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Sample records for annular core research reactor

  1. Facility modernization Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) has undergone numerous modifications since its conception in response to program needs. The original reactor fuel, which was special U-ZrH TRIGA fuel designed primarily for pulsing, has been replaced with a higher pulsing capacity BeO fuel. Other advanced operating modes which use this increased capability, in addition to the pulse and steady state, have been incorporated to tailor power histories and fluences to the experiments. Various experimental facilities have been developed that range from a radiography facility to a 50 cm diameter External Fuel Ring Cavity (FREC) using 180 of the original ZrH fuel elements. Currently a digital reactor console is being produced with GA, which will give enhanced monitoring capabilities of the reactor parameters while leaving the safety-related shutdown functions with analog technology. (author)

  2. MCNP/MCNPX model of the annular core research reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Cooper, Philip J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr. (.,; .)

    2006-10-01

    Many experimenters at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) have a need to predict the neutron/gamma environment prior to testing. In some cases, the neutron/gamma environment is needed to understand the test results after the completion of an experiment. In an effort to satisfy the needs of experimenters, a model of the ACRR was developed for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport codes MCNP [Br03] and MCNPX [Wa02]. The model contains adjustable safety, transient, and control rods, several of the available spectrum-modifying cavity inserts, and placeholders for experiment packages. The ACRR model was constructed such that experiment package models can be easily placed in the reactor after being developed as stand-alone units. An addition to the 'standard' model allows the FREC-II cavity to be included in the calculations. This report presents the MCNP/MCNPX model of the ACRR. Comparisons are made between the model and the reactor for various configurations. Reactivity worth curves for the various reactor configurations are presented. Examples of reactivity worth calculations for a few experiment packages are presented along with the measured reactivity worth from the reactor test of the experiment packages. Finally, calculated neutron/gamma spectra are presented.

  3. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Brian D.; Parma, Edward J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field - a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP) bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ) contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified) cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ) cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy.

  4. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser Krista; Chantel Nowlen K.; Russell DePriest K.

    2016-01-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1) available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were char...

  5. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with the central cavity liner removed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope production in the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched uranium targets to be irradiated in the high flux central region of the core. In order to accomplish this goal, the central cavity liner has been removed to allow for the eventual placement of targets in that region. This safety evaluation presents the analysis associated with operating the reactor in the steady state mode with the central cavity liner removed and the central region of the core filled with water and aluminum void targets. The reactor operation with enriched, uranium loaded targets will be analyzed in a future analysis document. This analysis describes only the operation of the reactor in the steady state mode; consideration of pulse mode operations with the liner removed is not presented

  6. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Krista; Chantel Nowlen, K.; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1) available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  7. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  8. ACRR [Annular Core Research Reactor] fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACER) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  9. Neutron Environment Characterization of the Central Cavity in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Edward J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Lippert, Lance L.; Vehar, David W.

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of the neutron environment in the central cavity of the Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is important in order to provide experimenters with the most accurate spectral information and maintain a high degree of fidelity in performing reactor experiments. Characterization includes both modeling and experimental efforts. Building accurate neutronic models of the ACRR and the central cavity "bucket" environments that can be used by experimenters is important in planning and designing experiments, as well as assessing the experimental results and quantifying uncertainties. Neutron fluence characterizations of two bucket environments, LB44 and PLG, are presented. These two environments are used frequently and represent two extremes in the neutron spectrum. The LB44 bucket is designed to remove the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and significantly attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The PLG bucket is designed to enhance the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The neutron characterization for each bucket was performed by irradiating 20 different activation foil types, some of which were cadmium covered, resulting in 37 different reactions at the peak axial flux location in each bucket. The dosimetry results were used in the LSL-M2 spectrum adjustment code with a 640-energy group MCNP-generated trial spectrum, self-shielding correction factors, the SNLRML or IRDFF dosimetry cross-section library, trial spectrum uncertainty, and trial covariance matrix, to generate a least-squares adjusted neutron spectrum, spectrum uncertainty, and covariance matrix. Both environment character-izations are well documented and the environments are available for use by experimenters. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  10. Neutron Environment Characterization of the Central Cavity in the Annular Core Research Reactor *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parma Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the neutron environment in the central cavity of the Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR is important in order to provide experimenters with the most accurate spectral information and maintain a high degree of fidelity in performing reactor experiments. Characterization includes both modeling and experimental efforts. Building accurate neutronic models of the ACRR and the central cavity “bucket” environments that can be used by experimenters is important in planning and designing experiments, as well as assessing the experimental results and quantifying uncertainties. Neutron fluence characterizations of two bucket environments, LB44 and PLG, are presented. These two environments are used frequently and represent two extremes in the neutron spectrum. The LB44 bucket is designed to remove the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and significantly attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The PLG bucket is designed to enhance the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The neutron characterization for each bucket was performed by irradiating 20 different activation foil types, some of which were cadmium covered, resulting in 37 different reactions at the peak axial flux location in each bucket. The dosimetry results were used in the LSL-M2 spectrum adjustment code with a 640-energy group MCNP-generated trial spectrum, self-shielding correction factors, the SNLRML or IRDFF dosimetry cross-section library, trial spectrum uncertainty, and trial covariance matrix, to generate a least-squares adjusted neutron spectrum, spectrum uncertainty, and covariance matrix. Both environment character-izations are well documented and the environments are available for use by experimenters.

  11. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.

    2000-01-01

    Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public.

  12. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public

  13. Critical heat flux predictions for the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides best estimate predictions of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and the Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) to support the proposed upgrade of the Annual Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) from its present value of 2 MWt to 4 MWt. These predictions are based on the University of New Mexico (UNM) - CHF correlation, originally developed for uniformly heated vertical annuli. The UNM-CHF correlation is applicable to low-flow and low-pressure conditions, which are typical of those in the ACRR. The three hypotheses that examined the effect of the nonuniform axial heat flux distribution in the ACRR core are (1) the local conditions hypotheses, (2) the total power hypothesis, and (3) the global conditions hypothesis. These hypotheses, in conjunction with the UNM-CHF correlation, are used to estimate the CHF and CHFR in the ACRR. Because the total power hypothesis predictions of power per rod at CHF are approximately 15%-20% lower than those corresponding to saturation exit conditions, it can be concluded that the total power hypothesis considerably underestimates the CHF for nonuniformly heated geometries. This conclusion is in agreement with previous experimental results. The global conditions hypothesis, which is more conservative and more accurate of the other two, provides the most reliable predictions of CHF/CHFR for the ACRR. The global conditions hypothesis predictions of CHFR varied between 2.1 and 3.9, with the higher value corresponding to the lower water inlet temperature of 20 degrees C

  14. Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation

  15. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  16. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  17. Annular core for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The active core of the 350 MW(t) MHTGR is annular in configuration, shaped to provide a large external surface-to-volume ratio for the transport of heat radially to the reactor vessel in case of a loss of coolant flow. For a given fuel temperature limit, the annular core provides approximately 40 % greater power output over a typical cylindrical configuration. The reactor core is made up of columns of hexagonal blocks, each 793-mm high and 360-mm wide. The active core is 3.5 m in o.d., 1.65 m in i.d., and 7.93 m tall. Fuel elements contain TRISO-coated microspheres of 19.8 % enriched uranium oxycarbide and of fertile thorium oxide. The core is controlled by 30 control rods which enter the inner and outer side reflectors from above. (author)

  18. Conceptual design study of Pebble Bed Type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor with annular core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the Conceptual Design Study of Pebble Bed Type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor with Annular Core Structure. From this study, it is made clear that the thermal power of the Pebble Bed Type Reactor can be increased to 500MW through introducing the annular core structure without losing the inherent safe characteristics (in the coolant depressurization accident, the fuel temperature does not exceed the temperature where the fuel defect begins.) This thermal power is two times higher than the inherent safe Pebble Bed Type High temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR) designed in West Germany. From this result, it is foreseen that the ratio of the plant cost to the reactor power is reduced and the economy of the plant operation is improved. The reactor performances e.g. fuel burnup and fuel temperature are maintained in same level of the MHTGR. (author)

  19. Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2010-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850ºC was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 ºC in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 to 30 MW, with various tests performed at each step to confirm

  20. Effect of moderator density distribution of annular flow on fuel assembly neutronic characteristics in boiling water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the moderator density distribution of annular flow on the fuel assembly neutronic characteristics in a boiling water nuclear reactor was investigated using the SRAC95 code system. For the investigation, a model of annular flow for fuel assembly calculation was utilized. The results of the assembly calculation with the model (Method 1) and those of the fuel assembly calculation with the uniform void fraction distribution (Method 2) were compared. It was found that Method 2 underestimates the infinite multiplication factor in the fuel assembly including the gadolinia rod (type 1 assembly). This phenomenon is explained by the fact that the capture rate in the thermal energy region in gadolinia fuel is estimated to be smaller when the liquid film of annular flow at the fuel rod surface is considered. A burnup calculation was performed under the condition of a void fraction of 65% and a volumetric fraction of the liquid film in liquid phase of 1. It is found that Method 2 underestimates the infinite multiplication factor in comparison to Method 1 in the early stage of burnup, and that Method 2 becomes to overestimate the factor after a certain degree of burnup. This is because Method 2 overestimates the depletion rate of the gadolinia. (author)

  1. Core neutronics of a swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial cores of the 5 MW swimming pool research reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre, Tehran have been analyzed using the computer codes METHUSELAH and EQUIPOISE. The effective multiplication factor, critical mass, moderator temperature and void coefficients of the core have been calculated and compared with vendor's values. Calculated values agree reasonably well with the vendor's results. (author)

  2. Neutron spectrometric methods for core inventory verification in research reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ellinger, A; Hansen, W; Knorr, J; Schneider, R

    2002-01-01

    In consequence of the Non-Proliferation Treaty safeguards, inspections are periodically made in nuclear facilities by the IAEA and the EURATOM Safeguards Directorate. The inspection methods are permanently improved. Therefore, the Core Inventory Verification method is being developed as an indirect method for the verification of the core inventory and to check the declared operation of research reactors.

  3. Reactor core materials research and integrated material database establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainly two research areas were covered in this project. One is to establish the integrated database of nuclear materials, and the other is to study the behavior of reactor core materials, which are usually under the most severe condition in the operating plants. During the stage I of the project (for three years since 1999) in- and out of reactor properties of stainless steel, the major structural material for the core structures of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), were evaluated and specification of nuclear grade material was established. And the damaged core components from domestic power plants, e.g. orifice of CVCS, support pin of CRGT, etc. were investigated and the causes were revealed. To acquire more resistant materials to the nuclear environments, development of the alternative alloys was also conducted. For the integrated DB establishment, a task force team was set up including director of nuclear materials technology team, and projector leaders and relevant members from each project. The DB is now opened in public through the Internet

  4. Core conversion of the Portuguese research reactor to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core conversion of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) to LEU fuel is being performed within IAEA's Technical Cooperation project POR/4/016, with financial support from the US and Portugal. CERCA was selected as manufacturer of the LEU assemblies by the IAEA after an international call for bids. CERCA provided a comprehensive package to the RPI which included the mechanical verification of the design of the assemblies, their manufacture and arrangements for a joint inspection of the finished assemblies. The LEU fuel assemblies were manufactured within 8 months upon final approval of the design. The safety analyses for the core conversion to LEU fuel were made with the assistance of the RERTR program and were submitted for review by the IAEA and by Portuguese authorities in January 2007. Revised documents were submitted in June 2007 addressing the issues raised during review. Regulatory approval was received in early August and core conversion was done in early September. All measured safety parameters are within the defined acceptance limits. Operation at full power is expected by the end of October. (author)

  5. Reactor core conversion studies of Ghana: Research Reactor-1 and proposal for addition of safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inclusion of an additional safety rod in conjunction with a core conversion study of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) was carried out using neutronics, thermal hydraulics and burnup codes. The study is based on a recommendation by Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARP) mission to incorporate a safety rod to the reactor safety system as well as the need to replace the reactor fuel with LEU. Conversion from one fuel type to another requires a complete re-evaluation of the safety analysis. Changes to the reactivity worth, shutdown margin, power density and material properties must be taken into account, and appropriate modifications made. Neutronics analysis including burnup was studied followed by thermal hydraulics analyses which comprise steady state and transients. Four computer codes were used for the analysis; MCNP, REBUS, PLTEP and PARET. The neutronics analysis revealed that the LEU core must be operated at 34 Kw in order to attain the flux of 1.0E12 n/cm2.s as the nominal flux of the HEU core. The auxiliary safety rod placed at a modified irradiation site gives a better worth than the cadmium capsules. For core excess reactivity of 4 mk, 348 fuel pins would be appropriate for the GHARR-1 LEU core. Results indicate that flux level of 1.0E12 n/cm2.s in the inner irradiation channel will not be compromised, if the power of the LEU core is increased to 34 kW. The GHARR-1 core using LEU-U02-12.5% fuel can be operated for 23 shim cycles, with cycles length 2.5 years, for over 57 years at the 17 kW power level. All 23 LEU cycles meet the ∼ 4.0 mk excess reactivity required at the beginning of cycle . For comparison, the MNSR HEU reference core can also be operated for 23 shim cycles, but with a cycle length of 2.0 years for just over 46 years at 15.0kW power level. It is observed that the GHARR-1 core with LEU UO2 fuel enriched to 12.5% and a power level of 34 kW can be operated ∼25% longer than the current HEU core operated at 30 k

  6. Researches on a reactor core in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, S; Iinuma, T; Kubo, K; Kato, H; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a study on a fusion reactor core is presented in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), including the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, a HIB interaction with a background gas, reactor cavity gas dynamics, the reactor gas backflow to the beam lines, and a HIB fusion reactor design. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with a standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. In a fusion reactor the HIB charge neutralization is needed for a ballistic HIB transport. Multiple mechanical shutters would be installed at each HIB port at the reactor wall to stop the blast waves and the chamber gas backflow, so that the accelerator final elements would be protected from the ...

  7. Innovative research reactor core designed. Estimation and analysis of gamma heating distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gamma heating value is an important factor needed for safety analysis of each experiments that will be realized on research reactor core. Gamma heat is internal heat source occurs in each irradiation facilities or any material irradiated in reactor core. This value should be determined correctly because of the safety related problems. The gamma heating value is in general depend on. reactor core characteristics, different one and other, and then each new reactor design should be completed by gamma heating data. The Innovative Research Reactor is one of the new reactor design that should be completed with any safety data, including the gamma heating value. For this reasons, calculation and analysis of gamma heating in the hole of reactor core and irradiation facilities in reflector had been done by using of modified and validated Gamset computer code. The result shown that gamma heating value of 11.75 W/g is the highest value at the center of reactor core, higher than gamma heating value of RSG-GAS. However, placement of all irradiation facilities in reflector show that safety characteristics for irradiation facilities of innovative research reactor more better than RSG-GAS reactor. Regarding the results obtained, and based on placement of irradiation facilities in reflector, can be concluded that innovative research reactor more safe for any irradiation used. (author)

  8. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

  9. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

  10. Neutronics conceptual design of the innovative research reactor core using uranium molybdenum fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multipurpose of research reactor utilization make many countries build the new research reactor. Trend of this reactor for this moment is multipurpose reactor type with a compact core to get high neutron flux at the low or medium level of power. The research newest. Reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 year old. Therefore, it is needed to design a new research reactor, called innovative research reactor (IRR) and then as an alternative to replace the old research reactor. The aim of this research is to get the optimal configuration of equilibrium core with the acceptance criteria are minimum thermal neutron flux is 2.5E14 n/cm2 s at the power level of 20 MW (minimum), length of cycle of more than 40 days, and the most efficient of using fuel in the core. Neutronics design has been performed for new fuel of U-9Mo-AI with various fuel density and reflector. Design calculation has been performed using WIMSD-5B and BATAN-FUEL computer codes. The calculation result of the conceptual design shows four core configurations namely 5x5, 5x7, 6x5 and 6x6. The optimalization result for equilibrium core of innovative research reactor is the 5x5 configuration with 450 gU fuel loading, berilium reflector, maximum thermal neutron flux at reflector is 3.33E14 n/cm2 sand length of cycle is 57 days is the most optimal of IRR. (author)

  11. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  12. McCARD for Neutronics Design and Analysis of Research Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyung Jin; Park, Ho Jin; Kwon, Soonwoo; Seo, Geon Ho; Hyo Kim, Chang

    2014-06-01

    McCARD is a Monte Carlo (MC) neutron-photon transport simulation code developed exclusively for the neutronics design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores. McCARD is equipped with the hierarchical modeling and scripting functions, the CAD-based geometry processing module, the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter and source multiplication factor estimation modules as well as the burnup analysis capability for the neutronics design and analysis of both research and power reactor cores. This paper highlights applicability of McCARD for the research reactor core neutronics analysis, as demonstrated for Kyoto University Critical Assembly, HANARO, and YALINA.

  13. Analysis of fuel management pattern of research reactor core of the MTR type design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactor core design needs neutronics parameter calculation use computer codes. Research reactor MTR type is very interested because can be used as research and also a radioisotope production. The research reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 years old. Therefore, it is needed to design a new research reactor as a compact core. Recent research reactor core is not enough to meet criteria acceptance in the UCD which already determined namely thermal neutron flux in the core is 1.0x1015 n/cm2s. so that it is necessary to be redesign the alternative core design. The new research reactor design is a MTR type with 5x5 configuration core, uses U9Mo-Al fuel, 70 cm of high and uses two certainly fuel management pattern. The aim of this research is to achieve neutron flux in the core to meet the criteria acceptance in the UCD. Calculation is done by using WIMSD-B, Batan-FUEL and Batan-3DIFF codes. The neutronic parameters to be achieved by this calculation are the power level of 50 MW thermal and core cycle of 20 days. The neutronics parameter calculation is done for new U-9Mo-Al fuel with variation of densities.The result of calculation showed that the fresh core with 5x5 configuration, 360 gram, 390 gram and 450 gram of fuel loadings have meet safety margin and acceptance criteria in the UCD at the thermal neutron flux is more then 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2s. But for equilibrium core is only the 450 gram of loading meet the acceptance criteria. (author)

  14. Demonstration of core neutronic calculation for research and training reactors via SCALE4.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, full core modelling is performed to improve neutronic analyses capability for nuclear research reactors using SCALE4.4 system. KENOV.a module of SCALE4.4 system is utilized for full core neutronic analysis. The ORIGEN-S module is also coupled with the KENOV.a module to perform burnup dependent core analyses. Results of control rod worths for 1st cycle of Cekmece TR-2 research reactor are presented. In particular, coupling of KENOV.a and ORIGEN-S modules of SCALE4.4 is discussed. The preliminary results of 2-D burnup dependent neutronic calculations are also given. (author)

  15. Development of Core Design Model for Small-Sized Research Reactor and Establishment of Infrastructure for Reactor Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within 10 years a growing world-wide demand of new research reactor construction is expected because of obsolescence. In Korea, a new research reactor is also required in order to meet domestic demand of utilization. KAERI has been devoted to develop an export-oriented research reactors for these kinds of demand. A next generation research reactor should comply with general requirements for safety, economics, environment-friendliness and non-proliferation as well as high performance requirement of high flux level. A export-tailored reactor should be developed for the demand of developing counties or under-developed countries. A new design concept is to be developed for a long cycle length core which has excellent irradiation facility with high flux

  16. Activities of research-reactor-technology project in FNCA from FY2005 to FY2007. Sharing neutronics calculation technique for core management and utilization of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RRT project (Research-Reactor-Technology Project) was carried out with the theme of 'sharing neutronics calculation technique for core management and utilization of research reactors' in the framework of FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) from FY2005 to FY2007. The objective of the project was to improve and equalize the level of neutronics calculation technique for the reactor core management among participating countries to assure the safe and stable operation of research reactors and the promotion of the effective utilization. Neutronics calculation codes, namely SRAC code system and MVP code, were adopted as common codes. Participating countries succeeded in applying the common codes to analyzing the core of each domestic research reactor. Some participating countries succeeded in applying the common codes to analyzing for utilization of own research reactors. Activities of RRT project have improved and equalized the level of neutronics calculation technique among participating countries. (author)

  17. Demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach on SNL's annual core research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the initial demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach and its implementing algorithm, the MIT-CSDL Non-Linear Digital Controller, on the annual core research reactor (ACCR) that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. This demonstration constituted the first use of reactivity constraints for the closed-loop, digital control of reactor power on a facility other than the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) research reactor (MITR-II). Also, because the ACRR and the MITR-II are of very different design, these trials established the generic nature of the reactivity constraint approach

  18. An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Memmott, Matthew; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hejzlar, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled fast reactor, respectively. The concepts were explored for both high- and low-conversion core configurations, and metal and oxide fuels. The annular fuel concept is best suited for low-conversion metal-fuelled cores, where it can enable a power uprate of ~20%; the magnitude ...

  19. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference betwe

  20. Selecting a MAPLE research reactor core for 1-10 mW operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MAPLE class of research reactors is designed so that a single reactor concept can satisfy a wide range of practical applications. This paper reports the results of physics studies performed on a number of potential core configurations fuelled with either 5 w/o or 8 w/o enriched UO2 or 20 w/o U3Si-Al and assesses the relative merits of each. Recommended core designs are given to maximize the neutron fluxes available for scientific application and isotope production

  1. A novel reactor concept for boron neutron capture therapy: annular low-low power reactor (ALLPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, B.; Levine, S.H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNC), originally proposed in 50's, has been getting renewed attention over the last {approx}10 years. This is in particular due to its potential for treating deep-seated brain tumors by employing epithermal neutron beams. Large (several MW) research reactors are currently used to obtain epithermal beams for BNCT, but because of cost and licensing issues it is not likely that such high-power reactors can be placed in regular medical centers. This paper describes a novel reactor concept for BNCT devised to overcome this obstacle. The design objective was to produce a beam of epithermal neutrons of sufficient intensity for BNCT at <50 kW using low enriched uranium. It is achieved by the annular reactor design, which is called Annular Low-Low Power Reactor (ALLPR). Preliminary studies using Monte Carlo simulations are summarized in this paper. The ALLPR should be relatively economical to build, and safe and easy to operate. This novel concept may increase the viability of using BNCT in medical centers worldwide. (author)

  2. MTR research reactor core behavior under a loss of shutdown heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: Heat removal during operation of medium power research reactors is assumed to be safely performed by forced convection and the adequate removal of residual decay heat after reactor shutdown need to continue forced convection removal for a certain period of time when the operating power before shut-down is above a certain power level. This is among the requirement for the overall safety of research reactor operation. Objective: The purpose of the present work is: - to estimate the maximum temperature in the core and to investigate the minimum power operating level before shutdown that needs a continuation forced convection after shutdown; - to evaluate occurrence of cladding damage following a shutdown reactor without forced convection Problem: The simulation process is undertaken using the RELAP5/Mod 3.2 code system. The IAEA 10 MW benchmark core which is a representative of medium pool type MTR research reactors was chosen here in order to investigate the cladding maximum fuel temperature without forced heat removal after shutdown of the reactor that was operating at different powers up to 10 MW. Nodalization: The benchmark core consists of 25 fuels elements placed in a 5 x 5 gird placed within pool filled by 9 m of light water. The primary loop is represented by pumps, pipes and heat exchangers. Each of the 25 fuel elements is represented individually. Results: The simulation process has shown that the cladding maximum temperature did not reach the melting point for aluminum (660 deg. C) but void is expected to be produced in the hot channels. Hence, the loss of forced heat removal after reactor scram did not induce any melting of the cladding by much deeper investigation may be undertaken because presence of void in channels could enhance corrosion phenomena and may induce some fission products release in the pools following localized fuel rupture due to corrosion. (authors)

  3. ORPHEE research reactor: 3D core depletion calculation using Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, F.; Brun, E.

    2014-06-01

    ORPHEE is a research reactor located at CEA Saclay. It aims at producing neutron beams for experiments. This is a pool-type reactor (heavy water), and the core is cooled by light water. Its thermal power is 14 MW. ORPHEE core is 90 cm height and has a cross section of 27x27 cm2. It is loaded with eight fuel assemblies characterized by a various number of fuel plates. The fuel plate is composed of aluminium and High Enriched Uranium (HEU). It is a once through core with a fuel cycle length of approximately 100 Equivalent Full Power Days (EFPD) and with a maximum burnup of 40%. Various analyses under progress at CEA concern the determination of the core neutronic parameters during irradiation. Taking into consideration the geometrical complexity of the core and the quasi absence of thermal feedback for nominal operation, the 3D core depletion calculations are performed using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® [1,2,3]. A preliminary validation of the depletion calculation was performed on a 2D core configuration by comparison with the deterministic transport code APOLLO2 [4]. The analysis showed the reliability of TRIPOLI-4® to calculate a complex core configuration using a large number of depleting regions with a high level of confidence.

  4. Comparing neutronics codes performance in analyzing a fresh-fuelled research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Calculation of neutron fluence rate with different neutronic codes is examined. • MCNP, TRIPOLI and CITATION were used for neutron fluence rate calculations. • The recently converted core of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) was used. • Fresh fuel of low enrichment in U-235 was assumed. • Thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates were computed. - Abstract: In this paper the relative performance of different simulation approaches is examined, focusing on the neutron fluence rate distribution in a nuclear reactor core. The main scope of the work is to benchmark and validate the neutronics code systems utilized in the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) for a high-density Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) core of compact size. For this purpose the recently converted core of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI), fueled with fresh, low enrichment in U-235 fuel, was simulated with the stochastic code TRIPOLI and the deterministic code system XSDRN/CITATION. RPI was selected on the basis that it is a similar to GRR-1 pool-type reactor, using same fuel and control rods type, as well as same types of coolant, moderator and reflector. The neutron fluence rate in RPI was computed using each numerical approach with changed approximations. In this frame the stochastic code TRIPOLI was tested using two different nuclear data libraries, i.e., ENDF/B-VI versus JEFF3.1, and two different ways of source definition, i.e., “point sources”, placed in the center of each fuel cell, versus a “distributed source”, where each fuel volume was considered as a neutron source. The deterministic code system XSDRN/CITATION was tested with respect to the definition of the transverse leakages associated to each one-dimensional, user-defined core zone, as analyzed by the XSDRN code in order to provide the zone equivalent cross sections. Thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates were computed and local values found in a 15 cm segment immediately below the

  5. Monte Carlo simulation of core physics parameters of the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code, version 4C (MCNP4C) and a set of neutron cross-section data were used to develop an accurate three-dimensional computational model of the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1). The geometry of the reactor core was modeled as closely as possible including the details of all the fuel elements, reactivity regulators, the control rod, all irradiation channels, and Be reflectors. The following reactor core physics parameters were calculated for the present highly enriched uranium (HEU) core: clean cold core excess reactivity (ρex), control rod (CR) and shim worth, shut down margin (SDM), neutron flux distributions in the irradiation channels, reactivity feedback coefficients and the kinetics parameters. The HEU input model was validated by experimental data from the final safety analyses report (SAR). The model predicted various key neutronics parameters fairly accurately and the calculated thermal neutron fluxes in the irradiation channels agree with the values obtained by foil activation method. Results indicate that the established Monte Carlo model is an accurate representation of the NIRR-1 HEU core and will be used to perform feasibility for conversion to low enriched uranium (LEU)

  6. Progress in the neutronic core conversion (HEU-LEU) analysis of Ghana research reactor-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anim-Sampong, S.; Maakuu, B. T.; Akaho, E. H. K.; Andam, A.; Liaw, J. J. R.; Matos, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Ghana Atomic Energy Commission; Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology

    2006-01-01

    The Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) and has operated at different power levels since its commissioning in March 1995. As required for all nuclear reactors, neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis are being performed for the HEU-LEU core conversion studies of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) facility, which is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). Stochastic Monte Carlo particle transport methods and tools (MCNP4c/MCNP5) were used to fine-tune a previously developed 3-D MCNP model of the GHARR-1 facility and perform neutronic analysis of the 90.2% HEU reference and candidate LEU (UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, U-9Mo) fresh cores with varying enrichments from 12.6%-19.75%. In this paper, the results of the progress made in the Monte Carlo neutronic analysis of the HEU reference and candidate LEU fuels are presented. In particular, a comparative performance assessment of the LEU with respect to neutron flux variations in the fission chamber and experimental irradiation channels are highlighted.

  7. RESEARCH OF RATIONAL LENGTH OF CORE SOIL USED IN ANNULAR EXCAVATION METHOD%隧道环形开挖时核心土合理长度研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周路军; 叶剑锋; 尚岳全

    2011-01-01

    为提高预留核心土工法的科学应用,对预留核心土环形开挖法中核心土合理长度问题进行研究.通过有限元模拟,分析了核心土长度变化对围岩塑性区、掌子面纵向位移及拱顶沉降的影响.%In order to improve the application of reserving core soil construction method, rational length of core soil used in reserving core soil with annular excavation method is researched. By means of finite element method, the influence of length of core soil to the plastic area in surrounding rock, longitudinal displacement of tunnel face and vault settlement are analyzed. Research shows that rational length of core soil is 2. 5 ~3.5m while surrounding rock is ranked Ⅵ.

  8. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the MIT research reactor low enrichment uranium (LEU) Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the MIT reactor is evolving. The in-house multi-channel thermal-hydraulics code, MULCH, was developed specifically for the MITR. This code has been benchmarked against PLTEMP for steady-state analysis, and RELAP5 and temperature measurements for the loss of primary flow transient. In this paper, thermal hydraulic analyses using MULCH and RELAP5 in support of the MITR conversion tasks are described. Various fuel configurations are evaluated in order to support the LEU core design optimization study. The results show that a preferable LEU core design employs a fuel meat thickness of 20 mils with 18 plates per element with a hot channel factor less than 1.76. Simulation results also show that the LEU-fueled MITR can potentially operate at a higher power level, about 30 % higher than the current core. (authors)

  9. Research on intelligent monitor for 3D power distribution of reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Core power distribution of ex-core measurement system has been reconstructed. • Building up an artificial intelligence model for 3-D core power distribution. • Error of the experiments has been reduced to 0.76%. • Methods for improving the accuracy of the model have been obtained. - Abstract: A real-time monitor for 3D reactor power distribution is critical for nuclear safety and high efficiency of NPP’s operation as well as for optimizing the control system, especially when the nuclear power plant (NPP) works at a certain power level or it works in load following operation. This paper was based on analyzing the monitor for 3D reactor power distribution technologies used in modern NPPs. Furthermore, considering the latest research outcomes, the paper proposed a method based on using an ex-core neutron detector system and a neural network to set up a real time monitor system for reactor’s 3D power distribution supervision. The results of the experiments performed on a reactor simulation machine illustrated that the new monitor system worked very well for a certain burn-up range during the fuel cycle. In addition, this new model could reduce the errors associated with the fitting of the distribution effectively, and several optimization methods were also obtained to improve the accuracy of the simulation model

  10. Real time simulation research in 200 MW low temperature nuclear heating reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    200 MW low temperature nuclear heating reactor is an important new-type reactor. Natural circulation is adopted in the flowage of reactor core. High precise models are built and selected, which are low temperature reactor power model, residual power releasing model, heat conductivity model in reactor core, thermo-hydraulic model, subcooling boiling model, CHF calculation model and so on. These models are solved using Gear arithmetic and Adams arithmetic, which are testified each other. Using appropriate arithmetic, the real time simulation of thermo-hydraulic process in the core is truly fulfilled. (authors)

  11. A study on improving the performance of a research reactor's equilibrium core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Utilizing low enriched uranium silicide fuel (U3Si2-Al of existing uranium density (3.285 g/cm3, different core configurations have been studied in search of an equilibrium core with an improved performance for the Pakistan Research Reactor-1. Furthermore, we have extended our analysis to the performance of higher density silicide fuels with a uranium density of 4.0 and 4.8 U g/cm3. The criterion used in selecting the best performing core was that of “unit flux time cycle length per 235U mass per cycle”. In order to analyze core performance by improving neutron moderation, utilizing higher-density fuel, the effect of the coolant channel width was also studied by reducing the number of plates in the standard/control fuel element. Calculations employing computer codes WIMSD/4 and CITATION were performed. A ten energy group structure for fission neutrons was used for the generation of microscopic cross-sections through WIMSD/4. To search the equilibrium core, two-dimensional core modelling was performed in CITATION. Performance indicators have shown that the higher-density uranium silicide-fuelled core (U density 4.8 g/cm3 without any changes in standard/control fuel elements, comprising of 15 standard and 4 control fuel elements, is the best performing of all analyzed cores.

  12. Developments in fabrication of annular MOX fuel pellet for Indian fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical rotary presses along with adoption of core rod feature were inducted for fabrication of intricate annular Mixed Oxide (MOX) pellets for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). In the existing tooling, bottom plungers contain core rod whereas top plungers contain a central hole for the entry of core rod during compaction. Frequent manual clean up of top plungers after few operations were required due to settling of powder in the annular hole of top plungers during compaction. Delay in cleaning can also result in breakage of tooling apart from increase in the dose to extremities of personnel. New design of tooling has been introduced to clean up the top plungers online during the operation of rotary press. It leads to increase in the productivity, reduces the spillage of valuable nuclear material and also reduces man-rem to operators significantly. The present paper describes the modification in tooling design and compaction sequence established for online cleaning of top plungers. (author)

  13. Optimisation of the Core Management Scenario to Reach High Fuel Burnup in the MYRRHA Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrahim, H. Ait [General Management, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Baeten, P.; Eynde, G. Van Den [Advanced Nuclear Systems, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Sobolev, V. [Nuclear Materials Science, Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN, Boeretang 200, BE-2400, Mol (Belgium); Nishihara, K. [Center for Neutron Science, Japanese Agency for Atomic Energy (JAEA), Muramatsu 124-2, 319-1112 Tokai-Mura, Ibaraki-Ken (Japan)

    2011-07-01

    An innovative fast spectrum experimental facility MYRRHA has being developed by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK CEN. The MYRRHA is an accelerator-driven system with a core loaded with fast reactor MOX fuel and cooled by liquid lead-bismuth eutectic. At this stage the selection of the facility operation mode and the fuel management scenario is of great importance. In the present article two different modes of the MYRRHA core management are compared: at constant power and at constant proton beam current. The results of neutronic and thermo-mechanical modeling are presented. It is shown that safer thermomechanical conditions for the fuel elements are predicted in the case of the core reshuffling with batches of ten fuel assemblies and with the ADS operation mode at a constant proton beam current. (author)

  14. Research reactor in-core fuel management optimisation using the multiobjective cross-entropy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-core fuel management optimisation (ICFMO) problem has been studied for several decades. Very little research has, however, been aimed at multiobjective optimisation involving the fundamental notion of Pareto optimality. In this paper, the recently developed multiobjective optimisation using the cross-entropy method (MOO CEM) algorithm is applied to a multiobjective ICFMO problem for the first time. A derivation of the MOO CEM algorithm is presented for ICFMO, along with a constraint handling technique. The algorithm is applied to a biobjective test problem for the SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor. The Pareto set approximated by the algorithm is compared to solutions obtained by typical operational reload strategies. The results indicate that the MOO CEM algorithm for multiobjective ICFMO is a robust and efficient method which is able to obtain a good spread of trade-off solutions. The method may therefore greatly aid in the decision making of a reactor operator tasked with designing reload configurations. (author)

  15. Fast reactor core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki [Hitachi Research Laboratory, Hitachi, Ltd., 7-1-1, Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki, 319-1221 Japan (Japan); Itooka, Satoshi [Hitachi-GE Nuclear Energy, Ltd., 3-1-1, Saiwai-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki, 317-0073 Japan (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    Fast Reactor (FR) core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency were conducted. A heterogeneous MA loaded core was designed based on the 1000MWe-ABR breakeven core. The heterogeneous MA loaded core with Zr-H loaded moderated targets had a better transmutation performance than the MA homogeneous loaded core. The annular pellet rod design was proposed as one of the possible design options for the MA target. It was shown that using annular pellet MA rods mitigates the self-shielding effect in the moderated target so as to enhance the transmutation rate.

  16. Safety analysis for core conversion (from HEU to LEU) of Pakistan research reactor-2 (PARR-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARR-2 (Pakistan Research Reactor-2), an MNSR (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) is to be converted from HEU (High Enriched Uranium) to LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel, along with all current MNSRs in various other countries. The purpose of conversion is to minimize the use of HEU for non-proliferation of high-grade nuclear fuel. The present report presents thermal hydraulic and safety analyses of PARR-2 using existing HEU fuel as well as proposed LEU fuel. Presently, the core is comprised of 90.2% enriched UAl4-Al fuel. There are 344 fuel pins of 5.5 mm diameter. The core has a total of 994.8 g of U235. Standard computer code PARET/ANL (version 1992) was employed to perform steady-state and transient analyses. Various parameters were computed, which included: coolant outlet, maximum clad surface and maximum fuel centerline temperatures; and peak power and corresponding peak core temperatures resulting from a transient initiated by 4 mK positive reactivity insertion. Results were compared with the reported data in Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). It was found that the PARET results were in reasonable agreement with the manufacturer's results. Calculations were also carried out for the proposed LEU core with two suggested fuel pin sizes (5.5 mm and 5.1 mm diameter with 12.6% and 12.3% enrichment, respectively). Comparison of the LEU results with the existing HEU fuel has been made and discussed.

  17. Assessment of core structural materials and surveillance programme of research reactors in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main structural materials to be used in the reactor core, support structures are stainless steel, aluminum and zirconium alloys (zircadyne). Other materials are also used, for example such as polymers in seals and protective coating, and hafnium (HF) as absorber materials in the control rod plates. Stainless steel is used for the reactor pool. The mechanical properties of stainless steel alloys change when they are subjected to irradiation. The main phenomena observed are swelling and irradiation - induced creep. The swelling phenomenon depends on the operating temperature and neutron fluence. For the reactor facility, components will operate at temperature below 70 o C and are expected to see a lifetime fluence of approximately 1 x 1023 n.cm-2.these conditions are well below the conditions where swelling becomes significant. Stainless steels have strong resistance to corrosion over a wide range of environments and temperature. The reactor pool and primary circuit water is demineralized water with controlled low conductivity of less than 100 μ.sm-1 no failure mechanism is known under such process conditions. Aluminum alloys will be used for the constructions of some reactor internals which working in radiation environment as their properties are well understood and show predictable behavior under such conditions. Aluminum is extensively used in water - cooled research reactors because of its low cross-section for the capture of thermal neutrons, excellent corrosion resistance and thermal conductivity. Irradiation damage of polymers strongly depends on the fluence received by the materials. Irradiation effects of polymers also depend on their compositions and molecular structure. if the content of natural rubber is high, irradiation induces an increase in the tensile strength. Where the content of polypropylene is high, irradiation reduces the strength. A materials surveillance plan has been developed and will be implemented from the commencement of reactor

  18. KNK II third core: design report for the annular fuel elements on the central position to accommodate material test inserts NZ 402 and NZ 403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since August 1984 irradiation experiments with temperature controlled pressure tube probes are being performed in the central position of KNK II. This is part of a long-term experimental program for the development of irradiation resistant reactor materials, which shall also be continued in the third core. The necessary irradiation channel is provided by a special annular fuel element. The present report describes the annular fuel elements for the third core. Aspects of the subassembly design are considered on the basis of the annular element design for the second core and the standard elements of the third core. Two annular elements NZ 402 and NZ 403 (as reserve) are available. It is demonstrated that the expected loadings will allow an unperturbed operation of the annular elements on the central position of the third core

  19. THACT-RR, Analysis of Thermal Hydraulics Transients in Research Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: A Computer Program for Analyzing Thermal-Hydraulics transients in Research Reactors. THACT-RR is a channel code. It analyses the transient response of a research reactor core after power excursions or coolant flow and/or coolant temperature changes. The THACT-RR code provides a homogeneous one-dimensional compressible fluid flow capability with an optional voiding model that estimates the void produced by sub-cooled boiling. It allows flow reversal and sub-cooled nucleate boiling. It also includes a selection of flow instability, departure from nucleate boiling, single and two-phase heat transfer correlations, and a physical properties library adapted to pressures, temperatures, and flow rates encountered in research reactors. 2 - Method of solution: The conservation laws are solved by the method of Characteristics coupled with an implicit finite difference technique to insure stability and convergence of the numerical scheme. The conduction equation is solved by an implicit finite difference method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The code is not adapted to very fast transient problems

  20. Parametric evaluation of mixed (low and high enriched) fuel core for a swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been carried out to evaluate the performance of a swimming pool type research reactor core comprised of mixed (low and high enriched) uranium fuel. The study includes the calculations of core reactivity, worth of control rods and core criticality at the Beginning Of Life (BOL) of the core and for two operating conditions Cold Zero Power (CZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP). Further, to ensure safe and stable operation of the core from nuclear design point of view, average power densities in the fuel region, power peaking factors, axial power distribution in the hot channel and reactivity feed back coefficients have also been calculated. Two group fluxes have also been determined at different irradiation locations. All these calculations have been carried out employing reactor lattice code WIMS-D14 and reactor analysis code CITATION The calculated results show reasonably good agreement with the quoted operational data of the previous LEU cores. (Author)

  1. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  2. Safety analysis for core conversion (from HEU to LEU) of Pakistan research reactor-2 (PARR-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain, E-mail: ishtiaq@pinstech.org.p [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Pervez, Showket [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2010-01-15

    PARR-2 (Pakistan Research Reactor-2), an MNSR (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) is to be converted from HEU (High Enriched Uranium) to LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel, along with all current MNSRs in various other countries. The purpose of conversion is to minimize the use of HEU for non-proliferation of high-grade nuclear fuel. The present report presents thermal hydraulic and safety analyses of PARR-2 using existing HEU fuel as well as proposed LEU fuel. Presently, the core is comprised of 90.2% enriched UAl{sub 4}-Al fuel. There are 344 fuel pins of 5.5 mm diameter. The core has a total of 994.8 g of U{sup 235}. Standard computer code PARET/ANL (version 1992) was employed to perform steady-state and transient analyses. Various parameters were computed, which included: coolant outlet, maximum clad surface and maximum fuel centerline temperatures; and peak power and corresponding peak core temperatures resulting from a transient initiated by 4 mK positive reactivity insertion. Results were compared with the reported data in Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). It was found that the PARET results were in reasonable agreement with the manufacturer's results. Calculations were also carried out for the proposed LEU core with two suggested fuel pin sizes (5.5 mm and 5.1 mm diameter with 12.6% and 12.3% enrichment, respectively). Comparison of the LEU results with the existing HEU fuel has been made and discussed.

  3. Alternative core design for the Innovative Research Reactor (RRI) from neutronics aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on its User Requirement Document and main function, RRI shall be able to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux of 1×1015 neutron cm-2s-1. The reason is that the RRI reactor can serve targets requiring a high neutron flux. From the previous results it was obtained that RRI design using fuel of RSG-GAS type was not possible to produce that high neutron flux. One among other reasons is that the geometry dimension is the large, as the neutron flux is inversely proportional to core volume. The objective of the study is to find an alternative core for RRI which meets the high neutron flux requirement. It was chosen an alternative fuel element one like used in JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) that has smaller dimension compared to that of the RSG-GAS reactor. Besides that, active core's height was also varied for 70 cm and 75 cm. Design was carried out by means of analytic codes WIMS-D5B, Batan-FUEL and Batan-3DIFF. Alternative core applied compact core configuration concept of 5×5 with 4 follower control elements. The calculations resulted 3 (three) alternative cores fulfill the requirement, including core using RSG-GAS fuel type but of 70 cm height instead of 60 cm. Through analyzing from over all aspects of core safety and efficiency as well as effectively, core using JMTR fuel type with height of 70 cm represent the best alternative core. (author)

  4. Shut-down margin study for the next generation VVER-1000 reactor including 13 x 13 hexagonal annular assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 x 13 assemblies are calculated. → The MCNP-5 code is run for many cases with different core burn up at various core temperatures. → There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. → SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated for specific average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC. - Abstract: Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 x 13 assemblies are calculated as the main aim of the present research. We have applied the MCNP-5 code for many cases with different values of core burn up at various core temperatures, and therefore their corresponding coolant densities and boric acid concentrations. There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. Specifically, SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated when the average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC are 0.531, 11.5, and 43 MW-days/kg-U, respectively.

  5. Thermal radiation in gas core nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slutz, S.A.; Gauntt, R.O.; Harms, G.A.; Latham, T.; Roman, W.; Rodgers, R.J. (Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1994-05-01

    A diffusive model of the radial transport of thermal radiation out of a cylindrical core of fissioning plasma is presented. The diffusion approximation is appropriate because the opacity of uranium is very high at the temperatures of interest (greater than 3000 K). We make one additional simplification of assuming constant opacity throughout the fuel. This allows the complete set of solutions to be expressed as a single function. This function is approximated analytically to facilitate parametric studies of the performance of a test module of the nuclear light bulb gas-core nuclear-rocket-engine concept, in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. Our findings indicate that radiation temperatures in range of 4000-6000 K are attainable, which is sufficient to test the high specific impulse potential (approximately 2000 s) of this concept. 15 refs.

  6. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of new irradiation channels inside the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chham, E; El Bardouni, T; Benaalilou, K; Boukhal, H; El Bakkari, B; Boulaich, Y; El Younoussi, C; Nacir, B

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the capacity of radioisotope production in the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor, which is considered as one of the most important applications of research reactors. The aim of this study is to enhance the utilization of TRIGA core in the field of neutron activation and ensure an economic use of the fuel. The main idea was to create an additional irradiation channel (IC) inside the core. For this purpose, three new core configurations are proposed, which differ according to the IC position in the core. Thermal neutron flux distribution and other neutronic safety parameters such as power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and control rods worth reactivity were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) code and neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII evaluation. The calculated thermal flux in the central thimble (CT) and in the added IC for the reconfigured core is compared with the thermal flux in the CT of the existing core, which is taken as a reference. The results show that all the obtained fluxes in CTs are very close to the reference value, while a remarkable difference is observed between the fluxes in the new ICs and reference. This difference depends on the position of IC in the reactor core. To demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate at 2MW, with new configurations based on new ICs, different safety-related thermal-hydraulic parameters were investigated. The PARET model was used in this study to verify whether the safety margins are met despite the new modifications of the core. The results show that it is possible to introduce new ICs safely in the reactor core, because the obtained values of the parameters are largely far from compromising the safety of the reactor.

  7. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of new irradiation channels inside the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chham, E; El Bardouni, T; Benaalilou, K; Boukhal, H; El Bakkari, B; Boulaich, Y; El Younoussi, C; Nacir, B

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the capacity of radioisotope production in the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor, which is considered as one of the most important applications of research reactors. The aim of this study is to enhance the utilization of TRIGA core in the field of neutron activation and ensure an economic use of the fuel. The main idea was to create an additional irradiation channel (IC) inside the core. For this purpose, three new core configurations are proposed, which differ according to the IC position in the core. Thermal neutron flux distribution and other neutronic safety parameters such as power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and control rods worth reactivity were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) code and neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII evaluation. The calculated thermal flux in the central thimble (CT) and in the added IC for the reconfigured core is compared with the thermal flux in the CT of the existing core, which is taken as a reference. The results show that all the obtained fluxes in CTs are very close to the reference value, while a remarkable difference is observed between the fluxes in the new ICs and reference. This difference depends on the position of IC in the reactor core. To demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate at 2MW, with new configurations based on new ICs, different safety-related thermal-hydraulic parameters were investigated. The PARET model was used in this study to verify whether the safety margins are met despite the new modifications of the core. The results show that it is possible to introduce new ICs safely in the reactor core, because the obtained values of the parameters are largely far from compromising the safety of the reactor. PMID:27552124

  8. Cold neutron tomography of annular coolant flow in a double subchannel model of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryout of the liquid coolant film on fuel pins at the top of boiling water reactor (BWR) cores constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is a limiting factor in the thermal power, and therefore the economy, of BWRs. Ongoing research on multiphase annular flow, specifically the liquid film thickness, is fundamental not only to nuclear reactor safety and operation but also to that of evaporators, condensers, and pipelines in a general industrial context. We have performed cold neutron tomography of adiabatic air water annular flow in a scaled up model of the subchannel geometry found in BWR fuel assemblies today. All imaging has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Neutron tomography is shown to excel in investigating the interactions of air water two phase flows with spacer vanes of different geometry. The high resolution, high contrast measurements provide spatial distributions of the coolant on top of the surfaces of the spacer, including the vanes, and in the subchannel downstream of the spacers.

  9. Cold neutron tomography of annular coolant flow in a double subchannel model of a boiling water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickhofel, J. L.; Zboray, R.; Damsohn, M.; Kaestner, A.; Lehmann, E. H.; Prasser, H.-M.

    2011-09-01

    Dryout of the liquid coolant film on fuel pins at the top of boiling water reactor (BWR) cores constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is a limiting factor in the thermal power, and therefore the economy, of BWRs. Ongoing research on multiphase annular flow, specifically the liquid film thickness, is fundamental not only to nuclear reactor safety and operation but also to that of evaporators, condensers, and pipelines in a general industrial context. We have performed cold neutron tomography of adiabatic air water annular flow in a scaled up model of the subchannel geometry found in BWR fuel assemblies today. All imaging has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Neutron tomography is shown to excel in investigating the interactions of air water two phase flows with spacer vanes of different geometry. The high resolution, high contrast measurements provide spatial distributions of the coolant on top of the surfaces of the spacer, including the vanes, and in the subchannel downstream of the spacers.

  10. Development of core technology for research reactors using plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around 250 research reactors are under operation over the world. However, about 2/3 have been operated more than 30 years and demands for replacements are expected in the near future. The number of expected units is around 110, and around 55 units from 40 countries will be expected to be bid in the world market. In 2007, Netherlands started international bidding process to construct a new 80MW RR (named PALLAS) with the target of commercial operation in 2016, which will replace the existing HFR(45MW). KAERI consortium has been participated in that bid. Most of RRs use plate type fuels as a fuel assembly, Be and Graphite as a reflector. On the other hand, in Korea, the KAERI is operating the HANARO, which uses a rod type fuel assembly and heavy water as a reflector. Hence, core technologies for RRs using plate type fuels are in short. Therefore, core technologies should be secured for exporting a RR. In chapter 2, the conceptual design of PALLAS which use plate type fuels are described including core, cooling system and connected systems, layout of general components. Experimental verification tests for the plate type fuel and second shutdown system and the code verification for nuclear design are explained in Chapter 3 and 4, respectively

  11. Replacement of the Core Beryllium Reflector in the SAFARI-1 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAFARI-1 Research Reactor is a 20 MW high flux MTR and has been continuously operational for more than 46 years. In this period, the core beryllium reflector had never been replaced. An ageing management action to replace the reflector received priority due to the risks involved with failure or deformation of elements. This paper elaborates on the actions taken to replace the old and manage the new reflector. To this extent a reflector replacement procedure, backed up by core neutronic calculations and a test plan, was developed for the safe replacement of the reflector. A reflector management programme will ensure that records of reflector elements are kept and used to optimally manage usage of every element. Due to the historic nature of reflector utilisation in the SAFARI-1 core, deformation of the elements was unavoidable. These deformations will be monitored in the management programme for the new reflector. Deformation measurement of the old reflector is planned and could yield interesting comparisons with analytical results. The action plan for final disposal of the old reflector, although still in development, is also mentioned in this paper. (author)

  12. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, K.C. [Univ. of Turabo, Gurabo, Puerto (Puerto Rico). College of Engineering; Yahr, G.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  13. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  14. Kinetic parameters study based on burn-up for improving the performance of research reactor equilibrium core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study kinetic parameters, effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron generation time have been investigated at different burn-up stages for research reactor's equilibrium core utilizing low enriched uranium high density fuel (U3Si2-Al fuel with 4.8 g/cm3 of uranium. Results have been compared with reference operating core of Pakistan research Reactor-1. It was observed that by increasing fuel burn-up, effective delayed neutron fraction is decreased while prompt neutron generation time is increased. However, over all ratio beff/L is decreased with increasing burn-up. Prompt neutron generation time L in the understudy core is lower than reference operating core of reactor at all burn-up steps due to hard spectrum. It is observed that beff is larger in the understudy core than reference operating core of due to smaller size. Calculations were performed with the help of computer codes WIMSD/4 and CITATION.

  15. Core calculations for the upgrading of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Perrotta, Jose A.; Bastos, Jose Luis F.; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo; Umbehaun, Pedro E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: asantos@net.ipen.br; perrotta@net.ipen.br; mitsuo@net.ipen.br

    1998-07-01

    The IEA-R1 Research Reactor is a multipurpose reactor. It has been used for basic and applied research in the nuclear area, training and radioisotopes production since 1957. In 1995, the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) took the decision to modernize and upgrade the power from 2 to 5 MW and increase the operational cycle. This work presents the design requirements and the calculations effectuated to reach this goal. (author)

  16. Kinetic study of the Tehran research reactor core with low enriched fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, A.; Afshar Bakeshloo, A. [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Physics Dept.; Bartsch, G. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik

    1997-11-01

    For evaluating the performance of the newly refuelled Tehran Research Reactor core with low enriched uranium fuel (LEU) in transient states a two group time dependent diffusion equation code (COSTANZA) was used. This paper presents results of calculations of the fast transients, revealing the steady performance of the core and fuel integrity during transient for a probable reactivity insertion of less than or equal dollar 1.5/0.5 s. The temperature dependant reactivity coefficients of the Doppler resonance broadening effect and of the moderator absorption cross section change and density dilution were calculated using cell-averaged 69 energy group WIMS-D/4 for two main libraries, old library and WIMKAL88, to 13 groups. The two group parameters for the COSTANZA code were also obtained by WIMS-D/4. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Bewertung der Leistungsfaehigkeit des neu beladenen Teheraner Forschungsreaktors mit niedrig angereichertem Uranbrennstoff bei Reaktivitaetstransienten wurde ein 2-Gruppen zeitabhaengiges Diffusionsprogramm COSTANZA verwendet. In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden Ergebnisse der Berechnung schneller Transienten vorgestellt, die das Verhalten des Reaktorkerns bzw. die Integritaet der Brennstaebe waehrend der Transienten fuer eine Reaktivitaetsaenderung von kleiner oder gleich Dollar 1.5/0.5 s zeigen. Die temperaturabhaengigen Reaktivitaetskoeffizienten der Doppler-Verbreitung im Brennstoff sowie der Dichteaenderung und der Neutronenabsorption im Moderator wurden mit Hilfe zellengemittelter 69 Energie-Gruppen der Datenbank WIMS-D/4 und fuer 13 Energiegruppen mit der Datenbank WIMKAL 88 ermittelt. Die Zweigruppendaten fuer das COSTANZA-Programm wurden ebenfalls mit Hilfe von WIMS-D/4 bestimmt. (orig.)

  17. Characteristic differences of LEU and HEU cores at the German FRJ-2 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabbi, R.; Wolters, J.; Damm, G. [Central Research Reactor Division, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    As a sophisticated computational method for reactor physics analysis and fuel management an MCNP model in very high fidelity was developed and coupled with a depletion code and applied to the HEU-LEU core conversion study. The analysis show that as a consequence of the high amount of U-238, the amount of U-235 in the LEU core is about 14% higher than in the HEU core. The reduction of the thermal flux varies between 16% (core) and 5% in the reflector zone. The rate of U-235 burnup in the LEU core is approx. 11.5% lower which allows an extension of irradiation time. Due to the effect of neutron spectrum the worth of the absorber system decreases in an LEU core by 17% resulting in a decrease of shutdown and excess reactivity. The kinetic parameters of the core are slightly reduced causing changes in the reactivity values and transient behavior of the core. The moderator coefficient is decreased by 18% and the Doppler coefficient is increased by 63%. Due to shortening of the absorption length of the fission neutrons the prompt neutron lifetime is reduced by 7%. (author)

  18. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V.2: Analysis (Appendices A-F)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 2 consists of detailed Appendices, covering safety analyses for generic 10 MW reactor, safety analysis - probabilistic methods, methods for preventing LOCA, radiological consequence analyses, examples of safety report amendments and safety specifications. Included in Volume 2 are example analyses for cores with with highly enriched uranium and low enriched uranium fuels showing differences that can be expected in the safety parameters and radiological consequences of postulated accidents. There are seven examples of licensing documents related to core conversion and two examples of methods for determining power limits for safety specifications in the document. Refs, figs, bibliographies and tabs

  19. Research and development of a super fast reactor. (2) Core design improvement on local void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 700MWe Supercritical-pressure water-cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) was designed with negative overall void reactivity. As there is no cross flow between the fuel assemblies, the local void reactivity, defined as the reactivity change when the coolant of one assembly disappears, also need to be kept negative throughout the cycle. In this study, we found out the mechanism of the local void reactivity and improved the core design to keep the local void reactivity negative for all the seed fuel assemblies. According to the theory analysis, several core configurations, including the thickness of ZrH layer, the layout of the seed fuel assembly, the layout of the core and the loading pattern, will affect the local void reactivity distribution. Sensitivity of those configurations on the local void reactivity was analyzed. 1.15cm of ZrH layer thickness is the best choice for reducing the local void reactivity for the current core design. The assembly layout has no obvious effect on the local void reactivity. It is necessary to load more blanket assemblies in the inner region of the core in order to reduce the local void reactivity of the inner seed fuel assemblies. Loading pattern is also important for flattening the local void reactivity distribution. A hybrid loading method can be employed to make the distribution of the local void reactivity more uniform. Based on those conclusions, a Super Fast Reactor is successfully designed with satisfying all of the design criteria and design goals as well as keeping the local void reactivity of all the seed fuel assemblies less than -30pcm. (author)

  20. Biofilm Community Dynamics in Bench-Scale Annular Reactors Simulating Arrestment of Chloraminated Drinking Water Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annular reactors (ARs) were used to study biofilm community succession and provide an ecological insight during nitrification arrestment through simultaneously increasing monochloramine (NH2Cl) and chlorine to nitrogen mass ratios, resulting in four operational periods (I to IV)....

  1. Burnup analysis and in-core fuel management study of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this study is to formulate an effective optimal fuel management strategy for the TRIGA MARK II research reactor at AERE, Savar. The core management study has been performed by utilizing four basic types of information calculated for the reactor: criticality, power peaking, neutron flux and burnup calculation. This paper presents the results of the burnup calculations for TRIGA LEU fuel elements. The fuel element burnup for approximately 20 years of operation was calculated using the TRIGAP compute code. The calculation is performed in one-dimensional radial geometry in TRIGAP. Inter-comparison of TRIGAP results with other two calculations performed by MVP-BURN and MCNP4C-ORIGEN2.1 show very good agreement. Reshuffling at 20,000 MWh step provides the highest core lifetime of the reactor, which is 64,500 MWh. Besides, the study gives valuable insight into the behaviour of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor in future

  2. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  3. Physical start up of the Dalat nuclear research reactor with the core configuration having a central neutron trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the reactor has reached physical criticality with the core configuration exempt from central neutron trap on 1 November 1983, the core configuration with a central neutron trap has been arranged in the reactor and the reactor has reached physical criticality with this core configuration at 17h48 on 18 December 1983. The integral worths of different control rods are determined with accuracy. 2 refs., 24 figs., 18 tabs

  4. Analysis of partial and total flow blockage of a single fuel assembly of an MTR research reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adorni, Martina [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy)]. E-mail: martina_adorni@tin.it; Bousbia-Salah, Anis [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy); Hamidouche, Tewfik [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger-Algeria, 02 Boulevard Frantz fanon, BP 399 Alger-gare (Algeria); Maro, Beniamino Di [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy); Pierro, Franco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy); D' Auria, Francesco [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Facolta di Ingegneria, Universita di Pisa, Via Diotisalvi, 2-56100 Pisa (Italy)

    2005-10-15

    The main aim of the following study is to perform a safety analysis of the IAEA 10 MW MTR Pool type Research Reactor [IAEA-TECDOC-233, 1980. IAEA Research Reactor Core Conversion from the use of high-enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels Guidebook] under flow blockage of a single Fuel Assembly (FA) conditions. Such event was rarely investigated in the open literature notwithstanding the fat that it constitutes a severe accident that may lead to local dryout and eventually to loss of the FA integrity. The transients herein considered are related to partial and total obstruction of the cooling channel of a single Fuel Assembly of the reactor core. This study constitutes the first step of a larger work, which consists in performing a 3D simulation using the Best Estimate coupled code technique. However, as a first approach the instantaneous reactor power is derived through the point kinetic approach of the used thermal-hydraulic system code.

  5. Analytical solution of neutron transport equation in an annular reactor with a rotating pulsed source; Resolucao analitica da equacao de transporte de neutrons em um reator anelar com fonte pulsada rotativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Paulo Cleber Mendonca

    2002-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution of the neutron transport equation in an annular reactor is presented with a short and rotating neutron source of the type S(x) {delta} (x- Vt), where V is the speed of annular pulsed reactor. The study is an extension of a previous study by Williams [12] carried out with a pulsed source of the type S(x) {delta} (t). In the new concept of annular pulsed reactor designed to produce continuous high flux, the core consists of a subcritical annular geometry pulsed by a rotating modulator, producing local super prompt critical condition, thereby giving origin to a rotating neutron pulse. An analytical solution is obtained by opening up of the annular geometry and applying one energy group transport theory in one dimension using applied mathematical techniques of Laplace transform and Complex Variables. The general solution for the flux consists of a fundamental mode, a finite number of harmonics and a transient integral. A condition which limits the number of harmonics depending upon the circumference of the annular geometry has been obtained. Inverse Laplace transform technique is used to analyse instability condition in annular reactor core. A regenerator parameter in conjunction with perimeter of the ring and nuclear properties is used to obtain stable and unstable harmonics and to verify if these exist. It is found that the solution does not present instability in the conditions stated in the new concept of annular pulsed reactor. (author)

  6. Study of startup conditions of a pulsed annular reactor; Estudo das reacoes de partida de um reator anelar pulsado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mario Augusto Bezerra da

    2003-10-15

    A new concept of reactor, which combines features of pulsed and stationary reactors, was proposed so as to produce intense neutronic fluxes. Such a reactor, known as VICHFPR (Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor), consists of a subcritical core with an annular geometry and pulsed by a rotating reflector which acts as a reactivity modulator as it produces a short pulse (approximately equal to 1 ms) of high intensity, guiding the region near the pulser to super-prompt critical state. This dissertation intends to analyze the startup conditions of a Pulsed Annular Reactor. The evolution of the neutron pulse intensity is analyzed when the reactivity modulator is brought upwards according to a helicoidal path from its initial position (far away from the core), when the multiplication factor has a subcritical value, up to the final position (near the core), in which a super-prompt critical state is reached. Part of the analysis is based on the variation of neutron reflection, which is a uniform function of the exit and reflection angles between the core and the modulator. It must be emphasized that this work is an approximation of the real situation. As the initial and final reactor parameters are known, a programming code in Fortran is worked out to provide the multiplication factor and the flux intensity evolution. According to the results obtained with this code, the conditions under which the modulator must be lifted up during the startup are established. Basically, these conditions are related to the analysis of the rising and the rotation velocities, the reflector saving and the initial distance between the reactor and the modulator. The Pulsed Annular Reactor startup was divided into three stages. Because of its negative reactivity in the first two stages, the neutron multiplication is not large, while the last one, having a positive reactivity, shows an intense multiplication as is usually expected when handling pulsed systems. This last stage is quite

  7. Neutron flux parameters for k{sub 0}-NAA method at the Malaysian nuclear agency research reactor after core reconfiguration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavar, A.R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Sarmani, S. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Wood, A.K. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, Kajang, Selangor 43000 (Malaysia); Fadzil, S.M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Masood, Z. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, Kajang, Selangor 43000 (Malaysia); Khoo, K.S., E-mail: khoo@ukm.m [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    The Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA) research reactor, commissioned in 1982, is a TRIGA Mark II swimming pool type reactor. When the core configuration changed in June 2009, it became essential to re-determine such neutron flux parameters as thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio (f), epithermal neutron flux shape factor ({alpha}), thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th}) and epithermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub epi}) in the irradiation positions of MNA research reactor in order to guarantee accuracy in the application of k{sub 0}-neutron activation analysis (k{sub 0}-NAA).The f and {alpha} were determined using the bare bi-isotopic monitor and bare triple monitor methods, respectively; Au and Zr monitors were utilized in present study. The results for four irradiation positions are presented and discussed in the present work. The calculated values of f and {alpha} ranged from 33.49 to 47.33 and -0.07 to -0.14, respectively. The {phi}{sub th} and the {phi}{sub epi} were measured as 2.03 x 10{sup 12} (cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and 6.05 x 10{sup 10} (cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) respectively. These results were compared to those of previous studies at this reactor as well as to those of reactors in other countries. The results indicate a good conformity with other findings.

  8. Safe operation of a TRIGA reactor in the situation of LEU-HEU core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanian TRIGA reactor was commissioned in 1980. The location of the research institute is Pitesti, 100 Km west of Bucharest. In fact there are two independent cores sharing the same pool. There are a 14 MW Steady State Reactor (SSR), high flux, and materials testing reactor and an Annular Core Pulsing Reactor (ACPR). The SSR reactor is a forced convection reactor cooled via a primary circuit with 4 pumps and 3 heat exchangers. The ACPR is natural convection cooled by the pool water. Modifications performed concerning core configuration resulted in the following. Removal the central pin from the bundle leads to slightly temperature increase of approximately 1% for the corner and edge pins, for the same pin power density. Also, the temperature slightly decreases for the 4 pins adjacent to the water hole. This is caused by the coolant flow redistribution. But, according to preliminary neutronic computations, PPF-s are decreasing, the edge and corner temperatures changes are no more detectable. DNB are decreasing, leading to a safer operation. Fuel management of TRIGA steady state core allows to obtain the requested fluxes for experimental reasons in the safer operation conditions. We can firmly state that the present operation of the reactor and the HEU-LEU core conversion fully respect the provisions of the National Regulatory Body and the IAEA. On the other side, we have to mention the common fact that research reactors cannot sustain themselves in the financial domain. The lack of sufficient financial support leads to shortage of the maintenance programs and to reduce of activities and personnel member; this is a real danger in maintaining the actual standards of nuclear safety. During this transition period, the Romanian TRIGA reactor is used much its capability in the frame of international cooperation this facility can ensure support for various research programmes in the fields of interest

  9. Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) core design. Joint research report (FY1998-1999)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reduce-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor aiming at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started a joint research program for conceptual design of RMWR core in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) since 1998. The research area includes the RMWR core conceptual designs, development of analysis methods for rector physics and thermal-hydraulics to design the RMWR cores with higher accuracy and preparation of MOX critical experiment to confirm the feasibility from the reactor physics point of view. The present report describes the results of joint research program 'RMWR core design Phase 1' performed by JAERI and JAPC in FY 1998 and 1999. The results obtained from the joint research program are as follows: Conceptual design study on the RMWR core has been performed. A core concept with a conversion ratio more than about 1 is basically feasible to multiple recycling of plutonium. Investigating core characteristics at the equilibrium, some promising core concepts to satisfy above aims have been established. As for BWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, three types of design have been obtained as follows; 1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.1, 2) one feasible to attain operation cycle of about 2 years and burn-up of about 60 GWd/t with conversion ratio more than 1 or 3) one in simple design based on the ABWR assembly and without blanket attaining conversion ratio more than 1. And as for PWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, two types of design have been obtained as follows; 1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.05 by using heavy water as a coolant and 2) one feasible to attain conversion ratio about l by using light water. In the study of nuclear calculation method, a reactor analysis code applicable to the

  10. Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) core design. Joint research report (FY1998-1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Reduce-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor aiming at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started a joint research program for conceptual design of RMWR core in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) since 1998. The research area includes the RMWR core conceptual designs, development of analysis methods for rector physics and thermal-hydraulics to design the RMWR cores with higher accuracy and preparation of MOX critical experiment to confirm the feasibility from the reactor physics point of view. The present report describes the results of joint research program 'RMWR core design Phase 1' performed by JAERI and JAPC in FY 1998 and 1999. The results obtained from the joint research program are as follows: Conceptual design study on the RMWR core has been performed. A core concept with a conversion ratio more than about 1 is basically feasible to multiple recycling of plutonium. Investigating core characteristics at the equilibrium, some promising core concepts to satisfy above aims have been established. As for BWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, three types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.1, (2) one feasible to attain operation cycle of about 2 years and burn-up of about 60 GWd/t with conversion ratio more than 1 or (3) one in simple design based on the ABWR assembly and without blanket attaining conversion ratio more than 1. And as for PWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, two types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.05 by using heavy water as a coolant and (2) one feasible to attain conversion ratio about l by using light water. In the study of nuclear calculation method, a reactor analysis code

  11. On the levitation force in horizontal core-annular flow with a large viscosity ratio and small density ratio

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Pourquie, M.J.B.M.; Beerens, J.C.

    2013-01-01

    A numerical study has been made of horizontal core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference between

  12. Safety core parameters prediction in research reactors using artificial neural networks: A comparative study of various learning algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) were applied successfully as an advanced and promising tool for simulating several reactor physics parameters in nuclear engineering applications. The main objective in using such Artificial Intelligent (AI) methods, in the field of nuclear engineering, is to develop simple and 1st estimate models capable of simulating adequately, with reasonable error, important reactor physics parameters in relatively short time comparatively to time consuming and cumbersome reactor physics computer codes. The feasibility of this application has been demonstrated through a previous work done for a typical benchmark 10 Mw IAEA LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) core research reactor, using an adaptive learning rate procedure in a typical back-propagation algorithm in the training process. However, even tough the predictive results achieved are within ±0.7% for Keff and within ±8.5% for Pmax, the convergence time spent during the training phase were of about 36 and 24 hours, respectively for both cited parameters, on a small computational system (300 Mhz Pentium II PC). Hence, this paper suggests one of the suitable ways explored to speed up the training process and to improve neural networks performances by carrying out a comprehensive sensitivity studies on an iterative and multistage calculation process using Neural Network MATLAB Toolbox

  13. Establishing a quality assurance program for in-core fuel management of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor using low enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance program for calculating of in-core fuel management of research reactor plays very important role in safety operation and effective utilization. The main objective of the program is to ensure the safe, reliable and optimum use of nuclear fuel and to meet the reactor utilization, which remains reactor operation within the limits imposed by the design safety considerations and the operational limits and conditions (OLCs) on the basis of safety analysis. The management of reactor core and nuclear fuel must be organized in a coherent way and comply with safety requirements. After successfully converting from HEU to LEU fuel for Dalat Research Reactor, a work to be in place is to study and implement the management of reactor core and nuclear fuel. This not only helps to ensure safety operation and efficient utilization but also contributes to build the safety culture and to be valuable experience for other nuclear projects. In addition, the application of the quality assurance program for in-core fuel management will contribute to avoid subjective mistakes, to clearly define responsibilities and to ensure legacy of expertise, which is also an urgent requirement. The selected computer code systems, data libraries and computation models must be fully met the requirements for analyzing status and characteristics of reactor core as well as the requirements for selecting, verifying and evaluating according to the regulations of the IAEA. (author)

  14. Physical start up of the Dalat nuclear research reactor with the core configuration exempt from neutron trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nominal power of the reconstructed Dalat reactor is of 500 KW. After a meticulous preparation the Russian and Vietnamese teams have proceeded to the physical reactor start-up in November 1983 with the core configuration exempt from the neutron trap. The reactor has reached the physical criticality at 19h50 on 1 November 1983. The report delineates different steps of the start-up procedure. 2 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  15. Development of space reactor core heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Space Power Advance Reactor (SPAR) core heat pupes are being developed to transport 15 kW of power at 1400 K. A straight, 2-m-long, 15.9-mm-diam heat pipe was fabricated of low-carbon arc-cast molybdenum and filled with sodium as the working fluid. This nonconcentric, annular, screen-tube-wick pipe was tested successfully at 16.1 kW at 1310 K, at which point a boiling limit was encountered. Follow-on work has produced an as yet untested heat pipe which has its wick centered in the evaporator by spacer wires to alleviate the boiling limit problem. A dual artery wick heat pipe is being fabricated to further improve on the boiling limit and increase redundancy. Because the heat pipe must bend around the radiation shield of the SPAR reactor, a series of bending experiments was performed. Promising results were achieved by filling the pipe completely with sodium and bending at 3650 K

  16. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  17. In-core fuel management, safety, and thermal hydraulics studies for upgrading TRIGA MARK II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has approved a project to upgrade the research reactor to higher flux to meet the growing demand of medical radio-isotopes production and other irradiation facilities. Preliminary studies with the various core parameters showed that it might be possible to create new irradiation flux traps, increase the neutron flux at desired location, and at the same time the fuel burn-up can be made optimal. This will need major reshuffling and reconfiguration of the core with fuel rods initially loaded. The principal objective of this study is focused to make the above improvements in the core without disturbing the safety parameters. This presentation deals with the neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor to upgrade it to a higher flux. To realize this objective, the overall strategy followed is: (I) generation of problem dependent cross section library from basic Evaluated Nuclear Data Files such as ENDF/B-VI, JENDL 3.2 with NJOY94.10+, (ii) use WIMSD-5 package to generate cell constants for all of the materials in the core and its immediate neighborhood, (iii) use CITATION to perform 3-D global analysis of the core to study multiplication factor, neutron flux and power distribution, power peaking factors, temperature reactivity coefficients, etc., (iv) check the validity of the deterministic codes with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B2, (v) couple output of CITATION with PARET to study thermal hydraulic behavior to predict safety margins, and (vi) reshuffle the current core configuration to achieve the desired objectives. The computational methods, tools and techniques, customization of cross section libraries, various models for cells and super cells, and a lot of associated utilities have been standardized and established/validated for the overall core analysis. Analyses using the 4-group, and 7-group libraries of macroscopic cross sections generated from the 69-group WIMSD-5 library were performed

  18. RETRAC, Reactor Core Accident Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: The RETRAC code uses a set of coupled neutron point-kinetics equations and thermal-hydraulic conservation laws to simulate nuclear reactor core behaviour under transient or accident conditions. The reactor core is represented by single equivalent unit cells composed of three regions: fuel, clad, and moderator (coolant). 2 - Method of solution: At each time step, core thermal power is calculated by solving a set of six delayed neutron group kinetics equations with adjusted reactivity feedbacks. The numerical resolution is performed by using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method. The externally inserted reactivity is specified in the input data file, whereas Doppler, fuel, clad, and water temperature reactivity feedbacks are calculated by the code itself. Core cooling is treated as a homogeneous one-dimensional fluid flow through a representative unit cell composed of three successive regions: fuel, clad, and coolant. Several flow regime models are considered for both single- and two-phase states of the coolant. The conservation laws are solved by the method of characteristics coupled with an implicit finite difference scheme to ensure stability and convergence of the numerical algorithm. Validation tests of the RETRAC code were performed by using the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores, for protected transients. Further assessment studies are in progress using experimental data. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The RETRAC code uses steady-state thermal-hydraulic correlations. Their use is not always justified, but it seems to be quite useful in quasi-steady cases such as as loss-of-flow transients

  19. Neutronics analysis of the initial core of the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The TRIGA Mark II Vienna is modeled employing MCNP5. → The model is confirmed through three different experiments. → Initial critical, reactivity distribution and flux mapping experiment. - Abstract: The Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor since March 1962. Its initial criticality was achieved on 7th March 1962 when 57th Fuel Element (FE) was loaded to the core. This paper describes the development of the MCNP model of the TRIGA reactor and its validation through three different experiments i.e. initial criticality, reactivity distribution and a thermal flux mapping experiment in the reactor core. All these experiments were performed on the initial core configuration. The MCNP model includes all necessary core components i.e. FE, Graphite Element GE, neutron Source Element (SE), Central IRradiation channel (CIR) etc. Outside the core, this model simulates the annular grooved graphite reflector, the thermal and thermalizing column, four beam tubes and the reactor water tank up to 100 cm in radial and +60 and -60 cm in axial direction. Each grid position at its exact location is modeled. This model employs the ENDF/B-VI data library except for the Sm-isotopes which are taken from JEFF 3.1 because ENDF/B-VI lacks samarium (Sm) cross sections. For the first experiment, the model predicts an effective multiplication factor (κeff) of 1.00183 with an estimated standard deviation 0.00031 which is very close to the experimental value 1.00114. The second experiment measures the reactivity values of four FE and one GE. In comparison to the MCNP results, the percent difference ranges from 4 to 22. The third experiment verifies the model at a local level with the radial and axial thermal flux density distribution in the core. Though the trends are similar, the MCNP model overestimates the radial thermal flux density in the core and underestimates these results at the core periphery.

  20. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper dwells upon the design and the operation of one of the German test reactors, namely, the TRIGA Mainz one (TRIGA: Training Research Isotope Production General Atomic). The TRIGA reactor is a pool test reactor the core of which contains a graphite reflector and is placed into 2 m diameter and 6.25 m height aluminum vessel. There are 75 fuel elements in the reactor core, and any of them contains about 36 g of 235U. The TRIGA reactors under the stable operation enjoy wide application to ensure tests and irradiation, namely: neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production, application of a neutron beam to ensure the physical, the chemical and the medical research efforts. Paper presents the reactor basic experimental program lines

  1. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  2. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper presented in the following areas of interest: (1) fuel development; (2) post-irradiation examinations; (3) reprocessing; (4) thermite reaction; (5) fuel fabrication; (6) element tests; (7) core tests; (8) criticals; (9) shipping; and (10) reactors and methods

  3. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  4. Experimental study on large diameter drilling in hard rock annular coring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinzhu WU; Guochun YANG; Wenchen WANG

    2008-01-01

    Based on analyzing method of large diameter hard rock drilling at home and abroad, the authors proposed a set of drilling of large diameter hard rock annular coring in low energy consumption, low cost and high efficiency. The prototype of drilling tools was designed and was made. The experimental result of the prototype indicates that this plan and technology are feasible and reach the anticipated object of design. A set of drilling tools has been offered for the constructs of large diameter hard rock coring.

  5. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of (232Th, 235U)O2 fuel using MCNPX2.6 code

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seyed Amir Hossein Feghhi; Marzieh Rezazadeh; Yachine Kadi; Claudio Tenreiro; Morteza Aref; Zohreh Gholamzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The small reactor design for the remote and less developed areas of the user countries should have simple features in view of the lack of infra-structure and resources. Many researchers consider long core life with no on-site refuelling activity as a primary feature for the small reactor design. Long core life can be achieved by enhancing internal conversion rate of fertile to fissile materials. For that purpose, thorium cycle can be adopted because a high fissile production rate of 233U converted from 232Th can be expected in the thermal energy region. A simple nuclear reactor core arranged 19 assemblies in hexagonal structure, using thorium-based fuel and heavy water as coolant and moderator was simulated using MCNPX2.6 code, aiming an optimized critical assembly. Optimized reflector thickness and gap between assemblies were determined to achieve minimum neutron leakage and void reactivity. The result was a more compact core, where assemblies were designed having 19-fuel pins in 1.25 pitch-to-diameter ratio. Optimum reflector thickness of 15 cm resulted in minimal neutron leakage in view of economic limitations. A 0.5 cm gap between assembles achieved more safety and 2.2% enrichment requirements. The present feasibility study suggests a thermal core of acceptable neutronic parameters to achieve a simple and safe core.

  6. An Innovative Passive Residual Heat Removal System of an Open-Pool Type Research Reactor with Pump Flywheel and Gravity Core Cooling Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon-Yeong Lee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In an open-pool type research reactor, the primary cooling system can be designed to have a downward flow inside the core during normal operation because of the plate type fuel geometry. There is a flow inversion inside the core from the downward flow by the inertia force of the primary coolant to the upward flow by the natural circulation when the pump is turned off. To delay the flow inversion time, an innovative passive system with pump flywheel and GCCT is developed to remove the residual heat. Before the primary cooling pump starts up, the water level of the GCCT is the same as that of the reactor pool. During the primary cooling pump operation, the water in the GCCT is moved into the reactor pool because of the pump suction head. After the pump stops, the potential head generates a downward flow inside the core by moving the water from the reactor pool to the GCCT and removes the residual heat. When the water levels of the two pools are the same again, the core flow has an inversion of the flow direction, and natural circulation is developed through the flap valves.

  7. Final Report, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Project: An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK (B204) Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model'' The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations

  8. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V.1: Validation of seismic analysis codes using reactor core experiments. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993, was attended by participants from France, India, Italy, Japan and the Russian Federation. The meeting was held to discuss and compare the results obtained by various organizations for the analysis of Italian tests on PEC mock-up. The background paper by A. Martelli, et al., Italy, entitled Fluid-Structure Interaction Experiments of PEC Core Mock-ups and Numerical Analysis Performed by ENEA presented details on the Italian PEC (Prova Elementi di Combustibile, i.e. Fuel Element Test Facility) test data for the benchmark. Several papers were presented on the analytical investigations of the PEC reactor core experiments. The paper by M. Morishita, Japan, entitled Seismic Response Analysis of PEC Reactor Core Mock-up, gives a brief review of the Japanese data on the Monju mock-up core experiment which had been distributed to the participating countries through the IAEA. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from the MS

  10. Research reactors: design, safety requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two types of reactors: research reactors or power reactors. The difference between the research reactor and energy reactor is that the research reactor has working temperature and fuel less than the power reactor. The research reactors cooling uses light or heavy water and also research reactors need reflector of graphite or beryllium to reduce the loss of neutrons from the reactor core. Research reactors are used for research training as well as testing of materials and the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and for industrial application. The difference is also that the research reactor smaller in terms of capacity than that of power plant. Research reactors produce radioactive isotopes are not used for energy production, the power plant generates electrical energy. In the world there are more than 284 reactor research in 56 countries, operates as source of neutron for scientific research. Among the incidents related to nuclear reactors leak radiation partial reactor which took place in three mile island nuclear near pennsylvania in 1979, due to result of the loss of control of the fission reaction, which led to the explosion emitting hug amounts of radiation. However, there was control of radiation inside the building, and so no occurred then, another accident that lead to radiation leakage similar in nuclear power plant Chernobyl in Russia in 1986, has led to deaths of 4000 people and exposing hundreds of thousands to radiation, and can continue to be effect of harmful radiation to affect future generations. (author)

  11. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    pins can be removed after the experiment and using Sandia's metrology lab, relative power profiles (radially and axially) can be determined. In addition to validating neutronic analyses, confirming heat transfer properties of the target/fuel pins and core will be conducted. Fuel/target pin power limits can be verified with out-of-pile (electrical heating) thermal-hydraulic experiments. This will yield data on the heat flux across the Zircaloy clad and establish safety margin and operating limits. Using Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) a 4 MW TRIGA type research reactor, target/fuel pins can be driven to desired fission power levels for long durations. Post experiment inspection of the pins can be conducted in the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility to observe changes in the mechanical properties of the LEU matrix and burn-up effects. Transient tests can also be conducted at the ACRR to observe target/fuel pin performance during accident conditions. Target/fuel pins will be placed in double experiment containment and driven by pulsing the ACRR until target/fuel failure is observed. This will allow for extrapolation of analytical work to confirm safety margins.

  12. Fast breeder reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The meeting was attended by 15 participants from seven countries and two international organizations. The Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) was attended by representatives from France, Fed. Rep. Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America - countries that have made significant progress in developing the technology and physics of sodium cooled fast reactors and have extensive national programmes in this field - as well as by representatives of the Commission of the European Communities and the IAEA. The design of fast-reactor power plants is a more difficult task than developing facilities with thermal reactors. Different reactor kinetics and dynamics, a hard neutron spectrum, larger integral doses of fuel and structural material irradiation, higher core temperatures, the use of an essentially novel coolant, and, as a result of all these factors, the additional reliability and safety requirements that are imposed on the planning and operation of sodium cooled fast reactors - all these factors pose problems that can be solved comprehensively only by countries with a high level of scientific and technical development. The exchange of experience between these countries and their combined efforts in solving the fundamental problems that arise in planning, constructing and operating fast reactors are promoting technical progress and reducing the relative expenditure required for various studies on developing and introducing commercial fast reactors. For this reason, the meeting concentrated on reviewing and discussing national fast reactor programmes. The situation with regard to planning, constructing and operating fast experimental and demonstration reactors in the countries concerned, the experience accumulated in operating them, the difficulties arising during operation and ways of over-coming them, the search for optimal designs for the power

  13. Light water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the technology of light water reactors (LWR) was being commercialized, the German Federal Government funded the reactor safety research program, which was conducted by national research centers, universities, and industry, and which led to the establishment, in early 1972, of the Nuclear Safety Project in Karlsruhe. In the seventies, the PNS project mainly studied the loss-of-coolant accident. Numerous experiments were run and computer codes developed for this purpose. In the eighties, the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center contributed to the German Risk Study, investigating especially core meltdown accidents under the impact of the events at Three Mile Island-2 and Chernobyl-4. Safety research in the nineties is concentrated on the requirements of future reactor generations, such as the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) or potential approaches which, at the present time, are discernible only as tentative theoretical designs. (orig.)

  14. A complete fuel development facility utilizing a dual core TRIGA reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A TRIGA Dual Core Reactor System has been chosen by the Romanian Government as the heart of a new fuel development facility which will be operated by the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Technologies. The Facility, which will be operational in 1976, is an integral part of the Romanian National Program for Power Reactor Development, with particular emphasis being placed on fuel development. The unique combination of a new 14 MW steady state TRIGA reactor, and the well-proven TRIGA Annular Core Pulsing Reactor (ACPR) in one below-ground reactor pool resulted in a substantial construction cost savings and gives the facility remarkable experimental flexibility. The inherent safety of the TRIGA fuel elements in both reactor cores means that a secondary containment building is not necessary, resulting in further construction cost savings. The 14 MW steady state reactor gives acceptably high neutron fluxes for long- term testing of various prototype fuel-cladding-coolant combinations; and the TRIGA ACPR high pulse capability allows transient testing of fuel specimens, which is so important for accurate prediction of the performance of power reactor fuel elements under postulated failure conditions. The 14 MW steady state reactor has one large and three small in-core irradiation loop positions, two large irradiation loop positions adjacent to the core face, and twenty small holes in the beryllium reflector for small capsule irradiation. The power level of 14 MW will yield peak unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes in the central experiment position approaching 3.0 x 1014 n/cm2-sec. The ACPR has one large dry central experimental cavity which can be loaded at pool level through a shielded offset loading tube; a small diameter in-core flux trap; and an in-core pneumatically-operated capsule irradiation position. A peak pulse of 15,000 MW will yield a peak fast neutron flux in the central experimental cavity of about 1.5 x 1017 n/cm2-sec. The pulse width at half maximum during a

  15. Review of neutronic assessments applied to small reactor core physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its design division for material test reactors and research reactors, AREVA TA has to characterize these manufactured cores. This step is sequential with neutronics benchmarks associated with validation (standard Verification and Validation approach). The previous two points are embedded in core projects and can be run separately especially when experimental tests are foreseen for validation database enrichment. Methodological standard is given in order to match validation and benchmark process illustrated alongside with two specific items on critical research reactors (AZUR - JHR) and subcritical mock up (AZUR). (author)

  16. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  17. Development of dual cooled annular fuel and its possibility to enhance both economy and safety of light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Yanghyun; Kim, Keonsik; Park, Jeongyong; Yang, Yongsik; Kim, Hyungkyu; In, Wangkee; Song, Kunwoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Over the past few decades, extensive studies have been performed to improve the reliability and safety of light water reactor (LWR) fuel. In recent years, power updating of about 10% is being achieved by modifying safety analysis methodology and subsequent increase in safety margin. But departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and loss of coolant accident (LOCA) are still two of the most important limiting factors which would restrict power updating more than 10%. Duel cooled annular fuel, cooled in both internal and external cooling channel, has advantages of considerably lower heat flux and lower fuel temperature than conventional solid fuel. While lower heat flus gives higher DNB margin for the same power retie, lower temperature reduces the stored energy of fuel. However, there are many technical issues that should be addressed before any new type of fuel can be considered for application to LWR. This paper describes the key technologies that Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed for dual cooled annular fuel and discusses the feasibility of its application to LWR.

  18. Development of dual cooled annular fuel and its possibility to enhance both economy and safety of light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few decades, extensive studies have been performed to improve the reliability and safety of light water reactor (LWR) fuel. In recent years, power updating of about 10% is being achieved by modifying safety analysis methodology and subsequent increase in safety margin. But departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and loss of coolant accident (LOCA) are still two of the most important limiting factors which would restrict power updating more than 10%. Duel cooled annular fuel, cooled in both internal and external cooling channel, has advantages of considerably lower heat flux and lower fuel temperature than conventional solid fuel. While lower heat flus gives higher DNB margin for the same power retie, lower temperature reduces the stored energy of fuel. However, there are many technical issues that should be addressed before any new type of fuel can be considered for application to LWR. This paper describes the key technologies that Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed for dual cooled annular fuel and discusses the feasibility of its application to LWR

  19. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  20. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keung Koo; Noh, J.M.; Hwang, D.H. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  1. Assumed mode approach to fast reactor core seismic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for a time history approach, rather than a response spectrum approach, to the seismic analysis of fast breeder reactor core structures is described. The use of a Rayleigh-Ritz/Assumed Mode formalism for developing mathematical models of reactor cores is presented. Various factors including structural nonlinearity, fluid inertia, and impact which necessitate abandonment of response spectrum methods are discussed. The use of the assumed mode formalism is described in some detail as it applies to reactor core seismic analysis. To illustrate the use of this formal approach to mathematical modeling, a sample reactor problem with increasing complexities of modeling is presented. Finally, several problem areas--fluid inertia, fluid damping, coulomb friction, impact, and modal choice--are discussed with emphasis on research needs for use in fast reactor seismic analysis

  2. Theoretical and experimental research of natural convection in the core of the high temperature pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical model of the developed THERMIX-2D-code for computing thermohydraulic behaviour of the core of high temperature pebble bed reactors is verified by experiments with natural convection flow. Such fluid flow behaviour can be of very high importance for the real reactor in the case of natural heat removal decay. The experiments are performed in a special set up testing-stand with pressures up to 30 bars and temperatures up to 3000C by using air and helium as fluid. In comparison with the experimental data the numerical results show that a good and useful simulation is given by the program. Pure natural convection flow in packed pebble beds is calculated with a very high degree of reliability. The investigation of flow stability demonstrate that radial-symmetric relations are not given temporarily when national convection is overlayed by forced convection flow. In the discussion it is explained when and to what extent the program leds to useful results in such situations. The test of the effective heat conductivity lambdasub(eff) results in an improvement of the lambdasub(eff)-data used so far for temperatures below 13000C. (orig.)

  3. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  4. Initial verification and validation of RAZORBACK - A research reactor transient analysis code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, Darren G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the work and results of the initial verification and validation (V&V) of the beta release of the Razorback code. Razorback is a computer code designed to simulate the operation of a research reactor (such as the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)) by a coupled numerical solution of the point reactor kinetics equations, the energy conservation equation for fuel element heat transfer, and the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for the water cooling of the fuel elements. This initial V&V effort was intended to confirm that the code work to-date shows good agreement between simulation and actual ACRR operations, indicating that the subsequent V&V effort for the official release of the code will be successful.

  5. Intrinsically secure fast reactors with dense cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slessarev, Igor [29, Res. Tivoli, Allee des Peupliers, 13090 Aix-en-Provence (France)], E-mail: igor.slessarev@free.fr

    2007-11-15

    Secure safety, resistance to weapons material proliferation and problems of long-lived wastes remain the most important 'painful points' of nuclear power. Many innovative reactor concepts have been developed aimed at a radical enhancement of safety. The promising potential of innovative nuclear reactors allows for shifting accents in current reactor safety 'strategy' to reveal this worth. Such strategy is elaborated focusing on the priority for intrinsically secure safety features as well as on sure protection being provided by the first barrier of defence. Concerning the potential of fast reactors (i.e. sodium cooled, lead-cooled, etc.), there are no doubts that they are able to possess many favourable intrinsically secure safety features and to lay the proper foundation for a new reactor generation. However, some of their neutronic characteristics have to be radically improved. Among intrinsically secure safety properties, the following core parameters are significantly important: reactivity margin values, reactivity feed-back and coolant void effects. Ways of designing intrinsically secure safety features in fast reactors (titled hereafter as Intrinsically Secure Fast Reactors - ISFR) can be found in the frame of current reactor technologies by radical enhancement of core neutron economy and by optimization of core compositions. Simultaneously, respecting resistance to proliferation, by using non-enriched fuel feed as well as a core breeding gain close to zero, are considered as the important features (long-lived waste problems will be considered in a separate paper). This implies using the following reactor design options as well as closed fuel cycles with natural U as the reactor feed: {center_dot}Ultra-plate 'dense cores' of the ordinary (monolithic) type with negative total coolant void effects. {center_dot}Modular type cores. Multiple dense modules can be embedded in the common reflector for achieving the desired NPP total

  6. Safety of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of research reactors that have been constructed worldwide for civilian applications is about 651. Of the reactors constructed, 284 are currently in operation, 258 are shut down and 109 have been decommissioned. More than half of all operating research reactors worldwide are over thirty years old. During this long period of time national priorities have changed. Facility ageing, if not properly managed, has a natural degrading effect. Many research reactors face concerns with the obsolescence of equipment, lack of experimental programmes, lack of funding for operation and maintenance and loss of expertise through ageing and retirement of the staff. Other reactors of the same vintage maintain effective ageing management programmes, conduct active research programmes, develop and retain high calibre personnel and make important contributions to society. Many countries that operate research reactors neither operate nor plan to operate power reactors. In most of these countries there is a tendency not to create a formal regulatory body. A safety committee, not always independent of the operating organization, may be responsible for regulatory oversight. Even in countries with nuclear power plants, a regulatory regime differing from the one used for the power plants may exist. Concern is therefore focused on one tail of a continuous spectrum of operational performance. The IAEA has been sending missions to review the safety of research reactors in Member States since 1972. Some of the reviews have been conducted pursuant to the IAEA' functions and responsibilities regarding research reactors that are operated within the framework of Project and Supply Agreements between Member States and the IAEA. Other reviews have been conducted upon request. All these reviews are conducted following procedures for Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety

  7. Monte Carlo modelling of VR-1 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of reactor core analysis by precise Monte Carlo codes are gradually increasing along with the accessibility of computing power. In the case of zero power research reactors, where temperature and burn-up effects remain negligible, model can approximate the reality to a very high degree. In such a case, most of calculation uncertainty can be caused by uncertainties in technical specifications of fuel and reactor internals. Thus performance of the modelling and its predictive power can be significantly improved via comparison with a large set of experimental data that can be acquired during reactor operation and via subtle tuning and improving the calculation model. The paper describes the case for neutronics calculations of VR-1 zero power reactor core. (author)

  8. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  9. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 1014 n/cm2/sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  10. TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  11. Validation of reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor COre Protection System (RCOPS), an advanced core protection calculator system, is a digitized one which provides core protection function based on two reactor core operation parameters, Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). It generates a reactor trip signal when the core condition exceeds the DNBR or LPD design limit. It consists of four independent channels adapted a two-out-of-four trip logic. System configuration, hardware platform and an improved algorithm of the newly designed core protection calculator system are described in this paper. One channel of RCOPS was implemented as a single channel facility for this R and D project where we performed final integration software testing. To implement custom function blocks, pSET is used. Software test is performed by two methods. The first method is a 'Software Module Test' and the second method is a 'Software Unit Test'. New features include improvement of core thermal margin through a revised on-line DNBR algorithm, resolution of the latching problem of control element assembly signal and addition of the pre-trip alarm generation. The change of the on-line DNBR calculation algorithm is considered to improve the DNBR net margin by 2.5%-3.3%. (author)

  12. Method of evaluating the reactor core performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable exact evaluation for the core performance in a short period. Constitution: A reactor core is equally divided into 2, 4 or 8 sections considering the structure of the symmetricalness and calculation for the evaluation the core performance is carried out to at least one region of the divided core. However, the reactor core can not be said to be completely symmetrical and there is a difference more or less, because if identical type fuels are loaded the way of burning is different depending on the positions, thereby causing difference in the total heat calorie generated. Accordingly, the performance evaluation is conducted for the entire core at a predetermined time interval, the compensation value for each of the fuels is calculated based on the result of the calculation for the entire core and the corresponding result of the calculation in each of the divided cores and the compensated values are added to the calculation result for the divided cores to compensate the calculated evaluation value. This enables to shorten the calculation time and improve the calculation accuracy. (Yoshino, Y.)

  13. Cold-neutron tomography of annular flow and functional spacer performance in a model of a boiling water reactor fuel rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Annular flows w/wo functional spacers are investigated by cold neutron imaging. → Liquid film thickness distribution on fuel pins and on spacer vanes is measured. → The influence of the spacers on the liquid film distributions has been quantified. → The cross-sectional averaged liquid hold-up significantly affected by the spacers. → The sapers affect the fraction of the entrained liquid hold up in the gas core. - Abstract: Dryout of the coolant liquid film at the upper part of the fuel pins of a boiling water reactor (BWR) core constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is both a safety concern and a limiting factor in the thermal power and thus for the economy of BWRs. We have investigated adiabatic, air-water annular flows in a scaled-up model of two neighboring subchannels as found in BWR fuel assemblies using cold-neutron tomography. The imaging of the double suchannel has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. Cold-neutron tomography is shown here to be an excellent tool for investigating air-water annular flows and the influence of functional spacers of different geometries on such flows. The high-resolution, high-contrast measurements provide the spatial distributions of the coolant liquid film thickness on the fuel pin surfaces as well as on the surfaces of the spacer vanes. The axial variations of the cross-section averaged liquid hold-up and its fraction in the gas core shows the effect of the spacers on the redistribution of the two phases.

  14. Core Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Joshua; Adrian, Betty

    2009-01-01

    The Core Research Center (CRC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), located at the Denver Federal Center in Lakewood, Colo., currently houses rock core from more than 8,500 boreholes representing about 1.7 million feet of rock core from 35 States and cuttings from 54,000 boreholes representing 238 million feet of drilling in 28 States. Although most of the boreholes are located in the Rocky Mountain region, the geologic and geographic diversity of samples have helped the CRC become one of the largest and most heavily used public core repositories in the United States. Many of the boreholes represented in the collection were drilled for energy and mineral exploration, and many of the cores and cuttings were donated to the CRC by private companies in these industries. Some cores and cuttings were collected by the USGS along with other government agencies. Approximately one-half of the cores are slabbed and photographed. More than 18,000 thin sections and a large volume of analytical data from the cores and cuttings are also accessible. A growing collection of digital images of the cores are also becoming available on the CRC Web site Internet http://geology.cr.usgs.gov/crc/.

  15. Modeling of thermal hydraulics behaviour in reactor core of reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is the one and only research reactor in Malaysia and had been used exclusively for research and development (R and D), training for reactor operators and education purposes. The RTP is a 1 MWt pool type reactor with natural convection cooling system and pulsing capability up to 1200 MWt. It went critical on 28 June 1982 and the core configuration has been changed twelve times to date. The core is a mixed type using 20% enriched U-ZrH fuel element containing 8.5, 12 and 20wt% uranium. This paper will discuss the modeling of thermal-hydraulics behaviour in reactor core of RTP using computer code namely PARET. The results of the calculation that were carried out at RTP are modelled and temperature profiles of the thermal hydraulics data at different locations and power levels are developed. s a comparison to the thermal hydraulics calculation using PARET, an experiment were carried out at several different locations and power levels in the reactor core for temperature profile in the core to compare the result obtained from PARET. Finally, an overall analysis of the result of PARET calculation and experimental measurement were exhibited in this paper. (author)

  16. Usage of burnable poison on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel assemblies with burnable poison are widely used on power reactors, but there are not commonly used on research reactors. This paper shows a neutronic analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the burnable poison usage on research reactors. This paper analyses both burnable poison design used on research reactors: Boron on the lateral wall and Cadmium wires. Both designs include a parametric study on the design parameters like the amount and geometry of the burnable poison. This paper presents the design flexibility using burnable poisons, it does not find an optimal or final design, which it will strongly depend on the core characteristics and fuel management strategy. (author)

  17. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  18. Mechanical core coupling and reactors stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural parts of nuclear reactors are complex mechanical systems, able to vibrate with a set of proper frequencies when suitably excited. Cyclical variations in the strain state of the materials, including density perturbations, are produced. This periodic changes may affect reactor reactivity. But a variation in reactivity affects reactor thermal power, thus modifying the temperature field of the abovementiones materials. If the variation in temperature fields is fast enough, thermal-mechanical coupling may produce fast variations in strain states, and this, at its turn, modifies the reactivity, and so on. This coupling between mechanical vibrations of the structure and the materials of the core, with power oscillations of the reactor, not only may not be excluded a priori, but it seems that it has been present in some stage of the incidents or accidents that happened during the development of nuclear reactor technology. The purpose of the present communication is: (a) To review and generalize some mathematical models that were proposed in order to describe thermal-mechanical coupling in nuclear reactors. (b) To discuss some conditions in which significant instabilities could arise, including large amplitude power oscillations coupled with mechanical vibrations whose amplitudes are too small to be excluded by conventional criteria of mechanical design. Enough Certain aspects of thr physical safety of nuclear power reactors, that are objected by people that opposes to the renaissance of nucleoelectric generation, are discussed in the framework of the mathematical model proposed in this paper

  19. Gas-core reactor power transient analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kascak, A. F.

    1972-01-01

    The nuclear fuel in the gas-core reactor concept is a ball of uranium plasma radiating thermal photons. The photons are met by an inflowing hydrogen stream, which is seeded with submicron size, depleted uranium particles. A 'wall-burnout' condition exists if the thermal photons can reach the cavity liner because of insufficient absorption by the hydrogen. An analysis was conducted in order to determine the time for which the maximum steady state reactor power could be exceeded without damage to the cavity liner due to burnout. Wall-burnout time as a function of the power increase above the initial steady state condition is shown in a graph.

  20. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

  1. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  2. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  3. Research Reactors Types and Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor, in gross terms, is a device in which nuclear chain reactions are initiated, controlled, and sustained at a steady rate. The nuclei of fuel heavy atoms (mostly 235U or 239Pu), when struck by a slow neutron, may split into two or more smaller nuclei as fission products,releasing energy and neutrons in a process called nuclear fission. These newly-born fast neutrons then undergo several successive collisions with relatively low atomic mass material, the moderator, to become thermalized or slow. Normal water, heavy water, graphite and beryllium are typical moderators. These neutrons then trigger further fissions, and so on. When this nuclear chain reaction is controlled, the energy released can be used to heat water, produce steam and drive a turbine that generates electricity. The fission process, and hence the energy release, are controlled by the insertion (or extraction) of control rods through the reactor. These rods are strongly neutron absorbents, and thus only enough neutrons to sustain the chain reaction are left in the core. The energy released, mostly in the form of heat, should be continuously removed, to protect the core from damage. The most significant use of nuclear reactors is as an energy source for the generation of electrical power and for power in some military ships. This is usually accomplished by methods that involve using heat from the nuclear reaction to power steam turbines. Research reactors are used for radioisotope production and for beam experiments with free neutrons. Historically, the first use of nuclear reactors was the production of weapons grade plutonium for nuclear weapons. Currently all commercial nuclear reactors are based on nuclear fission. Fusion power is an experimental technology based on nuclear fusion instead of fission.

  4. Site Investigation for Detection of KIJANG Reactor Core Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jun Yeon; Kim, Jeeyoung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It was planned for the end of March 2017 and extended to April 2018 according to the government budget adjustment. The KJRR project is intended for filling the self-sufficiency of RI demand including Mo-99, increasing the NTD capacity and developing technologies related to the research reactor. In project, site investigation is the first activity that defines seismologic and related geologic aspects of the site. Site investigation was carried out from Oct. 2012 to Jan. 2014 and this study is intended to describe detail procedures in locating the reactor core center. The location of the reactor core center was determined by collectively reviewing not only geological information but also information from architects engineering. EL 50m was selected as ground level by levering construction cost. Four recommended locations (R-1a - R-1d) are displayed for the reactor core center. R-1a was found optimal in consideration of medium rock contour, portion of medium rock covering reactor buildings, construction cost, physical protection and electrical resistivity. It is noted that engineering properties of the medium rock is TCR/RQD 100/53, elastic modulus 7,710 - 8,720MPa, permeability coefficient 2.92E-06cm/s, and S-wave velocity 1,380m/s, sound for foundations of reactor buildings.

  5. Modification of the Core Cooling System of TRIGA 2000 Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Efrizon; Fiantini, Rosalina

    2010-06-01

    To accomplish safety requirements, a set of actions has to be performed following the recommendations of the IAEA safety series 35 applied to research reactor. Such actions are considered in modernization of the old system, improving the core cooling system and safety evaluations. Due to the complexity of the process and the difficulty in putting the apparatus in the reactor core, analytical and experimental study on the determination of flow and temperature distribution in the whole coolant channel are difficult to be done. In the present work, a numerical study of flow and temperature distribution in the coolant channel of TRIGA 2000 has been carried out using CFD package. For this study, simulations were carried out on 3-D tested model. The model consists of the reactor tank, thermal and thermalizing column, reflector, rotary specimen rack, chimney, fuel element, primary pipe, diffuser, beam tube and a part of the core are constructed by 1.50 million unstructured tetrahedral cell elements. The results show that for the initial condition (116 fuel elements in the core) and for the inlet temperature of 24°C and the primary velocity of 5.6 m/s, there no boiling phenomena occur in the coolant channel. Due to this result, it is now possible to improve the core cooling system of TRIGA 2000 reactor. Meanwhile, forced flow from the diffuser system only affected the flow pattern in the outside of chimney and put on a small effect to the fluid flow's velocity in the inside of chimney.

  6. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V. 3: Comparison of observed effects with computer simulated effects on reactor cores from seismic disturbances. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains the final papers summarizing the validation of the codes on the basis of comparison of observed effects with computer simulated effects on reactor cores from seismic disturbances. Refs, figs tabs

  7. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  8. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  9. Nuclear Research Center IRT reactor dynamics calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the code DIRT, for dynamical calculations are described in the paper. With the results obtained by the program, an analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the Research Reactor IRT of the Nuclear Research Center (CIN) is performed. Different transitories were considered such as variation of the system reactivity, coolant inlet temperature variation and also variations of the coolant velocity through the reactor core. 3 refs

  10. Research Reactor Spent Fuel Transfer/Storage Cask with Application to TRIGA Fuel - Designed Cask Shielding Independent Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti owns and operates a TRIGA dual-core Research Reactor for material testing, power reactor fuel and nuclear safety studies (dual-core concept involves independent operation of TRIGA 14 MW Steady-State Reactor and TRIGA Annular-Core Pulsing Reactor at each end of a large pool). In May 2006, TRIGA 14 MW SSR core was fully converted to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU 20 wt% 235U) fuel, according to Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors agreements and current worldwide non-proliferation efforts. Paper presents a shielding independent evaluation applied to designed transfer/ storage cask for TRIGA INR spent fuel, a mandatory step in preparation of the documentation required for spent fuel transfer/storage cask authorisation process. Fuel elements irradiation was modelled by assuming constant power for entire residence time inside reactor core, for 14 MW reactor operation power and two different scenarios characteristic for accident calculations according to TRIGA 14 MW SSR safety report and reactor operation experience. The discharged spent LEU fuel was cooled down for 2 and 5 years, respectively. Source term assessment and spent fuel characteristic parameters estimation were done by means of ORIGEN-S burn-up code (included in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's SCALE6 package) with specific cross-sections libraries, updating data for each burn-up step. For the transfer/storage cask shielding analysis, two different cases have been considered, the main difference residing in TRIGA fuel elements loading. The radiation dose rates to the transfer/storage cask wall and in air at different distances from the cask have been estimated by means of MAVRIC/Monaco shielding 3D Monte Carlo code included in ORNL's SCALE6 package. (author)

  11. Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  12. In-core instrument for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns, in particular, an improvement for in-core equipments in a nuclear reactor having sliding members. Deposition layers of particles of metal carbides and metal nitrides are formed at the sliding surface of members in the in-core eqiupments. The matrix materials constituting the members are melted under irradiation of laser beams to form a welded layer integrated with the deposition layer. In this way, since the thickness of the welded layer is remarkably thin as compared with of the substrate material, when the irradiation of the laser beams is interrupted, corrosion resistance in water at high temperature can be improved remarkably since the melted portion is quenched and no chromium carbide is deposited at the crystal boudary. Accordingly, due to excellent corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance of the welded layer relative to the in-core equipments in the reactor having sliding surfaces, sliding incapability does not occur between each of the members under crevice conditions. Accordingly, no withdrawal incapability for equipments, for example, neutron monitors should occur upon periodical inspection. (I.S.)

  13. Sodium fast reactor evaluation: Core materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Jin Sik; Lee, Chan Bock; Lee, Byoung Oon; Raison, J. P.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Carmack, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) Program the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. In this paper the status of available and developmental materials for SFR core cladding and duct applications is reviewed. To satisfy the Generation IV SFR fuel requirements, an advanced cladding needs to be developed. The candidate cladding materials are austenitic steels, ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steels, and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels. A large amount of irradiation testing is required, and the compatibility of cladding with TRU-loaded fuel at high temperatures and high burnup must be investigated. The more promising F/M steels (compared to HT9) might be able to meet the dose requirements of over 200 dpa for ducts in the GEN-IV SFR systems.

  14. Core surveillance of boiling-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods suitable for a calculational procedure which determines the three-dimensional power distribution in boilingwater reactors on the basis of in-core detector readings are described. A two- dimensional equation based on diffusion theory is set up, and a method for incorporating detector readings in the solution of this equation is presented. A three-dimensional calculational method based on nodal theory is developed. Calculations are carried out using this method, and the results are compared with a three-dimensional nodal theory calculation . Finally, parameters affecting the detector readings are examined. (author)

  15. Decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors of WWR-S type were built in countries under Soviet influence in '60, last century and consequently reached their service life. Decommissioning implies removal of all radioactive components, processing, conditioning and final disposal in full safety of all sources on site of radiological pollution. The WWR-S reactor at Bucuresti-Magurele was put into function in 1957 and operated until 1997 when it was stopped and put into conservation in view of decommissioning. Presented are three decommissioning variants: 1. Reactor shut-down for a long period (30-50 years) what would entail a substantial decrease of contamination with lower costs in dismantling, mechanical, chemical and physical processing followed by final disposal of the radioactive wastes. The drawback of this solution is the life prolongation of a non-productive nuclear unit requiring funds for personnel, control, maintenance, etc; 2. Decommissioning in a single stage what implies large funds for a immediate investment; 3. Extending the operation on a series of stages rather phased in time to allow a more convenient flow of funds and also to gather technical solutions, better than the present ones. This latter option seems to be optimal for the case of the WWR-S Research at Bucharest-Magurele Reactor. Equipment and technologies should be developed in order to ensure the technical background of the first operations of decommissioning: equipment for scarification, dismantling, dismemberment in a highly radioactive environment; cutting-to-pieces and disassembling technologies; decontamination modern technologies. Concomitantly, nuclear safety and quality assurance regulations and programmes, specific to decommissioning projects should be implemented, as well as a modern, coherent and reliable system of data acquisition, recording and storing. Also the impact of decommissioning must be thoroughly evaluated. The national team of specialists will be assisted by IAEA experts to ensure the

  16. Fuel behavior comparison for a research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negut, Gh.; Mladin, M.; Prisecaru, I.; Danila, N.

    2006-06-01

    The paper presents the behavior and properties analysis of the low enriched uranium fuel, which will be loaded in the Romanian TRIGA 14 MW steady state research reactor compared with the original high enriched uranium fuel. The high and low enriched uranium fuels have similar thermal properties, but different nuclear properties. The research reactor core was modeled with both fuel materials and the reactor behavior was studied during a reactivity insertion accident. The thermal hydraulic analysis results are compared with that obtained from the safety analysis report for high enriched uranium fuel core. The low enriched uranium fuel shows a good behavior during reactivity insertion accident and a revised safety analysis report will be made for the low enriched uranium fuel core.

  17. Applications of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The purpose of the earlier publication, The Application of Research Reactors, IAEA-TECDOC-1234, was to present descriptions of the typical forms of research reactor use. The necessary criteria to enable an application to be performed were outlined for each one, and, in many cases, the minimum as well as the desirable requirements were given. This revision of the publication over a decade later maintains the original purpose and now specifically takes into account the changes in service requirements demanded by the relevant stakeholders. In particular, the significant improvements in

  18. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  19. MINT research reactor safety program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad Idris bin Taib [Division of Special Project, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi (Malaysia)

    2000-11-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) Research Reactor Safety Program has been done along with Reactor Power Upgrading Project, Reactor Safety Upgrading Project and Development of Expert System for On-Line Nuclear Process Control Project. From 1993 up to date, Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulics analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment as well as installation of New 2 MW Secondary Cooling System were done. Installations of New Reactor Building Ventilation System, Reactor Monitoring System, Updating of Safety Analysis Report and Upgrading Primary Cooling System are in progress. For future activities, Reactor Modeling will be included to add present activities. (author)

  20. Monte Carlo analysis of Musashi TRIGA mark II reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    The analysis of the TRIGA-II core at the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (Musashi reactor, 100 kW) was performed by the three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP4A). Effective multiplication factors (k{sub eff}) for the several fuel-loading patterns including the initial core criticality experiment, the fuel element and control rod reactivity worth as well as the neutron flux measurements were used in the validation process of the physical model and neutron cross section data from the ENDF/B-V evaluation. The calculated k{sub eff} overestimated the experimental data by about 1.0%{delta}k/k for both the initial core and the several fuel-loading arrangements. The calculated reactivity worths of control rod and fuel element agree well the measured ones within the uncertainties. The comparison of neutron flux distribution was consistent with the experimental ones which were measured by activation methods at the sample irradiation tubes. All in all, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is good, which indicated that the Monte Carlo model is enough to simulate the Musashi TRIGA-II reactor core. (author)

  1. Higher power density TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium zirconium hydride (U-ZrH) fuel is the fundamental feature of the TRIGA family of reactors that accounts for its widely recognized safety, good performance, economy of operation, and its acceptance worldwide. Of the 65 TRIGA reactors or TRIGA fueled reactors, several are located in hospitals or hospital complexes and in buildings that house university classrooms. These examples are a tribute to the high degree of safety of the operating TRIGA reactor. In the early days, the majority of the TRIGA reactors had power levels in the range from 10 to 250 kW, many with pulsing capability. An additional number had power levels up to 1 MW. By the late 1970's, seven TRIGA reactors with power levels up to 2 MW had been installed. A reduction in the rate of worldwide construction of new research reactors set in during the mid 1970's but construction of occasional research reactors has continued until the present. Performance of higher power TRIGA reactors are presented as well as the operation of higher power density reactor cores. The extremely safe TRIGA fuel, including the more recent TRIGA LEU fuel, offers a wide range of possible reactor configurations. A long core life is assured through the use of a burnable poison in the TRIGA LEU fuel. In those instances where large neutron fluxes are desired but relatively low power levels are also desired, the 19-rod hexagonal array of small diameter fuel rods offers exciting possibilities. The small diameter fuel rods have provided extremely long and trouble-free operation in the Romanian 14 MW TRIGA reactor

  2. Investigative studies on the effects of cadmium rabbits on high enriched uranium-fueled and low enriched uranium-fueled cores of Ghana Research Reactor-1 using MCNP5 code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boffie, J., E-mail: jboffie@yahoo.com [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Material Science, School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences (SNAS), University of Ghana, P.O. Box AE 1, Atomic Energy, Accra (Ghana); National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Akaho, E.H.K. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Material Science, School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences (SNAS), University of Ghana, P.O. Box AE 1, Atomic Energy, Accra (Ghana); Nyarko, B.J.B.; Odoi, H.C.; Tuffour-Achampong, K.; Abrefah, R.G. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Material Science, School of Nuclear and Allied Sciences (SNAS), University of Ghana, P.O. Box AE 1, Atomic Energy, Accra (Ghana); National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The operating parameters for both the HEU core and proposed LEU core were similar. • The length of the Cd in the capsules must be increased for its use in the LEU core. • Cd rabbits can emergently be used to shut down MNSRs. - Abstract: Miniature Neutron Source Reactors (MNSRs) are noted to be among highly safe research reactors. However, because of its use of one control rod for reactivity control and shutdown purposes, alternative methods of shutting it down are important. The Ghana MNSR uses four cadmium rabbits of approximate dimensions 6.5 cm × 5.0 cm × 0.1 cm and mass of 9.48 g each to emergently shut down the reactor. The Monte Carlo N-Particle code; version 5, (MCNP5) was used to design the high enriched uranium (HEU) and low enriched uranium (LEU) cores of the MNSR with four cadmium rabbits inserted in four inner irradiation sites of each core. The operating parameters and shutdown parameters for both cores with the central control rod (CCR) either fully withdrawn or fully inserted had similar results with the HEU core having slightly better results in terms of safety. However, the results show that the four inserted cadmium rabbits make the HEU core subcritical whiles in the LEU core, it still remains critical (k{sub eff} = 1.00005 ± 0.00007). The length of the cadmium material in each cadmium rabbit must therefore be increased by at least 0.5 cm in order to attain subcriticality (k{sub eff} = 0.99989 ± 0.00006) and shutdown margin of 0.11 mk when inserted in the LEU core.

  3. Reliability studies in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fault trees and event trees are widely used in industry to model and to evaluate the reliability of safety systems. Detailed analyzes in nuclear installations require the combination of these two techniques. This study uses the methods of FT (Fault Tree) and ET (Event Tree) to accomplish the PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) in research reactors. According to IAEA (lnternational Atomic Energy Agency), the PSA is divided into Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3. At the Level 1, conceptually, the security systems perform to prevent the occurrence of accidents, At the Level 2, once accidents happened, this Level seeks to minimize consequences, known as stage management of accident, and at Level 3 accident impacts are determined. This study focuses on analyzing the Level 1, and searching through the acquisition of knowledge, the consolidation of methodologies for future reliability studies. The Greek Research Reactor, GRR-1, is a case example. The LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) was chosen as the initiating event and from it, using ET, possible accidental sequences were developed, which could lead damage to the core. Moreover, for each of affected systems, probabilities of each event top of FT were developed and evaluated in possible accidental sequences. Also, the estimates of importance measures for basic events are presented in this work. The studies of this research were conducted using a commercial computational tool SAPHIRE. Additionally, achieved results thus were considered satisfactory for the performance or the failure of analyzed systems. (author)

  4. The effects of annular flow on dynamics of AP1000 reactor coolant pump rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feature of AP1000 RCP rotor system is that the whole rotor system is immersed in the annular flow. The rotor in annular flow induces fluctuating fluid forces, thereby causes vibration and noise, even rotor instability. The effects of annular flow on AP1000 RCP rotor system are different from that in bearings and seals and should be considered in a new approach. Based on the turbulent bulk flow theory and perturbation analysis, the rotor-flow coupled linear dynamic model is developed to predict the dynamics of AP1000 RCP immersed rotor. During the analysis, the rotor eccentricity, stator and rotor wall friction effects are emphasized. The analytic results show the rotor eccentricity induces divergence instability and significant decrease of instability speed for system with moderate or large eccentricity; however, stator and rotor wall friction effects distinctly suppress divergence instability and increase instability speed for system with small or moderate eccentricity. Finally, we can have the conclusion that the flow-structure interaction induced by annular flow has great effects on the dynamics of AP1000 RCP immersed rotor, which should be considered in rotor dynamic analysis and design of AP1000 RCP. The method and results in the paper have theoretical significance and practical importance. (author)

  5. Research nuclear reactor operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    arising in nuclear field and especially in works implying research reactors result first from the synthesis of the problems which sometimes are conventionally treated depending on the experience of the decision staff. Abnormal or un-specific problems from the technical point of view but always with economic consequences, as risk doses may occur. A series of such aspects and corresponding measures are discussed for the different situations as follows: a. Startup, operation, and shutdown of the reactor and, where appropriate, experimental devices; b. Loading, unloading, and movement within the reactor of fuel and other core and reflector components, including experimental devices; c. Routine maintenance of major components or systems that could have an effect on reactor safety; d. Inspections and tests of structures, systems and components that may have an effect on reactor safety, including those specified in the approved programme of periodic testing and inspection; e. Personnel radiation protection consistent with applicable regulations; f. Authorization of operation and maintenance and the conduct of irradiations and experiments that could affect reactor safety or radioactivity; g. Operator response to appropriate anticipated operational occurrences and, to the extent feasible, accident conditions; h. Emergency actions; i. Safety issues. Finally the handling of radioactive wastes and control monitoring of radioactive release are discussed

  6. Effective utilization and management of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of utilizing a research reactor effectively is closely related to its management and therefore should not be considered separately. Too often, attention has been focused on specific techniques and methods rather than on the overall programme of utilization, with the result that skills and equipment have been acquired without any active continuing programme of applications and services. The seminar reported here provided a forum for reactor managers, users, and operators to discuss their experience. At the invitation of the Government of Malaysia, it was held at the Asia Pacific Development Centre, Kuala Lumpur, from 7 to 11 November 1983. It was attended by about 50 participants from 19 Member States; it is hoped that a report on the seminar, including papers presented, can be published and thus reach a wider audience. Thirty-one lectures and contributions were presented at a total of seven sessions: Research reactor management; Radiation exposure and safety; Research reactor utilization (two sessions); PUSPATI Research Reactor Project Development; Core conversion to low-enriched uranium, and safeguards; Research reactor technology. In addition, a panel discussed the causes and resolutions of the under-utilization of research reactors

  7. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  8. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input.

  9. A New Generation of Research Reactors Fuelled with LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of countries have recently shown interest in new research reactors. In response to such willingness to develop nuclear technologies, we have prepared technical proposals on typical research reactors (RR) which will be built as part of nuclear research centres (NRC) according to base design principles. The requirements for such research reactors are defined to represent their competitive service parameters, including capabilities to support a wide spectrum of studies in various areas of theoretical and applied researches. Analysis of the current and projected uses of research reactors and assessment of the external market demands have prompted two design options of a pool-type reactor at a nuclear research centre, namely, a small (up to 0.5 MW) reactor with natural coolant circulation through its core and a reactor with forced coolant circulation scaled up to 10-15 MW. The research reactors under development will run with commercially available and well-proven fuel of low enrichment. (author)

  10. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  11. Laser anemometer measurements in an annular cascade of core turbine vanes and comparison with theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, L. J.; Seashultz, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    Laser measurements were made in an annular cascade of stator vanes operating at an exit critical velocity ratio of 0.78. Velocity and flow angles in the blade to blade plane were obtained at every 10 percent of axial chord within the passage and at 1/2 axial chord downstream of the vanes for radial positions near the hub, mean and tip. Results are presented in both plot and tabulated form and are compared with calculations from an inviscid, quasi three dimensional computer program. The experimental measurements generally agreed well with these theoretical calculations, an indication of the usefulness of this analytic approach.

  12. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1978 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  13. Research reactors and alternative devices for research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes papers on research reactors and alternatives to the research reactors - radioisotopic neutron sources, cyclotrons, D-T neutron generators and small accelerators, used for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, material science, applied and basic research using neutron beams. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 papers

  14. A comparison of measurements of atmospheric ammonia by filter packs, transition-flow reactors, simple and annular denuders and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiebe, H. A.; Anlauf, K. G.; Tuazon, E. C.; Winer, A. M.; Biermann, H. W.; Appel, B. R.; Solomon, P. A.; Cass, G. R.; Ellestad, T. G.; Knapp, K. T.; Peake, E.; Spicer, C. W.; Lawson, D. R.

    Using data obtained during the 1985 Nitrogen Species Methods Comparison Study (1988, Atmospheric Environment22, 1517), several measurement methods for sampling ambient NH 3 are compared. Eight days of continuous measurements at Pomona College, a smog receptor site in Los Angeles, provided an extensive data base for comparing the following methods: Fourier transform i.r. spectroscopy (FTIR), three filter pack configurations, a simple and an annular denuder, and the transition flow reactor. FTIR was defined as the reference method and it reported hourly NH 3 concentrations ranging from > 60 to 2280 nmol m -3 (1.5-57ppb) during the course of the study, the highest values coming from the influence of nearby livestock operations. Although only limited quality assurance procedures were carried out, the following conclusions can, nevertheless, be drawn: most of the methods correlated highly with the FTIR method (correlation coefficient r > 0.96); generally, the linear regression slopes were close to unity and the intercepts were insignificantly different from zero at the 95% confidence level); relative to the FTIR average values, (1) for 4-6 h sampling periods, the averages of the three filter packs from three research groups were 83-130% and the annular denuder average was 87%, and (2) for 10-12 h sampling periods, the simple denuder averaged 90% and the two transition flow reactors were 77-98%. Possible reasons for the reported systematic biases are presented, but these are not able to fully explain the large range of differences reported by the various methods.

  15. On the oxidation of uraninite from natural reactor cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui, D.; Eriksen, T.; Eklund, U.B.

    1999-07-01

    Natural nuclear reactors provide unique evidence in helping to understand the processes that might occur over long timescales in radioactive waste disposal sites. In the presented work, the extent and kinetics of oxidation of core material from the Oklo-Bangombe natural reactors are investigated. The X-ray powder diffraction analysis shows that the uraninites core samples from the Bangombe Reactor and Oklo Reactor 2, and Oklo Reactor 13 have the same unit-cell parameters as synthetic UO{sub 2.25}. A significant amount of fourmarierite, Pb(UO{sub 2}){sub 4}O{sub 3}(OH){sub 4}.4H{sub 2}O, was identified in the core samples from two shallow reactors Bangombe and Oklo 2, but not in the deeper reactor Oklo 13. The results of U(IV)/U(IV) measurements indicate that the extent of oxidative weathering of shallow reactors (Bangombe and Oklo 2) is greater than for the deeper reactor Oklo 13. Evaporable organic compounds found in the uraninite inclusion containing bitumen at the edge of Okelobondo Reactor (400 C) and in the black shale immediately above the Bangombe Reactor (260 C) may work as a reducing buffer or/and a hydrophobic water shield to depress the oxidative dissolution of the uraninite cores.

  16. Stability of core-annular flow of power-law fluids in the presence of interfacial surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The shear-thinning influence on the core-annular flow stability of two immiscible power-law fluids is considered by making a linear stability analysis.The flow is driven by an axial pressure gradient in a straight pipe with the interface between the two fluids occupied by an insoluble surfactant.Given the basic flow for this core-annular arrangement,the analytical solution is obtained with respect to the power-law fluid model.The linearized equations for the evolution of infinitesimal disturbances are derived and the stability problem is formulated as a generalized matrix eigenvalue problem,which is solved by using the software package Matlab based on the QZ algorithm.The shear-thinning property is found to have marked influence on the power-law fluid core-annular flow stability,which is reflected in various aspects.First,the capillary instability is magnified by the shear-thinning property,which may lead to an essential difference between power-law and Newtonian fluid flows.Especially when the interface is close to the pipe wall,the power-law fluid flow may be unstable while the Newtonian fluid flow is stable.Second,under disturbances to the interface a velocity discontinuity at the interface appears which is destabilizing to the flow.The magnitude of this velocity discontinuity is affected by the power-law index and the flow stability is influenced correspondingly.Besides,the shear-thinning property may induce new stability modes which do not appear in the Newtonian fluid flow.The flow stability shows much dependence on the interface location,the role of which was neglected in most previous studies.The shear-thinning fluid flow is more unstable to long wave disturbances when the interface is close to the pipe wall,while the Newtonian fluid flow is more unstable when the interface is close to the pipe centerline.But this trend is changed by the addition of interfacial surfactant,for which the power-law fluid flow is more stable no matter where the interface is

  17. Status report of Indonesian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description of the three Indonesia research reactors, their irradiation facilities and future prospect are given. The 250 kW Triga Mark II in Bandung has been in operation since 1965 and in 1972 its designed power was increased to 1000 kW. The core grid from the previous 250 kW Triga Mark II was then used by Batan for designing and constructing the Kartini reactor in Yogyakarta. This reactor commenced its operation in 1979. Both Triga reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilization such as for manpower training in nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, isotope production, and beam research in solid state physics. The Triga reactor management in Bandung has a strong cooperation with the Bandung Institute of Technology and the one in Yogyakarta with the Gadjah Mada University which has a Nuclear Engineering Department at its Faculty of Engineering. In 1976 there emerged an idea to have a high flux reactor appropriate for Indonesia's intention to prepare an infrastructure for both nuclear energy and non-energy industry era. Such an idea was then realized with the achievement of the first criticality of the RSG-GAS reactor at the Serpong area. It is now expected that by early 1992 the reactor will reach its full 30 MW power level and by the end of 1992 the irradiation facilities be utilizable fully for future scientific and engineering work. As a part of the national LEU fuel development program a study has been underway since early 1989 to convert the RSG-GAS reactor core from using oxide fuel to using higher loading silicide fuel. (author)

  18. Optimum burnup of BAEC TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Optimum loading scheme for BAEC TRIGA core is out-to-in loading with 10 fuels/cycle starting with 5 for the first reload. ► The discharge burnup ranges from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element for full power (3 MW) operation. ► Optimum extension of operating core life is 100 MWD per reload cycle. - Abstract: The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of BAEC (Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission) has been operating since 1986 without any reshuffling or reloading yet. Optimum fuel burnup strategy has been investigated for the present BAEC TRIGA core, where three out-to-in loading schemes have been inspected in terms of core life extension, burnup economy and safety. In considering different schemes of fuel loading, optimization has been searched by only varying the number of fuels discharged and loaded. A cost function has been defined and evaluated based on the calculated core life and fuel load and discharge. The optimum loading scheme has been identified for the TRIGA core, the outside-to-inside fuel loading with ten fuels for each cycle starting with five fuels for the first reload. The discharge burnup has been found ranging from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element and optimum extension of core operating life is 100 MWD for each loading cycle. This study will contribute to the in-core fuel management of TRIGA reactor

  19. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  20. Experimental research on dryout point of flow boiling in narrow annular channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An experimental research on the dryout point of flow boiling in narrow annular channels under low mass flux with 1.55 mm and 1.05 mm annular gap, respectively, is conducted. Distilled water is used as working fluid and the range of pressure is limited within 2.0~4.0 MPa and that of mass flux is 26.0~69.0 kg·m-2·s-1. The relation of critical heat flux (CHF) and critical qualities with mass flux and pressure are revealed. It is found that the critical qualities decrease with the increasing mass flux and increase with the increasing inlet qualities in externally heated annuli.Under the same conditions, critical qualities in the outer tube are always larger than those in the inner tube. The appearance of dryout point in bilaterally heated narrow annuli can be judged according to the ratio of qo/qi.

  1. Cronos 2: a neutronic simulation software for reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CRONOS2 software is that part of the SAPHYR code system dedicated to neutronic core calculations. CRONOS2 is a powerful tool for reactor design, fuel management and safety studies. Its modular structure and great flexibility make CRONOS2 an unique simulation tool for research and development for a wide variety of reactor systems. CRONOS2 is a versatile tool that covers a large range of applications from very fast calculations used in training simulators to time and memory consuming reference calculations needed to understand complex physical phenomena. CRONOS2 has a procedure library named CPROC that allows the user to create its own application environment fitted to a specific industrial use. (authors)

  2. Strengthening IAEA Safeguards for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Bruce D.; Anzelon, George A.; Budlong-Sylvester, Kory

    2016-09-28

    During their December 10-11, 2013, workshop in Grenoble France, which focused on the history and future of safeguarding research reactors, the United States, France and the United Kingdom (UK) agreed to conduct a joint study exploring ways to strengthen the IAEA’s safeguards approach for declared research reactors. This decision was prompted by concerns about: 1) historical cases of non-compliance involving misuse (including the use of non-nuclear materials for production of neutron generators for weapons) and diversion that were discovered, in many cases, long after the violations took place and as part of broader pattern of undeclared activities in half a dozen countries; 2) the fact that, under the Safeguards Criteria, the IAEA inspects some reactors (e.g., those with power levels under 25 MWt) less than once per year; 3) the long-standing precedent of States using heavy water research reactors (HWRR) to produce plutonium for weapons programs; 4) the use of HEU fuel in some research reactors; and 5) various technical characteristics common to some types of research reactors that could provide an opportunity for potential proliferators to misuse the facility or divert material with low probability of detection by the IAEA. In some research reactors, for example, such characteristics include rapid on-line refueling, and a core design with room for such a large number of assemblies or targets that it is difficult to detect diversion or undeclared irradiation. In addition, infrastructure associated with research reactors, such as hot cells, where plutonium could be separated, could pose a safeguards challenge because, in some cases, they are not declared (because they are not located in the facility or because nuclear materials are not foreseen to be processed inside) and may not be accessible to inspectors in States without an Additional Protocol in force.

  3. Strengthening IAEA Safeguards for Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Bruce D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Anzelon, George A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Budlong-Sylvester, Kory [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-09-01

    During their December 10-11, 2013, workshop in Grenoble France, which focused on the history and future of safeguarding research reactors, the United States, France and the United Kingdom (UK) agreed to conduct a joint study exploring ways to strengthen the IAEA’s safeguards approach for declared research reactors. This decision was prompted by concerns about: 1) historical cases of non-compliance involving misuse (including the use of non-nuclear materials for production of neutron generators for weapons) and diversion that were discovered, in many cases, long after the violations took place and as part of broader pattern of undeclared activities in half a dozen countries; 2) the fact that, under the Safeguards Criteria, the IAEA inspects some reactors (e.g., those with power levels under 25 MWt) less than once per year; 3) the long-standing precedent of States using heavy water research reactors (HWRR) to produce plutonium for weapons programs; 4) the use of HEU fuel in some research reactors; and 5) various technical characteristics common to some types of research reactors that could provide an opportunity for potential proliferators to misuse the facility or divert material with low probability of detection by the IAEA. In some research reactors, for example, such characteristics include rapid on-line refueling, and a core design with room for such a large number of assemblies or targets that it is difficult to detect diversion or undeclared irradiation. In addition, infrastructure associated with research reactors, such as hot cells, where plutonium could be separated, could pose a safeguards challenge because, in some cases, they are not declared (because they are not located in the facility or because nuclear materials are not foreseen to be processed inside) and may not be accessible to inspectors in States without an Additional Protocol in force.

  4. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  5. Hanging core support system for a nuclear reactor. [LMFBR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burelbach, J.P.; Kann, W.J.; Pan, Y.C.; Saiveau, J.G.; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1984-04-26

    For holding the reactor core in the confining reactor vessel, a support is disclosed that is structurally independent of the vessel, that is dimensionally accurate and stable, and that comprises tandem tension linkages that act redundantly of one another to maintain stabilized core support even in the unlikely event of the complete failure of one of the linkages. The core support has a mounting platform for the reactor core, and unitary structure including a flange overlying the top edge of the reactor vessels, and a skirt and box beams between the flange and platform for establishing one of the linkages. A plurality of tension rods connect between the deck closing the reactor vessel and the platform for establishing the redundant linkage. Loaded Belleville springs flexibly hold the tension rods at the deck and separable bayonet-type connections hold the tension rods at the platform.

  6. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  7. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; M, Wan Munirah W.; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-01

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  8. Status report of Indonesian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description of three Indonesian research reactor, its irradiation facilities and its future prospect are described. Since 1965 Triga Mark II 250 KW Bandung, has been in operation and in 1972 the design powers were increased to 1000 KW. Using core grid form Triga 250 KW BATAN has designed and constructed Kartini Reactor in Yogyakarta which started its operation in 1979. Both of this Triga type reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilization such as training manpower in nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, isotope production and beam research in solid state physics. Each of this reactor have strong cooperation with Bandung Institute of Technology at Bandung and Gajah Mada University at Yogyakarta which has a faculty of Nuclear Engineering. Since 1976 the idea to have high flux reactor has been foreseen appropriate to Indonesian intention to prepare infrastructure for nuclear industry for both energy and non-energy related activities. The idea come to realization with the first criticality of RSG-GAS (Multipurpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy) in July 1987 at PUSPIPTEK Serpong area. It is expected that by early 1992 the reactor will reached its full power of 30 MW and by end 1992 its expected that irradiation facilities will be utilized in the future for nuclear scientific and engineering work. (author)

  9. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.b, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  10. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  11. Meeting on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting 'Reactor Safety Research' organized for the second time by the GRS by order of the BMFT gave a review of research activities on the safety of light water reactors in the Federal Repulbic of Germany, international co-operation in this field and latest results of this research institution. The central fields of interest were subjects of man/machine-interaction, operational reliability accident sequences, and risk. (orig.)

  12. Ageing management for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past several years, ageing of research reactor facilities continues to be an important safety issue. Despite the efforts exerted by operating organizations and regulatory authorities worldwide to address this issue, the need for an improved strategy as well as the need for establishing and implementing a systematic approach to ageing management at research reactors was identified. This paper discusses, on the basis of the IAEA Safety Standards, the effect of ageing on the safety of research reactors and presents a proactive strategy for ageing management. A systematic approach for ageing management is developed and presented together with its key elements, along with practical examples for their application. (author)

  13. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1978 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  14. Analysis of the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1977-01-01

    Design power plant studies were carried out for two applications of the plasma core reactor: (1) As a breeder reactor, (2) As a reactor able to transmute actinides effectively. In addition to the above applications the reactor produced electrical power with a high efficiency. A reactor subsystem was designed for each of the two applications. For the breeder reactor, neutronics calculations were carried out for a U-233 plasma core with a molten salt breeding blanket. A reactor was designed with a low critical mass (less than a few hundred kilograms U-233) and a breeding ratio of 1.01. The plasma core actinide transmutation reactor was designed to transmute the nuclear waste from conventional LWR's. The spent fuel is reprocessed during which 100% of Np, Am, Cm, and higher actinides are separated from the other components. These actinides are then manufactured as oxides into zirconium clad fuel rods and charged as fuel assemblies in the reflector region of the plasma core actinide transmutation reactor. In the equilibrium cycle, about 7% of the actinides are directly fissioned away, while about 31% are removed by reprocessing.

  15. Method of controlling the heterogeneous reactor core in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To maintain the power distribution of fuel assemblies constant all over the reactor operation period by operating the control rods depending on the power change in blanket fuels. Method: Blanket fuels (internal blanket) are loaded at a central region of a reactor core comprising plutonium enriched region. Further, control rods for the start-up and shutdown of a reactor and fuel compensation and back-up control rods are arranged within the reactor core. The reactor core is surrounded with an axial blanket and a neutron shielding body. 21 fuel compensating control rods are present in the reactor core and 18 rods out of them are arranged at the outer region of the inner blanket. At the initial stage of the reactor operation, the control rods are divided into three blocks and they are inserted into the reactor core by 0%, 21% and 20% respectively required for the compensation of the burning reactivity at the initial stage of the reactor operation and inserted by 2%, 18% and 15% respectively at the initial balanced stage of the reactor core. (Horiuchi, T.)

  16. Burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core using MCNPX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a reactor design with a burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core that was evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). The current trend in advanced reactor design is the concept of a small modular reactor (SMR). However, very few of the SMR designs attempt to substantially increase the lifetime of a reactor core, especially without zone loading, fuel reshuffling, or other artificial mechanisms in the core that %E2%80%9Cflatten%E2%80%9D the power profile, including non-uniform cooling, non-uniform moderation, or strategic poison placement. Historically, the limitations of computing capabilities have prevented acceptable margins in the temporal component of the spatial excess reactivity in a reactor design, due primarily to the error in burnup calculations. This research was performed as an initial scoping analysis into the concept of a long-life fast reactor. It can be shown that a long-life fast reactor concept can be modeled using MCNPX to predict burnup and neutronics behavior. The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs. For the purpose of this study, a single core design was investigated: a relatively small reactor core, yielding a medium amount of power (~200 to 400 MWth). The results of this scoping analysis were successful in providing a preliminary reactor design involving metal U-235/U-238 fuel with HT-9 fuel cladding and sodium coolant at a 20% volume fraction.

  17. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  18. Optimization of the core of a 600 MV HTGR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through a thermal analysis, several reactor core parameters are considered, viz.: cooling channel diameter, juel channel diameter, distance between two channels power generated for lenght unit, etc. Using several criteria, the best solution or solutions are chosen

  19. Defuelling of the UTR-300 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.D.; Banford, H.M.; East, B.W. [Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ord, M.A.; Gaffka, A.P. [AEA Technology, Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RA (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-01

    A description is given of the movement of fuel elements from the core of the UTR-300 research reactor to the UNIFETCH flask, which is normally loaded under water, through a specially designed shielding arrangement which permits a dry transfer. The regulatory requirements and the safety case are summarised along with the predicted and measured doses to operators. The task was successfully completed to a tight time schedule with recorded doses which were well within the allocated dose budget. (orig.) 3 refs.

  20. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S. and others

    1999-03-01

    Integral reactors are developed for the applications such as sea water desalination, heat energy for various industries, and power sources for large container ships. In order to enhance the inherent and passive safety features, low power density concept is chosen for the integral reactor SMART. Moreover, ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation concepts are reviewed for better plant economy and simple design of reactor system. Especially, boron-free operation concept brings about large difference in core configurations and reactivity controls from those of the existing large size commercial nuclear power plants and also causes many differences in the safety aspects. The ultimate objectives of this study include detailed core design of a integral reactor, development of the core design system and technology, and finally acquisition of the system design certificate. The goal of the first stage is the conceptual core design, that is, to establish the design bases and requirements suitable for the boron-free concept, to develop a core loading pattern, to analyze the nuclear, thermal and hydraulic characteristics of the core and to perform the core shielding design. Interface data for safety and performance analyses including fuel design data are produced for the relevant design analysis groups. Nuclear, thermal and hydraulic, shielding design and analysis code systems necessary for the core conceptual design are established through modification of the existing design tools and newly developed methodology and code modules. Core safety and performance can be improved by the technology development such as boron-free core optimization, advaned core monitoring and operational aid system. Feasiblity study on the improvement of the core protection and monitoring system will also contribute toward core safety and performance. Both the conceptual core design study and the related technology will provide concrete basis for the next design phase. This study will also

  1. The reactor core analysis code CITATION-1000VP for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor core analysis with full core model has been necessary for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) design. The CITATION-1000VP code has been developed to enable reactor core analysis of HTTR with full core model through extending the number of zones and meshes, and enhancing the calculation speed of CITATION code. This report describes the program changes for extending the number of zones and meshes, and for vectorization. The maximum number of zones and meshes becomes 999 and 500, respectively. The calculation speed is enhanced up to 21 times. (author)

  2. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-07-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  3. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic

  4. Simulation of a TRIGA Reactor Core Blockage Using RELAP5 Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia A. L. Reis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of core coolant flow blockage transient have been simulated and analysed for the TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor using the RELAP5-MOD3.3 code. The transients are related to partial and to total obstruction of the core coolant channels. The reactor behaviour after the loss of flow was analysed as well as the changes in the coolant and fuel temperatures. The behaviour of the thermal hydraulic parameters from the transient simulations was analysed. For a partial blockage, it was observed that the reactor reaches a new steady state operation with new values for the thermal hydraulic parameters. The total core blockage brings the reactor to an abnormal operation causing increase in core temperature.

  5. RRFM 2009 transactions: 13. international topical meeting on Research Reactor Fuel Management (RRFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Conference covers topics in the area of research reactor fuel handling, performance, properties, core conversion, accident analysis etc. Different types of fuels for research reactors and their behaviour are presented in details

  6. Thermohydraulics of emergency core cooling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, by a group of experts of the OECD-NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, reviews the current state-of-knowledge in the field of emergency core cooling (ECC) for design-basis, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and core uncover transients in pressurized- and boiling-water reactors. An overview of the LOCA scenarios and ECC phenomenology is provided for each type of reactor, together with a brief description of their ECC systems. Separate-effects and integral-test facilities, which contribute to understanding and assessing the phenomenology, are reviewed together with similarity and scaling compromises. All relevant LOCA phenomena are then brought together in the form of tables. Each phenomenon is weighted in terms of its importance to the course of a LOCA, and appraised for the adequacy of its data base and analytical modelling. This qualitative procedure focusses attention on the modelling requirements of dominant LOCA phenomena and the current capabilities of the two-fluid models in two-phase flows. This leads into the key issue with ECC: quantitative code assessment and the application of system codes to predict with a well defined uncertainty the behaviour of a nuclear power plant. This issue, the methodologies being developed for code assessment and the question of how good is good enough are discussed in detail. Some general conclusions and recommendations for future research activities are provided

  7. Proceedings of first SWCR-KURRI academic seminar on research reactors and related research topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These are the proceedings of an academic seminar on research reactors and related research topics held at the Southwest Centre for Reactor Engineering Research and Design in Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China in September 24-26 in 1985. Included are the chairmen's addresses and 10 papers presented at the seminar in English. The titles of these papers are: (1) Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, (2) General Review of Thorium Research in Japanese Universities, (3) Comprehensive Utilization and Economic Analysis of the High Flux Engineering Test Reactor, (4) Present States of Applied Health Physics in Japan, (5) Neutron Radiography with Kyoto University Reactor, (6) Topics of Experimental Works with Kyoto University Reactor, (7) Integral Check of Nuclear Data for Reactor Structural Materials, (8) The Reactor Core, Physical Experiments and the Operation Safety Regulation of the Zero Energy Thermal Reactor for PWR Nuclear Power Plant, (9) HFETR Core Physical Parameters at Power, (10) Physical Consideration for Loads of Operated Ten Cycles in HFETR. (author)

  8. In-reactor experiments in fast breeder test reactor for assessment of core structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, India is a sodium cooled reactor with neutron flux level of the order of 1015 n/cm2/s and temperature of coolant in the range of 650-790K (380-520oC). This reactor is being used as a test bed for the development of fuel and structural materials required for Indian Fast Reactor Programme. FBTR is also used as a test facility to carry out accelerated irradiation tests on thermal reactor structural materials. In-reactor experiments on core structural materials are being carried out by subjecting prefabricated specimens to desired conditions of temperature and neutron fluence levels in FBTR. Non-instrumented irradiation capsules that can be loaded at any location of FBTR core are used for the experiments. Pressurised capsules of zirconium alloys have been developed and subjected to irradiation in FBTR to determine the irradiation creep rate of indigenously developed zirconium alloys (Zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5%Nb alloy) for life assessment of pressure tubes of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Technology development of pressurised capsules was carried out at IGCAR. These pressurised capsules were filled with argon and a small fraction of helium at a high pressure (5.0-6.5 MPa at room temperature) in such a way that the target stresses were attained in the walls of the pressurised capsules at the desired temperature of irradiation in the reactor. FBTR was operated at a low power of 8 MWt during this irradiation campaign to have an inlet temperature of about 579 K (306oC) which was close to the temperature of pressure tubes at full power in PHWR. Irradiation of thirty pressurised capsules was carried out in FBTR using six irradiation capsules for different durations (upto 79 days). The fluence levels attained by the pressurised capsules were up to 1.1 x 1021 n/cm2 (E> 1 MeV) at temperatures of 579 to 592 K. Post-irradiation increase in diameter of the pressurised

  9. Refueling strategy at the Budapest research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refueling strategy is very important for nuclear power plants and for highly utilized research reactors with power level in the megawatt range. New core design shall fulfill several demands and needs which can contradict each other sometimes. The loaded uranium quantity should assure the scheduled operation time (energy generation) and the maneuvering capability even at the end of the campaign. On the other hand the built in excess reactivity cannot be too high, because otherwise it would jeopardize the shutdown margin and reactor safety. Moreover the core arrangement should be optimum for in-core irradiation purposes and for the beam port experiments too. Sometimes this demand can be in contradiction with the desired burnup level. The achieved burnup level is very important from the fresh fuel consumption point of view, which has direct economic significance, however the generated spent fuel quantity is an important issue too. The refueling technique presented here allowed us at the Budapest Research Reactor to reach average burnup levels superseding 60%. (author)

  10. Characteristics of fast reactor core designs and closed fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poplavsky, V.M.; Eliseev, V.A.; Matveev, V.I.; Khomyakov, Y.S.; Tsyboulya, A.M.; Tsykunov, A.G.; Chebeskov, A.N. [State Scientific Center of the Russian Federation, Institute for Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE), Obninsk, Kaluga Region (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    On the basis of the results of recent studies, preliminary basic requirements related to characteristics of fast reactor core and nuclear fuel cycle were elaborated. Decreasing reactivity margin due to approaching breeding ratio to 1, requirements to support non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and requirements to decrease amount of radioactive waste are under consideration. Several designs of the BN-800 reactor core have been studied. In the case of MOX fuel it is possible to reach a breeding ratio about 1 due to the use of larger size of fuel elements with higher fuel density. Keeping low axial fertile blanket that would be reprocessed altogether with the core, it is possible to set up closed fuel cycle with the use of own produced plutonium only. Conceptual core designs of advanced commercial reactor BN-1800 with MOX and nitride fuel are also under consideration. It has been shown that it is expedient to use single enrichment fuel core design in this reactor in order to reach sufficient flattening and stability of power rating in the core. The main feature of fast reactor fuel cycle is a possibility to utilize plutonium and minor actinides which are the main contributors to the long-living radiotoxicity in irradiated nuclear fuel. The results of comparative analytical studies on the risk of plutonium proliferation in case of open and closed fuel cycle of nuclear power are also presented in the paper. (authors)

  11. Transient analysis for PWR reactor core using neural networks predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, transient analysis for a Pressurized Water Reactor core has been performed. A lumped parameter approximation is preferred for that purpose, to describe the reactor core together with mechanism which play an important role in dynamic analysis. The dynamic behavior of the reactor core during transients is analyzed considering the transient initiating events, wich are an essential part of Safety Analysis Reports. several transients are simulated based on the employed core model. Simulation results are in accord the physical expectations. A neural network is developed to predict the future response of the reactor core, in advance. The neural network is trained using the simulation results of a number of representative transients. Structure of the neural network is optimized by proper selection of transfer functions for the neurons. Trained neural network is used to predict the future responses following an early observation of the changes in system variables. Estimated behaviour using the neural network is in good agreement with the simulation results for various for types of transients. Results of this study indicate that the designed neural network can be used as an estimator of the time dependent behavior of the reactor core under transient conditions

  12. Overview of core simulation methodologies for light water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current in-core fuel management calculation methods provide a very efficient route to predict neutronics behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cores and their prediction accuracy for current generation LWRs is generally sufficient. However, since neutronics calculations for LWRs are based on various assumptions and simplifications, we should also recognize many implicit limitations that are 'embedded' in current neutronics calculation methodologies. Continuous effort for improvement of core simulation methodologies is also discussed. (author)

  13. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B2O3) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  14. Annular pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001142.htm Annular pancreas To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An annular pancreas is a ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles ...

  15. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  16. Optimization of a Potential New Core of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II Vienna is one of the last TRIGA reactors utilizing a mixed core with High Enrich Uranium (HEU) fuel. Due to the US Fuel Return Program, the Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut (ATI) is obliged to return its HEU fuel by 2019. There is no final decision on any further utilization of the Vienna research reactor beyond that point. However, of all possible scenarios of the future, the conversion of the current core into Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel and the complete replacement of all existing 83 burned FE(s) by new fresh FE(s) are investigated herein. This paper presents detailed reactor design calculations for three different reactor cores. The core 1 employs 104-type, core 2 uses 108-type and core 3 is loaded with mixed TRIGA fuels (i.e. 104 and 108). The combination of the Monte Carlo based neutronics code MCNP5, Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and depletion code ORIGEN2 and diffusion theory based reactor physics program TRIGLAV is used for this study. On the basis of this neutronics study, the amount of fuel required for a possible future reactor operation and its cost minimization is presented in this paper. The criticality, core excess reactivity, length of initial life cycle and thermal flux density distribution is simulated for three different cores. Keeping the utilization of existing fourteen 104-type FE(s) (i.e. six burned and eight fresh FE(s)) in view, the core 3 is found the most economical, enduring and safe option for future of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna. (author)

  17. Research reactor education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CORYS T.E.S.S. and TECHNICATOME present in this document some of the questions that can be rightfully raised concerning education and training of nuclear facilities' staffs. At first, some answers illustrate the tackled generic topics: importance of training, building of a training program, usable tools for training purposes. Afterwards, this paper deals more specifically with research reactors as an actual training tool. The pedagogical advantages they can bring are illustrated through an example consisting in the description of the AZUR facility training capabilities followed by the detailed experiences CORYS T.E.S.S. and TECHNICATOME have both gathered and keeps on gaining using research reactors for training means. The experience shows that this incomparable training material is not necessarily reserved to huge companies or organisations' numerous personnel. It offers enough flexibility to be adapted to the specific needs of a thinner audience. Thus research reactor staffs can also take advantages of this training method. (author)

  18. The WWR-SM-20 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the design features and experimental capabilities of the WWR-SM-20 research reactor are described. The reactor uses fuel assemblies consisting of six coaxial fuel tubes with a square cross-section. IRT-3M fuel assemblies can be used with both 90% enriched and 36% enriched uranium. The main characteristics of the IRT-3M fuel assemblies are given, as are the technical and physical parameters of the WWR-SM-20 reactor. The core can hold up to ten ampoule-type channels with a diameter of up to 68 mm. For irradiation purposes, up to 22 26-mm-diameter channels in the fuel assemblies, and up to 48 42-mm-diameter channels in the beryllium blocks of the reflector can be used. In the graphite blanket between the horizontal channels, channels with a diameter of up to 130 mm can be used. The thermal neutron flux density has a maximum value of 1.5 X 1018 m-2 · s-1 in the core and 2.3 X 1018 m-2 · s-1 in the reflector, and the fast neutron flux density (cE > 0.821 MeV) a maximum of 1.9 X 1018 m-2 · s-1. A number of design features have been incorporated in the WWR-SM-20 reactor to make it effectively safe

  19. Thermal-hydraulic behavior of physical quantities at critical velocities in a nuclear research reactor core channel using plate type fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi Ali Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal-hydraulic study presented here relates to a channel of a nuclear reactor core. This channel is defined as being the space between two fuel plates where a coolant fluid flows. The flow velocity of this coolant should not generate vibrations in fuel plates. The aim of this study is to know the distribution of the temperature in the fuel plates, in the cladding and in the coolant fluid at the critical velocities of Miller, of Wambsganss, and of Cekirge and Ural. The velocity expressions given by these authors are function of the geometry of the fuel plate, the mechanical characteristics of the fuel plate’s material and the thermal characteristics of the coolant fluid. The thermal-hydraulic study is made under steady-state; the equation set-up of the thermal problem is made according to El Wakil and to Delhaye. Once the equation set-up is validated, the three critical velocities are calculated and then used in the calculations of the different temperature profiles. The average heat flux and the critical heat flux are evaluated for each critical velocity and their ratio reported. The recommended critical velocity to be used in nuclear channel calculations is that of Wambsganss. The mathematical model used is more precise and all the physical quantities, when using this critical velocity, stay in safe margins.

  20. Burn up calculations for the Iranian miniature reactor: A reliable and safe research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Radiation Protection, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: faghihif@shirazu.ac.ir; Mirvakili, S.M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Presenting neutronic calculations pertaining to the Iranian miniature research reactor is the main goal of this article. This is a key to maintaining safe and reliable core operation. The following reactor core neutronic parameters were calculated: clean cold core excess reactivity ({rho}{sub ex}), control rod and shim worth, shut down margin (SDM), neutron flux distribution of the reactor core components, and reactivity feedback coefficients. Calculations for the fuel burnup and radionuclide inventory of the Iranian miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR), after 13 years of operational time, are carried out. Moreover, the amount of uranium burnup and produced plutonium, the concentrations and activities of the most important fission products, the actinide radionuclides accumulated, and the total radioactivity of the core are estimated. Flux distribution for both water and fuel temperature increases are calculated and changes of the central control rod position are investigated as well. Standard neutronic simulation codes WIMS-D4 and CITATION are employed for these studies. The input model was validated by the experimental data according to the final safety analysis report (FSAR) of the reactor. The total activity of the MNSR core is calculated including all radionuclides at the end of the core life and it is found to be equal to 1.3 x 10{sup 3}Ci. Our investigation shows that the reactor is operating under safe and reliable conditions.

  1. Burn up calculations for the Iranian miniature reactor: A reliable and safe research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presenting neutronic calculations pertaining to the Iranian miniature research reactor is the main goal of this article. This is a key to maintaining safe and reliable core operation. The following reactor core neutronic parameters were calculated: clean cold core excess reactivity (ρex), control rod and shim worth, shut down margin (SDM), neutron flux distribution of the reactor core components, and reactivity feedback coefficients. Calculations for the fuel burnup and radionuclide inventory of the Iranian miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR), after 13 years of operational time, are carried out. Moreover, the amount of uranium burnup and produced plutonium, the concentrations and activities of the most important fission products, the actinide radionuclides accumulated, and the total radioactivity of the core are estimated. Flux distribution for both water and fuel temperature increases are calculated and changes of the central control rod position are investigated as well. Standard neutronic simulation codes WIMS-D4 and CITATION are employed for these studies. The input model was validated by the experimental data according to the final safety analysis report (FSAR) of the reactor. The total activity of the MNSR core is calculated including all radionuclides at the end of the core life and it is found to be equal to 1.3 x 103Ci. Our investigation shows that the reactor is operating under safe and reliable conditions.

  2. Research reactor modernization and refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many recent, high profile research reactor unplanned shutdowns can be directly linked to different challenges which have evolved over time. The concept of ageing management is certainly nothing new to nuclear facilities, however, these events are highlighting the direct impact unplanned shutdowns at research reactors have on various stakeholders who depend on research reactor goods and services. Provided the demand for these goods and services remains strong, large capital projects are anticipated to continue in order to sustain future operation of many research reactors. It is within this context that the IAEA organized a Technical Workshop to launch a broader Agency activity on research reactor modernization and refurbishment (M and R). The workshop was hosted by the operating organization of the HOR Research Reactor in Delft, the Netherlands, in October 2006. Forty participants from twenty-three countries participated in the meeting: with representation from Africa, Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe, North America, South America and Western Europe. The specific objectives of this workshop were to present facility reports on completed, existing and planned M and R projects, including the project objectives, scope and main characteristics; and to specifically report on: - the project impact (planned or actual) on the primary and key supporting motivation for the M and R project; - the project impact (planned or actual) on the design basis, safety, and/or regulatory-related reports; - the project impact (planned or actual) on facility utilization; - significant lessons learned during or following the completion of M and R work. Contributions from this workshop were reviewed by experts during a consultancy meeting held in Vienna in December 2007. The experts selected final contributions for inclusion in this report. Requests were also distributed to some authors for additional detail as well as new authors for known projects not submitted during the initial 2006 workshop

  3. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  4. Advanced eddy current technique for measurement of annular gap between pressure tube and calandria tube in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), the PT (pressure tube) is designed to be nominally concentric with the encircling CT (calandria tube). Due to various factors PT becomes eccentric with respect to CT over the life of reactor. If this becomes excessive, hot PT will come in contact with cold CT. Such a cold spot could act as potential location for initiating blister formation and premature failure of PT. Hence it is important to periodically measure annular gap between PT and CT. An advanced eddy current technique has been successfully developed and incorporated in BARCIS (BARC Channel Inspection System) for measurement of PT-CT gap. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  5. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz, E-mail: mohdfaizs@tnb.com.my; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: rafies@tnb.com.my [Nuclear Energy Department, Regulatory Economics & Planning Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (Malaysia); Mamat Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal, E-mail: m-rizal@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Prototypes & Plant Development Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia); Roslan, Ridha, E-mail: ridha@aelb.gov.my; Sadri, Abd Aziz [Nuclear Installation Divisions, Atomic Energy Licensing Board (Malaysia); Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd [Reactor Technology Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH{sub 1.6}, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D{sup ®} computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  6. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie; Mamat @ Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal; Roslan, Ridha; Sadri, Abd Aziz; Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd

    2016-01-01

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH1.6, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  7. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH1.6, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M

  8. Assessment of HCDA energetics in the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of hypothetical core disruptive event analyses for the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core are reported. The analytical results cover a large number of parametric cases including variations in design parameters and phenomenological assumptions. Reactor core configurations at the beginning of cycle one and end of cycle four are evaluated. The energetic consequences are evaluated based upon both fuel expansion thermodynamic work potential and a relative probability assignment. It is concluded that the structural loads, which result from 101 megajoules of available expansion work at sodium slug impact on the reactor closure head (equivalent to 661 megajoules of fuel expansion work to one atmosphere), is an adequate energetic consequence envelope for use in specifying the Structural Margins Beyond the Design Basis

  9. Assessment of HCDA energetics in the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhow, S K; Switick, D M; McElroy, J L; Joe, B W; Elawar, Z J

    1981-03-27

    The results of hypothetical core disruptive event analyses for the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core are reported. The analytical results cover a large number of parametric cases including variations in design parameters and phenomenological assumptions. Reactor core configurations at the beginning of cycle one and end of cycle four are evaluated. The energetic consequences are evaluated based upon both fuel expansion thermodynamic work potential and a relative probability assignment. It is concluded that the structural loads, which result from 101 megajoules of available expansion work at sodium slug impact on the reactor closure head (equivalent to 661 megajoules of fuel expansion work to one atmosphere), is an adequate energetic consequence envelope for use in specifying the Structural Margins Beyond the Design Basis.

  10. Studying the effects of dynamical parameters on reactor core temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase productivity, reduce depreciation, and avoid possible accidents in a system such as fuel rods' melting and overpressure, control of temperature changes in the reactor core is an important factor. There are several methods for solving and analysing the stability of point kinetics equations. In most previous analyses, the effects of various factors on the temperature of the reactor core have been ignored. In this work, the effects of various dynamical parameters on the temperature of the reactor core and stability of the system in the presence of temperature feedback reactivity with external reactivity step, ramp and sinusoidal for six groups of delayed neutrons were studied using the method of Lyapunov exponent. The results proved to be in good agreement with other works

  11. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  12. Investigation of the core melt accident in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the thesis the core melt accident, heating up and collapsing of the reactor core were investigated. The most important parameters of influence were found and their effect on the development of the accident were shown. A causal diagram was developed representing the great number of events occurring in the course of the core melt accident as well as their mutual dependences. Models were developed and applied for a detailed description of the collapse process, melting of materials, heat and material transport at flow-off of the melted mass and for taking into account steam blocking in the destroyed core sections. (orig.)

  13. Design and development of small and medium integral reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Chang, M. H.; Lee, C. C.; Song, J. S.; Cho, B. O.; Kim, K. Y.; Kim, S. J.; Park, S. Y.; Lee, K. B.; Lee, C. H.; Chun, T. H.; Oh, D. S.; In, W. K.; Kim, H. K.; Lee, C. B.; Kang, H. S.; Song, K. N.

    1997-07-01

    Recently, the role of small and medium size integral reactors is remarkable in the heat applications rather than the electrical generations. Such a range of possible applications requires extensive used of inherent safety features and passive safety systems. It also requires ultra-longer cycle operations for better plant economy. Innovative and evolutionary designs such as boron-free operations and related reactor control methods that are necessary for simple reactor system design are demanded for the small and medium reactor (SMR) design, which are harder for engineers to implement in the current large size nuclear power plants. The goals of this study are to establish preliminary design criteria, to perform the preliminary conceptual design and to develop core specific technology for the core design and analysis for System-integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor (SMART) of 330 MWt power. Based on the design criteria of the commercial PWR`s, preliminary design criteria will be set up. Preliminary core design concept is going to be developed for the ultra-longer cycle and boron-free operation and core analysis code system is constructed for SMART. (author). 100 refs., 40 tabs., 92 figs.

  14. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT NUCLEAR RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR SNM ATTRIBUTION AND NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternat, M.; Beals, D.; Webb, R.; Nichols, T.

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle

  15. Estimative of core damage frequency in IPEN IEA-R1 research reactor due to the initiating events of loss of flow caused by channel blockage and loss of coolant caused by a large rupture in the pipe of the primary circuit - PSA level 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Daniel Massami [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work applies the methodology of Probabilistic Safety Assessment Level 1 to the research reactor IEA-R1 IPEN-CNEN/SP. Two categories of identified initiating events of accidents in the reactor are studied: loss of flow and loss of primary coolant. Among the initiating events, blockage of flow channel and loss of cooling fluid caused by large pipe rupture in the primary circuit are chosen for a detailed analysis. The event tree technique is used to analyze the evolution of the accident, including the actuation or the fail of actuation of the safety systems and the reactor damages. Using the fault tree the reliability of the following reactor safety systems is evaluated: reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool, Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and the electric system. Estimative for the frequency of damage to the reactor core and the probability of failure of the analyzed systems are calculated. The estimated values for the frequencies of core damage are within the expected margins and are of the same order of magnitude as those found for similar reactors. The reliability of the reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool and ECCS are satisfactory for the conditions in which these systems are required. However, for the electric system it is suggested an upgrade to increase its reliability. (author)

  16. Uranium droplet nuclear reactor core with MHD generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim; Kumar, Ratan

    An innovative concept employing liquid uranium droplets as fuel in an ultrahigh-temperature vapor core reactor (UTVR) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generator power system for space power generation has been studied. Metallic vapor in superheated form acts as a working fluid for a closed-Rankine-type thermodynamic cycle. Usage of fuel and working fluid in this form assures certain advantages. The major technical issues emerging as a result involve a method for droplet generation, droplet transport in the reactor core, heat generation in the fuel and transport to the metallic vapor, and materials compatibility. A qualitative and quantitative attempt to resolve these issues has indicated the promise and tentative feasibility of the system.

  17. Vibration tests on some models of PEC reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the aims of the experimental tests carried out at ISMES, within an agreement with the Department of Fast Reactors of ENEA, on some models of the elements of PEC Fast Nuclear Reactor Core in the frame of the activities for the seismic verification of the PEC core. The seismic verification is briefly described with particular attention to the problems arising from the shocks among the various elements during an earthquake, as well as the computer code used, the purpose and the techniques used to perform tests, some results and the first comparison between the theory and the experimental data

  18. Core Physics and Kinetics Calculations for the Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, C.; Albright, D.

    2007-01-01

    Highly efficient, compact nuclear reactors would provide high specific impulse spacecraft propulsion. This analysis and numerical simulation effort has focused on the technical feasibility issues related to the nuclear design characteristics of a novel reactor design. The Fissioning Plasma Core Reactor (FPCR) is a shockwave-driven gaseous-core nuclear reactor, which uses Magneto Hydrodynamic effects to generate electric power to be used for propulsion. The nuclear design of the system depends on two major calculations: core physics calculations and kinetics calculations. Presently, core physics calculations have concentrated on the use of the MCNP4C code. However, initial results from other codes such as COMBINE/VENTURE and SCALE4a. are also shown. Several significant modifications were made to the ISR-developed QCALC1 kinetics analysis code. These modifications include testing the state of the core materials, an improvement to the calculation of the material properties of the core, the addition of an adiabatic core temperature model and improvement of the first order reactivity correction model. The accuracy of these modifications has been verified, and the accuracy of the point-core kinetics model used by the QCALC1 code has also been validated. Previously calculated kinetics results for the FPCR were described in the ISR report, "QCALC1: A code for FPCR Kinetics Model Feasibility Analysis" dated June 1, 2002.

  19. 78 FR 56174 - In-Core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... the Federal Register (FR) on May 23, 2012 (77 FR 30435). The petitioner requested that the NRC amend...; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Parts 50 and 52 In-Core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Petition for...

  20. 77 FR 30435 - In-core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... assigned Docket ID PRM-50-84 (73 FR 71564; November 25, 2008). In addition, the petition states that the... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 In-core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core... ``require all holders of operating licenses for nuclear power plants (``NPP'') to operate NPPs with...

  1. Influence of nuclear data covariance on reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of nuclear data uncertainties on reactor core calculations were investigated systematically using the sampling based uncertainty and sensitivity software XSUSA developed at GRS. Varied nuclear data are generated randomly corresponding to the uncertainty information from the covariance matrices. After performing a large number of calculations with these data, the results are statistically evaluated; this can be done not only for integral, but also for local output quantities like the assembly power distribution of a reactor core. The method is applied to multi-group Monte Carlo calculations stationary states of the PWR MOX/UO2 core transient benchmark, and to corresponding nodal diffusion calculations. Unexpectedly large uncertainties result for the radial power distribution. The uncertainties in the nodal results agree very well with those in the Monte Carlo reference results; thus, it is possible to apply the random sampling method to determine the influence of nuclear data uncertainties on transient core calculations. (author)

  2. Core management, operational limits and conditions and safety aspects of the Australian High Flux Reactor (HIFAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Town, S.L. [ANSTO, Nuclear Technology Div., Menai (Australia)

    1997-07-01

    HIFAR is a DIDO class reactor which commenced routine operation at approximately 10 MW in 1960. It is principally used for production of medical radio-isotopes, scientific research using neutron scattering facilities and irradiation of silicon ingots for the electronics industry. A detailed description of the core, including fuel types, is presented. Details are given of the current fuel management program HIFUEL and the experimental measurements associated with reactor physics analysis of HIFAR are discussed. (author)

  3. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  4. Heat Pipe Reactor Dynamic Response Tests: SAFE-100 Reactor Core Prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.

    2005-01-01

    The SAFE-I00a test article at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center was used to simulate a variety of potential reactor transients; the SAFEl00a is a resistively heated, stainless-steel heat-pipe (HP)-reactor core segment, coupled to a gas-flow heat exchanger (HX). For these transients the core power was controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. This type of non-nuclear test is expected to provide reasonable approximation of reactor transient behavior because reactivity feedback is very simple in a compact fast reactor (simple, negative, and relatively monotonic temperature feedback, caused mostly by thermal expansion) and calculations show there are no significant reactivity effects associated with fluid in the HP (the worth of the entire inventory of Na in the core is .kinetics model was based on core thermal expansion via deflection measurements. It was found that core deflection was a strung function of how the SAFE-100 modules were fabricated and assembled (in terms of straightness, gaps, and other tolerances). To remove the added variable of how this particular core expands as compared to a different concept, it was decided to use a temperature based feedback model (based on several thermocouples placed throughout the core).

  5. Research reactor's role in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a TRIGA MARK-II was constructed in 1962, new research activity of a general nature, utilizing neutrons, prevailed in Korea. Radioisotopes produced from the MARK-II played a good role in the 1960's in educating people as to what could be achieved by a neutron source. Because the research reactor had implanted neutron science in the country, another TRIGA MARK-III had to be constructed within 10 years after importing the first reactor, due to increased neutron demand from the nuclear community. With the sudden growth of nuclear power, however, the emphasis of research changed. For a while research activities were almost all oriented to nuclear power plant technology. However, the specifics of nuclear power plant technology created a need for a more highly capable research reactor like HANARO 30MWt. HANARO will perform well with irradiation testing and other nuclear programs in the future, including: production of key radioisotopes, doping of silicon by transmutation, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiments, cold neutron source. 3 tabs., 2 figs

  6. Reactor core calculations incorporating subassembly thermal hydraulics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynas, S.W. [Applied Modelling and Computation Group Imperial Coll. Centre for Environmental Technology Royal School of Mines Prince Consort Road London (United Kingdom); Jones, J.R.

    1997-12-31

    Three dimensional reactor physics calculations performed in parallel with subassembly thermal hydraulic analysis can be used to examine local reactivity effects and increase modelling accuracy. Coupling together codes for coarse mesh neutronics and subassembly thermal hydraulics aids fault studies (fuel clad integrity, safety margin indication etc) and the examination of the interaction between physics and thermal hydraulics during transient events such as LOCA, boron dilution and control rod ejection. Local heating of the coolant decreases reactivity and the fission power peaking factor. Doppler feedback is stronger in the hot region of the fuel, also reducing peak power and reactivity. These thermal hydraulic feedback effects can play an important role in decelerating power excursions and their representation is described in this paper. (author)

  7. Reactor core calculations incorporating subassembly thermal hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three dimensional reactor physics calculations performed in parallel with subassembly thermal hydraulic analysis can be used to examine local reactivity effects and increase modelling accuracy. Coupling together codes for coarse mesh neutronics and subassembly thermal hydraulics aids fault studies (fuel clad integrity, safety margin indication etc) and the examination of the interaction between physics and thermal hydraulics during transient events such as LOCA, boron dilution and control rod ejection. Local heating of the coolant decreases reactivity and the fission power peaking factor. Doppler feedback is stronger in the hot region of the fuel, also reducing peak power and reactivity. These thermal hydraulic feedback effects can play an important role in decelerating power excursions and their representation is described in this paper. (author)

  8. USGS Core Research Center (CRC) Collection of Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Core Research Center (CRC) was established in 1974 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to preserve valuable rock cores for use by scientists and educators from...

  9. Methodology for reactor core physics analysis - part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The computer codes used for reactor core physics analysis are described. The modifications introduced in the public codes and the technical basis for the codes developed by the FURNAS utility are justified. An evaluation of the impact of these modifications on the parameter involved in qualifying the methodology is included. (F.E.). 5 ref, 7 figs, 5 tabs

  10. International topical meeting. Research Reactor Fuel Management (RRFM) and meeting of the International Group on Reactor Research (IGORR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research and test reactors have been in operation for over 60 years, over 270 research reactors are currently operating in more than 50 countries. This meeting is dedicated to different aspects of research reactor fuels: new fuels for new reactors, the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels, spent fuel management and computational tools for core simulation. About 80 contributions are reported in this document, they are organized into 7 sessions: 1) international topics and overview on new projects and fuel, 2) new projects and upgrades, 3) fuel development, 4) optimisation and research reactor utilisation, 5) innovative methods in research reactors physics, 6) safety, operation and research reactor conversion, 7) fuel back-end management, and a poster session. Experience from Australian, Romanian, Libyan, Syrian, Vietnamese, South-African and Ghana research reactors are reported among other things. The Russian program for research reactor spent fuel management is described and the status of the American-driven program for the conversion to low enriched uranium fuels is presented. (A.C.)

  11. Shielding design for research and education reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of education and research at the University, 20-KW powered SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor has been chosen as a prototype reactor. In order to study the safety characteristics of the reactor, exposure rate has been estimated at the pool boundary. Reactor core as a radiation source is assumed to be cylindrical volume source. Thus point kernel integration method can be applied to determine the exposure rate. For the sake of simplicity, calculation was done only for the prompt fission gamma rays and fission product gamma rays. As a result, the maximum exposure rate at the pool boundary was estimated to be 18R/min at the same height of the center of the core. In order to examine the accuracy for the point kernel integration method, two shielding experiments were carried out: one for the water tank only and the other for with concrete blocks outside the water tank. Water tank was made of wood pieces which is 13.4cm wide, 1.5cm thick and 2.15m long. Thus the water tank has the total dimension of 1 m radius and 2.1 m height. The experiment was carried out for the radiation source of 0.968 mCi Co-60 at the center of the water tank and the penetrated gamma rays were measured at 5 different detector positions. For the measurement and analysis of the responses, NaI(T1) 3''x3'' detector and 256 channel multichannel analyzer was utilized. To convert pulse height distribution to the exposure rate, Moriuchi conversion factor was adopted. Data from the calculations by point kernel method were well agreed within 10% band with the data from the the experiments. (Author)

  12. Safe operation and maintenance of research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsorn, S. [Reactor Operation Division, Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Chatuchak, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1999-10-01

    The first Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1) was established in 1961 at the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), Bangkok. The reactor was light water moderated and cooled, using HEU plate-type with U{sub 3}O{sub 8}- Al fuel meat and swimming pool type. The reactor went first critical on October 27, 1962 and had been licensed to operate at 1 MW (thermal). On June 30, 1975 the reactor was shutdown for modification and the core and control system was disassemble and replaced by that of TRIGA Mark III type while the pool cooling system, irradiation facilities and other were kept. Thus the name TRR-1/M1' has been designed due to this modification the fuel has been changed from HEU plate type to Uranium Zirconium Hydride (UZrH) Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) which include 4 Fuel Follower Control Rods and 1 Air Follower Control Rod. The TRR-1/M1 went critical on November 7, 1977 and the purpose of the operation are training, isotope production and research. Nowadays the TRR-1/M1 has been operated with core loading No.12 which released power of 1,056 MWD. (as of October 1998). The TRR-1/M1 has been operated at the power of 1.2 MW, three days a week with 34 hours per week, Shut-down on Monday for weekly maintenance and Tuesday for special experiment. The everage energy released is about 40.8 MW-hour per week. Every year, the TRR-1/M1 is shut-down about 2 months between February to March for yearly maintenance. (author)

  13. Simulation of a TRIGA Reactor Core Blockage Using RELAP5 Code

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Cases of core coolant flow blockage transient have been simulated and analysed for the TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor using the RELAP5-MOD3.3 code. The transients are related to partial and to total obstruction of the core coolant channels. The reactor behaviour after the loss of flow was analysed as well as the changes in the coolant and fuel temperatures. The behaviour of the thermal hydraulic parameters from the transient simulations was analysed. For a partial blockage, it was observed tha...

  14. Study on secondary shutdown systems in Tehran research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jalali, H.R.; Fadaei, A.H., E-mail: Fadaei_amir@aut.ac.ir; Gharib, M.

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A study was undertaken to summarize the techniques for secondary shutdown systems (SSS). • Neutronic calculation performed for proposed systems as SSS. • Dumping the heavy water stored in the reflector vessel is capable to shut down reactor. • Neutronic and transient calculation was done for validating the selected SSS. • All calculation shown that this system has advantages in safety and neutron economy. - Abstract: One important safety aspect of any research reactor is the ability to shut down the reactor. Usually, research reactors, currently in operation, have a single shutdown system based on the simultaneous insertion of the all control rods into the reactor core through gravity. Nevertheless, the International Atomic Energy Agency currently recommends use of two shutdown systems which are fully independent from each other to guarantee secure shutdown when one of them fails. This work presents an investigative study into secondary shutdown systems, which will be an important safety component in the research reactor and will provide another alternative way to shut down the reactor emergently. As part of this project, a study was undertaken to summarize the techniques that are currently used at world-wide research reactors for recognizing available techniques to consider in research reactors. Removal of the reflector, removal of the fuels, change in critical shape of reactor core and insertion of neutron absorber between the core and reflector are selected as possible techniques in mentioned function. In the next step, a comparison is performed for these methods from neutronic aspects. Then, chosen method is studied from the transient behavior point of view. Tehran research reactor which is a 5 MW open-pool reactor selected as a case study and all calculations are carried out for it. It has 5 control rods which serve the purpose of both reactivity control and shutdown of reactor under abnormal condition. Results indicated that heavy

  15. Preliminary Core Analysis of a Micro Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Chang Keun; Chang, Jongwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Venneri, Francesco [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos (United States); Hawari, Ayman [NC State Univ., Raleigh (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) will be 'melt-down proof'(MDP) under all circumstances, including the complete loss of coolant, and will be easily transportable and retrievable, and suitable for use with very little site preparation and Balance of Plant (BOP) requirements for a variety of applications, from power generation and process heat applications in remote areas to grid-unattached locations, including ship propulsion. The Micro Modular Reactor design proposed in this paper has 3 meter diameter core (2 meter active core) which is suitable for 'factory manufactured' and has few tens year of service life for remote deployment. We confirmed the feasibility of long term service life by a preliminary neutronic analysis in terms of the excess reactivity, the temperature feedback coefficient, and the control margins. We are able to achieve a reasonably long core life time of 5 ∼ 10 years under typical thermal hydraulic condition of a helium cooled reactor. However, on a situation where longer service period and safety is important, we can reduce the power density to the level of typical pebble bed reactor. In this case we can design 10 MWt MMR with core diameter for 10 ∼ 40 years core life time without much loss in the economics. Several burnable poisons are studied and it is found that erbia mixed in the compact matrix seems reasonably good poison. The temperature feedback coefficients were remaining negative during lifetime. Drum type control rods at reflector region and few control rods inside core region are sufficient to control the reactivity during operation and to achieve safe cold shutdown state.

  16. Fuel cycle for research reactors in the European Union

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H. [NUKEM Nuklear GmbH, Industriestrasse 13, D-63755 Alzenau, (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    In the European Union (EU) there are altogether 77 research reactors in operation, a large number of them being used for teaching and university research proposes as well as for fundamental research. The trend for the remaining and planned reactors is to enlarge their capacity by compact cores in order to increase neutron yields and power. Also the use of research reactors for the production of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment and therapeutic purposes has become more and more common. In addition to the 77 research reactors in operation (in the EU) there are a number of 72 reactors that have been shut down. To serve the needs of the research reactors in the European Union a vital and self-confident industry has been developed which also exports nuclear technology and fuel for peaceful purposes. The problems today in the fuel cycle lie in the disposal of spent research reactor fuel and the procurement of fresh fuel with U-235 assays above 20%. This paper provides a summary of specific activities by European companies in the individual steps of the fuel cycle for research reactors. (author)

  17. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the si

  18. Analysis of higher power research reactors' parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this monograph was to analyze and compare parameters of different types of research reactors having higher power. This analysis could be used for decision making and choice of a reactor which could possibly replace the existing ageing RA reactor in Vinca. Present experimental and irradiation needs are taken into account together with the existing reactors operated in our country, RB and TRIGA reactor

  19. Operating experiences of the research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research reactors are devices of wide importance, being used for different scientific research tasks, for testing and improving reactor systems and components, for the production of radioisotopes, for the purposes of defence, for staff training and for other purposes. There are three research reactors in Yugoslavia: RA, RB and TRIGA. Reactors RA and RB at the 'Boris Kidric' Institute of Nuclear Sciences are of heavy water type power being 6500 and 10 kW, and maximum thermal neutron flux of 1014 and 1011(n/cm2s), respectively. TRIGA reactor at the 'Jozef Stefan' Institute in Ljubljana is of 250 kW power and maximum thermal neutron flux of 1013(n/cm2s). Reactors RA and RB use soviet fuel in the form of uranium dioxide (80% enriched) and metallic uranium (2%). Besides, RB reactor operates with natural uranium too. TRIGA reactor uses american uranium fuel 70% and 20% enriched, uranium being mixed homogeneously with moderator (ZrH). Experiences in handling and controlling the fuel before irradiation in the reactor, in reactor and after it are numerous and valuable, involving either the commercial arrangements with foreign producers, or optimal burn up in reactor or fuel treatment after the reactor irradiation. Twenty years of operating experience of these reactors have great importance especially having in mind the number of trained staff. Maintenance of reactors systems and fluids in continuous operation is valuable experience from the point of view of water reactor utilization. The case of the RA reactor primary cycle cobalt decontamination and other events connected with nuclear and radiation security for all three reactors are also specially emphasized. Owing to our research reactors, numerous theoretical, numerical and experimental methods are developed for nuclear and other analyses and design of research and power reactors,as well as methods for control and protection of radiation. (author)

  20. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998-2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-12-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2014 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  1. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. E. Wierman

    2013-10-01

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2012 for selected components were obtained from the Equipment Performance and Information Exchange (EPIX). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10 year period while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant increasing trend was identified in the HPCI results. Statistically significant decreasing trends were identified for RCIC start-only and 8-hour trends.

  2. System Study: Reactor Core Isolation Cooling 1998–2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, John Alton [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Risk Assessment and Management Services Dept.

    2015-01-31

    This report presents an unreliability evaluation of the reactor core isolation cooling (RCIC) system at 31 U.S. commercial boiling water reactors. Demand, run hours, and failure data from fiscal year 1998 through 2013 for selected components were obtained from the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) Consolidated Events Database (ICES). The unreliability results are trended for the most recent 10-year period, while yearly estimates for system unreliability are provided for the entire active period. No statistically significant trends were identified in the RCIC results.

  3. Safety of research reactors (Design and Operation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this thesis is to conduct a comprehensive up-to-date literature review on the current status of safety of research reactor both in design and operation providing the future trends in safety of research reactors. Data and technical information of variety selected historical research reactors were thoroughly reviewed and evaluated, furthermore illustrations of the material of fuel, control rods, shielding, moderators and coolants used were discussed. Insight study of some historical research reactors was carried with considering sample cases such as Chicago Pile-1, F-1 reactor, Chalk River Laboratories,. The National Research Experimental Reactor and others. The current status of research reactors and their geographical distribution, reactor category and utilization is also covered. Examples of some recent advanced reactors were studied like safety barriers of HANARO of Korea including safety doors of the hall and building entrance and finger print identification which prevent the reactor from sabotage. On the basis of the results of this research, it is apparent that a high quality of safety of nuclear reactors can be attained by achieving enough robust construction, designing components of high levels of efficiency, replacing the compounds of the reactor in order to avoid corrosion and degradation with age, coupled with experienced scientists and technical staffs to operate nuclear research facilities.(Author)

  4. A research on the mechanisms of transition from annular flow in two-phase pipeline flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various kinds mechanisms of transitions from two-phase annular flow in tubes were studied and modelled, and the affection factors on the transitions were also discussed. Some mathematical equations and transition criteria for every mechanisms presented were derived, and an unified general criterion for the annular flow transitions in whole range of pipe inclinations was recommended. The boundaries predicted show good agreement with the air-water two-phase experimental data

  5. Gas core reactor power plants designed for low proliferation potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowry, L.L. (comp.)

    1977-09-01

    The feasibility of gas core nuclear power plants to provide adequate power while maintaining a low inventory and low divertability of fissile material is studied. Four concepts were examined. Two used a mixture of UF/sub 6/ and helium in the reactor cavities, and two used a uranium-argon plasma, held away from the walls by vortex buffer confinement. Power levels varied from 200 to 2500 MWth. Power plant subsystems were sized to determine their fissile material inventories. All reactors ran, with a breeding ratio of unity, on /sup 233/U born from thorium. Fission product removal was continuous. Newly born /sup 233/U was removed continuously from the breeding blanket and returned to the reactor cavities. The 2500-MWth power plant contained a total of 191 kg of /sup 233/U. Less than 4 kg could be diverted before the reactor shut down. The plasma reactor power plants had smaller inventories. In general, inventories were about a factor of 10 less than those in current U.S. power reactors.

  6. TRIGLAV - a computer programme for research reactor calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persic, A.; Ravnik, M.; Slavic, S.; Zagar, T. (J.Stefan Institute, Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1999-12-15

    TRIGLAV is a new computer programme for burn-up calculation of mixed core of research reactors. The code is based on diffusion model in two dimensions and iterative procedure is applied for its solution. The material data used in the model are calculated with the transport programme WIMS. In regard to fission density distribution and energy produced by the reactor the burn-up increment of fuel elements is determined. (orig.)

  7. Numerical investigation on the enhancement capability of annular chimney towards natural convective heat transfer in the interior zone of scaled down FBR core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: A numerical study has been carried out to determine the influence of annular cylindrical chimney on buoyancy-induced flow in the dished end cavity of scaled down Fast Breeder Reactor. Results are presented for (i) cylindrical chimney configuration and (ii) annular chimney configuration occupying the center of the circular plate. Two dimensional laminar simulations are obtained by solving the fully elliptical governing equations of flow and energy. The fluid is Newtonian and incompressible and satisfies the Boussinesq approximation. Results for the upward facing isothermal circular plate with chimney configurations in confined enclosure are analyzed. The velocity fields and isotherms are studied extensively to assess the impact of both geometries on the flow structure, dynamics and overall heat transfer characteristics in the cavity, towards enhancement of natural convective heat transfer. The predicted results for the cylindrical chimney are compared with known experimental results. The results are of interest to post accident heat removal in fast breeder reactors (FBR). (authors)

  8. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this technical paper is to provide status of the United State domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure (RRI) Program at the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper states the purpose of the program, lists the universities operating TRIGA reactors that are supported by the program, identifies anticipated fresh fuel needs for the reactor facilities, discusses spent fuel activities associated with the program, and addresses successes and planned activities for the program. (author)

  9. 78 FR 64027 - Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... COMMISSION Preoperational Testing of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors AGENCY... Core Cooling Systems for Pressurized-Water Reactors.'' This RG is being revised to incorporate guidance... emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) of pressurized water reactors (PWRs). This RG also describes...

  10. 77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear...-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling- Water Reactors.'' This... testing features of emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs)....

  11. Related activities on management of ageing of Dalat Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham Van Lam [Reactor Dept., Nuclear Research Institute, Dalat (Viet Nam)

    1998-10-01

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed in 1982 from the previous 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The reactor core, the control and instrumentation system, the primary and secondary cooling systems as well as other associated systems were newly designed and installed. The renovated reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained its nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. Since then DNRR has been operated safely. Retained structures of the former reactor such as the reactor aluminum tank, the graphite reflector, the thermal column, the horizontal beam tubes and the radiation concrete shielding are 35 years old. During the recent years, in-service inspection has been carried out, the reactor control and instrumentation system were renovated due to ageing and obsolescence of its components, reactor general inspection and refurbishment were performed. Efforts are being made to cope with ageing of old reactor components to maintain safe operation of the DNRR. (author)

  12. Overview on New Research Reactors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In China, 2 research reactors are now under construction. Correspondingly, this paper consists of 2 parts. Part 1 will focus on China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), the reactor characteristics, utilization, safety related systems and other main systems will be described in this part. Part 2 will focus on China Experiment Fast Reactor(CEFR), the general design and the safety features in particular will be illustrated in this part. (author)

  13. The behavior of reactor power and flux resulting from changes in core-coolant temperature for a miniature neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, measurements were performed to verify the theoretical predictions of reactor power and flux parameters that result from changes in core inlet temperature (Tin) and the temperature difference between the coolant inlet and outlet (ΔT) in the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1), which is a Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). The measured data shows that there is a strong dependence of the reactor power on coolant temperature in agreement with the design of MNSR. The experimental parameters were found to be in good agreement with data obtained using a semi-empirical relationship between the reactor power, flux parameters, core inlet temperature, and the coolant temperature rise. The relationship was therefore used to predict the power level of NIRR-1 from its neutron flux parameters to which it has been found to be proportional. The variation of Tin and ΔT with the reactor power and flux was also investigated and the results obtained are hereby discussed

  14. Reactor Core Internals Replacement of Ikata Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikata Units 1 and 2 have been in operation for a very long time. Unit 1, in particular, is one of the longest operating PWRs in Japan. In view of this history, preventive and proactive strategy has been adopted for the maintenance of major primary system components. Both units successfully completed the replacement of steam generators and reactor vessel heads approximately ten years ago. With regard to the reactor core internals, baffle former bolts (BFBs) were found to have been damaged by stress corrosion cracking (SCC) in 1989 at Bugey 2 in France. Since then, similar incidents have been reported in other European and U.S. plants, resulting in the replacement of failed BFBs. The BFB issue can be dealt with either by replacing bolts when damage is found or by replacing the entire core internals with those of a new design. Ikata Units 1 and 2 chose the latter and carried it out in 2004 and 2005, respectively.

  15. Defuelling of the UTR-300 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.D.; Banford, H.M.; East, B.W. [Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    The UTR-300 reactor at the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre was based on the original Argonaut design with two aluminium core tanks set in a graphite reflector each containing six fuel elements cooled and moderated by water flowing up through the tanks in a closed primary circuit. The fuel plates in the original 13-plate elements were uranium oxide-aluminium with a 22g loading of 90% {sup 235}U. After 7 years of operation at 100 kW (10 kW average), the maximum power was increased to 300 kW (30 kW average) and, in order to maintain the operational excess reactivity, it was necessary to add another plate to each element progressively over the years until they all contained 14 plates. These extra plates were uranium metal-aluminium with 24.5 g of 90% {sup 235}U. No further modification of the elements was possible and so, with reactivity steadily decreasing, and for a variety of other reasons, a decision was taken to cease operation in September 1995. This paper describes the procedures whereby the fuel was unloaded from the core into a UNIFETCH flask equipped with a specially designed rotating gamma ray shield and then transported on two separate loads to Dounreay for reprocessing. (author)

  16. Defuelling of the UTR-300 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.D.; Banford, H.M.; East, B.W. [Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom)

    1997-07-01

    The UTR-300 reactor at the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre was based on the original Argonaut design with two aluminium core tanks set in a graphite reflector each containing six fuel elements cooled and moderated by water flowing up through the tanks in a closed primary circuit. The fuel plates in the original 13-plate elements were uranium oxide-aluminium with a 22g loading of 90% {sup 235}U. After 7 years of operation at 100 kW (10 kW average), the maximum power was increased to 300 kW (30 kW average) and, in order to maintain the operational excess reactivity, it was necessary to add another plate to each element progressively over the years until they all contained 14 plates. These extra plates were uranium metal-aluminium with 24.5 g of 90% {sup 235}U. No further modification of the elements was possible and so, with reactivity steadily decreasing, and for a variety of other reasons, a decision was taken to cease operation in September 1995. This paper describes the procedures whereby the fuel was unloaded from the core into a UNIFETCH flask equipped with a specially designed rotating gamma ray shield and then transported on two separate loads to Dounreay for reprocessing. (author) 2 figs., 2 tabs., refs.

  17. Small ex-core heat pipe thermionic reactor concept (SEHPTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has developed an innovative space nuclear power concept with unique features and significant advantages for both Defense and Civilian space missions. The Small Ex-core Heat Pipe Thermionic Reactor (SEHPTR) concept was developed in response to Air Force needs for space nuclear power in the range of 10 to 40 kilowatts. This paper describes the SEHPTR concept and discusses the key technical issues and advantages of such a system

  18. Shock absorber in combination with a nuclear reactor core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention relates to the provision of shock absorbers for use in blind control rod passages of a nuclear reactor core structure which are not subject to degradation. The shock absorber elements are made of a porous brittle carbonaceous material, a porous brittle ceramic material, or a porous brittle refractory oxide and have a void volume of between 30% and 70% of the total volume of the element for energy absorption by fracturing due to impact loading by a control rod. (UK)

  19. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume VII. Reactor cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Cooling System (RCS) will provide the required cooling during test operations of the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The RCS transfers the reactor energy generated in the core to a closed-loop water storage system located completely inside the reactor containment building. After the reactor core has cooled to a safe level, the stored heat is rejected through intermediate heat exchangers to a common forced-draft evaporative cooling tower. The RCS is comprised of three independent cooling loops of which any two can remove sufficient heat from the core to prevent structural damage to the system components

  20. Safe Operation of Research Reactors in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany, experience was gained in the field of safe operation of research reactors during the last five decades. In this time, in total 46 research reactors were built and operated safely. Concerning the design, there is, or has been, a very broad range of different types of research reactors. The variety of facilities includes large pool or tank reactors with a thermal power of several tens of megawatt as well as small educational reactors with a negligible thermal power and critical assemblies. At present, 8 research reactors are still in operation. The other facilities are permanently shutdown, in decommissioning or have already been dismantled completely and released from regulatory control. In this paper, four selected facilities still being operated are presented as examples for safe operation of research reactors in Germany, including especially a description of the safety reviews and safety upgrades for the older facilities. (author)

  1. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation. [uranium hexafluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.; Wan, P. T.; Chow, S.

    1979-01-01

    The preliminary design of a uranium hexafluoride actinide transmutation reactor to convert long-lived actinide wastes to shorter-lived fission product wastes was analyzed. It is shown that externally moderated gas core reactors are ideal radiators. They provide an abundant supply of thermal neutrons and are insensitive to composition changes in the blanket. For the present reactor, an initial load of 6 metric tons of actinides is loaded. This is equivalent to the quantity produced by 300 LWR-years of operation. At the beginning, the core produces 2000 MWt while the blanket generates only 239 MWt. After four years of irradiation, the actinide mass is reduced to 3.9 metric tonnes. During this time, the blanket is becoming more fissile and its power rapidly approaches 1600 MWt. At the end of four years, continuous refueling of actinides is carried out and the actinide mass is held constant. Equilibrium is essentially achieved at the end of eight years. At equilibrium, the core is producing 1400 MWt and the blanket 1600 MWt. At this power level, the actinide destruction rate is equal to the production rate from 32 LWRs.

  2. Practices for Neutronic Design of Research Reactors: Safety and Performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In brief, the design aims to have a facility which is quickly operational and profitable, safe and able to evolve over 40 or 60 years, taking into account both the evolution of the requirements for experiments or production yet to be realized and the safety practices. This paper presents the AREVA current design and safety practices (both cannot be realized without the other) for the neutronic design of the research reactor (RR) cores. It completes the paper and presents the general methodology of neutronic design studies for the safety and performance aspects and only slightly focuses on the reactivity shutdown systems and the neutronic calculation schemes. The main points are illustrated with examples of the Jules Horowitz Reactor (core designer point of view). On this basis of our general methodology, certain problems are separated in order to permit rapid reiteration at an individual level before the final synthesis. For example: to carry out generic studies of fuel management strategies and core reactivity control in order to manage the power peak (need core depletion calculation) and to be able to reason step 0 for certain optimizations of the core geometry and characteristics. For the neutronic calculation scheme, our current practice is to combine the use of the deterministic and stochastic codes. The strong points of each type of code are used to reinforce the safety and the performance of our cores. In this field, AREVA has a R and D framework involving and coordinating the participants from the various sectors (power reactors, research reactor etc) in the development of the general calculation methods and associated tools, in particular for Monte Carlo core depletion calculations. The CEA (along with APOLLO, CRONOS and TRIPOLI codes) largely supports us in this field. Comparisons between MCNP and TRIPOLI and between the various libraries (ENDF, JEF, etc.) are also performed. That includes the recalculation of existing reactors (OSIRIS, ORPHEE, AZUR

  3. Application of research reactors for radiation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research Reactors are, as well as being necessary for research purposes, indispensable educational tools for a country whose electric power resources are strongly dependent on nuclear energy. Both large and small research reactors are available, but small ones are highly useful from the viewpoint of radiation education. This paper oders a brief review of how small research reactors can, and must, be used for radiation education for high school students, college and graduate students, as well as for the public. (author)

  4. Strategic planning for research reactors. Guidance for reactor managers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this publication is to provide guidance on how to develop a strategic plan for a research reactor. The IAEA is convinced of the need for research reactors to have strategic plans and is issuing a series of publications to help owners and operators in this regard. One of these covers the applications of research reactors. That report brings together all of the current uses of research reactors and enables a reactor owner or operator to evaluate which applications might be possible with a particular facility. An analysis of research reactor capabilities is an early phase in the strategic planning process. The current document provides the rationale for a strategic plan, outlines the methodology of developing such a plan and then gives a model that may be followed. While there are many purposes for research reactor strategic plans, this report emphasizes the use of strategic planning in order to increase utilization. A number of examples are given in order to clearly illustrate this function

  5. Determination of oxygen to uranium plus plutonium atom ratio in high density annular mixed oxide fuel pellets for fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper highlights the encountered difficulties and applied modifications in the analytical steps for the determination of [O/(U+Pu)] in high density annular (NatU0.335233U0.37 Pu0.295)O2 pellets, manufactured for irradiation in FBTR and discusses the results. (author)

  6. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipaun, Susan, E-mail: susan@nm.gov.my [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Industrial Technology Division, Blok 29T, Bangi 43200, Selangor (Malaysia); Usman, Shoaib, E-mail: usmans@mst.edu [Missouri University of Science and Technology, Nuclear Engineering, 222 Fulton Hall 301 W.14th St., Rolla 64509 MO (United States)

    2016-01-22

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system’s performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm{sup −3}. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR’s nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s{sup −1} from the 4” pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  7. Convective cooling in a pool-type research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipaun, Susan; Usman, Shoaib

    2016-01-01

    A reactor produces heat arising from fission reactions in the nuclear core. In the Missouri University of Science and Technology research reactor (MSTR), this heat is removed by natural convection where the coolant/moderator is demineralised water. Heat energy is transferred from the core into the coolant, and the heated water eventually evaporates from the open pool surface. A secondary cooling system was installed to actively remove excess heat arising from prolonged reactor operations. The nuclear core consists of uranium silicide aluminium dispersion fuel (U3Si2Al) in the form of rectangular plates. Gaps between the plates allow coolant to pass through and carry away heat. A study was carried out to map out heat flow as well as to predict the system's performance via STAR-CCM+ simulation. The core was approximated as porous media with porosity of 0.7027. The reactor is rated 200kW and total heat density is approximately 1.07+E7 Wm-3. An MSTR model consisting of 20% of MSTR's nuclear core in a third of the reactor pool was developed. At 35% pump capacity, the simulation results for the MSTR model showed that water is drawn out of the pool at a rate 1.28 kg s-1 from the 4" pipe, and predicted pool surface temperature not exceeding 30°C.

  8. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Central Cavity Free-Field Environment with the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-FF-CC-32-cl).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Richard Manuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naranjo, Gerald E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lippert, Lance L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffin, Patrick J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This document presents the facilit y - recommended characteri zation o f the neutron, prompt gamma - ray, and delayed gamma - ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor ( ACRR ) for the cen tral cavity free - field environment with the 32 - inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environmen t is ACRR - FF - CC - 32 - cl. The neutron, prompt gamma - ray , and delayed gamma - ray energy spectra , uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma - ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the cavity . Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples . Acknowledgements The authors wish to th ank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work . Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  9. Design of a decay tank for a pool type research reactor with a CFD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conceptual primary cooling system (PCS) was designed for adequate cooling of the core of a research reactor. The primary coolant after passing through the reactor core contains many kinds of radio-nuclides. A decay tank provides a delayed transit time to ensure that the N-16 activity decreases enough before the coolant leaves the decay tank's shielding room. The size of the decay tank should be enlarged to provide sufficient transit time. However, there was a limitation: to minimize the tank size, it should be designed with an internal baffle, which affects the pressure loss in the system and net positive suction head (NPSH) of the PCS pump. Therefore, the decay tank should be optimized for size and the internal baffle. A vertical type decay tank was chosen to optimize the geometrical arrangement of PCS and the vertical internal baffle was installed to minimize the number of internal structures. The preliminary geometry of the tank and the internal baffle were determined to satisfy the required delayed transit time by calculating the maximum velocity and the flow path length of the circular and the annular sections of the tank. The commercially available CFD model, FLUENT, which solves the Navier-Stokes and turbulent models, was used to specifically design the decay tank with the preliminarily calculated geometry and the related flow rate. Several turbulence models, standard k-ε model, renormalization group (RNG) model, and realizable k-ε model, were conducted to isolate the root cause of these differences. By comparing the results of the velocity profile and the characteristics of each model, a detailed design study was simulated using the realizable k-ε model. A user-defined scalar equation was solved to estimate the delayed transit time. The size and the internal baffle that satisfy the required transit time were determined based on the CFD results. (author)

  10. Research of natural resources saving by design studies of Pressurized Light Water Reactors and High Conversion PWR cores with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the framework of innovative neutronic conception of Pressurized Light Water Reactors (PWR) of 3. generation, saving of natural resources is of paramount importance for sustainable nuclear energy production. This study consists in the one hand to design high Conversion Reactors exploiting mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and in the other hand, to elaborate multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233U, in order to maximize natural resources economy. This study has two main objectives: first the design of High Conversion PWR (HCPWR) with mixed oxide fuels composed of thorium/uranium/plutonium, and secondly the setting up of multi-recycling strategies of both plutonium and 233U, to better natural resources economy. The approach took place in four stages. Two ways of introducing thorium into PWR have been identified: the first is with low moderator to fuel volume ratios (MR) and ThPuO2 fuel, and the second is with standard or high MR and ThUO2 fuel. The first way led to the design of under-moderated HCPWR following the criteria of high 233U production and low plutonium consumption. This second step came up with two specific concepts, from which multi-recycling strategies have been elaborated. The exclusive production and recycling of 233U inside HCPWR limits the annual economy of natural uranium to approximately 30%. It was brought to light that the strong need in plutonium in the HCPWR dedicated to 233U production is the limiting factor. That is why it was eventually proposed to study how the production of 233U within PWR (with standard MR), from 2020. It was shown that the anticipated production of 233U in dedicated PWR relaxes the constraint on plutonium inventories and favours the transition toward a symbiotic reactor fleet composed of both PWR and HCPWR loaded with thorium fuel. This strategy is more adapted and leads to an annual economy of natural uranium of about 65%. (author)

  11. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA organized mainly in 1999 to complete the verification loop in core of the high flux experimental reactor with the 2000 kW fuel elements, the re-starting of China Pulsed Reactor, review and assessment on nuclear safety for the restarting of the Uranium-water critical Facility and treat the fracture event with the fuel tubes in the HWRR

  12. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  13. Advanced computational methods for the assessment of reactor core behaviour during reactivity initiated accidents. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document at hand serves as the final report for the reactor safety research project RS1183 ''Advanced Computational Methods for the Assessment of Reactor Core Behavior During Reactivity-Initiated Accidents''. The work performed in the framework of this project was dedicated to the development, validation and application of advanced computational methods for the simulation of transients and accidents of nuclear installations. These simulation tools describe in particular the behavior of the reactor core (with respect to neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and thermal mechanics) at a very high level of detail. The overall goal of this project was the deployment of a modern nuclear computational chain which provides, besides advanced 3D tools for coupled neutronics/ thermal-hydraulics full core calculations, also appropriate tools for the generation of multi-group cross sections and Monte Carlo models for the verification of the individual calculational steps. This computational chain shall primarily be deployed for light water reactors (LWR), but should beyond that also be applicable for innovative reactor concepts. Thus, validation on computational benchmarks and critical experiments was of paramount importance. Finally, appropriate methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analysis were to be integrated into the computational framework, in order to assess and quantify the uncertainties due to insufficient knowledge of data, as well as due to methodological aspects.

  14. Light water reactor safety research project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development activities for the safety of Light Water Power Reactors carried out 1979 at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research are described. Considerations concerning the necessity, objectives and size of the Safety Research Project are presented, followed by a detailed discussion of the activities in the five tasks of the program, covering fracture mechanics and nondestructive testing, thermal-hydraulics, reactor noise analysis and pressure vessel steel surveillance. (Auth.)

  15. A computer control system for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most reactor applications until now, have not required computer control of core output. Commercial reactors are generally operated at a constant power output to provide baseline power. However, if commercial reactor cores are to become load following over a wide range, then centralized digital computer control is required to make the entire facility respond as a single unit to continual changes in power demand. Navy and research reactors are much smaller and simpler and are operated at constant power levels as required, without concern for the number of operators required to operate the facility. For navy reactors, centralized digital computer control may provide space savings and reduced personnel requirements. Computer control offers research reactors versatility to efficiently change a system to develop new ideas. The operation of any reactor facility would be enhanced by a controller that does not panic and is continually monitoring all facility parameters. Eventually very sophisticated computer control systems may be developed which will sense operational problems, diagnose the problem, and depending on the severity of the problem, immediately activate safety systems or consult with operators before taking action

  16. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  17. Aspects of cell calculations in deterministic reactor core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varvayanni, M. [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Savva, P., E-mail: savvapan@ipta.demokritos.gr [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Catsaros, N. [NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , PoB 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2011-02-15

    {Tau}he capability of achieving optimum utilization of the deterministic neutronic codes is very important, since, although elaborate tools, they are still widely used for nuclear reactor core analyses, due to specific advantages that they present compared to Monte Carlo codes. The user of a deterministic neutronic code system has to make some significant physical assumptions if correct results are to be obtained. A decisive first step at which such assumptions are required is the one-dimensional cell calculations, which provide the neutronic properties of the homogenized core cells and collapse the cross sections into user-defined energy groups. One of the most crucial determinations required at the above stage and significantly influencing the subsequent three-dimensional calculations of reactivity, concerns the transverse leakages, associated to each one-dimensional, user-defined core cell. For the appropriate definition of the transverse leakages several parameters concerning the core configuration must be taken into account. Moreover, the suitability of the assumptions made for the transverse cell leakages, depends on earlier user decisions, such as those made for the core partition into homogeneous cells. In the present work, the sensitivity of the calculated core reactivity to the determined leakages of the individual cells constituting the core, is studied. Moreover, appropriate assumptions concerning the transverse leakages in the one-dimensional cell calculations are searched out. The study is performed examining also the influence of the core size and the reflector existence, while the effect of the decisions made for the core partition into homogenous cells is investigated. In addition, the effect of broadened moderator channels formed within the core (e.g. by removing fuel plates to create space for control rod hosting) is also examined. Since the study required a large number of conceptual core configurations, experimental data could not be available

  18. Operating experience feedback from safety significant events at research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shokr, A.M. [Atomic Energy Authority, Abouzabal (Egypt). Egypt Second Research Reactor; Rao, D. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    2015-05-15

    Operating experience feedback is an effective mechanism to provide lessons learned from the events and the associated corrective actions to prevent recurrence of events, resulting in improving safety in the nuclear installations. This paper analyzes the events of safety significance that have been occurred at research reactors and discusses the root causes and lessons learned from these events. Insights from literature on events at research reactors and feedback from events at nuclear power plants that are relevant to research reactors are also presented along with discussions. The results of the analysis showed the importance of communication of safety information and exchange of operating experience are vital to prevent reoccurrences of events. The analysis showed also the need for continued attention to human factors and training of operating personnel, and the need for establishing systematic ageing management programmes of reactor facilities, and programmes for safety management of handling of nuclear fuel, core components, and experimental devices.

  19. Antineutrino emission and gamma background characteristics from a thermal research reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Bui, V M; Fallot, M; Communeau, V; Cormon, S; Estienne, M; Lenoir, M; Peuvrel, N; Shiba, T; Cucoanes, A S; Elnimr, M; Martino, J; Onillon, A; Porta, A; Pronost, G; Remoto, A; Thiolliere, N; Yermia, F; Zakari-Issoufou, A -A

    2016-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the antineutrino emission from research reactors is mandatory for any high sensitivity experiments either for fundamental or applied neutrino physics, as well as a good control of the gamma and neutron backgrounds induced by the reactor operation. In this article, the antineutrino emission associated to a thermal research reactor: the OSIRIS reactor located in Saclay, France, is computed in a first part. The calculation is performed with the summation method, which sums all the contributions of the beta decay branches of the fission products, coupled for the first time with a complete core model of the OSIRIS reactor core. The MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution code was used, allowing to take into account the contributions of all beta decayers in-core. This calculation is representative of the isotopic contributions to the antineutrino flux which can be found at research reactors with a standard 19.75\\% enrichment in $^{235}$U. In addition, the required off-equilibrium correction...

  20. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 (233U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code

  1. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz, E-mail: azizM@uniten.edu.my; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul [Universiti Tenaga Nasional. Jalan Ikram-UNITEN, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Pauzi, Anas Muhamad, E-mail: anas@uniten.edu.my; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad [Malaysian Nuclear Agency, Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 ({sup 233}U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  2. Simulation on reactor TRIGA Puspati core kinetics fueled with thorium (Th) based fuel element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Abdul Aziz; Pauzi, Anas Muhamad; Rahman, Shaik Mohmmed Haikhal Abdul; Zin, Muhamad Rawi Muhammad; Jamro, Rafhayudi; Idris, Faridah Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    In confronting global energy requirement and the search for better technologies, there is a real case for widening the range of potential variations in the design of nuclear power plants. Smaller and simpler reactors are attractive, provided they can meet safety and security standards and non-proliferation issues. On fuel cycle aspect, thorium fuel cycles produce much less plutonium and other radioactive transuranic elements than uranium fuel cycles. Although not fissile itself, Th-232 will absorb slow neutrons to produce uranium-233 (233U), which is fissile. By introducing Thorium, the numbers of highly enriched uranium fuel element can be reduced while maintaining the core neutronic performance. This paper describes the core kinetic of a small research reactor core like TRIGA fueled with a Th filled fuel element matrix using a general purpose Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code.

  3. Status report on the core conversion of the ASTRA-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The core conversion from HEU-fuel to LEU-fuel of the ASTRA-Reactor, a pool type research reactor with a thermal power of 10 MW, was started in 1982. In the beginning of the conversion MEU-fuel elements with UAlx-Al fuel and LEU-fuel elements with U3O8-Al fuel were successfully tested. Since 1985 only LEU-fuel elements with U3Si2-Al fuel were used. The HEU-fuel elements in the core were successively replaced by LEU-fuel elements. At the present time there are still 5 HEU-fuel elements in the core. The conversion will be finished in 1990. (orig.)

  4. Optimization of ultra-long cycle fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optimization of an ultra-long cycle fast reactor (UCFR) design with a power rate of 1000 MW (electric), UCFR-1000, has been performed to increase the safety of UCFR. Firstly, geometric optimization has been performed to decrease its peaking factors so that the peak temperatures measured by thermal hydraulic feedback are within the limit of design basis event (DBE). Secondly, fuel composition optimization has been performed by adopting Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel as a blanket material instead of natural uranium. Lastly, a small-size UCFR with a power rate of 100 MWe, UCFR-100, has been proposed for developing a short term deployable nuclear reactor. The major optimization process for UCFR-100 is decreasing maximum neutron flux and fast neutron fluence. The optimized UCFR-1000 has been enlarged radially and shortened axially from the initial UCFR design and this modification makes the burning speed of active core movement slower. It has been confirmed that a full-power operation of 60 years without refueling is feasible for both UCFR-1000 and UCFR-100 core designs by a breed-and-burn strategy. By the design optimization study, the reductions of maximum neutron flux, fast neutron fluence, and axial power peaking have been achieved, which are favorable for the safety of the UCFR. (author)

  5. United States Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure TRIGA Reactor Fuel Support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The United State Domestic Research Reactor Infrastructure Program at the Idaho National Laboratory manages and provides project management, technical, quality engineering, quality inspection and nuclear material support for the United States Department of Energy sponsored University Reactor Fuels Program. This program provides fresh, unirradiated nuclear fuel to Domestic University Research Reactor Facilities and is responsible for the return of the DOE-owned, irradiated nuclear fuel over the life of the program. This presentation will introduce the program management team, the universities supported by the program, the status of the program and focus on the return process of irradiated nuclear fuel for long term storage at DOE managed receipt facilities. It will include lessons learned from research reactor facilities that have successfully shipped spent fuel elements to DOE receipt facilities.

  6. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Program quarterly report, April--June 1977. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-11-01

    Information is presented concerning accident energetics; core debris behavior; sodium containment and structural integrity; research for elevated temperature design criteria; fuel motion detection; ACPR fuel motion system; and advanced reactor safety research assessment.

  7. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to revitalisation of the RA reactor started in 1986 were fulfilled except the exchange of the complete reactor instrumentation. Since 1992, due to economic and political reasons, RA reactor is in a difficult situation. The old RA reactor instrumentation was dismantled. Decision about the future status of the reactor should be made because the aging of all the components is becoming dramatic. Control and maintenance of the reactor components was done regularly and efficiently. The most important activity and investment in 1998 was improvement of conditions for spent fuel storage in the existing pools at the RA reactor. Russian company ENTEK and IAEA are involved in this activity which was initiated 1997. Fuel inspection by the IAEA safeguards inspectors was done on a monthly basis. Research reactor RA Annual report for year 2000 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection

  8. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to revitalisation of the RA reactor started in 1986 were fulfilled except the exchange of the complete reactor instrumentation. Since 1992, due to economic and political reasons, RA reactor is in a difficult situation. The old RA reactor instrumentation was dismantled. Decision about the future status of the reactor should be made because the aging of all the components is becoming dramatic. Control and maintenance of the reactor components was done regularly and efficiently. The most important activity and investment in 1998 was improvement of conditions for spent fuel storage in the existing pools at the RA reactor. Russian company ENTEK and IAEA are involved in this activity which was initiated 1997. Fuel inspection by the IAEA safeguards inspectors was done on a monthly basis. Research reactor RA Annual report for year 1998 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection

  9. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  10. The DALAT nuclear research reactor operation and conversion status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents operation and conversion status of the DALAT Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR). The DNRR is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed from the 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The core is loaded with Soviet-designed standard type WWR-M2 fuel assemblies with 36% enrichment. The reconstructed reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained its nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. The DNRR is operated mainly in continuous runs of 100 hours, once every 4 weeks, for radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses, training and research purposes. The remaining time between two continuous runs, is devoted to maintenance activities and to short runs. Until now 4 fuel reloading were executed. The reactor control and instrumentation system was upgraded in 1994. And now the reactor control system is being replaced by new one, the replacement will be fulfilled in March 2007. The study on fuel conversion has been done on the basis of a new LEU of 19.75% with UO2-Al dispersion fuel meat instead of the current HEU of 36% with aluminium-uranium alloy. The results of the study show that operation time of mixed core by inserting 36 LEU fuel assemblies lasts much longer than by inserting 36 HEU fuel assemblies (14.5 instead of 10.5 years). Neutron flux performances at irradiation positions are not significantly changed. Now we are working for realizing fuel conversion of the DNRR

  11. Excitation of neutron flux waves in reactor core transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the excitation of neutron flux waves in reactor core transients has been performed. A perturbation theory solution has been developed for the time-dependent thermal diffusion equation in which the absorption cross section undergoes a rapid change, as in a PWR rod ejection accident (REA). In this analysis the unperturbed reactor flux states provide the basis for the spatial representation of the flux solution. Using a simplified space-time representation for the cross section change, the temporal integrations have been carried out and analytic expressions for the modal flux amplitudes determined. The first order modal excitation strength is determined by the spatial overlap between the initial and final flux states, and the cross section perturbation. The flux wave amplitudes are found to be largest for rapid transients involving large reactivity perturbations

  12. Heat transfer evaluation in a plasma core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical evaluations of heat transfer in a fissioning uranium plasma core reactor cavity, operating with seeded hydrogen propellant, have been performed. A two-dimensional analysis is based on an assumed flow pattern and cavity wall heat exchange rate. Various iterative schemes were required by the nature of the radiative field and by the solid seed vaporization. Approximate formulations of the radiative heat flux are generally used, due to the complexity of the solution of a rigorously formulated problem. The present work analyzes the sensitivity of the results with respect to approximations of the radiative field, geometry, seed vaporization coefficients and flow pattern. The results present temperature, heat flux, density and optical depth distributions in the reactor cavity, acceptable simplifying assumptions, and iterative schemes

  13. Calculation of fundamental parameters for the dynamical study of TRIGA-3-Salazar reactor (Mixed reactor core)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic parameters for dynamic study of two different configurations, 8 and 9, both with standard fuel, 20% enrichment and Flip (Fuel Life Improvement Program with 70% enrichment) fuel, for TRIGA Mark-III reactor from Mexico Nuclear Center, are obtained. A calculation method using both WIMS-D4 and DTF-IV and DAC1 was established, to decide which of those two configurations has the best safety and operational conditions. Validation of this methodology is done by calculate those parameters for a reactor core with new standard fuel. Configuration 9 is recommended to be use. (Author)

  14. The effects of aging on Boiling Water Reactor core isolation cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study was performed to assess the effects of aging on the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling system in commercial Boiling Water Reactors. This study is part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The failure data, from national databases, as well as plant specific data were reviewed and analyzed to understand the effects of aging on the RCIC system. This analysis identified important components that should receive the highest priority in terms of aging management. The aging characterization provided information on the effects of aging on component failure frequency, failure modes, and failure causes

  15. The Berkeley TRIGA Mark III research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Berkeley Research Reactor went critical on August 10, 1966, and achieved licensed operating power of 1000 kW shortly thereafter. Since then, the reactor has operated, by and large, trouble free on a one-shift basis. The major use of the reactor is in service irradiations, and many scientific programs are accommodated, both on and off campus. The principal off-campus user is the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. The reactor is also an important instructional tool in the Nuclear Engineering Department reactor experiments laboratory course, and as a source of radioisotopes for two other laboratory courses given by the Department. Finally, the reactor is used in several research programs conducted within the Department, involving studies with neutron beams and in reactor kinetics

  16. A supercomputing application for reactors core design and optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced nuclear reactor designs are often intuition-driven processes where designers first develop or use simplified simulation tools for each physical phenomenon involved. Through the project development, complexity in each discipline increases and implementation of chaining/coupling capabilities adapted to supercomputing optimization process are often postponed to a further step so that task gets increasingly challenging. In the context of renewal in reactor designs, project of first realization are often run in parallel with advanced design although very dependant on final options. As a consequence, the development of tools to globally assess/optimize reactor core features, with the on-going design methods accuracy, is needed. This should be possible within reasonable simulation time and without advanced computer skills needed at project management scale. Also, these tools should be ready to easily cope with modeling progresses in each discipline through project life-time. An early stage development of multi-physics package adapted to supercomputing is presented. The URANIE platform, developed at CEA and based on the Data Analysis Framework ROOT, is very well adapted to this approach. It allows diversified sampling techniques (SRS, LHS, qMC), fitting tools (neuronal networks...) and optimization techniques (genetic algorithm). Also data-base management and visualization are made very easy. In this paper, we'll present the various implementing steps of this core physics tool where neutronics, thermo-hydraulics, and fuel mechanics codes are run simultaneously. A relevant example of optimization of nuclear reactor safety characteristics will be presented. Also, flexibility of URANIE tool will be illustrated with the presentation of several approaches to improve Pareto front quality. (author)

  17. Research and development into power reactor fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear fuel in a power reactor must perform reliably during normal operation, and the consequences of abnormal events must be researched and assessed. The present highly reliable operation of the natural UO2 in the CANDU power reactors has reduced the need for further work in this area; however a core of expertise must be retained for purposes such as training of new staff, retaining the capability of reacting to unforeseen circumstances, and participating in the commercial development of new ideas. The assessment of fuel performance during accidents requires research into many aspects of materials, fuel and fission product behaviour, and the consolidation of that knowledge into computer codes used to evaluate the consequences of any particular accident. This work is growing in scope, much is known from out-reactor work at temperatures up to about 1500 degreesC, but the need for in-reactor verification and investigation of higher-temperature accidents has necessitated the construction of a major new in-reactor test loop and the initiation of the associated out-reactor support programs. Since many of the programs on normal and accident-related performance are generic in nature, they will be applicable to advanced fuel cycles. Work will therefore be gradually transferred from the present, committed power reactor system to support the next generation of thorium-based reactor cycles

  18. IAEA programme on research reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the IAEA programme on research reactor safety and includes the safety related areas of conversions to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The program is based on the IAEA statutory responsibilities as they apply to the requirements of over 320 research reactors operating around the world. The programme covers four major areas: (a) the development of safety documents; (b) safety missions to research reactor facilities; (c) support of research programmes on research reactor safety; (d) support of Technical Cooperation projects on research reactor safety issues. The demand for these activities by the IAEA member states has increased substantially in recent years especially in developing countries with increasing emphasis being placed on LEU conversion matters. In response to this demand, the IAEA has undertaken an extensive programme for each of the four areas above. (author)

  19. The JASON reactor: from core removal to fuel reprocessing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beeley, P.; Williams, A.; Lockwood, R. [Defence College of Electromechanical Engineering, Nuclear Dept., HMS SULTAN (United Kingdom); Raymond, B.; Spyrou, N. [Surrey Univ., Dept. of Physical and Electronic Sciences (United Kingdom); Auziere, P. [AREVA NC, Treatment Business Unit, 78 - Velizy (France)

    2007-07-01

    The 10 kW JASON Argonaut reactor was operated at the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, London, between 1962 and 1996. After initial cooling in the core, the MTR type fuel (80% enriched U{sup 235}) was dry stored on site before transport in 1998 to BNFL, Sellafield for interim wet storage. Arrangements for reprocessing of the fuel at AREVA NC, La Hague are now in progress and this paper will describe various aspects of the storage, transfer, monitoring, and the treatment at La Hague plant. The radioactive waste resulting from the processing of these used fuels will be conditioned into a suitable package for return to UK.

  20. Overview of research reactor operation within AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents information on reactor operations within the Research Company of Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) today relative to a few years ago, and speculates on future operations. In recent years, the need for Research Company reactors has diminished. This, combined with economic pressures, has led to the shutdown of some of the company's major reactors. However, compliance with the government agenda to privatize government companies in Canada, and a Research Company policy of business development, has led to some offsetting activities. The building of a pool-type 10 MWt MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental) reactor for isotope production will assist in the sale of the AECL isotopes marketing company. A Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication facility and a Tritium Extraction Plant (TEP), both currently under construction, are needed in support of the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor and are in line with business development strategies. The research program demands on NRU stretch many years into the future and the strategies for achieving effective operation of this aging reactor, now 32 years old, are discussed. The repair of the leaking light-water reflector of the NRU reactor is highlighted. The isotope business requires that a second reactor be available for back-up production and the operation of the 42 year old NRX (National Research Experimental) reactor in its present 'hot standby' mode is believed to be unique in the world

  1. RERTR-2004: International meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oral and poster presentations of the Meeting covered the following topics: National and international programs related to Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR); development of new fuel types, testing, fabrication, modelling; studies of reactor cores conversion from highly enriched to low enriched fuel, including licensing; new and converted reactors; spent fuel management including storage and transportation; production of Molybdenum 99 under converted core conditions

  2. Research reactor job analysis - A project description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Addressing the need of the improved training in nuclear industry, nuclear utilities established training program guidelines based on Performance-Based Training (PBT) concepts. The comparison of commercial nuclear power facilities with research and test reactors owned by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), made in an independent review of personnel selection, training, and qualification requirements for DOE-owned reactors pointed out that the complexity of the most critical tasks in research reactors is less than that in power reactors. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) started a project by commissioning Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) to conduct a job analysis survey of representative research reactor facilities. The output of the project consists of two publications: Volume 1 - Research Reactor Job Analysis: Overview, which contains an Introduction, Project Description, Project Methodology,, and. An Overview of Performance-Based Training (PBT); and Volume 2 - Research Reactor Job Analysis: Implementation, which contains Guidelines for Application of Preliminary Task Lists and Preliminary Task Lists for Reactor Operators and Supervisory Reactor Operators

  3. Experimental facilities for Generation IV reactors research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Centrum Vyzkumu Rez (CVR) is research and development Company situated in Czech Republic and member of the UJV group. One of its major fields is material research for Generation IV reactor concepts, especially supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), very high temperature/gas-cooled fast reactor (VHTR/GFR) and lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR). The CVR is equipped by and is building unique experimental facilities which simulate the environment in the active zones of these reactor concepts and enable to pre-qualify and to select proper constructional materials for the most stressed components of the facility (cladding, vessel, piping). New infrastructure is founded within the Sustainable Energy project focused on implementation the Generation IV and fusion experimental facilities. The research of SCWR concept is divided to research and development of the constructional materials ensured by SuperCritical Water Loop (SCWL) and fuel components research on Fuel Qualification Test loop (SCWL-FQT). SCWL provides environment of the primary circuits of European SCWR, pressure 25 MPa, temperature 600 deg. C and its major purpose is to simulate behavior of the primary medium and candidate constructional materials. On-line monitoring system is included to collect the operational data relevant to experiment and its evaluation (pH, conductivity, chemical species concentration). SCWL-FQT is facility focused on the behavior of cladding material and fuel at the conditions of so-called preheater, the first pass of the medium through the fuel (in case of European SCWR concept). The conditions are 450 deg. C and 25 MPa. SCWL-FQT is unique facility enabling research of the shortened fuel rods. VHTR/GFR research covers material testing and also cleaning methods of the medium in primary circuit. The High Temperature Helium Loop (HTHL) enables exposure of materials and simulates the VHTR/GFR core environment to analyze the behavior of medium, especially in presence of organic compounds and

  4. Impedance change measurements of a superconducting shielded-core reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device was constructed using a stack of superconducting rings surrounding a ferrite rod, with the assembly inserted in a high turns count solenoid. Superconducting end pieces were also placed at either end of the rod to minimize flux leakage to the ferrite rod. The superconducting rings act as a magnetic shield to the ferrite, effectively eliminating the low reluctance path the ferrite offers. At a specific field the superconductor will be fully penetrated, placing the ferrite in the magnetic circuit and reducing the reactance offered by the solenoidal winding. In this mode of operation the shielded core reactor can be applied as a current limiting device. Results included in this paper, indicate that in the best design achieved leakage to the ferrite core could not be eliminated. The superconducting current induced by this leakage eliminated the low reluctance path of the ferrite by producing a counter-flux in the core exactly opposing the applied field. Shielding currents set up by penetration of the externally applied field were found to be minimal compared to the induced currents caused by leakage flux in the ferrite core

  5. Benchmark problems of start-up core physics of High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data of the HTTRs start-up core physics are useful to verify design codes of commercial HTGRs due to the similarities in the core size and excess reactivity. Form these viewpoints, it is significant to carry out the bench mark tests of design codes by using data of start-up core physics experiments planned for the HTTR. The evaluations of the first criticality, excess reactivity of annular cores, etc., are proposed for the benchmark problem. It was found from our precalculations that diffusion calculations provide larger excess reactivity and small number of fuel columns for the first criticality than Monte Carlo calculations. 19 refs

  6. RA Research reactor, Annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual report concerning the project 'RA research nuclear reactor' for 1989, financed by the Serbian ministry of science is divided into two parts. First part is concerned with RA reactor operation and maintenance, which is the task of the Division for reactor engineering of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering. Second part deals with radiation protection activities at the RA reactor which is the responsibility of the Institute for radiation protection. Scientific council of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering has stated that this report describes adequately the activity and tasks fulfilled at the RA reactor in 1989. The scope and the quality of the work done were considered successful both concerning the maintenance and reconstruction, as well as radiation protection activities

  7. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annual report concerning the project 'RA research nuclear reactor' for 1989, financed by the Serbian ministry of science is divided into two parts. First part is concerned with RA reactor operation and maintenance, which is the task of the Division for reactor engineering of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering. Second part deals with radiation protection activities at the RA reactor which is the responsibility of the Institute for radiation protection. Scientific council of the Institute for multidisciplinary studies and RA reactor engineering has stated that this report describes adequately the activity and tasks fulfilled at the RA reactor in 1989. The scope and the quality of the work done were considered successful both concerning the maintenance and reconstruction, as well as radiation protection activities

  8. The concept of a research fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thus,for advancement towards a commercial fusion reactor,we have proposed here as a next step a steady state operated research fusion reactor with an increased plasma-wall detachment so as to further guarantee not only the production but also a long-term (for many years) confinement of a self-sustained plasma at the existing technology level. We consider the primary goal of the research fusion reactor is the provision of full-scale conditions for carrying out materials science experiments to create and test 1 st wall materials for the commercial fusion reactor

  9. Machine learning of the reactor core loading pattern critical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. In this paper we investigate the applicability of a machine learning model which could be used for fast loading pattern evaluation. We employed a recently introduced machine learning technique, Support Vector Regression (SVR), which has a strong theoretical background in statistical learning theory. Superior empirical performance of the method has been reported on difficult regression problems in different fields of science and technology. SVR is a data driven, kernel based, nonlinear modelling paradigm, in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to evaluate the possibility of applying SVR method for reactor core loading pattern modelling. The starting set of experimental data for training and testing of the machine learning algorithm was obtained using a two-dimensional diffusion theory reactor physics computer code. We illustrate the performance of the solution and discuss its applicability, i.e., complexity, speed and accuracy, with a projection to a more realistic scenario involving machine learning from the results of more accurate and time consuming three-dimensional core modelling code. (author)

  10. A neural network to predict reactor core behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The global fuel management problem in BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors) can be understood as a very complex optimization problem, where the variables represent design decisions and the quality assessment of each solution is done through a complex and computational expensive simulation. This last aspect is the major impediment to perform an extensive exploration of the design space, mainly due to the time lost evaluating non promising solutions. In this work, we show how we can train a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) to predict the reactor behavior for a given configuration. The trained MLP is able to evaluate the configurations immediately, thus allowing performing an exhaustive evaluation of the possible configurations derived from a stock of fuel lattices, fuel reload patterns and control rods patterns. For our particular problem, the number of configurations is approximately 7.7 x 1010; the evaluation with the core simulator would need above 200 years, while only 100 hours were required with our approach to discern between bad and good configurations. The later were then evaluated by the simulator and we confirm the MLP usefulness. The good core configurations reached the energy requirements, satisfied the safety parameter constrains and they could reduce uranium enrichment costs. (authors)

  11. Gas-core reactor power transient analysis. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas core reactor is a proposed device which features high temperatures. It has applications in high specific impulse space missions, and possibly in low thermal pollution MHD power plants. The nuclear fuel is a ball of uranium plasma radiating thermal photons as opposed to gamma rays. This thermal energy is picked up before it reaches the solid cavity liner by an inflowing seeded propellant stream and convected out through a rocket nozzle. A wall-burnout condition will exist if there is not enough flow of propellant to convect the energy back into the cavity. A reactor must therefore operate with a certain amount of excess propellant flow. Due to the thermal inertia of the flowing propellant, the reactor can undergo power transients in excess of the steady-state wall burnout power for short periods of time. The objective of the study was to determine how long the wall burnout power could be exceeded without burning out the cavity liner. The model used in the heat-transfer calculation was one-dimensional, and thermal radiation was assumed to be a diffusion process. (auth)

  12. Impact of proposed research reactor standards on reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Standards Committee on Operation of Research Reactors, (ANS-15), sponsored by the American Nuclear Society, was organized in June 1971. Its purpose is to develop, prepare, and maintain standards for the design, construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning of nuclear reactors intended for research and training. Of the 15 original members, six were directly associated with operating TRIGA facilities. This committee developed a standard for the Development of Technical Specifications for Research Reactors (ANS-15.1), the revised draft of which was submitted to ANSI for review in May of 1973. The Committee then identified 10 other critical areas for standards development. Nine of these, along with ANS-15.1, are of direct interest to TRIGA owners and operators. The Committee was divided into subcommittees to work on these areas. These nine areas involve proposed standards for research reactors concerning: 1. Records and Reports (ANS-15.3) 2. Selection and Training of Personnel (ANS-15.4) 3. Effluent Monitoring (ANS-15.5) 4. Review of Experiments (ANS-15.6) 5. Siting (ANS-15.7) 6. Quality Assurance Program Guidance and Requirements (ANS-15.8) 7. Restrictions on Radioactive Effluents (ANS-15.9) 8. Decommissioning (ANS-15.10) 9. Radiological Control and Safety (ANS-15.11). The present status of each of these standards will be presented, along with their potential impact on TRIGA reactor operation. (author)

  13. Manual for the operation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great majority of the research reactors in newly established centres are light-water cooled and are often also light-water moderated. Consequently, the IAEA has decided to publish in its Technical Reports Series a manual dealing with the technical and practical problems associated with the safe and efficient operation of this type of reactor. Even though this manual is limited to light-water reactors in its direct application and presents the practices and experience at one specific reactor centre, it may also be useful for other reactor types because of the general relevance of the problems discussed and the long experience upon which it is based. It has, naturally, no regulatory character but it is hoped that it will be found helpful by staff occupied in all phases of the practical operation of research reactors, and also by those responsible for planning their experimental use. 23 refs, tabs

  14. Performance of a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henquin, E.R. [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina); Bisang, J.M., E-mail: jbisang@fiq.unl.edu.ar [Programa de Electroquimica Aplicada e Ingenieria Electroquimica (PRELINE), Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional del Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829, S3000AOM Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: > For this reactor configuration the current distribution is uniform. > For this reactor configuration with bipolar connection the leakage current is small. > The mass-transfer conditions are closely uniform along the electrode. > The fluidodynamic behaviour can be represented by the dispersion model. > This reactor represents a suitable device for laboratory trials. - Abstract: This paper reports on a multipurpose research electrochemical reactor with an innovative design feature, which is based on a filter press arrangement with inclined segmented electrodes and under a modular assembly. Under bipolar connection, the fraction of leakage current is lower than 4%, depending on the bipolar Wagner number, and the current distribution is closely uniform. When a turbulence promoter is used, the local mass-transfer coefficient shows a variation of {+-}10% with respect to its mean value. The fluidodynamics of the reactor responds to the dispersion model with a Peclet number higher than 10. It is concluded that this reactor is convenient for laboratory research.

  15. An analytical solution of the transport theory in an annular geometry with a rotating source; Uma solucao analitica da teoria de transporte com fonte rotativa em uma geometria anelar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Paulo Cleber Mendonca; Narain, Rajendra [Pernambuco Univ., Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear]. E-mail: clebermt@yahoo.com.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper presents an analytical solution for transport equation in a ring reactor with a rotating neutron source of the type S(x){delta}(x-Vt). It is an extension of the previous study of Williams carried out with source of the type S(x){delta}(t). Rotating neutron source is produced in a new concept of pulsed annular reactor for the production of high flux. The solution is obtained by opening of the annular geometry and applying transport theory in one-group, one-dimension, using applied mathematics techniques like Laplace Transforms and Complex Variables. A general solution for flux presented for the rotating source injected in the reactor. Condition for the existence of harmonics were specified depending upon the perimeter of the annular core. The solution is studied to look for flux instability of the harmonics in annular reactor. It is observed that no instability is possible the new reactor concept.(author)

  16. Research reactor records in the INIS database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a statistical analysis of more than 13,000 records of publications concerned with research and technology in the field of research and experimental reactors which are included in the INIS Bibliographic Database for the period from 1970 to 2001. The main objectives of this bibliometric study were: to make an inventory of research reactor related records in the INIS Database; to provide statistics and scientific indicators for the INIS users, namely science managers, researchers, engineers, operators, scientific editors and publishers, decision-makers in the field of research reactors related subjects; to extract other useful information from the INIS Bibliographic Database about articles published in research reactors research and technology. (author)

  17. Physical Characteristics of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of the TRIGA MARK II reactor of nominal power 250 KW has been stopped as all the fuel elements have been dismounted and taken away in 1968. The reconstruction of the reactor was accomplished with Russian technological assistance after 1975. The nominal power of the reconstructed reactor is of 500 KW. The recent Dalat reactor is unique of its kind in the world: Russian-designed core combined with left-over infrastructure of the American-made TRIGA II. The reactor was loaded in November 1983. It has reached physical criticality on 1/11/1983 (without central neutron trap) and on 18/12/1983 (with central neutron trap). The power start up occurred in February 1984 and from 20/3/1984 the reactor began to be operated at the nominal power 500 KW. The selected reports included in the proceedings reflect the start up procedures and numerous results obtained in the Dalat Nuclear Research Institute and the Centre of Nuclear Techniques on the determination of different physical characteristics of the reactor. These characteristics are of the first importance for the safe operation of the Dalat reactor

  18. Education and Training on ISIS Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulon, F.; Badeau, G.; Lescop, B.; Wohleber, X. [French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission, Paris (France)

    2013-07-01

    In the frame of academic and vocational programs the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology uses the ISIS research reactor as a major tool to ensure a practical and comprehensive understanding of the nuclear reactor physics, principles and operation. A large set of training courses have been developed on ISIS, optimising both the content of the courses and the pedagogical approach. Programs with duration ranging from 3 hours (introduction to reactor operation) to 24 hours (full program for the future operators of research reactors) are carried out on ISIS reactor. The reactor is operated about 350 hours/year for education and training, about 40 % of the courses being carried out in English. Thus, every year about 400 trainees attend training courses on ISIS reactor. We present here the ISIS research reactor and the practical courses that have been developed on ISIS reactor. Emphasis is given to the pedagogical method which is used to focus on the operational and safety aspects, both in normal and incidental operation. We will present the curricula of the academic and vocational courses in which the practical courses are integrated, the courses being targeted to a wide public, including operators of research reactors, engineers involved in the design and operation of nuclear reactors as well as staff of the regulatory body. We address the very positive impact of the courses on the development of the competences and skills of participants. Finally, we describe the Internet Reactor Laboratories (IRL) that are under development and will consist in broadcasting the training courses via internet to remote facilities or institutions.

  19. Education and Training on ISIS Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of academic and vocational programs the National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology uses the ISIS research reactor as a major tool to ensure a practical and comprehensive understanding of the nuclear reactor physics, principles and operation. A large set of training courses have been developed on ISIS, optimising both the content of the courses and the pedagogical approach. Programs with duration ranging from 3 hours (introduction to reactor operation) to 24 hours (full program for the future operators of research reactors) are carried out on ISIS reactor. The reactor is operated about 350 hours/year for education and training, about 40 % of the courses being carried out in English. Thus, every year about 400 trainees attend training courses on ISIS reactor. We present here the ISIS research reactor and the practical courses that have been developed on ISIS reactor. Emphasis is given to the pedagogical method which is used to focus on the operational and safety aspects, both in normal and incidental operation. We will present the curricula of the academic and vocational courses in which the practical courses are integrated, the courses being targeted to a wide public, including operators of research reactors, engineers involved in the design and operation of nuclear reactors as well as staff of the regulatory body. We address the very positive impact of the courses on the development of the competences and skills of participants. Finally, we describe the Internet Reactor Laboratories (IRL) that are under development and will consist in broadcasting the training courses via internet to remote facilities or institutions

  20. Progress achieved for the full conversion - from HEU to LEU - of the TRIGA 14 MW research reactor core at Pitesti, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2005, a shipment of 175 TRIGA fuel elements of fresh 20% low enriched uranium (LEU was successfully shipped from France to the institute for nuclear research in Pitesti, Romania. This was the second fresh fuel shipment resulting in a total of 225 fuel elements delivered under the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme. The global threat reduction initiative 'GTRI' is to reduce, and eliminate, the use of and storage of highly enriched uranium in civil nuclear activities. This IAEA project is funded by US-DOE contributing over 3.6 million US dollars; Romania contributing 0.5 million dollars and IAEA 0.3 million dollars and the coordinating role. Through the trilateral contract signed in 2003 among the parties, the French company CERCA was selected to manufacture the LEU fuel in accordance the original design from general atomics. This paper describes the good progress achieved (project schedule, manufacturing status, regulatory requirements and lessons learned). (author)

  1. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication technology of the U3Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U3Si2 dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U3Si2 fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 ∼ 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The γ-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U3Si2. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano-plates will be conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor(ATR). 49

  2. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors, nuclear heating reactors and critical facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1998, the NNSA organized to complete the nuclear safety review on the test loop in-reactor operation of the High-flux Engineering Experimental Reactor (HFEER) and the re-operation of the China Pulsed Reactor and the Uranium-water Criticality Facility. The NNSA conducted the nuclear safety review on the CP application of the China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) and the siting of China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR), and carried out the construction supervision on HTR-10, and dealt with the event about the technological tube breakage of HWRR and other events

  3. Development of Digital MMIS for Research Reactors: Graded Approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Though research reactors are small in size yet they are important in terms of industrial applications and R and D, educational purposes. Keeping the eye on its importance, Korean government has intention to upgrade and extend this industry. Presently, Korea is operating only HANARO at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) and AGN-201K at Kyung Hee University (KHU), which are not sufficient to meet the current requirements of research and education. In addition, we need self-sufficiency in design and selfreliance in design and operation, as we are installing research reactors in domestic as well as foreign territories for instance Jordan. Based on these demands, KAERI and universities initiated a 5 year research project since December 2011 collaboratly, for the deep study of reactor core, thermal hydraulics, materials and instrumentation and control (I and C). This particular study is being carried out to develop highly reliable advanced digital I and C systems using a grading approach. It is worth mentioning that next generation research reactor should be equipped with advance state of the art digital I and C for safe and reliable operation and impermeable cyber security system that is needed to be devised. Moreover, human error is one of important area which should be linked with I and C in terms of Man Machine Interface System (MMIS) and development of I and C should cover human factor engineering. Presently, the digital I and C and MMIS are well developed for commercial power stations whereas such level of development does not exist for research reactors in Korea. Since the functional and safety requirements of research reactors are not so strict as commercial power plants, the design of digital I and C systems for research reactors seems to be graded based on the stringency of regulatory requirements. This paper was motivated for the introduction of those missions, so it is going to describe the general overview of digital I and C systems, the graded

  4. Neutronic flux stability of production uranium graphite reactor conversion core relative to high-frequency oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary methodical simplified investigation into stability of the neutron field in the conversion load of industrial uranium-graphite reactors with regard to basic characteristics of the load in transient processes was carried out. Analysis was based on the calculated research into the behaviour of simplified single-point and one-dimensional models of the reactor core in transient regimes during the interconnected description of dynamics of neutron-physical and thermal properties of the load. Fundamental assumptions on the reactor characteristics used in the calculated model. In the context of accepted approximations the obtained results preclude the possibility for the occurrence of spontaneous high frequency oscillations resulting from the positive reactivity effect on the fuel temperature in the conversion load

  5. The study of core melting phenomena in reactor severe accident of PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Hong; Jeun, Gyoo Dong; Park, Seh In; Lim, Jae Hyuck; Park, Seong Yong [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bang, Kwang Hyun; Kim, Ki Yong [Korea Maritime Univ., Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-03-15

    After TMI-2 accident, it has been paid much attention to severe accidents beyond the design basis accidents and the research on the progress of severe accidents and mitigation and the closure of severe accidents has been actively performed. In particular, a great deal of uncertainties yet exist in the phase of late core melt progression and thus the research on this phase of severe accident progress has a key role in obtaining confidence in severe accident mitigation and nuclear reactor safety. In the present study, physics of late core melt progression, experimental data and the major phenomenological models of computer codes are reviewed and a direction of reducing the uncertainties in the late core melt progression is proposed.

  6. MIT research reactor. Power uprate and utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is a university research reactor located on MIT campus. and has a long history in supporting research and education. Recent accomplishments include a 20% power rate to 6 MW and expanding advanced materials fuel testing program. Another important ongoing initiative is the conversion to high density low enrichment uranium (LEU) monolithic U-Mo fuel, which will consist of a new fuel element design and power increase to 7 MW. (author)

  7. ENS RRFM 2005: 9th international topical meeting on research reactor fuel management. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ENS topical meeting on research reactor fuel management is an annual conference launched successfully in 1997. It has since then grown into well established international forum for the exchange and expertise on all significant aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle of research reactors. Oral presentations at this meeting were divided in the following four sessions: International Topics; Fuel Development, Qualification, Fabrication and Licensing; Reactor Operation, Fuel Safety and Core Conversion; Spent Fuel Management, Back-end Options, Transportation. The three poster sessions were devoted to fuel development, qualification, fabrication and licensing; reactor operation, fuel safety, core conversion, spent fuel; spent fuel management, fuel cycle back-end options, transportation

  8. Safety of Ghana Research Reactor (GHARR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ghana Research Reactor, GHARR-1 is a low power research rector with maximum thermal power lever of 30kW. The reactor is inherently safe and uses highly enriched uranium (HEU) as fuel, light water as moderator and beryllium as a reflector. The construction, commissioning and operation of this reactor have been subjected to the system of authorization and inspection developed by the Regulatory Authority, the Radiation Protection Board (RPB) with the assistance of the International Atomic Energy Agency. The reactor has been regulated by the preparation of an Interim Safety Analysis Report (SAR) based upon International Atomic Energy Agency standards. An International Safety Assessment peer review and safe inspections have confirmed a high level of operational safety of the reactor since it started operation in 1994. Since its operation there has been no significant reported incident/accidents. Several studies have validated the inherent safety of the reactor. The reactor has been used for neutron activation analysis of various samples, research and teaching. About 1000 samples are analysed annually. The final Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was submitted (after five years of extensive research on the operational reactor) to the Regulatory Authority for review in June 2000. (author)

  9. No small fry: Decommissioning research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To get a permit to build a research reactor, would-be operators need to submit an initial decommissioning plan for the eventual shutdown of their new facility. This, however, was not a requirement back in the 1950s, 60s and 70s when most research reactors that are now nearing the end of their working lives were built. The result: many unused reactors sit idle in the middle of university campuses, research parks and hospital compounds, because their operators lack the proper plans to decommission them

  10. Sodium Fast Reactor Core Definitions (version 1.2 - September 19)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) has defined the key research goals for advanced sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFR): - improved safety performance, specifically a demonstration of favourable transient behaviour under accident conditions; - improved economic competitiveness; - demonstration of flexible management of nuclear materials, in particular, waste reduction through minor actinide burning. With respect to SFR safety performance, one of the foremost GIF objective is to design cores that can passively avoid damage when the control rods fail to scram in response to postulated accident initiators (e.g., inadvertent reactivity insertion or loss of coolant flow). The analysis of such unprotected transients depends primarily on the physical properties of the fuel and the reactivity feedback coefficients of the core. Under the auspices of the Working Party on Reactor and System (WPRS), a mandate has been proposed to work towards a shared analysis of the feedback and transient behaviour of next generation SFR concepts. In order to achieve these goals, a step-by-step analysis approach has been proposed: 1. Compile a 'state of the art' report: review past and recent studies performed in the framework of sodium fast reactor and build a bibliographic repository which would stress core transient behaviours as a function of fuel characteristics (oxide, carbide, nitride and metal). 2. Perform a parametric study based on two different core sizes: large size core (3600 MW thermal) and medium size core (1500-2500 MW thermal). For both cores sizes three types of fuel are proposed: oxide, carbide and metal. This comparative study is aimed at identifying the advantages and drawbacks for each concept based on nominal performances and global safety parameters: - Neutronics characterisation of global parameters (k-eff, power and flux distributions, void effect, Doppler, etc.); - Feed-back coefficient evaluation, discussion and agreement on corresponding calculation

  11. PRIZMA predictions of in-core detection indications in the VVER-1000 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandiev, Yadgar Z.; Kashayeva, Elena A.; Malyshin, Gennady N.; Modestov, Dmitry G.; Khatuntsev, Kirill E.

    2014-06-01

    The paper describes calculations which were done by the PRIZMA code(1) to predict indications of in-core rhodium detectors in the VVER-1000 reactor for some core fragments with allowance for fuel and rhodium burnout.

  12. Research reactor operation, maintenance and utilization in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thai Research Reactor, TRR-1/Ml is currently operated at one meggawatt steady state power. It was first commissioned in 1962 as MTR swimming pool type research reactor, and the core was later changed to TRIGA Mark III. The new core has been operated since 1978. Current core configuration Core no.5, has totally 108 low-enriched-uranium (LEU) fuel elements of 8.5 wt% and 20 wt% a mixed core. It is light water cooled and moderated with end graphite and radial water reflected. Fuel meat consists of homogeneous mixture of U-ZrH1.6 alloy which provides built-in negative temperature coefficient. Since 1978, The TRIGA core has generated energy cumulatively of 358.18 MWD thermal, as of 30 September 1986. There are six major groups of facilities; four for neutron activation analysis (NAA), one for isotope production, and a group of beam tubes. The average utilization time of these facilities varies from 0 per cent to 98 per cent. Two main utilization are NAA and radioisotope production. (author)

  13. Safety requirements applied to research reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In France, there are currently some twenty research reactors in operation with a thermal powers up to a hundred megawatts. General safety requirements such as the redundancy and separation of protection system channels, continuous monitoring of confinement barriers and containment building leak tightness with respect to underlying soils and the underground water have been gradually established and applied. Regarding the seismic risk and those risks relating to the industrial environment and transportation of hazardous materials, the rules applying to research reactor design are the same as those applying to power reactors, albeit with some adaptations due to the specific features of certain reactors (short operating time or low radioactive product inventory). The following safety requirements applying specifically to the confinement barriers of pool-type research reactors should be noted: there must be no fuel cladding dryout under the various operating conditions; in the case of plate type fuels, this requirement implies checking the absence of flow redistribution in the hottest cooling channel; reactors must not be operated with a fuel element affected by clad failure; in such situations, the reactor must be automatically shut down and the fuel element in question removed and stored in a leaktight container; the core must not be uncovered in the event of a pipe break in the reactor coolant system or a window failure in neutron beam channels; this requirement is met through the integrated design of the reactor primary coolant system, which is installed in a 'water block', and through the implementation of automatic isolation valves on the neutron beam channels. The most significant specific approach adopted in France for the design of pool-type reactors using uranium and aluminum metal fuels is to take into account a BORAX-type explosive reactivity accident. For this type of accident, which is supposed to lead to total meltdown of the core under water

  14. Spontaneous stabilization of HTGRs without reactor scram and core cooling—Safety demonstration tests using the HTTR: Loss of reactivity control and core cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takamatsu, Kuniyoshi, E-mail: takamatsu.kuniyoshi@jaea.go.jp; Yan, Xing L.; Nakagawa, Shigeaki; Sakaba, Nariaki; Kunitomi, Kazuhiko

    2014-05-01

    It is well known that a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) has superior safety characteristics; for example, an HTGR has a self-control system that uses only physical phenomena against various accidents. Moreover, the large heat capacity and low power density of the core result in very slow temperature transients. Therefore, an HTGR serves inherently safety features against loss of core cooling accidents such as the Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (TEPCO)’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) disaster. Herein we would like to demonstrate the inherent safety features using the High-Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is the first HTGR in Japan with a thermal power of 30 MW and a maximum reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950 °C; it was built at the Oarai Research and Development Center of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). In this study, an all-gas-circulator trip test was analyzed as a loss of forced cooling (LOFC) test with an initial reactor power of 9 MW to demonstrate LOFC accidents. The analytical results indicate that reactor power decreases from 9 MW to 0 MW owing to the negative reactivity feedback effect of the core, even if the reactor shutdown system is not activated. The total reactivity decreases for 2–3 h and then gradually increases in proportion to xenon reactivity; therefore, the HTTR achieves recritical after an elapsed time of 6–7 h, which is different from the elapsed time at reactor power peak occurrence. After the reactor power peak occurs, the total reactivity oscillates several times because of the negative reactivity feedback effect and gradually decreases to zero. Moreover, the new conclusions are as follows: the greater the amount of residual heat removed from the reactor core, the larger the stable reactor power after recriticality owing to the heat balance of the reactor system. The minimum reactor power and the reactor power peak occurrence are affected by the neutron source. The greater the

  15. Fast reactor core management in Japan: twenty years of evolution at JOYO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty years of operations at the experimental fast reactor JOYO provide a wealth of experience with core and fuel management. This experience has been applied to several core modifications to upgrade JOYO's irradiation capability. Core physics tests and Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results have been used to confirm the accuracy of neutron diffusion theory calculations. These experiences and accumulated data will be useful for the core design in future fast reactors in Japan's development. (author)

  16. EVALUATION OF ZERO-POWER, ELEVATED-TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS AT JAPAN’S HIGH TEMPERATURE ENGINEERING TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2011-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The experimental benchmark performed and currently evaluated in this report pertains to the data available for two zero-power, warm-critical measurements with the fully-loaded HTTR core. Six isothermal temperature coefficients for the fully-loaded core from approximately 340 to 740 K have also been evaluated. These experiments were performed as part of the power-up tests (References 1 and 2). Evaluation of the start-up core physics tests specific to the fully-loaded core (HTTR-GCR-RESR-001) and annular start-up core loadings (HTTR-GCR-RESR-002) have been previously evaluated.

  17. Machine Learning of the Reactor Core Loading Pattern Critical Parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm, and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of a machine learning model which could be used for fast loading pattern evaluation. We employ a recently introduced machine learning technique, support vector regression (SVR), which is a data driven, kernel based, nonlinear modeling paradigm, in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to evaluate the possibility of applying SVR method for reactor core loading pattern modeling. We illustrate the performance of the solution and discuss its applicability, that is, complexity, speed, and accuracy

  18. Device for assisting the operation and administration of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable even unskilled persons to select adequate control rod planning in the same manner as done by the skilled designers. Constitution: Information showing the state of the reactor core before the control rod operation, for example, the control rod pattern and the power distribution, and the control rod alteration pattern after the control rod operation are inputted into an input device, while data base previously prepared based on the considerations of skilled designers are stored in the data base memory device. The control rod change pattern and the power distribution are inputted by the input device to the adequacy judging device for the control rod relative position and the stored data base are read out to determine the adequacy for the control relative position. The result is outputted to the judging device to display the adequacy. (Sekiya, K.)

  19. Power Control Method for Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baang, Dane; Suh, Yongsuk; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Considering safety-oriented design concept and other control environment, we developed a simple controller that provides limiting function of power change- rate as well as fine tracking performance. The design result has been well-proven via simulation and actual application to a TRIGA-II type research reactor. The proposed controller is designed to track the PDM(Power Demand) from operator input as long as maintaining the power change rate lower than a certain value for stable reactor operation. A power control method for a TRIGA-II type research reactor has been designed, simulated, and applied to actual reactor. The control performance during commissioning test shows that the proposed controller provides fine control performance for various changes in reference values (PDM), even though there is large measurement noise from neutron detectors. The overshoot at low power level is acceptable in a sense of reactor operation.

  20. Utilisation of the Research Reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor of the University of Mainz can be operated in the steady state mode with thermal powers up to a maximum of 100 kW and in the pulse mode with a maximum peak power of 250 MW. So far, more than 17 000 pulses have been performed. For irradiations the TRIGA Mainz has a central experimental tube, three pneumatic transfer systems and a rotary specimen rack. In addition, the TRIGA Mainz includes four horizontal beam ports and a graphite thermal column which provides a source of well-thermalised neutrons. A broad spectrum of commercial applications, scientific research and training can be executed. For education and training various courses in nuclear and radiochemistry, radiation protection, reactor operation and physics are held for scientists, advanced students, teachers, engineers and technicians. Isotope production and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) are applied in in-core positions for different applications. NAA in Mainz is focused to determine trace elements in different materials such as in archaeometry, forensics, biology and technical materials including semiconductors for photovoltaics. The beam ports and the thermal column are used for commercial as well as for special basic and applied research in medicine, biology, chemistry and physics. Experiments are in preparation to determine the fundamental neutron properties with very high precision using ultra cold neutrons (UCN) produced at the tangential beam port. A second source is under development at the radial piercing beam port. Another experiment under development is the determination of ground-state properties of radioactive nuclei with very high precision using a penning trap and collinear laser spectroscopy. For many years fast chemical separation procedures combining a gas-jet transport system installed in one beam tube with either continuous or discontinuous chemical separation are carried out. In addition the thermal column of the reactor is also used for medical and

  1. LMFBR type reactor core and its fuel exchange method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishibashi, Yoko; Koyama, Jun-ichi; Aoyama, Motoo; Haikawa, Katsumasa; Yamanaka, Akihiro

    1996-08-20

    Upon initial loading, two kinds of fuel assemblies including first fuel assemblies having a highest enrichment degree and second fuel assemblies having a lowest enrichment degree are loaded. The average fuel enrichment degree of an upper region of the first fuel assembly is made greater than that of the lower region. The reactivity of the lower region of the first fuel assembly is made lower than that of the upper portion to reduce power peak. Upon transfer from a first cycle to a second cycle, at least one of the second fuel assemblies is exchanged by the same number of the third fuel assemblies. In this case, an average fuel enrichment degree of the upper region of the third fuel assembly is made greater than that of the lower region to suppress the reactivity in the lower region of the third fuel assembly lower than the reactivity in the upper region thereby reducing the power peak. Thus, the upper power peak over the entire reactor core is moderated thereby capable of ensuring the reactor shut down margin without deteriorating the same. (N.H.)

  2. Unsteady thermal analysis of gas-cooled fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis presents numerical analysis of transient heat transfer in an equivalent coolant-fuel rod cell of a typical gas cooled, fast nuclear reactor core. The transient performance is assumed to follow a complete sudden loss of coolant starting from steady state operation. Steady state conditions are obtained from solving a conduction problem in the fuel rod and a parabolic turbutent convection problem in the coolant section. The coupling between the two problems is accomplished by ensuring continuity of the thermal conditions at the interface between the fuel rod and the coolant. to model turbulence, the mixing tenght theory is used. Various fuel rod configurations have been tested for optimal transient performance. Actually, the loss of coolant accident occurs gradually at an exponential rate. Moreover, a time delay before shutting down the reactor by insertion of control rods usually exists. It is required to minimize maximum steady state cladding temperature so that the time required to reach its limiting value during transient state is maximum. This will prevent the escape of radioactive gases that endanger the environment and the public. However, the case considered here is a limiting case representing what could actually happen in the worst probable accident. So, the resutls in this thesis are very indicative regarding selection of the fuel rode configuration for better transient performance in case of accidents in which complete loss of collant occurs instantaneously

  3. Technical specifications: Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and an envelope of operation within which there is assurance that these limits will not be exceeded

  4. Benchmark Evaluation of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor Upgraded LEU-Fueled Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2001-09-01

    Benchmark models were developed to evaluate the cold-critical start-up measurements performed during the fresh core reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. The final upgraded core configuration with 64 fuel elements has been completed. Evaluated benchmark measurement data include criticality, control-rod worth measurements, shutdown margin, and excess reactivity. Dominant uncertainties in keff include the manganese content and impurities contained within the stainless steel cladding of the fuel and the 236U and erbium poison content in the fuel matrix. Calculations with MCNP5 and ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data are approximately 1.4% greater than the benchmark model eigenvalue, supporting contemporary research regarding errors in the cross section data necessary to simulate TRIGA-type reactors. Uncertainties in reactivity effects measurements are estimated to be ~10% with calculations in agreement with benchmark experiment values within 2s. The completed benchmark evaluation de-tails are available in the 2014 edition of the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Evaluation of the NRAD LEU cores containing 56, 60, and 62 fuel elements have also been completed, including analysis of their respective reactivity effects measurements; they are also available in the IRPhEP Handbook but will not be included in this summary paper.

  5. International symposium on research reactor utilization, safety and management. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    that have undergone certain changes in core design or improvements in experimental and auxiliary devices. It was emphasised that increased safety requirements and strengthened regulatory demands should not be crucial if some older research reactors do not fulfil these demands. Benefits concerned with their utilisation should always be taken into account before decision making on shutdown

  6. Proposal of LDR Ir-192 Production in the TRIGA Mark II Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA MARK II research reactor in Vienna provides some irradiation positions with different flux distribution. In this regard, a case study is under investigation to appraise the possibility of medical radioisotope production in Vienna. For this purpose, neutron flux mapping and the axial neutron flux distribution are calculated by MCNP5 for the TRIGA Mark II core. This paper describes the feasibility of Low Dose Rate (LDR) 192Ir production in the core of the low power research reactor. (author)

  7. RA-10: A New Argentinian Multipurpose Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new multipurpose research reactor to replace RA-3 reactor has been decided to be built in Argentina to satisfy the increasing national and regional demands for radioisotopes. The project, supported by the National Administration, has started in 2010 and is planned to be operative in 2018. The expertise acquired in the country, in the design and licensing of nuclear reactors, encourage the National Atomic Energy Commission (CNEA) to face the challenge. INVAP S.E. is involved in the design and construction of the reactor facility and related installations, playing the role of main contractor. The RA-10 is a 30 MW thermal power reactor and is designed to achieve high performance neutrons production to fulfill the stakeholder's requirements in compliance with stringent safety regulations. The principal objectives of the facility are: to consolidate and increase the radioisotope production in order to cover future demands, to provide fuel and material testing irradiation facilities to support national technology development on this field, to offer new applications in the field of science and technology based on modern neutron techniques. The reactor is an open-pool facility with a compact core with MTR (Material Testing Reactor) low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel assemblies consisting of uranium silicide fuel plates, cladded in aluminum. Reactivity control is performed by hafnium plates. A heavy water reflector tank surrounds the core. It provides a high thermal neutron flux adequate to house irradiation facilities. A diverse and independent shutdown system is engineered through its drainage. The fundamental safety objective of the design is the radiological protection of the public, the personnel and the environment and consequently the design is based in three main principles: responsibility in safety management, defense-in-depth and safety features. Engineered Safety Features are provided which are capable of maintaining the reactor in a safe condition under all

  8. Development of a research nuclear reactor simulator using LABVIEW®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency recommends the use of safety and friendly interfaces for monitoring and controlling the operational parameters of the nuclear reactors. The most important variable in the nuclear reactors control is the power released by fission of the fuel in the core which is directly proportional to neutron flux. It was developed a digital system to simulate the neutron evolution flux and monitoring their interaction on the other operational parameters. The control objective is to bring the reactor power from its source level (mW) to a few W. It is intended for education of basic reactor neutronic principles such as the multiplication factor, criticality, reactivity, period, delayed neutron and control by rods. The 250 kW IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor at Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN (Belo Horizonte/Brazil) was used as reference. TRIGA reactors, developed by General Atomics (GA), are the most widely used research reactor in the world. They are cooled by light water under natural convection and are characterized by being inherently safety. The simulation system was developed using the LabVIEW® (Laboratory Virtual Instruments Engineering Workbench) software, considering the modern concept of virtual instruments (VI's). The main purpose of the system is to provide to analyze the behavior, and the tendency of some processes that occur in the reactor using a user-friendly operator interface. The TRIGA simulator system will allow the study of parameters, which affect the reactor operation, without the necessity of using the facility.(author)

  9. Development of a research nuclear reactor simulator using LABVIEW®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lage, Aldo Marcio Fonseca; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias; Pinto, Antonio Juscelino; Souza, Luiz Claudio Andrade [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency recommends the use of safety and friendly interfaces for monitoring and controlling the operational parameters of the nuclear reactors. The most important variable in the nuclear reactors control is the power released by fission of the fuel in the core which is directly proportional to neutron flux. It was developed a digital system to simulate the neutron evolution flux and monitoring their interaction on the other operational parameters. The control objective is to bring the reactor power from its source level (mW) to a few W. It is intended for education of basic reactor neutronic principles such as the multiplication factor, criticality, reactivity, period, delayed neutron and control by rods. The 250 kW IPR-R1 TRIGA research reactor at Nuclear Technology Development Center - CDTN (Belo Horizonte/Brazil) was used as reference. TRIGA reactors, developed by General Atomics (GA), are the most widely used research reactor in the world. They are cooled by light water under natural convection and are characterized by being inherently safety. The simulation system was developed using the LabVIEW® (Laboratory Virtual Instruments Engineering Workbench) software, considering the modern concept of virtual instruments (VI's). The main purpose of the system is to provide to analyze the behavior, and the tendency of some processes that occur in the reactor using a user-friendly operator interface. The TRIGA simulator system will allow the study of parameters, which affect the reactor operation, without the necessity of using the facility.(author)

  10. Supply of enriched uranium for research reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H. [NUKEM GmbH, Alzenau (Germany)

    1997-08-01

    Since the RERTR-meeting In Newport/USA in 1990 the author delivered a series of papers in connection with the fuel cycle for research reactors dealing with its front-end. In these papers the author underlined the need for unified specifications for enriched uranium metal suitable for the production of fuel elements and made proposals with regard to the re-use of in Europe reprocessed highly enriched uranium. With regard to the fuel cycle of research reactors the research reactor community was since 1989 more concentrating on the problems of its back-end since the USA stopped the acceptance of spent research reactor fuel on December 31, 1988. Now, since it is apparent that these back-end problem have been solved by AEA`s ability to reprocess and the preparedness of the USA to again accept physically spent research reactor fuel the author is focusing with this paper again on the front-end of the fuel cycle on the question whether there is at all a safe supply of low and high enriched uranium for research reactors in the future.

  11. Investigation of activity release during light water reactor core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A test facility was developed for the determination of activity release and of aerosol characteristics under realistic light water reactor core melting conditions. It is composed of a high-frequency induction furnace, a ThO2 crucible system, and a collection apparatus consisting of membrane and particulate filters. Thirty-gram samples of a representative core material mixture (corium) were melted under air, argon, or steam at 0.8 to 2.2 bar. In air at 27000C, for example, the relative release was 0.4 to 0.7% for iron, chromium, and cobalt and 4 to 11% for tin, antimony, and manganese. Higher release values of 20 to 40% at lower temperatures (21500C, air) were found for selenium, cadmium, tellurium, and cesium. The size distribution of the aerosol particles was trimodal with maxima at diameters of 0.17, 0.30, and 0.73 μm. The result of a qualitative x-ray microanalysis was that the main elements of the melt were contained in each aerosol particle. Further investigations will include larger melt masses and the additional influence of concrete on the release and aerosol behavior

  12. Power Excursion Accident Analysis of Research Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional neutronic code POWEX-K has been developed, and it has been coupled with the sub-channel thermal-hydraulic core analysis code SV based on the Single Mass Velocity Model. This forms the integrated neutronic/thermal hydraulics code system POWEX-K/SV for the accident analysis. The Training and Research Reactors at Budapest University of Technology and Economics (BME-Reactor) has been taken as a reference reactor. The cross-section generation procedure based on WIMS. The code uses an implicit difference approach for both the diffusion equations and thermal-hydraulics modules, with reactivity feedback effects due to coolant and fuel temperatures. The code system was applied to analyzing power excursion accidents initiated by ramp reactivity insertion of 1.2 $. The results show that the reactor is inherently safe in case of such accidents i.e. no core melt is expected even if the safety rods do not fall into the core

  13. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated

  14. The influence of reactor core parameters on effective breeding coefficient Keff

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Li-Po; Liu Yi-Bao; Wang Juan; Yang Bo; Zhang Tao

    2008-01-01

    The values of effective breeding coefficient Keff in a reactor core of nuclear power plant are calculated for different values of parameters (core structure, fuel assembly component) by using the Monte Carlo method. The obtained values of Keff are compared and analysed, which can provide theoretical basis for reactor design.

  15. Analysis of a homogenous and heterogeneous stylized half core of a CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Khawlani, Afrah [Physics Department, Sana' a (Yemen); Aziz, Moustafa [Nuclear and radiological regulatory authority, Cairo (Egypt); Ismail, Mahmud Yehia; Ellithi, Ali Yehia [Cairo Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Science

    2015-03-15

    The MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System) code has been used for modeling and simulation of a half core of CANDU (CANada Deuterium-Uranium) reactor, both homogenous and heterogeneous model for the reactor core are designed. The fuel is burnt in normal operation conditions of CANDU reactors. Natural uranium fuel is used in the model. The multiplication factor for homogeneous and heterogeneous reactor core is calculated and compared during fuel burnup. The concentration of both uranium and plutonium isotopes are analysed in the model. The flux and power distributions through channels are calculated.

  16. An experimental substantiation of the design functions imposed on the additional system for passively flooding the core of a VVER reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. V.; Remizov, O. V.

    2012-05-01

    Results obtained from a research work on experimentally substantiating the serviceability of the additional system for passively flooding the core of a VVER reactor from the second-stage hydro accumulators are presented.

  17. Utilizing the UMass-Lowell research reactor to enhance knowledge transfer in reactor operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: A renaissance of nuclear science and technology has begun. To meet the expected needs of the nuclear power industry and various governmental organizations (e.g. DOE and NRC), there will be an increased need to train (non-nuclear) scientists and engineers with some specialized training in the safe and effective application of various nuclear technologies. To this end UML is developing a new online Nuclear Power Fundamentals program focusing on the operation and safety of nuclear power systems. The primary target audience is Civil, Mechanical, Electrical, and Chemical engineering students or working professionals. Engineers who take this program will be able to contribute to the nuclear workforce. The goal of the online Nuclear Power Fundamentals program is to provide a strong educational base in the fundamentals of nuclear technology and reactor safety including reactor operations. Fundamental concepts needed to understand the key aspects of nuclear technology, with a focus on the basic design and safe operation of nuclear power systems will be taught. Topics will include basic nuclear and radiation physics, nuclear reactor physics, shielding, nuclear heat transport, and nuclear power systems and safety. The unique aspect of the proposed curriculum will be the 'hands-on' live remote reactor laboratory experiences and general emphasis on experiential learning that will be integrated throughout the online program. The 'hands-on' distance nuclear engineering training will offer a meaningful nuclear reactor laboratory component within the online curriculum. This laboratory capability is available via the nuclear101.com website and the UMass-Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) Online application. The UMLRR Online application will be used to provide a number of live demonstrations and laboratory experiences using the full capabilities of the UMLRR facility. These learning experiences will involve both core physics and balance-of-plant considerations. Typical

  18. Study on improvement of core management and irradiations field characterization methods of the experimental fast reactor Joyo (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the research study to develop the core management method and irradiation field characterization method of the experimental fast reactor Joyo. Improvements of the methods through comparison with measured data from the reactor core physics performance tests of Joyo and post irradiation examination (PIE) of tests conducted in the Joyo irradiation test facility complex are also described. There are eight chapters. Chapter 1 describes the objectives of this study, along with a brief history of the Joyo test reactor and an explanation of the role and importance of developing the sodium cooled fast breeder reactor (FBR) in Japan from the view point of providing the future energy source. Chapter 2 explains the core management method of the Joyo Mark-II irradiation core, which had been modified from the first Mark-I breeder core. The core management method modifications of Joyo included changing the refueling scheme by employing an in-out fuel shuffling method and re-examination of the thermal design margin of the driver fuel by reducing the hot spot factor based on the evaluation of the Joyo Mark-II core and plant performance tests. Chapter 3 describes the development of improved methods for evaluating the neutron and gamma flux distributions by including energy spectrum information in order to meet the requirements for their accuracy. These developments included modifying the analytical method and developing the new neutron dosimetry method of helium accumulation fluence monitor (HAFM). These improvements were validated by comparison with the measured reaction rates obtained by the conventional multiple foil activation method. Chapters 4 and 5 describe the design of the upgrade of the Joyo core and cooling system, called the Mark-III project, in order to increase the neutron flux 1.3 times higher than the original design maximum of the Joyo Mark-II core. The modified Mark-III core and plant performance test evaluations that were used to validate the

  19. Emergency reactor core cooling water injection device for light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oda, Junro.

    1994-05-13

    A reactor pressure vessel is immersed in pool water of a reactor container. A control valve is interposed to a water supplying pipelines connecting pool water and a pressure vessel. A valve actuation means for opening/closing the control valve comprises a lifting tank. The inner side of the lifting tank and the inner side of the pressure vessel are connected by a communication pipeline (a syphon pipe) at upper and lower two portions. The lifting tank and the control valve are connected by a link mechanism. When a water level in the pressure vessel is lowered, the water level in the lifting tank is lowered to the same level as that in the pressure vessel. This reduces the weight of the lifting tank, the lifting tank is raised, to open the control valve by way of a link mechanism. As a result, liquid phase in the pressure vessel is in communication with the pool water, and the pool water flows down into the pressure vessel to maintain the reactor core in a flooded state. (I.N.).

  20. Behaviour of steel pipe exposed to fouling by heavy oil during core-annular flow; Comportamento de tubo de aco exposto a sujeira de oleo pesado durante escoamento nucleo-anular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Adriana; Bannwart, Antonio C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    The use of water-assisted technologies such as core-annular flow to the pipelines of viscous oils has been proposed as an attractive alternative for production and transportation of heavy crudes in both onshore and offshore scenarios. Usually, core-annular flow can be created by injecting a relatively small water flow rate laterally in the pipe, so as to form a thin water annulus surrounding the viscous oil, which is pumped through the center. The reduction in friction losses obtained thanks to lubrication by water is significant, since the pressure drop in a steady state core flow becomes comparable to water flow only. For a complete assessment of core flow technology, however, unwanted effects associated with possible oil adhesion onto the pipe wall should be investigated, since these may cause severe fouling of the wall and pressure drop increase. It has been observed that oil adhesion on metallic surfaces may occur for certain types of crude and oilphilic pipe materials. In this work we present results of pressure drop monitoring during 35 hour-operation of a heavy oil-water core annular flow in a 26.08 mm. i.d. horizontal steel pipe. The oil used is described in terms of its main components and the results of static wet ability tests are also presented for comparison (author)

  1. Nuclear reactor safety research in Kazakhstan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The paper summarizes activities being implemented by the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan in support of safe operation of nuclear reactors; shows its crucial efforts and further road map in this line. As is known, the world community considers nuclear reactor safety as one of the urgent research areas. Kazakhstan has been pursuing studies in support of nuclear energy safety since early 80s. The findings allow to coordinate available computational methods and design new ones while validating new NPP Projects and making analysis for reactor installations available

  2. Facility for a Low Power Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalker, R. G.

    1949-09-14

    Preliminary investigation indicates that a reactor facility with ample research provisions for use by University or other interested groups, featuring safety in design, can be economically constructed in the Los Angeles area. The complete installation, including an underground gas-tight reactor building, with associated storage and experiment assembly building, administration offices, two general laboratory buildings, hot latoratory and lodge, can be constructed for approxinately $1,500,000. This does not include the cost of the reactor itself or of its auxiliary equipment,

  3. BNCT activities at Slovenian TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been reported that satisfactory thermal/epithermal neutron beams for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) could be designed at TRIGA research reactors These reactors are generally perceived as being safe to install and operate in populated areas. This contribution presents the most recent BNCT research activities on the 'Jozef Stefan' Institute, where epithermal neutron beam for 'in-vitro' irradiation has been developed and experimentally verified. Furthermore, The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of the epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials of human patients in thermalising column (TC) of TRIGA reactor has been carried out. The simulation results prove, that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beam throughout the world, could be installed in TC of the TRIGA reactor. (author)

  4. Design requirement for electrical system of an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoan Sung; Kim, H. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, J. S.; Ryu, J. S

    2004-12-01

    An advanced research reactor is being designed since 2002 and the conceptual design has been completed this year for the several types of core. Also the fuel was designed for the potential cores. But the process system, the I and C system, and the electrical system design are under pre-conceptual stage. The conceptual design for those systems will be developed in the next year. Design requirements for the electrical system set up to develop conceptual design. The same goals as reactor design - enhance safety, reliability, economy, were applied for the development of the requirements. Also the experience of HANARO design and operation was based on. The design requirements for the power distribution, standby power supply, and raceway system will be used for the conceptual design of electrical system.

  5. RMB. The new Brazilian multipurpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil has four research reactors (RR) in operation: IEA-R1, a 5 MW pool type RR; IPR-R1, a 100 kW TRIGA type RR; ARGONAUTA, a 500 W Argonaut type RR, and IPEN/MB-01, a 100 W critical facility. The first three were constructed in the 50's and 60's, for teaching, training, and nuclear research, and for many years they were the basic infrastructure for the Brazilian nuclear developing program. The last, IPEN/MB-01, is the result of a national project developed specifically for qualification of reactor physics codes. Considering the relative low power of Brazilian research reactors, with exception of IEAR1, none of the other reactors are feasible for radioisotope production, and even IEA-R1 has a limited capacity. As a consequence, since long ago, 100% of the Mo-99 needed to attend Brazilian nuclear medicine services has been imported. Because of the high dependence on external supply, the international Moly-99 supply crisis that occurred in 2008/2009 affected significantly Brazilian nuclear medicine services, and as presented in previous IAEA events, in 2010 Brazilian government formalized the decision to build a new research reactor. The new reactor named RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) will be a 30 MW open pool type reactor, using low enriched uranium fuel. The facility will be part of a new nuclear research centre, to be built about 100 kilometres from Sao Paulo city, in the southern part of Brazil. The new nuclear research centre will have several facilities, to use thermal and cold neutron beams; to produce radioisotopes; to perform neutron activation analysis; and to perform irradiations tests of materials and fuels of interest for the Brazilian nuclear program. An additional facility will be used to store, for at least 100 years, all the fuel used in the reactor. The paper describes the main characteristics of the new centre, emphasising the research reactor and giving a brief description of the laboratories that will be constructed, It also presents the

  6. RMB. The new Brazilian multipurpose research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrotta, Jose Augusto; Soares, Adalberto Jose [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN) (Brazil)

    2015-01-15

    Brazil has four research reactors (RR) in operation: IEA-R1, a 5 MW pool type RR; IPR-R1, a 100 kW TRIGA type RR; ARGONAUTA, a 500 W Argonaut type RR, and IPEN/MB-01, a 100 W critical facility. The first three were constructed in the 50's and 60's, for teaching, training, and nuclear research, and for many years they were the basic infrastructure for the Brazilian nuclear developing program. The last, IPEN/MB-01, is the result of a national project developed specifically for qualification of reactor physics codes. Considering the relative low power of Brazilian research reactors, with exception of IEAR1, none of the other reactors are feasible for radioisotope production, and even IEA-R1 has a limited capacity. As a consequence, since long ago, 100% of the Mo-99 needed to attend Brazilian nuclear medicine services has been imported. Because of the high dependence on external supply, the international Moly-99 supply crisis that occurred in 2008/2009 affected significantly Brazilian nuclear medicine services, and as presented in previous IAEA events, in 2010 Brazilian government formalized the decision to build a new research reactor. The new reactor named RMB (Brazilian Multipurpose Reactor) will be a 30 MW open pool type reactor, using low enriched uranium fuel. The facility will be part of a new nuclear research centre, to be built about 100 kilometres from Sao Paulo city, in the southern part of Brazil. The new nuclear research centre will have several facilities, to use thermal and cold neutron beams; to produce radioisotopes; to perform neutron activation analysis; and to perform irradiations tests of materials and fuels of interest for the Brazilian nuclear program. An additional facility will be used to store, for at least 100 years, all the fuel used in the reactor. The paper describes the main characteristics of the new centre, emphasising the research reactor and giving a brief description of the laboratories that will be constructed, It also

  7. ENS RRFM 2006: 10th international topical meeting on research reactor fuel management. Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RRFM Conference is organized by the European Nuclear Society (ENS) with co-operation of the IAEA. It includes detailed scientific and technical reports reports on the following main topics: Fuel development, qualification, fabrication and licensing; Spent fuel management, back-end options and transportation; Reactor operation, fuel safety and core conversion; Innovative methods in research reactor analysis; Global Treat Reduction Initiative

  8. [Granuloma annulare].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butsch, F; Weidenthaler-Barth, B; von Stebut, E

    2015-11-01

    Granuloma annulare is a benign, chronic inflammatory skin disease. Its pathogenesis is still unclear, but reports on infections as a trigger can be found. In addition, some authors reported an association with other systemic disease, e.g., cancer, trauma, and diabetes mellitus; however, these have not been verified. The clinical picture of granuloma annulare ranges from the localized form predominantly at the extremities to disseminated, subcutaneous, or perforating forms. Diagnosis is based on the typical clinical presentation which may be confirmed by a biopsy. Histologically, necrobiotic areas within granulomatous inflammation are typical. The prognosis of the disease is good with spontaneous resolution being frequently observed, especially in localized forms. Disseminated manifestations tend to persist longer, and recurrences are reported. When choosing between different therapeutic options, the benign disease character versus the individual degree of suffering and the potential therapy side effects must be considered. For local treatment, topical application of corticosteroids is most common. Disseminated forms can be treated systemically with corticosteroids for several weeks; alternatively, dapsone, hydroxychloroquine, retinoids, fumaric acid, cyclosporine, and anti-TNFα appear to be effective. PMID:26487494

  9. Measurement of the vacuum reactivity coefficient of the RP-0 reactor 7A4 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estimate results of the vacuum reactivity coefficient of the RP-0 reactor 7A4 core through the inverse kinetics and neutronic noise are presented. For this effect, a compensated ionization chamber was used at the position E2 of the core. Experience was carried out at 0,47 W power which was monitored by the same measurement equipment. Aluminum blades were used as vacuum in different configurations within the reactor core. Results were assessed through perturbation theory to an energy group

  10. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the

  11. FARM: a new tool for optimizing the core performance and safety characteristics of gas cooled fast reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designing and optimising a reactor core is rather complex as it involves neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and thermomechanics. In order to tentatively overcome these difficulties, a new approach based on simplified models, is being developed aiming in optimising both core performance (core volume, in-cycle Pu inventory..) and core safety characteristics (neutronics coefficients, core pressure drop, transient response..) of a Fast Neutron Reactor. This new approach, called FARM (Fast Reactor Methodology) is currently used for studying a Helium-Cooled Fast Reactor core with carbide fuel pins, and a SiC-based CMC (Ceramic Matrix Composite) cladding. This method has demonstrated that, for a given initial set of specifications (thermal power, inlet coolant temperature, He pressure), 10 optimization variables are sufficient to estimate fair core design features. All simplified models are built from reference CEA codes (ERANOS for neutronics, METEOR for fuel thermomechanics) by way of polynomial interpolations derived from physical analytical considerations. Some safety aspects are also considered in the analysis using analytical descriptions (decay heat removal by natural convection, thermal inertia of the core, etc...). With a multi-criterion genetic algorithm, the 10 optimization variables are then searched for improving both neutronics and safety characteristics. This new methodology allows less accurate, but optimized, core design features to be obtained and proves they are the best that fulfil all the requirements. The first series of studies justify several safety trends already considered in the conventional method (minimisation of pressure drop). Current results confirm that such an approach is possible, and leads to new core designs, similar to the reference core, but with better performance (at least, supply pumping power reduced by 30%, for the same core performance). (authors)

  12. Conversion Preliminary Safety Analysis Report for the NIST Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D. J.; Baek, J. S.; Hanson, A. L.; Cheng, L-Y; Brown, N.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-30

    The NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCNR) is a reactor-laboratory complex providing the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the nation with a world-class facility for the performance of neutron-based research. The heart of this facility is the NIST research reactor (aka NBSR); a heavy water moderated and cooled reactor operating at 20 MW. It is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel elements. A Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) program is underway to convert the reactor to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This program includes the qualification of the proposed fuel, uranium and molybdenum alloy foil clad in an aluminum alloy, and the development of the fabrication techniques. This report is a preliminary version of the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) that would be submitted to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for approval prior to conversion. The report follows the recommended format and content from the NRC codified in NUREG-1537, “Guidelines for Preparing and Reviewing Applications for the Licensing of Non-power Reactors,” Chapter 18, “Highly Enriched to Low-Enriched Uranium Conversions.” The emphasis in any conversion SAR is to explain the differences between the LEU and HEU cores and to show the acceptability of the new design; there is no need to repeat information regarding the current reactor that will not change upon conversion. Hence, as seen in the report, the bulk of the SAR is devoted to Chapter 4, Reactor Description, and Chapter 13, Safety Analysis.

  13. Calculation of the flow distribution for the new core of the RA-6 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the pressure drop, the flow distribution, effective cooling flow rate and the velocity in the subchannels that cool fuel plates for the new core of RA-6 research reactor were calculated. These calculations were performed for a flow of 340 m3/hr and water temperatures of 12 C degrees, of 35 C degrees and 42 C degrees. The flow distribution was calculated without considering either safety factors or geometric changes. All the calculations were performed considering the flow as isothermal. (author)

  14. Evaluation of improved light water reactor core designs. Final progress report, September 1979. LWRCD-20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work conducted under this research project has developed information which supports in all respects the U.S. position evolved under the NASAP/INFCE programs with respect to the near and intermediate term potential for ore conservation in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle. Moreover, in the even longer term, it has been confirmed that contention by Edlund and others that tight-pitch Pu/UO2 PWR cores can achieve conversion ratios which may allow these reactors to provide a competitive energy source far into the ore-scarce post-2000 era

  15. RRFM (European Research Reactor Conference) 2011 Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RRFM conference is an international forum for researchers, operators and decision-makers to discuss all significant aspects of Research Reactor utilisation. In order to improve operational efficiency and fuel safety and contribute to the search for back-end solutions for spent fuel

  16. Criticality qualification of a new Monte Carlo code for reactor core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catsaros, N. [Institute of Nuclear Technology - Radiation Protection, NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Gaveau, B. [MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Jaekel, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique, Ecole Normale Superieure, 24 rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris (France); Maillard, J. [MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); CNRS-IDRIS, Bt 506, BP167, 91403 Orsay (France); CNRS-IN2P3, 3 rue Michel Ange, 75794 Paris (France); Maurel, G. [Faculte de Medecine, Universite Paris VI, 27 rue de Chaligny, 75012 Paris (France); MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Savva, P., E-mail: savvapan@ipta.demokritos.g [Institute of Nuclear Technology - Radiation Protection, NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece); Silva, J. [MAPS, Universite Paris VI, 4 Place Jussieu, 75005 Paris (France); Varvayanni, M.; Zisis, Th. [Institute of Nuclear Technology - Radiation Protection, NCSR ' DEMOKRITOS' , P.O. Box 60228, 15310 Aghia Paraskevi (Greece)

    2009-11-15

    In order to accurately simulate Accelerator Driven Systems (ADS), the utilization of at least two computational tools is necessary (the thermal-hydraulic problem is not considered in the frame of this work), namely: (a) A High Energy Physics (HEP) code system dealing with the 'Accelerator part' of the installation, i.e. the computation of the spectrum, intensity and spatial distribution of the neutrons source created by (p, n) reactions of a proton beam on a target and (b) a neutronics code system, handling the 'Reactor part' of the installation, i.e. criticality calculations, neutron transport, fuel burn-up and fission products evolution. In the present work, a single computational tool, aiming to analyze an ADS in its integrity and also able to perform core analysis for a conventional fission reactor, is proposed. The code is based on the well qualified HEP code GEANT (version 3), transformed to perform criticality calculations. The performance of the code is tested against two qualified neutronics code systems, the diffusion/transport SCALE-CITATION code system and the Monte Carlo TRIPOLI code, in the case of a research reactor core analysis. A satisfactory agreement was exhibited by the three codes.

  17. Multi-group nodal expansion method for reactor core analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Byung Oh; Joo, Han Gyu; Park, Sang Yoon; Zee, Sung Quun; Kim, Ha Yong [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    MASTER-2.0 is a nuclear design code based on the two group diffusion theory to calculate the steady-state and transient pressurized water reactor core in a 3-dimensional Cartesian or hexagonal geometry. The response matrix based NEM has been extended for multi-group neutron diffusion theory in order to increase the computational accuracy for rectangular geometry. Coarse mesh rebalancing scheme is used to accelerate the convergence of iteration process. The transverse leakage profile involved in NEM is approximated by a parabola. Its coefficients are determined by using the continuity condition at interfaces or the intra-nodal flux shape including node vertices. For the verification of the multi-group NEM routine of MASTER-2.0, the combinations of the transverse leakage approximation with NEM were tested using two benchmark problems in order to check the sound operation of the routine. Comparisons made reveal that the accuracy of the NEM for the prediction of eigenvalue and power distribution is quite good and the four-group cross sections generated by CASMO-3 work properly in the MASTER code system. 11 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs. (Author)

  18. Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of 3 MW TRIGA Research Reactor of Bangladesh Considering Different Cycles of Burnup

    OpenAIRE

    M. H. Altaf; Badrun, N. H.

    2014-01-01

    Burnup dependent steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of TRIGA Mark-II research reactor has been carried out utilizing coupled point kinetics, neutronics and thermal hydraulics code EUREKA-2/RR. From the previous calculations of neutronics parameters including percentage burnup of individual fuel elements performed so far for 700 MWD burnt core of TRIGA reactor showed that the fuel rod predicted as hottest at the beginning of cycle (fresh core) was found to remain as the hottest until 200 ...

  19. A computer program to determine the specific power of prismatic-core reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computer program has been developed to determine the maximum specific power for prismatic-core reactors as a function of maximum allowable fuel temperature, core pressure drop, and coolant velocity. The prismatic-core reactors consist of hexagonally shaped fuel elements grouped together to form a cylindrically shaped core. A gas coolant flows axially through circular channels within the elements, and the fuel is dispersed within the solid element material either as a composite or in the form of coated pellets. Different coolant, fuel, coating, and element materials can be selected to represent different prismatic-core concepts. The computer program allows the user to divide the core into any arbitrary number of axial levels to account for different axial power shapes. An option in the program allows the automatic determination of the core height that results in the maximum specific power. The results of parametric specific power calculations using this program are presented for various reactor concepts

  20. Shape optimization of a Sodium Fast Reactor core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dombre Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply in this paper a geometrical shape optimization method for the design of the core of a SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor in order to minimize a thermal counter-reaction known as the sodium void effect. In this kind of reactors, by increasing the temperature, the core may become liable to a strong increase of reactivity, a key-parameter governing the chain-reaction at quasi-static states. We first use the one group energy diffusion model and give the generalization to the two groups energy equation. We then give some numerical results in the case of the one group energy equation. Note that the application of our method leads to some designs whose interfaces can be parametrized by very smooth curves which can stand very far from realistic designs. We don’t explain here the method that it would be possible to use for recovering an operational design but there exists several penalization methods (see [2] that could be employed to this end. On applique dans cet article une méthode d’optimisation géométrique dans le cadre de la conception d’un cœur de réacteur SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, i.e. réacteur à neutron rapide refroidi au sodium dans le but de minimiser une contre réaction thermique connue sous le nom d’effet de vidange sodium. Lorsqu’une augmentation de température survient, ce type de réacteur peut être sujet à une forte augmentation de réactivité, un paramètre clé dans le contrôle de la réaction en chaîne en régime quasi-statique. On a recours à l’équation de diffusion à un groupe puis on donne la généralisation du modèle d’optimisation pour l’équation de la diffusion à deux groupes d’énergie. On présente ensuite quelques résultats numériques obtenus dans le cas de l’équation à un groupe d’énergie. On note que l’application de cette méthode conduit à des designs de cœur présentant des interfaces très régulières qui sont loin d’un design de cœur faisable sur le

  1. Simple Model for Gas Holdup and Liquid Velocity of Annular Photocatalytic External-Loop Airlift Reactor Under both Bubble and Developing Slug Flow

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王一平; 陈为强; 黄群武; 冯加和; 崔勇

    2016-01-01

    Based on the momentum conservation approach, a theoretical model was developed to predict the su-perficial liquid velocity, and a correlation equation was established to calculate the gas holdup of an annular exter-nal-loop airlift reactor(AELAR)in the bubble flow and developing slug flow pattern. Experiments were performed by using tap-water and silicone oil with the viscosity of 2.0 mm2/s(2cs-SiO)and 5.0 mm2/s(5cs-SiO)as liquid phases. The effects of liquid viscosity and flow pattern on the AELAR performance were investigated. The predic-tions of the proposed model were in good agreement with the experimental results of the AELAR. In addition, the comparison of the experimental results shows that the proposed model has good accuracy and could be used to pre-dict the gas holdup and liquid velocity of an AELAR operating in bubble and developing flow pattern.

  2. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  3. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2011-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has not been evaluated as it is very similar to the evaluated core configuration. The benchmark eigenvalue is 1.0012 ± 0.0029. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  4. Core questions in domestication research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeder, Melinda A

    2015-03-17

    The domestication of plants and animals is a key transition in human history, and its profound and continuing impacts are the focus of a broad range of transdisciplinary research spanning the physical, biological, and social sciences. Three central aspects of domestication that cut across and unify this diverse array of research perspectives are addressed here. Domestication is defined as a distinctive coevolutionary, mutualistic relationship between domesticator and domesticate and distinguished from related but ultimately different processes of resource management and agriculture. The relative utility of genetic, phenotypic, plastic, and contextual markers of evolving domesticatory relationships is discussed. Causal factors are considered, and two leading explanatory frameworks for initial domestication of plants and animals, one grounded in optimal foraging theory and the other in niche-construction theory, are compared.

  5. Fluidized-bed atomic layer deposition reactor for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of a fluidized bed atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor is described in detail. The reactor consists of three parts that have all been placed in one protective cabinet: precursor dosing, reactor, and residual gas treatment section. In the precursor dosing section, the chemicals needed for the ALD reaction are injected into the carrier gas using different methods for different precursors. The reactor section is designed in such a way that a homogeneous fluidized bed can be obtained with a constant, actively controlled, reactor pressure. Furthermore, no filters are required inside the reactor chamber, minimizing the risk of pressure increase due to fouling. The residual gas treatment section consists of a decomposition furnace to remove residual precursor and a particle filter and is installed to protect the pump. In order to demonstrate the performance of the reactor, SiO2 particles have been coated with TiO2 using tetrakis-dimethylamino titanium (TDMAT) and H2O as precursors. Experiments with varying pulse times show that saturated growth can be obtained with TDMAT pulse times larger than 600 s. Analysis of the powder with High-Angle Annular Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that after 50 cycles, all SiO2 particles were coated with a 1.6 nm homogenous shell of TiO2

  6. Decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abramenkovs Andris

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In May 1995, the Latvian government decided to shut down the Salaspils Research Reactor and to dispense with nuclear energy in the future. The reactor has been out of operation since July 1998. A conceptual study on the decommissioning of the Salaspils Research Reactor was drawn up by Noell-KRC-Energie- und Umwelttechnik GmbH in 1998-1999. On October 26th, 1999, the Latvian government decided to start the direct dismantling to “green-field” in 2001. The upgrading of the decommissioning and dismantling plan was carried out from 2003-2004, resulting in a change of the primary goal of decommissioning. Collecting and conditioning of “historical” radioactive wastes from different storages outside and inside the reactor hall became the primary goal. All radioactive materials (more than 96 tons were conditioned for disposal in concrete containers at the radioactive wastes depository “Radons” at the Baldone site. Protective and radiation measurement equipment of the personnel was upgraded significantly. All non-radioactive equipment and materials outside the reactor buildings were released for clearance and dismantled for reuse or conventional disposal. Contaminated materials from the reactor hall were collected and removed for clearance measurements on a weekly basis.

  7. Corrosion Minimization for Research Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric Shaber; Gerard Hofman

    2005-06-01

    Existing university research reactors are being converted to use low-enriched uranium fue to eliminate the use of highly-enriched uranium. These conversions require increases in fuel loading that will result in the use of elements with more fuel plates, resulting in a net decrease in the water annulus between fuel plates. The proposed decrease in the water annulus raises questions about the requirements and stability of the surface hydroxide on the aluminum fuel cladding and the potential for runaway corrosion resulting in fuel over-temperature incidents. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), as regulator for these university reactors, must ensure that proposed fuel modifications will not result in any increased risk or hazard to the reactor operators or the public. This document reviews the characteristics and behavior of aluminum hydroxides, analyzes the drivers for fuel plate corrosion, reviews relevant historical incidents, and provides recommendations on fuel design, surface treatment, and reactor operational practices to avoid corrosion issues.

  8. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactor RA Annual report for year 1992 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection. First part includes 8 annexes describing reactor operation, activities of services for maintenance of reactor components and instrumentation, financial report and staffing. Second annex B is a paper by Z. Vukadin 'Recurrence formulas for evaluating expansion series of depletion functions' published in 'Kerntechnik' 56, (1991) No.6 (INIS record no. 23024136. Second part of the report is devoted to radiation protection issues and contains 4 annexes with data about radiation control of the working environment and reactor environment, description of decontamination activities, collection of radioactive wastes, and meteorology data

  9. The Finnish research programme on reactor safety (RETU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Finland the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM) has launched two national research programmes on the safety of nuclear reactors for the period 1995-1998. The research programme on Reactor Safety (RETU) concentrates on the search of safe limits of nuclear fuel and the reactor core, accident management methods and risk management of the operation of nuclear power plants. In the research programme the behaviour of high burnup nuclear fuel is studied both in normal operation and during power transients. In particular, the VVER fuel data base is supplemented by performing well-characterized experiments in international cooperation. The reactor dynamics codes are developed further to cope with complicated three-dimensional reactivity transients and accidents, and the operational range of the models is extended by implementing advanced flow models and numerical solution methods. In the research programme separate effects experiments are performed and severe accident calculation methods are developed. The Finnish thermal-hydraulic test facility PACTEL (Parallel Channel Test Loop) is used extensively for the evaluation of the VVER-440 plant accident behaviour, for the validation of the accident analysis computer codes and for the testing of proposed passive safety system concepts. Risk analysis is currently being introduced to safety-related risk decision-making among the power plant staff and the authorities. Methods of risk analysis are developed particularly for complicated accident sequences, where a general disturbance is combined with common-cause failures of equipment and human intervention. (4 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.)

  10. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to revitalisation of the RA reactor stared in 1986, were continued in 1991. A number of interventions on the reactor components were finished that are supposed to enable continuous and reliable operation. The last, and at the same time largest action, related to exchange of complete reactor instrumentation is underway, but it is behind the schedule in 1991 because the delivery of components from USSR is late. Production of this instruments is financed by the IAEA according to the contract signed in December 1988 with Russian Atomenergoexport. According to this contract, it has been planned that the RA reactor instrumentation should be delivered to the Vinca Institute by the end of 1990. Only 56% of the instrumentation was delivered until September 1991. Since then any delivery of components to Yugoslavia was stopped because of the temporary embargo imposed by the IAEA. In 1991 most of the existing RA reactor instrumentation was dismantled, only the part needed for basic measurements when reactor is not operated, was maintained. Activities related to improvement of Russian project were continued in 1994. Control and maintenance of the reactor components was done regularly and efficiently. Extensive repair of the secondary coolant loop is almost finished and will be completed in the first part of 1995 according to existing legal procedures and IAEA recommendations. Fuel inspection by the IAEA safeguards inspectors was done on a monthly basis. There have been on the average 47 employees at the RA reactor which is considered sufficient for maintenance and repair conditions. Research reactor RA Annual report for year 1991 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection

  11. Event management in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Radiological and Nuclear Safety field, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority of Argentina controls the activities of three investigation reactors and three critical groups, by means of evaluations, audits and inspections, in order to assure the execution of the requirements settled down in the Licenses of the facilities, in the regulatory standards and in the documentation of mandatory character in general. In this work one of the key strategies developed by the ARN to promote an appropriate level of radiological and nuclear safety, based on the control of the administration of the abnormal events that its could happen in the facilities is described. The established specific regulatory requirements in this respect and the activities developed in the entities operators are presented. (Author)

  12. Heat transfer and core neutronics considerations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Determan, W. R.; Lewis, Brian

    1991-01-01

    The authors summarize the results of detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic evaluations of the heat pipe cooled thermionic (HPTI) reactor design, identify its key design attributes, and quantify its performance characteristics. The HPTI core uses modular, liquid-metal core heat transfer assemblies to replace the liquid-metal heat transport loop employed by in-core thermionic reactor designs of the past. The nuclear fuel, power conversion, heat transport, and heat rejection functions are all combined into a single modular unit. The reactor/converter assembly uses UN fuel pins to obtain a critical core configuration with in-core safety rods and reflector controls added to complete the subassembly. By thermally bonding the core heat transfer assemblies during the reactor core is coupled neutronically, thermally, and electrically into a modular assembly of individual power sources with cross-tied architecture. A forward-facing heat pipe radiator assembly extends from the reactor head in the shape of a frustum of a cone on the opposite side of the power system from the payload. Important virtues of the concept are the absence of any single-point failures and the ability of the core to effectively transfer the TFE waste heat load laterally to other in-core heat transfer assemblies in the event of multiple failures in either in-core and radiator heat pipes.

  13. Research reactors: a tool for science and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The types and uses of research reactors are reviewed. After an analysis of the world situation, the demand of new research reactors of about 20 MW is foreseen. The experience and competitiveness of INVAP S.E. as designer and constructor of research reactors is outlined and the general specifications of the reactors designed by INVAP for Egypt and Australia are given

  14. Chemical and physical analysis of core materials for advanced high temperature reactors with process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various chemical and physical methods for the analysis of structural materials have been developed in the research programmes for advanced high temperature reactors. These methods are discussed using as examples the structural materials of the reactor core - the fuel elements consisting of coated particles in a graphite matrix and the structural graphite. Emphasis is given to the methods of chemical analysis. The composition of fuel kernels is investigated using chemical analysis methods to determine the heavy metals content (uranium, plutonium, thorium and metallic impurity elements) and the amount of non-metallic constituents. The properties of the pyrocarbon and silicon carbide coatings of fuel elements are investigated using specially developed physiochemical methods. Regarding the irradiation behaviour of coated particles and fuel elements, methods have been developed for examining specimens in hot cells following exposures under reactor operating conditions, to supplement the measurements of in-reactor performance. For the structural graphite, the determination of impurities is important because certain impurities may cause pitting corrosion during irradiation. The localized analysis of very low impurity concentrations is carried out using spectrochemical d.c. arc excitation, local laser and inductively coupled plasma methods. (orig.)

  15. Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) fuel and In-Core Fuel Management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, K.D.; Sterbentz, J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415-3850 (United States); Meyer, M. [Argonne National Laboratory- West (United States); Lowden, R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (United States); Hoffman, E.; Wei, T.Y.C. [Argonne National Laboratory (United States)]. e-mail: weavkd@inel.gov

    2004-07-01

    The Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) has been chosen as one of six candidates for development as a Generation IV nuclear reactor based on: its ability to fully utilize fuel resources; minimize or reduce its own (and other systems) actinide inventory; produce high efficiency electricity; and the possibility to utilize high temperature process heat. Current design approaches include a high temperature (2 850 C) helium cooled reactor using a direct Brayton cycle, and a moderate temperature (550 C - 650 C) helium or supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) cooled reactor using direct or indirect Brayton cycles. These design choices have thermal efficiencies that approach 45% to 50%, and have turbomachinery sizes that are much more compact compared to steam plants. However, there are challenges associated with the GCFR, which are the focus of current research. This includes safety system design for decay heat removal, development of high temperature/high fluence fuels and materials, and development of fuel cycle strategies. The work presented here focuses on the fuel and preliminary in-core fuel management, where advanced ceramic-ceramic (cercer) dispersion fuels are the main focus, and average burnups to 266 M Wd/kg appear achievable for the reference Si C/(U,TRU)C block/plate fuel. Solid solution (pellet) fuel in composite ceramic clad (Si C/Si C) is also being considered, but remains as a backup due to cladding fabrication challenges, and high centerline temperatures in the fuel. (Author)

  16. Proceedings of the international symposium on research reactor safety operations and modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Symposium on Research Reactor Safety, Operations and Modifications was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency in cooperation with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited-Research Company. The main objectives of this Symposium were: (1) to exchange information and to discuss current perspectives and concerns relating to all aspects to research reactor safety, operations, and modifications; and, (2) to present views and to discuss future initiatives and directions for research reactor design, operations, utilization, and safety. The symposium topics included: research reactor programmes and experience; research reactor design safety and analysis; research reactor modifications and decommissioning; research reactor licensing; and new research reactors. These topics were covered during eight oral sessions and three poster sessions. These Proceedings include the full text of the 93 papers presented. The subject of Symposium was quite wide-ranging in that it covered essentially all aspects of research reactor safety, operations, and modifications. This was considered to be appropriate and timely given the 326 research reactors currently in operation in some 56 countries; given the degree of their utilization which ranges from pure and applied research to radioisotopes production to basic training and manpower development; and given that many of these reactors are undergoing extensive modifications, core conversions, power upratings, and are becoming the subject of safety reassessment and regulatory reviews. Although the Symposium covered many topics, the majority of papers and discussions tended to focus mainly on research reactor safety. This was seen as a clear sign of the continuing recognition of the fundamental importance of identifying and addressing, particularly through international cooperation, issues and concerns associated with research reactor safety

  17. Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor Project: Laboratory-Directed Research and Development Program FY 2002 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, David Andrew; Dolan, Thomas James; Miller, Gregory Kent; Moore, Richard Leroy; Terry, William Knox; Ougouag, Abderrafi Mohammed-El-Ami; Oh, Chang H; Gougar, Hans D

    2002-11-01

    This report documents the results of our research in FY-02 on pebble-bed reactor technology under our Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled the Modular Pebble-Bed Reactor. The MPBR is an advanced reactor concept that can meet the energy and environmental needs of future generations under DOE’s Generation IV initiative. Our work is focused in three areas: neutronics, core design and fuel cycle; reactor safety and thermal hydraulics; and fuel performance.

  18. Experience at SAPHIR Research Reactor, Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The former SAPHIR research reactor has been dismantled completely without any significant difficulty. There are several factors underpinning the successful dismantling of SAPHIR: – Good housekeeping during operation and after shutdown; – Good maintenance of the infrastructure before and after shutdown; – Experienced personnel with knowledge of the reactor history; – Stable legal framework; – Close cooperation with the regulatory authority; – Excellent infrastructure of a large research centre; – Stable financing; – Stable organization, motivated personnel; – Support from skilful local companies; – Waste conditioning and treatment routes on-site and approved by the regulatory authority

  19. Proceedings of the Conference on research reactors application in Yugoslavia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Conference on research reactors operation was organised on the occasion of 20 anniversary of the RB zero power reactor start-up. The presentations showed that research reactors in Yugoslavia, RB, RA and TRIGA had an important role in development of nuclear sciences and technology in Yugoslavia. The reactors were applied in non-destructive testing of materials and fuel elements, development of reactor noise techniques, safety analyses, reactor control methods, neutron activation analysis, neutron radiography, dosimetry, isotope production, etc

  20. Research on the reactor physics using the Kyoto University Critical Assembly (KUCA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Kyoto University Critical Assembly [KUCA] is a multi-core type critical assembly established in 1974, as a facility for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. Thereafter, many reactor physics experiments have been carried out using three cores (A-, B-, and C-cores) in the KUCA. In the A- and B-cores, solid moderator such as polyethylene or graphite is used, whereas light-water is utilized as moderator in the C-core. The A-core has been employed mainly in connection with the Cockcroft-Walton type accelerator installed in the KUCA, to measure (1) the subcriticality by the pulsed neutron technique for the critical safety research and (2) the neutron spectrum by the time-of-flight technique. Recently, a basic study on the tight lattice core has also launched using the A-core. The B-core has been employed for the research on the thorium fuel cycle ever since. The C-core has been employed (1) for the basic studies on the nuclear characteristics of light-water moderated high-flux research reactors, including coupled-cores, and (2) for a research related to reducing enrichment of uranium fuel used in research reactors. The C-core is being utilized in the reactor laboratory course experiment for students of ten universities in Japan. The data base of the KUCA critical experiments is generated so far on the basis of approximately 350 experimental reports accumulated in the KUCA. Besides, the assessed KUCA code system has been established through analyses on the various KUCA experiments. In addition to the KUCA itself, both of them are provided for the joint use study by researchers of all universities in Japan. (author)

  1. Evaluation of the shielding design around the reactor core in the prototype FBR Monju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraki, Takako; Tada, Keiko [Advanced Reactor Technology Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Usami, Shin; Sasaki, Kenji [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, Tsuruga, Fukui (Japan); Tabayashi, Masao [Japan Atomic Power Co., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    This paper describes shielding evaluation of the measurements around the reactor core of Monju. The measurements were performed during the system start-up tests at different power levels between 0% and 45%. The measured reaction rates have been obtained radially from the core to the in-vessel storage rack and axially to the reactor vessel upper plenum. The measured values (E) were compared with the calculated values (C) obtained with the FBR shielding analysis methods. Based upon these results, the design margins around the reactor core have been re-examined and re-confirmed. (author)

  2. Core Research Program, Year 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Dramatic losses of bone mineral density (BMD) and muscle strength are two of the best documented changes observed in humans after prolonged exposure to microgravity. Recovery of muscle upon return to a 1-G environment is well studied, however, far less is known about the rate and completeness of BMD recovery to pre-flight values. Using the mature tail-suspended adult rat model, this proposal will focus on the temporal course of recovery in tibial bone following a 28-d period of skeletal unloading. Through the study of bone density and muscle strength in the same animal, time-points during recovery from simulated microgravity will be identified when bone is at an elevated risk for fracture. These will occur due to the rapid recovery of muscle strength coupled with a slower recovery of bone, producing a significant mismatch in functional strength of these two tissues. Once the time-point of maximal mismatch is defined, various mechanical and pharmacological interventions will be tested at and around this time-point in attempt to minimize the functional difference of bone and muscle. The outcomes of this research will have high relevance for optimizing the rehabilitation of astronauts upon return to Earth, as well as upon landing on the Martian surface before assuming arduous physical tasks. Further. it will impact significantly on rehabilitation issues common to patients experiencing long periods of limb immobilization or bed rest.

  3. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V. 2: Verification and improvement of reactor core seismic analysis codes using core mock-up experiments. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 26-28 September 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report (Volume II) contains the papers summarizing the verification of and improvement to the codes on the basis of the French and Japanese data. Volume I: ''Validation of the Seismic Analysis Codes Using the Reactor Code Experiments'' (IAEA-TECDOC-798) included the Italian PEC reactor data. Refs, figs and tabs

  4. Fuel burnup analysis for the Moroccan TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A fuel burnup analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II Moroccan research reactor was established. ► Burnup calculations were done by means of the in-house developed burnup code BUCAL1. ► BUCAL1 uses the MCNP tallies directly in the calculation of the isotopic inventories. ► The reactor life time was found to be 3360 MW h considering full power operating conditions. ► Power factors and fluxes of the in-core irradiation positions are strongly affected by burnup. -- Abstract: The fundamental advantage and main reason to use Monte Carlo methods for burnup calculations is the possibility to generate extremely accurate burnup dependent one group cross-sections and neutron fluxes for arbitrary core and fuel geometries. Yet, a set of values determined for a material at a given position and time remains accurate only in a local region, in which neutron spectrum and flux vary weakly — and only for a limited period of time, during which changes of the local isotopic composition are minor. This paper presents the approach of fuel burnup evaluation used at the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II research reactor. The approach is essentially based upon the utilization of BUCAL1, an in-house developed burnup code. BUCAL1 is a FORTRAN computer code designed to aid in analysis, prediction, and optimization of fuel burnup performance in nuclear reactors. The code was developed to incorporate the neutron absorption reaction tally information generated directly by MCNP5 code in the calculation of fissioned or neutron-transmuted isotopes for multi-fueled regions. The fuel cycle length and changes in several core parameters such as: core excess reactivity, control rods position, fluxes at the irradiation positions, axial and radial power factors and other parameters are estimated. Besides, this study gives valuable insight into the behavior of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor during its life-time and it will allow the establishment of

  5. Research nuclear reactor RA - Annual Report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities related to revitalisation of the RA reactor stared in 1986, were continued in 1991. A number of interventions on the reactor components were finished that are supposed to enable continuous and reliable operation. The last, and at the same time largest action, related to exchange of complete reactor instrumentation is underway, but it is behind the schedule in 1991 because the delivery of components from USSR is late. Production of this instruments is financed by the IAEA according to the contract signed in December 1988 with Russian Atomenergoexport. According to this contract, it has been planned that the RA reactor instrumentation should be delivered to the Vinca Institute by the end of 1990. Only 56% of the instrumentation was delivered until September 1991. Since then any delivery of components to Yugoslavia was stopped because of the temporary embargo imposed by the IAEA. In 1991 most of the existing RA reactor instrumentation was dismantled, only the part needed for basic measurements when reactor is not operated, was maintained. Construction of some support elements is almost finished by the local staff. The Institute has undertaken this activity in order to speed up the ending of the project. If all the planned instrumentation would not arrive until the end of March 1992, it would not be possible to start the RA reactor testing operation in the first part of 1993, as previously planned. In 1991, 53 staff members took part in the activities during 1991, which is considered sufficient for maintenance and repair conditions. Research reactor RA Annual report for year 1991 is divided into two main parts to cover: (1) operation and maintenance and (2) activities related to radiation protection

  6. Evaluation of fluid effects on the dynamic response of a fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of dynamic experiments on shaking tables, carried out in water (simulating sodium) on both single and coupled core element prototypes and core simplified mock-up configurations of the Italian PEC fast reactor test facility, with excitation gradually increasing up to above Safe Shutdown Earthquake, have been analysed by use of the one-dimensional computer program CORALIE and the two-dimensional program CLASH. The study confirmed the conservative nature of the PEC core design calculations, provided the natural frequency and damping values to be used in the calculations for the Final Safety Report, and allowed the fluid-structure interaction model to be assessed for the PEC core seismic analysis. It also contributed to the validation of the above-mentioned computer codes for their general use for the fast reactor core analysis as well as to a better understanding of fluid-structure interaction problems concerning the fast reactor core

  7. Steady Thermal Field Simulation of Forced Air-cooled Column-type Air-core Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Qiu; LI Zhenbiao; YIN Xiaogen; YUAN Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Modeling the steady thermal field of the column-type air-core reactor,and further analyzing its distribution regularity,will help optimizing reactor design as well as improving its quality.The operation mechanism and inner insulation structure of a novel current limiting column-type air-core reactor is introduced in this paper.The finite element model of five encapsulation forced air-cooled column type air-core reactor is constructed using Fluent.Most importantly,this paper present a new method that,the steady thermal field of reactor working under forced air-cooled condition is simulated without arbitrarily defining the convection heat transfer coefficient for the initial condition; The result of the thermal field distribution shows that,the maximum steady temperature rise of forced air-cooled columntype air-core reactor happens approximately 5% to its top.The law of temperature distribution indicates:In the 1/3part of the reactor to its bottom,the temperature will rise rapidly to the increasing of height,yet the gradient rate is gradually decreasing; In the 5 % part of the reactor to its top,the temperature will drop rapidly to the increasing of height; In the part between,the temperature will rise slowly to the increasing of height.The conclusion draws that more thermal withstand capacity should be considered at the 5 % part of the reactor to its top to achieve optimal design solution.

  8. Microflora of nuclear research reactor pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The circulation of pool water through the nuclear reactor core produces a bactericidal effect on the microflora due to the influence of various kinds of radiation. The microbe contents return to their initial level in 2 to 4 months after the circulation has stopped. The microflora comprises mainly cocci in large numbers, G-positive rods and fungi, and lower amounts of G-negative rods as compared with the water with which the reactor pool was initially filled. Increased amounts are present of radiation-resistant forms exhibiting intense production of catalase and nuclease. Supposedly, the presence of these enzymes is in some way beneficial to the microbes in their survival in the high-radiation zones. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs., 12 refs

  9. Technical specifications: Health Physics Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Health Physics Research Reactor (HPRR) and an envelope of operation within which there is assurance that these limits will not be exceeded. The specifications were written to satisfy the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0540, September 1, 1972

  10. Proceedings of the European Research Reactor Conference - RRFM 2012 Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2012 RRFM, the European Research Reactor Conference will be jointly organised with IGORR, the International Group Operating Research Reactors. This will allow offering engineers and specialised nuclear researchers the chance to focus on the latest technological developments in the field of nuclear research reactors. The conference programme will revolve around a series of Plenary Sessions dedicated to the latest global developments with regards to research reactor technology and management systems, parallel sessions that focused on specific research projects and initiatives. (authors)

  11. Reactor numerical simulation and hydraulic test research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L. S. [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, the computer hardware was improved on the numerical simulation on flow field in the reactor. In our laboratory, we usually use the Pro/e or UG commercial software. After completed topology geometry, ICEM-CFD is used to get mesh for computation. Exact geometrical similarity is maintained between the main flow paths of the model and the prototype, with the exception of the core simulation design of the fuel assemblies. The drive line system is composed of drive mechanism, guide bush assembly, fuel assembly and control rod assembly, and fitted with the rod level indicator and drive mechanism power device.

  12. Review of Operation and Maintenance Support Systems for Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation support systems do not directly control the plant but it can aid decision making itself by obtaining and analyzing large amounts of data. Recently, the demand of research reactor is growing and the need for operation support systems is increasing, but it has not been applied for research reactors. This study analyzes operation and maintenance support systems of NPPs and suggests appropriate systems for research reactors based on analysis. In this paper, operation support systems for research reactors are suggested by comparing with those of power reactors. Currently, research reactors do not cover special systems in order to improve safety and operability in comparison with power reactors. Therefore we expect to improve worth to use by introducing appropriate systems for research reactors. In further research, we will develop an appropriate system such as applications or tools that can be applied to the research reactor

  13. Analysis of advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor core designs with improved safety characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, the large majority of nuclear power plants are operated with thermal-neutron spectra and need regular fuel loading of enriched uranium. According to the identified conventional uranium resources and their current consumption rate, only about 100 years’ nuclear fuel supply is foreseen. A reactor operated with a fast-neutron spectrum, on the other hand, can induce self-sustaining, or even breeding, conditions for its inventory of fissile material, which effectively allow it, after the initial loading, to be refueled using simply natural or depleted uranium. This implies a much more efficient use of uranium resources. Moreover, minor actinides become fissionable in a fast-neutron spectrum, enabling full closure of the fuel cycle and leading to a minimization of long-lived radioactive wastes. The sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) is one of the most promising candidates to meet the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) declared goals. In comparison to other Generation IV systems, there is considerable design experience related to the SFR, and also more than 300 reactor years of practical operation. As a fast-neutron-spectrum system, the long-term operation of an SFR core in a closed fuel cycle will lead to an equilibrium state, where both reactivity and fuel mass flow stabilize. Although the SFR has many advantageous characteristics, it has one dominating neutronics drawback: there is generally a positive reactivity effect when sodium coolant is removed from the core. This so-called sodium void effect becomes even stronger in the equilibrium closed fuel cycle. The goal of the present doctoral research is to improve the safety characteristics of advanced SFR core designs, in particular, from the viewpoint of the positive sodium void reactivity effect. In this context, particular importance has been given to the dynamic core behavior under a hypothetical unprotected loss-of-flow (ULOF) accident scenario, in which sodium boiling occurs. The proposed

  14. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kenton, M.A. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  15. The applications of research reactors. Report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owners and operators of many research reactors are finding that their facilities are not being utilized as fully as they might wish. Perhaps the original mission of the reactor has been accomplished or a particular analysis is now performed better in other ways. In addition, the fact that a research reactor exists and is available does not guarantee that users will come seeking to take advantage of the facility. Therefore, many research reactor owners and operators recognize that there is a need to develop a strategic plan for long term sustainability, including the 'marketing' of their facilities. An important first element in writing a strategic plan is to evaluate the current and potential capabilities of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to assist in such an evaluation by providing some factual and advisory information with respect to all of the current applications of research reactors. By reference to this text, each facility owner and operator will be able to assess whether or not a new application is feasible with the reactor, and what will be required to develop capability in that application. Applications fall into four broad categories: human resource development, irradiations, extracted beam work and testing. The human resource category includes public information, training and education and can be accomplished by any reactor. Irradiation applications involves inserting material into the reactor to induce radioactivity for analytical purposes, to produce radioisotopes or to induce radiation damage effects. Almost all reactors can be utilized for some irradiation applications, but as the reactor flux gets higher the range of potential uses gets larger. Beam work usually includes using neutron beams outside of the reactor for a variety of analytical purposes. Because of the magnitude of the fluxes needed at some distance from the core, most beam work can only be performed by the intermediate and higher powered research reactors. Testing nuclear

  16. Technical Research on Safety Management and Effective Application of China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) is a tank in pool type, light water cooled, heavy water reflected research reactor. The maximum thermal neutron flux of the reactor is 1.0x1015 cm-2s-1, and the reactor power is 60 MW. The reactor was designed and constructed completely by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The construction project began on Aug. 26, 2002, reactor criticality was achieved on May 13, 2010, and it is scheduled to complete power increasing tests by the end of 2011. Future operation of CARR is preparing and its utilization program is considered. It is expected that CARR will greatly improve and enhance the comprehensive research capability of nuclear science and technology and push the peaceful use of nuclear technology forward. The paper briefly presents the reactor safety features, the operation organization and responsibilities, the management of operation safety, and the future utilizations. According to national safety regulations of research reactor, evaluation of operation safety of CARR shall be executed after initial operation at power level and submit the revised ''Final Safety Analysis Report'' (FSAR) to the regulatory body.Ordinary operation shall be approved and operation license shall be issued by the regulatory body after review on the ''Final Safety Analysis Report.'' Vertical and horizontal channels with associated equipment and instruments are installed in reactor core and in heavy water reflector. CARR will be used to produce variety of RIs in comprehensive fields, to meet the requirements of engineering tests and irradiation for developing NPP fuels and materials in China, to apply for NTD of mono-crystalline silicone, NAA, neutron photography and to provide high intense neutron beam for application of neutron scattering experiments in an adequate scale and others, etc. (author)

  17. Thermohydraulic assessment of the RP-10 reactor core to determine the maximum power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermohydraulic parameters assessment of the RP-10 reactor core from the most thermally demanded (hot channel). Determination of the operation thermal maximum power considering security margins and statistical treatment of uncertainty factors

  18. Comparison of three/four equations reactor core models in the Laguna Verde simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work presents results of the simulation of three transients in the full scope Laguna Verde nuclear power plant simulator. Three and four equations reactor core models were used, and simulation results are compared with manufacturer's predictions. (Author)

  19. Numerical Analysis of Magnetic Force of Dry-Type Air-Core Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUZhi-gang; GENGYing-san; WANGJian-hua

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a coupled magnetic-circuit method for computing the magnetic force of air-core reactor under short-time current. The current and the magnetic flux density are computed first and then the magnetic force is obtained. Thus, the dynamic stability performance of air-core reactor can be analyzed at the design stage to reduce experimental cost and shorten the lead-time of product development.

  20. Irradiation testing of miniature fuel plates for the RERTR program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, R.L.; Martin, M.M.

    1981-07-01

    An irradiation test facility, which provides a test bed for irradiating a variety of miniature fuel plates (miniplates) for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, has been placed into operation. These tests screen various candidate fuel materials on their suitability for replacing the highly enriched uranium fuel materials currently used by the world's test and research reactors with a lower enrichment fuel material, without significantly degrading reactor operating characteristics and power levels. The use of low uranium enrichment of about 20% /sup 235/U in place of highly enriched fuel for these reactors would reduce the potential for /sup 235/U diversion. The irradiation test facility, designated as HFED, is operating in core position E-7 in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), a 30-MW water-moderated reactor. The miniplates will achieve burnups of up to approx. 2.2 x 10/sup 27/ fissions/m/sup 3/ of fuel.

  1. An option for the Brazilian nuclear project: necessity of fast breeder reactors and core design for an experimental fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming to assure the continued utilization of fission energy, the development of fast breeder reactors (FBRs) is a necessity. Binary fueled LMFBRs are proposed, as the best type for the Brazilian nuclear system in the future. The inherent safety characteristics are superior to current fast breeder reactors and an efficient utilization of thorium can be realized. The construction and operation of an experimental fast reactor is the first step and a basic tool for the development of FBRs technologies. A serie of core design for an 90 MW FBR is studied and the possible options and sizes of the main parameters are identified. (E.G.)

  2. Control rod reactivity worth determination of a typical MTR research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizwan, M.; Raza, S.S.; Khan, R. [Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences (PIEAS), Islamabad (Pakistan). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering

    2015-10-15

    The safe and reliable utilization of research reactor demands the possible accurate information of control rod (CR) worths. The criticality positions of the control rods changes with time due to build up fission products. It is therefore important to determine the reactivity worth of control rods. The aim of this article is to estimate the reactivity worth of controls rods in the equilibrium core of a Materials Testing Reactor (MTR). A deterministic model of the reactor core was developed and confirmed against the reference results of excess reactivity, shutdown margin and combined control rod reactivity worth using the combination of WIMS/D4 and CITATION computer codes.

  3. Unique applications of research reactors with TRIGA UZrHx fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA reactor fuel (UZrHx) in research reactors provides significant safety features that have permitted varied and unique applications. The safety features include a very large, prompt, negative temperature coefficient of reactivity; very high safety limit for fuel temperature (1150 degrees C); and large fission product retention even for unclad fuel. The recognized safety of these reactors has permitted them to be located as appropriate on university campuses in buildings housing lecture halls and in hospitals. It has also facilitated installation of in-core or near-core experiments and facilities, including liquid hydrogen or other cryogenic neutron sources

  4. Influence of high dose irradiation on core structural and fuel materials in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) periodically organizes meeting to discuss and review important aspects of fast reactor technology. The fifth meeting held in Obninsk, Russian Federation, 16-19 June 1997, was devoted to the influence of high dose irradiation on the mechanical properties of reactor core structural and fuel materials. The proceedings includes the papers submitted at this meeting each with a separate abstract

  5. Irradiation capabilities of LR-0 reactor with VVER-1000 Mock-Up core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Košťál, Michal; Rypar, Vojtěch; Svadlenková, Marie; Cvachovec, František; Jánský, Bohumil; Milčák, Ján

    2013-12-01

    Even low power reactors, such as zero power reactors, are sufficient for semiconductor radiation hardness effect investigation. This reflects the fact that fluxes necessary for affecting semiconductor electrical resistance are much lower than fluxes necessary to affect material parameters. The paper aims to describe the irradiation possibilities of the LR-0 reactor with a special core arrangement corresponding to VVER-1000 dosimetry Mock-Up.

  6. The utility of different reactor types for the research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents a general view of the use of the different belgian research reactor i.e. venus reactor, BR-1 reactor, BR-2 reactor and BR-3 reactor. Particular attention is given to the programmes which is in the interest of international collaboration. In order to reach an efficient utilization of such reactors they require a specialized personnel groups to deal with the irradiation devices and radioactive materials and post irradiation examinations, creating a complete material testing station. (A.J.)

  7. Core monitoring and surveillance of VVER-440 type reactors in the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SCORPIO-VVER reactor core monitoring system is an advanced redundant software system without actuating members falling in the BT3 class which has been installed at the four Dukovany reactor units and at two units of the Slovak Jaslovske Bohunice V2 NPP. The system is described in detail and its history and experience gained at Dukovany are highlighted. (orig.)

  8. Safety review, assessment and inspection on research reactors, experimental reactors and nuclear heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NNSA and its regional office step further strengthened the regulation on the safety of in-service research reactors in 1996. A lot of work has been done on the supervision of safe in rectifying the review and assessment of modified items, the review of operational documents, the treatment of accidents, the establishment of the system for operational experience feedback, daily and routine inspection on nuclear safety. The internal management of the operating organization on nuclear safety was further strengthened, nuclear safety culture was further enhanced, the promotion in nuclear safety and the safety situation for in-service research reactors were improved

  9. A new safety channel based on ¹⁷N detection in research reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfi, Somayye; Gharib, Morteza

    2015-10-01

    Tehran research reactor (TRR) is a representative of pool type research reactors using light water, as coolant and moderator. This reactor is chosen as a prototype to demonstrate and prove the feasibility of (17)N detection as a new redundant channel for reactor power measurement. In TRR, similar to other pool type reactors, neutron detectors are immersed in the pool around the core as the main power measuring devices. In the present article, a different approach, using out of water neutron detector, is employed to measure reactor power. This new method is based on (17)O (n,p) (17)N reaction taking place inside the core and subsequent measurement of delayed neutrons emitted due to (17)N disintegration. Count and measurement of neutrons around outlet water pipe provides a reliable redundant safety channel to measure reactor power. Results compared with other established channels indicate a good agreement and shows a linear interdependency with true thermal power. Safety of reactor operation is improved with installation & use of this new power measuring channel. The new approach may equally serve well as a redundant channel in all other types of reactors having coolant comprised of oxygen in its molecular constituents. Contrary to existing channels, this one is totally out of water and thus is an advantage over current instrumentations. It is proposed to employ the same idea on other reactors (nuclear power plants too) to improve safety criteria. PMID:26123105

  10. Research reactor fuel management in the Czech Republic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel management of the Czech research reactors is described. There are three research reactors in the Czech Republic: LVR-15 and LR-0 operated by the Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc, VR-1 operated by the Czech Technical University, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering in Prague, and SR-0 reactor of SKODA JS plc which is under decommissioning now. The paper describes the major features of the Czech research reactors, types of fuels used in them, and the spent fuel management principles. The participation of the LVR-15 and VR-1 reactors in the RERTR international programme (Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors) is also highlighted. (author)

  11. Experimental investigation on Heat Transfer Performance of Annular Flow Path Heat Pipe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Guk; Kim, Kyung Mo; Jeong, Yeong Shin; Bang, In Cheol [UNIST, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Mochizuki et al. was suggested the passive cooling system to spent nuclear fuel pool. Detail analysis of various heat pipe design cases was studied to determine the heat pipes cooling performance. Wang et al. suggested the concept PRHRS of MSR using sodium heat pipes, and the transient performance of high temperature sodium heat pipe was numerically simulated in the case of MSR accident. The meltdown at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plants alarmed to the dangers of station blackout (SBO) accident. After the SBO accident, passive decay heat removal systems have been investigated to prevent the severe accidents. Mochizuki et al. suggested the heat pipes cooling system using loop heat pipes for decay heat removal cooling and analysis of heat pipe thermal resistance for boiling water reactor (BWR). The decay heat removal systems for pressurized water reactor (PWR) were suggested using natural convection mechanisms and modification of PWR design. Our group suggested the concept of a hybrid heat pipe with control rod as Passive IN-core Cooling System (PINCs) for decay heat removal for advanced nuclear power plant. Hybrid heat pipe is the combination of the heat pipe and control rod. In the present research, the main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure to the heat transfer performance of heat pipe containing neutron absorber material, B{sub 4}C. The main objective is to investigate the effect of the inner structure in heat pipe to the heat transfer performance with annular flow path. ABS pellet was used instead of B{sub 4}C pellet as cylindrical structures. The thermal performances of each heat pipes were measured experimentally. Among them, concentric heat pipe showed the best performance compared with others. 1. Annular evaporation section heat pipe and annular flow path heat pipe showed heat transfer degradation. 2. AHP also had annular vapor space and contact cooling surface per unit volume of vapor was increased. Heat transfer

  12. A concept of prospective sodium fast reactor with ductless fuel subassemblies in the core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedov, A.A.; Alekseev, P.N.; Fomichenko, P.A.; Ponomarev-Stepnoy, N.N.; Proshkin, A.A.; Ponomarev, A.S.; Stukalov, V.A. [Russian Research Center, Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-01

    The Kurchatov Institute studies the concept of a sodium fast reactor (SFR) with advanced core design, which is based on the following principle technique solutions: -) application of ductless fuel subassemblies with wide lattice of fuel rods of increased diameter and spaced by grids; -) the usage of dense U-Pu ceramic fuel and low-nickel steels, and -) application of cluster-type control and protection system. Preconceptual studies have shown, that SFR with advanced core design is 3 times more effective in the fuel consumption than project BN-800 reactor due to better neutron balance in the core and CBR (core breeding ratio) {approx} 1, provides getting quite high burn-up of the core fuel (Bmax {approx} 15-20 % of heavy atoms), increases fuel life up to 7-8 years at specific loading of fissile nuclides in the core less than 5 t/GW, decreases electricity demand for pumping the primary coolant (due to low hydraulic resistance of the core) and has bigger safety potential in accidents than the core with traditional liquid metal fast reactor design (due to low core reactivity margin, high level of natural circulation and subassemblies hydraulic interaction). In the paper the main results of preconceptual feasibility study of SFR with advanced core design are presented and discussed with a focus on technique and economic aspects. Some of characteristic features of core neutron physics, thermal hydraulics and fuel rod thermal mechanics behavior are displayed and discussed as well. (authors)

  13. Reactor physics calculations and their experimental validation for conversion and upgrading of a typical swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Detailed neutronic analysis of a typical swimming pool type research reactor, Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1), was carried out for conversion of its core from 93% highly enriched uranium to 20% low enriched uranium fuel with power upgrading from 5 to 10 MW. Standard computer codes WIMS-D/4 and CITATION were employed to calculate core excess reactivity, power defect, reactivity effect of xenon and samarium, reactivity worth of fuel element, worth of control rods, shutdown margin, reactivity feedback coefficients, neutron flux and power peaking factors. A series of low and high power tests were performed on the newly converted core to determine its performance. A comparison between the calculated and measured results is presented in this article. The agreement is generally good

  14. Reactor training simulator for the Replacement Research Reactor (RRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the ANSTO Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) Reactor Training Simulator (RTS) are presented.The RTS is a full-scope and partial replica simulator.Its scope includes a complete set of plant normal evolutions and malfunctions obtained from the plant design basis accidents list.All the systems necessary to implement the operating procedures associated to these transients are included.Within these systems both the variables connected to the plant SCADA and the local variables are modelled, leading to several thousands input-output variables in the plant mathematical model (PMM).The trainee interacts with the same plant SCADA, a Foxboro I/A Series system.Control room hardware is emulated through graphical displays with touch-screen.The main system models were tested against RELAP outputs.The RTS includes several modules: a model manager (MM) that encapsulates the plant mathematical model; a simulator human machine interface, where the trainee interacts with the plant SCADA; and an instructor console (IC), where the instructor commands the simulation.The PMM is built using Matlab-Simulink with specific libraries of components designed to facilitate the development of the nuclear, hydraulic, ventilation and electrical plant systems models

  15. Sampling of reactor pressure vessel and core internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decommissioning and dismantling of nuclear power plants is a growing business as a huge number of plants built in the 1970's have now reached their lifetime. It is well known that dismantling a nuclear power plant means an extraordinary expense for the owner respectively operator. Beside the dismantling works for itself, the disposal of activated components and other nuclear waste is very expensive. What comes next is the fact that final disposal facilities are not available yet in most countries meaning a need for interim storage on-site in specially built facilities. It can be concluded that a special attention is paid on producing a minimal radioactive waste volume. For this, optimized dismantling and packaging concepts have to be developed. AREVA is proud of versatile experience in successfully dismantling nuclear components like core internals and reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The basis of a well-founded and optimized dismantling and packaging concept must always be the detailed knowledge of the radiological condition of the component to be and in the best case a 3D activation- model. For keeping the necessary sampling effort as small as possible, but simultaneously as efficient as possible, representative sampling positions are defined in advance by theoretical radiological examinations. For this, a detailed 3D-CAD-model of the components to be dismantled has proven very helpful and effective. Under these aspects a sampling of RPV and its components is necessary to verify the theoretically calculated radiological data. The obtained results of activation and contamination are taken into account for the optimized dismantling and packaging strategy. The precise 3D-activation-model will reduce the necessary number and type of final disposal containers as security factors are minimized leading to a lower shielding effort, too. Besides, components or even parts of components may be subject of release measurement. In the end, costs can be reduced. In this context

  16. 100-KE REACTOR CORE REMOVAL PROJECT ALTERNATIVE ANALYSIS WORKSHOP REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HARRINGTON RA

    2010-01-15

    On December 15-16, 2009, a 100-KE Reactor Core Removal Project Alternative Analysis Workshop was conducted at the Washington State University Consolidated Information Center, Room 214. Colburn Kennedy, Project Director, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) requested the workshop and Richard Harrington provided facilitation. The purpose of the session was to select the preferred Bio Shield Alternative, for integration with the Thermal Shield and Core Removal and develop the path forward to proceed with project delivery. Prior to this workshop, the S.A. Robotics (SAR) Obstruction Removal Alternatives Analysis (565-DLV-062) report was issued, for use prior to and throughout the session, to all the team members. The multidisciplinary team consisted ofrepresentatives from 100-KE Project Management, Engineering, Radcon, Nuclear Safety, Fire Protection, Crane/Rigging, SAR Project Engineering, the Department of Energy Richland Field Office, Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, Defense Nuclear Facility Safety Board, and Deactivation and Decommission subject matter experts from corporate CH2M HILL and Lucas. Appendix D contains the workshop agenda, guidelines and expectations, opening remarks, and attendance roster going into followed throughout the workshop. The team was successful in selecting the preferred alternative and developing an eight-point path forward action plan to proceed with conceptual design. Conventional Demolition was selected as the preferred alternative over two other alternatives: Diamond Wire with Options, and Harmonic Delamination with Conventional Demolition. The teams preferred alternative aligned with the SAR Obstruction Removal Alternative Analysis report conclusion. However, the team identified several Path Forward actions, in Appendix A, which upon completion will solidify and potentially enhance the Conventional Demolition alternative with multiple options and approaches to achieve project delivery

  17. Core and fuel design for Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) using SRAC computer code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core and fuel down scale analysis on PBMR-HTR using SRAC program aims to identify the influence of U235 enrichment, burnable poison, coolant flow rate and coolant temperature entered to criticality core and safety aspects of nuclear reactor with the parameters are multiplication factor (keff) and fuel temperature coefficient, moderator temperature coefficient and coolant temperature coefficient. Core PBMR-HTR finite cylindrical with a hole in the middle which contains 334,000 pebble fuel bed. That consist of UO2 fuel, graphite moderator and helium coolant. Down scale the design model performed on the half core represent the whole core. The study was conducted by varying the fuel enrichment of 8%; 8.5%; 9%; 9.5% and 10%, while variation burnable poison enrichment at 5 ppm, 7 ppm, 9 ppm, 11 ppm and 15 ppm. The variation of coolant flow rate of 60%, 80%, 100%, 120% and 140% from its original value at 17.118 kg/s while the variation of coolant temperature input at 673.15 K; 723.15 K; 773.15 K; 823.15 K and 873.15 K. In this research, value of keff without Gd2O3 are 1.026213 (BOL) and 1.004173 (EOL) with excess reactivity of 2.55% with 9% U235 enrichment. While keff on BOL by using 7 ppm Gd2O3 of 1.006968 and 1.004198 for EOL with excess reactivity of 0.69%. Fuel temperature reactivity coefficient, moderator and coolant in a row for -8.597317E-05/K; -2.595284E-05 /K and 1.1496E-06/K. Temperature reactivity coefficient is negative. This indicates inherent safety characteristic have been met. Increasing the input temperature and coolant flow rate reduction lowers the value of keff core, and it will contribute to negative reactivity coefficient. (author)

  18. The current status of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tri Wulan Tjiptono; Syarip

    1998-10-01

    The Kartini reactor reached the first criticality on January 25, 1979. In the first three years, the reactor power is limited up to 50 kW thermal power and on July 1, 1982 has been increased to 100 kW. It has been used as experiments facility by researcher of Atomic Energy National Agency and students of the Universities. Three beam tubes used as experiments facilities, the first, is used as a neutron source for H{sub 2}O-Natural Uranium Subcritical Assembly, the second, is developed for neutron radiography facility and the third, is used for gamma radiography facility. The other facilities are rotary rack and two pneumatic transfer systems, one for delayed neutron counting system and the other for the new Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) facility. The rotary rack used for isotope production for NAA purpose (for long time irradiation), the delayed neutron counting system used for analysis the Uranium contents of the ores and the new NAA is provided for short live elements analysis. In the last three years the Reactor Division has a joint use program with the Nuclear Component and Engineering Center in research reactor instrumentation and control development. (author)

  19. Draft of standard for graphite core components in high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the design of the graphite components in the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR), the graphite structural design code for the HTTR etc. were applied. However, general standard systems for the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) have not been established yet. The authors had studied on the technical issues which is necessary for the establishment of a general standard system for the graphite components in the HTGR. The results of the study were documented and discussed at a 'Special committee on research on preparation for codes for graphite components in HTGR' at Atomic Energy Society of Japan (AESJ). As a result, 'Draft of Standard for Graphite Core Components in High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor.' was established. In the draft standard, the graphite components are classified three categories (A, B and C) in the standpoints of safety functions and possibility of replacement. For the components in the each class, design standard, material and product standards, and in-service inspection and maintenance standard are determined. As an appendix of the design standard, the graphical expressions of material property data of 1G-110 graphite as a function of fast neutron fluence are expressed. The graphical expressions were determined through the interpolation and extrapolation of the irradiated data. (author)

  20. Study on Mechanism of Drag Reduction by Core-annular Flow in Transportation of Emulsion Matrix%乳胶基质水环输送的机理研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨佳; 刘寿康

    2012-01-01

    对目前广泛应用于乳化炸药混装车上的水环输送乳胶基质的减阻机理进行了理论分析,分别推导出层流同心水环、湍流同心水环的速度分布与流量计算公式,并得到了从层流到湍流的转捩判据.此外,优化了水环润滑装置结构参数,提出了稳定水环输送的相关措施.%The mechanism of drag reduction by core-annular flow in transportation of emulsion matrix was widely used in the existing mixing-loading truck for emulsion explosive. After theoretical analysis, formulas were deduced respectively to calculate the velocity distribution, flow rate of annular water flow in laminar and turbulent flows. The criterion of transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow was obtained. Furthermore, the optimized parameters and some stabilizing measures are also proposed for core-annular flow device.

  1. The current status of utilization of research reactors in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminars on utilization of research reactors were held to enhance experience exchanging among institutes and universities in China. The status of CARR (China Advanced Research Reactor) project is briefly described. The progress in BNCT program in China is introduced. (author)

  2. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field in Flow-guide Tank of China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The flow-guide tank of China advanced research reactor (CARR) is located at the top of the reactor vessel and connected with the inlet coolant pipe. It acts as a reactor inlet coolant distributor and plays an important role in reducing the flow-induced vibration of the internal components of the reactor core. Several designs of the flow-guide tank have been proposed, however, the final design option has to be made after detailed investigation of the velocity profile within the flow-guide tank for each configuration.

  3. WIMCIT: An in-house development integrated code for neutron analysis in MTR reactors with mixed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    So far, Peruvian nuclear research reactors RP-10 and RP-0 have been operating only with uranium oxide fuel elements (U3O8+Al). In the future RP-10 reactor will operate with mixed cores (U3Si2+Al, U3O8+Al). For this reason the calculus capacity has to be increased in order to be able to handle the new fuel management. Since preparation of nuclear libraries for diffusion calculation requires a significant amount of computational and human resources a new tool that processes libraries generation and diffusion calculations is necessary. For this reason the WIMCIT code was developed. The main feature of this code is to integrate WIMS and CITATION codes. The user can generate nuclear libraries in different groups (from 1 to 18) in the range of 0 - 10MeV automatically. They are generated from the WIMS output and then interpolated to create an input to CITATION according to the user specifications. Both the flux and power profiles can be calculated in different transverse sections. The output form the diffusion calculations is processed and different physical parameters of the reactor are displayed to the user. Others WIMCIT capabilities are, flux calculation, power profiles, burn-up average by element, control rod interaction in the core and fuel management in mixed core. The WIMCIT code has been validated on the experimental data from the RP-10 fresh core to the current core (Number 24). (author)

  4. International conference on research reactor utilization, safety, decommissioning, fuel and waste management. Extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For more than 50 years research reactors have played an important role in the development of nuclear science and technology. They have made significant contributions to a large number of disciplines as well as to the educational and research programmes of about 70 countries world wide. About 675 research reactors have been built to date, of which some 278 are now operating in 59 countries (86 of them in 38 developing Member States). Altogether over 13,000 reactor-years of cumulative operational experience has been gained during this remarkable period. The objective of this conference was to foster the exchange of information on current research reactor concerns related to safety, operation, utilization, decommissioning and to provide a forum for reactor operators, designers, managers, users and regulators to share experience, exchange opinions and to discuss options and priorities. The topical areas covered were: a) Utilization, including New trends and directions for utilization of research reactors; Effective management of research reactors and associated facilities; Engineering considerations and experience related to refurbishment and modifications; Strategic planning and marketing; Classical applications (nuclear activation analysis, isotope production, neutron beam applications, industrial irradiations, medical applications); Training for operators; Educational programmes using a reactor; Current developments in design and fabrication of experimental facilities; Irradiation facilities; Projects for regional uses of facilities; Core management and calculation tools; Future trends for reactors; Use of simulators for training and educational programmes. b) Safety, including Experience with the preparation and Review of Safety Analysis Reports; Human factors in safety analysis; Management of extended shutdown periods; Modifications: safety analysis, regulatory aspects, commissioning programmes; Engineering safety features; Safety culture; Safety peer reviews and

  5. Radionuclide release from research reactor spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous investigations with respect to LWR fuel under non oxidizing repository relevant conditions were performed. The results obtained indicate slow corrosion rates for the UO2 fuel matrix. Special fuel-types (mostly dispersed fuels, high enriched in 235U, cladded with aluminium) are used in German research reactors, whereas in German nuclear power plants, UO2-fuel (LWR fuel, enrichment in 235U up to 5%, zircaloy as cladding) is used. Irradiated research reactor fuels contribute less than 1% to the total waste volume. In Germany, the state is responsible for fuel operation and for fuel back-end options. The institute for energy research (IEF-6) at the Research Center Juelich performs investigation with irradiated research reactor spent fuels under repository relevant conditions. In the study, the corrosion of research reactor spent fuel has been investigated in MgCl2-rich salt brine and the radionuclide release fractions have been determined. Leaching experiments in brine with two different research reactor fuel-types were performed in a hot cell facility in order to determine the corrosion behaviour and the radionuclide release fractions. The corrosion of two dispersed research reactor fuel-types (UAlx-Al and U3Si2-Al) was studied in 400 mL MgCl2-rich salt brine in the presence of Fe2+ under static and initially anoxic conditions. Within these experimental parameters, both fuel types corroded in the experimental time period of 3.5 years completely, and secondary alteration phases were formed. After complete corrosion of the used research reactor fuel samples, the inventories of Cs and Sr were quantitatively detected in solution. Solution concentrations of Am and Eu were lower than the solubility of Am(OH)3(s) and Eu(OH)3(s) solid phases respectively, and may be controlled by sorption processes. Pu concentrations may be controlled by Pu(IV) polymer species, but the presence of Pu(V) and Pu(IV) oxyhydroxides species due to radiolytic effects cannot completely be

  6. On 135Xe poisoning in the core of a thermal reactor with circulating fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The derivation of simple analytical expressions for estimating 135Xe poisoning in quasistationary state of the reactor with circulating fuel in the primary circuit. It is shown that 135Xe poisoning in such reactors depends on the ratio of the time during which fuel stays inside the core to the time outside the core (t1/t2).Even at ratio t1/t2=0.1, xenon poisoning effect can the reduced by six times compared to the reactor with fixed fuel, which essentially increases fuel use efficiency

  7. Ageing investigation and upgrading of components/systems of Kartini research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syarip; Widi Setiawan [Yogyakarta Nuclear Research Centre, Yogyakarta (Indonesia)

    1998-10-01

    Kartini research reactor has been operated in good condition and has demonstrated successful operation for the past 18 years, utilized for: reactor kinetic and control studies, instrumentation tests, neutronic and thermohydraulic studies, routine neutron activation analysis, reactor safety studies, training for research reactor operators and supervisors, and reactor physics experiments. Several components of Kartini reactor use components from the abandoned IRT-2000 Project at Serpong and from Bandung Reactor Centre such as: reactor tank, reactor core, heat exchanger, motor blower for ventilation system, fuel elements, etc. To maintain a good operating performance and also for aging investigation purposes, the component failure data collection has been done. The method used is based on the Manual on Reliability Data Collection For Research Reactor PSAs, IAEA TECDOC 636, and analyzed by using Data Entry System (DES) computer code. Analysis result shows that the components/systems failure rate of Kartini reactor is around 1,5.10{sup -4} up to 2,8.10{sup -4} per hour, these values are within the ranges of the values indicated in IAEA TECDOC 478. Whereas from the analysis of irradiation history shows that the neutron fluence of fuel element with highest burn-up (2,05 gram U-235 in average) is around 1.04.10{sup 16} n Cm{sup -2} and this value is still far below its limiting value. Some reactor components/systems have been replaced and upgraded such as heat exchanger, instrumentation and control system (ICS), etc. The new reactor ICS was installed in 1994 which is designed as a distributed structure by using microprocessor based systems and bus system technology. The characteristic and operating performance of the new reactor ICS, as well as the operation history and improvement of the Kartini research reactor is presented. (J.P.N.)

  8. Engineering review of the core support structure of the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-01

    The review of the core support structure of the gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) covered such areas as the design criteria, the design and analysis of the concepts, the development plan, and the projected manufacturing costs. Recommendations are provided to establish a basis for future work on the GCFR core support structure.

  9. Seismic responses of N-Reactor core. Independent review of Phase II work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seismic response of the N-Reactor core was independently analyzed to validate the results of Impell's analysis. The analysis procedure consists of two major stages: linear soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the overall N-Reactor structure complex and nonlinear dynamic analysis of the reactor core. In the SSI analysis, CLASSI computer codes were used to calculate the SSI response of the structures and to generate the input motions for the nonlinear reactor core analysis. In addition, the response was compared to the response from the SASSI analysis under review. The impact of foundation modeling techniques and the effect of soil stiffness variation on SSI response were also investigated. In the core analysis, a nonlinear dynamic analysis model was developed. The stiffness representation of the model was calculated through a finite element analysis of several local core geometries. Finite element analyses were also used to study the block to block interaction characteristics. Using this nonlinear dynamic model along with the basemat time histories generated from CLASSI and SASSI, several dynamic analyses of the core were performed. A series of sensitivity studies was performed to investigate the discretization of the core, the effect of vertical acceleration, the effect of basemat rocking, and modeling assumptions. In general, our independent analysis of core response validates the order of magnitude of the displacement calculated by Impell. 11 refs., 110 figs., 12 tabs

  10. Numerical simulation research on flow field in reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huaqi, Li [Key laboratory, (China)

    2009-07-01

    In this paper, some CFD examples completed by our lab. are introduced. Those examples include integral reactor core and single component flow field, also include transient and steady state. The geometry of computational domain for each example has been made by 3-D commercial software, such as UG and Pro/E. Some parts or components in the test model are removed, after the sensitivity analysis of those structures has been completed. The mesh is obtained by ICEM code, which can be single integral block or several separate blocks conbined after. All numerical simulation researches focus our analysis on the hydraulic characteristics including the flow resistant, the flow distribution and the mixing trail. In the end, the flow field in integral reactor core is taken as the special topic. The computation of the flow field has been carried out according to the test operation flow rate. Computational results has been compared with the corresponding test results. The relative error between computation and test is less than 6%. The computation results can be used to illustrate the influence on the flow distribution at core inlet by the lower supporting plate and other structures in lower plenum.

  11. a Dosimetry Assessment for the Core Restraint of AN Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, D. A.; Allen, D. A.; Tyrrell, R. J.; Meese, T. C.; Huggon, A. P.; Whiley, G. S.; Mossop, J. R.

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes calculations of neutron damage rates within the core restraint structures of Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors (AGRs). Using advanced features of the Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCBEND, and neutron source data from core follow calculations performed with the reactor physics code PANTHER, a detailed model of the reactor cores of two of British Energy's AGR power plants has been developed for this purpose. Because there are no relevant neutron fluence measurements directly supporting this assessment, results of benchmark comparisons and successful validation of MCBEND for Magnox reactors have been used to estimate systematic and random uncertainties on the predictions. In particular, it has been necessary to address the known under-prediction of lower energy fast neutron responses associated with the penetration of large thicknesses of graphite.

  12. Pakistan research reactor and its utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 5 MW enriched uranium fuelled, light water moderated and cooled Pakistan Research reactor became critical on 21st December, 1965 and was taken to full power on 22nd June, 1966. Since then is has been operated for about 23000 hours till 30th June, 1983 without any major break down. It has been used for the studies of neutron cross-sections, nuclear structure, fission physics, structure of material, radiation damage in crystals and semiconductors, studies of geological, biological and environmental samples by neutron activation techniques, radioisotope production, neutron radiography and for training of scientists, engineers and technicians. In the paper we have described briefly the facility of Pakistan Research Reactor and the major work carried around it during the last decade. (author)

  13. Developing the fuel for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of papers dealing with the possibility of research reactor adaptation to moderately and slightly enriched fuel with the 235U content of 45 and 20%, respectively, is presented. The main peculiarities and results of investigations carried out in two main directions, are under consideration: the increase of specific uranium content in traditional fuels (UAlsub(x)-Al, U3O8-Al, U,ZrHsub(x)) by means of improvements in technology and production (USA, FRG and France); the development of new highly dense kinds of fuel, such as U3Si, U3Si-Al, UO2 (USA, France). A conclusion is drawn that the research reactor fuel enrichment may be decreased

  14. 78 FR 63516 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY... Cooling Systems for New Boiling-Water Reactors.'' This RG describes testing methods the NRC staff...)-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors.''...

  15. 78 FR 58575 - Review of Experiments for Research Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-24

    ... COMMISSION Review of Experiments for Research Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION... Guide (RG) 2.4, ``Review of Experiments for Research Reactors.'' The guide is being withdrawn because... Experiments for Research Reactors,'' (ADAMS Accession No. ML003740131) because its guidance no longer...

  16. Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors. Proceedings of the XIV international meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apart from the progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program the national programs of Indonesia, Japan and China were presented. The major events, findings, and activities of 1991 are reviewed with a brief summary of the results which the RERTR Program had achieved by the end of 1990 in collaboration with its many international partners. The RERTR program, has concentrated its efforts on technology transfer and implementation activities consistent with the guidance received from the Department of Energy at the end of 1990. A number of presentations were devoted to development of new fuel uranium silicide fuel elements, fuel irradiation testing and reactor core conversions from highly enriched (HEU) to slightly enriched uranium (LEU). Calculations and measurements of converted reactor core parameters were shown related to safety test and analysis. Fuel cycle issue were discussed as well. One should note that a significant number of papers were devoted to Indonesian GA SIWABESSY reactor core conversion and related topics

  17. Hydrogen problems in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BMFT and BMI have initiated a workshop 'Hydrogen Problems in Reactor Safety Research' that took place October 3./4., 1983. The objective of this workshop was to present the state of the art in the main areas - Hydrogen-Production - Hydrogen-Distribution - Hydrogen-Ignition - Hydrogen-Burning and Containment Behaviour - Mitigation Measures. The lectures on the different areas are compiled. The most important results of the final discussion are summarized as well. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of thorium/U-233 lattices and cores in a breeder/burner heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the inevitable dwindling of uranium resources, advanced fuel cycles in the current generation of reactors stand to be of great benefit in the future. Heavy water moderated reactors have much potential to make use of thorium, a currently unexploited resource. Core fuelling configurations of a Heavy Water Reactor based on the self-sufficient thorium fuel cycle were simulated using the DRAGON and DONJON reactor physics codes. Three heterogeneously fuelled reactors and one homogeneously fuelled reactor were studied. (author)

  19. Safety Research Experiment Facility Project. Conceptual design report. Volume V. Reactor vessel and closure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Prestressed Concrete Reactor Vessel (PCRV) will serve as the primary pressure retaining structure for the Safety Research Experiment Facility (SAREF) reactor. The reactor core, control rod drive room, primary heat exchangers, and gas circulators will be located in cavities within the PCRV. The orientation of these cavities, except for the control rod drive room, will be similar to the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs that are currently proposed or under design. Due to the nature of this type of structure, all biological and radiological shielding requirements are incorporated into the basic vessel design. At the midcore plane there are three radially oriented slots that will extend from the outside surface of the PCRV to the reactor core liner. These slots will accommodate each of the fuel motion monitoring systems which will be part of the observation apparatus used with the loop experiments

  20. 2007 international meeting on Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR). Abstracts and available papers presented at the meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Meeting papers discuss research and test reactor fuel performance, manufacturing and testing. Some of the main topics are: conversion from HEU to LEU in different reactors and corresponding problems and activities; flux performance and core lifetime analysis with HEU and LEU fuels; physics and safety characteristics; measurement of gamma field parameters in core with LEU fuel; nondestructive analysis of RERTR fuel; thermal hydraulic analysis; fuel interactions; transient analyses and thermal hydraulics for HEU and LEU cores; microstructure research reactor fuels; post irradiation analysis and performance; computer codes and other related problems

  1. Fresh-Core Reload of the Neutron Radiography (NRAD) Reactor with Uranium(20)-Erbium-Zirconium-Hydride Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Thomas L. Maddock; Margaret A. Marshall; Leland M. Montierth

    2013-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA® (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The initial critical configuration developed during the fuel loading process, which contains only 56 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The 60-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (~±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  2. Development of Computer Program for Whole Core Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Fast Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A whole core thermal-hydraulic analysis program ACT was developed for the purpose of evaluating detailed in-core thermal-hydraulic phenomena of sodium cooled fast reactors under various reactor operation conditions. ACT consists of four kinds of calculation modules, i.e., fuel-assembly, inter-wrapper gap (core barrel), upper plenum and heat transport system modules. The latter two modules give proper boundary conditions for the reactor core thermal-hydraulic analysis. These four modules are coupled with each other by using MPI and calculate simultaneously on a cluster workstation. ACT was applied to analyzing a sodium experiment performed at JNC, which simulated the natural circulation decay heat removal under PRACS and DRACS operation condition. In the experiment, not only inter-wrapper flows but also reverses flows in the fuel assemblies were observed. ACT succeeded in simulating such complicated phenomena. (authors)

  3. Health services research doctoral core competencies

    OpenAIRE

    Holve Erin; Martin Diane P; Forrest Christopher B; Millman Anne

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This manuscript presents an initial description of doctoral level core competencies for health services research (HSR). The competencies were developed by a review of the literature, text analysis of institutional accreditation self-studies submitted to the Council on Education for Public Health, and a consensus conference of HSR educators from US educational institutions. The competencies are described in broad terms which reflect the unique expertise, interests, and preferred learn...

  4. Determination of the Sensitivity of the Antineutrino Probe for Reactor Core Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormon, S.; Fallot, M.; Bui, V.-M.; Cucoanes, A.; Estienne, M.; Lenoir, M.; Onillon, A.; Shiba, T.; Yermia, F.; Zakari-Issoufou, A.-A.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a feasibility study of the use of the detection of reactor-antineutrinos (νbare) for non proliferation purpose. To proceed, we have started to study different reactor designs with our simulation tools. We use a package called MCNP Utility for Reactor Evolution (MURE), initially developed by CNRS/IN2P3 labs to study Generation IV reactors. The MURE package has been coupled to fission product beta decay nuclear databases for studying reactor antineutrino emission. This method is the only one able to predict the antineutrino emission from future reactor cores, which don't use the thermal fission of 235U, 239Pu and 241Pu. It is also the only way to include off-equilibrium effects, due to neutron captures and time evolution of the fission product concentrations during a reactor cycle. We will present here the first predictions of antineutrino energy spectra from innovative reactor designs (Generation IV reactors). We will then discuss a summary of our results of non-proliferation scenarios involving the latter reactor designs, taking into account reactor physics constraints.

  5. Core power distribution methodology in the BEACON PWR [pressurized water reactor] core monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westinghouse has developed an advanced operational core support package called BEACON which uses a fully analytical methodology for on-line prediction of 3-D [three-dimensional] power distributions. The system provides core monitoring, core measurement reduction, core analysis and follow, and core predictions. The heart of the system is a very fast and accurate three dimensional nodal code which is used for core simulation and predictions. The system uses a new methodology with the existing core instrumentation to infer the current measured power distribution. This methodology has been qualified and yields excellent results

  6. The reactor core TRIGA Mark-III with fuels type 30/20; El nucleo del reactor TRIGA Mark-III con combustible tipo 30/20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F., E-mail: fortunato.aguilar@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    This work describes the calculation series carried out with the program MCNP5 in order to define the configuration of the reactor core with fuels 30/20 (fuels with 30% of uranium content in the Or-Zr-H mixture and a nominal enrichment of 20%). To select the configuration of the reactor core more appropriate to the necessities and future uses of the reactor, the following criterions were taken into account: a) the excess in the reactor reactivity, b) the switch out margin and c) to have new irradiation facilities inside the reactor core. Taking into account these criterions is proceeded to know the characteristics of the components that form the reactor core (dimensions, geometry, materials, densities and positions), was elaborated a base model of the reactor core, for the MCNP5 code, with a configuration composed by 85 fuel elements, 4 control bars and the corresponding structural elements. The high reactivity excess obtained with this model, gave the rule to realize other models of the reactor core in which the reactivity excess and the switch out margin were approximate to the values established in the technical specifications of the reactor operation. Several models were realized until finding the satisfactory model; this is composite for 74 fuels, 4 control bars and 6 additional experimental positions inside the reactor core. (Author)

  7. Development and application of neutron transport methods and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations. Technical report; Entwicklung und Einsatz von Neutronentransportmethoden und Unsicherheitsanalysen fuer Reaktorkernberechnungen. Technischer Bericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwermann, W.; Aures, A.; Bernnat, W.; and others

    2013-06-15

    This report documents the status of the research and development goals reached within the reactor safety research project RS1503 ''Development and Application of Neutron Transport Methods and Uncertainty Analyses for Reactor Core Calculations'' as of the 1{sup st} quarter of 2013. The superordinate goal of the project is the development, validation, and application of neutron transport methods and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations. These calculation methods will mainly be applied to problems related to the core behaviour of light water reactors and innovative reactor concepts. The contributions of this project towards achieving this goal are the further development, validation, and application of deterministic and stochastic calculation programmes and of methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, as well as the assessment of artificial neutral networks, for providing a complete nuclear calculation chain. This comprises processing nuclear basis data, creating multi-group data for diffusion and transport codes, obtaining reference solutions for stationary states with Monte Carlo codes, performing coupled 3D full core analyses in diffusion approximation and with other deterministic and also Monte Carlo transport codes, and implementing uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with the aim of propagating uncertainties through the whole calculation chain from fuel assembly, spectral and depletion calculations to coupled transient analyses. This calculation chain shall be applicable to light water reactors and also to innovative reactor concepts, and therefore has to be extensively validated with the help of benchmarks and critical experiments.

  8. Chemistry research and chemical techniques based on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry has occupied an important position historically in the sciences associated with nuclear reactors and it continues to play a prominent role in reactor-based research investigations. This Panel of prominent scientists in the field was convened by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to assess the present state of such chemistry research for the information of its Member States and others interested in the subject. There are two ways in which chemistry is associated with nuclear reactors: (a) general applications to many scientific fields in which chemical techniques are involved as essential service functions; and (b) specific applications of reactor facilities to the solution of chemical problems themselves. Twenty years of basic research with nuclear reactors have demonstrated a very widespread, and still increasing, demand for radioisotopes and isotopically-labelled molecules in all fields of the physical and biological sciences. Similarly, the determination of the elemental composition of a material through the analytical technique of activation analysis can be applied throughout experimental science. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. The korea multi-purpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents and discusses background and status of the design of the 30MW Korea Multi-purpose Research Reactor(KMRR) which is planed to achieve its first criticality in December, 19992, at Daeduk site of the Korea Advanced Energy Research Institute (KAERI). KAERI playing the leading role in Korea's nuclear technology development takes the total responsibility for its design, construction and operation. Number of Korean nuclear industries are, also, actively participating in the project while making the most of their expertise in relevant areas. (Author)

  10. Innovation and research in reactor safety. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second part of this article contains the continued survey of the advanced development of measures of engineered safeguards and facilities for accident management, referring in greater detail to digital safety and instrumentation and control systems, studies carried out at national research centers, and new facilities. Another topic considered in a separate chapter is the mitigation of the consequences of severe accidents. Irrespective of numerous improvements in accident prevention, reactor safety research in the past decade was characterized by its concentration on severe accidents. The objective of restricting the consequences of hypothetical severe accidents to the plant building was approached in mitigating emergency measures developed and, in some part, also implemented. In addition, analytical methods in the field of severe accidents were expanded, and technologies were developed and validated which seek to stabilize the core melt and to control the phenomena associated with core meltdown. On the whole, light water reactors incorporating the innovations mentioned above attain a safety level which, combined with corresponding efforts in the economic sector, is a prerequisite of the renaissance of nuclear technology in the beginning century. (orig.)

  11. Proceedings of the European Research Reactor Conference - RRFM 2013 Transactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2013 RRFM, the European Research Reactor Conference is jointly organised by ENS and Atomexpo LLC. This time the Research Reactor community meet in St. Petersburg, Russia. The conference programme will revolve around a series of Plenary Sessions dedicated to the latest global developments with regards to research reactor technology and management. Parallel sessions will focus on all areas of the Fuel Cycle of Research Reactors, their Utilisation, Operation and Management as well as specific research projects and innovative methods in research reactor analysis and design. In 2013 the European Research Reactor Conference will for the first time give special attention to complementary safety assessments of Research Reactors, following the Fukushima-Dai-Ichi NPP's Accident. (authors)

  12. Criteria for structural verification of fast reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural and functional criteria and relative verifications of PEC reactor fuel element are presented and discussed. Particular attention has been given to differentiate the structural verifications of low neutronic damage zones from those high neutronic damage ones. The structural verification criteria, which had already been presented at the 8th SMIRT Seminar Conference in Paris, have had some modifications during the Safety Report preparation. Finally some necessary activities are indicated for structural criteria validation, in particular for irradiated components, and for converging towards a European fast reactor code. (author). 3 refs, 6 tabs

  13. PRODUC program package for calculating correlation relations in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To perform calculations of fission product accumulation and radionuclide activity ratio distribution in the reactor fuel assembly (FA), the PRODUC software is developed. This package allows one to obtain distributions of radionuclide activity ratios for any fuel loading of the RBMK-1000 reactor. Plutonium and cerium-144 activity ratio distribution in the FA of the fuel loading of the 4th unit of the Chernobyl NPP as of April 25, 1986 is obtained according to the PRODUC program. 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 1 tab

  14. IGORR 1: Proceedings of the 1. meeting of the International Group On Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Descriptions of the ongoing projects presented at this Meeting were concerned with: New Research Reactor FRM-II at Munich; MITR-II reactor; The Advanced. Neutron Source (ANS) Project; The high Flux Reactor Petten, Status and Prospects; The High Flux Beam Reactor Instrumentation Upgrade; BER-II Upgrade; The BR2 Materials Testing Reactor Past, Ongoing and Under-Study Upgrades; The ORPHEE, Reactor Current Status and Proposed Enhancement of Experimental Variabilities; Construction of the Upgraded JRR-3; Status of the University of Missouri-Columbia Research Reactor Upgrade; the Reactor and Cold Neutron Facility at NIST; Upgrade of Materials Irradiation Facilities in HFIR; Backfitting of the FRG Reactors; University Research Reactors in the United States; and Organization of the ITER Project - Sharing of Informational Procurements. Topics of interest were: Thermal-hydraulic tests and correlations, Corrosion tests and analytical models , Multidimensional kinetic analysis for small cores, Fuel plates fabrication, Fuel plates stability, Fuel irradiation, Burnable poison irradiation, Structural materials irradiation, Neutron guides irradiation, Cold Source materials irradiation, Cold Source LN2 test, Source LH2-H2O reaction (H or D), Instrumentation upgrading and digital control system, Man-machine interface

  15. Reflooding of a severely damaged reactor core. Experimental analysis and modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The understanding of the reflood process of a severely damaged reactor core represents a challenge in the prediction of safety margin of existing and future pressurized water reactors. After the TMI-2 accident, the understanding of coolability of severely damaged reactor core became an objective of many theoretical and experimental studies. Currently, the French Institute of Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has started two experimental programs, PRELUDE and PEARL, to investigate the physical phenomena during a reflood process at high temperature and to provide relevant data in order to improve predictive models. The purpose of this paper is to propose a consistent thermo-hydraulic model of reflood of severely damaged reactor core. The presented model is based on the theory of heat transfer and two-phase flow in porous media and in small hydraulic diameter channels. The proposed model is implemented into the European computer code for severe accident analysis ICARE-CATHARE. The comparison of the calculations with PRELUDE experimental results is presented. Finally, the issue of transposition to the reactor scale is discussed and some answers are proposed using calculation results for a debris bed in a configuration similar to what could be expected in a severely damaged reactor core. (author)

  16. Study of power distribution in the CZP, HFP and normal operation states of VVER-1000 (Bushehr) nuclear reactor core by coupling nuclear codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Simulation of one-sixth of VVER-1000 reactor core by WIMS-D4 based on core symmetry. • Obtaining the cross sections of some nuclides by WIMS-D4 from BOC to EOC. • Transferring the obtained cross sections into CITATION as inputs for codes coupling. • Obtaining neutron fluxes and power by CITATION and program cycle in the CZP and HFP. • Distribution depiction of neutron fluxes and power in CZP, HFP and normal operation. - Abstract: In this research, the simulation of one-sixth of VVER-1000 (Bushehr) reactor core is carried out by WIMS-D4 nuclear code, based on symmetry of core and also by information obtained from FSAR. The cross sections of some nuclides are obtained by WIMS-D4 from the beginning of cycle (BOC) to the end of cycle (EOC), and they are transferred into the CITATION code as inputs. In the next stage, the amounts of neutron fluxes and power of reactor core are obtained by CITATION code in the CZP and HFP states. Then, the received products are returned again into the extended program cycle, thereby distributions of neutron fluxes and power are finally depicted. In the meantime, the space distribution of neutron fluxes and power throughout the core are presented during the normal operation by this simulation. It can be inferred that if the reactor operation continues, a flat power distribution will be made in the reactor core that might cause maximum power

  17. Reactor dynamics and stability analysis of a burst-mode gas core reactor, Brayton cycle space power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor dynamics and system stability studies are performed on a conceptual burst-mode gaseous core reactor space nuclear power system. This concept operates on a closed Brayton cycle in the burst mode (on the order of 100-MW output for a few thousand seconds) using a disk magnetohydrodynamic generator for energy conversion. The fuel is a gaseous mixture of UF4 or UF6 and helium. Nonlinear dynamic analysis is performed using circulating-fuel, point-reactor-kinetics equations along with thermodynamic, lumped-parameter heat transfer and one-dimensional isentropic flow equations. The gaseous nature of the fuel plus the fact that the fuel is circulating lead to dynamic behavior that is quite different from that of conventional solid-core systems. For the transients examined, Doppler fuel temperature and moderator temperature feedbacks are insignificant when compared with reactivity feedback associated with fuel gas density variations. The gaseous fuel density power coefficient of reactivity is capable of rapidly stabilizing the system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed; however, because of the strength of this feedback, standard external reactivity insertions alone are inadequate to bring about significant power level changes during normal reactor operation. Additional methods of reactivity control, such as changes in the gaseous of fuel mass flow rate or core inlet pressure, are required to achieve desired power level control. Finally, linear stability analysis gives results that are qualitatively in agreement with the nonlinear analysis

  18. IAEA's Cross Cutting Activities on Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: For nuclear research and technology development to continue to advance, research reactors (RRs) must be safely and reliably operated, adequately utilized, refurbished when necessary, provided with adequate proliferation-resistant fuel cycle services and safely decommissioned at the end of life. The IAEA has established its competence in the area of RRs with a long history of assistance to Member States in improving their utilization, by taking the lead in the development of safety standards, norms and dissemination of information on good practices for all aspects of the nuclear fuel cycle and in the planning and implementation of decommissioning. IAEA activities on RRs are formulated to cover a broad range of RR issues and to promote the continued development of scientific research and technological development using RRs. Member States look to the IAEA for coordination of the worldwide effort in this area and for help in solving specific problems. Today RR operating organizations need to overcome challenges such as the on-going management of ageing facilities, pressures for increased vigilance with respect to non-proliferation, and shrinking resources (financial as well as human) while fulfilling an expanding role in support of nuclear technology development. The IAEA coordinates and implements an array of activities that together provide broad support for RRs. As with other aspects of nuclear technology, RR activities within the IAEA are spread through diverse groups in different Departments. To ensure harmonized approaches a Cross-cutting coordination Group on Research Reactors (CCCGRR) has been established, with representatives from all IAEA Departments actively supporting RR activities. Utilization and application activities are generally lead from within the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications (NA). With respect to RRs, NA is primarily carrying out IAEA activities to assist and advise Member States in assessing their needs for research

  19. Restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor Joyo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental fast reactor Joyo is the first sodium cooled fast reactor in Japan. Joyo attained initial criticality as a breeder core in April 1977 and has operated as a high performance irradiation test bed since 2003. The 15th periodic inspection of Joyo commenced in May 2007 with the Fuel Handling Machine (FHM) being set up on the Rotating Plug (R/P) for refueling in June. When the R/P was taken down, measuring the load of the Hold-Down Shaft (HDS) revealed an abnormal decrease above the in-vessel storage rack (IVS). The HDS is a cylindrical FMH device that holds down the 6 surrounding subassemblies (S/As) which are adjacent to a withdrawn S/A. In order to investigate the cause of this, an in-vessel observation was conducted using a radiation-resistant fiber scope (RRF). As a result of the observations, it was discovered that the top of the irradiation test S/A 'MARICO-2' (the material testing rig with temperature control) had bent onto the IVS as an obstacle, and had damaged the Upper Core Structure (UCS). During the investigation of this incident, the in-vessel observations using RRF etc. took place at (1) the top of the S/As and the IVS for foreign material, (2) the bottom face of the UCS for damage under the condition with the level of sodium at -50 mm below the top of the S/As. In-vessel observation techniques for a Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) are important in confirming its safety and integrity. Since an in-vessel observation for an SFR has to be conducted under severe conditions that include high temperatures (∼ 200 deg-C) and high radiation doses (∼ 400 Gy/h), and the primary sodium coolant has to be retained in the Reactor Vessel (R/V) to remove the decay heat, an in-vessel observation equipment has to be designed to not only tolerate the severe conditions but also be capable of being inserted into the sealed R/V through the fixed holes built in to the R/P and gain access to the observation areas. The in-vessel observations were successfully

  20. Current status of operation and utilization of the Dalat research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a 500 kW swimming pool type reactor using the Soviet WWR-SM fuel assembly with 36% enrichment of U-235. It was upgraded from the USA 250 kW TRIGA Mark-II reactor. The first criticality of the renovated reactor was in November 1983 and its regular operation at nominal power of 500 kW has been since March 1984. The DNRR is operated mainly in continuous runs of 100 hrs, once every 4 weeks, for radioisotope production, neutron activation analyses and research purposes. The remaining time between two continuous runs is devoted to maintenance activities and also to short run for physics experiments and training purpose. From the first start-up to the end of December 2002, it totaled about 24,700 hrs of operation and the total energy released was 490 MWd. After 10 years of operation with the core of 89-fuel assembly configuration, in April 1994, the first refueling work was done and the 100-fuel assembly configuration was set-up. The second fuel reloading was executed in March 2002. At present time, the working configuration of the reactor core consists of 104 fuel assemblies. This fuel reloading will ensure efficient exploitation of the reactor for about 3 years with 1200-1300 hrs per year at nominal power. The current status of operation and utilization and some activities related to the reactor core management of the DNRR are presented and discussed in this paper. (author)