spin-orbit interactions in addition to this normal Cherenkov sound there appears an anomalous Cherenkov sound with forward and backward sound propagation. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the transition from the normal to anomalous Cherenkov sound happens in a singular way at the Cherenkov cone angle. The detection of this acoustic singularity therefore represents an alternative experimental tool for the measurement of the spin-orbit coupling strength.

  14. Anomalous feedback and negative domain wall resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Ran; Xiao, Di; Zhu, Jian-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic induction can be regarded as a negative feedback effect, where the motive-force opposes the change of magnetic flux that generates the motive-force. In artificial electromagnetics emerging from spintronics, however, this is not necessarily the case. By studying the current-induced domain wall dynamics in a cylindrical nanowire, we show that the spin motive-force exerting on electrons can either oppose or support the applied current that drives the domain wall. The switching into the anomalous feedback regime occurs when the strength of the dissipative torque β is about twice the value of the Gilbert damping constant α . The anomalous feedback manifests as a negative domain wall resistance, which has an analogy with the water turbine. (paper)

  15. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the Mechanical Behavior of Strongly Anisotropic Light-Weight Metallic Fiber Structures under Static and Dynamic Compressive Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Andersen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rigid metallic fiber structures made from a variety of different metals and alloys have been investigated mainly with regard to their functional properties such as heat transfer, pressure drop, or filtration characteristics. With the recent advent of aluminum and magnesium-based fiber structures, the application of such structures in light-weight crash absorbers has become conceivable. The present paper therefore elucidates the mechanical behavior of rigid sintered fiber structures under quasi-static and dynamic loading. Special attention is paid to the strongly anisotropic properties observed for different directions of loading in relation to the main fiber orientation. Basically, the structures show an orthotropic behavior; however, a finite thickness of the fiber slabs results in moderate deviations from a purely orthotropic behavior. The morphology of the tested specimens is examined by computed tomography, and experimental results for different directions of loading as well as different relative densities are presented. Numerical calculations were carried out using real structural data derived from the computed tomography data. Depending on the direction of loading, the fiber structures show a distinctively different deformation behavior both experimentally and numerically. Based on these results, the prevalent modes of deformation are discussed and a first comparison with an established polymer foam and an assessment of the applicability of aluminum fiber structures in crash protection devices is attempted.

  16. Micro-instabilities and anomalous transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.

    1992-01-01

    In order to optimise the design of a tokamak fusion reactor it is necessary to understand how the energy confinement time depends on the plasma and machine parameters. In principle the neo-classical theory provides this information but empirical evidence yields confinement times up to two orders of magnitude less than the predictions of this model. Experimental evidence of microscopic fluctuations in plasma density and other quantities suggests turbulent electro-magnetic fluctuations may be responsible for this anomalous transport. (Author)

  17. Anomalous Charge Transport in Disordered Organic Semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muniandy, S. V.; Woon, K. L.; Choo, K. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Anomalous charge carrier transport in disordered organic semiconductors is studied using fractional differential equations. The connection between index of fractional derivative and dispersion exponent is examined from the perspective of fractional Fokker-Planck equation and its link to the continuous time random walk formalism. The fractional model is used to describe the bi-scaling power-laws observed in the time-of flight photo-current transient data for two different types of organic semiconductors.

  18. Anomalous BRST Ward identity in string theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demichev, A.P.; Iofa, M.Z.

    1990-01-01

    BRST transformations are studied in the path integral approach to string theory on Riemann surfaces of genus h≥2. The BRST Ward identity (WI) is shown to be anomalous, the anomaly being due to non-invariance of the functional integration domain under BRST transformations. The distinction between complete Lagrange BRST transformations including the metric and the auxiliary field and the commonly used 'truncated' BRST transformation is discussed in detail. The problem of decoupling of spurions from physical operators is investigated. (orig.)

  19. Anomalous diffusion of fermions in superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drozdz, S.; Okolowicz, J.; Srokowski, T.; Ploszajczak, M.

    1996-03-01

    Diffusion of fermions in the periodic two-dimensional lattice of fermions is studied. It is shown that effects connected with antisymmetrization of the wave function increase chaoticness of motion. Various types of anomalous diffusion, characterized by a power spectral analysis are found. The nonlocality of the Pauli potential destroys cantori in the phase space. Consequently, the diffusion process is dominated by long free paths and the power spectrum is logarithmic at small frequency limit. (author)

  20. Anomalous Symmetry Fractionalization and Surface Topological Order

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In addition to possessing fractional statistics, anyon excitations of a 2D topologically ordered state can realize symmetry in distinct ways, leading to a variety of symmetry-enriched topological (SET phases. While the symmetry fractionalization must be consistent with the fusion and braiding rules of the anyons, not all ostensibly consistent symmetry fractionalizations can be realized in 2D systems. Instead, certain “anomalous” SETs can only occur on the surface of a 3D symmetry-protected topological (SPT phase. In this paper, we describe a procedure for determining whether a SET of a discrete, on-site, unitary symmetry group G is anomalous or not. The basic idea is to gauge the symmetry and expose the anomaly as an obstruction to a consistent topological theory combining both the original anyons and the gauge fluxes. Utilizing a result of Etingof, Nikshych, and Ostrik, we point out that a class of obstructions is captured by the fourth cohomology group H^{4}(G,U(1, which also precisely labels the set of 3D SPT phases, with symmetry group G. An explicit procedure for calculating the cohomology data from a SET is given, with the corresponding physical intuition explained. We thus establish a general bulk-boundary correspondence between the anomalous SET and the 3D bulk SPT whose surface termination realizes it. We illustrate this idea using the chiral spin liquid [U(1_{2}] topological order with a reduced symmetry Z_{2}×Z_{2}⊂SO(3, which can act on the semion quasiparticle in an anomalous way. We construct exactly solved 3D SPT models realizing the anomalous surface terminations and demonstrate that they are nontrivial by computing three-loop braiding statistics. Possible extensions to antiunitary symmetries are also discussed.

  1. What's wrong with anomalous chiral gauge theory?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kieu, T.D.

    1994-05-01

    It is argued on general ground and demonstrated in the particular example of the Chiral Schwinger Model that there is nothing wrong with apparently anomalous chiral gauge theory. If quantised correctly, there should be no gauge anomaly and chiral gauge theory should be renormalisable and unitary, even in higher dimensions and with non-Abelian gauge groups. Furthermore, it is claimed that mass terms for gauge bosons and chiral fermions can be generated without spoiling the gauge invariance. 19 refs

  2. Anomalous and resonance small-angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1988-01-01

    Significant changes in the small-angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous-dispersion terms for the scattering factor (X-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous-dispersion terms is first discussed before consideration of how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous-scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with X-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same for the analog experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scattering are discussed. (orig.)

  3. Anomalous and resonance small angle scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epperson, J.E.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1987-11-01

    Significant changes in the small angle scattered intensity can be induced by making measurements with radiation close to an absorption edge of an appropriate atomic species contained in the sample. These changes can be related quantitatively to the real and imaginary anomalous dispersion terms for the scattering factor (x-rays) or scattering length (neutrons). The physics inherent in these anomalous dispersion terms is first discussed before considering how they enter the relevant scattering theory. Two major areas of anomalous scattering research have emerged; macromolecules in solution and unmixing of metallic alloys. Research in each area is reviewed, illustrating both the feasibility and potential of these techniques. All the experimental results reported to date have been obtained with x-rays. However, it is pointed out that the formalism is the same or the analogue experiment with neutrons, and a number of suitable isotopes exist which exhibit resonance in an accessible range of energy. Potential applications of resonance small-angle neutron scatterings are discussed. 8 figs

  4. The Anomalous Magnetic Moment of the Muon

    CERN Document Server

    Jegerlehner, Friedrich

    2008-01-01

    This book reviews the present state of knowledge of the anomalous magnetic moment a=(g-2)/2 of the muon. The muon anomalous magnetic moment amy is one of the most precisely measured quantities in elementary particle physics and provides one of the most stringent tests of relativistic quantum field theory as a fundamental theoretical framework. It allows for an extremely precise check of the standard model of elementary particles and of its limitations. Recent experiments at the Brookhaven National Laboratory now reach the unbelievable precision of 0.5 parts per million, improving the accuracy of previous g-2 experiments at CERN by a factor of 14. A major part of the book is devoted to the theory of the anomalous magnetic moment and to estimates of the theoretical uncertainties. Quantum electrodynamics and electroweak and hadronic effects are reviewed. Since non-perturbative hadronic effects play a key role for the precision test, their evaluation is described in detail. After the overview of theory, the exper...

  5. Anomalous momentum transport from drift waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dominguez, R.R.; Staebler, G.M.

    1993-01-01

    A sheared slab magnetic field model B = B 0 [z + (x/L s )y], with inhomogeneous flows in the y and z directions, is used to perform a fully-kinetic stability analysis of the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and dissipative trapped electron (DTE) modes. The concomitant quasilinear stress components that couple to the local perpendicular (y-component) and parallel (z-component) momentum transport are also calculated and the anomalous perpendicular and parallel viscous stresses obtained. A breakdown of the ITG-induced perpendicular viscous stress is generally observed at moderate values of the sheared perpendicular flow. The ITG-induced parallel viscous stress is generally larger and strongly dependent on the sheared flows. The DTE-induced perpendicular viscous stress may sometimes be negative, tending to cancel the ITG contributions while the DTE-induced parallel viscous stress is generally small. The effect of the perpendicular stress component in the momentum balance equations is generally small while the parallel stress component can dominate the usual neoclassical viscous stress terms. The dominant contribution to parallel viscous stress by the ITG mode suggests that bulk plasma toroidal momentum confinement, like energy confinement, is governed by an anomalous ion loss mechanism. Furthermore, the large anomalous effect suggests that the neoclassical explanation of poloidal flows in tokamaks may be incorrect. The present results are in general agreement with existing experimental observations on momentum transport in tokamaks

  6. Emergence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in 5d perovskite SrIrO3 thin films: Interplay between correlation, disorder, and spin-orbit coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Abhijit; Kim, Ki-Seok; Jeong, Yoon H.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the effects of compressive strain on the electrical resistivity of 5d iridium based perovskite SrIrO3 by depositing epitaxial films of thickness 35 nm on various substrates such as GdScO3 (110), DyScO3 (110), and SrTiO3 (001). Surprisingly, we find anomalous transport behaviors as expressed by ρ∝Tε in the temperature dependent resistivity, where the temperature exponent ε evolves continuously from 4/5 to 1 and to 3/2 with an increase of compressive strain. Furthermore, magnetoresistance always remains positive irrespective of resistivity upturns at low temperatures. These observations imply that the delicate interplay between correlation and disorder in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling is responsible for the emergence of the non-Fermi liquid behaviors in 5d perovskite SrIrO3 thin films. We offer a theoretical framework for the interpretation of the experimental results.

  7. Compressed sensing & sparse filtering

    CERN Document Server

    Carmi, Avishy Y; Godsill, Simon J

    2013-01-01

    This book is aimed at presenting concepts, methods and algorithms ableto cope with undersampled and limited data. One such trend that recently gained popularity and to some extent revolutionised signal processing is compressed sensing. Compressed sensing builds upon the observation that many signals in nature are nearly sparse (or compressible, as they are normally referred to) in some domain, and consequently they can be reconstructed to within high accuracy from far fewer observations than traditionally held to be necessary. Apart from compressed sensing this book contains other related app

  8. zlib compression library

    OpenAIRE

    Gailly, Jean-loup; Adler, Mark

    2004-01-01

    (taken from http://www.gzip.org/ on 2004-12-01) zlib is designed to be a free, general-purpose, legally unencumbered -- that is, not covered by any patents -- lossless data-compression library for use on virtually any computer hardware and operating system. The zlib data format is itself portable across platforms. Unlike the LZW compression method used in Unix compress(1) and in the GIF image format, the compression method currently used in zlib essentially never expands the data. (LZW ca...

  9. Anomalous loss of DT alpha particles in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrmann, Hans W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1997-09-01

    An escaping alpha collector probe has been developed for TFTR`s DT phase. Energy distributions of escaping alphas have been determined by measuring the range of α-particles implanted into nickel foils located within the alpha collector. Results at 1.0 MA of plasma current are in good agreement with predictions for first orbit alpha loss. Results at 1.8 MA, however, show a significant anomalous loss of partially thermalized alphas (in addition to the expected first orbit loss), which is not observed with the lost alpha scintillator detectors in DT plasmas, but does resemble the anomalous delayed loss seen in DD plasmas. None of the candidate explanations proposed thus far are fully consistent with the anomalous loss observations. An experiment designed to study the effect of plasma major radius shifts on α-particle loss has led to a better understanding of α-particle dynamics in tokamaks. Intuitively, one might suppose that confined marginally passing α-particles forced to move toward higher magnetic field during an inward major radius shift (i.e., compression) would mirror and become trapped particles, leading to increased alpha loss. Such an effect was looked for during the shift experiment, however, no significant changes in alpha loss to the 90° lost alpha scintillator detector were observed during the shifts. It is calculated that the energy gained by an α-particle during the inward shift is sufficient to explain this result. However, an unexpected loss of partially thermalized α-particles near the passing/trapped boundary was observed to occur between inward and outward shifts at an intermediate value of plasma current (1.4 MA). This anomalous loss feature is not yet understood.

  10. Fractional cable equation for general geometry: A model of axons with swellings and anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Sánchez, Erick J.; Romero, Juan M.; Yépez-Martínez, Huitzilin

    2017-09-01

    Different experimental studies have reported anomalous diffusion in brain tissues and notably this anomalous diffusion is expressed through fractional derivatives. Axons are important to understand neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease. Indeed, abnormal accumulation of proteins and organelles in axons is a hallmark of these diseases. The diffusion in the axons can become anomalous as a result of this abnormality. In this case the voltage propagation in axons is affected. Another hallmark of different neurodegenerative diseases is given by discrete swellings along the axon. In order to model the voltage propagation in axons with anomalous diffusion and swellings, in this paper we propose a fractional cable equation for a general geometry. This generalized equation depends on fractional parameters and geometric quantities such as the curvature and torsion of the cable. For a cable with a constant radius we show that the voltage decreases when the fractional effect increases. In cables with swellings we find that when the fractional effect or the swelling radius increases, the voltage decreases. Similar behavior is obtained when the number of swellings and the fractional effect increase. Moreover, we find that when the radius swelling (or the number of swellings) and the fractional effect increase at the same time, the voltage dramatically decreases.

  11. Anomalous temperature dependence of H{sub c2} in BiSrCuO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broto, J.M. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Rakoto, H. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Ousset, J.C. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Coffe, G. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Askenazy, S. [Service National Des Champs Magnetiques Pulses, 31077 Toulouse Cedex (France); Osofsky, M.S. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5000 (United States); Soulen, R.J. Jr. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5000 (United States); Wolf, S.A. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5000 (United States); Pari, P. [Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, Service de Physique de l`Etat Condense, Laboratoire des Basses Temperatures, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Bozovic, I. [Edward L. Ginzton Research Center, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1025 (United States); Eckstein, J.N. [Edward L. Ginzton Research Center, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1025 (United States); Virshup, G.F. [Edward L. Ginzton Research Center, Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA 94304-1025 (United States)

    1995-05-01

    H{sub c2}(T) has been measured for thin BSCO films at temperatures down to 65 mK and pulsed fields up to 35 T. H{sub c2}(T) diverged anomalously as the temperature decreased: at the lowest temperature, it was five times that expected for a conventional superconductor. Although deviations from the conventional behavior have been observed in other superconductors, such strong divergence over such a large range of reduced temperature has not been seen before. (orig.).

  12. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...

  13. ttH anomalous coupling in double Higgs production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishiwaki, Kenji; Niyogi, Saurabh; Shivaji, Ambresh [Regional Centre for Accelerator-based Particle Physics, Harish-Chandra Research Institute,Chhatnag Road, Junsi, Allahabad-211019 (India)

    2014-04-02

    We study the effects of top-Higgs anomalous coupling in the production of a pair of Higgs boson via gluon fusion at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The introduction of anomalous ttH coupling can alter the hadronic double Higgs boson cross section and can lead to characteristic changes in certain kinematic distributions. We perform a global analysis based on available LHC data on the Higgs to constrain the parameters of ttH anomalous coupling. Possible overlap of the predictions due to anomalous ttH coupling with those due to anomalous trilinear Higgs coupling is also studied. We briefly discuss the effect of the anomalous ttH coupling on the HZ production via gluon fusion which is one of the main backgrounds in the HH→γγbb-macron channel.

  14. Contemporary Use of Anomalous Diffraction in Biomolecular Structure Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Q.; Hendrickson, W.

    2017-01-01

    The normal elastic X-ray scattering that depends only on electron density can be modulated by an ?anomalous? component due to resonance between X-rays and electronic orbitals. Anomalous scattering thereby precisely identifies atomic species, since orbitals distinguish atomic elements, which enables the multi- and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD and SAD) methods. SAD now predominates in de novo structure determination of biological macromolecules, and we focus here on the prevailing SAD method. We describe the anomalous phasing theory and the periodic table of phasing elements that are available for SAD experiments, differentiating between those readily accessible for at-resonance experiments and those that can be effective away from an edge. We describe procedures for present-day SAD phasing experiments and we discuss optimization of anomalous signals for challenging applications. We also describe methods for using anomalous signals as molecular markers for tracing and element identification. Emerging developments and perspectives are discussed in brief.

  15. Melting curve of compressed barium carbonate from in situ ionic conductivity measurements: Implications for the melting behavior of alkaline earth carbonates in Earth's deep carbon cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, J.; Li, J.; Zhu, F.; Li, Z.; Farawi, R.

    2017-12-01

    The whereabouts of subducted carbonates place a major constraint on the Earth's deep carbon cycle, but the fraction of carbon retained in the slab and transported into the deep mantle, compared to that released from the slab and recycled to the surface, is still under debate. Knowledge of the stability of carbonated mantle rocks is pivotal for assessing the ability of slabs to carry carbonates into the deep mantle. Determination and systematic comparison of the melting curves of alkali and alkaline earth carbonates at high pressure can help construct thermodynamic models to predict the melting behavior of complex carbonated mantle rocks. Among alkaline earth carbonates, the melting behavior of barium carbonate (BaCO3) has not been adequately understood. The reported melting point of BaCO3at 1 bar differ by nearly 800 °C and constraints on the melting curve of BaCO3 at high pressure are not available. In this study, the melting temperatures of BaCO3 were determined up to 11 GPa from in situ ionic conductivity measurements using the multi-anvil apparatus at the University of Michigan. The solid-liquid boundary at high pressure was detected on the basis of a steep rise in conductivity through the sample upon melting. The melting point of BaCO3 was found to drop from 1797 °C at 3.3 GPa to 1600 °C at 5.5 GPa and then rise with pressure to 2180 °C at 11 GPa. The observed melting depression point at 5.5 GPa corresponds to the phase transition of BaCO3 from the aragonite structure (Pmcn) to post-aragonite structure (Pmmn) at 6.3 GPa, 877 °C and 8.0 GPa, 727 °C, determined from synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements using laser-heated DAC experiments at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. These results are also compared with ex situ falling marker experiments, and the three methods together place tight constraints on the melting curve of BaCO3 and elucidates the effect of structural phase transitions on its melting behavior.

  16. Texture Studies and Compression Behaviour of Apple Flesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Bryony; Fonseca, Celia

    Compressive behavior of fruit flesh has been studied using mechanical tests and microstructural analysis. Apple flesh from two cultivars (Braeburn and Cox's Orange Pippin) was investigated to represent the extremes in a spectrum of fruit flesh types, hard and juicy (Braeburn) and soft and mealy (Cox's). Force-deformation curves produced during compression of unconstrained discs of apple flesh followed trends predicted from the literature for each of the "juicy" and "mealy" types. The curves display the rupture point and, in some cases, a point of inflection that may be related to the point of incipient juice release. During compression these discs of flesh generally failed along the centre line, perpendicular to the direction of loading, through a barrelling mechanism. Cryo-Scanning Electron Microscopy (cryo-SEM) was used to examine the behavior of the parenchyma cells during fracture and compression using a purpose designed sample holder and compression tester. Fracture behavior reinforced the difference in mechanical properties between crisp and mealy fruit flesh. During compression testing prior to cryo-SEM imaging the apple flesh was constrained perpendicular to the direction of loading. Microstructural analysis suggests that, in this arrangement, the material fails along a compression front ahead of the compressing plate. Failure progresses by whole lines of parenchyma cells collapsing, or rupturing, with juice filling intercellular spaces, before the compression force is transferred to the next row of cells.

  17. Anomalous transient behavior from an inhomogeneous initial optical vortex density

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Roux, FS

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Inhomogeneous optical vortex densities can be produced in stochastic optical fields by a combination of coherent and incoherent superposition of speckle fields. During subsequent propagation, the inhomogeneity in the vortex density decays away...

  18. Anomalous melting behavior of solid hydrogen at high pressures

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hanyu; Hernández, Eduardo R.; Yan, Jun; Ma, Yanming

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen is the most abundant element in the universe, and its properties under conditions of high temperature and pressure are crucial to understand the interior of of large gaseous planets and other astrophysical bodies. At ultra high pressures solid hydrogen has been predicted to transform into a quantum fluid, because of its high zero point motion. Here we report first principles two phase coexistence and Z method determinations of the melting line of solid hydrogen in a pressure range sp...

  19. Bibliography on Small Systems: Nonequilibrium Phenomena and Anomalous Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIU, Fei; Lamberto, Rondoni; TANG, Lei-Han; ZHOU, Hai-Jun; WANG, Yan-Ting

    2014-10-01

    The workshop and satellite conference held in July 2013 at the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics China (KITPC) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) brought together experts of a variety of different fields, and constituted a unique opportunity to share ideas and breed new ones in a strongly interdisciplinary fashion. At the same time, the breadth of the scope of these two meetings was so wide that the need for a collection of reference books and papers was pointed out, in order to help the interested professionals, as well as graduate students, both to tackle the technically advanced issues and to bridge the gaps, necessarily present in each other's background. Therefore, we invited some of the participants to produce a bibliography containing the most relevant works in their own fields, and to complement this bibliography with a short explanation of the content of those books and papers. We are thus very grateful to Igor Goychuk, David Lacoste, Annick Lesne, Andrea Puglisi, Hong Qian and Hugo Touchette for having accepted our invitation and for having produced what we consider a very useful tool for all those who want to learn or to understand more deeply the current theories concerning small and nonequilibrium systems.

  20. Anomalous atomic volume of alpha-Pu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kollar, J.; Vitos, Levente; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1997-01-01

    We have performed full charge-density calculations for the equilibrium atomic volumes of the alpha-phase light actinide metals using the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA). The average deviation between the experimental and the GGA atomic radii is 1.......3%. The comparison between the LDA and GGA results show that the anomalously large atomic volume of alpha-Pu relative to alpha-Np can be ascribed to exchange-correlation effects connected with the presence of low coordinated sites in the structure where the f electrons are close to the onset of localization...

  1. Anomalous Cepheids and population II blue stragglers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemec, James M.

    Recent studies of anomalous Cepheids (ACs) and population II blue stragglers (BSs), including photometrically variable BSs (VBSs), are reviewed. The VBSs represent about 25 percent of the BSs, the majority of which are SX Phe short-period variables in the Cepheid instability strip. Mass estimates derived using various techniques suggest that both ACs and BSs are relatively massive (about 1.0-1.6 solar mass). The recent discovery that two BSs in the globular cluster NGC 5466 are contact binaries, and the earlier discovery that one of the BSs in Omega Cen is an eclipsing binary, provide direct evidence that at least some BSs are binary systems.

  2. Observations of anomalous fading in maiolica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.G.E.

    1988-01-01

    In the course of an authenticity study on Italian maiolica (tin-glazed earthenware of the Renaissance period), storage at elevated temperature was used to accelerate anomalous fading. Substantial levels of fading were observed in about half of the samples, and in these cases the variation of fading with glow curve temperature accounted for the lack of an equivalent dose plateau. Some evidence was found for a difference in the fading between alpha and beta induced thermoluminescence (TL). More importantly, some samples with unstable natural TL were found: the implications of this for dating and the circumvention of fading are discussed. (author)

  3. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    CERN Document Server

    Hughes, V W; Earle, W; Efstathiadis, E F; Hare, M; Hazen, E S; Krienen, F; Miller, J P; Rind, O; Roberts, B L; Sulak, Lawrence R; Trofimov, A V; Brown, H N; Bunce, G M; Danby, G T; Larsen, R; Lee, Y Y; Meng, W; Mi, J L; Morse, W M; Pai, C; Prigl, R; Sanders, R; Semertzidis, Y K; Tanaka, M; Warburton, D; Orlov, Yu F; Winn, D; Grossmann, A; Jungmann, Klaus; zu Putlitz, Gisbert; Debevec, P T; Deninger, W; Hertzog, D W; Polly, C; Sedykh, S; Urner, D; Haeberlen, U; Cushman, P B; Duong, L; Giron, S; Kindem, J; McNabb, R; Miller, D; Timmermans, C; Zimmerman, D; Druzhinin, V P; Fedotovich, G V; Khazin, B I; Logashenko, I B; Ryskulov, N M; Serednyakov, S I; Shatunov, Yu M; Solodov, E P; Yamamoto, A; Iwasaki, M; Kawamura, M; Deng, H; Dhawan, S K; Farley, Francis J M; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Hughes, V W; Kawall, D; Redin, S I; Steinmetz, A

    1998-01-01

    A new experiment is underway at Brookhaven National Laboratory to measure the g-2 value of the muon to a precision of 0.35 ppm, which would improve our present knowledge by a factor of 20. In its initial run the muon anomalous g-value was found to be a/sub mu //sup + /=1165925(15)*10/sup -9/ [13 ppm], in good agreement with the previous CERN measurements and with approximately the same uncertainty. The current scientific motivations for this experiment are discussed, and the experiment is described. (30 refs).

  4. Global constraints on top quark anomalous couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Déliot, Frédéric; Faria, Ricardo; Fiolhais, Miguel C. N.; Lagarelhos, Pedro; Onofre, António; Pease, Christopher M.; Vasconcelos, Ana

    2018-01-01

    The latest results on top quark physics, namely single top quark production cross sections, W -boson helicity and asymmetry measurements are used to probe the Lorentz structure of the W t b vertex. The increase of sensitivity to new anomalous physics contributions to the top quark sector of the standard model is quantified by combining the relevant results from Tevatron and the Large Hadron Collider. The results show that combining an increasing set of available precision measurements in the search for new physics phenomena beyond the standard model leads to significant sensitivity improvements, especially when compared with the current expectation for the High Luminosity run at the LHC.

  5. The anomalous magnetic moment of the muon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, F.J.M.

    1975-01-01

    A historical survey of the measurements of the gyromagnetic ratio g of the muon. A brief introduction is given to the theory of the 'anomalous magnetic moment' a equivalent to 1/2(g-2) and its significance is explained. The main part of the review concerns the successive (g-2) experiments to measure a directly, with gradually increasing accuracy. At present experiment and theory agree to (13+-29) parts in 10 9 in g, and the muon still obeys the rules of quantum electrodynamics for a structureless point charge. (author)

  6. Presentation: 3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous densities

    OpenAIRE

    Uieda, Leonardo; Barbosa, Valeria C. F.

    2013-01-01

    Slides for the presentation "3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous densities" given at the 2013 AGU Meeting of the Americas in Cancun, Mexico.   Note: There was an error in the title of the talk. The correct title should be "3D magnetic inversion by planting anomalous magnetization"   Abstract: We present a new 3D magnetic inversion algorithm based on the computationally efficient method of planting anomalous densities. The algorithm consists of an iterative growth of the an...

  7. Inclusive anomalous muon production in e+e- annihilation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldman, G.J.; Bulos, F.; Lueke, D.; Abrams, G.S.; Alam, M.S.; Boyarski, A.M.; Breidenbach, M.; Dorfan, J.; Friedberg, C.E.; Fryberger, D.; Goldhaber, G.; Hanson, G.; Heile, F.B.; Jaros, J.A.; Kadyk, J.A.; Larsen, R.R.; Litke, A.M.; Lueth, V.; Madaras, R.J.; Morehouse, C.C.; Nguyen, H.K.; Paterson, J.M.; Perl, M.L.; Peruzzi, I.; Piccolo, M.; Pierre, F.M.; Pun, T.P.; Rapidis, P.; Richter, B.; Sadoulet, B.; Schwitters, R.F.; Tanenbaum, W.; Trilling, G.H.; Vannucci, F.; Whitaker, J.S.; Wiss, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    We present measurements of inclusive anomalous muon production in e + e - annihilations in three energy ranges. In all three ranges we observe a large anomalous muon production rate in two-prong events which is compatible with the expected decays of pairs of heavy leptons. In the highest energy range there is also appreciable anomalous muon production in multiprong events which, due to its magnitude and momentum dependence, must come in part from a source other than a heavy lepton

  8. Behaviorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J.

    2011-01-01

    Early forms of psychology assumed that mental life was the appropriate subject matter for psychology, and introspection was an appropriate method to engage that subject matter. In 1913, John B. Watson proposed an alternative: classical S-R behaviorism. According to Watson, behavior was a subject matter in its own right, to be studied by the…

  9. Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwman, L.I.

    2014-01-01

    Health behaviors are people’s actions, some purposefully deployed to promote or protect health; some thoughtlessly undertaken without concern for their potential risk to health; some consciously, even defiantly, deployed regardless of consequences to health. Risk behaviors are specific forms of

  10. Isotropic compression of cohesive-frictional particles with rolling resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luding, Stefan; Benz, Thomas; Nordal, Steinar

    2010-01-01

    Cohesive-frictional and rough powders are the subject of this study. The behavior under isotropic compression is examined for different material properties involving Coulomb friction, rolling-resistance and contact-adhesion. Under isotropic compression, the density continuously increases according

  11. Theoretical approaches to chemical dynamics in highly compressed fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calef, D.F.

    1987-01-01

    Methods that have been developed in the chemical physics community over the previous decade are applied to problems involving the dynamic chemical behavior of fluids under highly compressed conditions. The methods require detailed structural information about the environment seen by the reacting molecules. These methods are briefly reviewed. Examples for both statically compressed and shock conditions are discussed

  12. Testing framework for compression methods

    OpenAIRE

    Štoček, Ondřej

    2008-01-01

    There are many algorithms for data compression. These compression methods often achieve different compression rate and also use computer resources differently. In practice a combination of compression is usually used instead of standalone compression methods. The software tool can be evolved, where we can easily combine existing compression methods to new one and test it consequently. Main goal of this work is to propound such tool and implement it. Further goal is to implement basic library ...

  13. Acceleration and Propagation of Anomalous Cosmic Rays and Near-Relativistic Electrons in the Heliosheath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelof, E. C.

    2017-12-01

    Voyager 1/2 LECP observations at the termination shock (TS) crossings established that energetic ions (40keV-1MeV) appeared to be locally accelerated "termination shock particles", and since then have exhibited remarkably steady and similar intensities at both spacecraft throughout the heliosheath (HS). On the other hand, the anomalous cosmic rays (ACRs, 4-80 MeV total energy H, He, and O ions) increased more or less steadily across the shock and then gradually peaked years later. All the time in the HS, the ACRs at each spacecraft exhibited a striking "common spectrum", i.e., closely similar intensity histories when ordered by total energy. Near-relativistic electrons (30 keV-1 MeV) exhibited seemingly mutually inconsistent behavior while the two Voyagers transited the shock and HS, with the VGR2 electrons peaking at the shock, but later disappearing for a year (in 2010) and then slowly recovering, as opposed to the less variable VGR1 electrons whose remarkably smooth time history (2008-2012) was very similar to the VGR1 ACRs. Consequently, shock acceleration seems to be operating locally at the TS along with another spatially distributed acceleration/transport mechanism within the HS. The "reservoir" equation (Roelof, AIP Conf. Proc., 1500, 174-179 and 180-184, 2012) offers quantitative explanations for many of these apparently disparate observations. Meso-scale gradients and curvatures in the magnetic field produce transverse transport of energetic particles and (in direct consequence) "transverse compressive" acceleration that relates the fractional rate of momentum d(lnp)/dt=-(1/3)div(Vperp) to the divergence of the component of the plasma velocity transverse to the magnetic field. However, this acceleration rate must compete with the extinction rate of singly-charged ions due to charge exchange with the cold interstellar neutral H-atoms that permeate the HS. The agreement of the Voyager 1/2 LECP observations with the acceleration/extinction processes has

  14. Radio frequency pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farkas, Z.D.

    1988-12-01

    High gradients require peak powers. One possible way to generate high peak powers is to generate a relatively long pulse at a relatively low power and compress it into a shorter pulse with higher peak power. It is possible to compress before dc to rf conversion as is done for the relativistic klystron or after dc to rf conversion as is done with SLED. In this note only radio frequency pulse compression (RFPC) is considered. Three methods of RFPC will be discussed: SLED, BEC, and REC. 3 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  15. Elucidation of the mechanism for anomalous blueshift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotaki, Hideyuki; Kando, Masaki; Koga, J.K.; Nakajima, Kazuhisa

    2004-01-01

    The anomalous blue shift of high intensity laser which was discovered by the present authors occurs in the process of gas ionization accompanied with the self-focusing. This shift does not depend either on the laser power or on the gas density and all photons are shifted by a certain frequency, while the one which has been known in common depends on both the intensity and density and only some part of the laser photons is shifted. In order to elucidate this phenomenon, the occurrence conditions of the anomalous blue shift were investigated and the results are compared with theory. The shifts were measured by focusing the laser beam in the gas-filled chamber with an off-axis-parabolic mirror and with a convex lens. When the reflective lens was used the amount of the shift depended significantly on the ionization rate of the plasma, while it depended on the pulse width when the transmission lens was used indicating that the shift is determined by the valence due to the ionization at the focusing point. (S. Funahashi)

  16. Discovering anomalous events from urban informatics data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayarajah, Kasthuri; Subbaraju, Vigneshwaran; Weerakoon, Dulanga; Misra, Archan; Tam, La Thanh; Athaide, Noel

    2017-05-01

    Singapore's "smart city" agenda is driving the government to provide public access to a broader variety of urban informatics sources, such as images from traffic cameras and information about buses servicing different bus stops. Such informatics data serves as probes of evolving conditions at different spatiotemporal scales. This paper explores how such multi-modal informatics data can be used to establish the normal operating conditions at different city locations, and then apply appropriate outlier-based analysis techniques to identify anomalous events at these selected locations. We will introduce the overall architecture of sociophysical analytics, where such infrastructural data sources can be combined with social media analytics to not only detect such anomalous events, but also localize and explain them. Using the annual Formula-1 race as our candidate event, we demonstrate a key difference between the discriminative capabilities of different sensing modes: while social media streams provide discriminative signals during or prior to the occurrence of such an event, urban informatics data can often reveal patterns that have higher persistence, including before and after the event. In particular, we shall demonstrate how combining data from (i) publicly available Tweets, (ii) crowd levels aboard buses, and (iii) traffic cameras can help identify the Formula-1 driven anomalies, across different spatiotemporal boundaries.

  17. Ultrasonic Detection of Anomalous Machining Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margetan, F. J.; Enyart, Darrel; Thompson, R. B.

    2009-03-01

    During manufacture, rotating jet-engine components are shaped into their final configurations by machining operations which may include turning, drilling and broaching. Anomalous machining conditions, such as a loss of lubricant or a damaged cutting tool, can result in an altered near-surface microstructure, shortening the useful life of the component. In this paper we report on preliminary attempts to detect anomalous machining damage using ultrasonic surface acoustic waves (SAWs). Two pulse/echo immersion setups are considered: normal-incidence acoustic microscopy (Method 1); and oblique-incidence SAW backscatter (Method 2). Each method is applied to pairs of Ti 6-4 turned coupons, one manufactured using accepted best practices; and one purposely damaged using abusive machining conditions. Representative results are presented for each method. Method 1 is very sensitive to changes in surface topology; thus near-surface damage that is accompanied by surface topology changes can be readily detected. For detecting microstructural damage in the absence of topology changes, Method 2 is preferable. In Method 2 the transducer tilt angle is found which results in the maximum backscattered SAW "noise." This angle is dependent on the effective surface wave speed, which in turn is influenced by the near-surface microstructure. For a set twenty Ti 6-4 turned coupons, Method 2 was generally able to distinguish damaged from undamaged surfaces.

  18. Anomalous Dispersion in a Sand Bed River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, D. N.; Tucker, G. E.; Benson, D. M.

    2009-04-01

    There has been a recent surge of interest in non-local, heavy-tailed models of sediment transport and dispersion that are governed by fractional order differential equations. These models have a firm mathematical foundation and have been successfully applied in a variety of transport systems, but their use in geomorphology has been minimal because the data required to validate the models is difficult to acquire. We use data from a nearly 50-year-old tracer experiment to test a fluvial bed load transport model with a two unique features. First, the model uses a heavy-tailed particle velocity distribution with a divergent second moment to reproduce the anomalously high fraction of tracer mass observed in the downstream tail of the spatial distribution. Second, the model partitions mass into a detectable mobile phase and an undetectable, immobile phase. This two-phase transport model predicts two other features observed in the data: a decrease in the amount of detected tracer mass over the course of the experiment and the high initial velocity of the tracer plume. Because our model uses a heavy-tailed velocity distribution with a divergent second moment it is non-local and non-Fickian and able to reproduce aspects of the data that a local, Fickian model cannot. The model's successful prediction of the observed concentration profiles provides some of the first evidence of anomalous dispersion of bed load in a natural river.

  19. Powder diffraction studies using anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, D.E.; Wilkinson, A.P.

    1993-01-01

    With the increasing availability and accessibility of high resolution powder diffractometers at many synchrotron radiation sources throughout the world, there is rapidly-growing interest in the exploitation of anomalous dispersion techniques for structural studies of polycrystalline materials. In conjunction with the Rietveld profile method for structure refinement, such studies are especially useful for the determination of the site distributions of two or more atoms which are near neighbors in the periodic table, or atoms which are distributed among partially occupied sites. Additionally, it is possible to (1) determine the mean-square displacements associated with different kinds of atoms distributed over a single set of sites, (2) distinguish between different oxidation states and coordination geometries of a particular atom in a compound and (3) to determine f' for a wide range of atomic species as a function of energy in the vicinity of an absorption edge. Experimental methods for making anomalous dispersion measurements are described in some detail, including data collection strategies, data analysis and correlation problems, possible systematic errors, and the accuracy of the results. Recent work in the field is reviewed, including cation site-distribution studies (e.g. doped high T c superconductors, ternary alloys, FeCo 2 (PO 4 ) 3 , FeNi 2 BO 5 ), oxidation-state contrast (e.g. YBa 2 Cu 3 O 6+x , Eu 3 O 4 , GaCl 2 , Fe 2 PO 5 ), and the effect of coordination geometry (e.g. Y 3 Ga 5 O l2 )

  20. Revisit to diffraction anomalous fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawaguchi, T.; Fukuda, K.; Tokuda, K.; Shimada, K.; Ichitsubo, T.; Oishi, M.; Mizuki, J.; Matsubara, E.

    2014-01-01

    The diffraction anomalous fine structure method has been revisited by applying this measurement technique to polycrystalline samples and using an analytical method with the logarithmic dispersion relation. The diffraction anomalous fine structure (DAFS) method that is a spectroscopic analysis combined with resonant X-ray diffraction enables the determination of the valence state and local structure of a selected element at a specific crystalline site and/or phase. This method has been improved by using a polycrystalline sample, channel-cut monochromator optics with an undulator synchrotron radiation source, an area detector and direct determination of resonant terms with a logarithmic dispersion relation. This study makes the DAFS method more convenient and saves a large amount of measurement time in comparison with the conventional DAFS method with a single crystal. The improved DAFS method has been applied to some model samples, Ni foil and Fe 3 O 4 powder, to demonstrate the validity of the measurement and the analysis of the present DAFS method

  1. Anomalous Stars and Where to Find Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muna, Demitri; Huff, Eric

    2018-01-01

    The sky is now extensively mapped by imaging surveys in wavelengths that span the electromagnetic spectrum, ranging from Fermi and GALEX down to WISE, Planck, and radio surveys like FIRST and VLSS. Individual public catalogs now contain on order hundreds of millions of distinct sources. Recent progress in image analysis techniques makes possible great increases in the efficiency, sensitivity, and reliability of measurements that combine imaging data from multiple probes with heterogeneous properties. This is especially true for the identification of anomalous sources: traditional methods for finding ‘outliers’ typically rely on making hard cuts on noisy catalog properties, greatly restricting the potential discovery space. Cross-catalog matches confine investigation to objects that occur at signal-to-noise ratios sufficient to be independently detectable in a subset of all the available multi-wavelength coverage. The process of merging the latest analyses with existing data is severely hampered, however, by the fractured way in which these data are processed and stored, limitations of data access, the data volume involved, and the computation power required. This has left archive data far from fully exploited. Stellar anomalies present the best place to start: joint distributions of stellar colors and magnitudes have finer structures than extended sources, and modelling of point sources is computationally cheaper than for galaxies. We present a framework to solve the problem of applying new algorithms to old data while overcoming the limitations described above, in the search for the undiscovered anomalous.

  2. Anomalous thermal response of silicene to uniaxial stretching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-05-01

    Silicene—the silicon counterpart of graphene—has a two-dimensional structure that leads to a host of interesting physical and chemical properties of significant utility. We report here an investigation with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal transport in a single-layer silicene sheet under uniaxial stretching. We discovered that, contrary to its counterpart of graphene and despite the similarity of their honeycomb lattice structure, silicene exhibits an anomalous thermal response to tensile strain: The thermal conductivity of silicene and silicene nanoribbons first increases significantly with applied tensile strain rather than decreasing and then fluctuates at an elevated plateau. By quantifying the relative contribution from different phonon polarizations, we show first that the phonon transport in silicene is dominated by the out-of-plane flexural modes, similar to graphene. We attribute subsequently the unexpected and markedly different behavior of silicene to the interplay between two competing mechanisms governing heat conduction in a stretched silicene sheet, namely, (1) uniaxial stretching modulation in the longitudinal direction significantly depressing the phonon group velocities of longitudinal and transverse modes (phonon softening) and hindering heat conduction, and (2) phonon stiffening in the flexural modes counteracting the phonon softening effect and facilitating thermal transport. The abnormal behavior of the silicene sheet is further correlated to the unique deformation characteristics of its hexagonal lattice. Our study offers perspectives of modulating the thermal properties of low-dimensional structures for applications such as thermoelectric, photovoltaic, and optoelectronic devices.

  3. Free-beam soliton self-compression in air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, A. A.; Mitrofanov, A. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Pugžlys, A.; Panchenko, V. Ya; Shumakova, V.; Ališauskas, S.; Baltuška, A.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2018-02-01

    We identify a physical scenario whereby soliton transients generated in freely propagating laser beams within the regions of anomalous dispersion in air can be compressed as a part of their free-beam spatiotemporal evolution to yield few-cycle mid- and long-wavelength-infrared field waveforms, whose peak power is substantially higher than the peak power of the input pulses. We show that this free-beam soliton self-compression scenario does not require ionization or laser-induced filamentation, enabling high-throughput self-compression of mid- and long-wavelength-infrared laser pulses within a broad range of peak powers from tens of gigawatts up to the terawatt level. We also demonstrate that this method of pulse compression can be extended to long-range propagation, providing self-compression of high-peak-power laser pulses in atmospheric air within propagation ranges as long as hundreds of meters, suggesting new ways towards longer-range standoff detection and remote sensing.

  4. Anomalous compressibility associated with first order valence change in YbInCu4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arnold, Zdeněk; Kamarád, Jiří; De Teresa, J. M.; Ibarra, M. R.

    1998-01-01

    Roč. 7, - (1998), s. 623-625 ISSN 0917-6373. [International Conference - AIRAPT-16 and HPCJ-38-on High Pressure Science and Technology . Kyoto, 28.08.1997-29.08.1997] Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  5. Compressed Video Segmentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kobla, Vikrant; Doermann, David S; Rosenfeld, Azriel

    1996-01-01

    ... changes in content and camera motion. The analysis is performed in the compressed domain using available macroblock and motion vector information, and if necessary, discrete cosine transform (DCT) information...

  6. Mechanical chest compressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeroy, Matthew

    2012-09-13

    The authors of this study state that there is a lack of evidence about the efficiency of mechanical devices in producing chest compressions as an adjunct to resuscitation during cardiorespiratory arrest.

  7. Muon cooling: longitudinal compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yu; Antognini, Aldo; Bertl, Wilhelm; Hildebrandt, Malte; Khaw, Kim Siang; Kirch, Klaus; Papa, Angela; Petitjean, Claude; Piegsa, Florian M; Ritt, Stefan; Sedlak, Kamil; Stoykov, Alexey; Taqqu, David

    2014-06-06

    A 10  MeV/c positive muon beam was stopped in helium gas of a few mbar in a magnetic field of 5 T. The muon "swarm" has been efficiently compressed from a length of 16 cm down to a few mm along the magnetic field axis (longitudinal compression) using electrostatic fields. The simulation reproduces the low energy interactions of slow muons in helium gas. Phase space compression occurs on the order of microseconds, compatible with the muon lifetime of 2  μs. This paves the way for the preparation of a high-quality low-energy muon beam, with an increase in phase space density relative to a standard surface muon beam of 10^{7}. The achievable phase space compression by using only the longitudinal stage presented here is of the order of 10^{4}.

  8. Deterministic Compressed Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    programs. Examples of such algorithms are the interior point methods [51, 52], Lasso modification to LARS [106, 171], homotopy methods [99], weighted...component analysis . IEEE Signal Processing Letters, 9(2):40–42, 2002. [171] S. J. Kim, K. Koh, M. Lustig, S. Boyd, and D. Gorinevsky. A method for...53 7.3 Analysis of the GAME Algorithm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 III Expander-Based Compressed Sensing 61 8 Efficient Compressed

  9. Blind Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Gleichman, Sivan; Eldar, Yonina C.

    2011-01-01

    The fundamental principle underlying compressed sensing is that a signal, which is sparse under some basis representation, can be recovered from a small number of linear measurements. However, prior knowledge of the sparsity basis is essential for the recovery process. This work introduces the concept of blind compressed sensing, which avoids the need to know the sparsity basis in both the sampling and the recovery process. We suggest three possible constraints on the sparsity basis that can ...

  10. #FluxFlow: Visual Analysis of Anomalous Information Spreading on Social Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian; Cao, Nan; Wen, Zhen; Song, Yale; Lin, Yu-Ru; Collins, Christopher

    2014-12-01

    We present FluxFlow, an interactive visual analysis system for revealing and analyzing anomalous information spreading in social media. Everyday, millions of messages are created, commented, and shared by people on social media websites, such as Twitter and Facebook. This provides valuable data for researchers and practitioners in many application domains, such as marketing, to inform decision-making. Distilling valuable social signals from the huge crowd's messages, however, is challenging, due to the heterogeneous and dynamic crowd behaviors. The challenge is rooted in data analysts' capability of discerning the anomalous information behaviors, such as the spreading of rumors or misinformation, from the rest that are more conventional patterns, such as popular topics and newsworthy events, in a timely fashion. FluxFlow incorporates advanced machine learning algorithms to detect anomalies, and offers a set of novel visualization designs for presenting the detected threads for deeper analysis. We evaluated FluxFlow with real datasets containing the Twitter feeds captured during significant events such as Hurricane Sandy. Through quantitative measurements of the algorithmic performance and qualitative interviews with domain experts, the results show that the back-end anomaly detection model is effective in identifying anomalous retweeting threads, and its front-end interactive visualizations are intuitive and useful for analysts to discover insights in data and comprehend the underlying analytical model.

  11. Fast Compression and Decompression capabilities at HPCAT, APS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinogeikin, S. V.

    2016-12-01

    Materials behavior and phase transformation pathways are strongly influenced by the time dependence of the driving mechanism (compression, thermal transfer, strain, irradiation, etc). While shock compression and static compression are well established techniques available for a long time, the techniques filling the compression rate gap and studying materials behavior as a function of compression rates at intermediate rates remain scarce. Recent advances in synchrotron sources, x-ray optics, fast area detectors, and sample environment control have enabled many time-resolved experimental techniques for studying materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions. The High Pressure Collaborative Access Team (HPCAT) at the Advanced Photon Source has made a sustained effort to develop and assemble a powerful collection of high-pressure apparatus for time-resolved research and developing techniques for collecting high-quality time-resolved x-ray scattering data at compression rates intermediate between static and shock compression experiments. In this talk we will outline recently developed capabilities at HPCAT for synthesis of metastable and amorphous materials and studying properties (EOS, lattice relaxation, etc.) and phase transition mechanisms of materials using fast unidirectional and cyclic compression-decompression with variable strain rates up to extreme compression of tens of TPa per second.

  12. Ion acoustic instability of HPT particles, FAC density, anomalous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The intense FAC destabilizes the ion acoustic wave and the resultant electrostatic turbulence creates an anomalous resistivity. The current driven resistivity produces parallel electric field and high power dissipation. The anomalous resistivity , potential differnece along the auroral field lines ∥, intensity of electric field ...

  13. Porous and Fluffy Grains in the Regions of Anomalous Extinction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... It has long been established that the ratio of total to selective extinction is anomalously large (≥ 5) in certain regions of the interstellar medium. In these regions of anomalous extinction the dust grains are likely to be irregular in shape and fluffy in structure. Using discrete dipole approximation (DDA) we ...

  14. Anomalous Evidence, Confidence Change, and Theory Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmerich, Joshua A; Van Voorhis, Kellie; Wiley, Jennifer

    2016-08-01

    A novel experimental paradigm that measured theory change and confidence in participants' theories was used in three experiments to test the effects of anomalous evidence. Experiment 1 varied the amount of anomalous evidence to see if "dose size" made incremental changes in confidence toward theory change. Experiment 2 varied whether anomalous evidence was convergent (of multiple types) or replicating (similar finding repeated). Experiment 3 varied whether participants were provided with an alternative theory that explained the anomalous evidence. All experiments showed that participants' confidence changes were commensurate with the amount of anomalous evidence presented, and that larger decreases in confidence predicted theory changes. Convergent evidence and the presentation of an alternative theory led to larger confidence change. Convergent evidence also caused more theory changes. Even when people do not change theories, factors pertinent to the evidence and alternative theories decrease their confidence in their current theory and move them incrementally closer to theory change. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  15. High-pressure crystallography and compression behavior of the alkali-scandium-germanate end-members LiScGe2O6 and NaScGe2O6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofer, Gregor; Kuzel, Johann; Scheidl, Katharina S.; Redhammer, Günther; Miletich, Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic single-crystal samples of the monoclinic pyroxene-type compounds LiScGe 2 O 6 and NaScGe 2 O 6 have been investigated by means of in-situ high-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques. Crystal-structure investigations at hydrostatic high-pressure conditions were carried out in addition to 10 −4 GPa measurements using the diamond-anvil cell technique up to ∼9.5 GPa. Both samples, LiScGe 2 O 6 (space group P2 1 /c, a=9.9999(8) Å, b=9.1040(2) Å, c=5.4610(2) Å, β=109.240(2)° at 10 −4 GPa) and NaScGe 2 O 6 (space group C2/c, a=10.1678(5) Å, b=9.1583(5) Å, c=5.5672(3) Å, β=107.257(3)° at 10 −4 GPa), did not undergo any compression-induced change of symmetry as confirmed by single-crystal diffraction patterns. Series of high-pressure Raman spectra confirm the absence of any symmetry-related structural phase transition with band positions shifting in a smooth fashion on increasing pressure. High-precision lattice parameters, as determined from X-ray diffraction profile analyzes, were used to monitor both the compressibilities of lattice directions and the evolution of the unit-cell volume with pressure. The experimental data was fitted using a third-order Birch–Murnaghan equation-of-state approach and parameterized fits yield V 0 =469.60(11) Å 3 , K 0 =85.6(1.3) GPa and K′=5.9(4) for LiScGe 2 O 6 and V 0 =495.95(19) Å 3 , K 0 =79(3) GPa and K′=3.9(1.1) for NaScGe 2 O 6 . The systematic comparison of volume properties and compression behavior shows that both pyroxene-type compounds follow established trend lines with similar slopes in comparing volumes versus bulk moduli, and confirm that the position of trend lines in this systematics describing variations with M1 critically depend on the type of M2 and T cations, independent on the space-group symmetry. - Graphical abstract: Polyhedral model of the LiScGe 2 O 6 crystal structure at 9.51 GPa. Red and blue: crystallographic distinctive germanium-tetrahedral chains

  16. Rooted triple consensus and anomalous gene trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmidt Heiko A

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anomalous gene trees (AGTs are gene trees with a topology different from a species tree that are more probable to observe than congruent gene trees. In this paper we propose a rooted triple approach to finding the correct species tree in the presence of AGTs. Results Based on simulated data we show that our method outperforms the extended majority rule consensus strategy, while still resolving the species tree. Applying both methods to a metazoan data set of 216 genes, we tested whether AGTs substantially interfere with the reconstruction of the metazoan phylogeny. Conclusion Evidence of AGTs was not found in this data set, suggesting that erroneously reconstructed gene trees are the most significant challenge in the reconstruction of phylogenetic relationships among species with current data. The new method does however rule out the erroneous reconstruction of deep or poorly resolved splits in the presence of lineage sorting.

  17. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  18. The Anomalous Acceleration of the Pioneer Spacecrafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Diego, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    Radiometric data from the Pioneer 10 and 11 spacecrafts have revealed an unexplained constant acceleration of a_A = (8.74+/-1.33)×10^{-10}m s^{-2} towards the Sun, also known as the Pioneer anomaly. Different groups have analyzed the Pioneer data and have got the same results, which rules out computer programming and data handling errors. Attempts to explain this phenomenon arguing intrinsic causes on-board the spacecrafts failed or have led to inconclusive results. Therefore, the Pioneer anomalous acceleration has motivated the interest of researchers to find explanations that could bring insight upon the forces acting in the outer Solar Systems or a hint to discover new natural laws.

  19. Effect of anomalous drift during ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleksandrov, P.A.; Baranova, E.K.; Beloshitskii, V.V.; Demakov, K.D.; Starostin, V.A.

    1986-01-01

    Experimental and theoretical results are presented on Tl-ion implantation into hot silicon substrates (approx. 1200 0 C). a An anomalously large (by more than an order of magnitude) displacement of the peak position of the implanted impurity distribution into the bulk of the substrate is found. b) The conclusion is drawn that the basic process responsible for this displacement of the peak is radiation-enhanced diffusion (RED) due to nonequilibrium concentration of point defects produced in the heated target directly under implantation. c) The crystalline structure of the resulting ion-implanted layer indicates that in-situ annealing of the exposed layer occurs during high-temperature implantation. d) Experimental impurity distributions confirm the possibility of producing an implanted-impurity 'buried layer' below the layer of a single crystal silicon, the 'buried layer' depth depending on the implantation regime. (author)

  20. Anomalous Right Subclavian Artery-Esophageal Fistulae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Brooke Shires

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available An aberrant right subclavian artery (ARSA is the most common aortic arch anomaly, but only 19 previous cases of ARSA-esophageal fistula have been reported. Six patients have survived their bleeding episode. We describe the case of a 44-year-old woman who developed massive hemoptysis. Laryngoscopy, bronchoscopy, head and neck angiogram, and median sternotomy did not reveal what was presumed initially to be a tracheoinnominate fistula. Contrasted CT showed an anomalous subclavian artery posterior to the esophagus. Given the technical challenge of approaches for this pathology, the patient was unfit for open surgical repair. Therefore, endovascular covered stent grafts were deployed spanning the segment of the subclavian artery in continuity with the esophagus, via a right brachial artery approach. Unfortunately, the patient died after successful placement of the grafts.

  1. Anomalous inelastic neutron scattering from calcite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dove, M.T.; Harris, M.J.; Winkler, B.; Hagen, M.E.; Keele Univ.; Powell, B.M.; Steigenberger, U.

    1992-01-01

    Inelastic neutron scattering measurements on calcite (CaCO 3 ) in its low temperature phase have revealed the existence of an unusual column of inelastic scattering at the wavevector corresponding to the F point of the high temperature Brillouin zone. At the same wavevector there is also a transverse acoustic soft mode and the column of scattering ranges in energy from zero up to the soft mode. The intensity of the anomalous scattering increases rapidly with temperature, and is consistent with an Arrhenius relation of the form exp(-T * /T), where T * = 1035 K. We speculate that this scattering arises from thermal fluctuations of the calcite structure into a different ordered structure, which is related to an ordering instability at the F point. Evidence for this possibility has also been obtained from lattice energy calculations. (author)

  2. Edge separation using diffraction anomalous fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravel, B.; Bouldin, C.E.; Renevier, H.; Hodeau, J.L.; Berar, J.F.

    1999-01-01

    We exploit the crystallographic sensitivity of the Diffraction Anomalous Fine-Structure (DAFS) measurement to separate the fine structure contributions of different atomic species with closely spaced resonant energies. In BaTiO 3 the Ti K edge and Ba Lm edges are separated by 281 eV, or about 8.2 Angstrom -1 ), thus severely limiting the information content of the Ti K edge signal. Using the site selectivity of DAFS we can separate the two fine structure spectra using an iterative Kramers-Kronig method, thus extending the range of the Ti K edge spectrum. This technique has application to many rare earth/transition metal compounds, including many magnetic materials of technological significance for which K and L edges overlap in energy. (au)

  3. Mapping Anomalous Currents in Supersymmetric Dualities

    CERN Document Server

    Abel, Steven; Komargodski, Zohar

    2011-01-01

    In many strongly-coupled systems, the infrared dynamics is described by different degrees of freedom from the ultraviolet. It is then natural to ask how operators written in terms of the microscopic variables are mapped to operators composed of the macroscopic ones. Certain types of operators, like conserved currents, are simple to map, and in supersymmetric theories one can also follow the chiral ring. In this note, we consider supersymmetric theories and extend the mapping to anomalous currents (and gaugino bilinears). Our technique is completely independent of subtleties associated with the renormalization group, thereby shedding new light on previous approaches to the problem. We demonstrate the UV/IR mapping in several examples with different types of dynamics, emphasizing the uniformity and simplicity of the approach. Natural applications of these ideas include the effects of soft breaking on the dynamics of various theories and new models of electroweak symmetry breaking.

  4. Conformable derivative approach to anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H. W.; Yang, S.; Zhang, S. Q.

    2018-02-01

    By using a new derivative with fractional order, referred to conformable derivative, an alternative representation of the diffusion equation is proposed to improve the modeling of anomalous diffusion. The analytical solutions of the conformable derivative model in terms of Gauss kernel and Error function are presented. The power law of the mean square displacement for the conformable diffusion model is studied invoking the time-dependent Gauss kernel. The parameters related to the conformable derivative model are determined by Levenberg-Marquardt method on the basis of the experimental data of chloride ions transportation in reinforced concrete. The data fitting results showed that the conformable derivative model agrees better with the experimental data than the normal diffusion equation. Furthermore, the potential application of the proposed conformable derivative model of water flow in low-permeability media is discussed.

  5. Anomalous pulse interaction in dissipative media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordyugov, Grigory; Engel, Harald

    2008-06-01

    We review a number of phenomena occurring in one-dimensional excitable media due to modified decay behind propagating pulses. Those phenomena can be grouped in two categories depending on whether the wake of a solitary pulse is oscillatory or not. Oscillatory decay leads to nonannihilative head-on collision of pulses and oscillatory dispersion relation of periodic pulse trains. Stronger wake oscillations can even result in a bistable dispersion relation. Those effects are illustrated with the help of the Oregonator and FitzHugh-Nagumo models for excitable media. For a monotonic wake, we show that it is possible to induce bound states of solitary pulses and anomalous dispersion of periodic pulse trains by introducing nonlocal spatial coupling to the excitable medium.

  6. Anomalous diffusion in geophysical and laboratory turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tsinober

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an overview and some new results on anomalous diffusion of passive scalar in turbulent flows (including those used by Richardson in his famous paper in 1926. The obtained results are based on the analysis of the properties of invariant quantities (energy, enstrophy, dissipation, enstrophy generation, helicity density, etc. - i.e. independent of the choice of the system of reference as the most appropriate to describe physical processes - in three different turbulent laboratory flows (grid-flow, jet and boundary layer, see Tsinober et al. (1992 and Kit et al. (1993. The emphasis is made on the relations between the asymptotic properties of the intermittency exponents of higher order moments of different turbulent fields (energy, dissipation, helicity, spontaneous breaking of isotropy and reflexional symmetry and the variability of turbulent diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer, in the troposphere and in the stratosphere. It is argued that local spontaneous breaking of isotropy of turbulent flow results in anomalous scaling laws for turbulent diffusion (as compared to the scaling law of Richardson which are observed, as a rule, in different atmospheric layers from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL to the stratosphere. Breaking of rotational symmetry is important in the ABL, whereas reflexional symmetry breaking is dominating in the troposphere locally and in the stratosphere globally. The results are of speculative nature and further analysis is necessary to validate or disprove the claims made, since the correspondence with the experimental results may occur for the wrong reasons as happens from time to time in the field of turbulence.

  7. Anomalous diffusion in geophysical and laboratory turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsinober, A.

    We present an overview and some new results on anomalous diffusion of passive scalar in turbulent flows (including those used by Richardson in his famous paper in 1926). The obtained results are based on the analysis of the properties of invariant quantities (energy, enstrophy, dissipation, enstrophy generation, helicity density, etc.) - i.e. independent of the choice of the system of reference as the most appropriate to describe physical processes - in three different turbulent laboratory flows (grid-flow, jet and boundary layer, see Tsinober et al. (1992) and Kit et al. (1993). The emphasis is made on the relations between the asymptotic properties of the intermittency exponents of higher order moments of different turbulent fields (energy, dissipation, helicity, spontaneous breaking of isotropy and reflexional symmetry) and the variability of turbulent diffusion in the atmospheric boundary layer, in the troposphere and in the stratosphere. It is argued that local spontaneous breaking of isotropy of turbulent flow results in anomalous scaling laws for turbulent diffusion (as compared to the scaling law of Richardson) which are observed, as a rule, in different atmospheric layers from the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to the stratosphere. Breaking of rotational symmetry is important in the ABL, whereas reflexional symmetry breaking is dominating in the troposphere locally and in the stratosphere globally. The results are of speculative nature and further analysis is necessary to validate or disprove the claims made, since the correspondence with the experimental results may occur for the wrong reasons as happens from time to time in the field of turbulence.

  8. Unimode metamaterials exhibiting negative linear compressibility and negative thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudek, Krzysztof K; Attard, Daphne; Caruana-Gauci, Roberto; Grima, Joseph N; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof W

    2016-01-01

    Unimode metamaterials made from rotating rigid triangles are analysed mathematically for their mechanical and thermal expansion properties. It is shown that these unimode systems exhibit positive Poisson’s ratios irrespective of size, shape and angle of aperture, with the Poisson’s ratio exhibiting giant values for certain conformations. When the Poisson’s ratio in one loading direction is larger than +1, the systems were found to exhibit the anomalous property of negative linear compressibility along this direction, that is, the systems expand in this direction when hydrostatically compressed. Also discussed are the thermal expansion properties of these systems under the assumption that the units exhibit increased rotational agitation once subjected to an increase in temperature. The effect of the geometric parameters on the aforementioned thermo-mechanical properties of the system, are discussed, with the aim of identifying negative behaviour. (paper)

  9. Strong Bulk-Edge Coupling in the Compressible Half-Filled Quantum Hall State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milovanovic, M.V.; Shimshoni, E.

    1999-01-01

    We studied analytically static correlators in the compressible half-filled quantum Hall state, which characterize the nature of charged excitations in the bulk and on the edge of the system. We employ a modified version of the plasma analogy - namely, a mapping to a classical two-dimensional system of interacting particles - similarly to what has been done in studies of the incompressible (Laughlin) states. However, the 'fake plasma' corresponding to the half-filled state is found to have anomalously weak screening properties. As a consequence, the correlations along the edge do not decay algebraically as in the incompressible case, thus indicating the breakdown of Wen's edge theory. On the other hand, the bulk correlator (which parallels the Girvin-MacDonald algebraic off-diagonal long range order) decays algebraically in a similar way as in the incompressible states, signifying the presence of some kind of bosonic order even in the compressible state. The above results suggest that due to the strong coupling between charged modes on the edge and the neutral Fermions (dipoles) in the bulk, the (attractive) correlation hole is not well defined on the edge. Hence, the system there can be modeled as a free Fermi gas of electrons (with an appropriate boundary condition). A possible experimental indication of a strong bulk-edge coupling at half-filling has been indeed observed in non-local resistance measurements [1]. We also suggest, that while our results contradict the validity of an effective one-dimensional description of the edge excitations on the static level, the dynamics may decouple the edge and bulk so as to recover the Laughlin-like behavior apparent in the experiment of Grayson et al

  10. No need to replace an "anomalous" primate (Primates) with an "anomalous" bear (Carnivora, Ursidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Eliécer E; Pine, Ronald H

    2015-01-01

    By means of mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequencing of putative "yeti", "bigfoot", and other "anomalous primate" hair samples, a recent study concluded that two samples, presented as from the Himalayas, do not belong to an "anomalous primate", but to an unknown, anomalous type of ursid. That is, that they match 12S rRNA sequences of a fossil Polar Bear (Ursusmaritimus), but neither of modern Polar Bears, nor of Brown Bears (Ursusarctos), the closest relative of Polar Bears, and one that occurs today in the Himalayas. We have undertaken direct comparison of sequences; replication of the original comparative study; inference of phylogenetic relationships of the two samples with respect to those from all extant species of Ursidae (except for the Giant Panda, Ailuropodamelanoleuca) and two extinct Pleistocene species; and application of a non-tree-based population aggregation approach for species diagnosis and identification. Our results demonstrate that the very short fragment of the 12S rRNA gene sequenced by Sykes et al. is not sufficiently informative to support the hypotheses provided by these authors with respect to the taxonomic identity of the individuals from which these sequences were obtained. We have concluded that there is no reason to believe that the two samples came from anything other than Brown Bears. These analyses afforded an opportunity to test the monophyly of morphologically defined species and to comment on both their phylogenetic relationships and future efforts necessary to advance our understanding of ursid systematics.

  11. Channel box compression device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamizo, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yuki.

    1996-01-01

    The device of the present invention reduces the volume of spent fuel channel boxes of power plant facilities to eliminate secondary wastes, suppress generation of radiation sources and improve storage space efficiency. The device has a box-like shape. A support frame is disposed on the lateral side of the box for supporting spent channel boxes. A horizontal transferring unit and a vertical transferring compression unit driven by a driving mechanism are disposed in the support frame. Further, the compression unit may have a rotational compression roller so as to move freely in the transferring unit. In addition, the transferring unit and the driving mechanism may be disposed outside of pool water. With such a constitution, since spent channel boxes are compressed and bent by horizontal movement of the transferring unit and the vertical movement of the compression unit, no cut pieces or cut powders are generated. Further, if the transferring unit and the driving mechanism are disposed outside of the pool water, it is not necessary to make them waterproof, which facilitates the maintenance. (I.S.)

  12. Optical pulse compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glass, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The interest in using large lasers to achieve a very short and intense pulse for generating fusion plasma has provided a strong impetus to reexamine the possibilities of optical pulse compression at high energy. Pulse compression allows one to generate pulses of long duration (minimizing damage problems) and subsequently compress optical pulses to achieve the short pulse duration required for specific applications. The ideal device for carrying out this program has not been developed. Of the two approaches considered, the Gires--Tournois approach is limited by the fact that the bandwidth and compression are intimately related, so that the group delay dispersion times the square of the bandwidth is about unity for all simple Gires--Tournois interferometers. The Treacy grating pair does not suffer from this limitation, but is inefficient because diffraction generally occurs in several orders and is limited by the problem of optical damage to the grating surfaces themselves. Nonlinear and parametric processes were explored. Some pulse compression was achieved by these techniques; however, they are generally difficult to control and are not very efficient. (U.S.)

  13. An Onsager Singularity Theorem for Turbulent Solutions of Compressible Euler Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drivas, Theodore D.; Eyink, Gregory L.

    2017-12-01

    We prove that bounded weak solutions of the compressible Euler equations will conserve thermodynamic entropy unless the solution fields have sufficiently low space-time Besov regularity. A quantity measuring kinetic energy cascade will also vanish for such Euler solutions, unless the same singularity conditions are satisfied. It is shown furthermore that strong limits of solutions of compressible Navier-Stokes equations that are bounded and exhibit anomalous dissipation are weak Euler solutions. These inviscid limit solutions have non-negative anomalous entropy production and kinetic energy dissipation, with both vanishing when solutions are above the critical degree of Besov regularity. Stationary, planar shocks in Euclidean space with an ideal-gas equation of state provide simple examples that satisfy the conditions of our theorems and which demonstrate sharpness of our L 3-based conditions. These conditions involve space-time Besov regularity, but we show that they are satisfied by Euler solutions that possess similar space regularity uniformly in time.

  14. Celiac artery compression syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokotsakis, J N; Lambidis, C D; Lioulias, A G; Skouteli, E T; Bastounis, E A; Livesay, J J

    2000-04-01

    Celiac artery compression syndrome occurs when the median arcuate ligament of the diaphragm causes extrinsic compression of the celiac trunk. We report a case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with a three-month history of postprandial abdominal pain, nausea and some emesis, without weight loss. There was a bruit in the upper mid-epigastrium and the lateral aortic arteriography revealed a significant stenosis of the celiac artery. At operation, the celiac axis was found to be severely compressed anteriorly by fibers forming the inferior margin of the arcuate ligament of the diaphragm. The ligament was cut and a vein by-pass from the supraceliac aorta to the distal celiac artery was performed. The patient remains well and free of symptoms two and a half years since operation.In this report we discuss the indications and the therapeutic options of this syndrome as well as a review of the literature is being given.

  15. Isentropic Compression of Argon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oona, H.; Solem, J.C.; Veeser, L.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Rodriquez, P.J.; Younger, S.M.; Lewis, W.; Turley, W.D.

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the transition of argon from an insulator to a conductor by compressing the frozen gas isentropically to pressures at which neighboring atomic orbitals overlap sufficiently to allow some electron motion between atoms. Argon and the other rare gases have closed electron shells and therefore remain montomic, even when they solidify. Their simple structure makes it likely that any measured change in conductivity is due to changes in the atomic structure, not in molecular configuration. As the crystal is compressed the band gap closes, allowing increased conductivity. We have begun research to determine the conductivity at high pressures, and it is our intention to determine the compression at which the crystal becomes a metal

  16. Variant Branching Pattern of Dorsalis Pedis Artery Accompanied with Anomalous Presence of Extensor Hallucis Brevis Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwini Aithal Padur

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available During routine dissection, we came across multiple variations in the dorsum of the right foot. Dorsalis pedis artery (DPA presented with an unusual branching pattern. The arcuate artery was completely absent, and hence three tarsal branches arose from lateral side of DPA. The first branch continued as first dorsal metatarsal artery, the second branch continued as the second dorsal metatarsal artery, and the third branch continued as third dorsal metatarsal artery which also provided a small twig to the fourth intermetatarsal space as the fourth dorsal metatarsal artery. We also observed the unique presence of extensor hallucis brevis muscle with the origin from the medial part of superior surface of the calcaneus and inserted to proximal phalanx of great toe. Since the DPA was just beneath this muscle, anomalous presence of the muscle may lead to compression of DPA. Awareness regarding such variations is critical for angiographers, vascular surgeons, reconstructive and plastic surgeons.

  17. Energy transfer in compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grete, Philipp; O'Shea, Brian W.; Beckwith, Kris; Schmidt, Wolfram; Christlieb, Andrew

    2017-09-01

    Magnetic fields, compressibility, and turbulence are important factors in many terrestrial and astrophysical processes. While energy dynamics, i.e., how energy is transferred within and between kinetic and magnetic reservoirs, has been previously studied in the context of incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, we extend shell-to-shell energy transfer analysis to the compressible regime. We derive four new transfer functions specifically capturing compressibility effects in the kinetic and magnetic cascade, and capturing energy exchange via magnetic pressure. To illustrate their viability, we perform and analyze four simulations of driven isothermal MHD turbulence in the sub- and supersonic regime with two different codes. On the one hand, our analysis reveals robust characteristics across regime and numerical method. For example, energy transfer between individual scales is local and forward for both cascades with the magnetic cascade being stronger than the kinetic one. Magnetic tension and magnetic pressure related transfers are less local and weaker than the cascades. We find no evidence for significant nonlocal transfer. On the other hand, we show that certain functions, e.g., the compressive component of the magnetic energy cascade, exhibit a more complex behavior that varies both with regime and numerical method. Having established a basis for the analysis in the compressible regime, the method can now be applied to study a broader parameter space.

  18. Results of subscale MTF compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Stephen; Mossman, A.; Donaldson, M.; Fusion Team, General

    2016-10-01

    In magnetized target fusion (MTF) a magnetized plasma torus is compressed in a time shorter than its own energy confinement time, thereby heating to fusion conditions. Understanding plasma behavior and scaling laws is needed to advance toward a reactor-scale demonstration. General Fusion is conducting a sequence of subscale experiments of compact toroid (CT) plasmas being compressed by chemically driven implosion of an aluminum liner, providing data on several key questions. CT plasmas are formed by a coaxial Marshall gun, with magnetic fields supported by internal plasma currents and eddy currents in the wall. Configurations that have been compressed so far include decaying and sustained spheromaks and an ST that is formed into a pre-existing toroidal field. Diagnostics measure B, ne, visible and x-ray emission, Ti and Te. Before compression the CT has an energy of 10kJ magnetic, 1 kJ thermal, with Te of 100 - 200 eV, ne 5x1020 m-3. Plasma was stable during a compression factor R0/R >3 on best shots. A reactor scale demonstration would require 10x higher initial B and ne but similar Te. Liner improvements have minimized ripple, tearing and ejection of micro-debris. Plasma facing surfaces have included plasma-sprayed tungsten, bare Cu and Al, and gettering with Ti and Li.

  19. Holographic model for the anomalous scalings of the cuprates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauvelt, Erin; Cremonini, Sera; Hoover, Anthony; Li, Li; Waskie, Steven

    2018-03-01

    We examine transport in a holographic model in which the dynamics of the charged degrees of freedom is described by the nonlinear Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action. Axionic scalar fields are included to break translational invariance and generate momentum dissipation in the system. Scaling exponents are introduced by using geometries which are nonrelativistic and hyperscaling-violating in the infrared. In the probe DBI limit the theory reproduces the anomalous temperature dependence of the resistivity and Hall angle of the cuprate strange metals, ρ ˜T and cotΘH˜T2. These scaling laws would not be present without the nonlinear dynamics encoded by the DBI interactions. We further show that because of its richness the DBI theory supports a wide spectrum of temperature scalings. This model provides explicit examples in which transport is controlled by different relaxation times. On the other hand, when only one quantity sets the temperature scale of the system, the Hall angle and conductivity typically exhibit the same temperature behavior. We illustrate this point using new fully backreacted analytical dyonic black brane solutions.

  20. The mechanism of anomalous hardening in transition-metal monoborides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yongcheng; Gao, Zhenbang; Qin, Ping; Gao, Li; Tang, Chun

    2017-07-06

    The quest for novel nanomaterials with unusual functionalities continues to be a central challenge to modern nanoscience. Here we report a surprisingly anomalous hardening behavior exhibited by a class of transition-metal monoborides (TMB). Most remarkable is the occurrence of the intrinsic hardness maximum at the valence-electron concentration (VEC) of about 8 electrons per formula unit (e per f.u.); both lower and higher VECs lead to the decrease of hardness, contrasting with the expected positive correlation between hardness and VEC. Such an unexpected phenomenon originates from the presence of two sorts of bands near the Fermi level that respond oppositely to the movement of dislocations within the metal bilayer. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the hardness is closely related to the formation energy for TMB, which justifies the importance of the thermodynamic stability in designing superhard materials. Our findings not only elucidate the unique mechanism responsible for unusual atom-scale hardening but also open a new avenue towards designing novel multifunctional nanomaterials with the coexistence of high hardness and excellent electrical conductivity.

  1. Anomalous transport in turbulent plasmas and continuous time random walks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balescu, R. [Association Euratom-Etat Belge pour la Fusion, Physique Statistique et Plasmas, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Code Postal 231, Boulevard du Triomphe, 1050 Bruxelles (Belgium)

    1995-05-01

    The possibility of a model of anomalous transport problems in a turbulent plasma by a purely stochastic process is investigated. The theory of continuous time random walks (CTRW`s) is briefly reviewed. It is shown that a particular class, called the standard long tail CTRW`s is of special interest for the description of subdiffusive transport. Its evolution is described by a non-Markovian diffusion equation that is constructed in such a way as to yield exact values for all the moments of the density profile. The concept of a CTRW model is compared to an exact solution of a simple test problem: transport of charged particles in a fluctuating magnetic field in the limit of infinite perpendicular correlation length. Although the well-known behavior of the mean square displacement proportional to {ital t}{sup 1/2} is easily recovered, the exact density profile cannot be modeled by a CTRW. However, the quasilinear approximation of the kinetic equation has the form of a non-Markovian diffusion equation and can thus be generated by a CTRW.

  2. Anomalous Shape Changes of Silicon Nanopillars by Electrochemical Lithiation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2011-07-13

    Silicon is one of the most attractive anode materials for use in Li-ion batteries due to its ∼10 times higher specific capacity than existing graphite anodes. However, up to 400% volume expansion during reaction with Li causes particle pulverization and fracture, which results in rapid capacity fading. Although Si nanomaterials have shown improvements in electrochemical performance, there is limited understanding of how volume expansion takes place. Here, we study the shape and volume changes of crystalline Si nanopillars with different orientations upon first lithiation and discover anomalous behavior. Upon lithiation, the initially circular cross sections of nanopillars with 〈100〉, 〈110〉, and 〈111〉 axial orientations expand into cross, ellipse, and hexagonal shapes, respectively. We explain this by identifying a high-speed lithium ion diffusion channel along the 〈110〉 direction, which causes preferential volume expansion along this direction. Surprisingly, the 〈111〉 and 〈100〉 nanopillars shrink in height after partial lithiation, while 〈110〉 nanopillars increase in height. The length contraction is suggested to be due to a collapse of the {111} planes early in the lithiation process. These results give new insight into the Si volume change process and could help in designing better battery anodes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Dynamic compression of hydrogen isotopes at megabar pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunin, Ryurik F.; Urlin, Vitalii D.; Medvedev, Aleksandr B.

    2010-09-01

    We review the results of shock compression of solid protium to the pressure 66 GPa, of liquid deuterium to 110 GPa, and of solid deuterium to 123 GPa in explosive devices of spherical geometry. The results are compared with data obtained by US scientists using traditional energy sources (explosives and light-gas guns), striker acceleration in a strong magnetic field (Z facility at Sandia), and powerful lasers (Nova at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Omega at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester). Results of density measurements of hydrogen isotopes under quasi-isentropic compression are analyzed. The absence of an anomalous increase in density under shock and quasi-isentropic compression of hydrogen isotopes is demonstrated. On the other hand, both processes exhibit a sharp change in the compression curve slopes, at the respective pressures 45 and 300 GPa.

  4. Soliton compression to ultra-short pulses using cascaded quadratic nonlinearities in silica photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the possibility of using poled silica photonic crystal fibers for self-defocusing soliton compression with cascaded quadratic nonlinearities. Such a configuration has promise due to the desirable possibility of reducing the group-velocity mismatch. However, this unfortunately leads...... to increased phase mismatch, and the dispersion is often anomalous. All this reduces the design parameter space where soliton compression is possible, and poses strong requirements on the poling efficiency. We propose to use quasi-phase matching in order to reach realistic requirements on the quadratic...

  5. Emergence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in 5d perovskite SrIrO{sub 3} thin films: Interplay between correlation, disorder, and spin-orbit coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Abhijit [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ki-Seok [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Edge of Theoretical Science (IES), POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yoon H., E-mail: yhj@postech.ac.kr [Department of Physics, POSTECH, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We investigate the effects of compressive strain on the electrical resistivity of 5d iridium based perovskite SrIrO{sub 3} by depositing epitaxial films of thickness 35 nm on various substrates such as GdScO{sub 3} (110), DyScO{sub 3} (110), and SrTiO{sub 3} (001). Surprisingly, we find anomalous transport behaviors as expressed by ρ∝T{sup ε} in the temperature dependent resistivity, where the temperature exponent ε evolves continuously from 4/5 to 1 and to 3/2 with an increase of compressive strain. Furthermore, magnetoresistance always remains positive irrespective of resistivity upturns at low temperatures. These observations imply that the delicate interplay between correlation and disorder in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling is responsible for the emergence of the non-Fermi liquid behaviors in 5d perovskite SrIrO{sub 3} thin films. We offer a theoretical framework for the interpretation of the experimental results. - Highlights: • We studied the effect of compressive strain on the perovskite SrIrO{sub 3} thin films. • We revealed non-Fermi liquid behaviors in the transport properties. • Irrespective of weak localization effects, magnetoresistance remains positive. • Mott-Anderson-Griffiths scenario is proposed to account for the NFL behaviors.

  6. Anisotropic Concrete Compressive Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustenhoff Hansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Henrik Brøner; Hoang, Linh Cao

    2017-01-01

    When the load carrying capacity of existing concrete structures is (re-)assessed it is often based on compressive strength of cores drilled out from the structure. Existing studies show that the core compressive strength is anisotropic; i.e. it depends on whether the cores are drilled parallel...... correlation to the curing time. The experiments show no correlation between the anisotropy and the curing time and a small strength difference between the two drilling directions. The literature shows variations on which drilling direction that is strongest. Based on a Monto Carlo simulation of the expected...

  7. Image data compression investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrie, Carlos

    1989-01-01

    NASA continuous communications systems growth has increased the demand for image transmission and storage. Research and analysis was conducted on various lossy and lossless advanced data compression techniques or approaches used to improve the efficiency of transmission and storage of high volume stellite image data such as pulse code modulation (PCM), differential PCM (DPCM), transform coding, hybrid coding, interframe coding, and adaptive technique. In this presentation, the fundamentals of image data compression utilizing two techniques which are pulse code modulation (PCM) and differential PCM (DPCM) are presented along with an application utilizing these two coding techniques.

  8. Reentrant quantum anomalous Hall effect with in-plane magnetic fields in HgMnTe quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Hsiu-Chuan; Liu, Xin; Liu, Chao-Xing

    2013-08-01

    The quantum anomalous Hall effect has been predicted in HgMnTe quantum wells with an out-of-plane magnetization of Mn atoms. However, since HgMnTe quantum wells are paramagnetic, an out-of-plane magnetic field is required to polarize magnetic moments of Mn atoms, which inevitably induces Landau levels and makes it difficult to identify the origin of the quantized Hall conductance experimentally. In this work, we study the quantum anomalous Hall effect in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field in Mn-doped HgTe quantum wells. For a small out-of-plane magnetic field, the in-plane magnetic field can drive the system from a normal insulating state to a quantum anomalous Hall state. When the out-of-plane magnetic field is slightly above the transition point, the system shows a reentrant behavior of Hall conductance, varying from -e2/h to 0 and back to -e2/h, with increasing in-plane magnetic fields. The reentrant quantum anomalous Hall effect originates from the interplay between the exchange coupling of magnetic moments and the direct Zeeman coupling of magnetic fields. The calculation incorporating Landau levels shows that there is no qualitative change of the reentrant behavior.

  9. Effect of cold compression on precipitation and conductivity of an Al-Li-Cu alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A K; Robinson, J S

    2008-12-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the effect of increasing the degree of deformation applied by cold compression on the ageing kinetics and electrical conductivity response of an Al-Li-Cu alloy containing Mg and Ag. When cold compressed greater than 3%, the increased dislocation density accelerates the widespread precipitation of the T(1) phase resulting in an enhanced age hardening response. The lengthening rate of T(1) precipitates is also reduced in this cold compressed condition owing to the reduced local solute supersaturation, a result of the widespread precipitation of T(1) plates. Cold compression by less than 3% does not increase the age hardening response, and the precipitation of GP zones/theta'' appears to be suppressed. Precipitation of the T(1) phase is also not significantly enhanced compared with that of the more than 3% cold compressed conditions. The anomalous decrease in electrical conductivity is associated with the nucleation and growth of the T(1) phase. Strain fields around T(1) precipitates combined with the increased volume fraction of T(1) are thought to be the cause of the anomalous conductivity behaviour.

  10. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, Gregory L.; Drivas, Theodore D.

    2018-02-01

    We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or "coarse-grained" solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy) by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive "4 /5 th-law"-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents) required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the "Big Power Law in the Sky" observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  11. Cascades and Dissipative Anomalies in Compressible Fluid Turbulence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory L. Eyink

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available We investigate dissipative anomalies in a turbulent fluid governed by the compressible Navier-Stokes equation. We follow an exact approach pioneered by Onsager, which we explain as a nonperturbative application of the principle of renormalization-group invariance. In the limit of high Reynolds and Péclet numbers, the flow realizations are found to be described as distributional or “coarse-grained” solutions of the compressible Euler equations, with standard conservation laws broken by turbulent anomalies. The anomalous dissipation of kinetic energy is shown to be due not only to local cascade but also to a distinct mechanism called pressure-work defect. Irreversible heating in stationary, planar shocks with an ideal-gas equation of state exemplifies the second mechanism. Entropy conservation anomalies are also found to occur via two mechanisms: an anomalous input of negative entropy (negentropy by pressure work and a cascade of negentropy to small scales. We derive “4/5th-law”-type expressions for the anomalies, which allow us to characterize the singularities (structure-function scaling exponents required to sustain the cascades. We compare our approach with alternative theories and empirical evidence. It is argued that the “Big Power Law in the Sky” observed in electron density scintillations in the interstellar medium is a manifestation of a forward negentropy cascade or an inverse cascade of usual thermodynamic entropy.

  12. Search for Anomalous Couplings in the Higgs Sector at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Achard, P; Aguilar-Benítez, M; Alcaraz, J; Alemanni, G; Allaby, James V; Aloisio, A; Alviggi, M G; Anderhub, H; Andreev, V P; Anselmo, F; Arefev, A; Azemoon, T; Aziz, T; Bagnaia, P; Bajo, A; Baksay, G; Baksay, L; Baldew, S V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, Sw; Barczyk, A; Barillère, R; Bartalini, P; Basile, M; Batalova, N; Battiston, R; Bay, A; Becattini, F; Becker, U; Behner, F; Bellucci, L; Berbeco, R; Berdugo, J; Berges, P; Bertucci, B; Betev, B L; Biasini, M; Biglietti, M; Biland, A; Blaising, J J; Blyth, S C; Bobbink, Gerjan J; Böhm, A; Boldizsar, L; Borgia, B; Bottai, S; Bourilkov, D; Bourquin, Maurice; Braccini, S; Branson, J G; Brochu, F; Burger, J D; Burger, W J; Cai, X D; Capell, M; Cara Romeo, G; Carlino, G; Cartacci, A M; Casaus, J; Cavallari, F; Cavallo, N; Cecchi, C; Cerrada, M; Chamizo-Llatas, M; Chang, Y H; Chemarin, M; Chen, A; Chen, G; Chen, G M; Chen, H F; Chen, H S; Chiefari, G; Cifarelli, Luisa; Cindolo, F; Clare, I; Clare, R; Coignet, G; Colino, N; Costantini, S; de la Cruz, B; Cucciarelli, S; van Dalen, J A; De Asmundis, R; Déglon, P L; Debreczeni, J; Degré, A; Dehmelt, K; Deiters, K; Della Volpe, D; Delmeire, E; Denes, P; De Notaristefani, F; De Salvo, A; Diemoz, M; Dierckxsens, M; Dionisi, C; Dittmar, M; Doria, A; Dova, M T; Duchesneau, D; Duda, M; Echenard, B; Eline, A; El-Hage, A; El-Mamouni, H; Engler, A; Eppling, F J; Extermann, P; Falagán, M A; Falciano, S; Favara, A; Fay, J; Fedin, O; Felcini, M; Ferguson, T; Fesefeldt, H S; Fiandrini, E; Field, J H; Filthaut, F; Fisher, P H; Fisher, W; Fisk, I; Forconi, G; Freudenreich, Klaus; Furetta, C; Galaktionov, Yu; Ganguli, S N; García-Abia, P; Gataullin, M; Gentile, S; Giagu, S; Gong, Z F; Grenier, G; Grimm, O; Grünewald, M W; Guida, M; van Gulik, R; Gupta, V K; Gurtu, A; Gutay, L J; Haas, D; Hatzifotiadou, D; Hebbeker, T; Hervé, A; Hirschfelder, J; Hofer, H; Hohlmann, M; Holzner, G; Hou, S R; Hu, Y; Jin, B N; Jones, L W; de Jong, P; Josa-Mutuberria, I; Kaur, M; Kienzle-Focacci, M N; Kim, J K; Kirkby, Jasper; Kittel, E W; Klimentov, A; König, A C; Kopal, M; Koutsenko, V F; Kräber, M H; Krämer, R W; Krüger, A; Kunin, A; Ladrón de Guevara, P; Laktineh, I; Landi, G; Lebeau, M; Lebedev, A; Lebrun, P; Lecomte, P; Lecoq, P; Le Coultre, P; Le Goff, J M; Leiste, R; Levtchenko, M; Levchenko, P M; Li, C; Likhoded, S; Lin, C H; Lin, W T; Linde, Frank L; Lista, L; Liu, Z A; Lohmann, W; Longo, E; Lü, Y S; Luci, C; Luminari, L; Lustermann, W; Ma Wen Gan; Malgeri, L; Malinin, A; Maña, C; Mans, J; Martin, J P; Marzano, F; Mazumdar, K; McNeil, R R; Mele, S; Merola, L; Meschini, M; Metzger, W J; Mihul, A; Milcent, H; Mirabelli, G; Mnich, J; Mohanty, G B; Muanza, G S; Muijs, A J M; Musicar, B; Musy, M; Nagy, S; Natale, S; Napolitano, M; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Newman, H; Nisati, A; Novák, T; Nowak, H; Ofierzynski, R A; Organtini, G; Pal, I; Palomares, C; Paolucci, P; Paramatti, R; Passaleva, G; Patricelli, S; Paul, T; Pauluzzi, M; Paus, C; Pauss, Felicitas; Pedace, M; Pensotti, S; Perret-Gallix, D; Petersen, B; Piccolo, D; Pierella, F; Pioppi, M; Piroué, P A; Pistolesi, E; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Pozhidaev, V; Pothier, J; Prokofev, D; Prokofiev, D O; Quartieri, J; Rahal-Callot, G; Rahaman, M A; Raics, P; Raja, N; Ramelli, R; Rancoita, P G; Ranieri, R; Raspereza, A V; Razis, P A; Ren, D; Rescigno, M; Reucroft, S; Riemann, S; Riles, K; Roe, B P; Romero, L; Rosca, A; Rosemann, C; Rosenbleck, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Roth, S; Rubio, J A; Ruggiero, G; Rykaczewski, H; Sakharov, A; Saremi, S; Sarkar, S; Salicio, J; Sánchez, E; Schäfer, C; Shchegelskii, V; Schopper, Herwig Franz; Schotanus, D J; Sciacca, C; Servoli, L; Shevchenko, S; Shivarov, N; Shoutko, V; Shumilov, E; Shvorob, A V; Son, D; Souga, C; Spillantini, P; Steuer, M; Stickland, D P; Stoyanov, B; Strässner, A; Sudhakar, K; Sultanov, G G; Sun, L Z; Sushkov, S; Suter, H; Swain, J D; Szillási, Z; Tang, X W; Tarjan, P; Tauscher, Ludwig; Taylor, L; Tellili, B; Teyssier, D; Timmermans, C; Ting, Samuel C C; Ting, S M; Tonwar, S C; Tóth, J; Tully, C; Tung, K L; Ulbricht, J; Valente, E; Van de Walle, R T; Vásquez, R; Veszpremi, V; Vesztergombi, G; Vetlitskii, I; Vicinanza, D; Viertel, Gert M; Villa, S; Vivargent, M; Vlachos, S; Vodopyanov, I; Vogel, H; Vogt, H; Vorobev, I; Vorobyov, A A; Wadhwa, M; Wang, Q; Wang, X L; Wang, Z M; Weber, M; Wilkens, H; Wynhoff, S; Xia, L; Xu, Z Z; Yamamoto, J; Yang, B Z; Yang, C G; Yang, H J; Yang, M; Yeh, S C; Zalite, A; Zalite, Yu; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhu, G Y; Zhu, R Y; Zhuang, H L; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, B; Zöller, M

    2004-01-01

    Anomalous couplings of the Higgs boson are searched for through the processes e^+ e^- -> H gamma, e^+ e^- -> e^+ e^- H and e^+ e^- -> HZ. The mass range 70 GeV ffbar, H -> gamma gamma, H -> Z\\gamma and H -> WW^(*) are considered and no evidence is found for anomalous Higgs production or decay. Limits on the anomalous couplings d, db, Delta(g1z), Delta(kappa_gamma) and xi^2 are derived as well as limits on the H -> gamma gamma and H -> Z gamma decay rates.

  13. Disorder effect on chiral edge modes and anomalous Hall conductance in Weyl semimetals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takane, Yositake

    2016-01-01

    Typical Weyl semimetals host chiral surface states and hence show an anomalous Hall response. Although a Weyl semimetal phase is known to be robust against weak disorder, the effect of disorder on chiral states has not been fully clarified so far. We study the behavior of such chiral states in the presence of disorder and its consequences on an anomalous Hall response, focusing on a thin slab of Weyl semimetal with chiral surface states along its edge. It is shown that weak disorder does not disrupt chiral edge states but crucially affects them owing to the renormalization of a mass parameter: the number of chiral edge states changes depending on the strength of disorder. It is also shown that the Hall conductance is quantized when the Fermi level is located near Weyl nodes within a finite-size gap. This quantization of the Hall conductance collapses once the strength of disorder exceeds a critical value, suggesting that it serves as a probe to distinguish a Weyl semimetal phase from a diffusive anomalous Hall metal phase. (author)

  14. Temporal compressive sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Bryan W.

    2017-12-12

    Methods and systems for temporal compressive sensing are disclosed, where within each of one or more sensor array data acquisition periods, one or more sensor array measurement datasets comprising distinct linear combinations of time slice data are acquired, and where mathematical reconstruction allows for calculation of accurate representations of the individual time slice datasets.

  15. Compressive CFAR Radar Processing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Rossum, W.L. van; Otten, M.P.G.; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of a combined Compressive Sensing (CS) Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) radar processor under different interference scenarios using both the Cell Averaging (CA) and Order Statistic (OS) CFAR detectors. Using the properties of the Complex Approximate

  16. Compressive CFAR radar detection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anitori, L.; Otten, M.P.G.; Rossum, W.L. van; Maleki, A.; Baraniuk, R.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we develop the first Compressive Sensing (CS) adaptive radar detector. We propose three novel architectures and demonstrate how a classical Constant False Alarm Rate (CFAR) detector can be combined with ℓ1-norm minimization. Using asymptotic arguments and the Complex Approximate

  17. Gas compression infrared generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, W.F.

    1980-01-01

    A molecular gas is compressed in a quasi-adiabatic manner to produce pulsed radiation during each compressor cycle when the pressure and temperature are sufficiently high, and part of the energy is recovered during the expansion phase, as defined in U.S. Pat. No. 3,751,666; characterized by use of a cylinder with a reciprocating piston as a compressor

  18. Multiple snapshot compressive beamforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerstoft, Peter; Xenaki, Angeliki; Mecklenbrauker, Christoph F.

    2015-01-01

    For sound fields observed on an array, compressive sensing (CS) reconstructs the multiple source signals at unknown directions-of-arrival (DOAs) using a sparsity constraint. The DOA estimation is posed as an underdetermined problem expressing the field at each sensor as a phase-lagged superposition...

  19. Compression of Infrared images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantel, Claire; Forchhammer, Søren

    2017-01-01

    This paper investigates the compression of infrared images with three codecs: JPEG2000, JPEG-XT and HEVC. Results are evaluated in terms of SNR, Mean Relative Squared Error (MRSE) and the HDR-VDP2 quality metric. JPEG2000 and HEVC perform fairy similar and better than JPEG-XT. JPEG2000 performs...

  20. Nonlinear Frequency Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scollie, Susan; Glista, Danielle; Seelisch, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Frequency lowering technologies offer an alternative amplification solution for severe to profound high frequency hearing losses. While frequency lowering technologies may improve audibility of high frequency sounds, the very nature of this processing can affect the perceived sound quality. This article reports the results from two studies that investigated the impact of a nonlinear frequency compression (NFC) algorithm on perceived sound quality. In the first study, the cutoff frequency and compression ratio parameters of the NFC algorithm were varied, and their effect on the speech quality was measured subjectively with 12 normal hearing adults, 12 normal hearing children, 13 hearing impaired adults, and 9 hearing impaired children. In the second study, 12 normal hearing and 8 hearing impaired adult listeners rated the quality of speech in quiet, speech in noise, and music after processing with a different set of NFC parameters. Results showed that the cutoff frequency parameter had more impact on sound quality ratings than the compression ratio, and that the hearing impaired adults were more tolerant to increased frequency compression than normal hearing adults. No statistically significant differences were found in the sound quality ratings of speech-in-noise and music stimuli processed through various NFC settings by hearing impaired listeners. These findings suggest that there may be an acceptable range of NFC settings for hearing impaired individuals where sound quality is not adversely affected. These results may assist an Audiologist in clinical NFC hearing aid fittings for achieving a balance between high frequency audibility and sound quality. PMID:23539261

  1. Anomalously fast kinetics of lipid monolayer buckling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oppenheimer, Naomi; Diamant, Haim; Witten, Thomas A.

    2013-08-01

    We reexamine previous observations of folding kinetics of compressed lipid monolayers in light of the accepted mechanical buckling mechanism recently proposed by L. Pocivavsek [ScienceSCIEAS0036-807510.1126/science.1154069 320, 912 (2008)]. Using simple models, we set conservative limits on (a) the energy released in the mechanical buckling process and (b) the kinetic energy entailed by the observed folding motion. These limits imply a kinetic energy at least 30 times greater than the energy supplied by the buckling instability. We discuss possible extensions of the accepted picture that might resolve this discrepancy.

  2. Anomalous misfit strain relaxation in ultrathin YBa2Cu3O7 - delta epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamigaki, K.; Terauchi, H.; Terashima, T.; Bando, Y.; Iijima, K.; Yamamoto, K.; Hirata, K.; Hayashi, K.; Nakagawa, I.; Tomii, Y.

    1991-03-01

    Ultrathin YBa2Cu3O7-δ epitaxial films were successfully grown in situ on (001) SrTiO3 and MgO substrates by means of ozone-incorporating activated reactive evaporation. The x-ray-diffraction study was carefully examined to determine the structural properties of the grown films. Excellent crystallinity with no interfacial disorders was revealed by the appearance of the Laue oscillations. It was found that in a well lattice-matched YBa2Cu3O7-δ/SrTiO3 system, the crystallinity was deteriorated due to defect introduction at the critical layer thickness hc ( ˜ 130 Å). Interestingly, also in a poorly lattice-matched YBa2Cu3O7-δ/MgO system, excellent crystallinity was revealed even at above hc ( < 24 Å). This implies that an anomalous misfit relaxation process exists in the YBa2Cu3O7-δ/MgO system. In such a system, no crystal imperfection of the MgO substrate caused by defect introduction was elucidated by the grazing incidence x-ray scattering, which indicated that the MgO substrate did not contribute to the anomalous misfit relaxation. The anomalous growth manner was also found in YBa2Cu3O7-δ/MgO according to surface morphology investigations. Below 40 Å( ≳ hc), island nucleation growth was found. Above 40 Å, it was observed that an atomically smooth surface was obtained and the crystallinity was simultaneously improved. It is suggested that YBa2Cu3O7-δ possesses an anomalous misfit relaxation mechanism, and that especially in the growth on MgO, it couples with the characteristic growth behavior at the initial stage.

  3. On the quantum mechanics of consciousness, with application to anomalous phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, Robert G.; Dunne, Brenda J.

    1986-08-01

    molecular bonds, barrier penetration, and quantum statistical collective behavior become useful analogies for representation of a variety of consciousness experiences, both normal and anomalous, and for the design of experiments to study these systematically.

  4. Anomalous Anticipatory Responses in Networked Random Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, Roger D.; Bancel, Peter A.

    2006-01-01

    We examine an 8-year archive of synchronized, parallel time series of random data from a world spanning network of physical random event generators (REGs). The archive is a publicly accessible matrix of normally distributed 200-bit sums recorded at 1 Hz which extends from August 1998 to the present. The primary question is whether these data show non-random structure associated with major events such as natural or man-made disasters, terrible accidents, or grand celebrations. Secondarily, we examine the time course of apparently correlated responses. Statistical analyses of the data reveal consistent evidence that events which strongly affect people engender small but significant effects. These include suggestions of anticipatory responses in some cases, leading to a series of specialized analyses to assess possible non-random structure preceding precisely timed events. A focused examination of data collected around the time of earthquakes with Richter magnitude 6 and greater reveals non-random structure with a number of intriguing, potentially important features. Anomalous effects in the REG data are seen only when the corresponding earthquakes occur in populated areas. No structure is found if they occur in the oceans. We infer that an important contributor to the effect is the relevance of the earthquake to humans. Epoch averaging reveals evidence for changes in the data some hours prior to the main temblor, suggestive of reverse causation

  5. Diagnosing Anomalous Network Performance with Confidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settlemyer, Bradley W [ORNL; Hodson, Stephen W [ORNL; Kuehn, Jeffery A [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL

    2011-04-01

    Variability in network performance is a major obstacle in effectively analyzing the throughput of modern high performance computer systems. High performance interconnec- tion networks offer excellent best-case network latencies; how- ever, highly parallel applications running on parallel machines typically require consistently high levels of performance to adequately leverage the massive amounts of available computing power. Performance analysts have usually quantified network performance using traditional summary statistics that assume the observational data is sampled from a normal distribution. In our examinations of network performance, we have found this method of analysis often provides too little data to under- stand anomalous network performance. Our tool, Confidence, instead uses an empirically derived probability distribution to characterize network performance. In this paper we describe several instances where the Confidence toolkit allowed us to understand and diagnose network performance anomalies that we could not adequately explore with the simple summary statis- tics provided by traditional measurement tools. In particular, we examine a multi-modal performance scenario encountered with an Infiniband interconnection network and we explore the performance repeatability on the custom Cray SeaStar2 interconnection network after a set of software and driver updates.

  6. Are anomalously short tunnelling times measurable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delgado, V.; Muga, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Low and Mende have analyzed the conditions that would make possible an actual measurement of an anomalously short traversal time through a potential barrier concluding that such a measurement cannot be made because it is not possible to describe the tunnelling of a wave packet initially close to the barrier by the open-quote open-quote usual wave packet space time analysis close-quote close-quote. We complement this work in several ways: It is argued that the described failure of the usual formalism occurs under a set of too restrictive conditions, some of them not physically motivated, so it does not necessarily imply the impossibility of such a measurement. However, by retaining only conditions well motivated on physical grounds we have performed a systematic numerical check which shows that the conclusion by Low and Mende is indeed generally valid. It is shown that, as speculated by Low and Mende, the process is dominated by over the barrier transmission. Copyright copyright 1996 Academic Press, Inc

  7. Anomalous dispersion of microcavity trion-polaritons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhara, S.; Chakraborty, C.; Goodfellow, K. M.; Qiu, L.; O'Loughlin, T. A.; Wicks, G. W.; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Vamivakas, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    The strong coupling of excitons to optical cavities has provided new insights into cavity quantum electrodynamics as well as opportunities to engineer nanoscale light-matter interactions. Here we study the interaction between out-of-equilibrium cavity photons and both neutral and negatively charged excitons, by embedding a single layer of the atomically thin semiconductor molybdenum diselenide in a monolithic optical cavity based on distributed Bragg reflectors. The interactions lead to multiple cavity polariton resonances and anomalous band inversion for the lower, trion-derived, polariton branch--the central result of the present work. Our theoretical analysis reveals that many-body effects in an out-of-equilibrium setting result in an effective level attraction between the exciton-polariton and trion-polariton accounting for the experimentally observed inverted trion-polariton dispersion. Our results suggest a pathway for studying interesting regimes in quantum many-body physics yielding possible new phases of quantum matter as well as fresh possibilities for polaritonic device architectures.

  8. Anomalous transport from holography. Pt. II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Yanyan; Sharon, Amir [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Physics, Beersheba (Israel); Lublinsky, Michael [Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Department of Physics, Beersheba (Israel); University of Connecticut, Physics Department, Storrs, CT (United States)

    2017-03-15

    This is a second study of chiral anomaly-induced transport within a holographic model consisting of anomalous U(1){sub V} x U(1){sub A} Maxwell theory in Schwarzschild-AdS{sub 5} spacetime. In the first part, chiral magnetic/separation effects (CME/CSE) are considered in the presence of a static spatially inhomogeneous external magnetic field. Gradient corrections to CME/CSE are analytically evaluated up to third order in the derivative expansion. Some of the third order gradient corrections lead to an anomaly-induced negative B{sup 2}-correction to the diffusion constant. We also find modifications to the chiral magnetic wave nonlinear in B. In the second part, we focus on the experimentally interesting case of the axial chemical potential being induced dynamically by a constant magnetic and time-dependent electric fields. Constitutive relations for the vector/axial currents are computed employing two different approximations: (a) derivative expansion (up to third order) but fully nonlinear in the external fields, and (b) weak electric field limit but resuming all orders in the derivative expansion. A non-vanishing nonlinear axial current (CSE) is found in the first case. The dependence on magnetic field and frequency of linear transport coefficient functions is explored in the second. (orig.)

  9. Anomalous transport from holography. Part I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Yanyan [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Lublinsky, Michael [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel); Physics Department, University of Connecticut,2152 Hillside Road, Storrs, CT 06269-3046 (United States); Sharon, Amir [Department of Physics, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev,Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

    2016-11-17

    We revisit the transport properties induced by the chiral anomaly in a charged plasma holographically dual to anomalous U(1){sub V}×U(1){sub A} Maxwell theory in Schwarzschild-AdS{sub 5}. Off-shell constitutive relations for vector and axial currents are derived using various approximations generalising most of known in the literature anomaly-induced phenomena and revealing some new ones. In a weak external field approximation, the constitutive relations have all-order derivatives resummed into six momenta-dependent transport coefficient functions: the diffusion, the electric/magnetic conductivity, and three anomaly induced functions. The latter generalise the chiral magnetic and chiral separation effects. Nonlinear transport is studied assuming presence of constant background external fields. The chiral magnetic effect, including all order nonlinearity in magnetic field, is proven to be exact when the magnetic field is the only external field that is turned on. Non-linear corrections to the constitutive relations due to electric and axial external fields are computed.

  10. Mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, A.; Darwin, D.

    1980-10-01

    The behavior of the mortar constituent of concrete under cyclic compression was studied and a simple analytic model was developed to represent its cyclic behavior. Experimental work consisted of monotonic and cyclic compressive loading of mortar. Two mixes were used, with proportions corresponding to concretes having water cement ratios of 0.5 and 0.6. Forty-four groups of specimens were tested at ages ranging from 5 to 70 days. complete monotonic and cyclic stress strain envelopes were obtained. A number of loading regimes were investigated, including cycles to a constant maximum strain. Major emphasis was placed on tests using relatively high stress cycles. Degradation was shown to be a continuous process and a function of both total strain and load history. No stability or fatigue limit was apparent.

  11. Ultrahigh Pressure Dynamic Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, T. S.

    2017-12-01

    Laser-based dynamic compression provides a new opportunity to study the lattice structure and other properties of geological materials to ultrahigh pressure conditions ranging from 100 - 1000 GPa (1 TPa) and beyond. Such studies have fundamental applications to understanding the Earth's core as well as the interior structure of super-Earths and giant planets. This talk will review recent dynamic compression experiments using high-powered lasers on materials including Fe-Si, MgO, and SiC. Experiments were conducted at the Omega laser (University of Rochester) and the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS, Stanford). At Omega, laser drives as large as 2 kJ are applied over 10 ns to samples that are 50 microns thick. At peak compression, the sample is probed with quasi-monochromatic X-rays from a laser-plasma source and diffraction is recorded on image plates. At LCLS, shock waves are driven into the sample using a 40-J laser with a 10-ns pulse. The sample is probed with X-rays form the LCLS free electron laser providing 1012 photons in a monochromatic pulse near 10 keV energy. Diffraction is recorded using pixel array detectors. By varying the delay between the laser and the x-ray beam, the sample can be probed at various times relative to the shock wave transiting the sample. By controlling the shape and duration of the incident laser pulse, either shock or ramp (shockless) loading can be produced. Ramp compression produces less heating than shock compression, allowing samples to be probed to ultrahigh pressures without melting. Results for iron alloys, oxides, and carbides provide new constraints on equations of state and phase transitions that are relevant to the interior structure of large, extrasolar terrestrial-type planets.

  12. Primary percutaneous coronary intervention in an anomalous single coronary trunk arising anomalously from ascending aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mohit D; Girish, M P; Bansal, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Vivek; Trehan, Vijay; Tyagi, Sanjay

    2016-07-01

    A 45-year-old male patient presented with acute anterior wall myocardial infarction. Angiography revealed a single coronary trunk arising from the ascending aorta above the coronary sinuses and giving rise to right coronary artery, left circumflex artery and critical stenosis in the left anterior descending artery. This report also highlights the feasibility of performing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) in this rare anomaly and discusses the important technical considerations to be kept in mind while attempting such a case. This is the first report of such an anomalous origin of a single coronary trunk arising from ascending aorta.

  13. Anomalous superconductivity in black phosphorus under high pressures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, H.; Tachikawa, K.

    1984-01-01

    Pressure induced superconductivity in single crystals of black phosphorus has been studied. Maximum onset Tsub(c) was near 13 K. The anomalous superconductivity may be explained in terms of excitonic mechanism. (author)

  14. The relation between anomalous magnetic moment and axial anomaly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teryaev, O.V.

    1990-12-01

    The conservation of total angular momentum of spinor particle leads to a simple relation between the famous Schwinger and Adler coefficients determining axial anomaly and anomalous magnetic moment, respectively. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  15. The Chelyabinsk Meteorite Hits an Anomalous Zone in the Urals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochemasov, G. G.

    2013-09-01

    The Chelyabinsk meteorite is "strange" because it hits an area in the Urals where anomalous events are observed: shining skies, light balls, UFOs, electrphonic bolids. The area tectonically occurs at the intersection of two fold belts: Urals and Timan.

  16. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Won-kyung; Au, Virginia; Rose, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return is an uncommon congenital malformation, and may be partial or total. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) is more common than total anomalous pulmonary venous return, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac anomalies. Whilst many patients with PAPVR remain asymptomatic, some may present in later age with symptoms related to left-to-right shunt, right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. We report two cases of PAPVR detected on Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA) for the work up of pulmonary hypertension. The cases demonstrate that, although uncommon, partial anomalous pulmonary venous return can be a contributing factor to pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary veins should be carefully examined when reading a CTPA study.

  17. Anomalous diffusion process applied to magnetic resonance image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senra Filho, A. C. da S.; Garrido Salmon, C. E.; Murta Junior, L. O.

    2015-03-01

    Diffusion process is widely applied to digital image enhancement both directly introducing diffusion equation as in anisotropic diffusion (AD) filter, and indirectly by convolution as in Gaussian filter. Anomalous diffusion process (ADP), given by a nonlinear relationship in diffusion equation and characterized by an anomalous parameters q, is supposed to be consistent with inhomogeneous media. Although classic diffusion process is widely studied and effective in various image settings, the effectiveness of ADP as an image enhancement is still unknown. In this paper we proposed the anomalous diffusion filters in both isotropic (IAD) and anisotropic (AAD) forms for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhancement. Filters based on discrete implementation of anomalous diffusion were applied to noisy MRI T2w images (brain, chest and abdominal) in order to quantify SNR gains estimating the performance for the proposed anomalous filter when realistic noise is added to those images. Results show that for images containing complex structures, e.g. brain structures, anomalous diffusion presents the highest enhancements when compared to classical diffusion approach. Furthermore, ADP presented a more effective enhancement for images containing Rayleigh and Gaussian noise. Anomalous filters showed an ability to preserve anatomic edges and a SNR improvement of 26% for brain images, compared to classical filter. In addition, AAD and IAD filters showed optimum results for noise distributions that appear on extreme situations on MRI, i.e. in low SNR images with approximate Rayleigh noise distribution, and for high SNR images with Gaussian or non central χ noise distributions. AAD and IAD filter showed the best results for the parametric range 1.2 MRI. This study indicates the proposed anomalous filters as promising approaches in qualitative and quantitative MRI enhancement.

  18. Effect of fluid compressibility on journal bearing performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimofte, Florin

    1993-01-01

    An analysis was undertaken to determine the effect of fluid film compressibility on the performance of fluid film bearings. A new version of the Reynolds equation was developed, using a polytropic expansion, for both steady-state and dynamic conditions. Polytropic exponents from 1 (isothermal) to 1000 (approaching an incompressible liquid) were evaluated for two bearing numbers, selected from a range of practical interest for cryogenic application, and without cavitation. Bearing loads were insensitive to fluid compressibility for low bearing numbers, as was expected. The effect of compressibility on attitude angle was significant, even when the bearing number was low. A small amount of fluid compressibility was enough to obtain stable running conditions. Incompressible liquid lacked stability at all conditions. Fluid compressibility can be used to control the bearing dynamic coefficients, thereby influencing the dynamic behavior of the rotor-bearing system.

  19. Structural controls on anomalous transport in fractured porous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Yaniv; Geiger, Sebastian; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in a wide range of disordered systems, notably in fractured porous formations. We quantitatively identify the structural controls on anomalous tracer transport in a model of a real fractured geological formation that was mapped in an outcrop. The transport, determined by a continuum scale mathematical model, is characterized by breakthrough curves (BTCs) that document anomalous (or "non-Fickian") transport, which is accounted for by a power law distribution of local transition times ψ>(t>) within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW). We show that the determination of ψ>(t>) is related to fractures aligned approximately with the macroscopic direction of flow. We establish the dominant role of fracture alignment and assess the statistics of these fractures by determining a concentration-visitation weighted residence time histogram. We then convert the histogram to a probability density function (pdf) that coincides with the CTRW ψ>(t>) and hence anomalous transport. We show that the permeability of the geological formation hosting the fracture network has a limited effect on the anomalous nature of the transport; rather, it is the fractures transverse to the flow direction that play the major role in forming the long BTC tail associated with anomalous transport. This is a remarkable result, given the complexity of the flow field statistics as captured by concentration transitions.

  20. Behavior Subtraction applied to radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rossum, W.L. van; Caro Cuenca, M.

    2014-01-01

    An algorithm developed for optical images has been applied to radar data. The algorithm, Behavior Subtraction, is based on capturing the dynamics of a scene and detecting anomalous behavior. The radar application is the detection of small surface targets at sea. The sea surface yields the expected

  1. Anomalous maximum and minimum for the dissociation of a geminate pair in energetically disordered media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govatski, J. A.; da Luz, M. G. E.; Koehler, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the geminated pair dissociation probability φ as function of applied electric field and temperature in energetically disordered nD media. Regardless nD, for certain parameters regions φ versus the disorder degree (σ) displays anomalous minimum (maximum) at low (moderate) fields. This behavior is compatible with a transport energy which reaches a maximum and then decreases to negative values as σ increases. Our results explain the temperature dependence of the persistent photoconductivity in C60 single crystals going through order-disorder transitions. They also indicate how an energetic disorder spatial variation may contribute to higher exciton dissociation in multicomponent donor/acceptor systems.

  2. Anomalous Tunneling of Spin Wave in Polar State of Spin-1 BEC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watabe, Shohei; Ohashi, Yoji; Kato, Yusuke

    2012-01-01

    We investigate tunneling properties of collective spin-wave excitations in the polar state of a spin-1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Within the mean-field theory at T = 0, we show that when the condensate is in the critical supercurrent state, the spin wave mode exhibits perfect transmission through a nonmagnetic potential barrier in the low energy limit, unless the strength of a spin-independent interaction c o equals that of a spin-dependent interaction c o Such an anomalous tunneling behavior is absent in the case of a magnetic barrier. We also clarify a scaling law of the transmission probability as a function of the mode energy.

  3. Anomalous Tunneling of Spin Wave in Polar State of Spin-1 BEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Shohei; Kato, Yusuke; Ohashi, Yoji

    2012-12-01

    We investigate tunneling properties of collective spin-wave excitations in the polar state of a spin-1 spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Within the mean-field theory at T = 0, we show that when the condensate is in the critical supercurrent state, the spin wave mode exhibits perfect transmission through a nonmagnetic potential barrier in the low energy limit, unless the strength of a spin-independent interaction co equals that of a spin-dependent interaction co Such an anomalous tunneling behavior is absent in the case of a magnetic barrier. We also clarify a scaling law of the transmission probability as a function of the mode energy.

  4. The showerfront time-structure of ''anomalous muon'' events associated with Hercules X-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandreas, D.E.; Allen, R.C.; Biller, S.D.; Dion, G.M.; Lu, X-Q.; Vishwanath, P.R.; Yodh, G.B.; Berley, D.; Chang, C.Y.; Dingus, B.L.; Dion, C.; Goodman, J.A.; Gupta, S.K.; Haines, T.J.; Kwok, P.W.; Stark, M.J.; Burman, R.L.; Hoffman, C.M.; Lloyd-Evans, J.; Nagle, D.E.; Potter, M.E.; Sandberg, V.D.; Zhang, W.P.; Cady, D.R.; Ellsworth, R.W.; Krakauer, D.A.; Talaga, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The 11 ''in-phase'' source events from the 1986 muon-rich bursts associated with Hercules X-1 (previously reported by this group) have been studied for indications of further anomalous behavior. The most significant effect observed resulted from an analysis of the showerfront time-structures of these events. This analysis was then applied a priori to the rest of the source day, where an additional ∼9 signal events are expected to remain. The same effect was observed at a chance probability level of ∼0.1%. 1 ref., 7 figs

  5. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  6. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...

  7. Tunable anomalous hall effect induced by interfacial catalyst in perpendicular multilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J. Y.; Peng, W. L.; Sun, Q. Y.; Liu, Y. W.; Dong, B. W.; Zheng, X. Q.; Yu, G. H.; Wang, C.; Zhao, Y. C.; Wang, S. G.

    2018-04-01

    The interfacial structures, playing a critical role on the transport properties and the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in thin films and multilayers, can be modified by inserting an ultrathin functional layer at the various interfaces. The anomalous Hall effect (AHE) in the multilayers with core structure of Ta/CoFeB/X/MgO/Ta (X: Hf or Pt) is tuned by interfacial catalytic engineering. The saturation anomalous Hall resistance (RAH) is increased by 16.5% with 0.1 nm Hf insertion compared with the reference sample without insertion. However, the RAH value is decreased by 9.0% with 0.1 nm Pt insertion. The interfacial states were characterized by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS results indicate that a strong bonding between Hf and O for Hf insertion, but no bonding between Pt and O for Pt insertion. The bonding between metal and oxygen leads to various oxygen migration behavior at the interfaces. Therefore, the opposite behavior about the RAH originates from the different oxygen behavior due to various interfacial insertion. This work provides a new approach to manipulate spin transport property for the potential applications.

  8. Anomalous baryogenesis at the weak scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singleton, R.L. Jr.

    1991-06-01

    One of the fundamental constants of nature is the baryon asymmetry of the universe -- the ratio of the number of baryons to the entropy. This constant is about 10 -11 . In baryon- number conserving theories, this was just an initial condition. With the advent of the grand unified theories (GUTs), baryon number is no longer conserved, and this asymmetry can be generated dynamically. Unfortunately, however, there are reasons for preferring another mechanism. For example, GUTs predict proton decay which, after extensive searches, has not been found. An alternative place to look for baryogenesis is the electroweak phase transition, described by the standard model, which posses all the necessary ingredients for baryogenesis. Anomalous baryon-number violation in weak interactions becomes large at high temperatures, which offers the prospect of creating the asymmetry with the standard model or minimal extensions. This can just barely be done if certain conditions are fulfilled. CP violation must be large, which rules out the minimal standard model as the source of the asymmetry, but which is easily arranged with an extended Higgs sector. The baryon-number violating rates themselves are not exactly known, and they must be pushed to their theoretical limits. A more exact determination of these rates is needed before a definitive answer can be given. Finally, the phase transition must be at least weakly first order. Such phase transitions are accompanied by the formation and expansion of bubbles of true vacuum within the false vacuum, much like the boiling of water. As the bubbles expand, they provide a departure from thermal equilibrium, otherwise the dynamics will adjust the net baryon number to zero. The bubble expansion also provides a biasing that creates an asymmetry on the bubbles surface. Under optimal conditions, the observed asymmetry can just be produced. 31 refs., 10 figs

  9. Anomalous baryogenesis at the weak scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, R.L. Jr.

    1991-06-01

    One of the fundamental constants of nature is the baryon asymmetry of the universe -- the ratio of the number of baryons to the entropy. This constant is about 10{sup {minus}11}. In baryon- number conserving theories, this was just an initial condition. With the advent of the grand unified theories (GUTs), baryon number is no longer conserved, and this asymmetry can be generated dynamically. Unfortunately, however, there are reasons for preferring another mechanism. For example, GUTs predict proton decay which, after extensive searches, has not been found. An alternative place to look for baryogenesis is the electroweak phase transition, described by the standard model, which posses all the necessary ingredients for baryogenesis. Anomalous baryon-number violation in weak interactions becomes large at high temperatures, which offers the prospect of creating the asymmetry with the standard model or minimal extensions. This can just barely be done if certain conditions are fulfilled. CP violation must be large, which rules out the minimal standard model as the source of the asymmetry, but which is easily arranged with an extended Higgs sector. The baryon-number violating rates themselves are not exactly known, and they must be pushed to their theoretical limits. A more exact determination of these rates is needed before a definitive answer can be given. Finally, the phase transition must be at least weakly first order. Such phase transitions are accompanied by the formation and expansion of bubbles of true vacuum within the false vacuum, much like the boiling of water. As the bubbles expand, they provide a departure from thermal equilibrium, otherwise the dynamics will adjust the net baryon number to zero. The bubble expansion also provides a biasing that creates an asymmetry on the bubbles surface. Under optimal conditions, the observed asymmetry can just be produced. 31 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Anomalous facial nerve canal with cochlear malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo, L V; Curtin, H D

    2001-05-01

    Anteromedial "migration" of the first segment of the facial nerve canal has been previously identified in a patient with a non-Mondini-type cochlear malformation. In this study, several patients with the same facial nerve canal anomaly were reviewed to assess for the association and type of cochlear malformation. CT scans of the temporal bone of 15 patients with anteromedial migration of the first segment of the facial nerve canal were collected from routine departmental examinations. In seven patients, the anomalous course was bilateral, for a total of 22 cases. The migration was graded relative to normal as either mild/moderate or pronounced. The cochlea in each of these cases was examined for the presence and size of the basilar, second, and apical turns. The turns were either absent, small, normal, or enlarged. The CT scans of five patients with eight Mondini malformations were examined for comparison. The degree of the facial nerve migration was pronounced in nine cases and mild/moderate in 13. All 22 of these cases had associated cochlear abnormalities of the non-Mondini variety. These included common cavity anomalies with lack of definition between the cochlea and vestibule (five cases), cochleae with enlarged basilar turns and absent second or third turns (five cases), and cochleae with small or normal basilar turns with small or absent second or third turns (12 cases). None of the patients with Mondini-type cochlear malformations had anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal. Anteromedial migration of the facial nerve canal occurs in association with some cochlear malformations. It did not occur in association with the Mondini malformations. A cochlea with a Mondini malformation, being similar in size to a normal cochlea, may physically prohibit such a deviation in course.

  11. Small scale plasticity and compressive properties of composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard

    . In the present work, the influence of the mechanical properties of the matrix material on the compression strength is studied by changing the temperature during mechanical testing and thereby making it possible changing the matrix properties keeping all other properties in the experimental setup constant......The compression strength of uni-directional composite materials is mainly governed by the fiber-misalignment and the plasticity of the matrix material [1]. Therefore, in order to improve the compression behavior of uni-directional composite materials, a focus on those terms is necessary....... It is demonstrated how going from the more ductile high temperature case to the brittle low temperature case will increase the compression strength significantly with more than 30%. This behavior are validated experimentally as well as numerically using a non-linear smeared out composite material law [2] implemented...

  12. Rare associations of tetralogy of Fallot with anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery and totally anomalous pulmonary venous connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Supratim; Rao, Suresh G; Kulkarni, Snehal

    2016-06-01

    We describe the cases of two patients with tetralogy of Fallot, aged 4 years and 8 months, who were incidentally detected to have concomitant anomalous left coronary artery from pulmonary artery and total anomalous pulmonary venous connection, respectively, on preoperative imaging. They underwent surgical correction with good mid-term outcomes. In this study, we discuss the embryological basis, physiological effects, and review the literature of these two unusual associations. Awareness of these rare associations will avoid missed diagnoses and consequent surgical surprises.

  13. Fingerprints in compressed strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Cording, Patrick Hagge

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed into a context-free grammar of size n that supports efficient Karp–Rabin fingerprint queries to any substring of S. That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S......[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(log⁡N) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(log⁡log⁡N) query time...

  14. Recursive Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Freris, Nikolaos M.; Öçal, Orhan; Vetterli, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a recursive algorithm for performing compressed sensing on streaming data. The approach consists of a) recursive encoding, where we sample the input stream via overlapping windowing and make use of the previous measurement in obtaining the next one, and b) recursive decoding, where the signal estimate from the previous window is utilized in order to achieve faster convergence in an iterative optimization scheme applied to decode the new one. To remove estimation bias, a two-step ...

  15. Universal Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Jalali, Shirin; Poor, H. Vincent

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of developing universal algorithms for compressed sensing of stochastic processes is studied. First, R\\'enyi's notion of information dimension (ID) is generalized to analog stationary processes. This provides a measure of complexity for such processes and is connected to the number of measurements required for their accurate recovery. Then a minimum entropy pursuit (MEP) optimization approach is proposed, and it is proven that it can reliably recover any stationary ...

  16. Kalman Filtered Compressed Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Vaswani, Namrata

    2008-01-01

    We consider the problem of reconstructing time sequences of spatially sparse signals (with unknown and time-varying sparsity patterns) from a limited number of linear "incoherent" measurements, in real-time. The signals are sparse in some transform domain referred to as the sparsity basis. For a single spatial signal, the solution is provided by Compressed Sensing (CS). The question that we address is, for a sequence of sparse signals, can we do better than CS, if (a) the sparsity pattern of ...

  17. Scale adaptive compressive tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Pengpeng; Cui, Shaohui; Gao, Min; Fang, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the compressive tracking (CT) method (Zhang et al. in Proceedings of European conference on computer vision, pp 864-877, 2012) has attracted much attention due to its high efficiency, but it cannot well deal with the scale changing objects due to its constant tracking box. To address this issue, in this paper we propose a scale adaptive CT approach, which adaptively adjusts the scale of tracking box with the size variation of the objects. Our method significantly improves CT in three aspects: Firstly, the scale of tracking box is adaptively adjusted according to the size of the objects. Secondly, in the CT method, all the compressive features are supposed independent and equal contribution to the classifier. Actually, different compressive features have different confidence coefficients. In our proposed method, the confidence coefficients of features are computed and used to achieve different contribution to the classifier. Finally, in the CT method, the learning parameter λ is constant, which will result in large tracking drift on the occasion of object occlusion or large scale appearance variation. In our proposed method, a variable learning parameter λ is adopted, which can be adjusted according to the object appearance variation rate. Extensive experiments on the CVPR2013 tracking benchmark demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed method compared to state-of-the-art tracking algorithms.

  18. Compressed sensing electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leary, Rowan, E-mail: rkl26@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Saghi, Zineb; Midgley, Paul A. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3QZ (United Kingdom); Holland, Daniel J. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge, New Museums Site, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    The recent mathematical concept of compressed sensing (CS) asserts that a small number of well-chosen measurements can suffice to reconstruct signals that are amenable to sparse or compressible representation. In addition to powerful theoretical results, the principles of CS are being exploited increasingly across a range of experiments to yield substantial performance gains relative to conventional approaches. In this work we describe the application of CS to electron tomography (ET) reconstruction and demonstrate the efficacy of CS–ET with several example studies. Artefacts present in conventional ET reconstructions such as streaking, blurring of object boundaries and elongation are markedly reduced, and robust reconstruction is shown to be possible from far fewer projections than are normally used. The CS–ET approach enables more reliable quantitative analysis of the reconstructions as well as novel 3D studies from extremely limited data. - Highlights: • Compressed sensing (CS) theory and its application to electron tomography (ET) is described. • The practical implementation of CS–ET is outlined and its efficacy demonstrated with examples. • High fidelity tomographic reconstruction is possible from a small number of images. • The CS–ET reconstructions can be more reliably segmented and analysed quantitatively. • CS–ET is applicable to different image content by choice of an appropriate sparsifying transform.

  19. COMPRESSIVE AND SHEAR ANALYSIS OF RUBBER BLOCK UNDER LARGE STRAIN

    OpenAIRE

    K. Sridharan; R. Sivaramakrishnan

    2013-01-01

    The Elastomeric materials have found use in a wide range of applications, including hoses, tires, gaskets, seals, vibration isolators, bearings and dock fenders. The analysis of rubber blocks for its compression and shear behavior has been carried out using the imaging techniques. The dynamic stressing and its associated change in shape of the rubber blocks during large compression are very limited as their measurements were difficult. A newly developed Machine Vision based image processing t...

  20. Compressive strength of continuous fiber unidirectional composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Ronald H.

    finite element model introduces a boundary condition that only allows compressive and shear deformation, thus recognizing the actual deformation mechanism of a compressed unidirectional composite. A new approach for representing the resin matrix is employed, giving improved correlation to empirical measurements noted in the literature. A method of accounting for realistic composite imperfections is introduced. The patent application work was fed by results from the first three areas. A new engineering structure is created in which buckling is beneficial. Post buckled behavior favorably affects other structural components in an overload situation. The first three work streams form a coherent unit and are mutually supportive. The analytical model predictions are corroborated by the experimental measurements. Finite element model predictions are consistent with the analytical model predictions.

  1. Water anomalous thermodynamics, attraction, repulsion, and hydrophobic hydration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerdeiriña, Claudio A., E-mail: calvarez@uvigo.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada, Universidad de Vigo—Campus del Agua, Ourense 32004 (Spain); Debenedetti, Pablo G., E-mail: pdebene@princeton.edu [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2016-04-28

    A model composed of van der Waals-like and hydrogen bonding contributions that simulates the low-temperature anomalous thermodynamics of pure water while exhibiting a second, liquid-liquid critical point [P. H. Poole et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 73, 1632 (1994)] is extended to dilute solutions of nonionic species. Critical lines emanating from such second critical point are calculated. While one infers that the smallness of the water molecule may be a relevant factor for those critical lines to move towards experimentally accessible regions, attention is mainly focused on the picture our model draws for the hydration thermodynamics of purely hydrophobic and amphiphilic non-electrolyte solutes. We first focus on differentiating solvation at constant volume from the corresponding isobaric process. Both processes provide the same viewpoint for the low solubility of hydrophobic solutes: it originates from the combination of weak solute-solvent attractive interactions and the specific excluded-volume effects associated with the small molecular size of water. However, a sharp distinction is found when exploring the temperature dependence of hydration phenomena since, in contrast to the situation for the constant-V process, the properties of pure water play a crucial role at isobaric conditions. Specifically, the solubility minimum as well as enthalpy and entropy convergence phenomena, exclusively ascribed to isobaric solvation, are closely related to water’s density maximum. Furthermore, the behavior of the partial molecular volume and the partial molecular isobaric heat capacity highlights the interplay between water anomalies, attraction, and repulsion. The overall picture presented here is supported by experimental observations, simulations, and previous theoretical results.

  2. Anomalous metamagnetic-like transition in a FeRh/Fe3Pt interface occurring at T ≈ 120 K in the field-cooled-cooling curves for low magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Salem-Sugui Jr.

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on the magnetic properties of a special configuration of a FeRh thin film. An anomalous behavior on the magnetisation vs. temperature was observed when low magnetic fields are applied in the plane of a thin layer of FeRh deposited on ordered Fe3Pt. The anomalous effect resembles a metamagnetic transition and occur only in the field-cooled-cooling magnetisation curve at temperatures near 120 K in samples without any heat treatment.

  3. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susie Lau

    Full Text Available To investigate: (1 the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2 the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD in Asian women based on phantom study.We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD measurement software (Volpara to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA slabs.Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p0.05.Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  4. Mammographic compression in Asian women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. Methods We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35–80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Results Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (p0.05). Conclusions Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD. PMID:28419125

  5. Compressive Transient Imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Qilin

    2017-04-01

    High resolution transient/3D imaging technology is of high interest in both scientific research and commercial application. Nowadays, all of the transient imaging methods suffer from low resolution or time consuming mechanical scanning. We proposed a new method based on TCSPC and Compressive Sensing to achieve a high resolution transient imaging with a several seconds capturing process. Picosecond laser sends a serious of equal interval pulse while synchronized SPAD camera\\'s detecting gate window has a precise phase delay at each cycle. After capturing enough points, we are able to make up a whole signal. By inserting a DMD device into the system, we are able to modulate all the frames of data using binary random patterns to reconstruct a super resolution transient/3D image later. Because the low fill factor of SPAD sensor will make a compressive sensing scenario ill-conditioned, We designed and fabricated a diffractive microlens array. We proposed a new CS reconstruction algorithm which is able to denoise at the same time for the measurements suffering from Poisson noise. Instead of a single SPAD senor, we chose a SPAD array because it can drastically reduce the requirement for the number of measurements and its reconstruction time. Further more, it not easy to reconstruct a high resolution image with only one single sensor while for an array, it just needs to reconstruct small patches and a few measurements. In this thesis, we evaluated the reconstruction methods using both clean measurements and the version corrupted by Poisson noise. The results show how the integration over the layers influence the image quality and our algorithm works well while the measurements suffer from non-trival Poisson noise. It\\'s a breakthrough in the areas of both transient imaging and compressive sensing.

  6. Anomalous Light Emission and Wide Photoluminescence Spectra in Graphene Quantum Dot: Quantum Confinement from Edge Microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pu; Shi, Jun-Jie; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Xin-He; Zhong, Hong-Xia; Ding, Yi-Min; Cao, Xiong; Wu, Meng; Lu, Jing

    2016-08-04

    The physical origin of the observed anomalous photoluminescence (PL) behavior, that is, the large-size graphene quantum dots (GQDs) exhibiting higher PL energy than the small ones and the broadening PL spectra from deep ultraviolet to near-infrared, has been debated for many years. Obviously, it is in conflict with the well-accepted quantum confinement. Here we shed new light on these two notable debates by state-of-the-art first-principles calculations based on many-body perturbation theory. We find that quantum confinement is significant in GQDs with remarkable size-dependent exciton absorption/emission. The edge environment from alkaline to acidic conditions causes a blue shift of the PL peak. Furthermore, carbon vacancies are inclined to assemble at the GQD edge and form the tiny edge microstructures. The bound excitons, localized inside these edge microstructures, determine the anomalous PL behavior (blue and UV emission) of large-size GQDs. The bound excitons confined in the whole GQD lead to the low-energy transition.

  7. Analysis by compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meredith, David

    MEL is a geometric music encoding language designed to allow for musical objects to be encoded parsimoniously as sets of points in pitch-time space, generated by performing geometric transformations on component patterns. MEL has been implemented in Java and coupled with the SIATEC pattern discov...... discovery algorithm to allow for compact encodings to be generated automatically from in extenso note lists. The MEL-SIATEC system is founded on the belief that music analysis and music perception can be modelled as the compression of in extenso descriptions of musical objects....

  8. Compressive full waveform lidar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Weiyi; Ke, Jun

    2017-05-01

    To avoid high bandwidth detector, fast speed A/D converter, and large size memory disk, a compressive full waveform LIDAR system, which uses a temporally modulated laser instead of a pulsed laser, is studied in this paper. Full waveform data from NEON (National Ecological Observatory Network) are used. Random binary patterns are used to modulate the source. To achieve 0.15 m ranging resolution, a 100 MSPS A/D converter is assumed to make measurements. SPIRAL algorithm with canonical basis is employed when Poisson noise is considered in the low illuminated condition.

  9. Compression test apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanks, G. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An apparatus for compressive testing of a test specimen may comprise vertically spaced upper and lower platen members between which a test specimen may be placed. The platen members are supported by a fixed support assembly. A load indicator is interposed between the upper platen member and the support assembly for supporting the total weight of the upper platen member and any additional weight which may be placed on it. Operating means are provided for moving the lower platen member upwardly toward the upper platen member whereby an increasing portion of the total weight is transferred from the load indicator to the test specimen.

  10. Compressive Fatigue in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clorius, Christian Odin; Pedersen, Martin Bo Uhre; Hoffmeyer, Preben

    1999-01-01

    An investigation of fatigue failure in wood subjected to load cycles in compression parallel to grain is presented. Small clear specimens of spruce are taken to failure in square wave formed fatigue loading at a stress excitation level corresponding to 80% of the short term strength. Four...... frequencies ranging from 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz are used. The number of cycles to failure is found to be a poor measure of the fatigue performance of wood. Creep, maximum strain, stiffness and work are monitored throughout the fatigue tests. Accumulated creep is suggested identified with damage and a correlation...

  11. Metal Hydride Compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States); Bowman, Robert [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Smith, Barton [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Anovitz, Lawrence [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jensen, Craig [Hawaii Hydrogen Carriers LLC, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Conventional hydrogen compressors often contribute over half of the cost of hydrogen stations, have poor reliability, and have insufficient flow rates for a mature FCEV market. Fatigue associated with their moving parts including cracking of diaphragms and failure of seal leads to failure in conventional compressors, which is exacerbated by the repeated starts and stops expected at fueling stations. Furthermore, the conventional lubrication of these compressors with oil is generally unacceptable at fueling stations due to potential fuel contamination. Metal hydride (MH) technology offers a very good alternative to both conventional (mechanical) and newly developed (electrochemical, ionic liquid pistons) methods of hydrogen compression. Advantages of MH compression include simplicity in design and operation, absence of moving parts, compactness, safety and reliability, and the possibility to utilize waste industrial heat to power the compressor. Beyond conventional H2 supplies of pipelines or tanker trucks, another attractive scenario is the on-site generating, pressuring and delivering pure H2 at pressure (≥ 875 bar) for refueling vehicles at electrolysis, wind, or solar generating production facilities in distributed locations that are too remote or widely distributed for cost effective bulk transport. MH hydrogen compression utilizes a reversible heat-driven interaction of a hydride-forming metal alloy with hydrogen gas to form the MH phase and is a promising process for hydrogen energy applications [1,2]. To deliver hydrogen continuously, each stage of the compressor must consist of multiple MH beds with synchronized hydrogenation & dehydrogenation cycles. Multistage pressurization allows achievement of greater compression ratios using reduced temperature swings compared to single stage compressors. The objectives of this project are to investigate and demonstrate on a laboratory scale a two-stage MH hydrogen (H2) gas compressor with a

  12. Observation of Volkov-Pankratov states in topological HgTe heterojunctions using high-frequency compressibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhofer, A.; Tchoumakov, S.; Assaf, B. A.; Fève, G.; Berroir, J. M.; Jouffrey, V.; Carpentier, D.; Goerbig, M. O.; Plaçais, B.; Bendias, K.; Mahler, D. M.; Bocquillon, E.; Schlereth, R.; Brüne, C.; Buhmann, H.; Molenkamp, L. W.

    2017-11-01

    It is well established that topological insulators sustain Dirac fermion surface states as a consequence of band inversion in the bulk. These states have a helical spin polarization and a linear dispersion with large Fermi velocity. We report on a set of experimental observations supporting the existence of additional massive surface states. These states are also confined by the band inversion at a topological-trivial semiconductor heterojunction. While first introduced by Volkov and Pankratov (VP) before the understanding of the topological nature of such a junction, they were not experimentally identified. Here we identify their signatures on transport properties at high electric field. By monitoring the ac admittance of HgTe topological-insulator field-effect capacitors, we access the compressibility and conductivity of surface states in a broad range of energies and electric fields. The Dirac states are characterized by a compressibility minimum, a linear energy dependence, and a high mobility persisting up to energies much larger than the transport band gap of the bulk. At higher energies, we observe multiple anomalous behaviors in conductance, charge metastability, and Hall resistance that point towards the contribution of massive surface states in transport scattering and charge transfer to the bulk. The spectrum of these anomalies agrees with predictions of a phenomenological model of VP states in a smooth topological heterojunction. The model accounts for the finite interface depth, the effect of electric fields including Dirac screening, and predicts the energy of the first VP state. The massive surface states are a hallmark of topological heterojunctions, whose understanding is crucial for transport studies and applications.

  13. The origin of the compressibility anomaly in amorphous silica: a molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, Andrew M; Sullivan, Lucy A; Trachenko, Kostya; Bruin, Richard P; White, Toby O H; Dove, Martin T; Tyer, Richard P; Todorov, Ilian T; Wells, Stephen A

    2007-01-01

    We propose an explanation for the anomalous compressibility maximum in amorphous silica based on rigidity arguments. The model considers the fact that a network structure will be rigidly compressed in the high-pressure limit, and rigidly taut in the negative pressure limit, but flexible and hence softer at intermediate pressures. We validate the plausibility of this explanation by the analysis of molecular dynamics simulations. In fact this model is quite general, and will apply to any network solid, crystalline or amorphous; there are experimental indications that support this prediction. In contrast to other ideas concerning the compressibility maximum in amorphous silica, the model presented here does not invoke the existence of polyamorphic phase transitions in the glass phase

  14. Single-particle dispersion in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingqing; Xiao, Zuoli

    2018-04-01

    Single-particle dispersion statistics in compressible box turbulence are studied using direct numerical simulation. Focus is placed on the detailed discussion of effects of the particle Stokes number and turbulent Mach number, as well as the forcing type. When solenoidal forcing is adopted, it is found that the single-particle dispersion undergoes a transition from the ballistic regime at short times to the diffusive regime at long times, in agreement with Taylor's particle dispersion argument. The strongest dispersion of heavy particles is announced when the Stokes number is of order 1, which is similar to the scenario in incompressible turbulence. The dispersion tends to be suppressed as the Mach number increases. When hybrid solenoidal and compressive forcing at a ratio of 1/2 is employed, the flow field shows apparent anisotropic property, characterized by the appearance of large shock wave structures. Accordingly, the single-particle dispersion shows extremely different behavior from the solenoidal forcing case.

  15. A tutorial on inverse problems for anomalous diffusion processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Bangti; Rundell, William

    2015-03-01

    Over the last two decades, anomalous diffusion processes in which the mean squares variance grows slower or faster than that in a Gaussian process have found many applications. At a macroscopic level, these processes are adequately described by fractional differential equations, which involves fractional derivatives in time or/and space. The fractional derivatives describe either history mechanism or long range interactions of particle motions at a microscopic level. The new physics can change dramatically the behavior of the forward problems. For example, the solution operator of the time fractional diffusion diffusion equation has only limited smoothing property, whereas the solution for the space fractional diffusion equation may contain weak singularity. Naturally one expects that the new physics will impact related inverse problems in terms of uniqueness, stability, and degree of ill-posedness. The last aspect is especially important from a practical point of view, i.e., stably reconstructing the quantities of interest. In this paper, we employ a formal analytic and numerical way, especially the two-parameter Mittag-Leffler function and singular value decomposition, to examine the degree of ill-posedness of several ‘classical’ inverse problems for fractional differential equations involving a Djrbashian-Caputo fractional derivative in either time or space, which represent the fractional analogues of that for classical integral order differential equations. We discuss four inverse problems, i.e., backward fractional diffusion, sideways problem, inverse source problem and inverse potential problem for time fractional diffusion, and inverse Sturm-Liouville problem, Cauchy problem, backward fractional diffusion and sideways problem for space fractional diffusion. It is found that contrary to the wide belief, the influence of anomalous diffusion on the degree of ill-posedness is not definitive: it can either significantly improve or worsen the conditioning of

  16. Microinstability-based model for anomalous thermal confinement in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of microinstability-based thermal transport coefficients (chi/sub j/) for the purpose of modelling anomalous energy confinement properties in tokamak plasmas. Attention is primarily focused on ohmically heated discharges and the associated anomalous electron thermal transport. An appropriate expression for chi/sub e/ is developed which is consistent with reasonable global constraints on the current and electron temperature profiles as well as with the key properties of the kinetic instabilities most likely to be present. Comparisons of confinement scaling trends predicted by this model with the empirical ohmic data base indicate quite favorable agreement. The subject of anomalous ion thermal transport and its implications for high density ohmic discharges and for auxiliary-heated plasmas is also addressed.

  17. Microinstability-based model for anomalous thermal confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.

    1986-03-01

    This paper deals with the formulation of microinstability-based thermal transport coefficients (chi/sub j/) for the purpose of modelling anomalous energy confinement properties in tokamak plasmas. Attention is primarily focused on ohmically heated discharges and the associated anomalous electron thermal transport. An appropriate expression for chi/sub e/ is developed which is consistent with reasonable global constraints on the current and electron temperature profiles as well as with the key properties of the kinetic instabilities most likely to be present. Comparisons of confinement scaling trends predicted by this model with the empirical ohmic data base indicate quite favorable agreement. The subject of anomalous ion thermal transport and its implications for high density ohmic discharges and for auxiliary-heated plasmas is also addressed

  18. Anomalous control: when 'free-will' is not conscious.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggard, Patrick; Cartledge, Peter; Dafydd, Meilyr; Oakley, David A

    2004-09-01

    The conscious feeling of exercising 'free-will' is fundamental to our sense of self. However, in some psychopathological conditions actions may be experienced as involuntary or unwilled. We have used suggestion in hypnosis to create the experience of involuntariness (anomalous control) in normal participants. We compared a voluntary finger movement, a passive movement and a voluntary movement suggested by hypnosis to be 'involuntary.' Hypnosis itself had no effect on the subjective experience of voluntariness associated with willed movements and passive movements or on time estimations of their occurrence. However, subjective time estimates of a hypnotically-suggested, 'involuntary' finger movement were more similar to those for passive movements than for voluntary movements. The experience of anomalous control is qualitatively and quantitatively different from the normal conscious experience of a similar act produced intentionally. The experience of anomalous control may be produced either by pathology, or, in our case, by suggestion.

  19. The anomalous self-diffusion in α-Zr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hood, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    In a very recent publication, Horvath, Dyment and Mehrer, henceforth HDM, presented measurements of the self-diffusion coefficient Dsub(m) 0 for α-Zr as a function of temperature. The results of that study, done on a single crystal sample, were anomalous in the sense that a plot of log Dsub(m) 0 vs. 1/T(K -1 ) was not only non-linear, but exhibited two regions of downward curvature with increasing 1/T. HDM indicated that they were unable to see any explanation of their anomalous self-diffusion results. It is the purpose of this letter to indicate a means whereby these anomalous results may be ''explained'' and to suggest some experiments which might be undertaken to test the proposal. (orig./RK)

  20. Self-similar Gaussian processes for modeling anomalous diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, S. C.; Muniandy, S. V.

    2002-08-01

    We study some Gaussian models for anomalous diffusion, which include the time-rescaled Brownian motion, two types of fractional Brownian motion, and models associated with fractional Brownian motion based on the generalized Langevin equation. Gaussian processes associated with these models satisfy the anomalous diffusion relation which requires the mean-square displacement to vary with tα, 0Brownian motion and time-rescaled Brownian motion all have the same probability distribution function, the Slepian theorem can be used to compare their first passage time distributions, which are different. Finally, in order to model anomalous diffusion with a variable exponent α(t) it is necessary to consider the multifractional extensions of these Gaussian processes.

  1. Energy transfer in compressible turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bataille, Francoise; Zhou, YE; Bertoglio, Jean-Pierre

    1995-01-01

    This letter investigates the compressible energy transfer process. We extend a methodology developed originally for incompressible turbulence and use databases from numerical simulations of a weak compressible turbulence based on Eddy-Damped-Quasi-Normal-Markovian (EDQNM) closure. In order to analyze the compressible mode directly, the well known Helmholtz decomposition is used. While the compressible component has very little influence on the solenoidal part, we found that almost all of the compressible turbulence energy is received from its solenoidal counterpart. We focus on the most fundamental building block of the energy transfer process, the triadic interactions. This analysis leads us to conclude that, at low turbulent Mach number, the compressible energy transfer process is dominated by a local radiative transfer (absorption) in both inertial and energy containing ranges.

  2. Compressive sensing in medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Christian G; Sidky, Emil Y

    2015-03-10

    The promise of compressive sensing, exploitation of compressibility to achieve high quality image reconstructions with less data, has attracted a great deal of attention in the medical imaging community. At the Compressed Sensing Incubator meeting held in April 2014 at OSA Headquarters in Washington, DC, presentations were given summarizing some of the research efforts ongoing in compressive sensing for x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems. This article provides an expanded version of these presentations. Sparsity-exploiting reconstruction algorithms that have gained popularity in the medical imaging community are studied, and examples of clinical applications that could benefit from compressive sensing ideas are provided. The current and potential future impact of compressive sensing on the medical imaging field is discussed.

  3. Fingerprints in Compressed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2013-01-01

    The Karp-Rabin fingerprint of a string is a type of hash value that due to its strong properties has been used in many string algorithms. In this paper we show how to construct a data structure for a string S of size N compressed by a context-free grammar of size n that answers fingerprint queries....... That is, given indices i and j, the answer to a query is the fingerprint of the substring S[i,j]. We present the first O(n) space data structures that answer fingerprint queries without decompressing any characters. For Straight Line Programs (SLP) we get O(logN) query time, and for Linear SLPs (an SLP...... derivative that captures LZ78 compression and its variations) we get O(loglogN) query time. Hence, our data structures has the same time and space complexity as for random access in SLPs. We utilize the fingerprint data structures to solve the longest common extension problem in query time O(logNlogℓ) and O...

  4. Respiratory sounds compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahi, Azadeh; Moussavi, Zahra

    2008-04-01

    Recently, with the advances in digital signal processing, compression of biomedical signals has received great attention for telemedicine applications. In this paper, an adaptive transform coding-based method for compression of respiratory and swallowing sounds is proposed. Using special characteristics of respiratory sounds, the recorded signals are divided into stationary and nonstationary portions, and two different bit allocation methods (BAMs) are designed for each portion. The method was applied to the data of 12 subjects and its performance in terms of overall signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) values was calculated at different bit rates. The performance of different quantizers was also considered and the sensitivity of the quantizers to initial conditions has been alleviated. In addition, the fuzzy clustering method was examined for classifying the signal into different numbers of clusters and investigating the performance of the adaptive BAM with increasing the number of classes. Furthermore, the effects of assigning different numbers of bits for encoding stationary and nonstationary portions of the signal were studied. The adaptive BAM with variable number of bits was found to improve the SNR values of the fixed BAM by 5 dB. Last, the possibility of removing the training part for finding the parameters of adaptive BAMs for each individual was investigated. The results indicate that it is possible to use a predefined set of BAMs for all subjects and remove the training part completely. Moreover, the method is fast enough to be implemented for real-time application.

  5. Free compression tube. Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Ioan

    2012-11-01

    During the flight of vehicles, their propulsion energy must overcome gravity, to ensure the displacement of air masses on vehicle trajectory, to cover both energy losses from the friction between a solid surface and the air and also the kinetic energy of reflected air masses due to the impact with the flying vehicle. The flight optimization by increasing speed and reducing fuel consumption has directed research in the aerodynamics field. The flying vehicles shapes obtained through studies in the wind tunnel provide the optimization of the impact with the air masses and the airflow along the vehicle. By energy balance studies for vehicles in flight, the author Ioan Rusu directed his research in reducing the energy lost at vehicle impact with air masses. In this respect as compared to classical solutions for building flight vehicles aerodynamic surfaces which reduce the impact and friction with air masses, Ioan Rusu has invented a device which he named free compression tube for rockets, registered with the State Office for Inventions and Trademarks of Romania, OSIM, deposit f 2011 0352. Mounted in front of flight vehicles it eliminates significantly the impact and friction of air masses with the vehicle solid. The air masses come into contact with the air inside the free compression tube and the air-solid friction is eliminated and replaced by air to air friction.

  6. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheikh Mona A

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  7. Introduction to compressible fluid flow

    CERN Document Server

    Oosthuizen, Patrick H

    2013-01-01

    IntroductionThe Equations of Steady One-Dimensional Compressible FlowSome Fundamental Aspects of Compressible FlowOne-Dimensional Isentropic FlowNormal Shock WavesOblique Shock WavesExpansion Waves - Prandtl-Meyer FlowVariable Area FlowsAdiabatic Flow with FrictionFlow with Heat TransferLinearized Analysis of Two-Dimensional Compressible FlowsHypersonic and High-Temperature FlowsHigh-Temperature Gas EffectsLow-Density FlowsBibliographyAppendices

  8. Mammographic compression in Asian women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Susie; Abdul Aziz, Yang Faridah; Ng, Kwan Hoong

    2017-01-01

    To investigate: (1) the variability of mammographic compression parameters amongst Asian women; and (2) the effects of reducing compression force on image quality and mean glandular dose (MGD) in Asian women based on phantom study. We retrospectively collected 15818 raw digital mammograms from 3772 Asian women aged 35-80 years who underwent screening or diagnostic mammography between Jan 2012 and Dec 2014 at our center. The mammograms were processed using a volumetric breast density (VBD) measurement software (Volpara) to assess compression force, compression pressure, compressed breast thickness (CBT), breast volume, VBD and MGD against breast contact area. The effects of reducing compression force on image quality and MGD were also evaluated based on measurement obtained from 105 Asian women, as well as using the RMI156 Mammographic Accreditation Phantom and polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) slabs. Compression force, compression pressure, CBT, breast volume, VBD and MGD correlated significantly with breast contact area (pAsian women. The median compression force should be about 8.1 daN compared to the current 12.0 daN. Decreasing compression force from 12.0 daN to 9.0 daN increased CBT by 3.3±1.4 mm, MGD by 6.2-11.0%, and caused no significant effects on image quality (p>0.05). Force-standardized protocol led to widely variable compression parameters in Asian women. Based on phantom study, it is feasible to reduce compression force up to 32.5% with minimal effects on image quality and MGD.

  9. Total Anomalous Pulmonary Venous Connection to the Portal Vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyttenbach, Marina; Carrel, Thierry; Schuepbach, Peter; Tschaeppeler, Heinz; Triller, Juergen

    1996-01-01

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return represents a rare congenital anomaly with wide anatomic and physiologic variability. We report a case of a newborn with a rare form of total infracardiac anomalous pulmonary venous connection (TAPVC). The pulmonary veins draining both lungs formed two vertical veins, which joined to a common pulmonary trunk below the diaphragm. This venous channel connected to the portal vein through the esophageal hiatus. The diagnosis was suggested by color Doppler sonography and confirmed by intravenous digital subtraction angiography, which allowed definition of the anatomy

  10. High-pressure behavior of NaInSi2O6 and the influence of Me3+ on the compressibility of NaMe3+Si2O6 silicates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Periotto, Benedetta; Nestola, F.; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2012-01-01

    family, the empirical KT0 × V0 = constant relationship proposed in previous investigations is valid for isostructural compounds only if they share the same valence electron character. In addition, we collected intensity data on the same compound at 16 different pressures up to 9.467 GPa using a diamond......-anvil cell with diamond backing plates. The main structural compression mechanism is played by the tetrahedral chain kinking, which is related to the shortening of Na–O3long distances. Comparing our equation of state and high-pressure crystal structural results with previous data on NaMe3+Si2O6 pyroxenes, we...... show that their compressibility increases much faster with the size of Me3+ cation when this one is a 3d transition metal....

  11. Structural Performance of Composite Shear Walls under Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingyue Hao

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to research the effect of different layout forms of steel plate on the axial compression behavior of a steel plate-concrete composite shear wall, this paper presents the experimental results and analysis of the axial compression behavior of a composite shear wall, with different layout forms of steel plate. A total of three tests were carried out, composed of two composite walls with built-in steel plate, and one composite wall with two skins of steel plate. The gross dimensions of the three specimens were 1206 mm × 2006 mm × 300 mm. Experimental results show that the composite wall with two skins of steel plate has an optimal ability of elastic-plastic deformation, and the maximum axial compressive bearing capacity among the three specimens. Using the energy method, the critical local buckling stresses of steel plate were calculated, and compared with the yield stresses. According to different confined actions of concrete, concrete constitutive models were proposed, and the axial compressive strengths of confined concrete were calculated. Considering the local buckling of steel plate and confined concrete, the calculation formula of the axial compression of the composite wall was put forward, and the calculated results were in good agreement with the test results. Therefore, the different layout forms of steel plate have a great influence on its buckling, and on the concrete inhibition effect, which can affect the axial compressive bearing capacity of the composite wall.

  12. Adiabatic compression and radiative compression of magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Flux is conserved during mechanical compression of magnetic fields for both nonrelativistic and relativistic compressors. However, the relativistic compressor generates radiation, which can carry up to twice the energy content of the magnetic field compressed adiabatically. The radiation may be either confined or allowed to escape

  13. TPC data compression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger, Jens; Frankenfeld, Ulrich; Lindenstruth, Volker; Plamper, Patrick; Roehrich, Dieter; Schaefer, Erich; W. Schulz, Markus; M. Steinbeck, Timm; Stock, Reinhard; Sulimma, Kolja; Vestboe, Anders; Wiebalck, Arne E-mail: wiebalck@kip.uni-heidelberg.de

    2002-08-21

    In the collisions of ultra-relativistic heavy ions in fixed-target and collider experiments, multiplicities of several ten thousand charged particles are generated. The main devices for tracking and particle identification are large-volume tracking detectors (TPCs) producing raw event sizes in excess of 100 Mbytes per event. With increasing data rates, storage becomes the main limiting factor in such experiments and, therefore, it is essential to represent the data in a way that is as concise as possible. In this paper, we present several compression schemes, such as entropy encoding, modified vector quantization, and data modeling techniques applied on real data from the CERN SPS experiment NA49 and on simulated data from the future CERN LHC experiment ALICE.

  14. Waves and compressible flow

    CERN Document Server

    Ockendon, Hilary

    2016-01-01

    Now in its second edition, this book continues to give readers a broad mathematical basis for modelling and understanding the wide range of wave phenomena encountered in modern applications.  New and expanded material includes topics such as elastoplastic waves and waves in plasmas, as well as new exercises.  Comprehensive collections of models are used to illustrate the underpinning mathematical methodologies, which include the basic ideas of the relevant partial differential equations, characteristics, ray theory, asymptotic analysis, dispersion, shock waves, and weak solutions. Although the main focus is on compressible fluid flow, the authors show how intimately gasdynamic waves are related to wave phenomena in many other areas of physical science.   Special emphasis is placed on the development of physical intuition to supplement and reinforce analytical thinking. Each chapter includes a complete set of carefully prepared exercises, making this a suitable textbook for students in applied mathematics, ...

  15. Anomalous transport in correlated velocity fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Brian; Scher, Harvey

    2010-01-01

    We examine different types of heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields to ascertain the basic structural features that dominate the transport behavior. We contrast two approaches to the analysis, within the framework of the continuous time random walk (CTRW), considering recent simulations of particle transport in two correlated flow fields to discern these key features. These flow fields are the steady-state solutions of Darcy flow in systems with correlated distributions, P(K(x)), of hydraulic conductivity values K(x). One approach uses the organizational structure of the Lagrangian velocities determined from simulations to derive correlated space-time distributions for particle tracking, which are used to fit simulated breakthrough curve (BTC) data. These fits emphasize the ability to account for both early arrival times and late-time long tailing. The other approach, in this paper, treats the simulated BTCs as "measurements" and uses a truncated power-law form of psi(t), the probability density function (pdf) of local transit times, in a partial differential equation form of CTRW. Excellent fits to both data sets are obtained with a single value of beta, the key parameter that characterizes the nature of the dispersive transport. The value of beta is derivable from the high xi behavior of the pdf histogram Phi(xi) (where xi is the inverse velocity) of the Darcy field, which determines the late-time tail within psi(t). The quality of the two fits obtained herein with a physically derived parameter set is a probe of how heterogeneous hydraulic conductivity fields with different types of correlation can affect the larger-scale transport behavior. The features that give rise to a power-law tail of local transition times and a limit of the time range for non-Fickian behavior dominate the transport. The correlation structures of the different P(K(x)) play a secondary role compared to the spectrum of less frequent events (e.g., low velocity regions) that have a

  16. Tight bounds for top tree compression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Fernstrøm, Finn; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2017-01-01

    We consider compressing labeled, ordered and rooted trees using DAG compression and top tree compression. We show that there exists a family of trees such that the size of the DAG compression is always a logarithmic factor smaller than the size of the top tree compression (even for an alphabet...

  17. Parity-violating anomalous currents in arbitrary odd dimensions from stochastic quantisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Jiange; Liu Yiaoyang

    1990-01-01

    The stochastic quantization method is applied to evaluate the parity-violating anomalous currents in arbitrary odd dimensions. The complete anomalous vacuum currents which have gauge and Lorentz covariance are achieved. (author)

  18. Bilaterally painful anomalous insertion of the medial meniscus in a volleyball player with Marfanoid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santi, M D; Richardson, A B

    1993-01-01

    A female volleyball player with a Marfanoid habitus had bilateral symptomatic anomalous insertions of the medial meniscus. Arthroscopic resection of the anomalous portions of the medial menisci as they attached to the anterior cruciate ligament successfully eliminated her symptoms.

  19. Compressed Baryonic Matter of Astrophysics

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yanjun; Xu, Renxin

    2013-01-01

    Baryonic matter in the core of a massive and evolved star is compressed significantly to form a supra-nuclear object, and compressed baryonic matter (CBM) is then produced after supernova. The state of cold matter at a few nuclear density is pedagogically reviewed, with significant attention paid to a possible quark-cluster state conjectured from an astrophysical point of view.

  20. Application specific compression : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melgaard, David Kennett; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Myers, Daniel S.; Harrison, Carol D.; Lee, David S.; Lewis, Phillip J.; Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2008-12-01

    With the continuing development of more capable data gathering sensors, comes an increased demand on the bandwidth for transmitting larger quantities of data. To help counteract that trend, a study was undertaken to determine appropriate lossy data compression strategies for minimizing their impact on target detection and characterization. The survey of current compression techniques led us to the conclusion that wavelet compression was well suited for this purpose. Wavelet analysis essentially applies a low-pass and high-pass filter to the data, converting the data into the related coefficients that maintain spatial information as well as frequency information. Wavelet compression is achieved by zeroing the coefficients that pertain to the noise in the signal, i.e. the high frequency, low amplitude portion. This approach is well suited for our goal because it reduces the noise in the signal with only minimal impact on the larger, lower frequency target signatures. The resulting coefficients can then be encoded using lossless techniques with higher compression levels because of the lower entropy and significant number of zeros. No significant signal degradation or difficulties in target characterization or detection were observed or measured when wavelet compression was applied to simulated and real data, even when over 80% of the coefficients were zeroed. While the exact level of compression will be data set dependent, for the data sets we studied, compression factors over 10 were found to be satisfactory where conventional lossless techniques achieved levels of less than 3.