WorldWideScience

Sample records for anodontites elongatus swaison

  1. Anatomy and systematics of Anodontites Elongatus (Swainson from Amazon and Parana Basins, Brazil (Mollusca, Bivalvia, Unionoida, Mycetopodidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Ricardo L Simone

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The anatomy of Anodontiies elongatus (Swainson, 1823, a rare species restricted to the Amazon and Parana Basins, is described by first time, showing a group of conchological and anatomical characters exclusive of this species that may be analyzed to identify it. Diagnosis of A. elongatus: shell long antero-posteriorly, umbones prominent, periostracum opaque and smooth, two posterior radial striae; middle fold of mantle edge veiy tall; gill long antero-posteriorly and short dorso-ventrally, extending about a half of it total length beyond visceral mass; palps proportionally small, several furrows in its outer surface; stomach without esophageal transversal ridjp, dorsal hood and gastric shield poorly developed, major typhlosole entering in ddd , posterior pouch of sa³ very-long; style sac reduced, without crystalline style; distal region of intestine and rectum with a well developed typhlosole, "T" in section, other intestinal regions without folds; gonad gonochoristic.

  2. Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: a bivalve parasite of freshwater fishes / Anodontites trapesialis (LAMARCK, 1819: um bivalve parasito de peixes de água doce

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ângela Teresa Silva-Souza

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The bivalve mollusk Anodontites trapesialis has been indicated as an alternative source for aquaculture because it is considered a food of good nutritional value with a protein content close to that of fish. Its shells can be utilized as fertilizer and mixed to the food of domestic animals, and the nacre can be used to manufacture buttons and crafts. However, the larvae of A. trapesialis, which are the lasidium type, are obligatory parasites of freshwater fishes, and the introduction of this bivalve in fish farm tanks have caused trouble and losses for producers. Nothing is known, however, about their development in these environments. On the other hand, it should be pointed out that A. trapesialis is on Brazil’s list of species threatened with extinction. This article provides a compilation of information present in the literature, offering a detailed review, with the aim of presenting a general panorama of what is known about Anodontites trapesialis and its larval parasitism of fishes.O molusco bivalve, Anodontites trapesialis, tem sido indicado como fonte alternativa para a aqüicultura, por ser considerado um alimento de bom valor nutricional com um conteúdo protéico próximo ao do pescado. Suas conchas podem ser utilizadas como fertilizantes calcáreos e ser agregadas a alimentos de animais domésticos e o nácar pode ser utilizado para fabricar botões e artesanatos. No entanto, as larvas de A. trapesialis, que são do tipo lasidium, são parasitas obrigatórias de peixes de água doce e a introdução desse bivalve em tanques de piscicultura tem causado transtornos e prejuízos aos produtores. Nada se conhece, porém, sobre o seu desenvolvimento nesses ambientes. Por outro lado, ressalta-se que A. trapesialis consta da lista brasileira de espécies ameaçadas de extinção. No presente artigo são compiladas as informações presentes na literatura, em uma revisão detalhada, com o objetivo de apresentar o panorama geral do

  3. Ecotoxicidad de metales en el bivalvo dulceacuícola Anodontites trapesialis y su potencial uso en el biomonitoreo de ambientes acuáticos en la Amazonía peruana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Loayza-Muro; R. Elías-Letts

    2009-01-01

    The effects of Cd, Cu and Zn on the filtration rate of Anodontites trapesialis were tested in order to evaluate the suitability of this freshwater mussel for ecotoxicity bioassays. This sublethal endpoint is very relevant due to the ecological role of this mussel in Amazonian environments. The filtr

  4. Ecotoxicidad de metales en el bivalvo dulceacuícola Anodontites trapesialis y su potencial uso en el biomonitoreo de ambientes acuáticos en la Amazonía peruana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loayza-Muro, R.; Elías-Letts, R.; Herkovits, J.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of Cd, Cu and Zn on the filtration rate of Anodontites trapesialis were tested in order to evaluate the suitability of this freshwater mussel for ecotoxicity bioassays. This sublethal endpoint is very relevant due to the ecological role of this mussel in Amazonian environments. The

  5. Ecotoxicidad de metales en el bivalvo dulceacuícola Anodontites trapesialis y su potencial uso en el biomonitoreo de ambientes acuáticos en la Amazonía peruana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loayza-Muro, R.; Elías-Letts, R.; Herkovits, J.

    2009-01-01

    The effects of Cd, Cu and Zn on the filtration rate of Anodontites trapesialis were tested in order to evaluate the suitability of this freshwater mussel for ecotoxicity bioassays. This sublethal endpoint is very relevant due to the ecological role of this mussel in Amazonian environments. The filtr

  6. Caligus elongatus as parasites of farmed salmonids in Ireland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jackson, David; Deady, Sandra; Hassett, Daniel; Leahy, Yvonne

    2000-01-01

    Infestation patterns of Caligus elongatus on farmed Atlantic salmon and rainbow trout were investigated at several sites along the west coast of Ireland. Parasite abundances were examined in relation to host species, farm location and season. Differences were found in the relative prevalence of infe

  7. Metals bioaccumulation and biomarkers responses in the Neotropical freshwater clam Anodontites trapesialis: Implications for monitoring coal mining areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luciana Fernandes de; Cabral, Millena Terezinha; Vieira, Carlos Eduardo Delfino; Antoniazzi, Matheus Henrique; Risso, Wagner Ezequiel; Martinez, Claudia Bueno Dos Reis

    2016-11-15

    As one of the most impactful industries, coal mining can promote several alterations at surrounding environment. In surface water, elevated concentrations of metals like Mn, Zn, Fe and Al are often observed. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the bioaccumulation and the sub-lethal effects of these metals on various organs of the Neotropical bivalve Anodontites trapesialis confined along a stream located near a coal mine, in order to assess a set of biomarkers that could be used for effectively monitoring coal mining areas. Clams were caged, for 96h, at two sites located upstream (Up1 and Up2) and two sites downstream (Dw1 and Dw2) from the mine. Metals bioaccumulation was determined in gills, mantle, digestive gland, muscle and hemolymph and the following biomarkers were measured in A. trapesialis tissues: total antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals, metallothionein content, lipid peroxidation (LPO), proteins carbonylation, glutathione S-transferase activity, superoxide dismutase activity and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity. The results showed that Al and Fe bioaccumulation in the gills and hemolymph, Al bioaccumulation in the mantle and muscle, increased LPO in the gills (Dw1 and Dw2) and mantle (Dw1), as well as reduced AChE activity in the muscle (Dw1 and Dw2) should be considered effective biomarkers for monitoring coal mining areas. A. trapesialis proved to be an efficient biological model, considering that biomarkers responses were observed in the clams after only 96h of confinement at Dw sites, accordingly this species could be a good candidate for monitoring Neotropical freshwaters.

  8. Biomonitoring of Pb and Cd in two impacted watersheds in Southeast Brazil, using the freshwater mussel Anodontites trapesialis (Lamarck, 1819 (Bivalvia : Mycetopodidae as a biological monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréa C. Tomazelli

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies were carried out to investigate the contamination of Piracicaba and Mogi-Guaçu River basins (São Paulo State, Southeastern, Brazil for heavy metals (Cd and Pb, using the limnic bivalve Anodontites trapesialis as a biological monitor. The results showed that the concentrations of Pb were higher than the control group in both basins, showing the bioavailability of this non-essential element in the basins. The concentrations were higher in the Mogi-Guaçu than in the Piracicaba basin, and in the slightly contaminated sites in both basins. There was no correlation between the degree of human impact and Cd and Pb concentrations, it was not possible to infer about concentrations of these heavy metals in the bivalves based only in a broad evaluation of human impact.O principal objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a contaminação pelos metais pesados Cd e Pb nas bacias dos rios Piracicaba e Mogi-Guaçu (Estado de São Paulo, Brasil, utilizando o bivalve limnico Anodontites trapesialis como indicador biológico. As bacias estudadas apresentam diferentes graus de impacto, sendo a qualidade da água geralmente melhor na bacia do rio Mogi-Guaçu. Os teores de Pb detectados nos bivalves não podem ser considerados críticos, contudo, houve acúmulo em relação ao grupo de controle em ambas as bacias, especialmente na bacia do rio Mogi-Guaçu. As maiores concentrações dos elementos, especialmente Pb, foram observadas nos locais menos poluídos e na bacia menos degradada. Este fato sugere que estas concentrações não estão sendo afetadas apenas pelas atividades antrópicas nas bacias, mas deve-se considerar também fatores que afetem a biodisponibilidade ou fontes específicas e não pontuais.

  9. Biological Observations on the Mudskipper Pseudapocryptes elongatus in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucholtz, R. H.; Meilvang, A. S.; Cedhagen, Tomas;

    2009-01-01

    Aspects of the population biology of the mudskipper, Pseudapocryptes elongatus, (Cuvier, 1816) were studied in Bac Lieu Province in the Lower Mekong Delta, Vietnam, including sex ratio, length–frequency distribution, sexual dimorphism, hepatosomatic index (HSI), female gonadosomatic index (GSI...

  10. Biological Observations on the Mudskipper Pseudapocryptes elongatus in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucholtz, R. H.; Meilvang, A. S.; Cedhagen, Tomas

    2009-01-01

    Aspects of the population biology of the mudskipper, Pseudapocryptes elongatus, (Cuvier, 1816) were studied in Bac Lieu Province in the Lower Mekong Delta, Vietnam, including sex ratio, length–frequency distribution, sexual dimorphism, hepatosomatic index (HSI), female gonadosomatic index (GSI), ...... in salinities ranging from freshwater to 50 ppt. Gut content analysis revealed that P. elongatus is a herbivore, feeding mainly on pennate diatoms (93% of the diet)....

  11. Evaluación de la tasa de aclaración de la almeja dulceacuicola Anodontites tortolis en un medio con coliformes Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guzmán Alvis Angela Inés

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available En condiciones de laboratorio se evaluó la eficiencia de la almeja de agua dulce (Anodontites tortolis para disminuir la carga de coliformes fecales (Escherichia coli determinada mediante filtración  en  membrana  por  8  horas.  El  experimento  se  diseñó  con  dos  tratamientos (densidades  de seis (T1 y ocho almejas (T2 mãs un control con tres replicaciones.  Se encontraron diferencias significativas (P<0.05 en las tasas de aclaración entre tratamientos. Los mayores niveles de remoción de E. coli se presentan en el tratamiento con mayor cantidad de individuos y la tasa de aclaración varió entre 0,47 y 3,80 l/h por individuo. La almeja mostró tasas de aclaración dentro de los rangos registrados en la literatura, lo que hace a este organismo importante como potencial recurso biológico para el tratamiento de aguas terciarias con coliformes fecales

  12. Evaluación de la tasa de aclaración de la almeja dulceacuícola Anodontites tortolis en un medio con coliformes Escherichia coli Clearance rate of faecal coliforms by netropical freshwater clam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan René Mallama Leyton

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available En condiciones de laboratorio se evaluón acute; la eficiencia de la almeja de agua dulce (Anodontites tortolis) para disminuir la carga de coliformes fecales (Escherichia coli) determinada mediante filtración en membrana por 8 horas. El experimento se diseñó con dos tratamientos (densidades de seis (T1) y ocho almejas (T2) más un control) con tres replicaciones. Se encontraron diferencias significativas (PUnder laboratory conditions the efficiency of the freshwater clam Anodontites tortolis to diminish the quantity of faecal coliforms, determined by the membrane filtration method during eight hours was evaluated. The experiment was design with two treatments (two densities of six (T1) and eight clams (T2) and a control) and three replications. Statistical significant differences (P<0.05) according to the Kruskal-Wallis test for the clearance rates were found. The highest levels of remotion of E. coli belonged to the treatment in which there was the highest number of individuals. The clearance rate of the clams varied between 0.47 and 3.80 l.h-1.ind-1 which is reported in the literature. Removal levels showing A. tortolis suggest that this clam can be used as a biological resource for the treatment of the tertiary waters contaminated with faecal coliform bacteria.

  13. First Record of Two Gobiid Fishes, Luciogobius elongatus, L. platycephalus (Perciformes: Gobiidae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung-Ho Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two species of small gobiid fishes genus Luciogobius, i.e., L. elongatus, L. platycephalus were described as the first records from Korea based on specimens collected from gravel beaches of Gijang-gun, Busan-si, Korea. Luciogobius elongatus is distinguished from congeners by very elongated and naked body, 42-44 vertebrae, 6-7 dorsal soft rays, and no free rays on pectoral fin, and L. platycephalus is characterized by having very depressed head, naked body, 40-41 vertebrae, 10-11 dorsal soft rays, and pectoral fin with only upper 2-4 free rays. We propose the new Korean name “Ga-neun-mi-kkeun-mang-dug”, “Nab-jak-mi-kkeunmang- dug” for L. elongatus and L. platycephalus, respectively.

  14. The distribution of exocrine glands in Lepeophtheirus salmonis and Caligus elongatus (Copepoda: Caligidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, S.; Bron, J.E.; Sommerville, C.

    2000-01-01

    The morphology, function and distribution of exocrine glands of copepods have rarely been studied in detail and almost nothing is known about them in the sea lice species L. salmonis and C. elongatus. This study utilised a novel application of a light-microscopy staining technique to reveal a variet

  15. Phylogeny and chromosomal diversification in the Dichroplus elongatus species group (Orthoptera, Melanoplinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffarel, Alberto; Maronna, Maximiliano M.; Cigliano, María Marta; Palacios-Gimenez, Octavio M.; Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C.; Martí, Dardo A.

    2017-01-01

    In an attempt to track the chromosomal differentiation in the Dichroplus elongatus species group, we analyzed the karyotypes of four species with classical cytogenetic and mapping several multigene families through fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). We improved the taxon sampling of the D. elongatus species group adding new molecular data to infer the phylogeny of the genus and reconstruct the karyotype evolution. Our molecular analyses recovered a fully resolved tree with no evidence for the monophyly of Dichroplus. However, we recovered several stable clades within the genus, including the D. elongatus species group, under the different strategies of tree analyses (Maximum Parsimony and Maximum Likelihood). The chromosomal data revealed minor variation in the D. elongatus species group’s karyotypes caused by chromosome rearrangements compared to the phylogenetically related D. maculipennis species group. The karyotypes of D. intermedius and D. exilis described herein showed the standard characteristics found in most Dichroplini, 2n = 23/24, X0♂ XX♀, Fundamental number (FN) = 23/24. However, we noticed two established pericentric inversions in D. intermedius karyotype, raising the FN to 27♂/28♀. A strong variation in the heterochromatic blocks distribution was evidenced at interespecific level. The multigene families’ mapping revealed significant variation, mainly in rDNA clusters. These variations are probably caused by micro chromosomal changes, such as movement of transposable elements (TEs) and ectopic recombination. These observations suggest a high genomic dynamism for these repetitive DNA sequences in related species. The reconstruction of the chromosome character “variation in the FN” posits the FN = 23/24 as the ancestral state, and it is hypothesized that variations due to pericentric inversions has arisen independently three times in the evolutionary history of Dichroplus. One of these independent events occurred in the D

  16. Larval stages of Neoplagioporus elongatus (Goto and Ozaki, 1930) (Opecoelidae: Plagioporinae), with notes on potential second intermediate hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Ayaka; Urabe, Misako

    2017-04-01

    The morphology of sporocysts and cercariae of Neoplagioporus elongatus (Goto and Ozaki, 1930) is described for the first time. A cotylomicrocercous cercaria obtained from the sorbeoconch snail Semisulcospira nakasekoae was confirmed to be the cercaria of N. elongatus, based on the degree of sequence identity of the COI gene to that of adult worms. Freshwater annelids (oligochaetes and leeches) and some aquatic insects (odonates) were demonstrated experimentally to be potential second intermediate hosts.

  17. Generation and Evaluation of a Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Model of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Triana

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models and their applications represent a great advantage of systems biology. Through their use as metabolic flux simulation models, production of industrially-interesting metabolites can be predicted. Due to the growing number of studies of metabolic models driven by the increasing genomic sequencing projects, it is important to conceptualize steps of reconstruction and analysis. We have focused our work in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, for which several analyses and insights are unveiled. A comprehensive approach has been used, which can be of interest to lead the process of manual curation and genome-scale metabolic analysis. The final model, iSyf715 includes 851 reactions and 838 metabolites. A biomass equation, which encompasses elementary building blocks to allow cell growth, is also included. The applicability of the model is finally demonstrated by simulating autotrophic growth conditions of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942.

  18. Generation and Evaluation of a Genome-Scale Metabolic Network Model of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triana, Julián; Montagud†, Arnau; Siurana, Maria; Fuente, David; Urchueguía, Arantxa; Gamermann, Daniel; Torres, Javier; Tena, Jose; de Córdoba, Pedro Fernández; Urchueguía, Javier F.

    2014-01-01

    The reconstruction of genome-scale metabolic models and their applications represent a great advantage of systems biology. Through their use as metabolic flux simulation models, production of industrially-interesting metabolites can be predicted. Due to the growing number of studies of metabolic models driven by the increasing genomic sequencing projects, it is important to conceptualize steps of reconstruction and analysis. We have focused our work in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, for which several analyses and insights are unveiled. A comprehensive approach has been used, which can be of interest to lead the process of manual curation and genome-scale metabolic analysis. The final model, iSyf715 includes 851 reactions and 838 metabolites. A biomass equation, which encompasses elementary building blocks to allow cell growth, is also included. The applicability of the model is finally demonstrated by simulating autotrophic growth conditions of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. PMID:25141288

  19. Identification of Xenologs and Their Characteristic Low Expression Levels in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez-Canales, Gilberto; Arellano-Álvarez, Guadalupe; González-Domenech, Carmen M.; Cruz, Fernando de la; Moya-Simarro, Andrés; Delaye, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a central process in prokaryotic evolution. Once a gene is introduced into a genome by HGT, its contribution to the fitness of the recipient cell depends in part on its expression level. Here we show that in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, xenologs derived from non-cyanobacterial sources exhibited lower expression levels than native genes in the genome. In accord with our observation, xenolog codon adaptation indexes also displayed relatively low expression...

  20. Cross-amplification of heterologous microsatellite markers in Rhamdia quelen and Leporinus elongatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Mauricio Lopera-Barrero

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Native fish species in Brazil are an asset in fish farming, but their natural stocks have been significantly reduced in recent years. To mitigate this negative impact, studies on fish conservation are being conducted and genetic tools for the discrimination of population parameters are increasingly achieving great importance. Current analysis evaluates a set of microsatellite heterologous primers in the jundiá (Rhamdia quelen and in the piapara (Leporinus elongatus. Samples from the caudal fin of 15 broodstock from each species were analyzed. DNA extraction was performed with NaCl protocol and the integrity of the extracted DNA was checked with agarose gel 1%. Twenty primers developed for Piaractus mesopotamicus, Colossoma macropomum, Prochilodus lineatus, Brycon opalinus and Oreochromis niloticus were evaluated. Cross amplification of four primers of the B. opalinus and P. lineatus species (BoM12, Pli43 and Pli60 in R. quelen and BoM2, Pli43 and Pli60 in L. elongatus was assessed. Primers of P. mesopotamicus, C. macropomum and O. niloticus showed no cross amplification in the two species analyzed. Results revealed the possibility of using the four amplified heterologous primers in genetic studies for R. quelen and L. elongatus.

  1. Heterochromatin analysis in the fish species Liposarcus anisitsi (siluriformes and Leporinus elongatus (characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ferreira Artoni

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The chromosomes of two neotropical freshwater fish species, namely Liposarcus anisitsi (Siluriformes, Loricariidae and Leporinus elongatus (Characiformes, Anostomidae, were investigated by means of C-banding, Ag-NORs, fluorochrome staining and banding by hot saline solution (HSS treatment, to reveal patterns of heterochromatin differentiation. The karyotype of L. anisitsi is described for the first time. Staining with the GC-specific fluorescent antibiotic mithramycin (MM revealed bright signals in some C-banded blocks in both species, suggesting that these MM+ heterochromatin contains GC-rich DNA. Banding by denaturation employing HSS, followed by Giemsa staining, yielded corresponding results documenting the thermal stability of GC-rich DNA part of heterochromatin positive after C-banding. In L. elongatus the Ag-NOR also followed the above banding patterns. However, in L. anisitsi the Ag-NOR was MM+ but negatively stained after C-banding and HSS treatment. L. elongatus also showed C-banded segments that were negative for mithramycin staining and HSS treatment. The results obtained evidence the heterochromatin heterogeneity in these fish species.Cromossomos mitóticos de duas especies de peixes neotropicais, Leporinus elongatus (Characiformes e Liposarcus anisitsi (Siluriformes, foram estudados por diferentes métodos de bandamentos, com o intuito de investigar a diferenciação da heterocromatina. Enquanto que a macroestrutura cariotípica de L. elongatus já foi objeto de estudos anteriores, o cariótipo de L. anisitsi está sendo apresentado pela primeira vez. Em ambas as espécies, a coloração dos cromossomos com a mitramicina (MM, fluorocromo GC específico, evidenciou sinais brilhantes em alguns segmentos heterocromáticos também positivos ao bandamento C, sugerindo ser esta fração da heterocromatina rica em seqüências de bases GC. O tratamento dos cromossomos com solução salina aquecida e posterior coloração com Giemsa

  2. Gametogênese e dinâmica da reprodução de Anodontites trapesialis (Lamarck (Unionoida, Mycetopodidae no lago Baía do Poço, planície de inundação do rio Cuiabá, Mato Grosso, Brasil Gametogenesis and dynamics of the reproduction of Anodontites trapesialis (Lamarck (Unionoida, Mycetopodidae from Baia do Poço Lake at the Cuiabá River wetland, Mato Grosso, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia T. Callil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available O ciclo reprodutivo de Anodontites trapesialis foi estudado entre os meses de maio de 1998 a abril de 1999. Análises quantitativas dos elementos celulares revelaram que a espécie é exclusivamente hermafrodita com folículos masculinos e femininos separados. A gametogênese é contínua com picos de maturação e eliminação de gametas durante a estação seca. A ovogênese tem seu período de maturação máxima em abril e maio, momento em que óvulos maduros são observados preenchendo os folículos e gonoductos. A espermatogênese foi reconhecida por uma fase proliferativa com células em desenvolvimento e apresentou seu período de maturação entre abril e julho. Estas células se diferenciaram dando origem às mórulas espermáticas e espermatozóides livres, organizando a série espermática radial. Durante o período de liberação dos gametas, a maioria dos folículos apresentou agregados de espematozóides formando esferas espermáticas as "spermballs", as quais caracterizam a espécie como espermatozeugmata.The reproductive cycle of Anodontites trapesialiswas studied from May 1998 to April 1999. Quantitative analysis of the sexual cycle revealed that the species is exclusively hermaphrodite with separate male and female follicles. Gametogenesis is continuous with peaks of maturation and elimination of gametes during dry season. The period of maximum maturation of the oogenesis was in April and May, when mature oocytes were observed filling the follicles and gonoducts. Spermatogenesis was recognized by a proliferation phase with developing cells with period of maturation since April to July. These cells started to differentiate giving origin to spermatic morulae and free spermatozoa organizing the radial spermatic series. During the period of discharge of the gamets, the majority of follicles presented aggregates of spermatozoa forming the spermballs, which characterize the species as spermatozeugmata.

  3. Blueprint for a minimal photoautotrophic cell: conserved and variable genes in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Simpler biological systems should be easier to understand and to engineer towards pre-defined goals. One way to achieve biological simplicity is through genome minimization. Here we looked for genomic islands in the fresh water cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (genome size 2.7 Mb) that could be used as targets for deletion. We also looked for conserved genes that might be essential for cell survival. Results By using a combination of methods we identified 170 xenologs, 136 ORFans and 1401 core genes in the genome of S. elongatus PCC 7942. These represent 6.5%, 5.2% and 53.6% of the annotated genes respectively. We considered that genes in genomic islands could be found if they showed a combination of: a) unusual G+C content; b) unusual phylogenetic similarity; and/or c) a small number of the highly iterated palindrome 1 (HIP1) motif plus an unusual codon usage. The origin of the largest genomic island by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) could be corroborated by lack of coverage among metagenomic sequences from a fresh water microbialite. Evidence is also presented that xenologous genes tend to cluster in operons. Interestingly, most genes coding for proteins with a diguanylate cyclase domain are predicted to be xenologs, suggesting a role for horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of Synechococcus sensory systems. Conclusions Our estimates of genomic islands in PCC 7942 are larger than those predicted by other published methods like SIGI-HMM. Our results set a guide to non-essential genes in S. elongatus PCC 7942 indicating a path towards the engineering of a model photoautotrophic bacterial cell. PMID:21226929

  4. Blueprint for a minimal photoautotrophic cell: conserved and variable genes in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peretó Juli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simpler biological systems should be easier to understand and to engineer towards pre-defined goals. One way to achieve biological simplicity is through genome minimization. Here we looked for genomic islands in the fresh water cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (genome size 2.7 Mb that could be used as targets for deletion. We also looked for conserved genes that might be essential for cell survival. Results By using a combination of methods we identified 170 xenologs, 136 ORFans and 1401 core genes in the genome of S. elongatus PCC 7942. These represent 6.5%, 5.2% and 53.6% of the annotated genes respectively. We considered that genes in genomic islands could be found if they showed a combination of: a unusual G+C content; b unusual phylogenetic similarity; and/or c a small number of the highly iterated palindrome 1 (HIP1 motif plus an unusual codon usage. The origin of the largest genomic island by horizontal gene transfer (HGT could be corroborated by lack of coverage among metagenomic sequences from a fresh water microbialite. Evidence is also presented that xenologous genes tend to cluster in operons. Interestingly, most genes coding for proteins with a diguanylate cyclase domain are predicted to be xenologs, suggesting a role for horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of Synechococcus sensory systems. Conclusions Our estimates of genomic islands in PCC 7942 are larger than those predicted by other published methods like SIGI-HMM. Our results set a guide to non-essential genes in S. elongatus PCC 7942 indicating a path towards the engineering of a model photoautotrophic bacterial cell.

  5. Fatal bronchopneumonia in a Metastrongylus elongatus and Porcine circovirus type 2 co-infected pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marruchella, G; Paoletti, B; Speranza, R; Di Guardo, G

    2012-08-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) infection is distributed worldwide and PCV2-associated disease (PCVAD) is considered among the most economically relevant ones to the global swine industry. PCV2 is known to play a causal role in the porcine respiratory disease complex, usually in close association with a large plethora of other biologic agents. We describe herein a case of fatal parasitic bronchopneumonia by Metastrongylus elongatus in a PCV2-infected pig. Metastrongylosis may still represent a major concern for outdoor herds. Our recent experience suggests that a concurrent PCVAD condition may trigger metastrongylosis, which may subsequently result, at its turn, in severe, sometimes fatal, pulmonary disease.

  6. Spare quinones in the QB cavity of crystallized photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Roland; Kern, Jan; Zouni, Athina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2007-06-01

    The recent crystallographic structure at 3.0 A resolution of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus has revealed a cavity in the protein which connects the membrane phase to the binding pocket of the secondary plastoquinone Q(B). The cavity may serve as a quinone diffusion pathway. By fluorescence methods, electron transfer at the donor and acceptor sides was investigated in the same membrane-free PSII core particle preparation from T. elongatus prior to and after crystallization; PSII membrane fragments from spinach were studied as a reference. The data suggest selective enrichment of those PSII centers in the crystal that are intact with respect to O(2) evolution at the manganese-calcium complex of water oxidation and with respect to the integrity of the quinone binding site. One and more functional quinone molecules (per PSII monomer) besides of Q(A) and Q(B) were found in the crystallized PSII. We propose that the extra quinones are located in the Q(B) cavity and serve as a PSII intrinsic pool of electron acceptors.

  7. Looking into the genome of Thermosynechococcus elongatus (thermophilic cyanobacteria) with codon selection and usage perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabha, Ratna; Singh, Dhananjaya P; Rai, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Genome analysis of thermophilic cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 revealed factors ruling choices of codons in this organism. Multiple parameters like Nc, GC3s, RSCU, Codon Adaptation Index (CAI), optimal and rare codons, codon-pair context and amino acid usage were analysed and compositional constraint was identified as major factor. Wide range of Nc values for the same GC3 content suggested the role of translational selection. Mutational bias is suggested at synonymous position. Among optimal codons for translation, most were GC-ending. Seven codons (AGA, AGG, AUA, UAA, UAG, UCA and UGA) were found to have least occurrence in the entire genome and except stop codons all were A-ending (exception AGG). Most widely used codon-pair in the genome are G-ending or C-ending and A-ending or U-ending codons make pair with G-ending or C-ending codons. Amino acids which are largely distributed in T. elongatus tend to use G-ending or C-ending codons most frequently. Findings showed cumulative role of translational selection, translational accuracy and gene expression levels with mutational bias as key player in codon selection pattern of this organism.

  8. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as

  9. The structure of allophycocyanin from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.5 Å resolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, James William; Maghlaoui, Karim; Barber, James, E-mail: j.barber@imperial.ac.uk [Division of Molecular Biosciences, Imperial College, Exhibition Road, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2007-12-01

    The crystal structure of a light-harvesting protein that interacts with photosystem II is reported. Cyanobacteria and red algae use light-harvesting pigments bound by proteins to capture solar radiation and to channel excitation energy into their reaction centres. In most cyanobacteria, a multi-megadalton soluble structure known as the phycobilisome is a major light-harvesting system. Allophycocyanin is the main component of the phycobilisome core, forming a link between the rest of the phycobilisome and the reaction-centre core. The crystal structure of allophycocyanin from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (TeAPC) has been determined and refined at 3.5 Å resolution to a crystallographic R value of 26.0% (R{sub free} = 28.5%). The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the allophycocyanin structure from Spirulina platensis as the search model. The asymmetric unit contains an (αβ) monomer which is expanded by symmetry to a crystallographic trimer.

  10. Spatial genetic structure and mitochondrial DNA phylogeography of Argentinean populations of the grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Rosetti

    Full Text Available Many grasshopper species are considered of agronomical importance because they cause damage to pastures and crops. Comprehension of pest population dynamics requires a clear understanding of the genetic diversity and spatial structure of populations. In this study we report on patterns of genetic variation in the South American grasshopper Dichroplus elongatus which is an agricultural pest of crops and forage grasses of great economic significance in Argentina. We use Direct Amplification of Minisatellite Regions (DAMD and partial sequences of the cytochrome oxydase 1 (COI mitochondrial gene to investigate intraspecific structure, demographic history and gene flow patterns in twenty Argentinean populations of this species belonging to different geographic and biogeographic regions. DAMD data suggest that, although genetic drift and migration occur within and between populations, measurable relatedness among neighbouring populations declines with distance and dispersal over distances greater than 200 km is not typical, whereas effective gene flow may occur for populations separated by less than 100 km. Landscape analysis was useful to detect genetic discontinuities associated with environmental heterogeneity reflecting the changing agroecosystem. The COI results indicate the existence of strong genetic differentiation between two groups of populations located at both margins of the Paraná River which became separated during climate oscillations of the Middle Pleistocene, suggesting a significant restriction in effective dispersion mediated by females and large scale geographic differentiation. The number of migrants between populations estimated through mitochondrial and DAMD markers suggest that gene flow is low prompting a non-homogeneous spatial structure and justifying the variation through space. Moreover, the genetic analysis of both markers allows us to conclude that males appear to disperse more than females, reducing the chance of the

  11. Single particle analysis of thylakoid proteins from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 : Localization of the CupA subunit of NDH-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Ogawa, Teruo; Aro, Eva-Marl; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-01-01

    The larger protein complexes of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic membrane of Thermosynechoccus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 were studied by single particle electron microscopy after detergent solubilization, without any purification steps. Besides the "standard" L-shaped NDH-1L complex, related

  12. Single particle analysis of thylakoid proteins from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 : Localization of the CupA subunit of NDH-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folea, I. Mihaela; Zhang, Pengpeng; Nowaczyk, Marc M.; Ogawa, Teruo; Aro, Eva-Marl; Boekema, Egbert J.; Aro, Eva-Mari

    2008-01-01

    The larger protein complexes of the cyanobacterial photosynthetic membrane of Thermosynechoccus elongatus and Synechocystis 6803 were studied by single particle electron microscopy after detergent solubilization, without any purification steps. Besides the "standard" L-shaped NDH-1L complex, related

  13. Nuclear changes induced by the nematodes Xiphinema diversicaudatum and Longidorus elongatus in root-tips of perennial ryegrass, Lolium perenne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, B S; Robertson, W M; Trudgill, D L

    1982-09-01

    The DNA content and size of individual nuclei from galls of perennial ryegrass root-tips induced by X. diversicaudatum and L. elongatus were measured. Feeding by X. diversicaudatum increased the DNA content of the nuclei by varying amounts. No regular doubling pattern of the DNA content was discernible. The DNA values varied up to between 32-64C. Generally the size of the nuclei was not increased, although some were larger than control nuclei. The modified nuclei probably have an altered metabolic function, which increases the food value of the gall to the nematode. Some bi-nucleate cells were also observed, which probably result from mitosis without cytokinesis. A preliminary examination of nuclei from galls induced by L. elongatus revealed similar nuclear changes, but no bi-nucleate cells were found.

  14. Using a Microfluidic Gradient Generator to Characterize BG-11 Medium for the Growth of Cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Chun Yang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The photosynthetic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 has recently gained great attention for its ability to directly convert CO2 into renewable chemicals upon genetic engineering. Thus, it is of great interest to increase the growth speed and lower the medium requirement for cultivating this cyanobacterium. The cultivation medium of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 has been developed, which consists of many inorganic and metal ingredients with a specific composition, known as the BG-11 medium. In this work, we analyzed the concentration effect of each ingredient and identified the absolutely essential components in BG-11 medium for cyanobacteria growth using the concentration gradient generator chip (CGGC fabricated by MEMS technology. As shown by our results, removal of the individual component sodium nitrate, potassium phosphate, or magnesium sulfate from the BG-11 medium led to severe growth inhibition of Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. Contrary to our expectation, increasing concentration of the crucial ingredients showed either insignificant or negative impact on cell growth. Overall, standard growth could be achieved without supplementation of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA disodium, sodium carbonate, or sodium citrate to the culture medium. Further improvement of the CGGC-based microfluidic system based on this preliminary study may broaden its application range to analyze more complicated correlations.

  15. Diversidade genética de três estoques de piapara (Leporinus elongatus, utilizando RAPD = Genetic diversity of three stocks of piapara (Leporinus elongatus, using RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Cristina Gomes

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente a produção aquícola brasileira tem apresentado grandeprogresso. Dentre as espécies nativas cultivadas no Brasil, a piapara (Leporinus elongatus tem sido amplamente preconizada. Com objetivo de avaliar os programas de repovoamento, foram analisadas a variabilidade e a divergência genética de três estoques de piapara com a técnica de RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic. O primeiro estoque pertence à Estação de Aquicultura e Hidrologia da Duke Energy International (A; o segundo, à piscicultura de Rolândia (B e o terceiro, ao Programa de Repovoamento dos Rios do Paraná (C. Os dezprimers para RAPD utilizados produziram 105 fragmentos polimórficos, conferindo um polimorfismo de 98,1% para os três estoques avaliados. A porcentagem de locos polimórficos e índice de Shannon foi superior para o estoque A. Porém, todos valores foram elevados, indicando alta diversidade intrapopulacional. Os valores de Gst indicam que houvebaixa diferenciação genética entre os estoques A x B e moderada diferenciação entre os demais. O Nm foi maior entre os estoques A x B. A distância genética e o dendrograma indicam que os estoques A x B são menos distantes geneticamente.Latelly, aquiculture production in Brazil has made great strides. Among the native species cultivated in Brazil, piapara (Leporinus elogatus has been widely praised. With the objective of evaluating restocking programs, the variability and genetic divergence ofthree piapara stocks were analyzed using the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA technique. The first stock belongs to the Aquiculture and Hydrology Station of Duke Energy International (A; the second one belongs to a fish farm in the city of Rolândia(B; and the third to the River Restocking Program of Paraná (C. The ten primers used for RAPD produced 105 polymorphic loci, conferring a polymorphism of 98.1% for the three evaluated stocks. Polymorphic loci percentage and Shannon index were higher for stock A

  16. Identification of Xenologs and Their Characteristic Low Expression Levels in the Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Canales, Gilberto; Arellano-Álvarez, Guadalupe; González-Domenech, Carmen M; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moya, Andrés; Delaye, Luis

    2015-06-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a central process in prokaryotic evolution. Once a gene is introduced into a genome by HGT, its contribution to the fitness of the recipient cell depends in part on its expression level. Here we show that in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, xenologs derived from non-cyanobacterial sources exhibited lower expression levels than native genes in the genome. In accord with our observation, xenolog codon adaptation indexes also displayed relatively low expression values. These results are in agreement with previous reports that suggested the relative neutrality of most xenologs. However, we also demonstrated that some of the xenologs detected participated in cellular functions, including iron starvation acclimation and nitrate reduction, which corroborate the role of HGT in bacterial adaptation. For example, the expression levels of some of the xenologs detected are known to increase under iron-limiting conditions. We interpreted the overall pattern as an indication that there is a selection pressure against high expression levels of xenologs. However, when a xenolog protein product confers a selective advantage, natural selection can further modulate its expression level to meet the requirements of the recipient cell. In addition, we show that ORFans did not exhibit significantly lower expression levels than native genes in the genome, which suggested an origin other than xenology.

  17. Small secreted proteins enable biofilm development in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnasa, Rami; Nagar, Elad; Sendersky, Eleonora; Reich, Ziv; Simkovsky, Ryan; Golden, Susan; Schwarz, Rakefet

    2016-01-01

    Small proteins characterized by a double-glycine (GG) secretion motif, typical of secreted bacterial antibiotics, are encoded by the genomes of diverse cyanobacteria, but their functions have not been investigated to date. Using a biofilm-forming mutant of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and a mutational approach, we demonstrate the involvement of four small secreted proteins and their GG-secretion motifs in biofilm development. These proteins are denoted EbfG1-4 (enable biofilm formation with a GG-motif). Furthermore, the conserved cysteine of the peptidase domain of the Synpcc7942_1133 gene product (dubbed PteB for peptidase transporter essential for biofilm) is crucial for biofilm development and is required for efficient secretion of the GG-motif containing proteins. Transcriptional profiling of ebfG1-4 indicated elevated transcript levels in the biofilm-forming mutant compared to wild type (WT). However, these transcripts decreased, acutely but transiently, when the mutant was cultured in extracellular fluids from a WT culture, and biofilm formation was inhibited. We propose that WT cells secrete inhibitor(s) that suppress transcription of ebfG1-4, whereas secretion of the inhibitor(s) is impaired in the biofilm-forming mutant, leading to synthesis and secretion of EbfG1-4 and supporting the formation of biofilms. PMID:27558743

  18. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-08-20

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first crystallization and structural analysis of the monomeric form of PSIIcc with high oxygen evolution capacity, isolated from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The crystals belong to the space group C222(1), contain one monomer per asymmetric unit, and diffract to a resolution of 3.6 A. The x-ray diffraction pattern of the PSIIcc-monomer crystals exhibit less anisotropy (dependence of resolution on crystal orientation) compared with crystals of dimeric PSIIcc, and the packing of the molecules within the unit cell is different. In the monomer, 19 protein subunits, 35 chlorophylls, two pheophytins, the non-heme iron, the primary plastoquinone Q(A), two heme groups, 11 beta-carotenes, 22 lipids, seven detergent molecules, and the Mn(4)Ca cluster of the water oxidizing complex could be assigned analogous to the dimer. Based on the new structural information, the roles of lipids and protein subunits in dimer formation of PSIIcc are discussed. Due to the lack of non-crystallographic symmetry and the orientation of the membrane normal of PSIIcc perpendicular ( approximately 87 degrees ) to the crystallographic b-axis, further information about the structure of the Mn(4)Ca cluster is expected to become available from orientation-dependent spectroscopy on this new crystal form.

  19. Morphology, chemistry and function of the postpharyngeal gland in the South American digger wasps Trachypus boharti and Trachypus elongatus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Herzner

    Full Text Available Microbes pose severe threats to animals as competitors or pathogens and strongly affect the evolution of life history traits like parental care. Females of the European beewolf Philanthus triangulum, a solitary digger wasp, provision their offspring with paralyzed honeybees and embalm them with the secretion from large postpharyngeal glands (PPG that contain mainly unsaturated hydrocarbons. This coating changes the physico-chemical properties of the prey surface, causes a reduction of water condensation and retards growth of mold fungi. Here we examined the closely related South American genus Trachypus, which shows a life-history similar to Philanthus. We investigated whether Trachypus spp. also possess PPGs and embalm larval provisions. Using histological methods and 3D reconstructions we show that Trachypus boharti and T. elongatus possess PPGs that are similar to P. triangulum but somewhat smaller. The ultrastructure of the gland epithelium suggests that the gland content is at least partly sequestered from the hemolymph. Chemical analyses using gas chromatography / mass spectrometry revealed that both the cuticle and PPGs of Trachypus contain mainly unsaturated long-chain hydrocarbons. The gland of T. boharti additionally contains long-chain ketones. The hydrocarbons from the PPG of T. elongatus occurred on prey bees excavated from nests in the field but not on conspecific control bees. While the embalming only slightly elevated the amount of hydrocarbons on prey bees, the proportion of unsaturated hydrocarbons, which is crucial for the antifungal effect, was significantly increased. The Trachypus species under study possess PPGs that are very similar to the PPG of P. triangulum with regard to morphology, ultrastructure and chemistry. Moreover, we provide clear evidence that T. elongatus females embalm their prey, presumably as a means of prey preservation. The observed differences among Trachypus and Philanthus in gland size and prey

  20. Two new species of the Liolaemus elongatus-kriegi complex (Iguania, Liolaemidae from Andean highlands of southern Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Troncoso-Palacios

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The elongatus-kriegi complex is one of the most diverse clades of the Liolaemus (sensu stricto subgenus of lizards. There are currently 29 species recognized in this group distributed between Chile and Argentina. Based on molecular evidence, there seem to be five main clades nested within this complex: the elongatus, leopardinus, kriegi, petrophilus and punmahuida clades. Liolaemus buergeri and L. kriegi, both of the kriegi clade, were believed to inhabit the surroundings of the Laja Lagoon, in the Biobío Region of Chile. Moreover, this Chilean population of L. kriegi was recently recognized as an undescribed taxon called “Liolaemus sp. A” based on molecular phylogenetics. In this work, we studied these two populations of the Laja Lagoon and provided the morphological diagnosis to describe them as two new species: L. scorialis sp. n. and L. zabalai sp. n., previously considered L. buergeri and “L. kriegi/Liolaemus sp. A” respectively. Additionally, we identified another population of L. scorialis in the vicinity of La Mula Lagoon in the Araucanía Region of Chile. Liolaemus scorialis differs from almost all of the species of the elongatus-kriegi complex by its considerably smaller size. Nevertheless, without molecular data we cannot assign it to any particular subclade. Liolaemus zabalai belongs to the kriegi clade based on published molecular phylogenies. Finally, we provide some natural history data on both species and we document for the first time the presence of L. neuquensis in Chile from a museum specimen from La Mula Lagoon.

  1. Morphology, chemistry and function of the postpharyngeal gland in the South American digger wasps Trachypus boharti and Trachypus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzner, Gudrun; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Poettinger, Theodor; Weiss, Katharina; Koedam, Dirk; Kroiss, Johannes; Strohm, Erhard

    2013-01-01

    Microbes pose severe threats to animals as competitors or pathogens and strongly affect the evolution of life history traits like parental care. Females of the European beewolf Philanthus triangulum, a solitary digger wasp, provision their offspring with paralyzed honeybees and embalm them with the secretion from large postpharyngeal glands (PPG) that contain mainly unsaturated hydrocarbons. This coating changes the physico-chemical properties of the prey surface, causes a reduction of water condensation and retards growth of mold fungi. Here we examined the closely related South American genus Trachypus, which shows a life-history similar to Philanthus. We investigated whether Trachypus spp. also possess PPGs and embalm larval provisions. Using histological methods and 3D reconstructions we show that Trachypus boharti and T. elongatus possess PPGs that are similar to P. triangulum but somewhat smaller. The ultrastructure of the gland epithelium suggests that the gland content is at least partly sequestered from the hemolymph. Chemical analyses using gas chromatography / mass spectrometry revealed that both the cuticle and PPGs of Trachypus contain mainly unsaturated long-chain hydrocarbons. The gland of T. boharti additionally contains long-chain ketones. The hydrocarbons from the PPG of T. elongatus occurred on prey bees excavated from nests in the field but not on conspecific control bees. While the embalming only slightly elevated the amount of hydrocarbons on prey bees, the proportion of unsaturated hydrocarbons, which is crucial for the antifungal effect, was significantly increased. The Trachypus species under study possess PPGs that are very similar to the PPG of P. triangulum with regard to morphology, ultrastructure and chemistry. Moreover, we provide clear evidence that T. elongatus females embalm their prey, presumably as a means of prey preservation. The observed differences among Trachypus and Philanthus in gland size and prey embalming may have

  2. Development of SyneBrick Vectors As a Synthetic Biology Platform for Gene Expression in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wook Jin; Lee, Sun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Sim, Sang Jun; Woo, Han Min

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are oxygenic photosynthetic prokaryotes that are able to assimilate CO2 using solar energy and water. Metabolic engineering of cyanobacteria has suggested the possibility of direct CO2 conversion to value-added chemicals. However, engineering of cyanobacteria has been limited due to the lack of various genetic tools for expression and control of multiple genes to reconstruct metabolic pathways for biochemicals from CO2. Thus, we developed SyneBrick vectors as a synthetic biology platform for gene expression in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 as a model cyanobacterium. The SyneBrick chromosomal integration vectors provide three inducible expression systems to control gene expression and three neutral sites for chromosomal integrations. Using a SyneBrick vector, LacI-regulated gene expression led to 24-fold induction of the eYFP reporter gene with 1 mM isopropyl β-D-1-thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG) inducer in S. elongatus PCC 7942 under 5% (v/v) CO2. TetR-regulated gene expression led to 19-fold induction of the GFP gene when 100 nM anhydrotetracycline (aTc) inducer was used. Gene expression decreased after 48 h due to degradation of aTc under light. T7 RNA polymerase-based gene expression resulted in efficient expression with a lower IPTG concentration than a previously developed pTrc promoter. A library of T7 promoters can be used for tunable gene expression. In summary, SyneBrick vectors were developed as a synthetic biology platform for gene expression in S. elongatus PCC 7942. These results will accelerate metabolic engineering of biosolar cell factories through expressing and controlling multiple genes of interest.

  3. The potential of Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973 for sugar feedstock production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kuo; Tan, Xiaoming; Liang, Yajing; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-09-01

    It is important to obtain abundant sugar feedstocks economically and sustainably for bio-fermentation industry, especially for producing cheap biofuels and biochemicals. Besides plant biomass, photosynthetic cyanobacteria have also been considered to be potential microbe candidates for sustainable production of carbohydrate feedstocks. As the fastest growing cyanobacterium reported so far, Synechococcus elongatus UTEX 2973 (Syn2973) might have huge potential for bioproduction. In this study, we explored the potentials of this strain as photo-bioreactors for sucrose and glycogen production. Under nitrogen-replete condition, Syn2973 could accumulate glycogen with a rate of 0.75 g L(-1) day(-1) at the exponential phase and reach a glycogen content as high as 51 % of the dry cell weight (DCW) at the stationary phase. By introducing a sucrose transporter CscB, Syn2973 was endowed with an ability to secrete over 94 % sucrose out of cells under salt stress condition. The highest extracellular sucrose productivity reached 35.5 mg L(-1) h(-1) for the Syn2973 strain expressing cscB, which contained the similar amounts of intracellular glycogen with the wild type. Potassium chloride was firstly proved to induce sucrose accumulation as well as sodium chloride in Syn2973. By semi-continuous culturing, 8.7 g L(-1) sucrose was produced by the cscB-expressing strain of Syn2973 in 21 days. These results support that Syn2973 is a promising candidate with great potential for production of sugars.

  4. Thermostability of photosystem I trimers and monomers from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubin, Vladimir V.; Terekhova, Irina V.; Bolychevtseva, Yulia V.; El-Mohsnawy, Eithar; Rögner, Matthias; Mäntele, Werner; Kopczak, Marta J.; Džafić, Enela

    2017-05-01

    The performance of solar energy conversion into alternative energy sources in artificial systems highly depends on the thermostability of photosystem I (PSI) complexes Terasaki et al. (2007), Iwuchukwu et al. (2010), Kothe et al. (2013) . To assess the thermostability of PSI complexes from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus heating induced perturbations on the level of secondary structure of the proteins were studied. Changes were monitored by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra in the mid-IR region upon slow heating (1 °C per minute) of samples in D2O phosphate buffer (pD 7.4) from 20 °C to 100 °C. These spectra showed distinct changes in the Amide I region of PSI complexes as a function of the rising temperature. Absorbance at the Amide I maximum of PSI monomers (centered around 1653 cm- 1), gradually dropped in two temperature intervals, i.e. 60-75 and 80-90 °C. In contrast, absorbance at the Amide I maximum of PSI trimers (around 1656 cm- 1) dropped only in one temperature interval 80-95 °C. The thermal profile of the spectral shift of α-helices bands in the region 1656-1642 cm- 1 confirms the same two temperature intervals for PSI monomers and only one interval for trimers. Apparently, the observed absorbance changes at the Amide I maximum during heating of PSI monomers and trimers are caused by deformation and unfolding of α-helices. The absence of absorbance changes in the interval of 20-65 °C in PSI trimers is probably caused by a greater stability of protein secondary structure as compared to that in monomers. Upon heating above 80 °C a large part of α-helices both in trimers and monomers converts to unordered and aggregated structures. Spectral changes of PSI trimers and monomers heated up to 100 °C are irreversible due to protein denaturation and non-specific aggregation of complexes leading to new absorption bands at 1618-1620 cm- 1. We propose that monomers shield the denaturation sensitive sides at the

  5. Effect of the ration processing on the apparent digestibility values of nutrients for the piau (Leporinus elongatus Efeito do tipo de ração sobre a digestibilidade aparente dos nutrientes para piau (Leporinus elongatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Vieira Rosa Logato

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The experiment carried out at National Center for Research in Tropical Fish Pirassununga, SP, aiming to determine the effect of the ration processing on the apparent digestibility coefficients of the ingredients for the piau (L. elongatus. A total of 600 males of piau were utilized, allotted into six ponds of 300L. The applied treatments were: grinder processed ration, pelleting ration and extruded ration, utilizing rations with 32% crude protein and 3400 Kcal DE.Kg-1. The experiment was in a randomized blocks design with three treatments, three blocks and two replicates. The data were submitted to variance analysis by the SAEG computational package and the means of the treatments compared by SNK test (5% of significance. The results showed that there were significant differences among the digestibility coefficients of both protein and energy for the pelleted and extrused rations (P0.05.O experimento foi realizado no Centro Nacional de Pesquisa de Peixes Tropicais de Pirassununga, SP, objetivando-se determinar o efeito do processamento da ração sobre os coeficientes de digestibilidade aparente dos ingredientes para o piau (L. elongatus. Foram utilizados 600 machos de piau, distribuídos em seis tanques de 300 L. Os tratamentos aplicados foram: ração farelada, ração peletizada e ração extrusada, formuladas com 32% de PB e 3400 Kcal ED/Kg. O delineamento experimental foi em blocos casualizados, com três tratamentos, três blocos e duas repetições por tratamento. As análises estatísticas foram realizadas pelo SAEG, com as médias comparadas pelo teste SNK (5%. Houve diferenças entre os coeficientes de digestibilidade da proteína bruta e energia para as rações peletizada e extusada (P0,05.

  6. Spectroelectrochemistry of P700 in native photosystem I particles and diethyl ether-treated thylakoid membranes from spinach and Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanrong; Nakamura, Akimasa; Kuroiwa, Yoshinori; Kato, Yuki; Watanabe, Tadashi

    2008-04-02

    The redox potentials (E(composite function')) of P700 in intact and diethyl ether-treated thylakoid membranes as well as native photosystem (PS) I particles from spinach and Thermosynechococcus elongatus have been measured by a spectroelectrochemistry with an error range of +/-2-3 mV. Stepwise removal of antenna pigments by ether treatment caused distinct shifts of the E( composite function') value with increasing degree of water saturation in ether; negatively from +471 to +428 mV for spinach, but positively from +423 to +436 mV for T. elongatus. Such a contrasting behavior is discussed by invoking the mode of action of ether on the microenvironments around P700.

  7. Seasonal changes in food quantity and quality of the common North Sea copepods Temora longicornis and Pseudocalanus elongatus: a bioassay approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koski, Marja; Dutz, Jörg; Klein Breteler, W.

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the food quantity and quality over a seasonal cycle for the development and egg production of the common North Sea copepods Temora longicornis and Pseudocalanus elongatus, using a bioassay approach. Seston was sampled from December to October from a well-mixed water column...... with the seston from the spring bloom in March-April. The juveniles of both species were able to complete their development only in spring experiments. A multiple regression analyses and comparison to a good-quality standard food of the same concentration suggested that, in an annual scale, the egg production...... and development of T longicornis mainly depended on phytoplankton concentration, while the egg production and development of P. elongatus appeared also to benefit from detritus or heterotrophic food sources. The present study did not detect an influence of a specific food quality variable; however, an unexplained...

  8. Molecular Cloning, Biochemical Characterization, and Antitumor Properties of a Novel L-Asparaginase from Synechococcus elongatus PCC6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kebeish, R; El-Sayed, A; Fahmy, H; Abdel-Ghany, A

    2016-10-01

    L-asparaginase (EC 3.5.1.1), which catalyzes the deamidation of L-asparagine to L-aspartic acid and ammonia, has been widely used as a key therapeutic tool in the treatment of tumors. The current commercially available L-asparaginases, produced from bacteria, have signs of toxicity and hypersensitivity reactions during the course of tumor therapy. Therefore, searching for L-asparaginases with unique biochemical properties and fewer adverse effects was the objective of this work. In this study, cyanobacterial strain Synechococcus elongatus PCC6803 was found as a novel source of L-asparaginase. The L-asparaginase gene coding sequence (gi:939195038) was cloned and expressed in E. coli BL21(DE3), and the recombinant protein (Se.ASPII) was purified by affinity chromatography. The enzyme has high affinity towards L-asparagine and shows very weak affinity towards L-glutamine. The enzymatic properties of the recombinant enzyme were investigated, and the kinetic parameters (Km, Vmax) were measured. The pH and temperature dependence profiles of the novel enzyme were analyzed. The work was extended to measure the antitumor properties of the novel enzyme against different human tumor cell lines.

  9. Heavy metal accumulation and tolerance of energy grass (Elymus elongatus subsp. ponticus cv. Szarvasi-1) grown in hydroponic culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipos, Gyula; Solti, Adám; Czech, Viktória; Vashegyi, Ildikó; Tóth, Brigitta; Cseh, Edit; Fodor, Ferenc

    2013-07-01

    Phytoremediation is a plant based, cost effective technology to detoxify or stabilise contaminated soils. Fast growing, high biomass, perennial plants may be used not only in phytoremediation but also in energy production. Szarvasi-1 energy grass (Elymus elongatus subsp. ponticus cv. Szarvasi-1), a good candidate for this combined application, was grown in nutrient solution in order to assess its Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn accumulation and tolerance. Its shoot metal accumulation showed the order Pb < Ni < Cu ∼ Cd < Zn. In parallel with this, Pb and Ni had no or very little influence on the growth, dry matter content, chlorophyll concentration and transpiration of the plants. Cu and Cd treatment resulted in significant decreases in all these parameters that can be attributed to Fe plaque formation in the roots suggested by markedly increased Fe and Cu accumulation. This came together with decreased shoot and root Mn concentrations in both treatments while shoot Cu and Zn concentrations decreased under Cd and Cu exposure, respectively. Zn treatment had no effect or even slightly stimulated the plants. This may be due to a slight stimulation of Fe translocation and a very efficient detoxification mechanism. Based on the average 300 mg kg⁻¹ (dry mass) Zn concentration which is 0.03% of the shoot dry mass the variety is suggested to be classified as Zn accumulator. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Delignification and detoxification of peanut shell bio-waste using an extremely halophilic laccase from an Aquisalibacillus elongatus isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaie, Rezvan; Rezaei, Shahla; Jafari, Nasrin; Forootanfar, Hamid; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Faramarzi, Mohammad Ali

    2017-09-05

    Lignocellulose bioconversion is a harsh process requiring the use of surfactants and organic solvents. Consequently, the incorporation of laccases in this bioconversion requires the bioprospecting of enzymes that can remain stable under extreme conditions. An extracellular, highly stable laccase was produced by the halophilic isolate Aquisalibacillus elongatus in submerged liquid culture fermentation. Statistical and non-statistical strategies gave the highest enzymatic activity (8.02 U mL(-1)) following addition of glucose (1.7 g L(-1)), copper sulfate (0.8 g L(-1)), urea (15 g L(-1)), and CaCl2 (0.8 g L(-1)). The enzyme, after purification using a synthetic affinity support, delignified a peanut shell substrate by 45%. A pH of 8.0 and a temperature of 35 °C were optimal for delignification of this bio-waste material. Addition of [Bmim][PF6], 1,4-dioxane, acetone, and HBT promoted this bio-waste delignification. Bio-treatment in the presence of 50% [Bmim][PF6] gave a maximal lignin removal of 87%. The surfactants tested had no significant effects on the delignification yield. The laccase also detoxified the toxic phenols found in peanut shell waste. The high catalytic efficiency of this enzyme against a lignocellulosic sample under extreme conditions suggests the suitability of this laccase for industrial applications.

  11. Analysis of the solution structure of Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem I in n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside using small-angle neutron scattering and molecular dynamics simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Rosemary K. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Harris, Bradley J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Iwuchukwu, Ifeyinwa J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Bruce, Barry D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cheng, Xiaolin [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Qian, Shuo [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Heller, William T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); O’Neill, Hugh [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Frymier, Paul D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation were used to investigate the structure of trimeric photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (T. elongatus) stabilized in n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) detergent solution. Scattering curves of detergent and protein–detergent complexes were measured at 18% D2O, the contrast match point for the detergent, and 100% D2O, allowing observation of the structures of protein/detergent complexes. It was determined that the maximum dimension of the PSI–DDM complex was consistent with the presence of a monolayer belt of detergent around the periphery of PSI. A dummy-atom reconstruction of the shape of the complex from the SANS data indicates that the detergent envelope has an irregular shape around the hydrophobic periphery of the PSI trimer rather than a uniform, toroidal belt around the complex. A 50 ns MD simulation model (a DDM ring surrounding the PSI complex with extra interstitial DDM) of the PSI–DDM complex was developed for comparison with the SANS data. The results suggest that DDM undergoes additional structuring around the membrane-spanning surface of the complex instead of a simple, relatively uniform belt, as is generally assumed for studies that use detergents to solubilize membrane proteins.

  12. Engineering of a modular and synthetic phosphoketolase pathway for photosynthetic production of acetone from CO2 in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under light and aerobic condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwa, Jun-Won; Kim, Wook Jin; Sim, Sang Jun; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min

    2016-08-01

    Capture and conversion of CO2 to valuable chemicals is intended to answer global challenges on environmental issues, climate change and energy security. Engineered cyanobacteria have been enabled to produce industry-relevant chemicals from CO2 . However, the final products from cyanobacteria have often been mixed with fermented metabolites during dark fermentation. In this study, our engineering of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 enabled continuous conversion of CO2 to volatile acetone as sole product. This process occurred during lighted, aerobic culture via both ATP-driven malonyl-CoA synthesis pathway and heterologous phosphoketolase (PHK)-phosphotransacetylase (Pta) pathway. Because of strong correlations between the metabolic pathways of acetate and acetone, supplying the acetyl-CoA directly from CO2 in the engineered strain, led to sole production of acetone (22.48 mg/L ± 1.00) without changing nutritional constraints, and without an anaerobic shift. Our engineered S. elongatus strains, designed for acetone production, could be modified to create biosolar cell factories for sustainable photosynthetic production of acetyl-CoA-derived biochemicals.

  13. Characterization of Microbulbifer strain CMC-5, a new biochemical variant of Microbulbifer elongatus type strain DSM6810T isolated from decomposing seaweeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonnadula, RaviChand; Verma, Pankaj; Shouche, Yogesh S; Ghadi, Sanjeev C

    2009-12-01

    A Gram-negative, rod-shaped, non-spore forming, non-motile and moderate halophilic bacteria designated as strain CMC-5 was isolated from decomposing seaweeds by enrichment culture. The growth of strain CMC-5 was assessed in synthetic seawater-based medium containing polysaccharide. The bacterium degraded and utilized agar, alginate, carrageenan, xylan, carboxymethyl cellulose and chitin. The strain was characterized using a polyphasic approach for taxonomic identification. Cellular fatty acid analysis showed the presence of iso-C(15:0) as major fatty acid and significant amounts of iso-C(17:1x9c) and C(18:1x7c). Phylogenetic analysis based on 16S rDNA sequence indicated that strain CMC-5 is phylogenetically related to Microbulbifer genus and 99% similar to type strain Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T. However in contrast to Microbulbifer elongatus DSM6810T, strain CMC-5 is non-motile, utilizes glucose, galactose, inositol and xylan, does not utilize fructose and succinate nor does it produce H2S. Further growth of bacterial strain CMC-5 was observed when inoculated in seawater-based medium containing sterile pieces of Gracilaria corticata thalli. The bacterial growth was associated with release of reducing sugar in the broth suggesting its role in carbon recycling of polysaccharides from seaweeds in marine ecosystem.

  14. Cloning, expression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray studies of the ferredoxin-NAD(P)+ reductase from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liauw, Pasqual; Mashiba, Tomohiro; Kopczak, Marta; Wiegand, Katrin; Muraki, Norifumi; Kubota, Hisako; Kawano, Yusuke; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Hase, Toshiharu; Rögner, Matthias; Kurisu, Genji

    2012-09-01

    Ferredoxin-NADP(+) reductase (FNR) is a flavoenzyme that catalyses the reduction of NADP(+) in the final step of the photosynthetic electron-transport chain. FNR from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 (TeFNR) contains an additional 9 kDa domain at its N-terminus relative to chloroplastic FNRs and is more thermostable than those from mesophilic cyanobacteria. With the aim of understanding the structural basis of the thermostability of TeFNR and assigning a structural role to the small additional domain, the gene encoding TeFNR with and without an additional domain was engineered for heterologous expression and the recombinant proteins were purified and crystallized. Crystals of TeFNR without the additional domain belonged to space group P2(1), with unit-cell parameters a = 55.05, b = 71.66, c = 89.73 Å, α = 90, β = 98.21, γ = 90°.

  15. Photoautotrophic production of polyhydroxyalkanoates in a synthetic mixed culture of Synechococcus elongatus cscB and Pseudomonas putida cscAB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwe, Hannes; Hobmeier, Karina; Moos, Manuel; Kremling, Andreas; Pflüger-Grau, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    One of the major challenges for the present and future generations is to find suitable substitutes for the fossil resources we rely on today. Cyanobacterial carbohydrates have been discussed as an emerging renewable feedstock in industrial biotechnology for the production of fuels and chemicals, showing promising production rates when compared to crop-based feedstock. However, intrinsic capacities of cyanobacteria to produce biotechnological compounds are limited and yields are low. Here, we present an approach to circumvent these problems by employing a synthetic bacterial co-culture for the carbon-neutral production of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from CO2. The co-culture consists of two bio-modules: Bio-module I, in which the cyanobacterial strain Synechococcus elongatus cscB fixes CO2, converts it to sucrose, and exports it into the culture supernatant; and bio-module II, where this sugar serves as C-source for Pseudomonas putida cscAB and is converted to PHAs that are accumulated in the cytoplasm. By applying a nitrogen-limited process, we achieved a maximal PHA production rate of 23.8 mg/(L day) and a maximal titer of 156 mg/L. We will discuss the present shortcomings of the process and show the potential for future improvement. These results demonstrate the feasibility of mixed cultures of S. elongatus cscB and P. putida cscAB for PHA production, making room for the cornucopia of possible products that are described for P. putida. The construction of more efficient sucrose-utilizing P. putida phenotypes and the optimization of process conditions will increase yields and productivities and eventually close the gap in the contemporary process. In the long term, the co-culture may serve as a platform process, in which P. putida is used as a chassis for the implementation of synthetic metabolic pathways for biotechnological production of value-added products.

  16. Caracterização de escamas do peixe piau (Leporinus elongatus e sua aplicação na remoção de Cu(II de meio aquoso Characterization of the piau fish (Leporinus elongatus scales and their application to remove Cu(II from aqueous solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias de Barros Santos

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of fish scales of Leporinus elongatus and their application in the removal of Cu(II from aqueous solutions are described. It was observed that the scales are mainly formed by hydroxyapatite and type I collagen. Adsorption of Cu(II was performed using batch experiments at 25 0C. The ANOVA statistical results have shown that the Langmuir model was successful applied to determine the maximum adsorption capacity of 2.686 x10-4 mol g-1 and the Langmuir equilibrium parameter (b of 168.8 L mol-1. The Langmuir separation parameter, R L, has shown favorable adsorption of Cu(II on the scales.

  17. On Dichelyne (Cucullanellus elongatus (Tornquist, 1931 Petter, 1974: South American correlated species (Nematoda, Cucullanidae and some other helminths of micropogonias furnieri (Desmarest, 1823 (Pisces, Sciaenidae Sobre Dichelyne (Cucullanellus elongatus (Tornquist, 1931 Petter, 1974: espécies sul americanas correlatas (Nematoda, Cucullanidae e alguns outros helmintos de Micropogonias furnieri (Desmarest, 1823(Pisces, Sciaenidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Júlio Vicente

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available Dichelyne (Cucullanellus elongatus (Tomquist, 1931 Petter, 1974, from Venezuela, of which D.(C. amaurincai (Freitas, Vicente & Ibáñez, 1969 Petter, 1974 is proposed as a junior synonym, is redescribed and comments on the present status of the remaining species under the group, namely D.(C. dichelyneformes (Szidat, 1950 Petter, 1974, D.(C. rodriguesi (Pinto, Fábio & Noronha, 1970 Petter, 1974 and D.(C. travassosi (Guimarães & Cristofaro, 1974, occuring in South America are made. Dollfusentis chandleri Golvan, 1969 (Acanthocephala, Illiosentidae, Poecilancistrium caryophyllum (Diesing, 1850(Cestoidea, Otobothriidae and Callitetrarhynchus gracilis (Rudolphi, 1819(Cestoidea, Dasyrhynchidae as well as larval forms of Echinocephalus sp. (Nematoda, Gnathostomatidae and Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda, Anisakidae are also reported.Dichelyne (Cucullanellus elongatus (Tornquist, 1931 Petter, 1974, da Venezuela, da qual D.(C. amaurincai (Freitas, Vicente & Ibáñez, 1969 Petter, 1974 é proposta como sinônimo junior, é descrita, e são feitos comentários sobre a atual situação das outras espécies do mesmo grupo, ocorrendo na América do Sul, a saber: D.(C. dichelyneformes (Szidat, 1950 Petter, 1974, D.(C. rodriguesi (Pinto, Fábio & Noronha, 1971 Petter, 1974 e D.(C. travassosi (Guimarães & Cristofaro, 1974. Dollfusentis chandleri Golvan, 1969 (Acantochephala, Illiosentidae, Poecilancistrium cariophyllum (Diesing, 1850 (Cestoidea, Otobothriidae e Callitetrarhynchus gracilis (Rudolphi, 1819 (Cestoidea, Dayrhynchidae bem como formas larvares de Exhinocephalus sp. (Nematoda, Gnathostomatidae e Contracaecum sp. (Nematoda, Anisakidae são também assinaladas.

  18. Theophylline-dependent riboswitch as a novel genetic tool for strict regulation of protein expression in Cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahira, Yoichi; Ogawa, Atsushi; Asano, Hiroyuki; Oyama, Tokitaka; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2013-10-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 is a major model species for studies of photosynthesis. It is are also a potential cell factory for the production of renewable biofuels and valuable chemicals. We employed engineered riboswitches to control translational initiation of target genes in this cyanobacterium. A firefly luciferase reporter assay revealed that three theophylline riboswitches performed as expected in the cyanobacterium. Riboswitch-E* exhibited very low leaky expression of luciferase and superior and dose-dependent on/off regulation of protein expression by theophylline. The maximum magnitude of the induction vs. basal level was ∼190-fold. Furthermore, the induction level was responsive to a wide range of theophylline concentrations in the medium, from 0 to 2 mM, facilitating the fine-tuning of luciferase expression. We adapted this riboswitch to another gene regulation system, in which expression of the circadian clock kaiC gene product is controlled by the theophylline concentration in the culture medium. The results demonstrated that the adequately adjusted expression level of KaiC restored complete circadian rhythm in the kaiC-deficient arrhythmic mutant. This theophylline-dependent riboswitch system has potential for various applications as a useful genetic tool in cyanobacteria.

  19. A second conserved GAF domain cysteine is required for the blue/green photoreversibility of cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, Nathan C.; Njuguna, Stephanie Lane; Roberts, Laurel; Castillo, Elenor; Parson, Victoria L.; Dwojak, Sunshine; Lagarias, J. Clark; Spiller, Susan C.

    2008-01-01

    Phytochromes are widely occurring red/far-red photoreceptors that utilize a linear tetrapyrrole (bilin) chromophore covalently bound within a knotted PAS-GAF domain pair. Cyanobacteria also contain more distant relatives of phytochromes that lack this knot, such as the phytochrome-related cyanobacteriochromes implicated to function as blue/green switchable photoreceptors. In this study, we characterize the cyanobacteriochrome Tlr0924 from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Full-length Tlr0924 exhibits blue/green photoconversion across a broad range of temperatures, including physiologically relevant temperatures for this organism. Spectroscopic characterization of Tlr0924 demonstrates that its green-absorbing state is in equilibrium with a labile, spectrally distinct blue-absorbing species. The photochemically generated blue-absorbing state is in equilibrium with another species absorbing at longer wavelengths, giving a total of 4 states. Cys499 is essential for this behavior, because mutagenesis of this residue results in red-absorbing mutant biliproteins. Characterization of the C499D mutant protein by absorbance and CD spectroscopy supports the conclusion that its bilin chromophore adopts a similar conformation to the red-light-absorbing Pr form of phytochrome. We propose a model photocycle in which Z/E photoisomerization of the 15/16 bond modulates formation of a reversible thioether linkage between Cys499 and C10 of the chromophore, providing the basis for the blue/green switching of cyanobacteriochromes. PMID:18549244

  20. Recombinant thermoactive phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and its coupling with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs) for the conversion of CO2 to oxaloacetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prete, Sonia; De Luca, Viviana; Capasso, Clemente; Supuran, Claudiu T; Carginale, Vincenzo

    2016-01-15

    With the continuous increase of atmospheric CO2 in the last decades, efficient methods for carbon capture, sequestration, and utilization are urgently required. The possibility of converting CO2 into useful chemicals could be a good strategy to both decreasing the CO2 concentration and for achieving an efficient exploitation of this cheap carbon source. Recently, several single- and multi-enzyme systems for the catalytic conversion of CO2 mainly to bicarbonate have been implemented. In order to design and construct a catalytic system for the conversion of CO2 to organic molecules, we implemented an in vitro multienzyme system using mesophilic and thermophilic enzymes. The system, in fact, was constituted by a recombinant phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC) from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, in combination with mesophilic/thermophilic bacterial carbonic anhydrases (CAs), for converting CO2 into oxaloacetate, a compound of potential utility in industrial processes. The catalytic procedure is in two steps: the conversion of CO2 into bicarbonate by CA, followed by the carboxylation of phosphoenolpyruvate with bicarbonate, catalyzed by PEPC, with formation of oxaloacetate (OAA). All tested CAs, belonging to α-, β-, and γ-CA classes, were able to increase OAA production compared to procedures when only PEPC was used. Interestingly, the efficiency of the CAs tested in OAA production was in good agreement with the kinetic parameters for the CO2 hydration reaction of these enzymes. This PEPC also revealed to be thermoactive and thermostable, and when coupled with the extremely thermostable CA from Sulphurhydrogenibium azorense (SazCA) the production of OAA was achieved even if the two enzymes were exposed to temperatures up to 60 °C, suggesting a possible role of the two coupled enzymes in biotechnological processes.

  1. Seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep – numerical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mudrak

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A population dynamics model for copepods is presented describing a seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdansk Deep. The copepod model was coupled with an one-dimensional physical and biological upper layer model for nutrients (total inorganic nitrogen, phosphate, phytoplankton, microzooplankton and an early juvenile of herring as predator. In this model, mesozooplankton (herbivorous copepods has been introduced as animals having definite patterns of growth in successive stages, reproduction and mortality. The populations are represented by 6 cohorts in different developmental stages, thus assuming, that recruitment of the next generation occurs after a fixed period of adult life. The copepod model links trophic processes and population dynamics, and simulates individual growth within cohorts and the changes in biomass between cohorts. The simulations of annual cycles of copepods contain one complete generation of Pseudocalanus and two generations of Acartia in the whole column water, and indicate the importance of growth of older stages of 6 cohorts each species to total population biomass. The peaks of copepods biomass, main, at the turn of June and July for Pseudocalanus and smaller, in July for Acartia, lag that phytoplankton by ca. two mouths due to growth of cohorts in successive stages and egg production by females. The numerical results show that the investigated species could not be the main factor limiting the spring phytoplankton bloom in the Gdansk Deep, because the initial development was slow for Acartia and faster for Pseudocalanus, but main development formed after the bloom, in both cases. However, the simulated microzooplankton biomass was enough high to conclude, in our opinion, that, in this case, it was major cause limiting phytoplankton bloom. Model presented here is a next step in understanding how the population dynamics of a dominant species in the southern

  2. Development of a high-frequency in vivo transposon mutagenesis system for Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Kazuyuki; Mimuro, Mamoru; Tsuchiya, Tohru

    2014-11-01

    Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (Synechocystis) is the first sequenced photosynthetic organism and has two advantages: natural transformation and light-activated heterotrophic growth. Such characteristics have mainly promoted reverse genetic analysis in this organism, however, to date approximately 50% of genes are still annotated as 'unknown protein' or 'hypothetical protein'. Therefore, forward genetic analysis is required for the identification of significant genes responsible for photosynthesis and other physiological phenomena among the genes of unknown function. The in vivo transposon mutagenesis system is one of the major methods for random mutagenesis. However, present in vivo transposon mutagenesis systems for cyanobacteria face problems such as relatively low frequency of transposition and repeated transposition in the host cells. In this study, we constructed vectors based on a mini-Tn5-derived vector that was designed to prevent repeated transposition. Our vectors carry a hyperactive transposase and optimized recognition sequence of transposase, which were reported to enhance frequency of transposition. Using the vector, we succeeded in highly frequent transposition (9×10(-3) per recipient cell) in Synechocystis. Transposon insertion sites of 10 randomly selected mutants indicated that the insertion sites spread throughout the genome with low sequence dependency. Furthermore, one of the 10 mutants exhibited the slow-growing phenotype, and the mutant was functionally complemented by using our expression vector. Our system also worked with another model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, with high frequency. These results indicate that the developed system can be applied to the forward genetic analysis of a broad range of cyanobacteria. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Combined SAXS/EM Based Models of the S. elongatus Post-Translational Circadian Oscillator and its Interactions with the Output His-Kinase SasA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Rossi, Gian; Weigand, Steven; Mori, Tetsuya; Johnson, Carl H.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Egli, Martin (Vanderbilt); (NWU)

    2012-03-15

    The circadian clock in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is composed of a post-translational oscillator (PTO) that can be reconstituted in vitro from three different proteins in the presence of ATP and a transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). The homo-hexameric KaiC kinase, phosphatase and ATPase alternates between hypo- and hyper-phosphorylated states over the 24-h cycle, with KaiA enhancing phosphorylation, and KaiB antagonizing KaiA and promoting KaiC subunit exchange. SasA is a His kinase that relays output signals from the PTO formed by the three Kai proteins to the TTFL. Although the crystal structures for all three Kai proteins are known, atomic resolution structures of Kai and Kai/SasA protein complexes have remained elusive. Here, we present models of the KaiAC and KaiBC complexes derived from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which are consistent with previous EM based models. We also present a combined SAXS/EM model of the KaiC/SasA complex, which has two N-terminal SasA sensory domains occupying positions on the C-terminal KaiC ring reminiscent of the orientations adopted by KaiB dimers. Using EM we demonstrate that KaiB and SasA compete for similar binding sites on KaiC. We also propose an EM based model of the ternary KaiABC complex that is consistent with the sequestering of KaiA by KaiB on KaiC during the PTO dephosphorylation phase. This work provides the first 3D-catalogue of protein-protein interactions in the KaiABC PTO and the output pathway mediated by SasA.

  4. On Pomacea sordida (Swainson, 1823 (Prosobranchia, Ampullariidae Sobre Pomacea sordida (Swaison, 1823 (Prosobranchia, Ampullariidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Carvalho Thiengo

    1989-09-01

    Full Text Available A description of Pomacea sordida (Swainson, 1823 collected in Caxias and Nova Iguaçu, state of Rio de Janeiro, is presented. The shell is globose, heavy, whith greenish or horn-colored periostracum and dark spinal bands; apex subelevated, 4-5 moderately shoudered whorls, increasing rather rapidly and separated by deep suture. Aperture large, moderately round, yellowish or violaceous; lip thick and sometimes dark brown; umbilicus large and deep; operculum corneous and heavy, entirely closing the aperture. Ratios: shell width/shell length = 0.81-0.91 (mean 0.86; aperture length/shell length = 0.66-0.75 (mean 0.70. Testis, spermiduct and penis pouch as in Pomacea lineata (Spix, 1827. Seminal vesicle whitish and bean-shaped. Prostate cylindric and narrow, cream in coloar as the testis. Penis whiplike whith a closed circular spermiduct. Penial sheath elongated and tapered, with its distal tip turned to the right; outer basal gland situated on the left; inner median gland rounded; apical gland elongated and wrinkled. Ovary composed of branched whitish tubules lying superficially on the digestive gland; oviduct and seminal receptacle as in P. lineata; albumen gland yellowish - orange. Vestigial male copulatory apparatus (penis and its sheath present in all females examined.Nesse trabalho é apresentada a descrição de Pomacea sordida (Swainson, 1823, coletada em Caxias e Nova Iguaçu, Estado do Rio de Janeiro. Concha globosa, espessa, com perióstraco esverdeado ou castanho e com faixas espirais escuras; ápice pouco elevado, 4-5 giros moderadamente arredondados, crescendo relativamente rápido, separados por suturas profundas. Abertura grande, moderadamente arredondada, amarelada ou violácea; lábio espesso e algumas vezes marrom escuro; umbílico grande e profundo; opérculo córneo e espesso, fechando completamente a abertura. Razões: largura da concha/comprimento da concha=0.81-0.91 (média 0.86; comprimento da abertura/comprimento da concha=0.66-0.75 (média 0.70. Testículo, espermiduto e bolsa do pênis como em Pomacea lineata (Spix, 1827. Vesícula seminal esbranquiçada e em forma de feijão. Próstata cilíndrica e estreita, de cor creme como o testículo. Pênis em forma de chicote, com espermiduto circular e fechado. Bainha do pênis alongada tendo sua largura diminuída da base para a extremidade, sendo esta última voltada para a direita; glândula basal extrema situada à esquerda; glândula mediana interna arredondada; glândula apical alongada e com sulcos. Ovário composto de túbulos brancos ramificados dispostos superficialmente sobre a glândula digestiva verde. Oviduto e receptáculo seminal como em P. lineata; glândula de albume de cor alaranjada; ovos prismáticos e calcáreos de cor alaranjada. Aparelho copulador masculino vestigial (pênis e sua bainha presente em todas as fêmeas examinadas.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep – numerical simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Dzierzbicka-Głowacka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A population dynamics model for copepods is presented, describing the seasonal dynamics of Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Acartia spp. in the southern Baltic Sea (Gdańsk Deep. The copepod model was coupled with a one-dimensional physical and biological upper layer model for nutrients (total inorganic nitrogen, phosphate, phytoplankton, microzooplankton, and an early juvenile of herring as a predator. In this model, mesozooplankton (herbivorous copepods has been introduced as an animal having definite patterns of growth in successive stages, reproduction and mortality. The populations are represented by 6 cohorts in different developmental stages, thus assuming that recruitment of the next generation occurs after a fixed period of adult life. The copepod model links trophic processes and population dynamics, and simulates individual growth within cohorts and the changes in biomass between cohorts. The simulations of annual cycles of copepods contain one complete generation of Pseudocalanus and two generations of Acartia in the whole column water, and indicate the importance of growth in the older stages of 6 cohorts of each species, to arrive at a total population biomass. The peaks of copepods' biomass are larger at the turn of June and July for Pseudocalanus and smaller in July for Acartia, lagging that of phytoplankton by ca. two mouths, due to the growth of cohorts in successive stages and egg production by females. The numerical results show that the investigated species could not be the main factor limiting the spring phytoplankton bloom in the Gdańsk Deep, because the initial development was slow for Acartia and faster for Pseudocalanus, but the main development formed after the bloom, in both cases. The phytoplankton bloom is very important in the diet of the adults of the copepods, but it is not particularly important for the youngest part of new generation (early nauplii. However, the simulated microzooplankton biomass was

  6. Induction of a group 2 sigma factor, RPOD3, by high light and the underlying mechanism in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seki, Asako; Hanaoka, Mitsumasa; Akimoto, Yuki; Masuda, Susumu; Iwasaki, Hideo; Tanaka, Kan

    2007-12-21

    Among the sigma70 family bacterial sigma factors, group 2 sigma factors have similar promoter recognition specificity to group 1 (principal) sigma factors and express and function under specific environmental and physiological conditions. In general, the cyanobacterial genome encodes more than four group 2 sigma factors, and the unicellular Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (Synechococcus) has five group 2 sigma factors (RpoD2-6). In this study, we analyzed expression of group 2 sigma factors of Synechococcus at both mRNA and protein levels, and we showed that the rpoD3 expression was activated only by high light (1,500 micromol photons m(-2) s(-1)) among the various stress conditions examined. After high light shift, rpoD3 mRNA accumulated transiently within the first 5 min and diminished subsequently, whereas RpoD3 protein increased gradually during the first several hours. We also found that the rpoD3 deletion mutant rapidly lost viability under the same conditions. Analysis of the rpoD3 promoter structure revealed the presence of an HLR1 (high light-responsive element 1) sequence, which was suggested to be responsible for the high light-induced transcription under the control of the NblS (histidine kinase)-RpaB (response regulator) two-component system (Kappell, A. D., and van Waasbergen, L. G. (2007) Arch. Microbiol. 187, 337-342), at +6 to +23 with respect to the transcriptional start site. Here we demonstrated that recombinant RpaB protein specifically bound to HLR1 of the rpoD3 and hliA genes in vitro, and overexpression of a truncated RpaB variant harboring only the phosphoreceiver domain derepressed the transcription in vivo. Thus, we have concluded that phosphorylated RpaB are repressing the rpoD3 and hliA transcription under normal growth conditions, and the RpaB dephosphorylation induced by high light stress results in transcriptional derepression.

  7. Variación morfológica y dieta en dos poblaciones de Liolaemus elongatus Koslowsky, 1896 (Iguania: Tropiduridae del noroeste patagónico Morphological variation and diet in two Liolaemus elongatus Koslowsky, 1896 (Iguania: Tropiduridae populations from northwestern Patagonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAQUEL QUATRINI

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Se estudió morfología y dieta de dos poblaciones de Liolaemus elongatus del noroeste de la Patagonia, una de ambiente de estepa y otra de bosque. Ambas poblaciones se encuentran separadas por una distanciada de 30 km. Se evaluó la variación entre poblaciones y entre sexos de la coloración y patrón de diseño corporal, los parámetros métricos más relevantes (longitud hocico-cloaca, longitud y ancho de la cabeza y longitud del maxilar, así como de la composición y diversidad de los contenidos digestivos de 22 ejemplares adultos de estepa y 25 de bosque. Las poblaciones difirieron en la coloración, el patrón de diseño y en el tamaño corporal promedio (mayor en la zona de estepa. La variación en la coloración podría estar relacionada con factores genéticos o selectivos. Los valores mayores de tamaño corporal en la estepa podrían representar una disminución de tamaño a mayor altitud. No se encontró dimorfismo sexual en la coloración ni en la longitud hocico-cloaca en ninguna de las dos poblaciones. Respecto a la dieta, se advirtió un predominio de consumo de formícidos en ambas poblaciones. Los vegetales resultaron ser un componente usual, contrastando con las opiniones previas que consideraban a la especie exclusivamente insectívora. La disponibilidad de elementos vegetales podría ser un factor de considerable importancia para determinar la tendencia de esta especie a la omnivoría. Las diferencias en la dieta entre las dos poblaciones analizadas podrían estar relacionadas con diferentes parámetros ecológicos y/o con características intrínsecas de las poblacionesMorphology and diet of two Liolaemus elongatus populations from northwestern Patagonia, consisting of a steppe and a forested patch, and 30 km apart from each other, were studied. The variation between populations and sexes of the coloration and design pattern, the most relevant metrical parameters, and that of composition and diversity of the digestive

  8. Overexpression of lalA, a paralog of labA, is capable of affecting both circadian gene expression and cell growth in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Yasuhito; Nishikawa, Tomoe; Kondo, Takao; Oyama, Tokitaka

    2012-03-23

    In the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus, LabA negatively regulates circadian gene expression under the control of Kai-protein-based clock. Here we conducted a molecular genetic analysis of lalA, a paralog of labA. Although a lalA loss of function mutant did not exhibit any apparent phenotype under our experimental conditions, lalA overexpression inhibited cell growth and decreased cell viability. Moderate lalA overexpression brought about abnormalities in circadian gene expression: reduced amplitude of kaiBC expression rhythm, and altered peak and trough timing of psbAI and kaiA expression rhythms. These results imply that lalA is capable of affecting circadian gene expression and cell growth. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Diversidade genética de três estoques de piapara (Leporinus elongatus, utilizando RAPD - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v30i2.4710 Genetic diversity of three stocks of piapara (Leporinus elongatus, using RAPD - DOI: 10.4025/actascianimsci.v30i2.4710

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Vargas

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Recentemente a produção aquícola brasileira tem apresentado grande progresso. Dentre as espécies nativas cultivadas no Brasil, a piapara (Leporinus elongatus tem sido amplamente preconizada. Com objetivo de avaliar os programas de repovoamento, foram analisadas a variabilidade e a divergência genética de três estoques de piapara com a técnica de RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic. O primeiro estoque pertence à Estação de Aquicultura e Hidrologia da Duke Energy International (A; o segundo, à piscicultura de Rolândia (B e o terceiro, ao Programa de Repovoamento dos Rios do Paraná (C. Os dez primers para RAPD utilizados produziram 105 fragmentos polimórficos, conferindo um polimorfismo de 98,1% para os três estoques avaliados. A porcentagem de locos polimórficos e índice de Shannon foi superior para o estoque A. Porém, todos valores foram elevados, indicando alta diversidade intrapopulacional. Os valores de indicam que houve baixa diferenciação genética entre os estoques A x B e moderada diferenciação entre os demais. O Nm foi maior entre os estoques A x B. A distância genética e o dendrograma indicam que os estoques A x B são menos distantes geneticamente.Latelly, aquiculture production in Brazil has made great strides. Among the native species cultivated in Brazil, piapara (Leporinus elogatus has been widely praised. With the objective of evaluating restocking programs, the variability and genetic divergence of three piapara stocks were analyzed using the RAPD (Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA technique. The first stock belongs to the Aquiculture and Hydrology Station of Duke Energy International (A; the second one belongs to a fish farm in the city of Rolândia (B; and the third to the River Restocking Program of Paraná (C. The ten primers used for RAPD produced 105 polymorphic loci, conferring a polymorphism of 98.1% for the three evaluated stocks. Polymorphic loci percentage and Shannon index were higher for stock A

  10. O desenvolvimento embrionário da Piapara, Leporinus elongatus (Pisces, Anostomidae, utilizando técnicas de histologia, microscopia eletrônica de varredura e imunológicas empregando marcadores ósseos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Z. Sousa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo O desenvolvimento embrionário dos peixes é de grande importância para a piscicultura e na reintrodução de espécies ameaçadas de extinção em seus ambientes, e seu conhecimento constitui uma importante maneira para minimizar doenças e mortalidades dessas espécies. Com o auxílio de técnicas como a Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura (MEV e a imuno-histoquimica para identificar proteínas ósseas, foi possível avaliar as fases de desenvolvimento com mais riqueza de detalhes, facilitando a compreensão de hábitos e da biologia da espécie. Neste trabalho pudemos observar a ontogenia e osteogênese da Piapara (Leporinus elongatus, desde a fecundação até a fase juvenil, sendo evidenciadas estruturas importantes como o tamanho do vitelo, essencial para a nutrição do embrião; o fechamento do blastóporo, evento principal da embriogênese, que indica as taxas de fertilização; a metamorfose, que indica a formação dos primeiros e principais órgãos do animal e a formação de sua estrutura óssea. As Proteínas Ósseas Morfogenéticas (BMP-2 e BMP-4, moléculas essenciais reguladoras no desenvolvimento embrionário e na formação óssea, foram observadas apenas no estádio larval até o período juvenil, não sendo evidenciadas nos estágios anteriores. Os resultados desse trabalho trouxeram novas informações quanto à biologia do desenvolvimento dessa espécie, que certamente poderão auxiliar no aprimoramento de técnicas reprodutivas visando uma melhora na sua produção seja para fins comerciais ou de repovoamento.

  11. Immunocytochemical study of the distribuition of endocrine cells in the pancreas of the Brazilian sparrow species Zonotrichia Capensis Subtorquata (Swaison, 1837

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA Nascimento

    Full Text Available In the present study, we investigated types of pancreatic endocrine cells and its respective peptides in the Brazilian sparrow species using immunocytochemistry. The use of polyclonal specific antisera for somatostatin, glucagon, avian pancreatic polypeptide (APP, YY polypeptide (PYY and insulin, revealed a diversified distribution in the pancreas. All these types of immunoreactive cells were observed in the pancreas with different amounts. Insulin- Immunoreactive cells to (B cells were most numerous, preferably occupying the central place in the pancreatic islets. Somatostatin, PPA, PYY and glucagon immunoreactive cells occurred in a lower frequency in the periphery of pancreatic islets.

  12. Analysis of the complete Fischoederius elongatus (Paramphistomidae, Trematoda) mitochondrial genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Zhao, Yunyang; Wang, Lixia; Feng, Hanli; Tan, Li; Lei, Weiqiang; Zhao, Pengfei; Hu, Min; Fang, Rui

    2015-05-20

    Fischoederius elongates is an important trematode of Paramphistomes in ruminants. Animals infected with F. elongates often don't show obvious symptoms, so it is easy to be ignored. However it can cause severe economic losses to the breeding industry. Knowledge of the mitochondrial genome of F. elongates can be used for phylogenetic and epidemiological studies. The complete mt genome sequence of F. elongates is 14,120 bp in length and contains 12 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, two rRNA genes and two non-coding regions (LNR and SNR). The gene arrangement of F. elongates is the same as other trematodes, such as Fasciola hepatica and Paramphistomum cervi. Phylogenetic analyses using concatenated amino acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes by Maximum-likelihood and Neighbor-joining analysis method showed that F. elongates was closely related to P. cervi. The complete mt genome sequence of F. elongates should provide information for phylogenetic and epidemiological studies for F. elongates and the family Paramphistomidae.

  13. Biodiesel production using blue-green cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voshol, Gerben

    2015-01-01

    Due to concerns about global climate change and diminishing supplies of petroleum, there is a need to develop a clean sustainable alternative. The two main alternative fuels are bioethanol and biodiesel. Production of these biofuels using cyanobacteria is a new promising development. I describe the

  14. Biodiesel production using blue-green cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voshol, Gerben

    2015-01-01

    Due to concerns about global climate change and diminishing supplies of petroleum, there is a need to develop a clean sustainable alternative. The two main alternative fuels are bioethanol and biodiesel. Production of these biofuels using cyanobacteria is a new promising development. I describe the

  15. Development of a sperm cryopreservation protocol for redside dace, Clinostomus elongatus: implications for genome resource banking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Butts, Ian A.E.; Mokdad, A.; Trippel, E.A.;

    2013-01-01

    of extirpation.We developed cryopreservation protocols by testing the effects of diluent (buffered sperm motility-inhibiting saline solution [BSMIS]; BSMIS + glycine; sucrose; and Hanks’ balanced salt solution [HBSS]), cryoprotectant (dimethyl sulfoxide [DMSO]; propylene glycol [PG]; N,N-dimethylacetamide [DMA...

  16. Crystal structure of monomeric photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 3.6-a resolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broser, Matthias; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Kern, Jan; Guskov, Albert; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2010-01-01

    The membrane-embedded photosystem II core complex (PSIIcc) uses light energy to oxidize water in photosynthesis. Information about the spatial structure of PSIIcc obtained from x-ray crystallography was so far derived from homodimeric PSIIcc of thermophilic cyanobacteria. Here, we report the first c

  17. Biological observations on the mudskipper Pseudapocryptes elongatus in the Mekong Delta, Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bucholtz, Rikke Hagstrøm; Meilvang, A. S.; Cedhagen, T.

    2009-01-01

    ), gonad histology, fecundity and some observations on post-larvae and juveniles. In the population studied the sex ratio was skewed toward males. Females had a shorter mean length and a lower mean growth rate than males. No mature males or females were observed among mudskippers sampled in estuarine...

  18. A sneak preview of the daily life of S. elongatus by MS-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leite Guerreiro, A.C.

    2016-01-01

    Circadian rhythms are self-sustained and adjustable cycles, typically entrained with light/dark and/or temperature cycles. These rhythms are present in animals, plants, fungi and several bacteria. The central mechanism behind these ‘pacemakers’ and the connection to the circadian regulated pathways

  19. Effects of Irregular Bimetallic Nanostructures on the Optical Properties of Photosystem I from Thermosynechococcus elongatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Ashraf

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The fluorescence of photosystem I (PSI trimers in proximity to bimetallic plasmonic nanostructures have been explored by single-molecule spectroscopy (SMS at cryogenic temperature (1.6 K. PSI serves as a model for biological multichromophore-coupled systems with high potential for biotechnological applications. Plasmonic nanostructures are fabricated by thermal annealing of thin metallic films. The fluorescence of PSI has been intensified due to the coupling with plasmonic nanostructures. Enhancement factors up to 22.9 and 5.1 are observed for individual PSI complexes coupled to Au/Au and Ag/Au samples, respectively. Additionally, a wavelength dependence of fluorescence enhancement is observed, which can be explained by the multichromophoric composition of PSI.

  20. Sex determination studies in two species of teleost fish, Oreochromis niloticus and Leporinus elongatus

    OpenAIRE

    Baroiller, Jean-Francois; Nakayama, Ichiro; FORESTI,FAUSTO; Chourrout, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Genetic analyses of sex determination have identified sex chromosomes in many teleost fish species. However, there are several cases for which sex ratios do not fit perfectly with the expectations of heterogametic systems, suggesting the influence of either minor sex determining genes or environmental influences on the process of sex differentiation. The frequent absence of sex chromosome markers makes the identification of minor sex-determining genes very difficult. It is easier to test firs...

  1. Blind dating - mate finding in planktonic copepods. II. The pheromone cloud of Pseudocalanus elongatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiørboe, Thomas; Bagøien, E.; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro

    2005-01-01

    that encounter the pheromone signal of a female. For several minutes the male speeds around the female along zigzagged and looped swimming trails. Every 10 to 20 s he approaches the female, slows down, and makes physical contact with her. Between visits, the male makes long excursions that may take him up to 15...

  2. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 301492 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available g protein Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 MPTPTYPKASLIIRERGLPKREVLLSPDRQWTIGRQLDCSIRLTDAYVSRLHAVINAFLFRGQPLYFIRDAHSRNGTFLNGFPLQHSTLLHHEDVIGVGTTLLVFYYPDMFREISLDECPELTKGSTDSLPWRS ...

  3. Photophysiological and photosynthetic complex changes during iron starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared M Fraser

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential component in many protein complexes involved in photosynthesis, but environmental iron availability is often low as oxidized forms of iron are insoluble in water. To adjust to low environmental iron levels, cyanobacteria undergo numerous changes to balance their iron budget and mitigate the physiological effects of iron depletion. We investigated changes in key protein abundances and photophysiological parameters in the model cyanobacteria Synechococcus PCC 7942 and Synechocystis PCC 6803 over a 120 hour time course of iron deprivation. The iron stress induced protein (IsiA accumulated to high levels within 48 h of the onset of iron deprivation, reaching a molar ratio of ~42 IsiA : Photosystem I in Synechococcus PCC 7942 and ~12 IsiA : Photosystem I in Synechocystis PCC 6803. Concomitantly the iron-rich complexes Cytochrome b6f and Photosystem I declined in abundance, leading to a decrease in the Photosystem I : Photosystem II ratio. Chlorophyll fluorescence analyses showed a drop in electron transport per Photosystem II in Synechococcus, but not in Synechocystis after iron depletion. We found no evidence that the accumulated IsiA contributes to light capture by Photosystem II complexes.

  4. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 380426 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available rotein tlr1446 Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 MELRVGQGWRVGWRSDQHYAGLVGAEDWATELTDAEFRAFVELFRQLHEQLQAIAPELMPEEMITLSGHNDAVQLELEGYPHAYSLHLIVLGDRRVEGTWPAPVPPDFLLACCELKDGIAKGQSLQ ...

  5. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 414803 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ate aldolase Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 MAELSSDFDLAPYIEHSLLDPAATLEQIDQLCQEADRYHFAAVCLFPWVVRQAREWLNGRSP...RLCTVIDFPNGASTAASKVYAAQEAVENGAQELNVVVNLGWLRSDRADLVHQELAEIVEATGVPIKAILEATRLNPSELEQLTDLCLDAGVTMLQTSTGWFGGATPALVQQLRQLTRNRVGIHAAGGIRTWDQAAALVEAGAIRLGTSYGPMILQQRLAASTPAPA ...

  6. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 256802 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available tll1802 Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 MTALVRDYMTPNPFTISADAPISEAVRLMEEKQVRGLPVVDDKGKLVGLVSEADLIVREAPLEPP...LYITFLGSIIYFESPESFHQHLKKTLGQQVQDVMTPNPHTINVDAPISEAARLMVNHHISRLPVLNDQGELVGIISRHDLLRALHAQEASA ...

  7. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 64998 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available syc2491_c Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 MRPLTLEPHDQRSVLRLLIGAAWLDGDMQPEERNYLKGLLEKHRLAADPEFQDLMTRTTPISPAVFEQWLTAYLRQHPRREDVEALLEQISSVIYADSLIDAREAAVLCEIEQELEHRPALRLLDRLQTFFHHCLVMS ...

  8. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 302445 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available otein tlr1877 Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 MVHSVQCFCLNLEEIHMSHFSTLRTKVTDAEILKASLRDLGITVKTNADVRGYNGQRVRADIVAVLDGEYDLGWSRNADGTFDLIADLWGVAKKHNQTELINSINQKYAINKTLAEVKRPGLQNANVKLVVHS ...

  9. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 354435 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ein syc0719_c Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 MLAAALVGCDRLPWSQSDQSQEWPLDAPVAVSLKEQDSVDGIVTAPEDAQVTLAVESLRICKERANPADCLLIRGRLRTPTEFMGTWEAAGSPANNTEFQCSVAAQEIDCQEKRREEDGSAATTRYWLVRK ...

  10. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 405210 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available action center protein Psb28 Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 MGAMAEIQFIRGINEEVVPDVRLTRARDGSSGQAMFYFDNPKIVQEGNLEVTGMYMVDEEGEIVTRDVNAKFINGQPVAIEATYTMRSPQEWDRFIRFMDRYAASHGLGFQKSENS ...

  11. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 236201 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available otein tlr1675 Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 MRQSLSMTRLATGCPMRQLNFLMIFVIGLGLVLFSIQNTEPVSIKFFEGKVIQAPLCIELIIAMGIGAVFAWVFNVWVQVQRLFTIRVEMEARDEQIAHLEQDVERYKAALEEQQRLLPSVSSASTEK ...

  12. Lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus) egg mass and reef fish density SCUBA survey in the Strait of Georgia, February 15-22, 2012

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    by R.P. McPhie and J.R. King

    2012-01-01

    ...) egg mass density estimates. Previous lingcod egg mass SCUBA surveys involving egg mass counts were conducted at this index site in 1990, 1991, 1994, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007, 2010, and 2011...

  13. Structural response of photosystem 2 to iron deficiency : Characterization of a new photosystem 2-IdiA complex from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lax, Julia E. -M.; Arteni, Ana A.; Boekema, Egbert J.; Pistorius, Elfriede K.; Michel, Klaus-Peter; Roegner, Matthias

    2007-01-01

    Iron deficiency triggers various processes in cyanobacterial cells of which the synthesis of an additional antenna system (IsiA) around photosystem (PS) 1 is well documented [T.S. Bibby, J. Nield, J. Barber, Iron deficiency induces the formation of an antenna ring around trimeric photosystem I in cy

  14. Protein (Cyanobacteria): 22299158 [PGDBj - Ortholog DB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 60 197221:1260 ... c-type cytochrome synthesis protein Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 MDLLTLEGWLDNTAFAVLFL...TMLLYWCGAAFPQWPLLTAAGRTGMAIANLCITGLLAARWIEGGYFPISNLYESLFFLCWGLTAMHFVAESISGQPLVGVVTAPVAMGITAFAALSLPPEMQQSAPLV

  15. Electron transfer pathways from the S2-states to the S3-states either after a Ca2+/Sr2+ or a Cl-/I- exchange in Photosystem II from Thermosynechococcus elongatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussac, Alain; Rutherford, A William; Sugiura, Miwa

    2015-01-01

    The site for water oxidation in Photosystem II (PSII) goes through five sequential oxidation states (S0 to S4) before O2 is evolved. It consists of a Mn4CaO5-cluster close to a redox-active tyrosine residue (YZ). Cl- is also required for enzyme activity. By using EPR spectroscopy it has been shown that both Ca2+/Sr2+ exchange and Cl-/I- exchange perturb the proportions of centers showing high (S=5/2) and low spin (S=1/2) forms of the S2-state. The S3-state was also found to be heterogeneous with: i) a S=3 form that is detectable by EPR and not sensitive to near-infrared light; and ii) a form that is not EPR visible but in which Mn photochemistry occurs resulting in the formation of a (S2YZ)' split EPR signal upon near-infrared illumination. In Sr/Cl-PSII, the high spin (S=5/2) form of S2 shows a marked heterogeneity with a g=4.3 form generated at low temperature that converts to a relaxed form at g=4.9 at higher temperatures. The high spin g=4.9 form can then progress to the EPR detectable form of S3 at temperatures as low as 180K whereas the low spin (S=1/2) S2-state can only advance to the S3 state at temperatures≥235 K. Both of the two S2 configurations and the two S3 configurations are each shown to be in equilibrium at ≥235 K but not at 198 K. Since both S2 configurations are formed at 198 K, they likely arise from two specific populations of S1. The existence of heterogeneous populations in S1, S2 and S3 states may be related to the structural flexibility associated with the positioning of the oxygen O5 within the cluster highlighted in computational approaches and which has been linked to substrate exchange. These data are discussed in the context of recent in silico studies of the electron transfer pathways between the S2-state(s) and the S3-state(s).

  16. Monitoring light/dark association dynamics of multi-protein complexes in cyanobacteria using size exclusion chromatography-based proteomics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guerreiro, Ana C L; Penning, Renske; Raaijmakers, Linsey M; Axman, Ilka M; Heck, Albert J R; Altelaar, A F Maarten

    2016-01-01

    Diurnal rhythms are recurring 24h patterns such as light/dark cycles that affect many natural environmental and biological processes. The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (S. elongatus) produces its energy through photosynthesis and therefore its internal molecular machinery is strong

  17. Description d’une espèce nouvelle de Dinoderus (Coleoptera: Bostrychidæ)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lesne, P.

    1897-01-01

    Oblongo-elongatus, parallelus, brunneo-subruber, elytris brunneis. Frons et clypeus pilis densis, sat longis hirsuti. Antennœ funiculo haud fimbriato. Prothorax leviter elongatus, margine antico regulariter rotundato, sutura laterali antice obsoleta, libera; ordine marginali radulæ dentibus 12—14 co

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2306 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2306 ref|NP_681589.1| ATP-dependent DNA helicase [Thermosynechococcus ...elongatus BP-1] dbj|BAC08351.1| ATP-dependent DNA helicase [Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1] NP_681589.1 6.8 28% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-LAFR-01-1212 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-LAFR-01-1212 ref|NP_682898.1| phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase [Thermosynech...ococcus elongatus BP-1] dbj|BAC09660.1| phosphatidate cytidylyltransferase [Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1] NP_682898.1 0.74 30% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-FRUB-02-0745 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-FRUB-02-0745 ref|NP_682327.1| hypothetical protein tll1537 [Thermosynechococcu...s elongatus BP-1] dbj|BAC09089.1| tll1537 [Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1] NP_682327.1 1e-106 52% ...

  1. Distribución del género Diplodon (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Hyriidae en territorio Argentino mediante el uso de Colecciones Biológicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Hernán Torres

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Los bivalvos nacaríferos dulciacuícolas (“náyades”, son especies infaunales, endémicas de la RegiónNeotropical, pertenecientes a las familias Hyriidae (Swaison, 1840 y Etheriidae (Swaison, 1840. La alteración del ambiente y la competencia con especies invasoras como Corbicula fluminea (Müller, 1774 y Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857, impactan sobre las poblaciones naturales. En esta comunicación, se presenta el inicio de un Proyecto de investigación sobre la distribución geográfica de las especies del género Diplodon en la Argentina. Estas especies son un componente importante de la infauna de los cuerpos lóticos y lénticos, viviendo en fondos limosos, limo-arenosos, excepcionalmente en sustratos duros, con un régimen nutricio filtrador, teniendo un papel importante como recicladores de materia orgánica. Conocer la distribución de los bivalvos pertenecientes al género Diplodon en el territorio Argentino permitirá el reconocimiento de potenciales áreas prioritarias para su conservación. Sobre la base de la bibliografía disponible y los ejemplares de las especies del genero Diplodon depositados en la Colección Malacológica del Museo de La Plata (FCNyM-UNLP, se confeccionó una matriz de datos que incluye la identificación del ejemplar, la colección en que se encuentra depositado, el número de catálogo, la localidad y la fecha de colecta. Cada localidad fue ubicada mediante el uso de cartas geográficas de Argentina y revisiones bibliográficas en imágenes satelitales de GoogleEarth, asignando las coordenadas para cada punto. Como resultado del trabajo se obtiene la distribución de estas especies nativas y se discute el grado de solapamiento con las dos especies de bivalvos invasores y el impacto de actividades humanas. 

  2. Drei neue Elmiden von Sumatra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitter, Edm.

    1886-01-01

    Elongatus, parallelus, opacus, haud carinatus, niger, elytris fulvo-cinereis, antennis brunneis, tarsis rufis; capite subtilissime ruguloso, prothorace subquadrato, latitudine longiore, subparallelo, ruguloso, in medio longitudinaliter canaliculato, dorso utrinque oblique impresso, angulis omnibus a

  3. Tag effect data - Lingcod Stock Enhancement: ecological interactions, fishery contributions, and life history

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus) populations along the West Coast of North America have recovered from overfishing, but the status of genetically distinct lingcod in...

  4. Description de quatre espèces nouvelles du genre Rhyparus, Westw. (Scarabaeidae: Coprini)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairmaire, L.

    1893-01-01

    Long. 6 mill. — Elongatus, parallelus, fuscus, opacus, antennis palpisque ferrugineis; R. sumatrensi Fairm. ¹) affinis, similiter coloratus, sed multo minor et angustior, capite minus brevi, minus transverso, antice quadriangulato, haud truncato, fronte medio breviter biplicato, prothorace subquadra

  5. Description of a new genus and species of the Coleopterous family Colydidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitter, E.

    1882-01-01

    Corpus valde elongatum, convexum. Antennae 11-articulatae, sub frontis margine ante oculos insertae, apicem versus sensim incrassatae, articulo ultimo rotundato. Fronte tateribus elevata. Oculi antice emarginati. Prothorax elongatus, carinatus. Scutellum minutum. Elytra punctatostriata, interstitiis

  6. Description of a new genus and species of the Coleopterous family Colydidae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reitter, E.

    1882-01-01

    Corpus valde elongatum, convexum. Antennae 11-articulatae, sub frontis margine ante oculos insertae, apicem versus sensim incrassatae, articulo ultimo rotundato. Fronte tateribus elevata. Oculi antice emarginati. Prothorax elongatus, carinatus. Scutellum minutum. Elytra punctatostriata, interstitiis

  7. Mobile acoustic telemetry data - Lingcod Stock Enhancement: ecological interactions, fishery contributions, and life history

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Lingcod (Ophiodon elongatus) populations along the West Coast of North America have recovered from overfishing, but the status of genetically distinct lingcod in...

  8. Description of a new species of the Rhynchophorous genus Oxyrhynchus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, W.

    1880-01-01

    Elongatus, fuliginosus, opacus, fossulis luteo-pulverosis sparsutus. Sutura alba, prothoracis basi atomis albis adspersa. — Long. 10 mm. rostr. excl. Of a narrower shape than the other known species of the genus.

  9. Coléoptères nouveaux ou peu connus du Musée de Leyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairmaire, L.

    1887-01-01

    Long. 13 millim. — Elongatus, modice convexus, rufus, modice nitidus, capite infuscato, fulvo-pubescens, subtus cum pedibus dilute rufescens, tarsis obscuris; capite summo fortiter punctato, antice transversim late impresso et subtilius sed densius punctato, labro rufescente, late sinuato; antennis

  10. Variety of DNA Replication Activity Among Cyanobacteria Correlates with Distinct Respiration Activity in the Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Yamamoto, Jun-Ya; Watanabe, Satoru; Kanesaki, Yu; Chibazakura, Taku; Miyagishima, Shin-Ya; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-11-10

    Cyanobacteria exhibit light-dependent cell growth since most of their cellular energy is obtained by photosynthesis. In Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, one of the model cyanobacteria, DNA replication depends on photosynthetic electron transport. However, the critical signal for the regulatory mechanism of DNA replication has not been identified. In addition, conservation of this regulatory mechanism has not been investigated among cyanobacteria. To understand this regulatory signal and its dependence on light, we examined the regulation of DNA replication under both light and dark conditions among three model cyanobacteria, S. elongatus PCC 7942, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Interestingly, DNA replication activity in Synechocystis and Anabaena was retained when cells were transferred to the dark, although it was drastically decreased in S. elongatus. Glycogen metabolism and respiration were higher in Synechocystis and Anabaena than in S. elongatus in the dark. Moreover, DNA replication activity in Synechocystis and Anabaena was reduced to the same level as that in S. elongatus by inhibition of respiratory electron transport after transfer to the dark. These results demonstrate that there is disparity in DNA replication occurring in the dark among cyanobacteria, which is caused by the difference in activity of respiratory electron transport.

  11. NMSBA: Aken Technologies Final Report: Toxicity Testing of Liquidoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffing, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Travis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strickland, Lucas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    To determine the effect of Liquidoff on bacteria, three bacterial strains were tested: Escherichia coli DH5α, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. E. coli DH5α is a Gram-negative, aerobic bacterium that is often found in normal gut flora and is commonly used the laboratory due to its fast growth rate. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and S. elongatus PCC 7942 are Gram-negative, aquatic, autophototrophic cyanobacteria. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 is a marine cyanobacterium isolated from ‘fish pens’ on Magueyes Island, Puerto Rico in 1962, while S. elongatus PCC 7942 is a freshwater cyanobacterium. It should be noted that no Gram-positive bacterium was tested in this study.

  12. NMSBA: Aken Technologies. Final Report: Toxicity Testing of Liquidoff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruffing, Anne [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jensen, Travis J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Strickland, Lucas Marshall [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rader, Nadeya C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Carson, Bryan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of Liquidoff on bacteria, three bacterial strains were tested: Escherichia coli DH5α, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. E. coli DH5α is a Gramnegative, aerobic bacterium that is often found in normal gut flora and is commonly used the laboratory due to its fast growth rate. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 and S. elongatus PCC 7942 are Gram-negative, aquatic, autophototrophic cyanobacteria. Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002 is a marine cyanobacterium isolated from ‘fish pens’ on Magueyes Island, Puerto Rico in 1962, while S. elongatus PCC 7942 is a freshwater cyanobacterium. It should be noted that no Gram-positive bacterium was tested in this study.

  13. Description d’un Dytiscide nouveau

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Régimbart, M.

    1889-01-01

    Long. 5 mill. — Ovalis, sat elongatus, postice attenuatus, parum convexus. Capite et pronoto pallide testaceis, hoc postice sat late, illo postice in medio nigro et in elytris fortiter producto. Elytris nigris, ad latera vitta submarginali medium attingente, maculisque duodecim aliis albido-testacei

  14. Coléoptères nouveaux de l’Afrique du Musée de Leyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairmaire, L.

    1888-01-01

    Long. 22 à 25 mill. — Elongatus, convexus, fuscus aut brunneo-castaneus, modice nitidus, fulvo-pubescens; capite dense punctato, inter oculos sat late impresso, antice declivi, margine obtuse rotundato; antennis fuscis, medium corporis attingentibus, articulo 1° punctato, 2° minuto, 3° vix majore, a

  15. Two new Liolaemus lizards from the Andean highlands of Southern Chile (Squamata, Iguania, Liolaemidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncoso-Palacios, Jaime; Diaz, Hugo A; Puas, German I; Riveros-Riffo, Edvin; Elorza, Alvaro A

    2016-01-01

    Liolaemus is a diverse genus of lizards, subdivided into two subgenera: Liolaemus (sensu stricto) and Eulaemus, distributed mainly in Chile and Argentina. The Liolaemus elongatus-kriegi complex is the most diverse group within Liolaemus (sensu stricto), especially the species closely related to Liolaemus elongatus, which form a clade currently comprising nine species. Several Chilean species of this group have been recently described, mainly from volcanoes and poorly explored mountains. Here molecular and morphological evidence are provided for a new species of the Liolaemus elongatus clade, which is characterized by its small size and lack of dorsal pattern, unusual features for the species of this group of lizards. Additionally, the lack of precloacal pores in males of Liolaemus (sensu stricto) is a trait found in few species, which do not constitute a monophyletic group. A second new southern Chilean species is also described, without precloacal pores and supported by molecular phylogenetics to be related to Liolaemus villaricensis. Both new species were found in the same locality, near a lake located in a pre-Andean zone with Araucaria and Nothofagus forest. The two species are dedicated to prominent Lonkos (tribal chiefs) of the Mapuche and Pehuenche people: Janequeo and Leftraru. Additionally, the phylogenetic results suggest that Liolaemus lonquimayensis is a synonym of Liolaemus elongatus.

  16. A new species of the genus Rawasia, Roel. (Ecelonerides, Fam. Anthribidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, W.

    1881-01-01

    Minus elongatus, rufo-brunneus, pilis luteis tectus, interstitiis alternis elytrorum pilis luteis atrisque maculatis; prothorace vage, disperse punctato, antennis nigris, albo-spinosis, clava nigra, articulo ultimo brunneo. — Long. 15 mm. Closely allied to Rawasia Ritsemae Roel. ¹), almost similar i

  17. Plant Nematodes Occurring in Arkansas

    OpenAIRE

    Wehunt, E. J.; Golden, A. M.; Robbins, R. T.

    1989-01-01

    A total of 110 species of plant nematodes were found in various habitats in Arkansas. Thirty species from 19 genera are reported here for the first time. Included in the new reports are the known plant pathogens Criconemella onoense, Hirshmanniella oryzae, Longidorus elongatus, and Pratylenchus pratensis.

  18. Cyanobacterial photosystem II at 2.9-A resolution and the role of quinones, lipids, channels and chloride

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guskov, Albert; Kern, Jan; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Saenger, Wolfram

    2009-01-01

    Photosystem II (PSII) is a large homodimeric protein-cofactor complex located in the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane that acts as light-driven water:plastoquinone oxidoreductase. The crystal structure of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus at 2.9-A resolution allowed the unambiguous assignment

  19. A new species of the genus Rawasia, Roel. (Ecelonerides, Fam. Anthribidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofs, W.

    1881-01-01

    Minus elongatus, rufo-brunneus, pilis luteis tectus, interstitiis alternis elytrorum pilis luteis atrisque maculatis; prothorace vage, disperse punctato, antennis nigris, albo-spinosis, clava nigra, articulo ultimo brunneo. — Long. 15 mm. Closely allied to Rawasia Ritsemae Roel. ¹), almost similar

  20. Coléoptères nouveaux de l’Afrique du Musée de Leyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fairmaire, L.

    1888-01-01

    Long. 22 à 25 mill. — Elongatus, convexus, fuscus aut brunneo-castaneus, modice nitidus, fulvo-pubescens; capite dense punctato, inter oculos sat late impresso, antice declivi, margine obtuse rotundato; antennis fuscis, medium corporis attingentibus, articulo 1° punctato, 2° minuto, 3° vix majore,

  1. Localization of cyanobacterial photosystem II donor-side subunits by electron microscopy and the supramolecular organization of photosystem II in the thylakoid membrane

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuhl, Helena; Rögner, Matthias; Breemen, Jan F.L. van; Boekema, Egbert J.

    1999-01-01

    A large set of electron microscopy projections of photosystem II (PSII) dimers isolated from the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus was characterized by single particle image analysis. In addition to previously published maps at lower resolution [Boekema, E.J., Hankamer, B., Bald, D., Kruip, J.,

  2. Annual and spatial variability in endo- and ectoparasite infections of North Sea cod (Gadus morhua Linnaeus, 1758) larvae, post-larvae and juveniles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrdana, Foojan; Bahlool, Qusay Z. M.; Skovgaard, Alf;

    2014-01-01

    A parasitological investigation was performed on a total of 5380 Atlantic cod larvae, post-larvae and small juveniles sampled from the North Sea during a period of five years. The copepod Caligus elongatus (Von Nordmann, 1832) and the nematode Hysterothylacium aduncum (Rudolphi, 1802) were found...

  3. Determining sex and life stage of Del Norte salamanders from external cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisa Ollivier; Hartwell H. Welsh Jr

    2003-01-01

    Life stage determination for many western plethodontids often requires dissection of the specimen. Availability of reliable external measures that could be applied under field conditions would enhance future studies of the genus Plethodon. We examined preserved specimens of the Del Norte Salamander, Plethodon elongatus, taken from...

  4. Some Silurian (Llandovery) monograptids from Saudi Arabia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    El-Khayal, A.A.

    1985-01-01

    Three species of Monograptus are recognized from Qusayba, Al-Qasim Province, Saudi Arabia. The Qusayba Shales Member of the Tabuk Formation in central Saudi Arabia contains M. decipiens decipiens, M. ex gr. barrandei and M. elongatus, associated with other graptolites. This assemblage is indicative

  5. Description d’une nouvelle espèce de Gyrinide du Musée de Leyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regimbart, M.

    1884-01-01

    Long. 6 3/4 mm. (ano excepto). — Oblongo-ovalis, elongatus, mediocriter convexus; supra in regionibus glabris purpureocupreus, nitidus, subtilissime reticulatus, in regionibus punctato-tomentosis obscure cœruleus et subopacus, anguste pallide testaceo limbatus; infra pallide testaceus, pedibus conco

  6. Probing the accessibility of the Mn(4)Ca cluster in photosystem II : Channels calculation, noble gas derivatization, and cocrystallization with DMSO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Broser, Matthias; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2009-01-01

    Using the 2.9 A resolution structure of the membrane-intrinsic protein-cofactor complex photosystem II (PSII) from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, we calculated and characterized nine possible substrate/product channels leading to/away from the Mn(4)Ca cluster, where water is oxidi

  7. Two new Liolaemus lizards from the Andean highlands of Southern Chile (Squamata, Iguania, Liolaemidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Troncoso-Palacios

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Liolaemus is a diverse genus of lizards, subdivided into two subgenera: Liolaemus (sensu stricto and Eulaemus, distributed mainly in Chile and Argentina. The L. elongatus-kriegi complex is the most diverse group within Liolaemus (sensu stricto, especially the species closely related to L. elongatus, which form a clade currently comprising nine species. Several Chilean species of this group have been recently described, mainly from volcanoes and poorly explored mountains. Here molecular and morphological evidence are provided for a new species of the L. elongatus clade, which is characterized by its small size and lack of dorsal pattern, unusual features for the species of this group of lizards. Additionally, the lack of precloacal pores in males of Liolaemus (sensu stricto is a trait found in few species, which do not constitute a monophyletic group. A second new southern Chilean species is also described, without precloacal pores and supported by molecular phylogenetics to be related to Liolaemus villaricensis. Both new species were found in the same locality, near a lake located in a pre-Andean zone with Araucaria and Nothofagus forest. The two species are dedicated to prominent Lonkos (tribal chiefs of the Mapuche and Pehuenche people: Janequeo and Leftraru. Additionally, the phylogenetic results suggest that L. lonquimayensis is a synonym of L. elongatus.

  8. Two new Liolaemus lizards from the Andean highlands of Southern Chile (Squamata, Iguania, Liolaemidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troncoso-Palacios, Jaime; Diaz, Hugo A.; Puas, German I.; Riveros-Riffo, Edvin; Elorza, Alvaro A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Liolaemus is a diverse genus of lizards, subdivided into two subgenera: Liolaemus (sensu stricto) and Eulaemus, distributed mainly in Chile and Argentina. The Liolaemus elongatus-kriegi complex is the most diverse group within Liolaemus (sensu stricto), especially the species closely related to Liolaemus elongatus, which form a clade currently comprising nine species. Several Chilean species of this group have been recently described, mainly from volcanoes and poorly explored mountains. Here molecular and morphological evidence are provided for a new species of the Liolaemus elongatus clade, which is characterized by its small size and lack of dorsal pattern, unusual features for the species of this group of lizards. Additionally, the lack of precloacal pores in males of Liolaemus (sensu stricto) is a trait found in few species, which do not constitute a monophyletic group. A second new southern Chilean species is also described, without precloacal pores and supported by molecular phylogenetics to be related to Liolaemus villaricensis. Both new species were found in the same locality, near a lake located in a pre-Andean zone with Araucaria and Nothofagus forest. The two species are dedicated to prominent Lonkos (tribal chiefs) of the Mapuche and Pehuenche people: Janequeo and Leftraru. Additionally, the phylogenetic results suggest that Liolaemus lonquimayensis is a synonym of Liolaemus elongatus. PMID:27920609

  9. Stream and Aquifer Biology of South-Central Texas - A Literature Review, 1973-97

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    ice age 3 million years ago had a major influence on the biology of the Edwards aquifer. During extremely cold periods, the ground water maintains...carps and minnows)—Continued Bullhead minnow Pimephales vigilax G, SA, N Tench Tinca tinca G Catostomidae (suckers... Catostomidae Cycleptus elongatus Blue sucker T Ictaluridae Satan eurystomus Widemouth blindcat T Trogloglanis pattersoni Toothless blindcat T

  10. Scandinavian Oncophorus (Bryopsida, Oncophoraceae: species, cryptic species, and intraspecific variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Hedenäs

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Scandinavian members of the acrocarpous moss genus Oncophorus were revised after field observations had suggested unrecognized diversity. Based on molecular (nuclear: internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2, ITS; plastid: trnGUCC G2 intron, trnG, rps4 gene + trnS-rps4 spacer, rps4 and morphological evidence, four morphologically distinguishable species are recognized, Oncophorus elongatus (I.Hagen Hedenäs, O. integerrimus Hedenäs sp. nov. (syn. O. virens var. elongatus Limpr., O. virens (Hedw. Brid., and O. wahlenbergii Brid. (O. sardous Herzog, syn. nov.. Oncophorus elongatus was earlier recognized, but much of its variation was hidden within O. wahlenbergii. Its circumscription is here expanded to include plants with long leaves having mostly denticulate or sharply denticulate upper margins and with long and narrow marginal cells in the basal portion of the sheathing leaf lamina. The new species O. integerrimus sp. nov. differs from O. virens in having more loosely incurved leaves and entire or almost entire upper leaf margins. Besides these characters, the species in the respective pairs differ in quantitative features of the leaf lamina cells. Several cryptic entities were found, in several cases as molecularly distinct as some of the morphologically recognizable species, and phylogeographic structure is present within O. elongatus and O. virens.

  11. The role of lantern fish (Myctophidae) in the life-cycle of cetacean parasites from western Mediterranean waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateu, Paula; Nardi, Valentina; Fraija-Fernández, Natalia; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Gil de Sola, Luis; Raga, Juan Antonio; Fernández, Mercedes; Aznar, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    Myctophids (lantern fish) and cephalopods play a key role in trophic webs from the continental slope and oceanic waters linking the zooplankton to top predators. Many cetaceans feed on both lantern fish and cephalopods, and such prey would thus be expected to bridge the trophic gap in the life-cycles of helminths infecting cetaceans. However, information on the life-cycles of most of these helminths is extremely scanty. We examined the parasite fauna of myctophids and cephalopods in two areas from the western Mediterranean where at least 21 helminth taxa from cetaceans have been reported and both cetacean diversity and abundance is high. A total of 1012 individuals of 8 lantern fish species, namely, Ceratoscopelus maderensis, Lampanyctus crocodilus, Notoscopelus elongatus, Benthosema glaciale, Myctophum punctatum, Lobianchia dofleini, Diaphus holti and Hygophum benoiti, and 792 individuals of 2 cephalopod species, Alloteuthis media and Sepietta oweniana, were collected from the Gulf of Valencia and Alboran Sea (Spanish Mediterranean) during 2010-2012 and examined for larval helminths. All these species have been reported as prey for at least some cetacean species in the area. Only five helminth taxa were found. The nematodes Anisakis pegreffii and Anisakis physeteris were detected in N. elongatus and C. maderensis (overall prevalence for Anisakis: 8.1% and 0.5%, respectively). Their prevalence in N. elongatus was significantly higher than that from the other three myctophid species with n>50 individuals. A single individual of Hysterothylacium sp. was found in N. elongatus (prevalence: 0.5%) and Raphidascarididae gen. spp. in N. elongatus and L. crocodilus (prevalence: 20.3% and 0.7%, respectively). Juvenile didymozoid digeneans (Torticaecum type) were detected in N. elongatus and L. crocodilus (prevalence: 18.5% and 4.3%, respectively). Two unidentified cestode plerocercoids were collected from N. elongatus. Our study suggests, for the first time, that myctophids

  12. Modeling habitat suitability of the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a Neotropical shallow lagoon, southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. C. L. Silveira

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to model the habitat suitability for an invasive clam Corbicula fluminea in a coastal shallow lagoon in the southern Neotropical region (–30.22, –50.55. The lagoon (19km2, maximum deep 2.5m was sampled with an Ekman dredge in an orthogonal matrix comprising 84 points. At each sampling point, were obtained environmental descriptors as depth, organic matter content (OMC, average granulometry (Avgran, and the percentage of sand (Pcsand. Prediction performance of Generalized Linear Models (GLM, Generalized Additive Models (GAM and Boosted Regression Tree (BRT were compared. Also, niche overlapping with other native clam species (Castalia martensi, Neocorbicula limosa and Anodontites trapesialis was examined. A BRT model with 1400 trees was selected as the best model, with cross-validated correlation of 0.82. The relative contributions of predictors were Pcsand-42.6%, OMC-35.8%, Avgran-10.9% and Depth-10.8%. Were identified that C. fluminea occur mainly in sandy sediments with few organic matter, in shallow areas nor by the shore. The PCA showed a wide niche overlap with the native clam species C. martensi, N. limosa and A. trapesialis.

  13. Engineering a synthetic pathway in cyanobacteria for isopropanol production directly from carbon dioxide and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusakabe, Tamami; Tatsuke, Tsuneyuki; Tsuruno, Keigo; Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Atsumi, Shota; Liao, James C; Hanai, Taizo

    2013-11-01

    Production of alternate fuels or chemicals directly from solar energy and carbon dioxide using engineered cyanobacteria is an attractive method to reduce petroleum dependency and minimize carbon emissions. Here, we constructed a synthetic pathway composed of acetyl-CoA acetyl transferase (encoded by thl), acetoacetyl-CoA transferase (encoded by atoAD), acetoacetate decarboxylase (encoded by adc) and secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (encoded by adh) in Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942 to produce isopropanol. The enzyme-coding genes, heterogeneously originating from Clostridium acetobutylicum ATCC 824 (thl and adc), Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 (atoAD) and Clostridium beijerinckii (adh), were integrated into the S. elongatus genome. Under the optimized production conditions, the engineered cyanobacteria produced 26.5 mg/L of isopropanol after 9 days.

  14. Removal of triazine herbicides from freshwater systems using photosynthetic microorganisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Barreiro, O. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Rioboo, C. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Herrero, C. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain); Cid, A. [Laboratorio de Microbiologia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira s/n. 15071 A Coruna (Spain)]. E-mail: cid@udc.es

    2006-11-15

    The uptake of the triazine herbicides, atrazine and terbutryn, was determined for two freshwater photosynthetic microorganisms, the green microalga Chlorella vulgaris and the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. An extremely rapid uptake of both pesticides was recorded, although uptake rate was lower for the cyanobacterium, mainly for atrazine. Other parameters related to the herbicide bioconcentration capacity of these microorganisms were also studied. Growth rate, biomass, and cell viability in cultures containing herbicide were clearly affected by herbicide uptake. Herbicide toxicity and microalgae sensitivity were used to determine the effectiveness of the bioconcentration process and the stability of herbicide removal. C. vulgaris showed higher bioconcentration capability for these two triazine herbicides than S. elongatus, especially with regard to terbutryn. This study supports the usefulness of such microorganisms, as a bioremediation technique in freshwater systems polluted with triazine herbicides.

  15. Genome Engineering of the 2,3-Butanediol Biosynthetic Pathway for Tight Regulation in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozzi, Nicole E; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-11-20

    Cyanobacteria have gained popularity among the metabolic engineering community as a tractable photosynthetic host for renewable chemical production. However, though a number of successfully engineered production systems have been reported, long-term genetic stability remains an issue for cyanobacterial systems. The genetic engineering toolbox for cyanobacteria is largely lacking inducible systems for expression control. The characterization of tight regulation systems for use in cyanobacteria may help to alleviate this problem. In this work we explore the function of the IPTG inducible promoter P(L)lacO1 in the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 as well as the effect of gene order within an operon on pathway expression. According to our experiments, P(L)lacO1 functions well as an inducible promoter in S. elongatus. Additionally, we found that gene order within an operon can strongly influence control of expression of each gene.

  16. Las especies del género Gyropus Nitzsch, 1818 (Phthiraptera: Gyropidae parásitas de Octodontidae (Mammalia: Rodentia The species of the genus Gyropus Nitzch, 1818 (Phthiraptera: Gyropidae parasitic on the Octodontidae (Mammalia: Rodentia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DOLORES DEL CARMEN CASTRO

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo tiene por finalidad otorgar status específico pleno a la subespecie Gyropus parvus elongatus Castro, Cicchino & Torres-Mura, 1987, describir la nueva especie Gyropus distinctus a partir de materiales recolectados sobre Octodon degus (Molina, 1782 y Octodon lunatus Osgood, 1943 procedentes del centro de Chile y, finalmente, ofrecer un análisis de las posibles razones de la distribución geográfica y del rango de hospedadores conocidos para estas tres especiesThe purpose of this paper is to give full specific status to the subspecies Gyropus parvus elongatus Castro, Cicchino & Torres-Mura, 1987, to describe the new species Gyropus distinctus collected in Octodon degus and O. lunatus from central Chile, along with an analysis of the possible causes than could explain their geographic and host range distributions known to date for these three species

  17. Active prey selection in two pelagic copepods feeding on potentially toxic and non-toxic dinoflagellates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Mette; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Grazing on two red tide dinoflagellates, the potentially toxic Karenia mikimotoi and the non-toxic Gyrodinium instriatum, was examined in two species of marine copepods, Pseudocalanus elongatus and Temora longicornis. Both copepods cleared K. mikimotoi at rates that were a little lower but compar......Grazing on two red tide dinoflagellates, the potentially toxic Karenia mikimotoi and the non-toxic Gyrodinium instriatum, was examined in two species of marine copepods, Pseudocalanus elongatus and Temora longicornis. Both copepods cleared K. mikimotoi at rates that were a little lower...... but comparable to those at which they cleared the slightly larger G. instriatum when the two dinoflagellates were offered separately. However, when feeding on mixtures of the two prey species, the clearance rates on K. mikimotoi were substantially reduced in both copepods while their clearances of G. instiatum...

  18. First report of two species of scarab beetles (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae inside nests of Azteca cf. chartifex Forel (Hymenoptera, Formicidae in Brazilian Amazonian Rainforest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Rafael Alves-Oliveira

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT We report for the first time the occurrence of two species of scarab beetles, Phileurus carinatus declivis Prell, 1914 (Scarabaeidae: Dynastinae and Cyclidius elongatus (Olivier, 1789 (Cetoniinae: Cremastocheilini inside nests of Azteca cf. chartifex Forel, 1896, a neotropical arboreal ant species. This report indicates that these two beetle species are associated, at least as inquilines, to this ant species, although the nature of this relationship remains unclear.

  19. First records of zerconid mites (Acari: Mesostigmata: Zerconidae from Albania, with description of three new species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ujvári, Zs.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Elaborating a material collected from different regions of Albania, eleven species of the genus Zercon(Zerconidae were identified, three of them, Z. albanicus sp. nov., Z. cavatus sp. nov. and Z. elongatus sp. nov., proved to be newto science. Short description of male and deutonymph of Z. villosus and morphological notes on Z. spatulatus are also provided.New occurrences of each species are depicted on maps as well.

  20. Study on the Tribe Ochyromerini (Coleoptera, Curculionidae) from East Asia I, Descriptions of New Species of the Genera Endaeus and Endaenidius

    OpenAIRE

    Kojima, Hiroaki; Morimoto, Katsura

    1995-01-01

    This is the first part of our systematic study on the tribe Ochyromerini (=Endaeini) from East Asia with descriptions of 28 new species of the weevils in the genera Endaeus Schoenherr and Endaenidius Morimoto as follows: Endaeus albolineatus sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus niger sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus zonatus sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus robustus sp. nov. (Thailand), Endaeus longipes sp. nov. (E. Malaysia), Endaeus formosanus sp. nov. (Taiwan), Endaeus elongatus sp. nov. (Taiwan),...

  1. Concentric-flow electrokinetic injector enables serial crystallography of ribosome and photosystem II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, Raymond G.; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E. Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S.; Young, Iris D.; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S.; Koglin, Jason E.; Boutet, Sébastien; Junco, Elia A.; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J.; Hampton, Christina Y.; Puglisi, Elisabetta V.; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Stan, Claudiu A.; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Soltis, S. Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D.; DeMirci, Hasan

    2015-11-30

    We describe a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector for efficiently delivering microcrystals for serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography analysis that enables studies of challenging biological systems in their unadulterated mother liquor. We used the injector to analyze microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2-Å structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (<3-Å diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin at ambient temperature (3.4-Å structure).

  2. Lego clocks: building a clock from parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Michael; Simons, Mirre J P; Merrow, Martha

    2008-06-01

    A new finding opens up speculation that the molecular mechanism of circadian clocks in Synechococcus elongatus is composed of multiple oscillator systems (Kitayama and colleagues, this issue, pp. 1513-1521), as has been described in many eukaryotic clock model systems. However, an alternative intepretation is that the pacemaker mechanism-as previously suggested-lies primarily in the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the clock protein KaiC.

  3. Concentric-flow electrokinetic injector enables serial crystallography of ribosome and photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Raymond G; Gati, Cornelius; Laksmono, Hartawan; Dao, E Han; Gul, Sheraz; Fuller, Franklin; Kern, Jan; Chatterjee, Ruchira; Ibrahim, Mohamed; Brewster, Aaron S; Young, Iris D; Michels-Clark, Tara; Aquila, Andrew; Liang, Mengning; Hunter, Mark S; Koglin, Jason E; Boutet, Sébastien; Junco, Elia A; Hayes, Brandon; Bogan, Michael J; Hampton, Christina Y; Puglisi, Elisabetta V; Sauter, Nicholas K; Stan, Claudiu A; Zouni, Athina; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K; Soltis, S Michael; Puglisi, Joseph D; DeMirci, Hasan

    2016-01-01

    We describe a concentric-flow electrokinetic injector for efficiently delivering microcrystals for serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography analysis that enables studies of challenging biological systems in their unadulterated mother liquor. We used the injector to analyze microcrystals of Geobacillus stearothermophilus thermolysin (2.2-Å structure), Thermosynechococcus elongatus photosystem II (<3-Å diffraction) and Thermus thermophilus small ribosomal subunit bound to the antibiotic paromomycin at ambient temperature (3.4-Å structure).

  4. Fisheries Investigation on the Lower White River, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-05-01

    energy into reproduction by different sizes, ages , and sexes of fish. Males and females usually differ greatly in length-weight relationship at this time...the two seasons (Table 1). The readings were fairly typical of large southern US rivers for the respective times of year. Fish 33. During the study, 58...Blacktail shiner (N. venustus) R N C Mimic shiner (N. Volucellus) R N C Bullhead minnow (Pimephales vigilax) N Catostomidae Blue sucker (Cycleptus elongatus

  5. Biological and Physical Conditions at a Newly Placed Gravel Bar Habitat in the Tombigbee River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-01

    Jsp( ot s ch (il,,ii al d rodUCtS. Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF MRii AGE REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE OM o 7--1 I&. REPORT SERURITY...the Buttahatchie River than at the gravel bar. Water temperature was lower at the former site because of canopy cover- age , which limited heating by...lax oullhead minnow C Catostomidae Cycteptus elongatus Blue sucker U .Tctiobus cyprineltus Bigmouth buffalo U ictiobus bubalus Smalimouth buffalo C

  6. Structural changes of the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II during the catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glöckner, Carina; Kern, Jan; Broser, Matthias; Zouni, Athina; Yachandra, Vittal; Yano, Junko

    2013-08-02

    The oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the membrane-bound protein complex photosystem II (PSII) catalyzes the water oxidation reaction that takes place in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms. We investigated the structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC during the S state transitions using x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Overall structural changes of the Mn4CaO5 cluster, based on the manganese ligand and Mn-Mn distances obtained from this study, were incorporated into the geometry of the Mn4CaO5 cluster in the OEC obtained from a polarized XAS model and the 1.9-Å high resolution crystal structure. Additionally, we compared the S1 state XAS of the dimeric and monomeric form of PSII from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and spinach PSII. Although the basic structures of the OEC are the same for T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII, minor electronic structural differences that affect the manganese K-edge XAS between T. elongatus PSII and spinach PSII are found and may originate from differences in the second sphere ligand atom geometry.

  7. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr virus DNA release from lymphoblastoid cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yih-Yih KOK; Pauline BALRAJ; Alan Soo-Beng KHOO; Wan-Loy CHU; Siew-Moi PHANG; Shar Mariam MOHAMED; Rakesh NAIDU; Pey-Jiun LAI; Shui-Nyuk LING; Joon-Wah MAK; Patricia Kim-Chooi LIM

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the inhibitory activities of methanol extracts from the microalgae Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus, and Spirulina platensis against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) in three Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) cell lines, namely Akata, B95-8, and P3HR-1. The antiviral activity was assessed by quantifying the cell-free EBV DNA using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. The methanol extracts from Ankistrodesmus convolutus and Synechococcus elongatus displayed low cytotoxicity and potent effect in reducing cell-free EBV DNA (EC50<0.01 μg/ml) with a high therapeutic index (>28000). After fractionation by column chromatography, the fraction from Synechococcus elongatus (SEF1) reduced the cell-free EBV DNA most effectively (EC50=2.9 μg/ml, therapeutic index>69). Upon further fractionation by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), the sub-fraction SEF1'a was most active in reducing the cell-free EBV DNA (EC50=1.38 μg/ml, therapeutic index>14.5). This study suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds that can be used against EBV.

  8. Biochemical analysis of three putative KaiC clock proteins from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 suggests their functional divergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegard, Anika; Dörrich, Anja K; Deinzer, Hans-Tobias; Beck, Christian; Wilde, Annegret; Holtzendorff, Julia; Axmann, Ilka M

    2013-05-01

    Cyanobacteria have been shown to have a circadian clock system that consists mainly of three protein components: KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. This system is well understood in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, for which robust circadian oscillations have been shown. Like many other cyanobacteria, the chromosome of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 contains additional kaiC and kaiB gene copies besides the standard kaiABC gene cluster. The respective gene products differ significantly in their amino acid sequences, especially in their C-terminal regions, suggesting different functional characteristics. Here, phosphorylation assays of the three Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 KaiC proteins revealed that KaiC1 phosphorylation depends on KaiA, as is well documented for the Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 KaiC protein, whereas KaiC2 and KaiC3 autophosphorylate independently of KaiA. This was confirmed by in vivo protein-protein interaction studies, which demonstrate that only KaiC1 interacts with KaiA. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the three different Kai proteins form only homomeric complexes in vivo. As only KaiC1 phosphorylation depends on KaiA, a prerequisite for robust oscillations, we suggest that the kaiAB1C1 gene cluster in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 controls circadian timing in a manner similar to the clock described in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942.

  9. Structural, functional, and mutational analysis of the NblA protein provides insight into possible modes of interaction with the phycobilisome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dines, Monica; Sendersky, Eleonora; David, Liron; Schwarz, Rakefet; Adir, Noam

    2008-10-31

    The enormous macromolecular phycobilisome antenna complex (>4 MDa) in cyanobacteria and red algae undergoes controlled degradation during certain forms of nutrient starvation. The NblA protein (approximately 6 kDa) has been identified as an essential component in this process. We have used structural, biochemical, and genetic methods to obtain molecular details on the mode of action of the NblA protein. We have determined the three-dimensional structure of the NblA protein from both the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus vulcanus and the mesophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942. The NblA monomer has a helix-loop-helix motif which dimerizes into an open, four-helical bundle, identical to the previously determined NblA structure from Anabaena. Previous studies indicated that mutations to NblA residues near the C terminus impaired its binding to phycobilisome proteins in vitro, whereas the only mutation known to affect NblA function in vivo is located near the protein N terminus. We performed random mutagenesis of the S. elongatus nblA gene which enabled the identification of four additional amino acids crucial for NblA function in vivo. This data shows that essential amino acids are not confined to the protein termini. We also show that expression of the Anabaena nblA gene complements phycobilisome degradation in an S. elongatus NblA-null mutant despite the low homology between NblAs of these cyanobacteria. We propose that the NblA interacts with the phycobilisome via "structural mimicry" due to similarity in structural motifs found in all phycobiliproteins. This suggestion leads to a new model for the mode of NblA action which involves the entire NblA protein.

  10. Seasonal Variation in Shell Calcification of Planktonic Foraminifera in the NE Atlantic Reveals Species-Specific Response to Temperature, Productivity, and Optimum Growth Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinkauf, Manuel F G; Kunze, José G; Waniek, Joanna J; Kučera, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Using shells collected from a sediment trap series in the Madeira Basin, we investigate the effects of seasonal variation of temperature, productivity, and optimum growth conditions on calcification in three species of planktonic Foraminifera. The series covers an entire seasonal cycle and reflects conditions at the edge of the distribution of the studied species, manifesting more suitable growth conditions during different parts of the year. The seasonal variation in seawater carbonate saturation at the studied site is negligible compared to other oceanic regions, allowing us to assess the effect of parameters other than carbonate saturation. Shell calcification is quantified using weight and size of individual shells. The size-weight scaling within each species is robust against changes in environmental parameters, but differs among species. An analysis of the variation in calcification intensity (size-normalized weight) reveals species-specific response patterns. In Globigerinoides ruber (white) and Globigerinoides elongatus, calcification intensity is correlated with temperature (positive) and productivity (negative), whilst in Globigerina bulloides no environmental forcing is observed. The size-weight scaling, calcification intensity, and response of calcification intensity to environmental change differed between G. ruber (white) and G. elongatus, implying that patterns extracted from pooled analyses of these species may reflect their changing proportions in the samples. Using shell flux as a measure of optimum growth conditions, we observe significant positive correlation with calcification intensity in G. elongatus, but negative correlation in G. bulloides. The lack of a consistent response of calcification intensity to optimum growth conditions is mirrored by the results of shell size analyses. We conclude that calcification intensity in planktonic Foraminifera is affected by factors other than carbonate saturation. These factors include temperature

  11. Mechanisms used for genomic proliferation by thermophilic group II introns.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Mohr

    Full Text Available Mobile group II introns, which are found in bacterial and organellar genomes, are site-specific retroelements hypothesized to be evolutionary ancestors of spliceosomal introns and retrotransposons in higher organisms. Most bacteria, however, contain no more than one or a few group II introns, making it unclear how introns could have proliferated to higher copy numbers in eukaryotic genomes. An exception is the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus, which contains 28 closely related copies of a group II intron, constituting approximately 1.3% of the genome. Here, by using a combination of bioinformatics and mobility assays at different temperatures, we identified mechanisms that contribute to the proliferation of T. elongatus group II introns. These mechanisms include divergence of DNA target specificity to avoid target site saturation; adaptation of some intron-encoded reverse transcriptases to splice and mobilize multiple degenerate introns that do not encode reverse transcriptases, leading to a common splicing apparatus; and preferential insertion within other mobile introns or insertion elements, which provide new unoccupied sites in expanding non-essential DNA regions. Additionally, unlike mesophilic group II introns, the thermophilic T. elongatus introns rely on elevated temperatures to help promote DNA strand separation, enabling access to a larger number of DNA target sites by base pairing of the intron RNA, with minimal constraint from the reverse transcriptase. Our results provide insight into group II intron proliferation mechanisms and show that higher temperatures, which are thought to have prevailed on Earth during the emergence of eukaryotes, favor intron proliferation by increasing the accessibility of DNA target sites. We also identify actively mobile thermophilic introns, which may be useful for structural studies, gene targeting in thermophiles, and as a source of thermostable reverse transcriptases.

  12. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David

    2012-12-01

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 μm thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  13. Inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV antigen expression in lymphoblastoid cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koh Yih Yih

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory activities of microalgal extracts against the expression of three EBV antigens, latent membrane protein (LMP1, Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen (EBNA1 and Z Epstein-Barr reactivation activator (ZEBRA were assessed by immunocytochemistry. The observation that the methanol extracts and their fractions from Ankistrodesmus convolutus, Synechococcus elongatus and Spirulina platensis exhibited inhibitory activity against EBV proteins in three Burkitt’s lymphoma cell lines at concentrations as low as 20 μg/ml suggests that microalgae could be a potential source of antiviral compounds against EBV.

  14. Diversity of Marine Cyanobacteria from Three Mangrove Environment in Tamil Nadu Coast, South East Coast of India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Silambarasan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Marine cyanobacteria were isolated from rhizosphere soil samples, of the three mangroves viz Parangipettai, Ariyankuppam and Mudasal odai mangroves south east coast of India. As many as 39 Cyanobacteria, belonging to 12 families were identified in which Oscillatoriaceae alone contributed (11. The species such as Oscillatoria cortiana, Oscillatoria salina, Oscillatoria tenuis, Oscillatoria formosa, Lyngbya major, Lyngbya confervoides, Lyngbya majuscule, Lyngbya mesotricha, Phormidium stagnina, Plectonema terebrans and Plectonema putuale and minimum in Synechococcaceae recorded only one species the species such as Synechococcus elongatus. Among the species Synechocystis salina, Oscillatoria salina, Phormidium ambiguum, Phormidium tenue, Spirulina major distributed all the mangroves.

  15. Best practices for fluorescence microscopy of the cyanobacterial circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Susan E.; Erb, Marcella L.; Pogliano, Joe; Golden, Susan S.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This chapter deals with methods of monitoring the subcellular localization of proteins in single cells in the circadian model system Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. While genetic, biochemical and structural insights into the cyanobacterial circadian oscillator have flourished, difficulties in achieving informative subcellular imaging in cyanobacterial cells have delayed progress of the cell biology aspects of the clock. Here, we describe best practices for using fluorescent protein tags to monitor localization. Specifically we address how to vet fusion proteins and overcome challenges in microscopic imaging of very small autofluorescent cells. PMID:25662459

  16. Culturing photosynthetic bacteria through surface plasmon resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Bajin, Lauren; Sinton, David [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Centre for Sustainable Energy, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2012-12-17

    In this work, cultivation of photosynthetic microbes in surface plasmon enhanced evanescent fields is demonstrated. Proliferation of Synechococcus elongatus was obtained on gold surfaces excited with surface plasmons. Excitation over three days resulted in 10 {mu}m thick biofilms with maximum cell volume density of 20% vol/vol (2% more total accumulation than control experiments with direct light). Collectively, these results indicate the ability to (1) excite surface-bound cells using plasmonic light fields, and (2) subsequently grow thick biofilms by coupling light from the surface. Plasmonic light delivery presents opportunities for high-density optofluidic photobioreactors for microalgal analysis and solar fuel production.

  17. Five glutamic acid residues in the C-terminal domain of the ChlD subunit play a major role in conferring Mg(2+) cooperativity upon magnesium chelatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindley, Amanda A; Adams, Nathan B P; Hunter, C Neil; Reid, James D

    2015-11-10

    Magnesium chelatase catalyzes the first committed step in chlorophyll biosynthesis by inserting a Mg(2+) ion into protoporphyrin IX in an ATP-dependent manner. The cyanobacterial (Synechocystis) and higher-plant chelatases exhibit a complex cooperative response to free magnesium, while the chelatases from Thermosynechococcus elongatus and photosynthetic bacteria do not. To investigate the basis for this cooperativity, we constructed a series of chimeric ChlD proteins using N-terminal, central, and C-terminal domains from Synechocystis and Thermosynechococcus. We show that five glutamic acid residues in the C-terminal domain play a major role in this process.

  18. Circadian gating of the cell cycle revealed in single cyanobacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiong; Pando, Bernardo F; Dong, Guogang; Golden, Susan S; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2010-03-19

    Although major progress has been made in uncovering the machinery that underlies individual biological clocks, much less is known about how multiple clocks coordinate their oscillations. We simultaneously tracked cell division events and circadian phases of individual cells of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus and fit the data to a model to determine when cell cycle progression slows as a function of circadian and cell cycle phases. We infer that cell cycle progression in cyanobacteria slows during a specific circadian interval but is uniform across cell cycle phases. Our model is applicable to the quantification of the coupling between biological oscillators in other organisms.

  19. ¿La práctica de la siembra directa en cultivos de soja favorece las poblaciones de acridios (Orthoptera: Acrididae en el partido de Benito Juárez?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel SCUFFI

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Considerando el desarrollo del cultivo de soja en siembra directa en el partido de Benito Juárez, y que algunos autores sostienen que esta práctica favorece los acridios, se evaluó la riqueza de especies y la abundancia en soja con siembra directa y convencional. Se registraron siete especies (Aleuas lineatus Stål, Covasacris pallidinota (Bruner, Baeacris pseudopunctulatus (Ronderos, Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos, Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanchard, Dichroplus pratensis Bruner y Scotussa lemniscata (Stål. La riqueza de especies acumulada en los diferentes cultivos fue similar (p> 0,05. En soja de primera con siembra directa, se registraron 2,3 ± 0,19 especies, en soja de primera con siembra convencional 1,45 ± 0,15 especies y en soja de segunda con siembra directa 2,25 ± 0,28 especies. Dichroplus elongatus fue la especie más abundante en todos los cultivos y en todos los momentos. Las restantes presentaron baja abundancia y se registraron en algunos momentos. No existió diferencia (p> 0,05 en la abundancia de tucuras entre los cultivos y en las diferentes fechas de muestreo. La baja riqueza de especies registrada estaría relacionada con la baja diversidad vegetal de los cultivos. Este estudio no mostró diferencias en la abundancia y riqueza de especies de acuerdo a la labranza utilizada.

  20. Dynamic structural changes underpin photoconversion of a blue/green cyanobacteriochrome between its dark and photoactivated states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornilescu, Claudia C; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Burgie, E Sethe; Markley, John L; Ulijasz, Andrew T; Vierstra, Richard D

    2014-01-31

    The phytochrome superfamily of photoreceptors exploits reversible light-driven changes in the bilin chromophore to initiate a variety of signaling cascades. The nature of these alterations and how they impact the protein moiety remain poorly resolved and might include several species-specific routes. Here, we provide a detailed picture of photoconversion for the photosensing cGMP phosphodiesterase/adenylyl cyclase/FhlA (GAF) domain from Thermosynechococcus elongatus (Te) PixJ, a member of the cyanobacteriochrome clade. Solution NMR structures of the blue light-absorbing dark state Pb and green light-absorbing photoactivated state Pg, combined with paired crystallographic models, revealed that the bilin and GAF domain dynamically transition via breakage of the C10/Cys-494 thioether bond, opposite rotations of the A and D pyrrole rings, sliding of the bilin in the GAF pocket, and the appearance of an extended region of disorder that includes Cys-494. Changes in GAF domain backbone dynamics were also observed that are likely important for inter-domain signal propagation. Taken together, photoconversion of T. elongatus PixJ from Pb to Pg involves complex structural changes within the GAF domain pocket that transduce light into a mechanical signal, many aspects of which should be relevant to others within the extended phytochrome superfamily.

  1. Caracterización de las comunidades de acridios (Orthoptera: Acridoidea del partido de Benito Juárez, sudeste de la provincia de Buenos Aires, Argentina Grasshopper (Orthoptera: Acridoidea community structure in Benito Juárez county, in outhern Buenos Aires province, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura de Wysiecki

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Se analizó la riqueza, densidad, constancia y distribución de especies de acridios, en distintas comunidades vegetales (1997-2002 en el partido de Benito Juárez, sudeste de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Las comunidades vegetales se categorizaron en pastizales nativos, comunidades halófilas, pasturas sin disturbio, pasturas con moderado disturbio y pasturas con alto disturbio. En total se registraron 23 especies de acridios. Los melanoplinos dominaron en casi todas las comunidades vegetales, excepto en las halófilas que se caracterizaron por la presencia de un acridino, Covasacris pallidinota (Bruner. La riqueza de especies promedio por sitio por año, varió entre 2,10 ± 0,60 especies en las pasturas con moderado disturbio y 6,20 ± 0,58 especies en las comunidades halófilas. La riqueza de especies acumulada fue de 17 en los pastizales nativos, 14 en las comunidades halófilas, 19 en las pasturas sin disturbio, 18 en las pasturas con moderado disturbio y 14 en las pasturas con alto disturbio. La densidad promedio de acridios fue máxima en el 2001 y 2002. Dichroplus pratensis Bruner y Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos dominaron en los pastizales nativos y en las pasturas con alto disturbio, C. pallidinota en las comunidades halófilas, D. elongatus y Scotussa lemniscata (Stål en las pasturas sin disturbio y en las pasturas con moderado disturbio. La estructura taxonómica de las comunidades de acridios fue constante en los pastizales nativos, las comunidades halófilas y las pasturas. Hubo pocas especies de amplia distribución e intermedias y las raras fueron las más numerosas. De las 23 especies registradas en todos los sitios, D. elongatus fue la única de amplia distribución. Históricamente, para la zona de estudio, Dichroplus maculipennis (Blanch fue señalada como la especie dominante. Sin embargo, nuestros resultados sugieren que en la actualidad la especie dominante es D. elongatus. Si bien resulta imposible conocer las causas

  2. Novel class of glutathione transferases from cyanobacteria exhibit high catalytic activities towards naturally occurring isothiocyanates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiktelius, Eric; Stenberg, Gun

    2007-01-01

    In the present paper, we report a novel class of GSTs (glutathione transferases), called the Chi class, originating from cyanobacteria and with properties not observed previously in prokaryotic enzymes. GSTs constitute a widespread multifunctional group of proteins, of which mammalian enzymes are the best characterized. Although GSTs have their origin in prokaryotes, few bacterial representatives have been characterized in detail, and the catalytic activities and substrate specificities observed have generally been very modest. The few well-studied bacterial GSTs have largely unknown physiological functions. Genome databases reveal that cyanobacteria have an extensive arsenal of glutathione-associated proteins. We have studied two cyanobacterial GSTs which are the first examples of bacterial enzymes that are as catalytically efficient as the best mammalian enzymes. GSTs from the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 and from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 6301 were found to catalyse the conjugation of naturally occurring plant-derived isothiocyanates to glutathione at high rates. The cyanobacterial GSTs studied are smaller than previously described members of this enzyme family, but display many of the typical structural features that are characteristics of GSTs. They are also active towards several classical substrates, but at the same moderate rates that have been observed for other GSTs derived from prokaryotes. The cloning, expression and characterization of two cyanobacterial GSTs are described. The possible significance of the observed catalytic properties is discussed in the context of physiological relevance and GST evolution. PMID:17484723

  3. Impairment of O-antigen production confers resistance to grazing in a model amoeba-cyanobacterium predator-prey system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkovsky, Ryan; Daniels, Emy F; Tang, Karen; Huynh, Stacey C; Golden, Susan S; Brahamsha, Bianca

    2012-10-09

    The grazing activity of predators on photosynthetic organisms is a major mechanism of mortality and population restructuring in natural environments. Grazing is also one of the primary difficulties in growing cyanobacteria and other microalgae in large, open ponds for the production of biofuels, as contaminants destroy valuable biomass and prevent stable, continuous production of biofuel crops. To address this problem, we have isolated a heterolobosean amoeba, HGG1, that grazes upon unicellular and filamentous freshwater cyanobacterial species. We have established a model predator-prey system using this amoeba and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Application of amoebae to a library of mutants of S. elongatus led to the identification of a grazer-resistant knockout mutant of the wzm ABC O-antigen transporter gene, SynPCC7942_1126. Mutations in three other genes involved in O-antigen synthesis and transport also prevented the expression of O-antigen and conferred resistance to HGG1. Complementation of these rough mutants returned O-antigen expression and susceptibility to amoebae. Rough mutants are easily identifiable by appearance, are capable of autoflocculation, and do not display growth defects under standard laboratory growth conditions, all of which are desired traits for a biofuel production strain. Thus, preventing the production of O-antigen is a pathway for producing resistance to grazing by certain amoebae.

  4. Anthropogenic impact of mercury accumulation in fish from the Rio Madeira and Rio Negro rivers (Amazonia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dórea, José G; Barbosa, Antonio C

    2007-03-01

    Fish is an important concentrator of mono-methyl mercury and the main route to human contamination. We compared fish Hg bioaccumulation (within similar weight ranges) in two Amazonian river habitats during high-water seasons. The Rio Madeira has been greatly impacted by agriculture, alluvial gold extraction, and a hydroelectric reservoir, whereas the Rio Negro is much less affected by these human activities. The species at the top of the food web, Hoplias malabaricus (piscivorous; 80-668 ng Hg/g) and Cichla spp. (piscivorous; 42-747 ng Hg/g) showed the highest range of Hg concentrations. Nonpiscivorous species with comparable weight range, such as Potamorhina latior (detritivorous; 20-157 ng Hg/g) and Myleus torquatus (herbivorous; 2-182 ng Hg/g), had lower Hg concentrations. Triportheus elongatus (omnivorous; 5-350 ng Hg/g), with the lowest weight range, also showed a low range of Hg concentrations. Despite the Rio Madeira's higher sediment load as well as environmental impacts (deforestation, agriculture, hydroelectric reservoir, and alluvial gold mining) on natural Hg release, fish Hg bioaccumulation was no different between the two river habitats for nonpiscivorous species. In this small observational study only the species at the top of the food web (M. torquatus, Cichla spp, T. elongatus) showed higher mean Hg concentrations in the Rio Madeira than the dominantly wilderness habitat of the Rio Negro.

  5. Diversity of KaiC-based timing systems in marine Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axmann, Ilka M; Hertel, Stefanie; Wiegard, Anika; Dörrich, Anja K; Wilde, Annegret

    2014-04-01

    The coordination of biological activities into daily cycles provides an important advantage for the fitness of diverse organisms. Most eukaryotes possess an internal clock ticking with a periodicity of about one day to anticipate sunrise and sunset. The 24-hour period of the free-running rhythm is highly robust against many changes in the natural environment. Among prokaryotes, only Cyanobacteria are known to harbor such a circadian clock. Its core oscillator consists of just three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC that produce 24-hour oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, even in vitro. This unique three-protein oscillator is well documented for the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Several physiological studies demonstrate a circadian clock also for other Cyanobacteria including marine species. Genes for the core clock components are present in nearly all marine cyanobacterial species, though there are large differences in the specific composition of these genes. In the first section of this review we summarize data on the model circadian clock from S. elongatus PCC 7942 and compare it to the reduced clock system of the marine cyanobacterium Prochlorococcus marinus MED4. In the second part we discuss the diversity of timing mechanisms in other marine Cyanobacteria with regard to the presence or absence of different components of the clock.

  6. The complete mitochondrial genome of Gastrothylax crumenifer (Gastrothylacidae, Trematoda) and comparative analyses with selected trematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xin; Wang, Lixia; Chen, Hongmei; Feng, Hanli; Shen, Bang; Hu, Min; Fang, Rui

    2016-06-01

    In the present study, we sequenced and analyzed the mitochondrial (mt) genome of Gastrothylax crumenifer and compared it with other selected trematodes. The full mt genome of G. crumenifer was amplified, sequenced, assembled, analyzed and then subjected to phylogenetic analysis. The complete mt genome of G. crumenifer is 14,801 bp in length and contains two rRNA genes, two non-coding regions (LNR and SNR), 12 protein-coding genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. The gene organization of the G. crumenifer mt genome is the same as that of other trematodes, except for Schistosoma haematobium and Schistosoma spindale. All the genes are transcribed in the same direction and rich in "A + T", which is in accordance with other trematodes, such as Fasciola hepatica, Paramphistomum cervi, and Fischoederius elongatus. Phylogenetic analysis using concatenated amino acid sequences of the 12 protein-coding genes showed that G. crumenifer is closely related to F. elongatus. The availability of mt genome sequence of G. crumenifer can provide useful DNA markers for studying the molecular epidemiology and population genetics of this parasite and other paramphistomes.

  7. FLAVODIIRON2 and FLAVODIIRON4 Proteins Mediate an Oxygen-Dependent Alternative Electron Flow in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under CO2-Limited Conditions1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Nishi, Akiko; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism of an alternative electron flow (AEF) functioning under suppressed (CO2-limited) photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Photosynthetic linear electron flow, evaluated as the quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)], reaches a maximum shortly after the onset of actinic illumination. Thereafter, Y(II) transiently decreases concomitantly with a decrease in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate and then recovers to a rate that is close to the initial maximum. These results show that CO2 limitation suppresses photosynthesis and induces AEF. In contrast to the wild type, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON2 (FLV2) and FLV4 proteins show no recovery of Y(II) after prolonged illumination. However, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in genes encoding proteins functioning in photorespiration show AEF activity similar to the wild type. In contrast to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has no FLV proteins with high homology to FLV2 and FLV4 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This lack of FLV2/4 may explain why AEF is not induced under CO2-limited photosynthesis in S. elongatus PCC 7942. As the glutathione S-transferase fusion protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli exhibits NADH-dependent oxygen reduction to water, we suggest that FLV2 and FLV4 mediate oxygen-dependent AEF in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 when electron acceptors such as CO2 are not available. PMID:25540330

  8. Quantifying the robustness of circadian oscillations at the single-cell level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, Guillaume; Rust, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are light-harvesting microorganisms that contribute to 30% of the photosynthetic activity on Earth and contain one of the simplest circadian systems in the animal kingdom. In Synechococcus elongatus , a species of freshwater cyanobacterium, circadian oscillations are regulated by the KaiABC system, a trio of interacting proteins that act as a biomolecular pacemaker of the circadian system. While the core oscillator precisely anticipates Earth's 24h light/dark cycle, it is unclear how much individual cells benefit from the expression and maintenance of a circadian clock. By studying the growth dynamics of individual S . elongatus cells under sudden light variations, we show that several aspects of cellular growth, such as a cell's division probability and its elongation rate, are tightly coupled to the circadian clock. We propose that the evolution and maintenance of a circadian clock increases the fitness of cells by allowing them to take advantage of cyclical light/dark environments by alternating between two phenotypes: expansionary, where cells grow and divide at a fast pace during the first part of the day, and conservative, where cells enter a more quiescent state to better prepare to the stresses associated with the night's prolonged darkness.

  9. The missing leopard lizard: Liolaemus ubaghsi sp. nov., a new species of the leopardinus clade (Reptilia: Squamata: Liolaemidae) from the Andes of the O'Higgins Region in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquerré, Damien; Troncoso-Palacios, Jaime; Garín, Carlos F; Núnez, Herman

    2014-06-17

    Liolaemus is an extremely species rich genus of iguanid lizards from southern South America. Most of the diversity though is found in the Andes Cordillera, between Argentina and Chile. Here we describe Liolaemus ubaghsi sp. nov., from El Teniente Mine, in the Andean mountains of the O'Higgins Region in Chile. This species presents scalation and pattern traits that belong to the leopardinus clade, a group of viviparous, high altitude lizards that inhabit the mountain ranges surrounding Santiago City. The species of this clade in turn belong to the Andean and Patagonian elongatus-kriegi complex. Liolaemus ubaghsi sp. nov. has been previously recognized as L. leopardinus and L. elongatus, nevertheless we present diagnostic traits that allow us to describe it as a new species. It mainly differs from the rest of the leopardinus clade (L. leopardinus, L. ramonensis, L. valdesianus and L. frassinettii) by having the following unique combination of traits: ochre background coloration, a wide dark occipital stripe, dark flanks, white dots dispersed on the dorsum, absence of leopard-like spots and enlarged infralabial scales. 

  10. Structural model of the circadian clock KaiB-KaiC complex and mechanism for modulation of KaiC phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R; Pattanayek, Sabuj; Mori, Tetsuya; Johnson, Carl H; Stewart, Phoebe L; Egli, Martin [Vanderbilt

    2010-03-08

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro by the KaiA, KaiB and KaiC proteins in the presence of ATP. The principal clock component, KaiC, undergoes regular cycles between hyper- and hypo-phosphorylated states with a period of ca. 24 h that is temperature compensated. KaiA enhances KaiC phosphorylation and this enhancement is antagonized by KaiB. Throughout the cycle Kai proteins interact in a dynamic manner to form complexes of different composition. We present a three-dimensional model of the S. elongatus KaiB-KaiC complex based on X-ray crystallography, negative-stain and cryo-electron microscopy, native gel electrophoresis and modelling techniques. We provide experimental evidence that KaiB dimers interact with KaiC from the same side as KaiA and for a conformational rearrangement of the C-terminal regions of KaiC subunits. The enlarged central channel and thus KaiC subunit separation in the C-terminal ring of the hexamer is consistent with KaiC subunit exchange during the dephosphorylation phase. The proposed binding mode of KaiB explains the observation of simultaneous binding of KaiA and KaiB to KaiC, and provides insight into the mechanism of KaiB's antagonism of KaiA.

  11. Mussel shell evaluation as bioindicator for heavy metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrello, Avacir Casanova; Lopes, Fabio; Galvao, Tiago D. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina (UEL), PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Fisica Nuclear Aplicada

    2009-07-01

    Full text: Recently, in Brazil, it has been appearing a new and unusual 'plague' in leisure and commercial fishing, caused by the parasitic larval phase of certain native bivalve mollusks of fresh water known as 'Naiades'. Such situation involves the presence of big bivalve of fresh water, mainly Anodontites trapesialis, in the tanks and dams of the fish creation, such bivalve mollusks belonging to the Ordem Unionoida and the Familia Mycetopodidae. The present work objectified to analyze the shells of such mollusks to verify the possibility of such mollusks as bioindicators of heavy metals in fresh water. The mollusks shells were collected in a commercial fishing at Londrina-PR, and analyzed qualitatively to determine the chemical composition and possible correlation with existent heavy metals in the aquatic environment. Studies of the literature have been showing that those mollusks are susceptible the existent chemical alterations in the aquatic environment due to anthropogenic action. Three different shells were analyzed, with the measures done on the external and internal side, using a portable Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence system (PXRF-LFNA-02). The measures were realized in the applied nuclear physics laboratory of State University of Londrina, and the PXRF-LFNA-02 is composed by a X-Ray tube (with Ag target and filter) with potency of 4W, and a detector Si-PIN model XR-100CR of Ampetc Inc. with resolution of 221eV for the line of 5.9 keV of the {sup 55}Fe (with a 25{mu}m Be window thickness and Ag collimator), Current 10 mA and High Voltage 28 kV. In the internal part of shells were identified the elements Ca, P, Fe, Mn and Sr and in the external part were identified Ca, P, Fe, Mn, Sr and Cu. The Ca ratio among the external and internal sides of the analyzed shells is around of 1, and it was expected because Ca is the main composed of mollusks shells. The ratio of P, Fe, Mn, and Sr for Ca stayed constant in all analyzed shells

  12. Expanding the Cyanobacterial Nitrogen Regulatory Network: The GntR-Like Regulator PlmA Interacts with the PII-PipX Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labella, Jose I.; Obrebska, Anna; Espinosa, Javier; Salinas, Paloma; Forcada-Nadal, Alicia; Tremiño, Lorena; Rubio, Vicente; Contreras, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, phototrophic organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis, perceive nitrogen status by sensing 2-oxoglutarate levels. PII, a widespread signaling protein, senses and transduces nitrogen and energy status to target proteins, regulating metabolism and gene expression. In cyanobacteria, under conditions of low 2-oxoglutarate, PII forms complexes with the enzyme N-acetyl glutamate kinase, increasing arginine biosynthesis, and with PII-interacting protein X (PipX), making PipX unavailable for binding and co-activation of the nitrogen regulator NtcA. Both the PII-PipX complex structure and in vivo functional data suggested that this complex, as such, could have regulatory functions in addition to PipX sequestration. To investigate this possibility we performed yeast three-hybrid screening of genomic libraries from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, searching for proteins interacting simultaneously with PII and PipX. The only prey clone found in the search expressed PlmA, a member of the GntR family of transcriptional regulators proven here by gel filtration to be homodimeric. Interactions analyses further confirmed the simultaneous requirement of PII and PipX, and showed that the PlmA contacts involve PipX elements exposed in the PII-PipX complex, specifically the C-terminal helices and one residue of the tudor-like body. In contrast, PII appears not to interact directly with PlmA, possibly being needed indirectly, to induce an extended conformation of the C-terminal helices of PipX and for modulating the surface polarity at the PII-PipX boundary, two elements that appear crucial for PlmA binding. Attempts to inactive plmA confirmed that this gene is essential in S. elongatus. Western blot assays revealed that S. elongatus PlmA, irrespective of the nitrogen regime, is a relatively abundant transcriptional regulator, suggesting the existence of a large PlmA regulon. In silico studies showed that PlmA is universally and exclusively found in cyanobacteria

  13. Architecture and mechanism of the central gear in an ancient molecular timer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egli, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Molecular clocks are the product of natural selection in organisms from bacteria to human and their appearance early in evolution such as in the prokaryotic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus suggests that these timers served a crucial role in genetic fitness. Thus, a clock allows cyanobacteria relying on photosynthesis and nitrogen fixation to temporally space the two processes and avoid exposure of nitrogenase carrying out fixation to high levels of oxygen produced during photosynthesis. Fascinating properties of molecular clocks are the long time constant, their precision and temperature compensation. Although these are hallmarks of all circadian oscillators, the actual cogs and gears that control clocks vary widely between organisms, indicating that circadian timers evolved convergently multiple times, owing to the selective pressure of an environment with a daily light/dark cycle. In S. elongatus, the three proteins KaiA, KaiB and KaiC in the presence of ATP constitute a so-called post-translational oscillator (PTO). The KaiABC PTO can be reconstituted in an Eppendorf tube and keeps time in a temperature-compensated manner. The ease by which the KaiABC clock can be studied in vitro has made it the best-investigated molecular clock system. Over the last decade, structures of all three Kai proteins and some of their complexes have emerged and mechanistic aspects have been analysed in considerable detail. This review focuses on the central gear of the S. elongatus clock and only enzyme among the three proteins: KaiC. Our determination of the three-dimensional structure of KaiC early in the quest for a better understanding of the inner workings of the cyanobacterial timer revealed its unusual architecture and conformational differences and unique features of the two RecA-like domains constituting KaiC. The structure also pinpointed phosphorylation sites and differential interactions with ATP molecules at subunit interfaces, and helped guide experiments to

  14. Expanding the cyanobacterial nitrogen regulatory network: The GntR-like regulator PlmA interacts with the PII-PipX complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ignacio Labella

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, phototrophic organisms that perform oxygenic photosynthesis, perceive nitrogen status by sensing 2-oxoglutarate levels. PII, a widespread signaling protein, senses and transduces nitrogen and energy status to target proteins, regulating metabolism and gene expression. In cyanobacteria, under conditions of low 2-oxoglutarate, PII forms complexes with the enzyme N-acetyl glutamate kinase, increasing arginine biosynthesis, and with PII-interacting protein X (PipX, making PipX unavailable for binding and co-activation of the nitrogen regulator NtcA. Both the PII-PipX complex structure and in vivo functional data suggested that this complex, as such, could have regulatory functions in addition to PipX sequestration. To investigate this possibility we performed yeast three-hybrid screening of genomic libraries from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942, searching for proteins interacting simultaneously with PII and PipX. The only prey clone found in the search expressed PlmA, a member of the GntR family of transcriptional regulators proven here by gel filtration to be homodimeric. Interactions analyses further confirmed the simultaneous requirement of PII and PipX, and showed that the PlmA contacts involve PipX elements exposed in the PII-PipX complex, specifically the C-terminal helices and one residue of the tudor-like body. In contrast, PII appears not to interact directly with PlmA, possibly being needed indirectly, to induce an extended conformation of the C-terminal helices of PipX and for modulating the surface polarity at the PII-PipX boundary, two elements that appear crucial for PlmA binding. Attempts to inactive plmA confirmed that this gene is essential in S. elongatus. Western blot assays revealed that S. elongatus PlmA, irrespective of the nitrogen regime, is a relatively abundant transcriptional regulator, suggesting the existence of a large PlmA regulon. In silico studies showed that PlmA is universally and exclusively found

  15. Light dilution via wavelength management for efficient high-density photobioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Matthew D; Graham, Percival J; Nguyen, Brian; Sargent, Edward H; Sinton, David

    2017-02-06

    The spectral distribution of light influences microalgae productivity; however, development of photobioreactors has proceeded largely without regard to spectral optimization. Here we use monochromatic light to quantify the joint influence of path length, culture density, light intensity and wavelength on productivity and efficiency in Synechococcus elongatus. The productivity of green light was ∼4 x that of red at the highest levels of culture density, depth and light intensity. This performance is attributed to the combination of increased dilution and penetration of this weakly absorbed wavelength over a larger volume fraction of the reactor. In contrast, red light outperformed other wavelengths in low-density cultures with low light intensities. Low density cultures also adapted more rapidly to reduce absorption of longer wavelengths, allowing for prolonged cultivation. Taken together, these results indicate that, particularly for artificially lit photobioreactors, wavelength needs to be included as a critical operational parameter to maintain optimal performance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  16. Wavelength-selective plasmonics for enhanced cultivation of microalgae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Sinton, David

    2015-02-01

    Optimal photon management is a key challenge for photobioreactor design, since light gradients and varying spectral sensitivities between organisms result in uneven illumination and unused photons. This paper demonstrates wavelength specific scattering from plasmonic nano-patterned surfaces as a means of addressing the challenge of photon management in photobioreactors. Modular photobioreactors were constructed with different reflective substrates including arrays of plasmonic nanodisks, broadband reflectors, and untreated glass. It was found that the growth rate of cyanobacterium S. elongatus in photobioreactors equipped with a plasmonic substrate (R623 nm ˜ 35%) was enhanced by 6.5% compared to photobioreactors equipped with untreated glass. Furthermore, plasmonic reflectors showed a normalized power efficiency improvement of 52% over broadband reflectors. Wavelength-specific reflection from plasmonic reflectors increases the flux of useful light to cultures without sacrificing the full spectrum.

  17. Genetic variability in five species of Anostomidae (Ostariophysi - Characiformes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiari Lucimara

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variability was studied in five fish species (Anostomidae: Schizodon intermedius and S. nasutus and Leporinus friderici, L. elongatus and L. obtusidens, collected at one location on the Tibagi River (Paraná, Brazil. The protein data from seven systems coded collectively for 19 loci in the liver, muscle and heart. Nine of these loci were polymorphic. The estimated proportion of polymorphism loci ( varied from 16.7% in S. intermedius to 36.9% in L. friderici; the mean heterozygosity observed (o was 0.027 ± 0.015 and 0.109 ± 0.042, respectively. The estimated value of the genetic identity among L. friderici and S. intermedius (0.749 and S. nasutus (0.787 suggested that these are "congeneric" species. Morphological characteristics indicate that these species belong to distinct genera, while isoenzymatic data show that they are very similar at the genetic/biochemical level.

  18. Improved Alkane Production in Nitrogen-Fixing and Halotolerant Cyanobacteria via Abiotic Stresses and Genetic Manipulation of Alkane Synthetic Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kageyama, Hakuto; Waditee-Sirisattha, Rungaroon; Sirisattha, Sophon; Tanaka, Yoshito; Mahakhant, Aparat; Takabe, Teruhiro

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria possess the unique capacity to produce alkane. In this study, effects of nitrogen deficiency and salt stress on biosynthesis of alkanes were investigated in three kinds of cyanobacteria. Intracellular alkane accumulation was increased in nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC7120, but decreased in non-diazotrophic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 and constant in a halotolerant cyanobacterium Aphanothece halophytica under nitrogen-deficient condition. We also found that salt stress increased alkane accumulation in Anabaena sp. PCC7120 and A. halophytica. The expression levels of two alkane synthetic genes were not upregulated significantly under nitrogen deficiency or salt stress in Anabaena sp. PCC7120. The transformant Anabaena sp. PCC7120 cells with additional alkane synthetic gene set from A. halophytica increased intracellular alkane accumulation level compared to control cells. These results provide a prospect to improve bioproduction of alkanes in nitrogen-fixing halotolerant cyanobacteria via abiotic stresses and genetic engineering.

  19. Cyanobacteria Maintain Constant Protein Concentration despite Genome Copy-Number Variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiao-Yu; O'Shea, Erin K

    2017-04-18

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has multiple copies of its single chromosome, and the copy number varies in individual cells, providing an ideal system to study the effect of genome copy-number variation on cell size and gene expression. Using single-cell fluorescence imaging, we found that protein concentration remained constant across individual cells regardless of genome copy number. Cell volume and the total protein amount from a single gene were both positively, linearly correlated with genome copy number, suggesting that changes in cell volume play an important role in buffering genome copy-number variance. This study provides a quantitative examination of gene expression regulation in cells with variable genome copies and sheds light on the compensation mechanisms for variance in genome copy number. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Records of new localities and hosts for crustacean parasites in fish from the eastern Amazon in northern Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Marcos Sidney Brito; Corrêa, Lincoln Lima; Oliveira Ferreira, Drielly; Neves, Lígia Rigor; Tavares-Dias, Marcos

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate parasites crustacean fauna in Arapaima gigas, Cichla monoculus, Cichla ocellaris, Cichla jariina, Satanoperca jurupari, Leporinus friderici, Leporinus fasciatus, Hoplias malabaricus, Phractocephalus hemioliopterus, Serrasalmus altispinis, Pseudoplatystoma tigrinum and Potamotrygon motoro of the State Amapá and Pará, in northern Brazil. A total of 242 parasites, including Argulus elongatus, Argulus multicolor,Argulus juparanaensis, Argulus nattereri, Dolops discoidalis, Dolops longicauda, Braga patagonica, Braga fluviatilis, Livoneca guianensis and undetermined Lernaeidae, were collected from these hosts. The Argulus species had the greatest richness among the community of parasitic crustaceans. There was a low abundance of parasites among the hosts, other than D. discoidalis, was most abundant in the integument of A. gigas and P. tigrinum. Finally, the present study reported nine new hosts for the crustacean parasite species and expanded knowledge of the occurrence of some parasite species in the Jari River basin, in eastern Amazon.

  1. Absence of sterols constrains food quality of cyanobacteria for an invasive freshwater bivalve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basen, Timo; Rothhaupt, Karl-Otto; Martin-Creuzburg, Dominik

    2012-09-01

    The accumulation of cyanobacterial biomass may severely affect the performance of aquatic consumers. Here, we investigated the role of sterols in determining the food quality of cyanobacteria for the invasive clam Corbicula fluminea, which has become a common benthic invertebrate in many freshwater ecosystems throughout the world. In standardized growth experiments, juvenile clams were fed mixtures of different cyanobacteria (Anabaena variabilis, Aphanothece clathrata, Synechococcus elongatus) or sterol-containing eukaryotic algae (Cryptomonas sp., Nannochloropsis limnetica, Scenedesmus obliquus). In addition, the cyanobacterial food was supplemented with different sterols. We provide evidence that somatic growth of C. fluminea on cyanobacterial diets is constrained by the absence of sterols, as indicated by a growth-enhancing effect of sterol supplementation. Thus, our findings contribute to our understanding of the consequences of cyanobacterial mass developments for benthic consumers and highlight the importance of considering sterols as potentially limiting nutrients in aquatic food webs.

  2. Fluorescent minerals - A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark.

  3. Linking foraging strategies of marine calanoid copepods to patterns of nitrogen stable isotope signatures in a mesocosm study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Frank; Saage, A.; Santer, B.

    2005-01-01

    foraging mode and, further, with its nitrogen stable isotope signature (delta(15)N). This is because a more carnivorous diet may be expected to result in a higher delta(15)N. We tested this hypothesis in a mesocosm study using a density gradient (0 to 80 ind. 1(-1)) of calanoid copepods. We expected......, whereas nanoflagellates increased with increasing copepod density. As expected, Centropages hamatus, a cruising species, showed the strongest isotopic increase and also highest population growth at low copepod density, suggesting that it was the most efficient species in capturing ciliates. Temora...... longicornis, a stationary suspension-feeder, showed a uniform isotopic increase in all mesocosms, which we believe resulted from nutritional stress arising from poor feeding on both ciliates (too fast for ingestion by T. longicornis) and nanoflagellates (too small). However, Pseudocalanus elongatus, a species...

  4. Hyper-cryptic marine meiofauna: species complexes in Nemertodermatida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Meyer-Wachsmuth

    Full Text Available Nemertodermatida are microscopically small, benthic marine worms. Specimens of two nominal species, Sterreria psammicola and Nemertinoides elongatus from 33 locations worldwide were sequenced for three molecular markers. Species delimitation and validation was done using gene trees, haplotype networks and multilocus Bayesian analysis. We found 20 supported species of which nine: Nemertinoides glandulosum n.sp., N. wolfgangi n.sp., Sterreria boucheti n.sp., S. lundini n.sp., S. martindalei n.sp., S. monolithes n.sp., S. papuensis n.sp., S. variabilis n.sp. and S. ylvae n.sp., are described including nucleotide-based diagnoses. The distribution patterns indicate transoceanic dispersal in some of the species. Sympatric species were found in many cases. The high level of cryptic diversity in this meiofauna group implies that marine diversity may be higher than previously estimated.

  5. Single Molecule Spectroscopy on Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Jelezko, F; Schuler, S; Thews, E; Tietz, C; Wechsler, A; Wrachtrup, J

    2001-01-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy was applied to unravel the energy transfer pathway in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes. Detailed analysis of excitation and fluorescence emission spectra has been made for peripheral plant antenna LHC II and Photosystem I from cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Optical transitions of individual pigments were resolved under nonselective excitation of antenna chlorophylls. High-resolution fluorescence spectroscopy of individual plant antenna LHC II indicates that at low temperatures, the excitation energy is localized on the red-most Chl a pool absorbing at 680 nm. More than one pigment molecule is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the LHC II trimer. The spectral lines of single Chl a molecules absorbing at 675 nm are broadened because of the Foerster energy transfer towards the red-most pigments. Low-temperature spectroscopy on single PS I trimers indicates that two subgroups of pigments, which are present in the red antenna pool, differ by the strength of t...

  6. Wavelength-selective plasmonics for enhanced cultivation of microalgae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooms, Matthew D.; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Sinton, David, E-mail: sinton@mie.utoronto.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, and Institute for Sustainable Energy, University of Toronto, Toronto M5S 3G8 (Canada)

    2015-02-09

    Optimal photon management is a key challenge for photobioreactor design, since light gradients and varying spectral sensitivities between organisms result in uneven illumination and unused photons. This paper demonstrates wavelength specific scattering from plasmonic nano-patterned surfaces as a means of addressing the challenge of photon management in photobioreactors. Modular photobioreactors were constructed with different reflective substrates including arrays of plasmonic nanodisks, broadband reflectors, and untreated glass. It was found that the growth rate of cyanobacterium S. elongatus in photobioreactors equipped with a plasmonic substrate (R{sub 623 nm} ∼ 35%) was enhanced by 6.5% compared to photobioreactors equipped with untreated glass. Furthermore, plasmonic reflectors showed a normalized power efficiency improvement of 52% over broadband reflectors. Wavelength-specific reflection from plasmonic reflectors increases the flux of useful light to cultures without sacrificing the full spectrum.

  7. Optimization of isopropanol production by engineered cyanobacteria with a synthetic metabolic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirokawa, Yasutaka; Suzuki, Iwane; Hanai, Taizo

    2015-05-01

    Cyanobacterium is an attractive host for the production of various chemicals and alternative fuels using solar energy and carbon dioxide. In previous study, we succeeded to produce isopropanol using engineered Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 under dark and anaerobic conditions (0.43 mM, 26.5 mg/l). In the present study, we report the further optimization of this isopropanol producing condition. We then optimized growth conditions for production of isopropanol by the engineered cyanobacteria, including the use of cells in early stationary phase and buffering of the production medium to neutral pH. We observed that shifting of cultures from dark and anaerobic to light and aerobic conditions during the production phase dramatically increased isopropanol production by conversion to isopropanol from acetate, byproduct under dark and anaerobic condition. Under the optimized production conditions, the titer of isopropanol was elevated 6-fold, to 2.42 mM (146 mg/l).

  8. The genus Trematocarpus (Sarcodiaceae, Rhodophyta in southern Africa and the exclusion of Sphaerococcus (Chondrus scutellatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. Simons

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available Trematocarpus Kützing in southern Africa is found to comprise four taxa in three species: newly described is T.  fragilis (Ag. De Toni var. divaricatus Simons, var. nov. Two of the species, T. flabellatus (J. Ag. De Toni and T.  affinis (J. Ag. De Toni are restored to independent specific rank after being regarded as synonyms of T.  scutellatus (Her. Searles. It is shown that  Sphaerococcus (Chondrus scutellatus Her., the basionym of  T.  scutellatus refers to a species of Gigartina, therefore a new combination Gigartina scutellata (Her. Simons is made for this species which was formerly known as G. fastigiata J. Ag. and G. scabiosa (Kiitz. Papenf. Trematocarpus elongatus Kiitz. is relegated to synonymy under T. fragilis var.  divaricatus.

  9. Robustness and Optimality of Light Harvesting in Cyanobacterial Photosystem I

    CERN Document Server

    Sener, M K; Ritz, T; Park, S; Fromme, P; Schulten, K; Sener, Melih K.; Lu, Deyu; Ritz, Thorsten; Park, Sanghyun; Fromme, Petra; Schulten, Klaus

    2002-01-01

    As most biological species, photosynthetic lifeforms have evolved to function optimally, despite thermal disorder and with fault tolerance. It remains a challenge to understand how this is achieved. To address this challenge the function of the protein-pigment complex photosystem I (PSI) of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is investigated theoretically. The recently obtained high resolution structure of this complex exhibits an aggregate of 96 chlorophylls that are electronically coupled to function as a light-harvesting antenna complex. This paper constructs an effective Hamiltonian for the chlorophyll aggregate to describe excitation transfer dynamics and spectral properties of PSI. For this purpose, a new kinetic expansion method, the sojourn expansion, is introduced. Our study shows that at room temperature fluctuations of site energies have little effect on the calculated excitation lifetime and quantum yield, which compare favorably with experimental results. The efficiency of the system is fo...

  10. Engineering an Obligate Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium to Utilize Glycerol for Growth and Chemical Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Masahiro; Atsumi, Shota

    2017-01-20

    Cyanobacteria have attracted much attention as a means to directly recycle carbon dioxide into valuable chemicals that are currently produced from petroleum. However, the titers and productivities achieved are still far below the level required in industry. To make a more industrially applicable production scheme, glycerol, a byproduct of biodiesel production, can be used as an additional carbon source for photomixotrophic chemical production. Glycerol is an ideal candidate due to its availability and low cost. In this study, we found that a heterologous glycerol respiratory pathway enabled Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to utilize extracellular glycerol. The engineered strain produced 761 mg/L of 2,3-butanediol in 48 h with a 290% increase over the control strain under continuous light conditions. Glycerol supplementation also allowed for continuous cell growth and 2,3-butanediol production in diurnal light conditions. These results highlight the potential of glycerol as an additional carbon source for photomixotrophic chemical production in cyanobacteria.

  11. Global metabolic rewiring for improved CO2 fixation and chemical production in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Masahiro; Carroll, Austin L.; Atsumi, Shota

    2017-03-01

    Cyanobacteria have attracted much attention as hosts to recycle CO2 into valuable chemicals. Although cyanobacteria have been engineered to produce various compounds, production efficiencies are too low for commercialization. Here we engineer the carbon metabolism of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to improve glucose utilization, enhance CO2 fixation and increase chemical production. We introduce modifications in glycolytic pathways and the Calvin Benson cycle to increase carbon flux and redirect it towards carbon fixation. The engineered strain efficiently uses both CO2 and glucose, and produces 12.6 g l-1 of 2,3-butanediol with a rate of 1.1 g l-1 d-1 under continuous light conditions. Removal of native regulation enables carbon fixation and 2,3-butanediol production in the absence of light. This represents a significant step towards industrial viability and an excellent example of carbon metabolism plasticity.

  12. Covalent immobilization of oriented photosystem II on a nanostructured electrode for solar water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Masaru; Cardona, Tanai; Rutherford, A William; Reisner, Erwin

    2013-07-24

    Photosystem II (PSII) offers a biological and sustainable route of photochemical water oxidation to O2 and can provide protons and electrons for the generation of solar fuels, such as H2. We present a rational strategy to electrostatically improve the orientation of PSII from a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus , on a nanostructured indium tin oxide (ITO) electrode and to covalently immobilize PSII on the electrode. The ITO electrode was modified with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of phosphonic acid ITO linkers with a dangling carboxylate moiety. The negatively charged carboxylate attracts the positive dipole on the electron acceptor side of PSII via Coulomb interactions. Covalent attachment of PSII in its electrostatically improved orientation to the SAM-modified ITO electrode was accomplished via an amide bond to further enhance red-light-driven, direct electron transfer and stability of the PSII hybrid photoelectrode.

  13. Introduction of a synthetic CO₂-fixing photorespiratory bypass into a cyanobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Patrick M; Zarzycki, Jan; Niyogi, Krishna K; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2014-04-01

    Global photosynthetic productivity is limited by the enzymatic assimilation of CO2 into organic carbon compounds. Ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RuBisCO), the carboxylating enzyme of the Calvin-Benson cycle, poorly discriminates between CO2 and O2, leading to photorespiration and the loss of fixed carbon and nitrogen. With the advent of synthetic biology, it is now feasible to design, synthesize, and introduce biochemical pathways in vivo. We engineered a synthetic photorespiratory bypass based on the 3-hydroxypropionate bi-cycle into the model cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942. The heterologously expressed cycle is designed to function as both a photorespiratory bypass and an additional CO2-fixing pathway, supplementing the Calvin-Benson cycle. We demonstrate the function of all six introduced enzymes and identify bottlenecks to be targeted in subsequent bioengineering. These results have implications for efforts to improve photosynthesis and for the "green" production of high value products of biotechnological interest.

  14. Ultrafast infrared observation of exciton equilibration from oriented single crystals of photosystem II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaucikas, Marius; Maghlaoui, Karim; Barber, Jim; Renger, Thomas; van Thor, Jasper J.

    2016-12-01

    In oxygenic photosynthesis, two photosystems work in series. Each of them contains a reaction centre that is surrounded by light-harvesting antennae, which absorb the light and transfer the excitation energy to the reaction centre where electron transfer reactions are driven. Here we report a critical test for two contrasting models of light harvesting by photosystem II cores, known as the trap-limited and the transfer-to-the trap-limited model. Oriented single crystals of photosystem II core complexes of Synechococcus elongatus are excited by polarized visible light and the transient absorption is probed with polarized light in the infrared. The dichroic amplitudes resulting from photoselection are maintained on the 60 ps timescale that corresponds to the dominant energy transfer process providing compelling evidence for the transfer-to-the-trap limitation of the overall light-harvesting process. This finding has functional implications for the quenching of excited states allowing plants to survive under high light intensities.

  15. Coupled Oscillations and Circadian Rhythms in Molecular Replication Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Nathaniel; Alasibi, Samaa; Peacock-Lopez, Enrique; Ashkenasy, Gonen

    2015-01-02

    Living organisms often display rhythmic and oscillatory behavior. We investigate here a challenge in contemporary Systems Chemistry, that is, to construct "bottom-up" molecular networks that display such complex behavior. We first describe oscillations during self-replication by applying kinetic parameters relevant to peptide replication in an open environment. Small networks of coupled oscillators are then constructed in silico, producing various functions such as logic gates, integrators, counters, triggers, and detectors. These networks are finally utilized to simulate the connectivity and network topology of the Kai proteins circadian clocks from the S. elongatus cyanobacteria, thus producing rhythms whose constant frequency is independent of the input intake rate and robust toward concentration fluctuations. We suggest that this study helps further reveal the underlying principles of biological clocks and may provide clues into their emergence in early molecular evolution.

  16. Structural basis of the oxidative activation of the carboxysomal [gamma]-carbonic anhydrase, CcmM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña, Kerry L.; Castel, Stephane E.; de Araujo, Charlotte; Espie, George S.; Kimber, Matthew S. (Guelph); (Toronto)

    2010-04-26

    Cyanobacterial RuBisCO is sequestered in large, icosahedral, protein-bounded microcompartments called carboxysomes. Bicarbonate is pumped into the cytosol, diffuses into the carboxysome through small pores in its shell, and is then converted to CO{sub 2} by carbonic anhydrase (CA) prior to fixation. Paradoxically, many {beta}-cyanobacteria, including Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, lack the conventional carboxysomal {beta}-CA, ccaA. The N-terminal domain of the carboxysomal protein CcmM is homologous to {gamma}-CA from Methanosarcina thermophila (Cam) but recombinant CcmM derived from ccaA-containing cyanobacteria show no CA activity. We demonstrate here that either full length CcmM from T. elongatus, or a construct truncated after 209 residues (CcmM209), is active as a CA - the first catalytically active bacterial {gamma}-CA reported. The 2.0 {angstrom} structure of CcmM209 reveals a trimeric, left-handed {beta}-helix structure that closely resembles Cam, except that residues 198-207 form a third {alpha}-helix stabilized by an essential Cys194-Cys200 disulfide bond. Deleting residues 194-209 (CcmM193) results in an inactive protein whose 1.1 {angstrom} structure shows disordering of the N- and C-termini, and reorganization of the trimeric interface and active site. Under reducing conditions, CcmM209 is similarly partially disordered and inactive as a CA. CcmM protein in fresh E. coli cell extracts is inactive, implying that the cellular reducing machinery can reduce and inactivate CcmM, while diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, activates the enzyme. Thus, like membrane-bound eukaryotic cellular compartments, the {beta}-carboxysome appears to be able to maintain an oxidizing interior by precluding the entry of thioredoxin and other endogenous reducing agents.

  17. Evaluation of algal biofilms on indium tin oxide (ITO for use in biophotovoltaic platforms based on photosynthetic performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong-Lee Ng

    Full Text Available In photosynthesis, a very small amount of the solar energy absorbed is transformed into chemical energy, while the rest is wasted as heat and fluorescence. This excess energy can be harvested through biophotovoltaic platforms to generate electrical energy. In this study, algal biofilms formed on ITO anodes were investigated for use in the algal biophotovoltaic platforms. Sixteen algal strains, comprising local isolates and two diatoms obtained from the Culture Collection of Marine Phytoplankton (CCMP, USA, were screened and eight were selected based on the growth rate, biochemical composition and photosynthesis performance using suspension cultures. Differences in biofilm formation between the eight algal strains as well as their rapid light curve (RLC generated using a pulse amplitude modulation (PAM fluorometer, were examined. The RLC provides detailed information on the saturation characteristics of electron transport and overall photosynthetic performance of the algae. Four algal strains, belonging to the Cyanophyta (Cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105, Spirulina platensis. (UMACC 159 and the Chlorophyta Chlorella vulgaris (UMACC 051, and Chlorella sp. (UMACC 313 were finally selected for investigation using biophotovoltaic platforms. Based on power output per Chl-a content, the algae can be ranked as follows: Synechococcus elongatus (UMACC 105 (6.38×10(-5 Wm(-2/µgChl-a>Chlorella vulgaris UMACC 051 (2.24×10(-5 Wm(-2/µgChl-a>Chlorella sp.(UMACC 313 (1.43×10(-5 Wm(-2/µgChl-a>Spirulina platensis (UMACC 159 (4.90×10(-6 Wm(-2/µgChl-a. Our study showed that local algal strains have potential for use in biophotovoltaic platforms due to their high photosynthetic performance, ability to produce biofilm and generation of electrical power.

  18. Comparative morphology of the postpharyngeal gland in the Philanthinae (Hymenoptera, Crabronidae) and the evolution of an antimicrobial brood protection mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Katharina; Strohm, Erhard; Kaltenpoth, Martin; Herzner, Gudrun

    2015-12-21

    Hymenoptera that mass-provision their offspring have evolved elaborate antimicrobial strategies to ward off fungal infestation of the highly nutritive larval food. Females of the Afro-European Philanthus triangulum and the South American Trachypus elongatus (Crabronidae, Philanthinae) embalm their prey, paralyzed bees, with a secretion from a complex postpharyngeal gland (PPG). This coating consists of mainly unsaturated hydrocarbons and reduces water accumulation on the prey's surface, thus rendering it unfavorable for fungal growth. Here we (1) investigated whether a North American Philanthus species also employs prey embalming and (2) assessed the occurrence and morphology of a PPG among females of the subfamily Philanthinae in order to elucidate the evolution of prey embalming as an antimicrobial strategy. We provide clear evidence that females of the North American Philanthus gibbosus possess large PPGs and embalm their prey. The comparative analyses of 26 species from six genera of the Philanthinae, using histological methods and 3D-reconstructions, revealed pronounced differences in gland morphology within the subfamily. A formal statistical analysis based on defined characters of the glands confirmed that while all members of the derived tribe Philanthini have large and complex PPGs, species of the two more basal tribes, Cercerini and Aphilanthopsini, possess simple and comparatively small glands. According to an ancestral state reconstruction, the complex PPG most likely evolved in the last common ancestor of the Philanthini, thus representing an autapomorphy of this tribe. Prey embalming, as described for P. triangulum and T. elongatus, and now also for P. gibbosus, most probably requires a complex PPG. Hence, the morphology and size of the PPG may allow for inferences about the origin and distribution of the prey embalming behavior within the Philanthinae. Based on our results, we suggest that prey embalming has evolved as an antimicrobial strategy in

  19. Involvement of the cynABDS Operon and the CO2-Concentrating Mechanism in the Light-Dependent Transport and Metabolism of Cyanate by Cyanobacteria▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espie, George S.; Jalali, Farid; Tong, Tommy; Zacal, Natalie J.; So, Anthony K.-C.

    2007-01-01

    The cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC7942 and Synechococcus sp. strain UTEX625 decomposed exogenously supplied cyanate (NCO−) to CO2 and NH3 through the action of a cytosolic cyanase which required HCO3− as a second substrate. The ability to metabolize NCO− relied on three essential elements: proteins encoded by the cynABDS operon, the biophysical activity of the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and light. Inactivation of cynS, encoding cyanase, and cynA yielded mutants unable to decompose cyanate. Furthermore, loss of CynA, the periplasmic binding protein of a multicomponent ABC-type transporter, resulted in loss of active cyanate transport. Competition experiments revealed that native transport systems for CO2, HCO3−, NO3−, NO2−, Cl−, PO42−, and SO42− did not contribute to the cellular flux of NCO− and that CynABD did not contribute to the flux of these nutrients, implicating CynABD as a novel primary active NCO− transporter. In the S. elongatus strain PCC7942 ΔchpX ΔchpY mutant that is defective in the full expression of the CCM, mass spectrometry revealed that the cellular rate of cyanate decomposition depended upon the size of the internal inorganic carbon (Ci) (HCO3− + CO2) pool. Unlike wild-type cells, the rate of NCO− decomposition by the ΔchpX ΔchpY mutant was severely depressed at low external Ci concentrations, indicating that the CCM was essential in providing HCO3− for cyanase under typical growth conditions. Light was required to activate and/or energize the active transport of both NCO− and Ci. Putative cynABDS operons were identified in the genomes of diverse Proteobacteria, suggesting that CynABDS-mediated cyanate metabolism is not restricted to cyanobacteria. PMID:17122352

  20. Involvement of the cynABDS operon and the CO2-concentrating mechanism in the light-dependent transport and metabolism of cyanate by cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espie, George S; Jalali, Farid; Tong, Tommy; Zacal, Natalie J; So, Anthony K-C

    2007-02-01

    The cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC7942 and Synechococcus sp. strain UTEX625 decomposed exogenously supplied cyanate (NCO-) to CO2 and NH3 through the action of a cytosolic cyanase which required HCO3- as a second substrate. The ability to metabolize NCO- relied on three essential elements: proteins encoded by the cynABDS operon, the biophysical activity of the CO2-concentrating mechanism (CCM), and light. Inactivation of cynS, encoding cyanase, and cynA yielded mutants unable to decompose cyanate. Furthermore, loss of CynA, the periplasmic binding protein of a multicomponent ABC-type transporter, resulted in loss of active cyanate transport. Competition experiments revealed that native transport systems for CO2, HCO3-, NO3-, NO2-, Cl-, PO4(2-), and SO4(2-) did not contribute to the cellular flux of NCO- and that CynABD did not contribute to the flux of these nutrients, implicating CynABD as a novel primary active NCO- transporter. In the S. elongatus strain PCC7942 DeltachpX DeltachpY mutant that is defective in the full expression of the CCM, mass spectrometry revealed that the cellular rate of cyanate decomposition depended upon the size of the internal inorganic carbon (Ci) (HCO3- + CO2) pool. Unlike wild-type cells, the rate of NCO- decomposition by the DeltachpX DeltachpY mutant was severely depressed at low external Ci concentrations, indicating that the CCM was essential in providing HCO3- for cyanase under typical growth conditions. Light was required to activate and/or energize the active transport of both NCO- and Ci. Putative cynABDS operons were identified in the genomes of diverse Proteobacteria, suggesting that CynABDS-mediated cyanate metabolism is not restricted to cyanobacteria.

  1. Genome sequences of siphoviruses infecting marine Synechococcus unveil a diverse cyanophage group and extensive phage-host genetic exchanges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Sijun; Wang, Kui; Jiao, Nianzhi; Chen, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Investigating the interactions between marine cyanobacteria and their viruses (phages) is important towards understanding the dynamic of ocean's primary productivity. Genome sequencing of marine cyanophages has greatly advanced our understanding about their ecology and evolution. Among 24 reported genomes of cyanophages that infect marine picocyanobacteria, 17 are from cyanomyoviruses and six from cyanopodoviruses, and only one from cyanosiphovirus (Prochlorococcus phage P-SS2). Here we present four complete genome sequences of siphoviruses (S-CBS1, S-CBS2, S-CBS3 and S-CBS4) that infect four different marine Synechococcus strains. Three distinct subtypes were recognized among the five known marine siphoviruses (including P-SS2) in terms of morphology, genome architecture, gene content and sequence similarity. Our study revealed that cyanosiphoviruses are genetically diverse with polyphyletic origin. No core genes were found across these five cyanosiphovirus genomes, and this is in contrast to the fact that many core genes have been found in cyanomyovirus or cyanopodovirus genomes. Interestingly, genes encoding three structural proteins and a lysozyme of S-CBS1 and S-CBS3 showed homology to a prophage-like genetic element in two freshwater Synechococcus elongatus genomes. Re-annotation of the prophage-like genomic region suggests that S. elongatus may contain an intact prophage. Cyanosiphovirus genes involved in DNA metabolism and replication share high sequence homology with those in cyanobacteria, and further phylogenetic analysis based on these genes suggests that ancient and selective genetic exchanges occurred, possibly due to past prophage integration. Metagenomic analysis based on the Global Ocean Sampling database showed that cyanosiphoviruses are present in relatively low abundance in the ocean surface water compared to cyanomyoviruses and cyanopodoviruses.

  2. Timing of morphological and ecological innovations in the cyanobacteria--a key to understanding the rise in atmospheric oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, C E; Sánchez-Baracaldo, P

    2010-01-01

    When cyanobacteria originated and diversified, and what their ancient traits were, remain critical unresolved problems. Here, we used a phylogenomic approach to construct a well-resolved 'core' cyanobacterial tree. The branching positions of four lineages (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Synechococcus elongatus, Synechococcus PCC 7335 and Acaryochloris marina) were problematic, probably due to long branch attraction artifacts. A consensus genomic tree was used to study trait evolution using ancestral state reconstruction (ASR). The early cyanobacteria were probably unicellular, freshwater, had small cell diameters, and lacked the traits to form thick microbial mats. Relaxed molecular clock analyses suggested that early cyanobacterial lineages were restricted to freshwater ecosystems until at least 2.4 Ga, before diversifying into coastal brackish and marine environments. The resultant increases in niche space and nutrient availability, and consequent sedimentation of organic carbon into the deep oceans, would have generated large pulses of oxygen into the biosphere, possibly explaining why oxygen rose so rapidly. Rapid atmospheric oxidation could have destroyed the methane-driven greenhouse with simultaneous drawdown in pCO(2), precipitating 'Snowball Earth' conditions. The traits associated with the formation of thick, laminated microbial mats (large cell diameters, filamentous growth, sheaths, motility and nitrogen fixation) were not seen until after diversification of the LPP, SPM and PNT clades, after 2.32 Ga. The appearance of these traits overlaps with a global carbon isotopic excursion between 2.2 and 2.1 Ga. Thus, a massive re-ordering of biogeochemical cycles caused by the appearance of complex laminated microbial communities in marine environments may have caused this excursion. Finally, we show that ASR may provide an explanation for why cyanobacterial microfossils have not been observed until after 2.0 Ga, and make suggestions for how future

  3. Aboriginal Consumption of Estuarine Food Resources and Potential Implications for Health through Trace Metal Exposure; A Study in Gumbaynggirr Country, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Shaina; Sullivan, Caroline A; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J

    2015-01-01

    Fishing and resource use continues to be an essential aspect of life for many Aboriginal communities throughout Australia. It is important for dietary sustenance, and also retains deep social, cultural and economic significance, playing a fundamental role in maintaining group cohesion, transferring cultural knowledge and affirming Indigenous identities. We surveyed approximately 20% of the Gumbaynggirr Aboriginal community of Nambucca Heads, New South Wales, Australia. This paper explores Gumbaynggirr Connection to Country and engagement in cultural practice. It quantifies fishing efforts and consumption of seafood within the community. We found 95% of the sample group fish, with the highest rate of fishing being 2-3 times a week (27%). Furthermore, 98% of participants eat seafood weekly or more frequently, up to more than once a day (24%). Survey results revealed that Myxus elongatus (Sand mullet) and naturally recruited Saccostrea glomerata (Sydney rock oysters) continue to be important wild resources to the Gumbaynggirr community. Trace metals were measured in M. elongatus and S. glomerata samples collected by community participants in this study. Maximum levels prescribed in the Australia New Zealand Food Standards Code were not exceeded in the edible tissue for either species, however both species exceeded the generally expected levels for zinc and copper and S. glomerata samples exceeded the generally expected level for selenium. Furthermore the average dietary exposure to trace metals from consuming seafood was calculated for the surveyed population. Trace metal intake was then compared to the provisional tolerable weekly intake prescribed by the Joint Expert Committee on Food Additives. This process revealed that copper and selenium intake were both within the provisional tolerable weekly intake, while there is no guideline for zinc. Furthermore, participants relying heavily on wild resources from the Nambucca River estuary may exceed the provisional

  4. Is Monoglucosyldiacylglycerol a Precursor to Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol in All Cyanobacteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Naoki

    2015-10-01

    Monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) is ubiquitous in the photosynthetic membranes of cyanobacteria and chloroplasts. It is synthesized by galactosylation of diacylglycerol (DAG) in the chloroplasts, whereas it is produced by epimerization of monoglucosyldiacylglycerol (GlcDG) in at least several cyanobacteria that have been analyzed such as Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. A previous study, however, showed that the mgdE gene encoding the epimerase is absent in some cyanobacteria such as Gloeobacter violaceus, Thermosynechococcus elongatus and Acaryochloris marina. In addition, the N-terminal 'fatty acid hydroxylase' domain is lacking in the MgdE protein of Prochlorococcus marinus. These problems may cast doubt upon the general (or exclusive) role of MgdE in the epimerization of GlcDG to MGDG in cyanobacteria. In addition, GlcDG is usually present at a very low level, and the structural determination of endogenous GlcDG has not been accomplished with cyanobacterial samples. In this study, I determined the structure of GlcDG from Anabaena variabilis by (1)H- and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. I then showed that G. violaceus, T. elongatus, A. marina and P. marinus contain GlcDG. In all cases, GlcDG consisted of fewer unsaturated molecular species than MGDG, providing further evidence that GlcDG is a precursor to MGDG. The conversion of GlcDG to MGDG was also demonstrated by radiolabeling and chase experiments in G. violaceus and P. marinus. These results demonstrate that all the analyzed cyanobacteria contain GlcDG, which is converted to MGDG, and suggest that an alternative epimerase is required for MGDG synthesis in these cyanobacteria.

  5. Deletion of the Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 kaiAB1C1 gene cluster causes impaired cell growth under light-dark conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörrich, Anja K; Mitschke, Jan; Siadat, Olga; Wilde, Annegret

    2014-11-01

    In contrast to Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, few data exist on the timing mechanism of the widely used cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. The standard kaiAB1C1 operon present in this organism was shown to encode a functional KaiC protein that interacted with KaiA, similar to the S. elongatus PCC 7942 clock. Inactivation of this operon in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 resulted in a mutant with a strong growth defect when grown under light-dark cycles, which was even more pronounced when glucose was added to the growth medium. In addition, mutants showed a bleaching phenotype. No effects were detected in mutant cells grown under constant light. Microarray experiments performed with cells grown for 1 day under a light-dark cycle revealed many differentially regulated genes with known functions in the ΔkaiABC mutant in comparison with the WT. We identified the genes encoding the cyanobacterial phytochrome Cph1 and the light-repressed protein LrtA as well as several hypothetical ORFs with a complete inverse behaviour in the light cycle. These transcripts showed a stronger accumulation in the light but a weaker accumulation in the dark in ΔkaiABC cells in comparison with the WT. In general, we found a considerable overlap with microarray data obtained for hik31 and sigE mutants. These genes are known to be important regulators of cell metabolism in the dark. Strikingly, deletion of the ΔkaiABC operon led to a much stronger phenotype under light-dark cycles in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 than in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942. © 2014 The Authors.

  6. FLAVODIIRON2 and FLAVODIIRON4 proteins mediate an oxygen-dependent alternative electron flow in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 under CO2-limited conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimakawa, Ginga; Shaku, Keiichiro; Nishi, Akiko; Hayashi, Ryosuke; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Katsuhiko; Makino, Amane; Miyake, Chikahiro

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to elucidate the molecular mechanism of an alternative electron flow (AEF) functioning under suppressed (CO2-limited) photosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Photosynthetic linear electron flow, evaluated as the quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)], reaches a maximum shortly after the onset of actinic illumination. Thereafter, Y(II) transiently decreases concomitantly with a decrease in the photosynthetic oxygen evolution rate and then recovers to a rate that is close to the initial maximum. These results show that CO2 limitation suppresses photosynthesis and induces AEF. In contrast to the wild type, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in the genes encoding FLAVODIIRON2 (FLV2) and FLV4 proteins show no recovery of Y(II) after prolonged illumination. However, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 mutants deficient in genes encoding proteins functioning in photorespiration show AEF activity similar to the wild type. In contrast to Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 has no FLV proteins with high homology to FLV2 and FLV4 in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This lack of FLV2/4 may explain why AEF is not induced under CO2-limited photosynthesis in S. elongatus PCC 7942. As the glutathione S-transferase fusion protein overexpressed in Escherichia coli exhibits NADH-dependent oxygen reduction to water, we suggest that FLV2 and FLV4 mediate oxygen-dependent AEF in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 when electron acceptors such as CO2 are not available. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  7. Posttranslational regulation of nitrate assimilation in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Takatani, Nobuyuki; Tanigawa, Mari; Omata, Tatsuo

    2005-01-01

    Posttranslational regulation of nitrate assimilation was studied in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. The ABC-type nitrate and nitrite bispecific transporter encoded by the nrtABCD genes was completely inhibited by ammonium as in Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942. Nitrate reductase was insensitive to ammonium, while it is inhibited in the Synechococcus strain. Nitrite reductase was also insensitive to ammonium. The inhibition of nitrate and nitrite transport required the PII protein (glnB gene product) and the C-terminal domain of NrtC, one of the two ATP-binding subunits of the transporter, as in the Synechococcus strain. Mutants expressing the PII derivatives in which Ala or Glu is substituted for the conserved Ser49, which has been shown to be the phosphorylation site in the Synechococcus strain, showed ammonium-promoted inhibition of nitrate uptake like that of the wild-type strain. The S49A and S49E substitutions in GlnB did not affect the regulation of the nitrate and nitrite transporter in Synechococcus either. These results indicated that the presence or absence of negative electric charge at the 49th position does not affect the activity of the PII protein to regulate the cyanobacterial ABC-type nitrate and nitrite transporter according to the cellular nitrogen status. This finding suggested that the permanent inhibition of nitrate assimilation by an S49A derivative of PII, as was previously reported for Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942, is likely to have resulted from inhibition of nitrate reductase rather than the nitrate and nitrite transporter.

  8. Vertical distribution, diversity and assemblages of mesopelagic fishes in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivar, M. P.; Bernal, A.; Molí, B.; Peña, M.; Balbín, R.; Castellón, A.; Miquel, J.; Massutí, E.

    2012-04-01

    The mesopelagic fish community of the western Mediterranean was studied during two cruises carried out in December 2009 and July 2010 in the shelf and slope zones around the Balearic Islands. Much of what was previously known about this deep water group of fishes in the Mediterranean Sea came from studies performed using planktonic and small midwater nets. This study was the first attempt to use large pelagic trawls and small nets combined with information about the main sound scattering layers to analyse mesopelagic fish composition, diversity and species assemblages. This community is characterised by a relatively low diversity compared to other oceanic regions of the world, with Myctophiformes and Stomiiformes being the main contributors. Bathymetry and the level of the water column were the most important factors structuring the investigated fish assemblages, and similar vertical patterns were observed for the different species collected during the two study periods. A shelf assemblage composed of a few species of myctophids, with Notoscopelus elongatus being the main contributor, was distinguished. The slope assemblage included both Myctophiformes and Stomiiformes that showed differences in their day-night main location along the water column. In terms of species behaviour, two important groups were detected. The first was non-migrant or weakly migrant species, with the paradigmatic example being the gonostomatid Cyclothone braueri, which occurred at a depth of 400-600 m; this species is partly responsible for the permanent acoustic (38 kHz) response at this depth. The second group, near-surface migrants at night, was represented by most of the juvenile and adult myctophids, exemplified by Ceratoscopelus maderensis, with the exception of just a few of the largest size classes of some species, such as Lampanyctus crocodilus and N. elongatus that remain near the bottom.

  9. Science Review for the Scott Bar Salamander (Plethodon asupak) and the Siskiyou Mountains Salamander (P. stormi): Biology, Taxonomy, Habitat, and Detection Probabilities/Occupancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGross, Douglas J.; Bury, R. Bruce

    2007-01-01

    The Plethodon elongatus Complex in the Klamath-Siskiyou Ecoregion of southern Oregon and northern California includes three species: the Del Norte salamander, Plethodon elongatus; the Siskiyou Mountains salamander, P. stormi; and the Scott Bar salamander, P. asupak. This review aims to summarize the current literature and information available on select topics for P. stormi and P. asupak. These are both terrestrial salamanders belonging to the Family Plethodontidae, which contains more species and has a wider geographic distribution than any other family of salamanders (Wake 1966, 2006; Pough 1989). The genera of this family have greatly diversified ecologically across North America, Central America, northern South America, Sardinia, southeastern France and northwestern Italy, and have recently been discovered on the Korean peninsula (Min et al. 2005). The genus Plethodon is found exclusively in North America and is split into three distinct clades, based upon morphology and phylogenetics (Highton and Larson 1979): eastern small Plethodon, eastern large Plethodon, and the western Plethodon. The western Plethodon are the greatest representation of Plethodontidae in the Pacific Northwest, with 8 species. The two species with the most restricted ranges of these regional congeners are the Siskiyou Mountains and Scott Bar salamanders. These salamanders occupy the interior of the Klamath-Siskiyou Ecoregion which straddles the California and Oregon state lines, between Siskiyou County (CA) and Jackson and Josephine Counties (OR). The relatively recent discovery of P. asupak (Mead et al. 2005) and the limited range of both species have created an environment of uncertain conservation status for these species. This review will focus on four central topics of concern for land and resource managers: Biology; Taxonomy; Habitat; and Detection Probabilities/Occupancy.

  10. Diet and feeding strategies of mesopelagic fishes in the western Mediterranean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernal, Ainhoa; Olivar, M. Pilar; Maynou, Francesc; Fernández de Puelles, M. Luz

    2015-06-01

    Myctophids, gonostomatids and sternoptychids are the most abundant teleosteans worldwide and constitute an important assemblage of the mesopelagic ecosystem, functioning as vehicles of energy and matter through trophic webs. This study concentrates on the trophic ecology of the most abundant mesopelagic fishes of the western Mediterranean (WM) based on stomach content analysis. The myctophids (in this study: Benthosema glaciale, Ceratoscopelus maderensis, Lobianchia dofleini, Myctophum punctatum, Hygophum benoiti, Hygophum hygomii, Lampanyctus crocodilus, Lampanyctus pusillus and Notoscopelus elongatus) perform extensive diel migrations across the water column, between the surface to as deep as 1000 m, interacting with plankton and micronekton at multiple depths, and generally feeding in the epipelagic layers at night. In contrast, the gonostomatids Cyclothone braueri, Cyclothone pygmaea, and the sternoptychid Argyropelecus hemigymnus remain below epipelagic layers, feeding at different times throughout the day and night. The diet composition, trophic niche breadth and prey selectivity of 11 of these fish species were determined for juvenile and adult individuals from two surveys performed in December 2009 and July 2010 in the western Mediterranean Sea. The number of prey items varied among species, e.g. Myctophum punctatum was the species with the highest feeding intensity, reaching ca. 700 prey items in a stomach, whereas the mean number of prey in Cyclothone braueri was low (usually 1 or 2 prey per stomach). A dietary shift towards larger prey was evident from juveniles to the largest and oldest adult individuals, despite trophic niche breadths did not increase with body length for any of these mesopelagic species. The diets of the small gonostomatids, sternoptychid and early juveniles of myctophids were dominated by non-calanoid copepods, ostracods, and other small zooplankton, whereas medium-sized myctophids, e.g. L. dofleini or H. benoiti, preyed mainly on

  11. Estudio Palinológico de los 35 mts. Superiores de la Sección Tarragona, Sabana de Bogotá Estudio Palinológico de los 35 mts. Superiores de la Sección Tarragona, Sabana de Bogotá

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dueñas J. Hernando

    1979-12-01

    Full Text Available En el presente trabajo se da a conocer el resulrado del estudio palinológico de los 35 metros superiores de la sección Tarragona, localizada en la Sabana de Bogotá, a 2.560 metros sobre el nivel del mar. Se describen 2 géneros (Spirotremesporites, Striadyadosporites y 5 especies(Spirotremesporites simplex, Spirotremesporites multiplex, Spirotremesporites ecuatorialis, Striadyadosporites elongatus y Striadyadosporites constrictus de fungi fósil, 14 tipos de polen, 8 tipos de esporas triletes, 4 tipos de Pediastrum y un tipo especial de Chlorococcales. Con base en la relación de polen de elementos de páramo a polen de elementos de bosque (Pp/Pb y a la estrarigrafía, se dividió el diagrama depolen en 8 zonas climáticas (vegetación, con las cuales fue posible correlacionar la sección Tarragona con otras secciones levantadas en la Sabana de Bogotá y regiones aledañas. Utilizando esta correlación y las fechas de edad absoluta que se han obtenido en las diferentes secciones del área, fue posible efectuar una correlacion tentativa con las unidades cronoestratigráficas europeas.  Los 35 metros superiores de la sección Tarragona representan la historia geológica de por lo menos los últimos 500.000 años de la Sabana de Bogotá.In this study it is given the result of the palynological study of the uppermost 35 meters of the Tarragona section, located in the Sabana de Bogotá at an altitude of 2.560 meters above sea level.  It is described: 2 genus (Spirotremesporites, Striadyadosporites and 5 species (Spirotremesporites simplex, Spirotremesporites multiplex, Spirotremesporites ecuatorialis, Striadyadosporites elongatus and Striadyadosporites constrictus of fossil fungi, 14 types of pollen, 8 types of trilete spores, 4 types of Pediastrum and one special type of Chlorococcales.  On the basis of the relation, Pollen of paramo elements to Pollen of forest elements (Pp/Pb and the stratigraphy it was possible to divide the pollen diagram

  12. Seasonal dynamic of the occurrence of the gregarines infection of Harpalus rufipes (Coleoptera, Carabidae in agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Y. Reshetnyak

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Relationships in the “parasite-host” system are closely interrelated and occur at all levels from the molecular to behavioral and population ones. There are two models of realization of these relations. The first case is when the parasites are uniformly distributed in the host population. High extensiveness of invasion is accompanied by its low intensity. The second case is when a part of host population is infected with parasites, but the negative impact is manifested to the maximum extent. Invasion of the ground beetle Harpalus rufipes (De Geer, 1774, dwelling in sweet corn agroecosystems located in the vicinity of Dnipropetrovsk near Doslidnoe village, by several gregarines species is investigated in this study. H. rufipes is an abundant, ubiquitous species, living in extremely wide range of terrestrial ecosystems, with especially high populations inhabiting anthropogenically transformed environments. H. rufipes has a wide range of feeding. This species is distributed in the Central and Eastern Europe, and introduced to North America. Gregarines were found in the intestines of 20 individuals of H. rufipes from 190 (10.5%: Gregarina ovata Dufour, 1828, G. steini Berndt, 1902, G. amarae (Hammerschmidt, 1839 Frantzius, 1848, Clitellocephalus ophoni (Tuzet and Ormieres, 1956 Clopton, 2002, Torogregarina sphinx Clopton, 1998, Gigaductus macrospora Filipponi, 1948 and G. elongatus (Moriggi, 1943 Filipponi, 1948. There is high level of infestation of C. ophoni and G. steini. At the same time, not more than three species of the gregarines were localized in the beetle body. Seasonal dynamic of occurrence of the gregarines is as follows. Maximal indices of occurrence are found at the end of August (22.2% and minimal ones at the end of June (4.8%. The highest total number of gregarines (383 ind. is recorded at the end of August, the lowest one is fixed at the beginning of September (33 ind.. Indices of gregarine species dominance are as follows

  13. Perfil de ácidos grasos de diversas especies de pescados consumidos en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Isabel Castro González

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Los factores bióticos y abióticos determinan la composición de ácidos grasos AG en los peces, información relevante por la asociación existente entre su consumo y los beneficios para la salud humana. El objetivo de esta investigación fue identificar la variación en la concentración de AG, según diferentes factores, en diez especies marinas de pescado comestible en México: Euthynnus alletteratus, Sciaenops ocellatus, Bairdiella chrysoura, Sphyraena guachancho, Symphurus elongatus, Istiophorus platypterus, Ophichthus rex, Eugerres plumieri, Eucinostomus entomelas y Oreochromis mossambicus. La determinación de AG se llevó a cabo mediante cromatografía de gases. El contenido de lípidos totales varió entre 0.93 y 1.95g/100g en E. entomelas y O. mossambicus, respectivamente. E. alletteratus, B. chrysoura, S elongatus, I. platypterus, O. rex y E. plumieri presentaron el siguiente orden en la concentración de AG: AG poliinsaturados AGPAG saturados AGSAG monoinsaturados AGM. S. ocellatus, S. guachancho y E. entomelas: AGSAGPAGM; mientras que tan solo O. mossambicus presentó AGSAGMAGP. Este tuvo la mayor concentración de AGS 559.40mg/100g y AGM 422.60mg/100g, mientras que B. chrysoura presentó el mayor contenido mg/100g de AGP 663.03, AGn-3 514.03, EPA+DHA 506.10 y AGn-6 145.80. Factores bióticos y abióticos influyeron significativamente en la concentración de AG. Las especies subtropicales presentaron una concentración 42.1 mayor de EPA+DHA que las tropicales. Los valores presentados pueden cambiar según modificaciones en el ecosistema y en las características de cada especie, sin embargo, el conocimiento aquí generado es útil para mejorar las recomendaciones sobre el consumo de pescado.

  14. Biocomputational prediction of non-coding RNAs in model cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ude Susanne

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In bacteria, non-coding RNAs (ncRNA are crucial regulators of gene expression, controlling various stress responses, virulence, and motility. Previous work revealed a relatively high number of ncRNAs in some marine cyanobacteria. However, for efficient genetic and biochemical analysis it would be desirable to identify a set of ncRNA candidate genes in model cyanobacteria that are easy to manipulate and for which extended mutant, transcriptomic and proteomic data sets are available. Results Here we have used comparative genome analysis for the biocomputational prediction of ncRNA genes and other sequence/structure-conserved elements in intergenic regions of the three unicellular model cyanobacteria Synechocystis PCC6803, Synechococcus elongatus PCC6301 and Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP1 plus the toxic Microcystis aeruginosa NIES843. The unfiltered numbers of predicted elements in these strains is 383, 168, 168, and 809, respectively, combined into 443 sequence clusters, whereas the numbers of individual elements with high support are 94, 56, 64, and 406, respectively. Removing also transposon-associated repeats, finally 78, 53, 42 and 168 sequences, respectively, are left belonging to 109 different clusters in the data set. Experimental analysis of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 validated new ncRNAs originating from the fabF-hoxH and apcC-prmA intergenic spacers and three highly expressed ncRNAs belonging to the Yfr2 family of ncRNAs. Yfr2a promoter-luxAB fusions confirmed a very strong activity of this promoter and indicated a stimulation of expression if the cultures were exposed to elevated light intensities. Conclusion Comparison to entries in Rfam and experimental testing of selected ncRNA candidates in Synechocystis PCC6803 indicate a high reliability of the current prediction, despite some contamination by the high number of repetitive sequences in some of these species. In particular, we

  15. Structures of KaiC Circadian Clock Mutant Proteins: A New Phosphorylation Site at T426 and Mechanisms of Kinase, ATPase and Phosphatase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Mori, Tetsuya; Xu, Yao; Pattanayek, Sabuj; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; (Vanderbilt)

    2010-09-02

    The circadian clock of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus can be reconstituted in vitro by three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. Homo-hexameric KaiC displays kinase, phosphatase and ATPase activities; KaiA enhances KaiC phosphorylation and KaiB antagonizes KaiA. Phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of the two known sites in the C-terminal half of KaiC subunits, T432 and S431, follow a strict order (TS {yields} pTS {yields} pTpS {yields} TpS {yields} TS) over the daily cycle, the origin of which is not understood. To address this void and to analyze the roles of KaiC active site residues, in particular T426, we determined structures of single and double P-site mutants of S. elongatus KaiC. The conformations of the loop region harboring P-site residues T432 and S431 in the crystal structures of six KaiC mutant proteins exhibit subtle differences that result in various distances between Thr (or Ala/Asn/Glu) and Ser (or Ala/Asp) residues and the ATP {gamma}-phosphate. T432 is phosphorylated first because it lies consistently closer to P{gamma}. The structures of the S431A and T432E/S431A mutants reveal phosphorylation at T426. The environments of the latter residue in the structures and functional data for T426 mutants in vitro and in vivo imply a role in dephosphorylation. We provide evidence for a third phosphorylation site in KaiC at T426. T426 and S431 are closely spaced and a KaiC subunit cannot carry phosphates at both sites simultaneously. Fewer subunits are phosphorylated at T426 in the two KaiC mutants compared to phosphorylated T432 and/or S431 residues in the structures of wt and other mutant KaiCs, suggesting that T426 phosphorylation may be labile. The structures combined with functional data for a host of KaiC mutant proteins help rationalize why S431 trails T432 in the loss of its phosphate and shed light on the mechanisms of the KaiC kinase, ATPase and phosphatase activities.

  16. Engineering a cyanobacterium as the catalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of CO2 to 1,2-propanediol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Han

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modern society primarily relies on petroleum and natural gas for the production of fuels and chemicals. One of the major commodity chemicals 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO, which has an annual production of more than 0.5 million tons in the United States, is currently produced by chemical processes from petroleum derived propylene oxide, which is energy intensive and not sustainable. In this study, we sought to achieve photosynthetic production of 1,2-PDO from CO2 using a genetically engineered cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Compared to the previously reported biological 1,2-PDO production processes which used sugar or glycerol as the substrates, direct chemical production from CO2 in photosynthetic organisms recycles the atmospheric CO2 and will not compete with food crops for arable land. Results In this study, we reported photosynthetic production of 1,2-PDO from CO2 using a genetically engineered cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Introduction of the genes encoding methylglyoxal synthase (mgsA, glycerol dehydrogenase (gldA, and aldehyde reductase (yqhD resulted in the production of ~22mg/L 1,2-PDO from CO2. However, a comparable amount of the pathway intermediate acetol was also produced, especially during the stationary phase. The production of 1,2-PDO requires a robust input of reducing equivalents from cellular metabolism. To take advantage of cyanobacteria’s NADPH pool, the synthetic pathway of 1,2-PDO was engineered to be NADPH-dependent by exploiting the NADPH-specific secondary alcohol dehydrogenases which have not been reported for 1,2-PDO production previously. This optimization strategy resulted in the production of ~150mg/L 1,2-PDO and minimized the accumulation of the incomplete reduction product, acetol. Conclusion This work demonstrated that cyanobacteria can be engineered as a catalyst for the photosynthetic conversion of CO2 to 1,2-PDO. This work also characterized two NADPH

  17. Short-term cold storage of sperm from six neotropical characiformes fishes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Marques

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Sperm of the following Neotropical Characiformes fish species were tested for cold storage: Brycon lundii, Piaractus mesopotamicus, Leporinus elongatus, Leporinus friderici, Prochilodus lineatus and Prochilodus marggravii. Each sperm sample was split into two aliquots. The first was placed into a plastic bag with air or oxygen and the second, in a plastic tube with air. The samples were maintained at temperatures between 1.7-4.9 ºC. The rate of sperm motility was estimated using a 50 mM NaCl solution as the activating solution. The shortest sperm storage duration (7 h was recorded for L. friderici, when the sperm motility rate reached ~ 30%, whereas the longest duration (20 h was obtained with the sperm of P. lineatus. A fertilisation test using Prochilodus marggravii sperm refrigerated for 8 h yielded 88-90% of viable embryos. The refrigerated storage method could be of practical applications, especially in fish reproductive management at hatchery stations.O sêmen das seguintes espécies de Characiformes neotropicais foi testado para armazenamento em ambiente resfriado: Brycon lundii, Piaractus mesopotamicus, Leporinus elongatus, Leporinus friderici, Prochilodus lineatus e Prochilodus marggravii. Amostras de sêmen, obtidas por massagem da parede celômica, foram armazenadas em saco plástico com ar ou oxigênio ou em tubo plástico com ar, e mantidas resfriadas entre 1,7-4,9º C. A taxa de motilidade espermática foi estimada usando-se NaCl 50 mM como solução ativadora. O sêmen com menor duração de viabilidade (7 h foi o de L. friderici, quando a taxa de motilidade espermática alcançou ~30%, enquanto que o de maior duração (20 h foi o de P. lineatus. A fertilização de ovócitos utilizando sêmen refrigerado por 8 h de Prochilodus marggravii produziu 88-90% de embriões viáveis. O método de armazenamento desenvolvido neste trabalho tem aplicações práticas, especialmente no manejo reprodutivo de peixes em estações de

  18. Genetic variability of broodstocks of restocking programs in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Lopera-Barrero

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was evaluate the genetic diversity of the following broodstocks: piapara (Leporinus elongatus, dourado (Salminus brasiliensis, jundiá (Rhamdia quelen and cachara (Pseudoplatystoma fasciatum already useful for restocking programs in the Paranapanema, Iguaçu and Paraná Brazilian Rivers. Materials and methods. Samples from the caudal fin of 122 fish were analyzed. DNA was extracted by NaCl protocol. PCR products were separated by a horizontal agarose gel electrophoresis. The fragments were visualized by staining with ethidium bromide. Results. The amplification of 25 primers generated different fragments in studied species that allowed characterizing 440 fragments of 100-2900 bp. High percentage of polymorphic fragments (66.67 to 86.29, Shannon index (0.365 to 0.486 and genetic diversity of Nei (0.248 to 0.331 were detected. Conclusions. The level of genetic variability in the broodstocks was adequate for allowing their use in restocking programs in the studied Rivers. However, periodical monitoring studies of genetic variability in these stocks, the mating system, reproductive system and general management must be made to guarantee the preservation of wild populations.

  19. A barrier to upstream migration in the fish passage of Itaipu Dam (Canal da Piracema), Paraná River basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,; Fontes Júnior, Hélio Martins; Makrakis, Sergio; Gomes, Luiz Carlos; Latini, João Dirço

    2012-01-01

    The majority of the fish passages built in the Neotropical region are characterised by low efficiency and high selectivity; in many cases, the benefits to fish populations are uncertain. Studies conducted in the Canal da Piracema at Itaipu dam on the Parana River indicate that the system component designated as the Discharge channel in the Bela Vista River (herein named Canal de deságue no rio Bela Vista or CABV), a 200 m long technical section, was the main barrier to the upstream migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of restriction imposed by the CABV on upstream movements of Prochilodus lineatus and Leporinus elongatus, Characiformes. Fish were tagged with passive integrated transponders (PIT tags) and released both downstream and upstream of this critical section. Individuals of both species released downstream of the CABV took much more time to reach the upper end of the system (43.6 days vs. 15.9 days), and passed in much lower proportions (18% vs. 60.8%) than those tagged upstream of this component. Although more work is needed to differentiate between fishway effects and natural variation in migratory motivation, the results clearly demonstrate passage problems at the CABV.

  20. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Betancor, K.; Ritz, C.; Fernández-Piñas, F.; Leganés, F.; Rodea-Palomares, I.

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful contribution for the whole cell biosensors discipline and related areas allowing to perform appropriate assessment of mixture effects in non-monotonic dose-response frameworks PMID:26606975

  1. A Photo-Labile Thioether Linkage to Phycoviolobilin Provides the Foundation for the Blue/Green Photocycles in DXCF-Cyanobacteriochromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgie, E. Sethe [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Walker, Joseph M. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Phillips Jr., George N. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Vierstra, Richard D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2013-01-08

    The phytochrome superfamily encompasses a diverse collection of photochromic photoreceptors in plants and microorganisms that employ a covalently linked bilin cradled in a cGMP-phosphodiesterase/adenylyl-cyclase/FhlA (GAF) domain to detect light. Whereas most interconvert between red- and far-red-light-absorbing states, cyanobacteria also express variants called cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) that modify bilin absorption to collectively perceive the entire visible spectrum. Here, we present two X-ray crystallographic structures of the GAF domain from the blue/green photochromic CBCR PixJ from Thermosynechococcus elongatus. Moreover, these structures confirm the hypothesis that CBCRs variably manipulate the chromophore π-conjugation system through isomerization and a second thioether linkage, in this case involving the bilin C10 carbon and Cys494 within a DXCF sequence characteristic of blue/green CBCRs. Biochemical studies support a mechanism for photoconversion whereby the second linkage ruptures on route to the green-light-absorbing state. All together, theTePixJ(GAF) models illustrate the remarkable structural and photochemical versatility among phytochromes and CBCRs in driving light perception.

  2. Gastrointestinal Helminth Parasites Community of Fish Species in a Niger Delta Tidal Creek, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Ekata Ogbeibu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A pool of fish species in a Niger Delta tidal creek, Buguma Creek, Nigeria, collected monthly from November 2004 to June 2006, at flood tides, were examined for gastrointestinal helminth parasites. The fish species were caught with hooks and lines and cast nets. Only nematode parasites were encountered in the study. Of the 1,149 fish specimens examined, 213 (representing 18.5% were infected with various nematodes parasites. Dasyatis margarita had the highest prevalence rate of 66.7% (2 infected out of 3 examined, followed by Pseudotolithus (Pseudotolithus senegalensis with a prevalence of 41.7% (10 infected out of 24, while the least infected were Arius gigas and Pomadasys jubelini with prevalence of 3.8% and 1.4%, respectively. No infection was recorded in Elops lacerta, Gobius sp., Lutjanus agennes, L. goreensis, Argyrosomus regius, Sphyraena guachancho, S. sphyraena, Cynoglossus senegalensis, Sarotherodon melanotheron, Tilapia guineensis, Liza falcipinnis, Mugil cephalus, and M. curema. The nematode parasites, Capillaria zederi, and Aplectana hamatospicula had the highest prevalence of 33.3% in D. margarita. Laurotravassoxyuris sp. also had the same prevalence in Trichiurus lepturus. Goezia sigalasi had the second highest prevalence of 12.5% in P. (Fonticulus elongatus which had the highest number examined, due to its high dominance in the water.

  3. Evanescent cultivation of photosynthetic bacteria on thin waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierobon, S. C.; Ooms, M. D.; Sinton, D.

    2014-04-01

    Waveguides with thicknesses similar to biofilms (10-100 µm) provide an opportunity to improve the bioenergy density of biofilm photobioreactors, avoiding the fundamental light- and mass-transport productivity limitations of planktonic photobioreactors. This report investigates the biofilm growth of a mutant of Synechococcus elongatus (PCC 7942) in evanescent light fields that can be scaled over large planar areas. In this study, areas of 7.2 cm2 are illuminated via frustrated total internal reflections on planar waveguides. The resulting photosynthetic biofilm growth showed resilience to surface intensities exceeding photosynthetic limits and a more uniform cell density distribution (1.0 ± 0.3 × 109 mL-1) than predicted from surface light distribution profiles. These results indicate potential for larger area biofilms using the uniform lighting conditions identified. The combination of evanescent illumination with biofilms indicates a modular reactor cell density on the order of 108 mL-1, representing a two orders of magnitude improvement over current facility architectures, with significant potential for further improvement through denser biofilms.

  4. One-pot synthesis of glutathione by a two-enzyme cascade using a thermophilic ATP regeneration system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xing; Wu, Hui; Huang, Bing; Li, Zhimin; Ye, Qin

    2017-01-10

    In vitro cascade catalysis using enzyme-based system is becoming a promising biomanufacturing platform for biofuels and biochemicals production. Glutathione is a pivotal non-protein thiol compound and widely applied in food and pharmaceutical industries. In this study, glutathione was synthesized by a bifunctional glutathione synthetase together with a thermophilic ATP regeneration system through a two-enzyme cascade in vitro. Four bifunctional glutathione synthetases from Streptococcus sanguinis, S. gordonii, S. uberis and Bacillus cereus were applied for glutathione synthesis. The bifunctional glutathione synthetase from S. sanguinis was selected and coupled with the polyphosphate kinase from Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 for regenerating ATP to produce glutathione in one pot. In the optimized system, 28.5mM glutathione was produced within 5h due to efficient ATP regeneration from low-cost polyphosphate. The yield based on added l-cysteine reached 81.4% and the productivity of glutathione achieved 5.7mM/h. The one-pot system indicated a potential biotransformation platform for industrial production of glutathione. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancing the light-driven production of D-lactate by engineering cyanobacterium using a combinational strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Tao, Fei; Ni, Jun; Wang, Yu; Yao, Feng; Xu, Ping

    2015-05-01

    It is increasingly attractive to engineer cyanobacteria for bulk production of chemicals from CO2. However, cofactor bias of cyanobacteria is different from bacteria that prefer NADH, which hampers cyanobacterial strain engineering. In this study, the key enzyme D-lactate dehydrogenase (LdhD) from Lactobacillus bulgaricus ATCC11842 was engineered to reverse its favored cofactor from NADH to NADPH. Then, the engineered enzyme was introduced into Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 to construct an efficient light-driven system that produces D-lactic acid from CO2. Mutation of LdhD drove a fundamental shift in cofactor preference towards NADPH, and increased D-lactate productivity by over 3.6-fold. We further demonstrated that introduction of a lactic acid transporter and bubbling CO2-enriched air also enhanced D-lactate productivity. Using this combinational strategy, increased D-lactate concentration and productivity were achieved. The present strategy may also be used to engineer cyanobacteria for producing other useful chemicals.

  6. Structural and Dynamic Basis for Low-Affinity, High-Selectivity Binding of L-Glutamine by the Glutamine Riboswitch

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiming Ren

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Naturally occurring L-glutamine riboswitches occur in cyanobacteria and marine metagenomes, where they reside upstream of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. By combining X-ray, NMR, and MD, we characterized an L-glutamine-dependent conformational transition in the Synechococcus elongatus glutamine riboswitch from tuning fork to L-shaped alignment of stem segments. This transition generates an open ligand-binding pocket with L-glutamine selectivity enforced by Mg2+-mediated intermolecular interactions. The transition also stabilizes the P1 helix through a long-range “linchpin” Watson-Crick G-C pair-capping interaction, while melting a short helix below P1 potentially capable of modulating downstream readout. NMR data establish that the ligand-free glutamine riboswitch in Mg2+ solution exists in a slow equilibrium between flexible tuning fork and a minor conformation, similar, but not identical, to the L-shaped bound conformation. We propose that an open ligand-binding pocket combined with a high conformational penalty for forming the ligand-bound state provide mechanisms for reducing binding affinity while retaining high selectivity.

  7. Engineering acyl carrier protein to enhance production of shortened fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueliang; Hicks, Wade M; Silver, Pamela A; Way, Jeffrey C

    2016-01-01

    The acyl carrier protein (ACP) is an essential and ubiquitous component of microbial synthesis of fatty acids, the natural precursor to biofuels. Natural fatty acids usually contain long chains of 16 or more carbon atoms. Shorter carbon chains, with increased fuel volatility, are desired for internal combustion engines. Engineering the length specificity of key proteins in fatty acid metabolism, such as ACP, may enable microbial synthesis of these shorter chain fatty acids. We constructed a homology model of the Synechococcus elongatus ACP, showing a hydrophobic pocket harboring the growing acyl chain. Amino acids within the pocket were mutated to increase steric hindrance to the acyl chain. Certain mutant ACPs, when over-expressed in Escherichia coli, increased the proportion of shorter chain lipids; I75 W and I75Y showed the strongest effects. Expression of I75 W and I75Y mutant ACPs also increased production of lauric acid in E. coli that expressed the C12-specific acyl-ACP thioesterase from Cuphea palustris. We engineered the specificity of the ACP, an essential protein of fatty acid metabolism, to alter the E. coli lipid pool and enhance production of medium-chain fatty acids as biofuel precursors. These results indicate that modification of ACP itself could be combined with enzymes affecting length specificity in fatty acid synthesis to enhance production of commodity chemicals based on fatty acids.

  8. Fluorescent minerals--A potential source of UV protection and visible light for the growth of green algae and cyanobacteria in extreme cosmic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omairi, Tareq; Wainwright, Milton

    2015-07-01

    We propose that green algae (Chlorella variabilis and Dunaliella tertiolecta) and cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus and Nostoc commune) can grow inside fluorescent rock minerals which convert damaging UV light to visible light, thereby allowing these organisms to survive and thrive in UV-rich environments without (or with limited) visible light, which would otherwise be inimical to them. The four microorganisms were incubated inside fluorescent rocks composed of fluorite, calcite and pyrite. The resultant growth was then measured following exposure to UV radiation, with the use of optical density and measurement of chlorophyll concentration. Results show that the microorganisms were shielded from harmful UV in these semi-transparent rocks, while at the same time benefiting from the fact that the minerals converted UV to visible light; this have been shown by a statistically significant increase in their growth, which although lower than when the cells were incubated in sunlight, was significantly higher than in controls incubated in the dark. Copyright © 2015 The Committee on Space Research (COSPAR). Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Silica ecosystem for synergistic biotransformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Baris R.; Sakkos, Jonathan K.; Yeom, Sujin; Wackett, Lawrence P.; Aksan, Alptekin

    2016-06-01

    Synergistical bacterial species can perform more varied and complex transformations of chemical substances than either species alone, but this is rarely used commercially because of technical difficulties in maintaining mixed cultures. Typical problems with mixed cultures on scale are unrestrained growth of one bacterium, which leads to suboptimal population ratios, and lack of control over bacterial spatial distribution, which leads to inefficient substrate transport. To address these issues, we designed and produced a synthetic ecosystem by co-encapsulation in a silica gel matrix, which enabled precise control of the microbial populations and their microenvironment. As a case study, two greatly different microorganisms: Pseudomonas sp. NCIB 9816 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 were encapsulated. NCIB 9816 can aerobically biotransform over 100 aromatic hydrocarbons, a feat useful for synthesis of higher value commodity chemicals or environmental remediation. In our system, NCIB 9816 was used for biotransformation of naphthalene (a model substrate) into CO2 and the cyanobacterium PCC 7942 was used to provide the necessary oxygen for the biotransformation reactions via photosynthesis. A mathematical model was constructed to determine the critical cell density parameter to maximize oxygen production, and was then used to maximize the biotransformation rate of the system.

  10. Improving alkane synthesis in Escherichia coli via metabolic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xuejiao; Yu, Haiying; Zhu, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Concerns about energy security and global petroleum supply have made the production of renewable biofuels an industrial imperative. The ideal biofuels are n-alkanes in that they are chemically and structurally identical to the fossil fuels and can "drop in" to the transportation infrastructure. In this work, an Escherichia coli strain that produces n-alkanes was constructed by heterologous expression of acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase (AAR) and aldehyde deformylating oxygenase (ADO) from Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942. The accumulation of alkanes ranged from 3.1 to 24.0 mg/L using different expressing strategies. Deletion of yqhD, an inherent aldehyde reductase in E. coli, or overexpression of fadR, an activator for fatty acid biosynthesis, exhibited a nearly twofold increase in alkane titers, respectively. Combining yqhD deletion and fadR overexpression resulted in a production titer of 255.6 mg/L in E. coli, and heptadecene was the most abundant product.

  11. Alkane production by the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c possessing the α-olefin biosynthesis pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Tomoko; Liang, Yue; Arai, Daichi; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Honda, Toru; Muto, Masaki; Kakunaka, Natsumi; Tanaka, Tsuyoshi

    2015-02-01

    The production of alkanes in a marine cyanobacterium possessing the α-olefin biosynthesis pathway was achieved by introducing an exogenous alkane biosynthesis pathway. Cyanobacterial hydrocarbons are synthesized via two separate pathways: the acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) reductase/aldehyde-deformylating oxygenase (AAR/ADO) pathway for the alkane biosynthesis and the α-olefin synthase (OLS) pathway for the α-olefin biosynthesis. Coexistence of these pathways has not yet been reported. In this study, the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c was shown to produce α-olefins similar to those of Synechococcus sp. PCC7002 via the α-olefin biosynthesis pathway. The production of heptadecane in Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c was achieved by expressing the AAR/ADO pathway genes from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. The production yields of heptadecane in Synechococcus sp. NKBG15041c varied with the expression level of the aar and ado genes. The maximal yield of heptadecane was 4.2 ± 1.2 μg/g of dried cell weight in the transformant carrying a homologous promoter. Our results also suggested that the effective activation of ADO may be more important for the enhancement of alkane production by cyanobacteria.

  12. All-atom molecular dynamics simulation of a photosystem I/detergent complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, Bradley J. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Cheng, Xiaolin [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Frymier, Paul [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2014-09-18

    All-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to investigate the solution structure and dynamics of the photosynthetic pigment protein complex photosystem I (PSI) from Thermosynechococcus elongatus embedded in a toroidal belt of n-dodecyl-β-d-maltoside (DDM) detergent. Evaluation of root-mean-square deviations (RMSDs) relative to the known crystal structure show that the protein complex surrounded by DDM molecules is stable during the 200 ns simulation time, and root-mean-square fluctuation (RMSF) analysis indicates that regions of high local mobility correspond to solvent-exposed regions such as turns in the transmembrane α-helices and flexible loops on the stromal and lumenal faces. Comparing the protein detergent complex to a pure detergent micelle, the detergent surrounding the PSI trimer is found to be less densely packed but with more ordered detergent tails, contrary to what is seen in most lipid bilayer models. We also investigated any functional implications for the observed conformational dynamics and protein detergent interactions, discovering interesting structural changes in the psaL subunits associated with maintaining the trimeric structure of the protein. Moreover, we find that the docking of soluble electron mediators such as cytochrome c6 and ferredoxin to PSI is not significantly impacted by the solubilization of PSI in detergent.

  13. Sucrose secreted by the engineered cyanobacterium and its fermentability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yangkai; Luo, Quan; Liang, Feiyan; Lu, Xuefeng

    2016-10-01

    The unicellular cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (Syn7942), synthesizes sucrose as the only compatible solute under salt stress. A series of engineered Syn7942 strains for sucrose production were constructed. The overexpression of the native sps (encoding a natively fused protein of sucrose phosphate synthase SPS and sucrose phosphate phosphatase SPP) in Syn7942 wild type caused a 93% improvement of sucrose productivity. The strain FL130 co-overexpressing sps and cscB (encoding a sucrose transporter) exhibited a 74% higher extracellular sucrose production than that overexpressing cscB only. Both results showed the significant improvement of sucrose productivity by the double functional protein SPS-SPP. Afterwards, FL130 was cultivated under a modified condition, and the cell-free culture medium containing 1.5 g L-1 sucrose was pre-treated with an acid hydrolysis technique. Cultivated with the neutralized hydrolysates as the starting media, two widely used microorganisms, Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, showed a comparable growth with that in the control media supplemented with glucose. These results clearly demonstrated that the cell-free culture of sucrose-secreting cyanobacteria can be applied as starting media in microbial cultivation.

  14. Physiological tolerance and stoichiometric potential of cyanobacteria for hydrocarbon fuel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämäräinen, Jari; Knoop, Henning; Stanford, Natalie J; Guerrero, Fernando; Akhtar, M Kalim; Aro, Eva-Mari; Steuer, Ralf; Jones, Patrik R

    2012-11-30

    Cyanobacteria are capable of directly converting sunlight, carbon dioxide and water into hydrocarbon fuel or precursors thereof. Many biological and non-biological factors will influence the ability of such a production system to become economically sustainable. We evaluated two factors in engineerable cyanobacteria which could potentially limit economic sustainability: (i) tolerance of the host to the intended end-product, and (ii) stoichiometric potential for production. Alcohols, when externally added, inhibited growth the most, followed by aldehydes and acids, whilst alkanes were the least inhibitory. The growth inhibition became progressively greater with increasing chain-length for alcohols, whilst the intermediate C6 alkane caused more inhibition than both C3 and C11 alkane. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 was more tolerant to some of the tested chemicals than Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, particularly ethanol and undecane. Stoichiometric evaluation of the potential yields suggested that there is no difference in the potential productivity of harvestable energy between any of the studied fuels, with the exception of ethylene, for which maximal stoichiometric yield is considerably lower. In summary, it was concluded that alkanes would constitute the best choice metabolic end-product for fuel production using cyanobacteria if high-yielding strains can be developed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Robust circadian clocks from coupled protein-modification and transcription–translation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Lubensky, David K.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus uses both a protein phosphorylation cycle and a transcription–translation cycle to generate circadian rhythms that are highly robust against biochemical noise. We use stochastic simulations to analyze how these cycles interact to generate stable rhythms in growing, dividing cells. We find that a protein phosphorylation cycle by itself is robust when protein turnover is low. For high decay or dilution rates (and compensating synthesis rates), however, the phosphorylation-based oscillator loses its integrity. Circadian rhythms thus cannot be generated with a phosphorylation cycle alone when the growth rate, and consequently the rate of protein dilution, is high enough; in practice, a purely posttranslational clock ceases to function well when the cell doubling time drops below the 24-h clock period. At higher growth rates, a transcription–translation cycle becomes essential for generating robust circadian rhythms. Interestingly, although a transcription–translation cycle is necessary to sustain a phosphorylation cycle at high growth rates, a phosphorylation cycle can dramatically enhance the robustness of a transcription–translation cycle at lower protein decay or dilution rates. In fact, the full oscillator built from these two tightly intertwined cycles far outperforms not just each of its two components individually, but also a hypothetical system in which the two parts are coupled as in textbook models of coupled phase oscillators. Our analysis thus predicts that both cycles are required to generate robust circadian rhythms over the full range of growth conditions. PMID:21149676

  16. High-throughput and quantitative approaches for measuring circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria using bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Paddock, Mark L; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J; Golden, Susan S

    2015-01-01

    The temporal measurement of a bioluminescent reporter has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for characterizing circadian rhythms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Primarily, two approaches have been used to automate this process: (1) detection of cell culture bioluminescence in 96-well plates by a photomultiplier tube-based plate-cycling luminometer (TopCount Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter, Perkin Elmer) and (2) detection of individual colony bioluminescence by iteratively rotating a Petri dish under a cooled CCD camera using a computer-controlled turntable. Each approach has distinct advantages. The TopCount provides a more quantitative measurement of bioluminescence, enabling the direct comparison of clock output levels among strains. The computer-controlled turntable approach has a shorter set-up time and greater throughput, making it a more powerful phenotypic screening tool. While the latter approach is extremely useful, only a few labs have been able to build such an apparatus because of technical hurdles involved in coordinating and controlling both the camera and the turntable, and in processing the resulting images. This protocol provides instructions on how to construct, use, and process data from a computer-controlled turntable to measure the temporal changes in bioluminescence of individual cyanobacterial colonies. Furthermore, we describe how to prepare samples for use with the TopCount to minimize experimental noise and generate meaningful quantitative measurements of clock output levels for advanced analysis.

  17. Light-driven hydrogen production by a hybrid complex of a [NiFe]-hydrogenase and the cyanobacterial photosystem I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihara, Masaki; Nishihara, Hirofumi; Yoon, Ki-Seok; Lenz, Oliver; Friedrich, Bärbel; Nakamoto, Hitoshi; Kojima, Kouji; Honma, Daisuke; Kamachi, Toshiaki; Okura, Ichiro

    2006-01-01

    In order to generate renewable and clean fuels, increasing efforts are focused on the exploitation of photosynthetic microorganisms for the production of molecular hydrogen from water and light. In this study we engineered a 'hard-wired' protein complex consisting of a hydrogenase and photosystem I (hydrogenase-PSI complex) as a direct light-to-hydrogen conversion system. The key component was an artificial fusion protein composed of the membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase from the beta-proteobacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16 and the peripheral PSI subunit PsaE of the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The resulting hydrogenase-PsaE fusion protein associated with PsaE-free PSI spontaneously, thereby forming a hydrogenase-PSI complex as confirmed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifuge and immunoblot analysis. The hydrogenase-PSI complex displayed light-driven hydrogen production at a rate of 0.58 mumol H(2).mg chlorophyll(-1).h(-1). The complex maintained its accessibility to the native electron acceptor ferredoxin. This study provides the first example of a light-driven enzymatic reaction by an artificial complex between a redox enzyme and photosystem I and represents an important step on the way to design a photosynthetic organism that efficiently converts solar energy and water into hydrogen.

  18. Factors Influencing Fish Composition in an Australian Intermittently Open Estuary. Is Stability Salinity-Dependent?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, S. P.

    2001-06-01

    The ichthyofauna of the intermittently open Shellharbour Lagoon in southeastern Australia was sampled over 14 months to investigate factors influencing species composition. Zostera capricorni and bare sand habitats were sampled every two months with a fine-mesh seine. Of the 10 277 fish caught representing 19 families and 27 species, the most numerically dominant species were Pseudogobius olorum and Pseudomugil signifer. The most abundant economically important species were Acanthopagrus australis, Mugil cephalus and Myxus elongatus. Mean number of fish and species was significantly higher over Zostera than bare sand during months immediately after the estuary opened when juvenile marine fishes recruited, demonstrating the estuary's nursery function. In contrast to other intermittently open estuaries in Australia and South Africa, Shellharbour Lagoon's fish assemblage appears resilient to perturbation and does not undergo distinct seasonal variations. This may be a result of the estuary's short open phases providing less opportunity for marine fishes to enter. Perhaps more importantly, the less dramatic fluctuations in salinity between open and closed phases maintains salinity at a level intermediate of the tolerances of both marine and estuarine fishes.

  19. Condition factor variations over time and trophic position among four species of Characidae from Amazonian floodplain lakes: effects of an anomalous drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribuzy-Neto, I A; Conceição, K G; Siqueira-Souza, F K; Hurd, L E; Freitas, C E C

    2017-08-17

    The effects of extreme droughts on freshwater fish remain unknown worldwide. In this paper, we estimated the condition factor, a measure of relative fitness based on the relationship of body weight to length, in four fish species representing two trophic levels (omnivores and piscivores) from Amazonian floodplain lakes for three consecutive years: 2004, 2005 (an anomalous drought year), and 2006. The two omnivores, Colossoma macropomum and Mylossoma duriventre, exhibited trends consistent with their life cycles in 2004 and 2006: high values during the hydrologic seasons of high water, receding water, and low water, with a drop following reproduction following the onset of rising water. However during the drought year of 2005 the condition factor was much lower than normal during receding and low water seasons, probably as a result of an abnormal reduction in resource availability in a reduced habitat. The two piscivorous piranhas, Serrasalmus spilopleura and S. elongatus, maintained relatively stable values of condition factor over the hydrologic cycles of all three years, with no apparent effect of the drought, probably because the reduction in habitat is counterbalanced by the resulting increase in relative prey density. We suggest that if predictions of increasing drought in the Amazon are correct, predatory species may benefit, at least in the short run, while omnivores may be negatively affected.

  20. A comparative cytogenetic study of five piranha species (Serrasalmus, Serrasalminae) from the Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Celeste Mutuko; Porto, Jorge Ivan Rebelo; Feldberg, Eliana

    2002-04-01

    Cytogenetic studies were conducted on five piranha species belonging to the genus Serrasalmus, subfamily Serrasalminae (Serrasalmus altispinis, S. compressus, S. elongatus, S. manuelli, and S. spilopleura). All the species were collected in the Amazon basin: confluence of Negro and Solimões Rivers (CatalãoLake), Solimões River (Marchantaria Island - Camaleão Lake), Uatumã River (Hydroelectric Power Station of Balbina), and Pitinga River (Hydroelectric Power Station of Pitinga). All the five species possess 2n = 60 chromosomes with 5-12 subtelo-and acrocentric chromosomes bearing nucleolar organizer regions. A proximal C-band positive heterochromatin block was evident on the long arms of a medium-sized metacentric chromosome pair in all the analized species, thus making it a cytogenetic marker for the genus. It is hypothesized that 2n = 60 chromosomes represents a derived feature in terms of the chromosomal evolution of piranhas because the basal lineages possess 2n = 62. Both Robertsonian centric fusion and non-Robertsonian rearragements such as pericentric inversions seem implicated in the chromosomal evolution of this group.

  1. Cyanobacterial defense mechanisms against foreign DNA transfer and their impact on genetic engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucken, Karina; Koch, Robin; Dagan, Tal

    2013-01-01

    Cyanobacteria display a large diversity of cellular forms ranging from unicellular to complex multicellular filaments or aggregates. Species in the group present a wide range of metabolic characteristics including the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen, resistance to extreme environments, production of hydrogen, secondary metabolites and exopolysaccharides. These characteristics led to the growing interest in cyanobacteria across the fields of ecology, evolution, cell biology and biotechnology. The number of available cyanobacterial genome sequences has increased considerably in recent years, with more than 140 fully sequenced genomes to date. Genetic engineering of cyanobacteria is widely applied to the model unicellular strains Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. However the establishment of transformation protocols in many other cyanobacterial strains is challenging. One obstacle to the development of these novel model organisms is that many species have doubling times of 48 h or more, much longer than the bacterial models E. coli or B. subtilis. Furthermore, cyanobacterial defense mechanisms against foreign DNA pose a physical and biochemical barrier to DNA insertion in most strains. Here we review the various barriers to DNA uptake in the context of lateral gene transfer among microbes and the various mechanisms for DNA acquisition within the prokaryotic domain. Understanding the cyanobacterial defense mechanisms is expected to assist in the development and establishment of novel transformation protocols that are specifically suitable for this group.

  2. Allometric shape change of the lower pharyngeal jaw correlates with a dietary shift to piscivory in a cichlid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellig, Christoph J.; Kerschbaumer, Michaela; Sefc, Kristina M.; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2010-07-01

    The morphological versatility of the pharyngeal jaw of cichlid fishes is assumed to represent a key factor facilitating their unparalleled trophic diversification and explosive radiation. It is generally believed that the functional design of an organism relates to its ecology, and thus, specializations to different diets are typically associated with distinct morphological designs, especially manifested in the cichlids’ pharyngeal jaw apparatus. Thereby, the lower pharyngeal jaw (LPJ) incorporates some of the most predictive features for distinct diet-related morphotypes. Thus, considering that piscivorous cichlids experience an ontogenetic dietary shift from typically various kinds of invertebrates to fish, concomitant morphological changes in the LPJ are expected. Using Lepidiolamprologus elongatus, a top predator in the shallow rocky habitat of Lake Tanganyika, as model, and applying geometric and traditional morphometric techniques, we demonstrate an allometric change in ontogenetic LPJ shape development coinciding with the completion of the dietary shift toward piscivory. The piscivorous LPJ morphotype is initiated in juvenile fish by increasing elongation and narrowing of the LPJ and—when the fish reach a size of 80-90 mm standard length—further refined by the elongation of the posterior muscular processes, which serve as insertion for the fourth musculus levator externus. The enlarged muscular processes of the fully mature piscivorous morphotype provide for the construction of a powerful lever system, which allows the large individuals to process large prey fish and rely on exclusive piscivory.

  3. Revisão da subfamília Atactorhynchinae Petrotschenko, 1956 (Acanthocephala - Neoechinorhynchidae A review of Atactorhynchinae Petrotschenko, 1956 (Acanthocephala, Neoechinorhynchidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dely Noronha

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available No presente trabalho é feita a revisão da subfamília Atactorhynchinae Petrostschenko, 1956. Para o gênero Floridosentis Ward, 1953, o estudo é baseado em exemplares do material tipo, além de outros encontrados parasitnando três peixes do gênero Mugil (Parati, provenientes de Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro. Quanto ao gênero Atactorhynchus Chandler, 1935, o nosso estudo foi baseado na descrição original de Chandler e do trabalho de Golvan sobre a classe dos Eoacanthocephala (Van Cleave, 1936.In this paper, the authors revise the sub-family Atactorhynchinae Petrotschenko, 1956, after studying types of Floridosentis mugilis (Machado Filho, 1951 and material recovered from intestine of Mugil sp. from Cabo Frio, Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil. They confirm what was suggested by Bullock, 1962, about a new combination for the type species of Floridosentis Ward, 1953. For this reason, they make F. elongatus, synonym of F. mugilis Machado Filho, 1951. Besides they also enlarge the subfamily diagnosis and add a table showing the maind differences between the two genera under Atactorhynchinae Petrotschenko, 1956.

  4. Inorganic Fe2+ formation upon Fe-S protein thermodestruction in the membranes of thermophilic cyanobacteria: Mössbauer spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurov YuN; Novakova, A A; Davletshina, L N; Aleksandrov AYu; Khval'kovskaya, E A; Semin, B K; Belevich, N P; Ivanov, I I; Rubin, A B

    1999-04-30

    A model description of the Mössbauer spectrum (80 K) of native membranes of the thermophilic cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is suggested on the basis of the known values of quadrupole splitting (deltaE(Q)) and isomer shift (deltaFe) for the iron-containing components of the photosynthetic apparatus. Using this approach, we found that heating the membranes at 70-80 K results in a decrease of doublet amplitudes belonging to F(X), F(A), F(B) and ferredoxin and simultaneous formation of a new doublet with deltaE(Q) = 3.10 mm/s and delta-Fe = 1.28 mm/s, typical of inorganic hydrated forms of Fe2+. The inhibition of electron transfer via photosystem I to oxygen, catalyzed by ferredoxin, occurs within the same range of temperatures. The data demonstrate that the processes of thermoinduced Fe2+ formation and distortions in the photosystem I electron transport in the membranes are interrelated and caused mainly by the degradation of ferredoxin. The possible role of Fe2+ formation in the damage of the photosynthetic apparatus resulting from heating and the action of other extreme factors is discussed.

  5. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Betancor, K; Ritz, Christian; Fernández-Piñas, F

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differe......A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts...... illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition......, the approach also allowed identification and quantification of departures from additivity (interactions) among analytes. The biosensor was found to respond in a near additive way to heavy metal mixtures except when Hg, Co and Ag were present, in which case strong interactions occurred. The method is a useful...

  6. Defining an additivity framework for mixture research in inducible whole-cell biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Betancor, K; Ritz, Christian; Fernández-Piñas, F;

    2015-01-01

    A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts for differe......A novel additivity framework for mixture effect modelling in the context of whole cell inducible biosensors has been mathematically developed and implemented in R. The proposed method is a multivariate extension of the effective dose (EDp) concept. Specifically, the extension accounts...... for differential maximal effects among analytes and response inhibition beyond the maximum permissive concentrations. This allows a multivariate extension of Loewe additivity, enabling direct application in a biphasic dose-response framework. The proposed additivity definition was validated, and its applicability...... illustrated by studying the response of the cyanobacterial biosensor Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 pBG2120 to binary mixtures of Zn, Cu, Cd, Ag, Co and Hg. The novel method allowed by the first time to model complete dose-response profiles of an inducible whole cell biosensor to mixtures. In addition...

  7. Long-wavelength chlorophylls in photosystem I of cyanobacteria: origin, localization, and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karapetyan, N V; Bolychevtseva, Yu V; Yurina, N P; Terekhova, I V; Shubin, V V; Brecht, M

    2014-03-01

    The structural organization of photosystem I (PSI) complexes in cyanobacteria and the origin of the PSI antenna long-wavelength chlorophylls and their role in energy migration, charge separation, and dissipation of excess absorbed energy are discussed. The PSI complex in cyanobacterial membranes is organized preferentially as a trimer with the core antenna enriched with long-wavelength chlorophylls. The contents of long-wavelength chlorophylls and their spectral characteristics in PSI trimers and monomers are species-specific. Chlorophyll aggregates in PSI antenna are potential candidates for the role of the long-wavelength chlorophylls. The red-most chlorophylls in PSI trimers of the cyanobacteria Arthrospira platensis and Thermosynechococcus elongatus can be formed as a result of interaction of pigments peripherally localized on different monomeric complexes within the PSI trimers. Long-wavelength chlorophylls affect weakly energy equilibration within the heterogeneous PSI antenna, but they significantly delay energy trapping by P700. When the reaction center is open, energy absorbed by long-wavelength chlorophylls migrates to P700 at physiological temperatures, causing its oxidation. When the PSI reaction center is closed, the P700 cation radical or P700 triplet state (depending on the P700 redox state and the PSI acceptor side cofactors) efficiently quench the fluorescence of the long-wavelength chlorophylls of PSI and thus protect the complex against photodestruction.

  8. The last glacial-interglacial transition and dinoflagellate cysts in the western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouis-Zargouni, Imene; Turon, Jean-Louis; Londeix, Laurent; Kallel, Néjib; Essallami, Latifa

    2012-02-01

    Using the analysis of dinoflagellate cysts in three deep-sea sediments cores situated in the Sicilian-Tunisian Strait, in the Gulf of Lions and in the Alboran Sea, we reconstruct the paleoenvironmental changes that took place during the last glacial-interglacial transition in the western Mediterranean Sea. The development of the warm microflora Impagidinium aculeatum and especially Spiniferites mirabilis appears to be an important proxy for recognizing warm periods as the Bölling/Alleröd and the Early Holocene. Bitectatodinium tepikiense, Spiniferites elongatus and Nematosphaeropsis labyrinthus mark the end of the Heinrich event 1 and the Younger Dryas. This cold microfloral association confirms the drastic climate changes in the western Mediterranean Sea synchronous to the dry and cold climate which occurred in the South European margin. The dinocyst N. labyrinthus shows high percentages in all studied regions during the Younger Dryas. Its distribution reveals a significant increase from the South to the North of this basin during this cold brief event. Thus, we note that this species can be considered as a new eco-stratigraphical tracer of the Younger Dryas in the western Mediterranean Sea.

  9. High throughput and quantitative approaches for measuring circadian rhythms in cyanobacteria using bioluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Paddock, Mark L.; Katsuki, Takeo; Greenspan, Ralph J.; Golden, Susan S.

    2016-01-01

    The temporal measurement of a bioluminescent reporter has proven to be one of the most powerful tools for characterizing circadian rhythms in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus. Primarily, two approaches have been used to automate this process: (1) detection of cell culture bioluminescence in 96-well plates by a photomultiplier tube-based plate-cycling luminometer (TopCount Microplate Scintillation and Luminescence Counter, Perkin Elmer) and (2) detection of individual colony bioluminescence by iteratively rotating a Petri dish under a cooled CCD camera using a computer-controlled turntable. Each approach has distinct advantages. The TopCount provides a more quantitative measurement of bioluminescence, enabling the direct comparison of clock output levels among strains. The computer-controlled turntable approach has a shorter set-up time and greater throughput, making it a more powerful phenotypic screening tool. While the latter approach is extremely useful, only a few labs have been able to build such an apparatus because of technical hurdles involved in coordinating and controlling both the camera and the turntable, and in processing the resulting images. This protocol provides instructions on how to construct, use, and process data from a computer-controlled turntable to measure the temporal changes in bioluminescence of individual cyanobacterial colonies. Furthermore, we describe how to prepare samples for use with the TopCount to minimize experimental noise, and generate meaningful quantitative measurements of clock output levels for advanced analysis. PMID:25662451

  10. Indirect Interspecies Regulation: Transcriptional and Physiological Responses of a Cyanobacterium to Heterotrophic Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClure, Ryan S.; Thiel, Vera; Sadler, Natalie C.; Kim, Young-Mo; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beliaev, Alexander S.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanisms by which microbes interact in communities remain poorly understood. Here, we interrogated specific interactions between photoautotrophic and heterotrophic members of a model consortium to infer mechanisms that mediate metabolic coupling and acclimation to partnership. This binary consortium was composed of a cyanobacterium, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1, which supported growth of an obligate aerobic heterotroph, Meiothermus ruber strain A, by providing organic carbon, O2, and reduced nitrogen. Species-resolved transcriptomic analyses were used in combination with growth and photosynthesis kinetics to infer interactions and the environmental context under which they occur. We found that the efficiency of biomass production and resistance to stress induced by high levels of dissolved O2 increased, beyond axenic performance, as a result of heterotrophic partnership. Coordinated transcriptional responses transcending both species were observed and used to infer specific interactions resulting from the synthesis and exchange of resources. The cyanobacterium responded to heterotrophic partnership by altering expression of core genes involved with photosynthesis, carbon uptake/fixation, vitamin synthesis, and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS). IMPORTANCE This study elucidates how a cyanobacterial primary producer acclimates to heterotrophic partnership by modulating the expression levels of key metabolic genes. Heterotrophic bacteria can indirectly regulate the physiology of the photoautotrophic primary producers, resulting in physiological changes identified here, such as increased intracellular ROS. Some of the interactions inferred from this model system represent putative principles of metabolic coupling in phototrophic-heterotrophic partnerships. PMID:28289730

  11. Sucrose synthase in unicellular cyanobacteria and its relationship with salt and hypoxic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolman, María A; Torres, Leticia L; Martin, Mariana L; Salerno, Graciela L

    2012-05-01

    Higher plants and cyanobacteria metabolize sucrose (Suc) by a similar set of enzymes. Suc synthase (SuS, A/UDP-glucose: D: -fructose 2-α-D: -glucosyl transferase) catalyzes a reversible reaction. However, it is in the cleavage of Suc that this enzyme plays an important role in vivo, providing sugar nucleotides for polysaccharide biosynthesis. In cyanobacteria, SuS occurrence has been reported in heterocyst-forming strains, where it was shown to be involved also in nitrogen fixation. We investigated the presence of sequences homologous to SuS-encoding genes (sus) in recently sequenced cyanobacterial genomes. In this work, we show for the first time the presence of SuS in unicellular cyanobacterium strains (Microcystis aeruginosa PCC 7806, Gloebacter violaceus PCC 7421, and Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1). After functional characterization of SuS encoding genes, we demonstrated an increase in their transcript levels after a salt treatment or hypoxic stress in M. aeruginosa and G. violaceus cells. Based on phylogenetic analysis and on the presence of sus homologs in the most recently radiated cyanobacterium strains, we propose that sus genes in unicellular cyanobacteria may have been acquired through horizontal gene transfer. Taken together, our data indicate that SuS acquisition by cyanobacteria might be related to open up new ecological niches.

  12. Towards clarifying what distinguishes cyanobacteria able to resurrect after desiccation from those that cannot: The photosynthetic aspect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raanan, Hagai; Oren, Nadav; Treves, Haim; Keren, Nir; Ohad, Itzhak; Berkowicz, Simon M; Hagemann, Martin; Koch, Moriz; Shotland, Yoram; Kaplan, Aaron

    2016-06-01

    Organisms inhabiting biological soil crusts (BSCs) are able to cope with extreme environmental conditions including daily hydration/dehydration cycles, high irradiance and extreme temperatures. The photosynthetic machinery, potentially the main source of damaging reactive oxygen species during cessation of CO(2) fixation in desiccating cells, must be protected to avoid sustained photodamage. We compared certain photosynthetic parameters and the response to excess light of BCS-inhabiting, desiccation-tolerant cyanobacteria Leptolyngbya ohadii and Nostoc reinholdii with those observed in the "model" organisms Nostoc sp. PCC 7120, able to resurrect after mild desiccation, and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that are unable to recover from dehydration. Desiccation-tolerant strains exhibited a transient decline in the photosynthetic rate at light intensities corresponding to the inflection point in the PI curve relating the O(2) evolution rate to light intensity. They also exhibited a faster and larger loss of variable fluorescence and profoundly faster Q(A)(-) re-oxidation rates after exposure to high illumination. Finally, a smaller difference was found in the temperature of maximal thermoluminescence signal in the absence or presence of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) than observed in "model" cyanobacteria. These parameters indicate specific functional differences of photosystem II (PSII) between desiccation tolerant and sensitive cyanobacteria. We propose that exposure to excess irradiation activates a non-radiative electron recombination route inside PSII that minimizes formation of damaging singlet oxygen in the desiccation-tolerant cyanobacteria and thereby reduces photodamage.

  13. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-29

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria.

  14. Intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization is widespread in cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Skouri-Panet, Feriel; Li, Jinhua; Férard, Céline; Gugger, Muriel; Laurent, Thierry; Couradeau, Estelle; Ragon, Marie; Cosmidis, Julie; Menguy, Nicolas; Margaret-Oliver, Isabel; Tavera, Rosaluz; López-García, Purificación; Moreira, David

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria have played a significant role in the formation of past and modern carbonate deposits at the surface of the Earth using a biomineralization process that has been almost systematically considered induced and extracellular. Recently, a deep-branching cyanobacterial species, Candidatus Gloeomargarita lithophora, was reported to form intracellular amorphous Ca-rich carbonates. However, the significance and diversity of the cyanobacteria in which intracellular biomineralization occurs remain unknown. Here, we searched for intracellular Ca-carbonate inclusions in 68 cyanobacterial strains distributed throughout the phylogenetic tree of cyanobacteria. We discovered that diverse unicellular cyanobacterial taxa form intracellular amorphous Ca-carbonates with at least two different distribution patterns, suggesting the existence of at least two distinct mechanisms of biomineralization: (i) one with Ca-carbonate inclusions scattered within the cell cytoplasm such as in Ca. G. lithophora, and (ii) another one observed in strains belonging to the Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 lineage, in which Ca-carbonate inclusions lie at the cell poles. This pattern seems to be linked with the nucleation of the inclusions at the septum of the cells, showing an intricate and original connection between cell division and biomineralization. These findings indicate that intracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria has been overlooked by past studies and open new perspectives on the mechanisms and the evolutionary history of intra- and extracellular Ca-carbonate biomineralization by cyanobacteria.

  15. Nematodes (Mermithidae) parasitizing grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae) in the Pampean region, Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusconi, J M; Camino, N B; Achinelly, M F

    2017-03-01

    This work provides the results of a survey of entomonematodes parasites of grasshoppers in grasslands of the Pampean Region, Argentina. Nymphs of Staurorhectus longicornis Giglio-Tos, Laplatacris dispar Rhen, 1939, Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos, 1894 and Metaleptea brevicornis (L.) (Orthoptera: Acrididae) were collected. Mermithidae was the only family registered with seven species: Agamermis decaudata Cobb, Steiner and Christie, 1923, Amphimermis bonaerensis Miralles and Camino, 1983, Amphimermis dichroplusi Camino and Lange, 1997, Amphimermis ronderosi Camino and Lange, 1997, Hexamermis coclhearius Stock and Camino, 1992, Hexamermis ovistriata Stock and Camino, 1992, and Longimermis acridophila Camino and Stock, 1989. The values of parasitism ranged between 1-12%, and intensity not overcome the number of 5.0 nematodes per larva. The nematodes observed showed specificity, not registering the same species of parasite in more than one host species. The Pampean region constituted an area with high diversity of mermithids where new species could be consider as bioregulator agents of this troublesome insect pests in agricultural areas of Argentina.

  16. Diversification of DnaA dependency for DNA replication in cyanobacterial evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Watanabe, Satoru; Ehira, Shigeki; Kanesaki, Yu; Chibazakura, Taku; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-05-01

    Regulating DNA replication is essential for all living cells. The DNA replication initiation factor DnaA is highly conserved in prokaryotes and is required for accurate initiation of chromosomal replication at oriC. DnaA-independent free-living bacteria have not been identified. The dnaA gene is absent in plastids and some symbiotic bacteria, although it is not known when or how DnaA-independent mechanisms were acquired. Here, we show that the degree of dependency of DNA replication on DnaA varies among cyanobacterial species. Deletion of the dnaA gene in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 shifted DNA replication from oriC to a different site as a result of the integration of an episomal plasmid. Moreover, viability during the stationary phase was higher in dnaA disruptants than in wild-type cells. Deletion of dnaA did not affect DNA replication or cell growth in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or Anabaena sp. PCC 7120, indicating that functional dependency on DnaA was already lost in some nonsymbiotic cyanobacterial lineages during diversification. Therefore, we proposed that cyanobacteria acquired DnaA-independent replication mechanisms before symbiosis and such an ancestral cyanobacterium was the sole primary endosymbiont to form a plastid precursor.

  17. Structural and Dynamic Basis for Low-Affinity, High-Selectivity Binding of L-Glutamine by the Glutamine Riboswitch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Aiming; Xue, Yi; Peselis, Alla; Serganov, Alexander; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M; Patel, Dinshaw J

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring L-glutamine riboswitches occur in cyanobacteria and marine metagenomes, where they reside upstream of genes involved in nitrogen metabolism. By combining X-ray, NMR, and MD, we characterized an L-glutamine-dependent conformational transition in the Synechococcus elongatus glutamine riboswitch from tuning fork to L-shaped alignment of stem segments. This transition generates an open ligand-binding pocket with L-glutamine selectivity enforced by Mg(2+)-mediated intermolecular interactions. The transition also stabilizes the P1 helix through a long-range "linchpin" Watson-Crick G-C pair-capping interaction, while melting a short helix below P1 potentially capable of modulating downstream readout. NMR data establish that the ligand-free glutamine riboswitch in Mg(2+) solution exists in a slow equilibrium between flexible tuning fork and a minor conformation, similar, but not identical, to the L-shaped bound conformation. We propose that an open ligand-binding pocket combined with a high conformational penalty for forming the ligand-bound state provide mechanisms for reducing binding affinity while retaining high selectivity.

  18. Energy Sensing versus 2-Oxoglutarate Dependent ATPase Switch in the Control of Synechococcus PII Interaction with Its Targets NAGK and PipX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lüddecke

    Full Text Available PII proteins constitute a superfamily of highly conserved signaling devices, common in all domains of life. Through binding of the metabolites ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG, they undergo conformational changes which allow them to regulate a variety of target proteins including enzymes, transport proteins and transcription factors. But, in reverse, these target proteins also modulate the metabolite sensing properties of PII, as has been recently shown. We used this effect to refine our PII based Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET sensor and amplify its sensitivity towards ADP. With this enhanced sensor setup we addressed the question whether the PII protein from the model organism Synechococcus elongatus autonomously switches into the ADP conformation through ATPase activity as proposed in a recently published model. The present study disproves ATPase activity as a relevant mechanism for the transition of PII into the ADP state. In the absence of 2-OG, only the ATP/ADP ratio and concentration of ADP directs the competitive interaction of PII with two targets, one of which preferentially binds PII in the ATP-state, the other in the ADP-state.

  19. Cellular trade-offs and optimal resource allocation during cyanobacterial diurnal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Alexandra-M; Knoop, Henning; Bockmayr, Alexander; Steuer, Ralf

    2017-07-18

    Cyanobacteria are an integral part of Earth's biogeochemical cycles and a promising resource for the synthesis of renewable bioproducts from atmospheric CO2 Growth and metabolism of cyanobacteria are inherently tied to the diurnal rhythm of light availability. As yet, however, insight into the stoichiometric and energetic constraints of cyanobacterial diurnal growth is limited. Here, we develop a computational framework to investigate the optimal allocation of cellular resources during diurnal phototrophic growth using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We formulate phototrophic growth as an autocatalytic process and solve the resulting time-dependent resource allocation problem using constraint-based analysis. Based on a narrow and well-defined set of parameters, our approach results in an ab initio prediction of growth properties over a full diurnal cycle. The computational model allows us to study the optimality of metabolite partitioning during diurnal growth. The cyclic pattern of glycogen accumulation, an emergent property of the model, has timing characteristics that are in qualitative agreement with experimental findings. The approach presented here provides insight into the time-dependent resource allocation problem of phototrophic diurnal growth and may serve as a general framework to assess the optimality of metabolic strategies that evolved in phototrophic organisms under diurnal conditions.

  20. Metabolic engineering of Cupriavidus necator for heterotrophic and autotrophic alka(e)ne production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crépin, Lucie; Lombard, Eric; Guillouet, Stéphane E

    2016-09-01

    Alkanes of defined carbon chain lengths can serve as alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Recently, microbial pathways of alkane biosynthesis have been identified and enabled the production of alkanes in non-native producing microorganisms using metabolic engineering strategies. The chemoautotrophic bacterium Cupriavidus necator has great potential for producing chemicals from CO2: it is known to have one of the highest growth rate among natural autotrophic bacteria and under nutrient imbalance it directs most of its carbon flux to the synthesis of the acetyl-CoA derived polymer, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), (up to 80% of intracellular content). Alkane synthesis pathway from Synechococcus elongatus (2 genes coding an acyl-ACP reductase and an aldehyde deformylating oxygenase) was heterologously expressed in a C. necator mutant strain deficient in the PHB synthesis pathway. Under heterotrophic condition on fructose we showed that under nitrogen limitation, in presence of an organic phase (decane), the strain produced up to 670mg/L total hydrocarbons containing 435mg/l of alkanes consisting of 286mg/l of pentadecane, 131mg/l of heptadecene, 18mg/l of heptadecane, and 236mg/l of hexadecanal. We report here the highest level of alka(e)nes production by an engineered C. necator to date. We also demonstrated the first reported alka(e)nes production by a non-native alkane producer from CO2 as the sole carbon source. Copyright © 2016 International Metabolic Engineering Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Identification of the light-independent phosphoserine pathway as an additional source of serine in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klemke, Friederike; Baier, Antje; Knoop, Henning; Kern, Ramona; Jablonsky, Jiri; Beyer, Gabriele; Volkmer, Thomas; Steuer, Ralf; Lockau, Wolfgang; Hagemann, Martin

    2015-05-01

    L-serine is one of the proteinogenic amino acids and participates in several essential processes in all organisms. In plants, the light-dependent photorespiratory and the light-independent phosphoserine pathways contribute to serine biosynthesis. In cyanobacteria, the light-dependent photorespiratory pathway for serine synthesis is well characterized, but the phosphoserine pathway has not been identified. Here, we investigated three candidate genes for enzymes of the phosphoserine pathway in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Only the gene for the D-3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase is correctly annotated in the genome database, whereas the 3-phosphoserine transaminase and 3-phosphoserine phosphatase (PSP) proteins are incorrectly annotated and were identified here. All enzymes were obtained as recombinant proteins and showed the activities necessary to catalyse the three-step phosphoserine pathway. The genes coding for the phosphoserine pathway were found in most cyanobacterial genomes listed in CyanoBase. The pathway seems to be essential for cyanobacteria, because it was impossible to mutate the gene coding for PSP in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 or in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. A model approach indicates a 30-60% contribution of the phosphoserine pathway to the overall serine pool. Hence, this study verified that cyanobacteria, similar to plants, use the phosphoserine pathway in addition to photorespiration for serine biosynthesis. © 2015 The Authors.

  2. Prevalence and Sequence-Based Identity of Rumen Fluke in Cattle and Deer in New Caledonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauquil, Laura; Hüe, Thomas; Hurlin, Jean-Claude; Mitchell, Gillian; Searle, Kate; Skuce, Philip; Zadoks, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    An abattoir survey was performed in the French Melanesian archipelago of New Caledonia to determine the prevalence of paramphistomes in cattle and deer and to generate material for molecular typing at species and subspecies level. Prevalence in adult cattle was high at animal level (70% of 387 adult cattle) and batch level (81%). Prevalence was lower in calves at both levels (33% of 484 calves, 51% at batch level). Animals from 2 of 7 deer farms were positive for rumen fluke, with animal-level prevalence of 41.4% (29/70) and 47.1% (33/70), respectively. Using ITS-2 sequencing, 3 species of paramphistomes were identified, i.e. Calicophoron calicophorum, Fischoederius elongatus and Orthocoelium streptocoelium. All three species were detected in cattle as well as deer, suggesting the possibility of rumen fluke transmission between the two host species. Based on heterogeneity in ITS-2 sequences, the C. calicophorum population comprises two clades, both of which occur in cattle as well as deer. The results suggest two distinct routes of rumen fluke introduction into this area. This approach has wider applicability for investigations of the origin of rumen fluke infections and for the possibility of parasite transmission at the livestock-wildlife interface.

  3. Allophycocyanin and phycocyanin crystal structures reveal facets of phycobilisome assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Ailie; Adir, Noam

    2013-03-01

    X-ray crystal structures of the isolated phycobiliprotein components of the phycobilisome have provided high resolution details to the description of this light harvesting complex at different levels of complexity and detail. The linker-independent assembly of trimers into hexamers in crystal lattices of previously determined structures has been observed in almost all of the phycocyanin (PC) and allophycocyanin (APC) structures available in the Protein Data Bank. In this paper we describe the X-ray crystal structures of PC and APC from Synechococcus elongatus sp. PCC 7942, PC from Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and PC from Thermosynechococcus vulcanus crystallized in the presence of urea. All five structures are highly similar to other PC and APC structures on the levels of subunits, monomers and trimers. The Synechococcus APC forms a unique loose hexamer that may show the structural requirements for core assembly and rod attachment. While the Synechococcus PC assembles into the canonical hexamer, it does not further assemble into rods. Unlike most PC structures, the Synechocystis PC fails to form hexamers. Addition of low concentrations of urea to T. vulcanus PC inhibits this proteins propensity to form hexamers, resulting in a crystal lattice composed of trimers. The molecular source of these differences in assembly and their relevance to the phycobilisome structure is discussed.

  4. An allele of the crm gene blocks cyanobacterial circadian rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Joseph S; Bordowitz, Juliana R; Bree, Anna C; Golden, Susan S

    2013-08-20

    The SasA-RpaA two-component system constitutes a key output pathway of the cyanobacterial Kai circadian oscillator. To date, rhythm of phycobilisome associated (rpaA) is the only gene other than kaiA, kaiB, and kaiC, which encode the oscillator itself, whose mutation causes completely arrhythmic gene expression. Here we report a unique transposon insertion allele in a small ORF located immediately upstream of rpaA in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 termed crm (for circadian rhythmicity modulator), which results in arrhythmic promoter activity but does not affect steady-state levels of RpaA. The crm ORF complements the defect when expressed in trans, but only if it can be translated, suggesting that crm encodes a small protein. The crm1 insertion allele phenotypes are distinct from those of an rpaA null; crm1 mutants are able to grow in a light:dark cycle and have no detectable oscillations of KaiC phosphorylation, whereas low-amplitude KaiC phosphorylation rhythms persist in the absence of RpaA. Levels of phosphorylated RpaA in vivo measured over time are significantly altered compared with WT in the crm1 mutant as well as in the absence of KaiC. Taken together, these results are consistent with the hypothesis that the Crm polypeptide modulates a circadian-specific activity of RpaA.

  5. Nematodes (Mermithidae parasitizing grasshoppers (Orthoptera: Acrididae in the Pampean region, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. M. Rusconi

    Full Text Available Abstract This work provides the results of a survey of entomonematodes parasites of grasshoppers in grasslands of the Pampean Region, Argentina. Nymphs of Staurorhectus longicornis Giglio-Tos, Laplatacris dispar Rhen, 1939, Dichroplus elongatus Giglio-Tos, 1894 and Metaleptea brevicornis (L. (Orthoptera: Acrididae were collected. Mermithidae was the only family registered with seven species: Agamermis decaudata Cobb, Steiner and Christie, 1923, Amphimermis bonaerensis Miralles and Camino, 1983, Amphimermis dichroplusi Camino and Lange, 1997, Amphimermis ronderosi Camino and Lange, 1997, Hexamermis coclhearius Stock and Camino, 1992, Hexamermis ovistriata Stock and Camino, 1992, and Longimermis acridophila Camino and Stock, 1989. The values of parasitism ranged between 1-12%, and intensity not overcome the number of 5.0 nematodes per larva. The nematodes observed showed specificity, not registering the same species of parasite in more than one host species. The Pampean region constituted an area with high diversity of mermithids where new species could be consider as bioregulator agents of this troublesome insect pests in agricultural areas of Argentina.

  6. Structural basis of cyanobacterial photosystem II Inhibition by the herbicide terbutryn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broser, Matthias; Glöckner, Carina; Gabdulkhakov, Azat; Guskov, Albert; Buchta, Joachim; Kern, Jan; Müh, Frank; Dau, Holger; Saenger, Wolfram; Zouni, Athina

    2011-05-01

    Herbicides that target photosystem II (PSII) compete with the native electron acceptor plastoquinone for binding at the Q(B) site in the D1 subunit and thus block the electron transfer from Q(A) to Q(B). Here, we present the first crystal structure of PSII with a bound herbicide at a resolution of 3.2 Å. The crystallized PSII core complexes were isolated from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The used herbicide terbutryn is found to bind via at least two hydrogen bonds to the Q(B) site similar to photosynthetic reaction centers in anoxygenic purple bacteria. Herbicide binding to PSII is also discussed regarding the influence on the redox potential of Q(A), which is known to affect photoinhibition. We further identified a second and novel chloride position close to the water-oxidizing complex and in the vicinity of the chloride ion reported earlier (Guskov, A., Kern, J., Gabdulkhakov, A., Broser, M., Zouni, A., and Saenger, W. (2009) Nat. Struct. Mol. Biol. 16, 334-342). This discovery is discussed in the context of proton transfer to the lumen.

  7. Discrete gene replication events drive coupling between the cell cycle and circadian clocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paijmans, Joris; Bosman, Mark; Ten Wolde, Pieter Rein; Lubensky, David K

    2016-04-12

    Many organisms possess both a cell cycle to control DNA replication and a circadian clock to anticipate changes between day and night. In some cases, these two rhythmic systems are known to be coupled by specific, cross-regulatory interactions. Here, we use mathematical modeling to show that, additionally, the cell cycle generically influences circadian clocks in a nonspecific fashion: The regular, discrete jumps in gene-copy number arising from DNA replication during the cell cycle cause a periodic driving of the circadian clock, which can dramatically alter its behavior and impair its function. A clock built on negative transcriptional feedback either phase-locks to the cell cycle, so that the clock period tracks the cell division time, or exhibits erratic behavior. We argue that the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus has evolved two features that protect its clock from such disturbances, both of which are needed to fully insulate it from the cell cycle and give it its observed robustness: a phosphorylation-based protein modification oscillator, together with its accompanying push-pull read-out circuit that responds primarily to the ratios of different phosphoform concentrations, makes the clock less susceptible to perturbations in protein synthesis; the presence of multiple, asynchronously replicating copies of the same chromosome diminishes the effect of replicating any single copy of a gene.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Fatty Acid Desaturases in Cyanobacterial Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyuan Chi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Fatty acid desaturases are enzymes that introduce double bonds into the hydrocarbon chains of fatty acids. The fatty acid desaturases from 37 cyanobacterial genomes were identified and classified based upon their conserved histidine-rich motifs and phylogenetic analysis, which help to determine the amounts and distributions of desaturases in cyanobacterial species. The filamentous or N2-fixing cyanobacteria usually possess more types of fatty acid desaturases than that of unicellular species. The pathway of acyl-lipid desaturation for unicellular marine cyanobacteria Synechococcus and Prochlorococcus differs from that of other cyanobacteria, indicating different phylogenetic histories of the two genera from other cyanobacteria isolated from freshwater, soil, or symbiont. Strain Gloeobacter violaceus PCC 7421 was isolated from calcareous rock and lacks thylakoid membranes. The types and amounts of desaturases of this strain are distinct to those of other cyanobacteria, reflecting the earliest divergence of it from the cyanobacterial line. Three thermophilic unicellular strains, Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 and two Synechococcus Yellowstone species, lack highly unsaturated fatty acids in lipids and contain only one Δ9 desaturase in contrast with mesophilic strains, which is probably due to their thermic habitats. Thus, the amounts and types of fatty acid desaturases are various among different cyanobacterial species, which may result from the adaption to environments in evolution.

  9. Robust circadian clocks from coupled protein-modification and transcription-translation cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwicker, David; Lubensky, David K; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-12-28

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus uses both a protein phosphorylation cycle and a transcription-translation cycle to generate circadian rhythms that are highly robust against biochemical noise. We use stochastic simulations to analyze how these cycles interact to generate stable rhythms in growing, dividing cells. We find that a protein phosphorylation cycle by itself is robust when protein turnover is low. For high decay or dilution rates (and compensating synthesis rates), however, the phosphorylation-based oscillator loses its integrity. Circadian rhythms thus cannot be generated with a phosphorylation cycle alone when the growth rate, and consequently the rate of protein dilution, is high enough; in practice, a purely posttranslational clock ceases to function well when the cell doubling time drops below the 24-h clock period. At higher growth rates, a transcription-translation cycle becomes essential for generating robust circadian rhythms. Interestingly, although a transcription-translation cycle is necessary to sustain a phosphorylation cycle at high growth rates, a phosphorylation cycle can dramatically enhance the robustness of a transcription-translation cycle at lower protein decay or dilution rates. In fact, the full oscillator built from these two tightly intertwined cycles far outperforms not just each of its two components individually, but also a hypothetical system in which the two parts are coupled as in textbook models of coupled phase oscillators. Our analysis thus predicts that both cycles are required to generate robust circadian rhythms over the full range of growth conditions.

  10. A New Environmentally Safe Formulation and of Low Cost for Prolonged Release System of Atrazine and Diuron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gracy karla da Rocha Cortes

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Diuron and atrazine were incorporated in new formulations developed with the purpose to improve herbicides action through release systems, as well as to reduce the environmental toxicity. A low cost formulation (ALG/ESC was obtained by combining sodium alginate (ALG with fish scales of the Piau fish (ESC from the Leporinus elongatus species. From the crosslinking of ALG/ESC with CaCl2, the formulation ALG/ESC-CaCl2 was obtained. For ALG/ESC-CaCl2, the results are successful, showing a prolonged release of 3.5 and 4.5 days for atrazine and diuron, respectively. Based on parameters of an empirical equation used to fit the herbicide release data, it appears that the release systems of diuron and atrazine from ALG/ESC-CaCl2 are by diffusion processes due to anomalous transport, which did not follow Fick’s laws of diffusion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.17807/orbital.v9i3.994

  11. Streamlined Construction of the Cyanobacterial CO2-Fixing Organelle via Protein Domain Fusions for Use in Plant Synthetic Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Esquer, C Raul; Shubitowski, Tyler B; Kerfeld, Cheryl A

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (BMCs) are self-assembling organelles that sequester segments of biochemical pathways within a protein shell. Given their functional diversity, BMCs constitute a rich source of metabolic modules for applications in synthetic biology. The carboxysome, the cyanobacterial BMC for CO(2) fixation, has attracted significant attention as a target for installation into chloroplasts and serves as the foundation for introducing other types of BMCs into plants. Carboxysome assembly involves a series of protein-protein interactions among at least six gene products to form a metabolic core, around which the shell assembles. This complexity creates significant challenges for the transfer, regulation, and assembly of carboxysomes, or any of the myriad of functionally distinct BMCs, into heterologous systems. To overcome this bottleneck, we constructed a chimeric protein in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus that structurally and functionally replaces four gene products required for carboxysome formation. The protein was designed based on protein domain interactions in the carboxysome core. The resulting streamlined carboxysomes support photosynthesis. This strategy obviates the need to regulate multiple genes and decreases the genetic load required for carboxysome assembly in heterologous systems. More broadly, the reengineered carboxysomes represent a proof of concept for a domain fusion approach to building multifunctional enzymatic cores that should be generally applicable to the engineering of BMCs for new functions and cellular contexts.

  12. A carbon sink pathway increases carbon productivity in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, John W K; Atsumi, Shota

    2015-05-01

    The burning of fossil reserves, and subsequent release of carbon into the atmosphere is depleting the supply of carbon-based molecules used for synthetic materials including plastics, oils, medicines, and glues. To provide for future society, innovations are needed for the conversion of waste carbon (CO2) into organic carbon useful for materials. Chemical production directly from photosynthesis is a nascent technology, with great promise for capture of CO2 using sunlight. To improve low yields, it has been proposed that photosynthetic capacity can be increased by a relaxation of bottlenecks inherent to growth. The limits of carbon partitioning away from growth within the cell and the effect of partitioning on carbon fixation are not well known. Here we show that expressing genes in a pathway between carbon fixation and pyruvate increases partitioning to 2,3-butanediol (23BD) and leads to a 1.8-fold increase in total carbon yield in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Specific 2,3-butanediol production increases 2.4-fold. As partitioning increases beyond 30%, it leads to a steep decline in total carbon yield. The data suggests a local maximum for carbon partitioning from the Calvin Benson cycle that is scalable with light intensity.

  13. Homology modeling of Homo sapiens lipoic acid synthase: Substrate docking and insights on its binding mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Ezhilarasi; Hassan, Sameer; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Padmalayam, Indira; Rajaram, Rama; Viswanathan, Vijay

    2017-05-07

    Lipoic acid synthase (LIAS) is an iron-sulfur cluster mitochondrial enzyme which catalyzes the final step in the de novo pathway for the biosynthesis of lipoic acid, a potent antioxidant. Recently there has been significant interest in its role in metabolic diseases and its deficiency in LIAS expression has been linked to conditions such as diabetes, atherosclerosis and neonatal-onset epilepsy, suggesting a strong inverse correlation between LIAS reduction and disease status. In this study we use a bioinformatics approach to predict its structure, which would be helpful to understanding its role. A homology model for LIAS protein was generated using X-ray crystallographic structure of Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 (PDB ID: 4U0P). The predicted structure has 93% of the residues in the most favour region of Ramachandran plot. The active site of LIAS protein was mapped and docked with S-Adenosyl Methionine (SAM) using GOLD software. The LIAS-SAM complex was further refined using molecular dynamics simulation within the subsite 1 and subsite 3 of the active site. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to report a reliable homology model of LIAS protein. This study will facilitate a better understanding mode of action of the enzyme-substrate complex for future studies in designing drugs that can target LIAS protein. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. From PII signaling to metabolite sensing: a novel 2-oxoglutarate sensor that details PII-NAGK complex formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lüddecke

    Full Text Available The widespread PII signal transduction proteins are known for integrating signals of nitrogen and energy supply and regulating cellular behavior by interacting with a multitude of target proteins. The PII protein of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus forms complexes with the controlling enzyme of arginine synthesis, N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK in a 2-oxoglutarate- and ATP/ADP-dependent manner. Fusing NAGK and PII proteins to either CFP or YFP yielded a FRET sensor that specifically responded to 2-oxoglutarate. The impact of the fluorescent tags on PII and NAGK was evaluated by enzyme assays, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy and isothermal calorimetric experiments. The developed FRET sensor provides real-time data on PII - NAGK interaction and its modulation by the effector molecules ATP, ADP and 2-oxoglutarate in vitro. Additionally to its utility to monitor 2-oxoglutarate levels, the FRET assay provided novel insights into PII - NAGK complex formation: (i It revealed the formation of an encounter-complex between PII and NAGK, which holds the proteins in proximity even in the presence of inhibitors of complex formation; (ii It revealed that the PII T-loop residue Ser49 is neither essential for complex formation with NAGK nor for activation of the enzyme but necessary to form a stable complex and efficiently relieve NAGK from arginine inhibition; (iii It showed that arginine stabilizes the NAGK hexamer and stimulates PII - NAGK interaction.

  15. Population dynamics of a dominant species (Pseudocalanus, Acartia and Temora) in the Gulf of Gdansk (southern Baltic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzierzbicka-Glowacka, L.; Janecki, M.; Lemieszek, A.; Jakacki, J.; Nowicki, A.

    2012-04-01

    1 - C3 and C4 - C5 and finally the adult stage - C6. The Baltic zooplankton is composed of microzooplankton, mezozooplankton and macroplankton with characteristic ichtyoplankton forms. The structure of mezozooplankton in the Gdansk Gulf mainly consisted of four taxa: copepoda, cladocera, rotatoria and meroplankton. The most important species in the Gdansk Gulf are copepoda: Acartia spp. (i.e. A. bifilosa, A. longiremis and A. tonsa), Temora longicornis, Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus and Centropages hamatus and cladocera: Bosmina coregoni maritime and Podon polyphemoides. Copepoda dominate numerically, while in the warm season Cladocera are subdominants. The study describes numerical simulations of the seasonal dynamics of Acartia spp., Temora longicornis and Pseudocalanus minutus elongatus in the southern Baltic Sea using a three-dimensional version of the coupled ecosystem-copepod model. In the case of the Baltic Sea, food concentration and temperature are the main factors controlling copepod development, and salinity is a masking factor. The surface water salinity of the southern Baltic is constant at 7-8 PSU. It is included in the present study. The simulated population dynamics were compared with observations at the Gulf of Gdansk. This work is supported by the Polish State Committee of Scientific Research [grant number: NN306 353239 and No. N N305 111636]. The partial support for this study was also provided by the project Satellite Monitoring of the Baltic Sea Environment - SatBaltyk founded by European Union through European Regional Development Fund contract no. POIG 01.01.02-22-011/09. Calculations were done at the Academic Computer Center in Gdansk.

  16. Structure, ligands and substrate coordination of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II in the S2 state: a combined EPR and DFT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmiller, Thomas; Krewald, Vera; Navarro, Montserrat Pérez; Retegan, Marius; Rapatskiy, Leonid; Nowaczyk, Marc M; Boussac, Alain; Neese, Frank; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Pantazis, Dimitrios A; Cox, Nicholas

    2014-06-28

    The S2 state of the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II, which consists of a Mn4O5Ca cofactor, is EPR-active, typically displaying a multiline signal, which arises from a ground spin state of total spin ST = 1/2. The precise appearance of the signal varies amongst different photosynthetic species, preparation and solvent conditions/compositions. Over the past five years, using the model species Thermosynechococcus elongatus, we have examined modifications that induce changes in the multiline signal, i.e. Ca(2+)/Sr(2+)-substitution and the binding of ammonia, to ascertain how structural perturbations of the cluster are reflected in its magnetic/electronic properties. This refined analysis, which now includes high-field (W-band) data, demonstrates that the electronic structure of the S2 state is essentially invariant to these modifications. This assessment is based on spectroscopies that examine the metal centres themselves (EPR, (55)Mn-ENDOR) and their first coordination sphere ligands ((14)N/(15)N- and (17)O-ESEEM, -HYSCORE and -EDNMR). In addition, extended quantum mechanical models from broken-symmetry DFT now reproduce all EPR, (55)Mn and (14)N experimental magnetic observables, with the inclusion of second coordination sphere ligands being crucial for accurately describing the interaction of NH3 with the Mn tetramer. These results support a mechanism of multiline heterogeneity reported for species differences and the effect of methanol [Biochim. Biophys. Acta, Bioenerg., 2011, 1807, 829], involving small changes in the magnetic connectivity of the solvent accessible outer MnA4 to the cuboidal unit Mn3O3Ca, resulting in predictable changes of the measured effective (55)Mn hyperfine tensors. Sr(2+) and NH3 replacement both affect the observed (17)O-EDNMR signal envelope supporting the assignment of O5 as the exchangeable μ-oxo bridge and it acting as the first site of substrate inclusion.

  17. Characterization of the physiological stress response in lingcod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milston, R.H.; Davis, M.W.; Parker, S.J.; Olla, B.L.; Clements, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2006-01-01

    The goal of this study was to describe the duration and magnitude of the physiological stress response in lingcod Ophiodon elongatus after exposure to brief handling and sublethal air stressors. The response to these stressors was determined during a 24-h recovery period by measuring concentrations of plasma cortisol, lactate, glucose, sodium, and potassium. Lingcod were subjected to brief handling followed by either a 15-min or a 45-min air stressor in the laboratory. After the 15-min stressor, an increase in cortisol or glucose could not be detected until after 5 min of recovery. Peak concentrations were measured after 30 min for cortisol and after 60 min for glucose and lactate. Glucose and lactate had returned to basal levels after 12 h, whereas cortisol did not return to basal levels until after 24 h of recovery. Immediately following a 45-min air stressor, all measured parameters were significantly elevated over levels in prestressor control fish. Cortisol concentrations tended to increase and reached a measured peak after 8 h of recovery, whereas glucose and lactate reached a measured peak after 1 h of recovery. Cortisol and lactate returned to basal levels within 24 h. Glucose, however, remained elevated even after 24 h of recovery. Plasma ions initially increased during the first hour of recovery, and the concentrations then declined to a level below that measured in control fish for the remainder of the 24-h recovery period. In addition, we evaluated the effect of fish size on the stress response. There was no significant difference between the stress response of smaller (41-49-cm [total length] and larger (50-67-cm) lingcod after 45 min air exposure. In general, both the magnitude and duration of the primary and secondary stress responses in lingcod are comparable to those of salmonids. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2006.

  18. Semiquinone-iron complex of photosystem II: EPR signals assigned to the low-field edge of the ground state doublet of QA•-Fe2+ and QB•-Fe2+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedoud, Arezki; Cox, Nicholas; Sugiura, Miwa; Lubitz, Wolfgang; Boussac, Alain; Rutherford, A William

    2011-07-12

    The quinone-iron complex of the electron acceptor complex of Photosystem II was studied by EPR spectroscopy in Thermosynechococcus elongatus. New g ∼ 2 features belonging to the EPR signal of the semiquinone forms of the primary and secondary quinone, i.e., Q(A)(•-)Fe(2+) and Q(B)(•-)Fe(2+), respectively, are reported. In previous studies, these signals were missed because they were obscured by the EPR signal arising from the stable tyrosyl radical, TyrD(•). When the TyrD(•) signal was removed, either by chemical reduction or by the use of a mutant lacking TyrD, the new signals dominated the spectrum. For Q(A)(•-)Fe(2+), the signal was formed by illumination at 77 K or by sodium dithionite reduction in the dark. For Q(B)(•-)Fe(2+), the signal showed the characteristic period-of-two variations in its intensity when generated by a series of laser flashes. The new features showed relaxation characteristics comparable to those of the well-known features of the semiquinone-iron complexes and showed a temperature dependence consistent with an assignment to the low-field edge of the ground state doublet of the spin system. Spectral simulations are consistent with this assignment and with the current model of the spin system. The signal was also present in Q(B)(•-)Fe(2+) in plant Photosystem II, but in plants, the signal was not detected in the Q(A)(•-)Fe(2+) state.

  19. On the ultrafast kinetics of the energy and electron transfer reactions in photosystem I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavov, Chavdar Lyubomirov

    2009-07-09

    The subject of the current work is one of the main participants in the light-dependent phase of oxygenic photosynthesis, Photosystem I (PS I). This complex carries an immense number of cofactors: chlorophylls (Chl), carotenoids, quinones, etc, which together with the protein entity exhibit several exceptional properties. First, PS I has an ultrafast light energy trapping kinetics with a nearly 100% quantum efficiency. Secondly, both of the electron transfer branches in the reaction center are suggested to be active. Thirdly, there are some so called 'red' Chls in the antenna system of PS I, absorbing light with longer wavelengths than the reaction center. These 'red' Chls significantly modify the trapping kinetics of PS I. The purpose of this thesis is to obtain better understanding of the above-mentioned, specific features of PS I. This will not merely cast more light on the mechanisms of energy and electron transfer in the complex, but also will contribute to the future developments of optimized artificial light-harvesting systems. In the current work, a number of PS I complexes isolated from different organisms (Thermosynechococcus elongatus, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Arabidopsis thaliana) and possessing distinctive features (different macroorganisation, monomers, trimers, monomers with a semibelt of peripheral antenna attached; presence of 'red' Chls) is investigated. The studies are primarily focused on the electron transfer kinetics in each of the cofactor branches in the PS I reaction center, as well as on the effect of the antenna size and the presence of 'red' Chls on the trapping kinetics of PS I. These aspects are explored with the help of several ultrafast optical spectroscopy methods: (i) time-resolved fluorescence ? single photon counting and synchroscan streak camera; and (ii) ultrafast transient absorption. Physically meaningful information about the molecular mechanisms of the energy trapping in PS I is

  20. Structural basis for the regulation of NtcA-dependent transcription by proteins PipX and PII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llácer, José L; Espinosa, Javier; Castells, Miguel A; Contreras, Asunción; Forchhammer, Karl; Rubio, Vicente

    2010-08-31

    PII, an ancient and widespread signaling protein, transduces nitrogen/carbon/energy abundance signals through interactions with target proteins. We clarify structurally how PII regulates gene expression mediated by the transcription factor NtcA, the global nitrogen regulator of cyanobacteria, shedding light on NtcA structure and function and on how NtcA is activated by 2-oxoglutarate (2OG) and coactivated by the nonenzymatic PII target, protein PipX. We determine for the cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus the crystal structures of the PII-PipX and PipX-NtcA complexes and of NtcA in active and inactive conformations (respective resolutions, 3.2, 2.25, 2.3, and 3.05 A). The structures and the conclusions derived from them are consistent with the results of present and prior site-directed mutagenesis and functional studies. A tudor-like domain (TLD) makes up most of the PipX structure and mediates virtually all the contacts of PipX with PII and NtcA. In the PII-PipX complex, one PII trimer sequesters the TLDs of three PipX molecules between its body and its extended T loops, preventing PipX activation of NtcA. Changes in T loop conformation triggered by 2OG explain PII-PipX dissociation when 2OG is bound. The structure of active dimeric NtcA closely resembles that of the active cAMP receptor protein (CRP). This strongly suggests that with these proteins DNA binding, transcription activation, and allosteric regulation occur by common mechanisms, although the effectors are different. The PipX-NtcA complex consists of one active NtcA dimer and two PipX monomers. PipX coactivates NtcA by stabilizing its active conformation and by possibly helping recruit RNA polymerase but not by providing extra DNA contacts.

  1. Three cyanobacteriochromes work together to form a light color-sensitive input system for c-di-GMP signaling of cell aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Gen; Ni-Ni-Win; Narikawa, Rei; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2015-06-30

    Cyanobacteriochromes (CBCRs) are cyanobacterial photoreceptors that have diverse spectral properties and domain compositions. Although large numbers of CBCR genes exist in cyanobacterial genomes, no studies have assessed whether multiple CBCRs work together. We recently showed that the diguanylate cyclase (DGC) activity of the CBCR SesA from Thermosynechococcus elongatus is activated by blue-light irradiation and that, when irradiated, SesA, via its product cyclic dimeric GMP (c-di-GMP), induces aggregation of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus cells at a temperature that is suboptimum for single-cell viability. For this report, we first characterize the photobiochemical properties of two additional CBCRs, SesB and SesC. Blue/teal light-responsive SesB has only c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) activity, which is up-regulated by teal light and GTP. Blue/green light-responsive SesC has DGC and PDE activities. Its DGC activity is enhanced by blue light, whereas its PDE activity is enhanced by green light. A ΔsesB mutant cannot suppress cell aggregation under teal-green light. A ΔsesC mutant shows a less sensitive cell-aggregation response to ambient light. ΔsesA/ΔsesB/ΔsesC shows partial cell aggregation, which is accompanied by the loss of color dependency, implying that a nonphotoresponsive DGC(s) producing c-di-GMP can also induce the aggregation. The results suggest that SesB enhances the light color dependency of cell aggregation by degrading c-di-GMP, is particularly effective under teal light, and, therefore, seems to counteract the induction of cell aggregation by SesA. In addition, SesC seems to improve signaling specificity as an auxiliary backup to SesA/SesB activities. The coordinated action of these three CBCRs highlights why so many different CBCRs exist.

  2. Microhabitats de mosquitos (Diptera, Culicidae em internódios de taquara na Mata Atlântica, Paraná, Brasil Mosquitoes microhabitats (Diptera, Culicidae in bamboo internodes in Atlantic forest, Paraná, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Leuch Lozovei

    Full Text Available During two consecutive years, from January 1985 to December 1986, a comparative study of mosquitoes preferences for breeding habitat was carried out in the Atlantic Forest of the Serra do Mar, Paraná State, Brazil. To achieve it, 1875 bamboo internodes aligned vertically in live green, bamboo plants Merostachys speciosa Munro and Merostachys sp. were used, in which metabolic water was exuded from the plant itself, and presenting different size/pattern holes at their lateral walls, bored by the local sylvan fauna. Another group of 1200 individual internode traps was used as comparative element, carved out with a transversal cut by a saw, filled with local stream water and held in branches at different heights in the vegetal strata nearby. At both microhabitat types, a total of 17 culicid species was registered. Culex (Microculex neglectus Lutz, 1904, Cx. (Carrollia soperi Antunes & Lane, 1937, Sabethes (Sabethes batesi Lane & Cerqueira, 1942 and Sa. (Sabethinus melanonymphe (Dyar, 1924colonized exclusively live plant internodes, while Culex (Microculex elongatus Rozeboom & Lane, 1950, Cx. (Carrollia iridescens (Lutz, 1905, Cx. (Carrollia kompi Valencia,1973and Trichoprosopon (Trichoprosopon soaresi Dyar & Knab, 1907 bred only in internode traps. The remaining nine species colonized both habitats indistinctly. Quantitatively, was detected the abundance of 60.1% at live green internodes, against 39.9% for internode traps. Concerning the different patterns of bored live internode holes, 40.3% of the total computed specimens were collected in square or rectangular holes, 31.9% in two hole internodes, one minute circular, the other wider, and the remaining 28.8% of specimens distributed in other pattern type internodes. The mosquitoes breeding at these microhabitats fall in the culicid entomofauna specialized at locating and detecting peculiar and propitious mesogen conditions for breeding purposes.

  3. Questioning the role of phenology shifts and trophic mismatching in a planktonic food web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Angus; Harmer, Rachel A.; Widdicombe, Claire E.; McEvoy, Andrea J.; Smyth, Tim J.; Cummings, Denise G.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Maud, Jacqueline L.; McConville, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    In a warming climate, differential shifts in the seasonal timing of predators and prey have been suggested to lead to trophic "mismatches" that decouple primary, secondary and tertiary production. We tested this hypothesis using a 25-year time-series of weekly sampling at the Plymouth L4 site, comparing 57 plankton taxa spanning 4 trophic levels. During warm years, there was a weak tendency for earlier timings of spring taxa and later timings of autumn taxa. While this is in line with many previous findings, numerous exceptions existed and only a few taxa (e.g. Gyrodinium spp., Pseudocalanus elongatus, and Acartia clausi) showed consistent, strong evidence for temperature-related timing shifts, revealed by all 4 of the timing indices that we used. Also, the calculated offsets in timing (i.e. "mismatches") between predator and prey were no greater in extreme warm or cold years than during more average years. Further, the magnitude of these offsets had no effect on the "success" of the predator, in terms of their annual mean abundance or egg production rates. Instead numerous other factors override, including: inter-annual variability in food quantity, high food baseline levels, turnover rates and prolonged seasonal availability, allowing extended periods of production. Furthermore many taxa, notably meroplankton, increased well before the spring bloom. While theoretically a chronic mismatch, this likely reflects trade-offs for example in predation avoidance. Various gelatinous taxa (Phaeocystis, Noctiluca, ctenophores, appendicularians, medusae) may have reduced these predation constraints, with variable, explosive population outbursts likely responding to improved conditions. The match-mismatch hypothesis may apply for highly seasonal, pulsed systems or specialist feeders, but we suggest that the concept is being over-extended to other marine systems where multiple factors compensate.

  4. Rhythmic and sustained oscillations in metabolism and gene expression of Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 under constant light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Bhupendra Gaudana

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria, a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, oscillate between day and night time metabolisms with concomitant oscillations in gene expression in response to light/dark cycles (LD. The oscillations in gene expression have been shown to sustain in constant light (LL with a free running period of 24 h in a model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. However, equivalent oscillations in metabolism are not reported under LL in this non-nitrogen fixing cyanobacterium. Here we focus on Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, a unicellular, nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium known to temporally separate the processes of oxygenic photosynthesis and oxygen-sensitive nitrogen fixation. In a recent report, metabolism of Cyanothece 51142 has been shown to oscillate between photosynthetic and respiratory phases under LL with free running periods that are temperature dependent but significantly shorter than the circadian period. Further, the oscillations shift to circadian pattern at moderate cell densities that are concomitant with slower growth rates. Here we take this understanding forward and demonstrate that the utradian rhythm under LL sustains at much higher cell densities when grown under turbulent regimes that simulate flashing light effect. Our results suggest that the ultradian rhythm in metabolism may be needed to support higher carbon and nitrogen requirements of rapidly growing cells under LL. With a comprehensive Real time PCR based gene expression analysis we account for key regulatory interactions and demonstrate the interplay between clock genes and the genes of key metabolic pathways. Further, we observe that several genes that peak at dusk in Synechococcus peak at dawn in Cyanothece and vice versa. The circadian rhythm of this organism appears to be more robust with peaking of genes in anticipation of the ensuing photosynthetic and respiratory metabolic phases.

  5. Structure of Psb29/Thf1 and its association with the FtsH protease complex involved in photosystem II repair in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec Ková, Martina; Yu, Jianfeng; Krynická, Vendula; Kozlo, Amanda; Shao, Shengxi; Koník, Peter; Komenda, Josef; Murray, James W; Nixon, Peter J

    2017-09-26

    One strategy for enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants is to improve their ability to repair photosystem II (PSII) in response to irreversible damage by light. Despite the pivotal role of thylakoid-embedded FtsH protease complexes in the selective degradation of PSII subunits during repair, little is known about the factors involved in regulating FtsH expression. Here we show using the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 that the Psb29 subunit, originally identified as a minor component of His-tagged PSII preparations, physically interacts with FtsH complexes in vivo and is required for normal accumulation of the FtsH2/FtsH3 hetero-oligomeric complex involved in PSII repair. We show using X-ray crystallography that Psb29 from Thermosynechococcus elongatus has a unique fold consisting of a helical bundle and an extended C-terminal helix and contains a highly conserved region that might be involved in binding to FtsH. A similar interaction is likely to occur in Arabidopsis chloroplasts between the Psb29 homologue, termed THF1, and the FTSH2/FTSH5 complex. The direct involvement of Psb29/THF1 in FtsH accumulation helps explain why THF1 is a target during the hypersensitive response in plants induced by pathogen infection. Downregulating FtsH function and the PSII repair cycle via THF1 would contribute to the production of reactive oxygen species, the loss of chloroplast function and cell death.This article is part of the themed issue 'Enhancing photosynthesis in crop plants: targets for improvement'. © 2017 The Authors.

  6. Application of peptide gemini surfactants as novel solubilization surfactants for photosystems I and II of cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeda, Shuhei; Umezaki, Katsunari; Noji, Tomoyasu; Ikeda, Atsushi; Kawakami, Keisuke; Kondo, Masaharu; Yamamoto, Yasushi; Shen, Jian-Ren; Taga, Keijiro; Dewa, Takehisa; Ito, Shigeru; Nango, Mamoru; Tanaka, Toshiki; Mizuno, Toshihisa

    2013-09-17

    We designed novel peptide gemini surfactants (PG-surfactants), DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D, which can solubilize Photosystem I (PSI) of Thermosynecoccus elongatus and Photosystem II (PSII) of Thermosynecoccus vulcanus in an aqueous buffer solution. To assess the detailed effects of PG-surfactants on the original supramolecular membrane protein complexes and functions of PSI and PSII, we applied the surfactant exchange method to the isolated PSI and PSII. Spectroscopic properties, light-induced electron transfer activity, and dynamic light scattering measurements showed that PSI and PSII could be solubilized not only with retention of the original supramolecular protein complexes and functions but also without forming aggregates. Furthermore, measurement of the lifetime of light-induced charge-separation state in PSI revealed that both surfactants, especially DKDKC12D, displayed slight improvement against thermal denaturation below 60 °C compared with that using β-DDM. This degree of improvement in thermal resistance still seems low, implying that the peptide moieties did not interact directly with membrane protein surfaces. By conjugating an electron mediator such as methyl viologen (MV(2+)) to DKDKC12K (denoted MV-DKDKC12K), we obtained derivatives that can trap the generated reductive electrons from the light-irradiated PSI. After immobilization onto an indium tin oxide electrode, a cathodic photocurrent from the electrode to the PSI/MV-DKDKC12K conjugate was observed in response to the interval of light irradiation. These findings indicate that the PG-surfactants DKDKC12K and DKDKC12D provide not only a new class of solubilization surfactants but also insights into designing other derivatives that confer new functions on PSI and PSII.

  7. Crystallographic and Computational Analysis of the Barrel Part of the PsbO Protein of Photosystem II: Carboxylate-Water Clusters as Putative Proton Transfer Relays and Structural Switches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bommer, Martin; Bondar, Ana-Nicoleta; Zouni, Athina; Dobbek, Holger; Dau, Holger

    2016-08-23

    In all organisms that employ oxygenic photosynthesis, the membrane-extrinsic PsbO protein is a functionally important component of photosystem II. To study the previously proposed proton antenna function of carboxylate clusters at the protein-water interface, we combined crystallography and simulations of a truncated cyanobacterial (Thermosynechococcus elongatus) PsbO without peripheral loops. We expressed the PsbO β-barrel heterologously and determined crystal structures at resolutions of 1.15-1.5 Å at 100 K at various pH values and at 297 K and pH 6. (1) Approximately half of the 177 surface waters identified at 100 K are resolved at 297 K, suggesting significant occupancy of specific water sites at room temperature, and loss of resolvable occupancy for other sites. (2) Within a loop region specific to cyanobacterial PsbO, three residues and four waters coordinating a calcium ion are well ordered even at 297 K; the ligation differs for manganese. (3) The crystal structures show water-carboxylate clusters that could facilitate fast Grotthus-type proton transfer along the protein surface and/or store protons. (4) Two carboxylate side chains, which are part of a structural motif interrupting two β-strands and connecting PsbO to photosystem II, are within hydrogen bonding distance at pH 6 (100 K). Simulations indicate coupling between protein structure and carboxylate protonation. The crystal structure determined at 100 K and pH 10 indicates broken hydrogen bonding between the carboxylates and local structural change. At pH 6 and 297 K, both conformations were present in the crystal, suggesting conformational dynamics in the functionally relevant pH regime. Taken together, crystallography and molecular dynamics underline a possible mechanism for pH-dependent structural switching.

  8. Karyotype differentiation and cytotaxonomic considerations in species of Serrasalmidae (Characiformes from the Amazon basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celeste Mutuko Nakayama

    Full Text Available Six species of Serrasalmidae from the central Amazon, representatives of the genera Serrasalmus (S. elongatus, S. maculatus, S. cf. rhombeus, and S. rhombeus, Pygocentrus (P. nattereri, and Colossoma (C. macropomum, were analyzed regarding the distribution of the Ag-NORs, C-positive heterochromatin and 18S and 5S rRNA genes on the chromosomes. All specimens had 2n = 60 chromosomes, except S. cf. rhombeus, with 2n = 58, and C. macropomum with 2n = 54 chromosomes. The Ag-NORs were multiple and located on the short arms of subtelo-acrocentric chromosomes in all Serrasalmus species and in P. nattereri, but were found on metacentric chromosomes in C. macropomum. The 18S rDNA sites were usually coincident with Ag-NORs, although some species had a higher number and/or a distinct localization of these sites. C-positive heterochromatin was preferentially situated in centromeric regions, remarkably on metacentric pair number 7 in all Serrasalmus species and number 3 in P. nattereri, which beared a conspicuous proximal C-band on the long arms. The 5S rDNA sites were detected in a single chromosomal pair in all species. In Serrasalmus and P. nattereri, this pair was the number 7 and 3, respectively, thereby revealing its co-localization with the conspicuous heterochromatic band. However, in C. macropomum, only one homologue (probably belonging to pair number 12 exhibited 5S rDNA sites on the short arms, close to the centromere. The present data revealed reliable cytotaxonomic markers, enabling the evaluation of karyotype differentiation and interrelationships among Serrasalmidae, as well as the probable occurrence of a species complex in S. rhombeus.

  9. Prevalence of infection and molecular confirmation by using ITS-2 region of Fasciola gigantica found in domestic cattle from Chiang Mai province, Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anawat Phalee; Chalobol Wongsawad

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the infection ofFasciola gigantica(F. gigantica) in domestic cattle from ChiangMai province and molecular confirmation usingITS-2 region.Methods:The liver and gall bladder ofBubalus bubalis(B. bubalis) andBos taurus(B. taurus) from slaughterhouses were examined adult worms and prevalence investigation.The species confirmation with phylogenetic analysis usingITS-2 sequences was performed by maximum likelihood andUPGMA methods. Results:The total prevalences of infection inB. bubalis andBubalus taurus(B. taurus) were 67.27% and52.94% respectively.The respective prevalence in bothB. bubalis andB. taurus were acquired fromDoi-Saket,Muang, andSanpatong districts, with81.25%,62.50% and60.00% for B. bubalis and62.50%,50.00% and47.06% forBos taurus respectively.The species confirmation ofF. gigantica and some related species by basing on maximum likelihood andUPGMA methods used,4 groups of trematodes weregenerated, firstF. gigantica group including specimen ofChiang Mai, second2 samples of F. hepatica, third group of3 rumen flukes;Orthocoelium streptocoelium, F. elongatus andParamphistomum epliclitum and fourth group of3 minute intestinal flukes;Haplorchis taichui, Stellantchasmu falcatus,Haplorchoides sp. and liver fluke;Opisthorchis viverrini respectively.Conclusions:These results can be confirmed theGiant liver fluke which mainly caused fascioliasis inChiangMai was identified asF. gigantica and specimens were the same as those ofF. gigantica recorded in other different countries.Nucleotide sequence of ITS-2 region has been proven as effective diagnostic tool for the identification ofF. gigantica.

  10. Structure and function of a cyanophage-encoded peptide deformylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jeremy A; Lorimer, Don; Youle, Merry; Witte, Pam; Craig, Tim; Abendroth, Jan; Rohwer, Forest; Edwards, Robert A; Segall, Anca M; Burgin, Alex B

    2013-06-01

    Bacteriophages encode auxiliary metabolic genes that support more efficient phage replication. For example, cyanophages carry several genes to maintain host photosynthesis throughout infection, shuttling the energy and reducing power generated away from carbon fixation and into anabolic pathways. Photodamage to the D1/D2 proteins at the core of photosystem II necessitates their continual replacement. Synthesis of functional proteins in bacteria requires co-translational removal of the N-terminal formyl group by a peptide deformylase (PDF). Analysis of marine metagenomes to identify phage-encoded homologs of known metabolic genes found that marine phages carry PDF genes, suggesting that their expression during infection might benefit phage replication. We identified a PDF homolog in the genome of Synechococcus cyanophage S-SSM7. Sequence analysis confirmed that it possesses the three absolutely conserved motifs that form the active site in PDF metalloproteases. Phylogenetic analysis placed it within the Type 1B subclass, most closely related to the Arabidopsis chloroplast PDF, but lacking the C-terminal α-helix characteristic of that group. PDF proteins from this phage and from Synechococcus elongatus were expressed and characterized. The phage PDF is the more active enzyme and deformylates the N-terminal tetrapeptides from D1 proteins more efficiently than those from ribosomal proteins. Solution of the X-ray/crystal structures of those two PDFs to 1.95 Å resolution revealed active sites identical to that of the Type 1B Arabidopsis chloroplast PDF. Taken together, these findings show that many cyanophages encode a PDF with a D1 substrate preference that adds to the repertoire of genes used by phages to maintain photosynthetic activities.

  11. Responses of Szarvasi-1 energy grass to sewage sludge treatments in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rév, Ambrus; Tóth, Brigitta; Solti, Ádám; Sipos, Gyula; Fodor, Ferenc

    2017-09-01

    Sewage sludge (SS) originating from communal wastewater is a hazardous material but have a potentially great nutritive value. Its disposal after treatment in agricultural lands can be a very economical and safe way of utilization once fast growing, high biomass, perennial plants of renewable energy production are cultivated. Szarvasi-1 energy grass (Elymus elongatus subsp. ponticus cv. Szarvasi-1), a good candidate for this application, was grown in hydroponics in order to assess its metal accumulation and tolerance under increasing SS amendments. The applied SS had a composition characteristic to SS from communal wastes and did not contain any toxic heavy metal contamination from industrial sludge in high concentration. Toxic effects was assessed in quarter strength Hoagland nutrient solution and only the two highest doses (12.5-18.75 g dm(-3)) caused decreases in root growth, shoot water content and length and stomatal conductance whereas shoot growth, root water content, chlorophyll concentration and the maximal quantum efficiency of photosystem II was unaffected. Shoot K, Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn and Cu content decreased but Na and Ni increased in the shoot compared to the unamended control. The nutritive effect was tested in 1/40 strength Hoagland solution and only the highest dose (12.5 g dm(-3)) decreased root growth and stomatal conductance significantly while lower doses (1.25-6.25 g dm(-3)) had a stimulative effect. Shoot K, Na, Fe and Ni increased and Ca, Mg, Mn, Zn and Cu decreased in this treatment. It was concluded that SS with low heavy metal content can be a potentially good fertilizer for high biomass non-food crops such as Szarvasi-1 energy grass. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Redox crisis underlies conditional light-dark lethality in cyanobacterial mutants that lack the circadian regulator, RpaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamond, Spencer; Rubin, Benjamin E; Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Chen, You; Barber, Chase D; Golden, Susan S

    2017-01-24

    Cyanobacteria evolved a robust circadian clock, which has a profound influence on fitness and metabolism under daily light-dark (LD) cycles. In the model cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, a functional clock is not required for diurnal growth, but mutants defective for the response regulator that mediates transcriptional rhythms in the wild-type, regulator of phycobilisome association A (RpaA), cannot be cultured under LD conditions. We found that rpaA-null mutants are inviable after several hours in the dark and compared the metabolomes of wild-type and rpaA-null strains to identify the source of lethality. Here, we show that the wild-type metabolome is very stable throughout the night, and this stability is lost in the absence of RpaA. Additionally, an rpaA mutant accumulates excessive reactive oxygen species (ROS) during the day and is unable to clear it during the night. The rpaA-null metabolome indicates that these cells are reductant-starved in the dark, likely because enzymes of the primary nighttime NADPH-producing pathway are direct targets of RpaA. Because NADPH is required for processes that detoxify ROS, conditional LD lethality likely results from inability of the mutant to activate reductant-requiring pathways that detoxify ROS when photosynthesis is not active. We identified second-site mutations and growth conditions that suppress LD lethality in the mutant background that support these conclusions. These results provide a mechanistic explanation as to why rpaA-null mutants die in the dark, further connect the clock to metabolism under diurnal growth, and indicate that RpaA likely has important unidentified functions during the day.

  13. Intensive DNA Replication and Metabolism during the Lag Phase in Cyanobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Watanabe

    Full Text Available Unlike bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, several species of freshwater cyanobacteria are known to contain multiple chromosomal copies per cell, at all stages of their cell cycle. We have characterized the replication of multi-copy chromosomes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (hereafter Synechococcus 7942. In Synechococcus 7942, the replication of multi-copy chromosome is asynchronous, not only among cells but also among multi-copy chromosomes. This suggests that DNA replication is not tightly coupled to cell division in Synechococcus 7942. To address this hypothesis, we analysed the relationship between DNA replication and cell doubling at various growth phases of Synechococcus 7942 cell culture. Three distinct growth phases were characterised in Synechococcus 7942 batch culture: lag phase, exponential phase, and arithmetic (linear phase. The chromosomal copy number was significantly higher during the lag phase than during the exponential and linear phases. Likewise, DNA replication activity was higher in the lag phase cells than in the exponential and linear phase cells, and the lag phase cells were more sensitive to nalidixic acid, a DNA gyrase inhibitor, than cells in other growth phases. To elucidate physiological differences in Synechococcus 7942 during the lag phase, we analysed the metabolome at each growth phase. In addition, we assessed the accumulation of central carbon metabolites, amino acids, and DNA precursors at each phase. The results of these analyses suggest that Synechococcus 7942 cells prepare for cell division during the lag phase by initiating intensive chromosomal DNA replication and accumulating metabolites necessary for the subsequent cell division and elongation steps that occur during the exponential growth and linear phases.

  14. Intensive DNA Replication and Metabolism during the Lag Phase in Cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Ohbayashi, Ryudo; Kanesaki, Yu; Saito, Natsumi; Chibazakura, Taku; Soga, Tomoyoshi; Yoshikawa, Hirofumi

    2015-01-01

    Unlike bacteria such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, several species of freshwater cyanobacteria are known to contain multiple chromosomal copies per cell, at all stages of their cell cycle. We have characterized the replication of multi-copy chromosomes in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (hereafter Synechococcus 7942). In Synechococcus 7942, the replication of multi-copy chromosome is asynchronous, not only among cells but also among multi-copy chromosomes. This suggests that DNA replication is not tightly coupled to cell division in Synechococcus 7942. To address this hypothesis, we analysed the relationship between DNA replication and cell doubling at various growth phases of Synechococcus 7942 cell culture. Three distinct growth phases were characterised in Synechococcus 7942 batch culture: lag phase, exponential phase, and arithmetic (linear) phase. The chromosomal copy number was significantly higher during the lag phase than during the exponential and linear phases. Likewise, DNA replication activity was higher in the lag phase cells than in the exponential and linear phase cells, and the lag phase cells were more sensitive to nalidixic acid, a DNA gyrase inhibitor, than cells in other growth phases. To elucidate physiological differences in Synechococcus 7942 during the lag phase, we analysed the metabolome at each growth phase. In addition, we assessed the accumulation of central carbon metabolites, amino acids, and DNA precursors at each phase. The results of these analyses suggest that Synechococcus 7942 cells prepare for cell division during the lag phase by initiating intensive chromosomal DNA replication and accumulating metabolites necessary for the subsequent cell division and elongation steps that occur during the exponential growth and linear phases.

  15. An automated flow for directed evolution based on detection of promiscuous scaffolds using spatial and electrostatic properties of catalytic residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Chakraborty

    Full Text Available The aspiration to mimic and accelerate natural evolution has fueled interest in directed evolution experiments, which endow or enhance functionality in enzymes. Barring a few de novo approaches, most methods take a template protein having the desired activity, known active site residues and structure, and proceed to select a target protein which has a pre-existing scaffold congruent to the template motif. Previously, we have established a computational method (CLASP based on spatial and electrostatic properties to detect active sites, and a method to quantify promiscuity in proteins. We exploit the prospect of promiscuous active sites to serve as the starting point for directed evolution and present a method to select a target protein which possesses a significant partial match with the template scaffold (DECAAF. A library of partial motifs, constructed from the active site residues of the template protein, is used to rank a set of target proteins based on maximal significant matches with the partial motifs, and cull out the best candidate from the reduced set as the target protein. Considering the scenario where this 'incubator' protein lacks activity, we identify mutations in the target protein that will mirror the template motif by superimposing the target and template protein based on the partial match. Using this superimposition technique, we analyzed the less than expected gain of activity achieved by an attempt to induce β-lactamase activity in a penicillin binding protein (PBP (PBP-A from T. elongatus, and attributed this to steric hindrance from neighboring residues. We also propose mutations in PBP-5 from E. coli, which does not have similar steric constraints. The flow details have been worked out in an example which aims to select a substitute protein for human neutrophil elastase, preferably related to grapevines, in a chimeric anti-microbial enzyme which bolsters the innate immune defense system of grapevines.

  16. CRISPR-Cas9 for the genome engineering of cyanobacteria and succinate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hung; Shen, Claire R; Huang, Chun-Hung; Sung, Li-Yu; Wu, Meng-Ying; Hu, Yu-Chen

    2016-11-01

    Cyanobacteria hold promise as a cell factory for producing biofuels and bio-derived chemicals, but genome engineering of cyanobacteria such as Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 poses challenges because of their oligoploidy nature and long-term instability of the introduced gene. CRISPR-Cas9 is a newly developed RNA-guided genome editing system, yet its application for cyanobacteria engineering has yet to be reported. Here we demonstrated that CRISPR-Cas9 system can effectively trigger programmable double strand break (DSB) at the chromosome of PCC 7942 and provoke cell death. With the co-transformation of template plasmid harboring the gene cassette and flanking homology arms, CRISPR-Cas9-mediated DSB enabled precise gene integration, ameliorated the homologous recombination efficiency and allowed the use of lower amount of template DNA and shorter homology arms. The CRISPR-Cas9-induced cell death imposed selective pressure and enhanced the chance of concomitant integration of gene cassettes into all chromosomes of PCC 7942, hence accelerating the process of obtaining homogeneous and stable recombinant strains. We further explored the feasibility of engineering cyanobacteria by CRISPR-Cas9-assisted simultaneous glgc knock-out and gltA/ppc knock-in, which improved the succinate titer to 435.0±35.0μg/L, an ≈11-fold increase when compared with that of the wild-type cells. These data altogether justify the use of CRISPR-Cas9 for genome engineering and manipulation of metabolic pathways in cyanobacteria.

  17. Effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on cyanobacteria and algae in laboratory strains and in natural algal assemblages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bácsi, István; B-Béres, Viktória; Kókai, Zsuzsanna; Gonda, Sándor; Novák, Zoltán; Nagy, Sándor Alex; Vasas, Gábor

    2016-05-01

    In recent years measurable concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have been shown in the aquatic environment as a result of increasing human consumption. Effects of five frequently used non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (diclofenac, diflunisal, ibuprofen, mefenamic acid and piroxicam in 0.1 mg ml(-1) concentration) in batch cultures of cyanobacteria (Synechococcus elongatus, Microcystis aeruginosa, Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii), and eukaryotic algae (Desmodesmus communis, Haematococcus pluvialis, Cryptomonas ovata) were studied. Furthermore, the effects of the same concentrations of NSAIDs were investigated in natural algal assemblages in microcosms. According to the changes of chlorophyll-a content, unicellular cyanobacteria seemed to be more tolerant to NSAIDs than eukaryotic algae in laboratory experiments. Growth of eukaryotic algae was reduced by all drugs, the cryptomonad C. ovata was the most sensitive to NSAIDs, while the flagellated green alga H. pluvialis was more sensitive than the non-motile green alga D. communis. NSAID treatments had weaker impact in the natural assemblages dominated by cyanobacteria than in the ones dominated by eukaryotic algae, confirming the results of laboratory experiments. Diversity and number of functional groups did not change notably in cyanobacteria dominated assemblages, while they decreased significantly in eukaryotic algae dominated ones compared to controls. The results highlight that cyanobacteria (especially unicellular ones) are less sensitive to the studied, mostly hardly degradable NSAIDs, which suggest that their accumulation in water bodies may contribute to the expansion of cyanobacterial mass productions in appropriate environmental circumstances by pushing back eukaryotic algae. Thus, these contaminants require special attention during wastewater treatment and monitoring of surface waters.

  18. Translational control of small heat shock genes in mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria by RNA thermometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimdins, Annika; Klinkert, Birgit; Aschke-Sonnenborn, Ursula; Kaiser, Friederike M; Kortmann, Jens; Narberhaus, Franz

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacteria constitute a heterogeneous phylum of oxygen-producing, photosynthetic prokaryotes. They are susceptible to various stress conditions like heat, salt, or light stress, all inducing the cyanobacterial heat shock response (HSR). Cyanobacterial small heat shock proteins (sHsps) are known to preserve thylakoid membrane integrity under stress conditions, thereby protecting the photosynthesis machinery. In Synechocystis sp PCC 6803, synthesis of the sHsp Hsp17 is regulated by an RNA thermometer (RNAT) in the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of the hsp17 mRNA. RNATs are direct temperature sensors that control expression of many bacterial heat shock and virulence genes. They hinder translation at low temperatures by base pairing, thus blocking ribosome access to the mRNA.   To explore the temperature range in which RNATs act, we studied various RNAT candidates upstream of sHsp genes from mesophilic and thermophilic cyanobacteria. The mesophilic cyanobacteria Anabaena variabilis and Nostoc sp chromosomally encode two sHsps each. Reporter gene studies suggested RNAT-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of shsp expression in both organisms. Detailed structural analysis of the two A. variabilis candidates revealed two novel RNAT types. The first, avashort, regulates translation primarily by masking of the AUG translational start codon. The second, featuring an extended initial hairpin, thus named avalong, presumably makes use of complex tertiary interaction. The 5'-UTR of the small heat shock gene hspA in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus is predicted to adopt an extended secondary structure. Structure probing revealed that the ribosome binding site was blocked at temperatures below 55 °C. The results of this study demonstrate that cyanobacteria commonly use RNATs to control expression of their small heat shock genes.

  19. Paleobiology of the Mesoproterozoic Billyakh Group, Anabar Uplift, northern Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeev, V. N.; Knoll, A. H.; Grotzinger, J. P.

    1995-01-01

    Silicified peritidal carbonates of the Mesoproterozoic Kotuikan and Yusmastakh Formations, Anabar Uplift, northeastern Siberia, contain exceptionally well-preserved microfossils. The assemblage is dominated by ellipsoidal akinetes of nostocalean cyanobacteria (Archaeoellipsoides) and problematic spheroidal unicells (Myxococcoides); both are allochthonous and presumably planktonic. The assemblage also includes distinctive mat-forming scytonematacean and entophysalidacean cyanobacteria, diverse short trichomes interpreted as cyanobacterial hormogonia or germinated akinetes, rare longer trichomes, and several types of colonial unicells. Although many taxa in the Kotuikan-Yusmastakh assemblage are long-ranging prokaryotes, the overall character of the assemblage is distinctly Mesoproterozoic, with its major features shared by broadly coeval floras from Canada, China, India, and elsewhere in Siberia. Microfossils also occur in middle to inner shelf shales of the Ust'-Il'ya and lower Kotuikan Formations. Leiosphaerid acritarchs (up to several hundred microns in diameter) characterize this facies. As in other Mesoproterozoic acritarch assemblages, acanthomorphic and other complex forms that typify Neoproterozoic assemblages are absent. The combination in Billyakh assemblages of exceptional preservation and low eukaryotic diversity supports the hypothesis that nucleated organisms diversified markedly near the Mesoproterozoic-Neoproterozoic boundary. The assemblages also demonstrate the antiquity of cyanobacteria capable of cell differentiation and suggest the importance of both changing peritidal substrates and evolving eukaryotes in determining stratigraphic patterns of Proterozoic prokaryotes. The permineralized assemblage contains 33 species belonging to 17 genera. Ten new species or new combinations are proposed: Archaeoellipsoides costatus n. sp., A. elongatus n. comb., A. dolichos n. comb., A. minor n. nom., A. crassus n. comb., A. major n. comb., A. bactroformis n

  20. Ethylene production with engineered Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veetil, Vinod Puthan; Angermayr, S Andreas; Hellingwerf, Klaas J

    2017-02-23

    Metabolic engineering and synthetic biology of cyanobacteria offer a promising sustainable alternative approach for fossil-based ethylene production, by using sunlight via oxygenic photosynthesis, to convert carbon dioxide directly into ethylene. Towards this, both well-studied cyanobacteria, i.e., Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, have been engineered to produce ethylene by introducing the ethylene-forming enzyme (Efe) from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola PK2 (the Kudzu strain), which catalyzes the conversion of the ubiquitous tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediate 2-oxoglutarate into ethylene. This study focuses on Synechocystis sp PCC 6803 and shows stable ethylene production through the integration of a codon-optimized version of the efe gene under control of the Ptrc promoter and the core Shine-Dalgarno sequence (5'-AGGAGG-3') as the ribosome-binding site (RBS), at the slr0168 neutral site. We have increased ethylene production twofold by RBS screening and further investigated improving ethylene production from a single gene copy of efe, using multiple tandem promoters and by putting our best construct on an RSF1010-based broad-host-self-replicating plasmid, which has a higher copy number than the genome. Moreover, to raise the intracellular amounts of the key Efe substrate, 2-oxoglutarate, from which ethylene is formed, we constructed a glycogen-synthesis knockout mutant (ΔglgC) and introduced the ethylene biosynthetic pathway in it. Under nitrogen limiting conditions, the glycogen knockout strain has increased intracellular 2-oxoglutarate levels; however, surprisingly, ethylene production was lower in this strain than in the wild-type background. Making use of different RBS sequences, production of ethylene ranging over a 20-fold difference has been achieved. However, a further increase of production through multiple tandem promoters and a broad-host plasmid was not achieved speculating that the transcription strength and

  1. Effects of PII deficiency on expression of the genes involved in ammonium utilization in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takatani, Nobuyuki; Omata, Tatsuo

    2006-06-01

    The Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 mutant deficient in PII protein (the glnB gene product) was found to express glutamine synthetase activity at levels several times higher than the wild-type strain. There was no significant difference in nitrate reductase activity levels between the two strains, and the nitrite reductase levels were somewhat lower in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. The higher glutamine synthetase activity in the mutant was ascribed to higher expression levels of the glutamine synthetase genes (glnA and glnN), which belong to the regulon controlled by NtcA, a Crp-family transcription regulator. Examination of the effects of PII deficiency on other NtcA-regulated genes revealed that the transcript levels of amt1 (encoding an ammonium permease) and gifB (encoding an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase) were increased, whereas that of gifA (a homolog of gifB, encoding another glutamine synthetase inhibitor) was decreased, with those of nirA, nrtC, icd, sigE (rpoD2-V), nblA and ntcA being unaffected. Unlike the Synechococcus elongatus strain PCC 7942, induction or repression of the NtcA-regulated genes proceeded normally in the PII-deficient mutant upon nitrogen depletion. The altered steady-state expression levels of glnA, glnN, amt1, gifA and gifB in the PII-deficient mutant suggested that Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 has a mechanism for regulation of the subset of the NtcA-regulated genes related directly to ammonium assimilation.

  2. Diversidad y distribución de acridios (Orthoptera: Acridoidea en pastizales del sur de la región pampeana, Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanina Mariottini

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Los acridios son componentes nativos de los pastizales, dichos sistemas han sido modificados debido a la intensificación de las actividades agrícola-ganaderas y por lo tanto se considera importante estudiar las comunidades de acridios asociadas. Se estudió la diversidad y distribución de acridios en el Sur de la región pampeana a través de muestreos realizados en las comunidades vegetales más representativas del partido de Laprida, provincia de Buenos Aires, durante cinco temporadas (2005-2010. Se recolectaron 22 especies. La subfamilia Melanoplinae fue la más diversa (ocho especies. La mayor cantidad de especies se observó en los pastizales nativos (18. La diversidad en los pastizales alterados (1.75±0.096 fue superior (p<0.05 a la de los pastizales halófilos (1.34±0.12. La riqueza de plantas en los pastizales nativos y los pastizales alterados fue superior (p<0.05 a la de las demás comunidades. Se registro una relación positiva entre la riqueza de plantas y las variables riqueza y diversidad de acridios. La similitud entre las comunidades de acridios estimada por los índices cualitativos fue superior al 60%. En general, las especies que tuvieron una mayor frecuencia de aparición, mostraron una mayor abundancia y distribución. Covasacris pallidinota, Dichroplus elongatus, D. maculipennis, Borellia bruneri y B. pallida fueron las de mayor distribución, cinco especies tuvieron una distribución intermedia y la mayoría (12 una distribución restringida.

  3. Isolation and characterization of Microbulbifer species 6532A degrading seaweed thalli to single cell detritus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakabayashi, Masayuki; Sakatoku, Akihiro; Noda, Fumio; Noda, Minoru; Tanaka, Daisuke; Nakamura, Shogo

    2012-02-01

    To reduce the volume of seaweed wastes and extract polysaccharides, seaweed-degrading bacteria were isolated from drifting macroalgae harvested along the coast of Toyama Bay, Japan. Sixty-four bacterial isolates were capable of degrading "Wakame" (Undaria pinnatifida) thallus fragments into single cell detritus (SCD) particles. Amongst these, strain 6532A was the most active degrader of thallus fragments, and was capable of degrading thallus fragments to SCD particles within a day. Although the sequence similarity of the 16S rRNA gene of strain 6532A was 100% similar to that of Microbulbifer elongatus JAMB-A7, several distinct differences were observed between strains, including motility, morphology, and utilization of D: -arabinose and gelatin. Consequently, strain 6532A was classified as a new Microbulbifer strain, and was designated Microbulbifer sp. 6532A. Strain 6532A was capable of degrading both alginate and cellulose in the culture medium, zymogram analysis of which revealed the presence of multiple alginate lyases and cellulases. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to directly demonstrate the existence of these enzymes in Microbulbifer species. Shotgun cloning and sequencing of the alginate lyase gene in 6532A revealed a 1,074-bp open reading frame, which was designated algMsp. The reading frame encoded a PL family seven enzyme composed of 358 amino acids (38,181 Da). With a similarity of 74.2%, the deduced amino acid sequence was most similar to a Saccharophagus enzyme (alg 7C). These findings suggest that algMsp in strain 6532A is a novel alginate lyase gene.

  4. Fossil and Genetic Evidence for the Polyphyletic Nature of the Planktonic Foraminifera "Globigerinoides", and Description of the New Genus Trilobatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spezzaferri, Silvia; Kucera, Michal; Pearson, Paul Nicholas; Wade, Bridget Susan; Rappo, Sacha; Poole, Christopher Robert; Morard, Raphaël; Stalder, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Planktonic foraminifera are one of the most abundant and diverse protists in the oceans. Their utility as paleo proxies requires rigorous taxonomy and comparison with living and genetically related counterparts. We merge genetic and fossil evidence of “Globigerinoides”, characterized by supplementary apertures on spiral side, in a new approach to trace their “total evidence phylogeny” since their first appearance in the latest Paleogene. Combined fossil and molecular genetic data indicate that this genus, as traditionally understood, is polyphyletic. Both datasets indicate the existence of two distinct lineages that evolved independently. One group includes “Globigerinoides” trilobus and its descendants, the extant “Globigerinoides” sacculifer, Orbulina universa and Sphaeroidinella dehiscens. The second group includes the Globigerinoides ruber clade with the extant G. conglobatus and G. elongatus and ancestors. In molecular phylogenies, the trilobus group is not the sister taxon of the ruber group. The ruber group clusters consistently together with the modern Globoturborotalita rubescens as a sister taxon. The re-analysis of the fossil record indicates that the first “Globigerinoides” in the late Oligocene are ancestral to the trilobus group, whereas the ruber group first appeared at the base of the Miocene with representatives distinct from the trilobus group. Therefore, polyphyly of the genus "Globigerinoides" as currently defined can only be avoided either by broadening the genus concept to include G. rubescens and a large number of fossil species without supplementary apertures, or if the trilobus group is assigned to a separate genus. Since the former is not feasible due to the lack of a clear diagnosis for such a broad genus, we erect a new genus Trilobatus for the trilobus group (type species Globigerina triloba Reuss) and amend Globoturborotalita and Globigerinoides to clarify morphology and wall textures of these genera. In the new

  5. A review of the leafhopper tribe Hyalojassini (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae: Iassinae) with description of new taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Wu; Dietrich, Christopher H; Zhang, Yalin

    2015-01-01

    The morphologically diverse leafhopper tribe Hyalojassini is reinstated from synonymy under Iassini based on distinctive features of the male genitalia and a key to the Oriental genera is given. The previously monotypic genera Hyalojassus Evans and Coriojassus Evans are revised and redescribed based on study of the type species. The following new genera and species are described from Thailand and China and placed in Hyalojassini: Kanchanaburiassus maculatus gen. nov. & sp. nov. from Kanchanaburi, Thailand; Lamelliassus chaingmaiensis gen. & sp. nov. from Chaingmai, Thailand; Siamiassus constanti gen. & sp. nov. from Loei, Thailand ; Decliviassus gen nov. with D. bipunctatus sp. nov., D. maculatus sp. nov., and D. nudus sp. nov., from Thailand; Trocniassus gen. nov. with T. shaanxiensis and T. henanensis sp. nov.; Hyalojassus elongatus sp. nov. and H. punctulatus sp. nov. from Thailand and H. yunnanensis sp. nov. from China; Coriojassus loeiensis sp. nov. from Thailand, C. yunnanensis sp. nov. and C. zhejiangensis sp. nov. from Yunnan and Zhejiang, China, respectively, the latter representing the first records of the genus from China. Sinojassus Dai et al. 2010 (nec Zhang 1985) is a junior homonym, thus a new replacement name, Siniassus nom. nov., is proposed, the genus is transferred to Hyalojassini, and the following new combinations are made: Siniassus loberus (Dai, Zhang & Zhang, 2010), Siniassus aspinus (Dai, Zhang & Zhang, 2010), Siniassus compressus (Dai, Zhang & Zhang, 2010) and Siniassus webbi (Dai & Dietrich, 2010). Detailed morphological descriptions and illustrations for all new taxa are provided. The following New World genera share the diagnostic morphological features of Hyalojassini and are newly placed in this tribe: Absheta Blocker, Aztrania Blocker, Baldriga Blocker, Bertawolia Blocker, Betawala Blocker, Comanopa Blocker, Daveyoungana Blocker & Webb, Derakandra Blocker, Donleva Blocker, Gargaropsis Fowler, Garlica Blocker, Gehundra Blocker

  6. An in situ, individual-based approach to quantify connectivity of marine fish: ontogenetic movements and residency of lingcod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Mary Anne; Reynolds, Brad F; Powers, Sean P

    2010-12-13

    As modern fishery assessments change in an effort to be more accurate and encompass the range of potential ecosystem interactions, critical information on the ecology of species including life history, intra and inter-specific competitive interactions and habitat requirements must be added to the standard fishery-dependent and independent data sets. One species whose movements and habitat associations greatly affects exploitation patterns is lingcod, Ophiodon elongatus, which support an economically important fishery along the coastal waters of the Pacific Coast of North America. High site fidelity and limited movements within nearshore areas are hypothesized to have resulted in high catchability, a major factor that has contributed to overfished stocks. Thus, assessing the level of movement and connectivity among lingcod subpopulations inhabiting nearshore habitats is a prerequisite to determining the condition of lingcod stocks. We used the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST) Project acoustic receiver array in Alaska's Prince William Sound to monitor movements and residency of 21 acoustic-tagged lingcod for up to 16 months. Eight of sixteen lingcod (50%) initially aged at 2.5- to 3.5- years-old dispersed from their tag site. Dispersal was highly seasonal, occurring in two, five-week periods from mid-December through January and from mid-April through May. Dispersal in winter may be related to sexually immature lingcod or newly-mature male lingcod being displaced by territorial males. Spring dispersal may be indicative of the onset of migratory behavior where lingcod move out into Prince William Sound and possibly the offshore waters of the Gulf of Alaska. Our results reveal a pattern of ontogenetic dispersal as lingcod approach 4-years-old and exceed 50 cm total length. The large proportion of tagged fish migrating out of Port Gravina, their tagging site, reflects a high level of connectivity among Prince William Sound subpopulations. Our results also support the

  7. Gene essentiality, conservation index and co-evolution of genes in cyanobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiruveedula, Gopi Siva Sai; Wangikar, Pramod P

    2017-01-01

    Cyanobacteria, a group of photosynthetic prokaryotes, dominate the earth with ~ 1015 g wet biomass. Despite diversity in habitats and an ancient origin, cyanobacterial phylum has retained a significant core genome. Cyanobacteria are being explored for direct conversion of solar energy and carbon dioxide into biofuels. For this, efficient cyanobacterial strains will need to be designed via metabolic engineering. This will require identification of target knockouts to channelize the flow of carbon toward the product of interest while minimizing deletions of essential genes. We propose "Gene Conservation Index" (GCI) as a quick measure to predict gene essentiality in cyanobacteria. GCI is based on phylogenetic profile of a gene constructed with a reduced dataset of cyanobacterial genomes. GCI is the percentage of organism clusters in which the query gene is present in the reduced dataset. Of the 750 genes deemed to be essential in the experimental study on S. elongatus PCC 7942, we found 494 to be conserved across the phylum which largely comprise of the essential metabolic pathways. On the contrary, the conserved but non-essential genes broadly comprise of genes required under stress conditions. Exceptions to this rule include genes such as the glycogen synthesis and degradation enzymes, deoxyribose-phosphate aldolase (DERA), glucose-6-phosphate 1-dehydrogenase (zwf) and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase class1, which are conserved but non-essential. While the essential genes are to be avoided during gene knockout studies as potentially lethal deletions, the non-essential but conserved set of genes could be interesting targets for metabolic engineering. Further, we identify clusters of co-evolving genes (CCG), which provide insights that may be useful in annotation. Principal component analysis (PCA) plots of the CCGs are demonstrated as data visualization tools that are complementary to the conventional heatmaps. Our dataset consists of phylogenetic profiles for 23

  8. From cyanobacteria to plants: conservation of PII functions during plastid evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chellamuthu, Vasuki Ranjani; Alva, Vikram; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-02-01

    This article reviews the current state-of-the-art concerning the functions of the signal processing protein PII in cyanobacteria and plants, with a special focus on evolutionary aspects. We start out with a general introduction to PII proteins, their distribution, and their evolution. We also discuss PII-like proteins and domains, in particular, the similarity between ATP-phosphoribosyltransferase (ATP-PRT) and its PII-like domain and the complex between N-acetyl-L-glutamate kinase (NAGK) and its PII activator protein from oxygenic phototrophs. The structural basis of the function of PII as an ATP/ADP/2-oxoglutarate signal processor is described for Synechococcus elongatus PII. In both cyanobacteria and plants, a major target of PII regulation is NAGK, which catalyzes the committed step of arginine biosynthesis. The common principles of NAGK regulation by PII are outlined. Based on the observation that PII proteins from cyanobacteria and plants can functionally replace each other, the hypothesis that PII-dependent NAGK control was under selective pressure during the evolution of plastids of Chloroplastida and Rhodophyta is tested by bioinformatics approaches. It is noteworthy that two lineages of heterokont algae, diatoms and brown algae, also possess NAGK, albeit lacking PII; their NAGK however appears to have descended from an alphaproteobacterium and not from a cyanobacterium as in plants. We end this article by coming to the conclusion that during the evolution of plastids, PII lost its function in coordinating gene expression through the PipX-NtcA network but preserved its role in nitrogen (arginine) storage metabolism, and subsequently took over the fine-tuned regulation of carbon (fatty acid) storage metabolism, which is important in certain developmental stages of plants.

  9. Hypersensitive photic responses and intact genome-wide transcriptional control without the KaiC phosphorylation cycle in the Synechococcus circadian system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umetani, Miki; Hosokawa, Norimune; Kitayama, Yohko; Iwasaki, Hideo

    2014-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are unique organisms with remarkably stable circadian oscillations. These are controlled by a network architecture that comprises two regulatory factors: posttranslational oscillation (PTO) and a transcription/translation feedback loop (TTFL). The clock proteins KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC are essential for the circadian rhythm of the unicellular species Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. Temperature-compensated autonomous cycling of KaiC phosphorylation has been proposed as the primary oscillator mechanism that maintains the circadian clock, even in the dark, and it controls genome-wide gene expression rhythms under continuous-light conditions (LL). However, the kaiC(EE) mutation (where "EE" represents the amino acid changes Ser431Glu and Thr432Glu), where phosphorylation cycling does not occur in vivo, has a damped but clear kaiBC expression rhythm with a long period. This suggests that there must be coupling between the robust PTO and the "slave" unstable TTFL. Here, we found that the kaiC(EE) mutant strain in LL was hypersensitive to the dark acclimation required for phase shifting. Twenty-three percent of the genes in the kaiC(EE) mutant strain exhibited genome-wide transcriptional rhythms with a period of 48 h in LL. The circadian phase distribution was also conserved significantly in most of the wild-type and kaiC(EE) mutant strain cycling genes, which suggests that the output mechanism was not damaged severely even in the absence of KaiC phosphorylation cycles. These results strongly suggest that the KaiC phosphorylation cycle is not essential for generating the genome-wide rhythm under light conditions, whereas it is important for appropriate circadian timing in the light and dark.

  10. CryoEM and Molecular Dynamics of the Circadian KaiB-KaiC Complex Indicates That KaiB Monomers Interact with KaiC and Block ATP Binding Clefts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villarreal, Seth A.; Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Mori, Tetsuya; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl H.; Egli, Martin; Stewart, Phoebe L. [Case Western; (Vanderbilt); (Vanderbilt-MED)

    2014-10-02

    The circadian control of cellular processes in cyanobacteria is regulated by a posttranslational oscillator formed by three Kai proteins. During the oscillator cycle, KaiA serves to promote autophosphorylation of KaiC while KaiB counteracts this effect. Here, we present a crystallographic structure of the wild-type Synechococcus elongatus KaiB and a cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) structure of a KaiBC complex. The crystal structure shows the expected dimer core structure and significant conformational variations of the KaiB C-terminal region, which is functionally important in maintaining rhythmicity. The KaiBC sample was formed with a C-terminally truncated form of KaiC, KaiC-Δ489, which is persistently phosphorylated. The KaiB–KaiC-Δ489 structure reveals that the KaiC hexamer can bind six monomers of KaiB, which form a continuous ring of density in the KaiBC complex. We performed cryoEM-guided molecular dynamics flexible fitting simulations with crystal structures of KaiB and KaiC to probe the KaiBC protein–protein interface. This analysis indicated a favorable binding mode for the KaiB monomer on the CII end of KaiC, involving two adjacent KaiC subunits and spanning an ATP binding cleft. A KaiC mutation, R468C, which has been shown to affect the affinity of KaiB for KaiC and lengthen the period in a bioluminescence rhythm assay, is found within the middle of the predicted KaiBC interface. The proposed KaiB binding mode blocks access to the ATP binding cleft in the CII ring of KaiC, which provides insight into how KaiB might influence the phosphorylation status of KaiC.

  11. Feeding strategy of Downs herring larvae (Clupea harengus L.) in the English Channel and North Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denis, Jeremy; Vallet, Carole; Courcot, Lucie; Lefebvre, Valérie; Caboche, Josselin; Antajan, Elvire; Marchal, Paul; Loots, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    This study aims to characterize the larval feeding strategy of the Downs sub-population of North Sea herring (Clupea harengus L.). Diet composition, vacuity rate and prey selectivity of larvae from 8 to 15 mm collected during the International Bottom Trawl Survey (IBTS) - MIK sampling from 2008 to 2013 were assessed by direct observation of their gut contents using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The high contribution of protists and small zooplanktonic prey observed in the gut contents proved the relevance of SEM to study the diet of first feeding larvae. The relatively low vacuity rate of 45% suggests that food may not be a limiting factor for Downs herring larvae in winter. These larvae appeared to be omnivorous and there was a clear shift in term of prey composition at a size of 13 mm. Smaller larvae (8-12 mm) fed on a higher diversity of small prey, mainly small copepods (Oncaea spp. and Euterpina acutifrons), invertebrate eggs, diatoms (Psammodicthyon panduriforme and Coscinodiscus spp.) and dinoflagellates (Dinophysis acuminate and Prorocentrum micans) whereas bigger larvae (13-15 mm) fed on a lower diversity of larger prey, mainly copepods (Temora longicornis and Paracalanus parvus) and dinoflagellates (Gonyaulax spp.). Downs herring larvae had clear prey preferences as some dinoflagellates (Pyrophacus spp., Gonyaulax spp., P. micans and Porocentrum lima), invertebrate eggs, copepods (Oncaea spp. and nauplii) and diatoms (Thalassiosira curviseriata) were positively selected and other diatoms (Nitzschia spp., Thalassiosira tenera, Thalassiosira spp. and Chaetoceros spp.) and copepods (Pseudocalanus elongatus, T. longicornis and Unidentified calanoid) were negatively selected. We argue that this shift in term of prey preferences occurring at a size of 13 mm constitutes the critical period for Downs herring larvae.

  12. A thermodynamically consistent model of the post-translational Kai circadian clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubensky, David K.; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2017-01-01

    The principal pacemaker of the circadian clock of the cyanobacterium S. elongatus is a protein phosphorylation cycle consisting of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB and KaiC. KaiC forms a homohexamer, with each monomer consisting of two domains, CI and CII. Both domains can bind and hydrolyze ATP, but only the CII domain can be phosphorylated, at two residues, in a well-defined sequence. While this system has been studied extensively, how the clock is driven thermodynamically has remained elusive. Inspired by recent experimental observations and building on ideas from previous mathematical models, we present a new, thermodynamically consistent, statistical-mechanical model of the clock. At its heart are two main ideas: i) ATP hydrolysis in the CI domain provides the thermodynamic driving force for the clock, switching KaiC between an active conformational state in which its phosphorylation level tends to rise and an inactive one in which it tends to fall; ii) phosphorylation of the CII domain provides the timer for the hydrolysis in the CI domain. The model also naturally explains how KaiA, by acting as a nucleotide exchange factor, can stimulate phosphorylation of KaiC, and how the differential affinity of KaiA for the different KaiC phosphoforms generates the characteristic temporal order of KaiC phosphorylation. As the phosphorylation level in the CII domain rises, the release of ADP from CI slows down, making the inactive conformational state of KaiC more stable. In the inactive state, KaiC binds KaiB, which not only stabilizes this state further, but also leads to the sequestration of KaiA, and hence to KaiC dephosphorylation. Using a dedicated kinetic Monte Carlo algorithm, which makes it possible to efficiently simulate this system consisting of more than a billion reactions, we show that the model can describe a wealth of experimental data. PMID:28296888

  13. A RAD-based linkage map and comparative genomics in the gudgeons (genus Gnathopogon, Cyprinidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kakioka Ryo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The construction of linkage maps is a first step in exploring the genetic basis for adaptive phenotypic divergence in closely related species by quantitative trait locus (QTL analysis. Linkage maps are also useful for comparative genomics in non-model organisms. Advances in genomics technologies make it more feasible than ever to study the genetics of adaptation in natural populations. Restriction-site associated DNA (RAD sequencing in next-generation sequencers facilitates the development of many genetic markers and genotyping. We aimed to construct a linkage map of the gudgeons of the genus Gnathopogon (Cyprinidae for comparative genomics with the zebrafish Danio rerio (a member of the same family as gudgeons and for the future QTL analysis of the genetic architecture underlying adaptive phenotypic evolution of Gnathopogon. Results We constructed the first genetic linkage map of Gnathopogon using a 198 F2 interspecific cross between two closely related species in Japan: river-dwelling Gnathopogon elongatus and lake-dwelling Gnathopogon caerulescens. Based on 1,622 RAD-tag markers, a linkage map spanning 1,390.9 cM with 25 linkage groups and an average marker interval of 0.87 cM was constructed. We also identified a region involving female-specific transmission ratio distortion (TRD. Synteny and collinearity were extensively conserved between Gnathopogon and zebrafish. Conclusions The dense SNP-based linkage map presented here provides a basis for future QTL analysis. It will also be useful for transferring genomic information from a “traditional” model fish species, zebrafish, to screen candidate genes underlying ecologically important traits of the gudgeons.

  14. A RAD-based linkage map and comparative genomics in the gudgeons (genus Gnathopogon, Cyprinidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The construction of linkage maps is a first step in exploring the genetic basis for adaptive phenotypic divergence in closely related species by quantitative trait locus (QTL) analysis. Linkage maps are also useful for comparative genomics in non-model organisms. Advances in genomics technologies make it more feasible than ever to study the genetics of adaptation in natural populations. Restriction-site associated DNA (RAD) sequencing in next-generation sequencers facilitates the development of many genetic markers and genotyping. We aimed to construct a linkage map of the gudgeons of the genus Gnathopogon (Cyprinidae) for comparative genomics with the zebrafish Danio rerio (a member of the same family as gudgeons) and for the future QTL analysis of the genetic architecture underlying adaptive phenotypic evolution of Gnathopogon. Results We constructed the first genetic linkage map of Gnathopogon using a 198 F2 interspecific cross between two closely related species in Japan: river-dwelling Gnathopogon elongatus and lake-dwelling Gnathopogon caerulescens. Based on 1,622 RAD-tag markers, a linkage map spanning 1,390.9 cM with 25 linkage groups and an average marker interval of 0.87 cM was constructed. We also identified a region involving female-specific transmission ratio distortion (TRD). Synteny and collinearity were extensively conserved between Gnathopogon and zebrafish. Conclusions The dense SNP-based linkage map presented here provides a basis for future QTL analysis. It will also be useful for transferring genomic information from a “traditional” model fish species, zebrafish, to screen candidate genes underlying ecologically important traits of the gudgeons. PMID:23324215

  15. Tidal exchange of zooplankton between Lough Hyne and the adjacent coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, K. A.; Davenport, J.; Barnes, D. K. A.

    2005-01-01

    Pseudocalanus elongatus made up over 22% of the abundance. The general import of micro- to mesozooplankton may, in part, explain the higher densities of this size-class of zooplankton within the semi-enclosed system of Lough Hyne.

  16. Diversity in guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) sensitivity among guanylate kinases of bacteria and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Yuhta; Izumi, Atsushi; Fukunaga, Yoshinori; Kusumi, Kensuke; Iba, Koh; Watanabe, Seiya; Nakahira, Yoichi; Weber, Andreas P M; Nozawa, Akira; Tozawa, Yuzuru

    2014-05-30

    The guanosine 3',5'-bisdiphosphate (ppGpp) signaling system is shared by bacteria and plant chloroplasts, but its role in plants has remained unclear. Here we show that guanylate kinase (GK), a key enzyme in guanine nucleotide biosynthesis that catalyzes the conversion of GMP to GDP, is a target of regulation by ppGpp in chloroplasts of rice, pea, and Arabidopsis. Plants have two distinct types of GK that are localized to organelles (GKpm) or to the cytosol (GKc), with both enzymes being essential for growth and development. We found that the activity of rice GKpm in vitro was inhibited by ppGpp with a Ki of 2.8 μM relative to the substrate GMP, whereas the Km of this enzyme for GMP was 73 μM. The IC50 of ppGpp for GKpm was ∼10 μM. In contrast, the activity of rice GKc was insensitive to ppGpp, as was that of GK from bakers' yeast, which is also a cytosolic enzyme. These observations suggest that ppGpp plays a pivotal role in the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts through specific inhibition of GKpm activity, with the regulation of GTP biosynthesis in chloroplasts thus being independent of that in the cytosol. We also found that GKs of Escherichia coli and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 are insensitive to ppGpp, in contrast to the ppGpp sensitivity of the Bacillus subtilis enzyme. Our biochemical characterization of GK enzymes has thus revealed a novel target of ppGpp in chloroplasts and has uncovered diversity among bacterial GKs with regard to regulation by ppGpp.

  17. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - a fully automated, miniaturized instrument for measuring gene expression in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio; Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kianoosh

    2012-07-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecrafts opens the doors to a large number of experiments on the influence of space environment on biological systems that will profoundly impact our ability to conduct safe and effective space travel, and might also shed light on terrestrial physiology or biological function and human disease and aging processes. Measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, determine metabolic basis of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance, test our ability to sustain and grow in space organisms that can be used for life support and in situ resource utilization during long-duration space exploration, and monitor both the spacecraft environment and crew health. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology and medicine. Accordingly, supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measuring microbial expression of thousands of genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing bacterial cell walls, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing it on a microarray and (4) providing electrochemical readout, all in a microfluidics cartridge. The prototype under development is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by the NASA Small Spacecraft Office. The first target application is to cultivate and measure gene expression of the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, i.e. a cyanobacterium known to exhibit remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions

  18. Engineering Cyanobacterial Cell Morphology for Enhanced Recovery and Processing of Biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Adam; Chandler, Jenna; MacCready, Joshua S; Huang, Jingcheng; Osteryoung, Katherine W; Ducat, Daniel C

    2017-05-01

    Cyanobacteria are emerging as alternative crop species for the production of fuels, chemicals, and biomass. Yet, the success of these microbes depends on the development of cost-effective technologies that permit scaled cultivation and cell harvesting. Here, we investigate the feasibility of engineering cell morphology to improve biomass recovery and decrease energetic costs associated with lysing cyanobacterial cells. Specifically, we modify the levels of Min system proteins in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. The Min system has established functions in controlling cell division by regulating the assembly of FtsZ, a tubulin-like protein required for defining the bacterial division plane. We show that altering the expression of two FtsZ-regulatory proteins, MinC and Cdv3, enables control over cell morphology by disrupting FtsZ localization and cell division without preventing continued cell growth. By varying the expression of these proteins, we can tune the lengths of cyanobacterial cells across a broad dynamic range, anywhere from an ∼20% increased length (relative to the wild type) to near-millimeter lengths. Highly elongated cells exhibit increased rates of sedimentation under low centrifugal forces or by gravity-assisted settling. Furthermore, hyperelongated cells are also more susceptible to lysis through the application of mild physical stress. Collectively, these results demonstrate a novel approach toward decreasing harvesting and processing costs associated with mass cyanobacterial cultivation by altering morphology at the cellular level.IMPORTANCE We show that the cell length of a model cyanobacterial species can be programmed by rationally manipulating the expression of protein factors that suppress cell division. In some instances, we can increase the size of these cells to near-millimeter lengths with this approach. The resulting elongated cells have favorable properties with regard to cell harvesting and lysis. Furthermore, cells treated in this

  19. Gene Expression Measurement Module (GEMM) - A Fully Automated, Miniaturized Instrument for Measuring Gene Expression in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Peyvan, Kia; Karouia, Fathi; Ricco, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    The capability to measure gene expression on board spacecraft opens the door to a large number of high-value experiments on the influence of the space environment on biological systems. For example, measurements of gene expression will help us to understand adaptation of terrestrial life to conditions beyond the planet of origin, identify deleterious effects of the space environment on a wide range of organisms from microbes to humans, develop effective countermeasures against these effects, and determine the metabolic bases of microbial pathogenicity and drug resistance. These and other applications hold significant potential for discoveries in space biology, biotechnology, and medicine. Supported by funding from the NASA Astrobiology Science and Technology Instrument Development Program, we are developing a fully automated, miniaturized, integrated fluidic system for small spacecraft capable of in-situ measurement of expression of several hundreds of microbial genes from multiple samples. The instrument will be capable of (1) lysing cell walls of bacteria sampled from cultures grown in space, (2) extracting and purifying RNA released from cells, (3) hybridizing the RNA on a microarray and (4) providing readout of the microarray signal, all in a single microfluidics cartridge. The device is suitable for deployment on nanosatellite platforms developed by NASA Ames' Small Spacecraft Division. To meet space and other technical constraints imposed by these platforms, a number of technical innovations are being implemented. The integration and end-to-end technological and biological validation of the instrument are carried out using as a model the photosynthetic bacterium Synechococcus elongatus, known for its remarkable metabolic diversity and resilience to adverse conditions. Each step in the measurement process-lysis, nucleic acid extraction, purification, and hybridization to an array-is assessed through comparison of the results obtained using the instrument with

  20. Identification and characterization of a carboxysomal γ-carbonic anhydrase from the cyanobacterium Nostoc sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Charlotte; Arefeen, Dewan; Tadesse, Yohannes; Long, Benedict M; Price, G Dean; Rowlett, Roger S; Kimber, Matthew S; Espie, George S

    2014-09-01

    Carboxysomes are proteinaceous microcompartments that encapsulate carbonic anhydrase (CA) and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco); carboxysomes, therefore, catalyze reversible HCO3 (-) dehydration and the subsequent fixation of CO2. The N- and C-terminal domains of the β-carboxysome scaffold protein CcmM participate in a network of protein-protein interactions that are essential for carboxysome biogenesis, organization, and function. The N-terminal domain of CcmM in the thermophile Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 is also a catalytically active, redox regulated γ-CA. To experimentally determine if CcmM from a mesophilic cyanobacterium is active, we cloned, expressed and purified recombinant, full-length CcmM from Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 as well as the N-terminal 209 amino acid γ-CA-like domain. Both recombinant proteins displayed ethoxyzolamide-sensitive CA activity in mass spectrometric assays, as did the carboxysome-enriched TP fraction. NstCcmM209 was characterized as a moderately active and efficient γ-CA with a k cat of 2.0 × 10(4) s(-1) and k cat/K m of 4.1 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) at 25 °C and pH 8, a pH optimum between 8 and 9.5 and a temperature optimum spanning 25-35 °C. NstCcmM209 also catalyzed the hydrolysis of the CO2 analog carbonyl sulfide. Circular dichroism and intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence analysis demonstrated that NstCcmM209 was progressively and irreversibly denatured above 50 °C. NstCcmM209 activity was inhibited by the reducing agent tris(hydroxymethyl)phosphine, an effect that was fully reversed by a molar excess of diamide, a thiol oxidizing agent, consistent with oxidative activation being a universal regulatory mechanism of CcmM orthologs. Immunogold electron microscopy and Western blot analysis of TP pellets indicated that Rubisco and CcmM co-localize and are concentrated in Nostoc sp. PCC 7120 carboxysomes.

  1. Evolution of the bomolochiform superfamily complex (Copepoda: Cyclopoida): new insights from ssrDNA and morphology, and origin of Umazuracolids from polychaete-infesting ancestors rejected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huys, Rony; Fatih, Farrah; Ohtsuka, Susumu; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia

    2012-01-01

    Poecilostome cyclopoids are among the most morphologically diverse copepods, having established symbiotic relationships with teleosts, elasmobranchs and invertebrate hosts belonging to no fewer than 14 marine phyla. Many parasitic lineages display radically divergent body plans and on that basis have traditionally been placed at higher taxonomic rank than they deserve. The most recent example is the monotypic family Umazuracolidae, established for a derived fish parasite with bomolochiform affinities. Phylogenetic analysis of complete ssrDNA (18S) sequences of 44 species belonging to 21 families of cyclopoid copepods shows that there is no support for the familial distinctiveness of the Umazuracolidae. Both maximum parsimony tree reconstruction and Bayesian inference, operating under the GTR+I+Γ model of nucleotide substitution, unambiguously placed Umazuracola elongatus in the Taeniacanthidae within the predominantly fish parasitic bomolochiform complex, refuting the original suggestion of a shared most recent common ancestry with polychaete symbionts. The phylogenies also revealed that the bomolochiform families and the Clausidiidae (and allies) form a monophyletic group, the clausidiiform complex, with high nodal support under both methods. Bayesian inference suggested a diphyletic origin of the "Poecilostomatoida" with the clausidiiform family-group holding a basal position while the traditional cyclopoid families form a monophyletic group in apposition to a second poecilostomatoid clade; however, maximum parsimony results were equivocal, depending on outgroup selection. Scrutiny of the morphological characters diagnosing the monotypic families Tegobomolochidae and Tuccidae demonstrated that they merely represent derived lineages within more inclusive taxa, the former being related to a group of nostril-inhabiting genera within the Bomolochidae, the latter forming the sistergroup of Taeniacanthodes within the Taeniacanthidae. The taeniacanthid genus

  2. Fishes of the Blackwater River Drainage, Tucker County, West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotta, Daniel A.; Welsh, Stuart; Wegman, Douglas P.; Oldham, Thomas E.; Hedrick, Lara B.

    2015-01-01

    The Blackwater River, a tributary of the upper Cheat River of the Monongahela River, hosts a modest fish fauna. This relatively low diversity of fish species is partly explained by its drainage history. The Blackwater was once part of the prehistoric, northeasterly flowing St. Lawrence River. During the Pleistocene Epoch, the fauna was significantly affected by glacial advance and by proglacial lakes and their associated overflows. After the last glacial retreat, overflow channels, deposits, and scouring altered drainage courses and connected some of the tributaries of the ancient Teays and Pittsburgh drainages. These major alterations allowed the invasion of fishes from North America's more species-rich southern waters. Here we review fish distributions based on 67 surveys at 34 sites within the Blackwater River drainage, and discuss the origin and status of 37 species. Within the Blackwater River watershed, 30 species (20 native, 10 introduced) have been reported from upstream of Blackwater Falls, whereas 29 (26 native, 3 introduced) have been documented below the Falls. Acid mine drainage, historic lumbering, and human encroachment have impacted the Blackwater's ichthyofauna. The fishes that have been most affected are Salvelinus fontinalis (Brook Trout), Clinostomus elongatus (Redside Dace), Nocomis micropogon (River Chub), Hypentelium nigricans (Northern Hog Sucker), Etheostoma flabellare (Fantail Darter), and Percina maculata(Blackside Darter). The first two species incurred range reductions, whereas the latter four were probably extirpated. In the 1990s, acid remediation dramatically improved the water quality of the river below Davis. Recent surveys in the lower drainage revealed 15 fishes where none had been observed since at least the 1940s; seven of these (Cyprinella spiloptera [Spotfin Shiner], Luxilus chrysocephalus [Striped Shiner], Notropis photogenis [Silver Shiner], N. rubellus [Rosyface Shiner];Micropterus dolomieu

  3. Phylogenetic Relationships and Genetic Variation in Longidorus and Xiphinema Species (Nematoda: Longidoridae) Using ITS1 Sequences of Nuclear Ribosomal DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Weimin; Szalanski, Allen L; Robbins, R T

    2004-03-01

    Genetic analyses using DNA sequences of nuclear ribosomal DNA ITS1 were conducted to determine the extent of genetic variation within and among Longidorus and Xiphinema species. DNA sequences were obtained from samples collected from Arkansas, California and Australia as well as 4 Xiphinema DNA sequences from GenBank. The sequences of the ITS1 region including the 3' end of the 18S rDNA gene and the 5' end of the 5.8S rDNA gene ranged from 1020 bp to 1244 bp for the 9 Longidorus species, and from 870 bp to 1354 bp for the 7 Xiphinema species. Nucleotide frequencies were: A = 25.5%, C = 21.0%, G = 26.4%, and T = 27.1%. Genetic variation between the two genera had a maximum divergence of 38.6% between X. chambersi and L. crassus. Genetic variation among Xiphinema species ranged from 3.8% between X. diversicaudatum and X. bakeri to 29.9% between X. chambersi and X. italiae. Within Longidorus, genetic variation ranged from 8.9% between L. crassus and L. grandis to 32.4% between L. fragilis and L. diadecturus. Intraspecific genetic variation in X. americanum sensu lato ranged from 0.3% to 1.9%, while genetic variation in L. diadecturus had 0.8% and L. biformis ranged from 0.6% to 10.9%. Identical sequences were obtained between the two populations of L. grandis, and between the two populations of X. bakeri. Phylogenetic analyses based on the ITS1 DNA sequence data were conducted on each genus separately using both maximum parsimony and maximum likelihood analysis. Among the Longidorus taxa, 4 subgroups are supported: L. grandis, L. crassus, and L. elongatus are in one cluster; L. biformis and L. paralongicaudatus are in a second cluster; L. fragilis and L. breviannulatus are in a third cluster; and L. diadecturus is in a fourth cluster. Among the Xiphinema taxa, 3 subgroups are supported: X. americanum with X. chambersi, X. bakeri with X. diversicaudatum, and X. italiae and X. vuittenezi forming a sister group with X. index. The relationships observed in this study

  4. An in situ, individual-based approach to quantify connectivity of marine fish: ontogenetic movements and residency of lingcod.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Anne Bishop

    Full Text Available As modern fishery assessments change in an effort to be more accurate and encompass the range of potential ecosystem interactions, critical information on the ecology of species including life history, intra and inter-specific competitive interactions and habitat requirements must be added to the standard fishery-dependent and independent data sets. One species whose movements and habitat associations greatly affects exploitation patterns is lingcod, Ophiodon elongatus, which support an economically important fishery along the coastal waters of the Pacific Coast of North America. High site fidelity and limited movements within nearshore areas are hypothesized to have resulted in high catchability, a major factor that has contributed to overfished stocks. Thus, assessing the level of movement and connectivity among lingcod subpopulations inhabiting nearshore habitats is a prerequisite to determining the condition of lingcod stocks. We used the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking (POST Project acoustic receiver array in Alaska's Prince William Sound to monitor movements and residency of 21 acoustic-tagged lingcod for up to 16 months. Eight of sixteen lingcod (50% initially aged at 2.5- to 3.5- years-old dispersed from their tag site. Dispersal was highly seasonal, occurring in two, five-week periods from mid-December through January and from mid-April through May. Dispersal in winter may be related to sexually immature lingcod or newly-mature male lingcod being displaced by territorial males. Spring dispersal may be indicative of the onset of migratory behavior where lingcod move out into Prince William Sound and possibly the offshore waters of the Gulf of Alaska. Our results reveal a pattern of ontogenetic dispersal as lingcod approach 4-years-old and exceed 50 cm total length. The large proportion of tagged fish migrating out of Port Gravina, their tagging site, reflects a high level of connectivity among Prince William Sound subpopulations. Our

  5. Formation of interacting spins on flavosemiquinone and tyrosine radical in photoreaction of a blue light sensor BLUF protein TePixD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Hiroko; Fukushima, Yoshimasa; Okajima, Koji; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-25

    Light-induced radicals were detected by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and pulsed electron-nuclear double resonance (ENDOR) in the BLUF-domain protein TePixD of the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1. The illumination of TePixD at 5-200 K derived an EPR signal with a separation of 85 G between the main peaks around g = 2, showing a typical Pake's pattern of magnetic dipole-dipole interaction between two nearby radicals. Longer illumination induced an EPR signal at g = 2.0045, which was assigned as a neutral flavosemiquinone FADH(*). The FADH(*) formation occurred in parallel with a decrease in Pake's doublet. The Pake's doublet was not detected in a mutant TePixD protein in which a tyrosine residue was replaced with phenylalanine (Y8F protein). A pulsed ENDOR study suggested that the Pake's doublet had arisen from the interaction between a neutral flavosemiquinone radical and a neutral tyrosine radical, i.e., the FADH(*)-Y8(*) state. An EPR simulation of the Pake's doublet showed that the distance between FAD and Y8 is 2.2 A shorter than that calculated from the X-ray crystallography structure in the dark-adapted state, suggesting the modification of the protein conformation in the photoinduced FADH(*)-Y8(*) state. The Pake's doublet signal was detected by 10 K illumination in the sample which was immediately frozen after 273 K illumination, corresponding to the red-shifted state F(490). On the other hand, the signal was not detected in the sample which was incubated for 10 min at 273 K in the dark after 273 K illumination, corresponding to the dark-adapted state D(471). In the sample annealed at 160 K for 10 min after 160 K illumination, corresponding to the partially red-shifted state J(11), the Pake's doublet signal was detected by the 10 K illumination. On the basis of these observations, we concluded that the interaction with the FADH(*)-Y8(*) state occurred after the second photoexcitation of the photoinduced red

  6. FAUNA POLIPARAZITARĂ A MAMIFERELOR SĂLBATICE DIN REZERVAŢIA NATURALĂ „CODRII” DIN REPUBLICA MOLDOVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ştefan RUSU

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Studiul parazitofaunei la mamiferele sălbatice din Rezervaţia Naturală „Codrii”, Republica Moldova, a pus în evi­denţă un nivel înalt de infestare a lor cu fasciole, dicrocelii, strongiloizi, protişti. Cerbul-nobil (Cervus elaphus Linaeus, 1758 era infestat cu Dicrocoelium lanceolatum (12,8%, Fasciola hepatica (9,5%, larve de strongiloizi (88,0% şi oochişti de Eimeria spp. (28,2%; cerbul-cu-pete (Cervus nippon Temminsk, 1838 – cu D. lanceolatum (14,9%, F. hepatica (10,2%, larve de strongiloizi (79,8%, oochişti de Eimeria spp. (22,4%; căpriorul (Capreolus capreolus Linaeus, 1758 – cu D. lanceolatum (20,1%, F. hepatica (3,2%, larve de strongiloizi (89,4% şi oochişti de Eimeria spp. (38,1%. La mistreţ s-a constatat un nivel de infestare cu Dicrocoelium lanceolatum în 3,6% cazuri, larve de Stron­gy­loides ransomi – în 72,3% cazuri, Metastrongylus elongatus – în 87,5% cazuri şi cu Eimeria spp. – în 46,3% cazuri. La Iepurele-de-câmp s-a constatat un nivel de infestare cu D. lanceolatum în 28,2% cazuri şi cu Strongyloides papillosus – în 59,4% cazuri. Nivelul înalt de infestare a mamiferelor sălbatice cu diverşi agenţi parazitari demonstrează încă o dată că ele participă la menţinerea lanţului epizootic al acestor maladii şi au un rol important la infestarea omului şi a anima­lelor domestice. Prin urmare, este strict necesar ca maladiile parazitare la animalele sălbatice să fie anual monitorizate, stabilind în acest mod evoluţia lor, apariţia unor noi agenţi parazitari şi elaborarea măsurilor de combatere a acestora. POLIPARASITIC FAUNA OF WILD MAMMALS INHABITING NATURAL RESERVATION “COdrii” in THE Republic OF MOldovaThe study on parasitic fauna in wild mammals from natural reservation “Codrii” in Republic of Moldova has revealed the high level of their infestation with fascicles, dicrocelium, strongiles and protista. The red deer (Cervus elaphus Linaeus, 1758 have been infested

  7. Estudio de los estados larvales de la ictiofauna en la zona de Puerto Nariño, Amazonia Colombiana, durante el período de aguas ascendentes (2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutiérrez Espinosa Mónica Andrea

    2004-12-01

    la prole sea llevada a zonas de criadero (parches de gramalotes en el área de várzea. La mayor o menor influencia de las aguas del río Amazonas, por tanto, está determinando la abundancia y la diversidad de larvas en los diferentes ambientes acuáticos muestreados. Es así como los sitios con mayor número de larvas y con valores altos de diversidad fueron aquellos en que la influencia de las aguas del río Amazonas es alta (río Amazonas, el río Loreto Yacu y el caño Zancudillo, colectándose el 75% de las larvas y presentando valores
    de diversidad de Shannon-Weever mayor a 2,5. Sitios con menor influencia de las aguas del río Amazonas como el lago Tarapoto y el caño Igarapé-Uassú presentaron menor abundancia de larvas (1,6% entre los dos, y valores de diversidad menor a 1,5. Se proponen sitios de desove de algunas especies como Anodus elongatus, Triportheus cf. Albus, T. cf elongatus, Mylossoma aureum y M. duriventre, teniendo en cuenta su abundancia en momentos específicos durante el muestreo y el estado de desarrollo en que fueron colectadas. Por medio de estudios sobre larvas se puede tener una visión general de la dinámica de la reproducción en determinados ambientes acuáticos, pudiéndose determinar épocas y sitos de desove, al igual que sitios de criadero de los juveniles de peces. Así se propone un modelo general de la dinámica reproductiva de los peces en la zona de várzea de Puerto Nariño.

  8. Checklist of copepods from Gulf of Nicoya, Coronado Bay and Golfo Dulce, Pacific coast of Costa Rica, with comments on their distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Ramírez, A

    1996-12-01

    A list of 54 copepod species (Crustacea) in 23 families is presented for the Pacific coast of Costa Rica. Identifications are from zooplankton samples of the Victor Hensen Expedition during December 1993 and February 1994. Samples were taken with a Bongo net (0.60 m net opening, 2.50 m net length) with 200 microns mesh size. Oblique hauls were done from the surface to the ground at a towing speed of aprox. 1 knot. 37 species (68.5%) were found in the Gulf of Nicoya, 36 in Golfo Dulce (66.6%) and 17 (31.4%) species were common to both gulfs, while only twelve species (22.2%) were found in Coronado Bay. Four species (7.4%) were distributed along the coast and were common to the three regions: Paracalanus parvus, Euchaeta sp., Oithona plumifera and O. similis. Eleven species of calanoids found normally in the Costa Rica Dome show the influence of typical oceanic waters principally at the mouth of Gulf of Nicoya. Differences were observed in the composition and presence of the copepod species when the inner and outer (upper and lower) parts of both gulfs were compared. Gulf of Nicoya was dominated in its upper part by typical neritic estuarine species like Acartia lilljenborgii, Paracalanus parvus and, Hemyciclops thalassius as well as species of Pseudodiaptomus. On the other hand a more oceanic composition of copepods was observed in the lower part of the gulf. Both small species, like Oncaea venusta, as well as larger species, such as Pleuromamma robusta, Eucalanus attenuatus, E. elongatus and Rhincalanus nasutus, were typical of these waters. Oithona plumifera and O. similis were found in the lower part too; and both species are typical from oceanic water. Coronado Bay was characterized by the presence of typical oceanic species like Neocalanus gracilis, Euchaeta longicornis, Eucalanus attenuatus and Haloptilus ornatus with more transitional species like Clausocalanus pergens and C. furcatus near the coast. In the Golfo Dulce differences in copepod composition were

  9. Seasonal and interannual changes in zooplankton community in the coastal zone of the North-Eastern Black Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikishina, A. B.; Arashkevich, E. G.; Louppova, N. E.; Soloviev, K. A.

    2009-04-01

    obtained using SSC satellite data. For studying vertical distribution of zooplankton depth stratified samples were collected in different seasons. To evaluate seasonal variations in reproduction and offspring development of dominant mesozooplankton populations, we analyzed age structure of five species: four herbivorous copepods - Acartia clausi, Pseudocalanus elongatus, Paracalanus parvus and Calanus euxinus, and carnivorous chaethognaths Parasagitta setosa. Periods of mass reproduction varied in different years. The possible reason for this variation is the effect of climate change and top-predators on seasonal shift in zooplankton dynamics. Whereas timing of reproduction is related to life strategy of species, an intensity of reproduction and success of new generations depend on food supply. The impact of food conditions on abundance and age structure of herbivores was studied in the different seasons. Vertical distribution of different species also altered from year to year. Thus, in "warm" July 2007 (sea surface temperature 27°C) most of the Calanus euxinus population concentrated in the deeper layers than in "cold" July 2005 (sea surface temperature 22°C).

  10. Systematics of the weevil genus Mecinus Germar, 1821 (Coleoptera: Curculionidae). I. Taxonomic treatment of the species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Roberto; Fogato, Valter

    2013-01-01

    Palaearctic species of the weevil genus Mecinus Germar, 1821 are revised. A total of 47 species are recognized, one of which, M. baridioides sp. n. is new to science. Mecinus dorsalis var. tavaresi Hoffmann, 1958 (stat. rev.) is considered as a distinct species, whereas M. alboscutellatus var. atratulus (Solari, 1933) is maintained as a subspecies of M. alboscutellatus (Hustache, 1913). The following new synonymies are proposed: Mecinus barbarus Gyllenhal, 1838 (= M. longiusculus var. subcylindricus Pic, 1896 syn. n.); M. caucasicus (Reitter, 1907) (= Gymnetron caucasicum var. rubricum Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. comosus Boheman, 1845 (= M. setosus Kiesenwetter, 1864 syn. n.; = M. hesteticus Vitale, 1906 syn. n.; = M. pici Reitter, 1907 syn. n.; = M. pici var. theresae Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. elongatus (H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862) (= G. pyrenaeum H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862 syn. n.); M. haemorrhoidalis (H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862) (= M. fairmairei Tournier, 1873 syn. n.; = G. variabile var. brevipenne Desbrochers des Loges, 1893 syn. n.; = G. variabile var. curtulum Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. humeralis Tournier, 1873 (= M. tournieri Fairmaire, 1876 syn. n.; = M. lineicollis Reitter, 1907 syn. n.); M. paratychioides (Hoffmann, 1965) (= G. longirostre Pic, 1921 syn. n.); M. longulus (Desbrochers des Loges, 1893) (= G. nigronotatum Pic, 1906 syn. n.; = G. nigronotatum var. vaulogeri Pic, 1930 syn. n.); M. pipistrellus (Marseul, 1871) (= G. concavirostre Stöcklein, 1950 syn. n.); M. plantaginis (Eppelsheim, 1875) (= G. zherichini Korotyaev, 1994 syn. n.); M. pyraster (Herbst, 1795) (= M. schneideri Kirsch, 1870 syn. n.; = M. hariolus Reitter, 1907 syn. n.; = M. pici var. favarcqui Pic, 1915 syn. n.); M. sanctus (Desbrochers des Loges, 1893) (= G. laterufum Pic, 1900 syn. n.); M. simus (Mulsant & Rey, 1859) (= G. mixtum Mulsant & Godart, 1873 syn. n.); M. tychioides (H. Brisout de Barneville, 1862) (= G. aestivum Hoffmann, 1956 syn. n.); M. vulpes (Lucas

  11. Comparative analysis of cyanobacterial superoxide dismutases to discriminate canonical forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabaharan Dharmar

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Superoxide dismutases (SOD are ubiquitous metalloenzymes that catalyze the disproportion of superoxide to peroxide and molecular oxygen through alternate oxidation and reduction of their metal ions. In general, SODs are classified into four forms by their catalytic metals namely; FeSOD, MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD and NiSOD. In addition, a cambialistic form that uses Fe/Mn in its active site also exists. Cyanobacteria, the oxygen evolving photosynthetic prokaryotes, produce reactive oxygen species that can damage cellular components leading to cell death. Thus, the co-evolution of an antioxidant system was necessary for the survival of photosynthetic organisms with SOD as the initial enzyme evolved to alleviate the toxic effect. Cyanobacteria represent the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and their SOD sequences available in the databases lack clear annotation. Hence, the present study focuses on structure and sequence pattern of subsets of cyanobacterial superoxide dismutases. Result The sequence conservation and structural analysis of Fe (Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP1 and MnSOD (Anabaena sp. PCC7120 reveal the sharing of N and C terminal domains. At the C terminal domain, the metal binding motif in cyanoprokaryotes is DVWEHAYY while it is D-X-[WF]-E-H-[STA]-[FY]-[FY] in other pro- and eukaryotes. The cyanobacterial FeSOD differs from MnSOD at least in three ways viz. (i FeSOD has a metal specific signature F184X3A188Q189.......T280......F/Y303 while, in Mn it is R184X3G188G189......G280......W303, (ii aspartate ligand forms a hydrogen bond from the active site with the outer sphere residue of W243 in Fe where as it is Q262 in MnSOD; and (iii two unique lysine residues at positions 201 and 255 with a photosynthetic role, found only in FeSOD. Further, most of the cyanobacterial Mn metalloforms have a specific transmembrane hydrophobic pocket that distinguishes FeSOD from Mn isoform. Cyanobacterial Cu/ZnSOD has a copper domain and two

  12. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyman, Philip D [J. Craig Venter Institute; Smith, Hamillton O.

    2014-12-03

    established. In the course of this work, we identified a new hydrogenase from environmental DNA sequence and successfully expressed it in a variety of hosts including cyanobacteria. This was one of the first examples of these complicated enzymes being moved across vastly different bacterial species and is the first example of a hydrogenase being “brought to life” from no other information than a DNA sequence from metagenomic data. The hydrogenase we identified had the molecular signature of other O2-tolerant hydrogenases, and we discovered that the resulting enzyme had exceptionally high oxygen- and thermo-tolerance. The new enzyme retained 80% of its activity after incubation at 80° C for 2 hours and retained 20% activity in 1% O2. We performed detailed analysis on the maturation genes required for construction of a functional enzyme of this class of hydrogenase, and found that seven additional maturation genes were required for minimal activity and a total of nine genes besides the hydrogenase were required for optimal maturation efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the maturation genes are functional on closely-related hydrogenase enzymes such as those from Alteromonas macleodii and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. Finally, we have extensively modified the hydrogenase to engineer new traits including higher H2 production and better interaction with electron donors. For example, combining two strategies increased hydrogenase activity in cyanobacteria by at least 20-fold over our initial expression level. The activity of this combined strain is almost twice that of the native hydrogenase activity in S. elongatus. This work validates the idea that these enzymes are broadly tolerant to modifications that may help integrate them into a successful photobiological H2 production system. While we did not achieve our ultimate goal of integrating the functional hydrogenase with the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus, the work on this project has led to significant

  13. Ictiofauna de la Laguna Yahuarcaca y aspectos tróficos y reproductivos de cinco especies predominantes, Leticia - Colombia Ictiofauna de la Laguna Yahuarcaca y aspectos tróficos y reproductivos de cinco especies predominantes, Leticia - Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojica José Iván

    2000-06-01

    ="text3">de los periodos estudiados, lo que indica la gran influencia que ejerce el pulso hídrico sobre ésta. Se analizaron las variaciones en los diferentes muestreos de la dieta de cinco especies de peces predominantes: Schizodon fasciatus, Rhytiodus microlepis (Anostomidae, Triportheus albus, Triportheus angulatus, y Triportheus elongatus (Characidae. Las tres especies de Triportheus tienen una estrategia alimenticia generalista, con preferencias por insectos terrestres, partes de peces, frutos y semillas. Las dos especies de la familia Anostomidae son netamente especialistas y se alimentan preferiblemente de material vegetal, tanto de origen autóctono como alóctono. En todas las especies analizadas el tipo y cantidad de alimento consumido fue diferente en cada periodo de muestreo, debido a la variación de los recursos relacionada con el pulso hídrico.The Amazon River floodplains are highly productive pulsing systems from an ecological point,due mostly to the periodic inflow of sediments that are dragged from the Andes by the rivers.In Colombia, this Amazon systems have not been intensely studied, therefore, this study tookplace in an floodplain lake of the Amazon river near the city of Leticia. Ichthyological sampleswere taken at four different times during a year according to the

  14. 从12S rRNA基因序列探讨中国10种壁虎的系统关系%PHYLOGENY OF TEN SPECIES OF CHINESE GEKKONID LIZARDS (GEKKONIDAE: LACERTILIA) INFERRED FROM 12 S rDAN DNA SEQUENCES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    韩德民; 周开亚; 王义权

    2001-01-01

    对肌肉样品采用SDS/蛋白酶K裂解、酚-氯仿抽提和乙醇沉淀提取总DNA,用线粒体12S rDNA通用引物扩增,用银染测序和ABI Prism 310型遗传分析仪测定了Gekko japonicus, G. swinhonis, G. hokouensis, G. gecko, Cyrtopodion elongatus, C. russowi, Teratoscincus roborowskii, Hemidactylus bowringii, H. frenatus和Gehyra mutilata 10种壁虎的线粒体12S rRNA基因片段的序列。对位排列后的序列长421 bp,含201个变异位点。属间核苷酸变异范围为0.228~0.282,属内是0.005~0.263。重建的分子系统树将10种壁虎聚为三支:第1支是大壁虎和截趾虎;第2支由壁虎属其余的3个种构成一个单系;第三支由其余3个属的5个种组成。研究结果表明:截趾虎与壁虎属4物种亲缘关系较近;吐鲁番沙虎和弯脚虎属2物种、蜥虎属2物种之间的亲缘关系较近,支持Russell(1976)关于弯脚虎属与蜥虎属间进化关系的研究结果而不支持Kluge(1987)将沙虎属另立亚科的系统发生假说;铅山壁虎与无蹼壁虎最先聚为姐妹群,再与多疣壁虎相聚组成一个单系。%The studies on phylogenetic relationships of gekkonid lizards have been largely based on morphological characters before, including the structure of digits and internal anatomy. In China, the phylogeny among some gekkonid lizards based on karyotype, nucleolar organizer and LDH (lactic dehydrogenase) isozyme was r e ported. However, nucleotide sequence data have not yet been employed to study th e phylogeny of gekkonid lizards. In the present study, phylogenetic relationship among 10 Chinese gekkonid lizard species was inferred based on sequences of 1 2S rRNA gene fragment.  1. Material and method   Total DNA was extracted from about 50 mg of the muscle tissue from 10 gekkonid lizards (Gekko japonicus, G. swinhonis, G. hokouensis, G. gecko, Cyrtopodion elongatus, C. russowi, Teratoscincus roborowskii, Hemidactylus bowringii, H. frenatus and

  15. Desarrollo post-embrionario, fecundidad y consumo de alimento de Dichroplus exilis (Orthoptera: Acrididae bajo condiciones controladas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bardi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available La Subfamilia Melanoplinae tiene una relevancia central dentro de la acridiofauna Argentina. Varias especies suelen ser numéricamente dominantes en las comunidades de acridios del país y algunas constituyen serias plagas. El objetivo de este trabajo fue conocer el ciclo de vida postembrionario, la fecundidad y supervivencia de las hembras y el consumo de alimento de Dichruplus exilis bajo condiciones controladas (30°C; 40%HR y 14L-10O. Para ello se realizó el seguimiento de tres cohortes de 16, 17 y 20 individuos. El tiempo de incubación fue de 14.4±1.08 días. La duración del desarrollo ninfal fue 41.38; 0.71 días (I 8.73; 0.20, II 6.38; 0.24, III 5.64; 0.33, IV 7.15; 0.43, V 9.76; 0.54; IV 7.85; 0.95; la fecundidad promedio fue de 381.84, 38.54huevos/hembra. El consumo registrado fue de 9.89; 1.08 (mg/ind./día para las ninfas de IV, 18.04; 0.73 (mg/ind./día para las de V y IV, mientras que el consumo promedio de los adultos, sin diferenciar sexo y estado reproductivo, fue de 16.41; 4.32mg/día. Estos parámetros, al ser comparados con los de otras especies afines, indican que D. exilis exhibe atributos biológicos que condicen con los de otros melanoplinos considerados plaga.Postembryonic development, fecundity and food consumption of Dichroplus exilis (Orthoptera: Acrididae under controlled conditions. Dichroplus exilis is a widely distributed species in Southern South America. Although there have been reports of D. exilis as an agricultural pest, some recent observations suggest that the damage attributed to D. elongatus may actually have been caused by D. exilis. This study was conducted to determine the postembryonic life cycle stages, fertility and food consumption of this species under controlled conditions (30°C, 14L-10D, 40% RH.Individuals employed belong to the laboratory-hatched first generation (F1, from adults (n=64, ♀=28, ♂=36 collected in natural grasslands near Rafaela, Santa Fe province in North- Eastern

  16. Progress in the Molecular Mechanism of Circadian Clock in Cyanobacterium%蓝藻生物节律性分子调控机制的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李青雁; 庞羽彤; 李小龙; 周飞飞; 张芳; 霍宇鹏; 赵宇玮

    2013-01-01

    Circadian clocks are endogenous time-keeping mechanisms which are ubiquitous in a variety of o rganisms from bacteria to mammals. In order to coordinate with and adapt to the daily environmental changes which are driven by the self-rolling of the earth, the circadian clock controls various metabolic and biological activities with a circle period of 24 h. One of the cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus PCC7942 is a model organism for the circadian clock system. Three proteins encoded by the kaiA/B/C gene cluster, which is functional basis for the circadian rhythm, generate the basic timing loop of the circadian clock in Synechococcus. Circadian time clue is transmitted from the KaiABC-based central oscillator to the clock-controlled transcription factors. KaiC, an autokinase and autophosphatase, is the central component of the cyanobacterial circadian clock. The daily auto-phosphorylation and auto-dephosphorylation cycle of KaiC and the post-translational modification of the proteins, which consisted the inputing and output pathways of the circadian clock, have composed the transcriptional and translational feed-back loop (TTFL). In traditional theory of circadian clock model in cyanobacteria, TTFL regulation of clock genes are thought to be essential for sustaining and outputing of the basic circadian timing loop in Synechococcus. But surprisingly, KaiABC-based central oscillators are only found in cyanobacteria and very few prokaryotic species. It seems that this Kai-based clock is not an ubiquitous time-keeping mechanism that has been selected by organisms during natural evolution. Recently, some circadian clock research groups have demonstrated that non-transcriptional and translational oscillators could be the driving force of the generating and sustaining of biological circadian rhythm. The peroxiredoxins (PRX) are reported to be conserved markers of circadian rhythms, which are also thought to be a new focus of the researches on the molecular

  17. Hydrogen from Water in a Novel Recombinant Cyanobacterial System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyman, Philip D [J. Craig Venter Institute; Smith, Hamillton O.

    2014-12-03

    established. In the course of this work, we identified a new hydrogenase from environmental DNA sequence and successfully expressed it in a variety of hosts including cyanobacteria. This was one of the first examples of these complicated enzymes being moved across vastly different bacterial species and is the first example of a hydrogenase being “brought to life” from no other information than a DNA sequence from metagenomic data. The hydrogenase we identified had the molecular signature of other O2-tolerant hydrogenases, and we discovered that the resulting enzyme had exceptionally high oxygen- and thermo-tolerance. The new enzyme retained 80% of its activity after incubation at 80° C for 2 hours and retained 20% activity in 1% O2. We performed detailed analysis on the maturation genes required for construction of a functional enzyme of this class of hydrogenase, and found that seven additional maturation genes were required for minimal activity and a total of nine genes besides the hydrogenase were required for optimal maturation efficiency. Furthermore, we demonstrated that the maturation genes are functional on closely-related hydrogenase enzymes such as those from Alteromonas macleodii and Thiocapsa roseopersicina. Finally, we have extensively modified the hydrogenase to engineer new traits including higher H2 production and better interaction with electron donors. For example, combining two strategies increased hydrogenase activity in cyanobacteria by at least 20-fold over our initial expression level. The activity of this combined strain is almost twice that of the native hydrogenase activity in S. elongatus. This work validates the idea that these enzymes are broadly tolerant to modifications that may help integrate them into a successful photobiological H2 production system. While we did not achieve our ultimate goal of integrating the functional hydrogenase with the cyanobacterial photosynthetic apparatus, the work on this project has led to significant

  18. A taxonomic monograph of the genus Tylodinus Champion (Coleoptera: Curculionidae: Cryptorhynchinae: Tylodina) of Chiapas, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Cozar, Jesús; Anderson, Robert S; Jones, Robert W; León-Corté, Jorge L

    2014-04-15

    nodulosus species group (3) T. andersoni new species (Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1), T. nodulosus (Boheman), T. zilchi Kuschel; Tylodinus pusillus species group (2) T. porvenirensis new species (type locality: Chiapas, El Porvenir, El Porvenir (2 km NE)), T. pusillus new species (type locality: Chiapas, 4 km SE Custepec); Tylodinus spiniventris species group (2) T. lum new species (Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec), and T. spiniventris new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Reserva Huitepec); Incertae sedis (13) T. pinguis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1) , T. kissingeri new species (type locality: Chiapas, Tapalapa, ca. 14 km NE Coapilla), T. complicatus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, La Yerbabuena), T. dominicus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Corzo, Reserva de la Biósfera La Sepultura), T. noctis new species (type locality: Chiapas, Coapilla, ca. 10.5 km NE Coapilla), T. rufus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas, Cerro Huitepec); T. branstetteri new species (type locality: Chiapas, La Concordia, 4 km SE Custepec), T. kuscheli new species (type locality: Chiapas, Villa Flores, Ejido Sierra Morena), T. pappi new species (type locality: Chiapas, Unión Juárez, Volcán Tacan), T. gibbosus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Pueblo Nuevo Solistahuacán, Yerbabuena Reserve), T. immundus new species (type locality: Chiapas, San Cristóbal de las Casas Cerro Huitepec), T. intzin new species (type locality: Chiapas, Tenejapa, Yashanal), T. elongatus new species (type locality: Chiapas, Ángel Albino Corzo, Reserva El Triunfo, Polígono 1). Three species (T. nodulosus (Boheman), T. zilchi Kuschel and T. cavicrus Champion) are not known to occur in Chiapas but were included in this study to be more representative of inter- and intraspecific variation and to provide a

  19. A systematic revision of Operclipygus Marseul (Coleoptera, Histeridae, Exosternini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Caterino

    2013-02-01

    ., O. hamistrius (Schmidt, 1893 comb. n., O. impressicollis sp. n., O. intersectus sp. n., O. montanus sp. n., O. nubosus sp. n., O. pichinchensis sp. n., O. propinquus sp. n., O. quinquestriatus sp. n., O. rubidus (Hinton, 1935 comb. n., O. rufescens sp. n., O. troglodytes sp. n.], O. plicicollis group [O. cephalicus sp. n., O. longidens sp. n., O. plicicollis (Schmidt, 1893], O. fossipygus group [O. disconnectus sp. n., O. fossipygus (Wenzel, 1944, O. foveipygus (Bickhardt, 1918, O. fungicolus (Wenzel & Dybas, 1941, O. gibbulus (Schmidt, 1889 comb. n., O. olivensis sp. n., O. simplicipygus sp. n., O. subdepressus (Schmidt, 1889, O. therondi (Wenzel, 1976], O. impunctipennis group [O. chamelensis sp. n., O. foveiventris sp. n., O. granulipectus sp. n., O. impunctipennis (Hinton, 1935 comb. n., O. latifoveatus sp. n., O. lissipygus sp. n., O. maesi sp. n., O. mangiferus sp. n., O. marginipennis sp. n., O. nicodemus sp. n., O. nitidus sp. n., O. pacificus sp. n., O. pauperculus sp. n., O. punctissipygus sp. n., O. subviridis sp. n., O. tripartitus sp. n., O. vorax sp. n.], O. marginellus group [O. ashei sp. n., O. baylessae sp. n., O. dentatus sp. n., O. formicatus sp. n., O. hintoni sp. n., O. marginellus (J.E. LeConte, 1860 comb. n., O. orchidophilus sp. n., O. selvorum sp. n., O. striatellus (Fall, 1917 comb. n.], incertae sedis: O. teapensis (Marseul, 1853 comb. n., O. punctulatus sp. n., O. lama Mazur, 1988, O. florifaunensis sp. n., O. bosquesecus sp. n., O. arnaudi Dégallier, 1982, O. subsphaericus sp. n., O. latipygus sp. n., O. elongatus sp. n., O. rupicolus sp. n., O. punctipleurus sp. n., O. falini sp. n., O. peregrinus sp. n., O. brooksi sp. n., O. profundipygus sp. n., O. punctatissimus sp. n., O. cavisternus sp. n., O. siluriformis sp. n., O. parallelus sp. n., O. abbreviatus sp. n., O. pygidialis (Lewis, 1908, O. faltistrius sp. n., O. limonensis sp. n., O. wenzeli sp. n., O. iheringi (Bickhardt, 1917, O. angustisternus (Wenzel, 1944, O. shorti sp. n. We