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Sample records for annular core research reactor

  1. Facility modernization Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) has undergone numerous modifications since its conception in response to program needs. The original reactor fuel, which was special U-ZrH TRIGA fuel designed primarily for pulsing, has been replaced with a higher pulsing capacity BeO fuel. Other advanced operating modes which use this increased capability, in addition to the pulse and steady state, have been incorporated to tailor power histories and fluences to the experiments. Various experimental facilities have been developed that range from a radiography facility to a 50 cm diameter External Fuel Ring Cavity (FREC) using 180 of the original ZrH fuel elements. Currently a digital reactor console is being produced with GA, which will give enhanced monitoring capabilities of the reactor parameters while leaving the safety-related shutdown functions with analog technology. (author)

  2. Critical heat flux prediction for the annular core research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on best estimate predictions of Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) obtained to support the upgrade of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories for 2 to 4 MWt. The CHF productions are based on the University of New Mexico's (UNM)-CHF correlations in conjunction with the Global Conditions Hypothesis (GCH). Results indicate that for the range of inlet water temperature of 293 to 333 K, CHFR predictions range from 3.9 to 2.1, which is more than sufficient to support the proposed ACRR upgrade

  3. MCNP/MCNPX model of the annular core research reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePriest, Kendall Russell; Cooper, Philip J.; Parma, Edward J., Jr. (.,; .)

    2006-10-01

    Many experimenters at the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) have a need to predict the neutron/gamma environment prior to testing. In some cases, the neutron/gamma environment is needed to understand the test results after the completion of an experiment. In an effort to satisfy the needs of experimenters, a model of the ACRR was developed for use with the Monte Carlo N-Particle transport codes MCNP [Br03] and MCNPX [Wa02]. The model contains adjustable safety, transient, and control rods, several of the available spectrum-modifying cavity inserts, and placeholders for experiment packages. The ACRR model was constructed such that experiment package models can be easily placed in the reactor after being developed as stand-alone units. An addition to the 'standard' model allows the FREC-II cavity to be included in the calculations. This report presents the MCNP/MCNPX model of the ACRR. Comparisons are made between the model and the reactor for various configurations. Reactivity worth curves for the various reactor configurations are presented. Examples of reactivity worth calculations for a few experiment packages are presented along with the measured reactivity worth from the reactor test of the experiment packages. Finally, calculated neutron/gamma spectra are presented.

  4. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hehr Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field – a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response.

  5. Characterization of Novel Calorimeters in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hehr, Brian D.; Parma, Edward J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, S. Michael

    2016-02-01

    A series of pulsed irradiation experiments have been performed in the central cavity of Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) to characterize the responses of a set of elemental calorimeter materials including Si, Zr, Sn, Ta, W, and Bi. Of particular interest was the perturbing effect of the calorimeter itself on the ambient radiation field - a potential concern in dosimetry applications. By placing the calorimeter package into a neutron-thermalizing lead/polyethylene (LP) bucket and irradiating both with and without a cadmium wrapper, it was demonstrated that prompt capture gammas generated inside the calorimeters can be a significant contributor to the measured dose in the active disc region. An MCNP model of the experimental setup was shown to replicate measured dose responses to within 10%. The internal (n,γ) contribution was found to constitute as much as 50% of the response inside the LP bucket and up to 20% inside the nominal (unmodified) cavity environment, with Ta and W exhibiting the largest enhancement due to their sizable (n,γ) cross sections. Capture reactions in non-disc components of the calorimeter were estimated to be responsible for up to a few percent of the measured response. This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sandia is a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy.

  6. A Preliminary Calculation of Annular Core Design for a High-flux Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of research reactors in operation over the world become old and the number of research reactors is expected to be reduced around 1/3 within a next decade. So it may be necessary to prepare in advance for the future demands of research reactors with a high performance. Therefore, based on the HANARO experiences through design to operation, a concept development of an improved research reactor is under doing. In this paper, 10 MW conceptual annular core is proposed and its basic characteristics were analyzed as a preliminary step

  7. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    OpenAIRE

    Kaiser Krista; Chantel Nowlen K.; Russell DePriest K.

    2016-01-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1) available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were char...

  8. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with the central cavity liner removed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope production in the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched uranium targets to be irradiated in the high flux central region of the core. In order to accomplish this goal, the central cavity liner has been removed to allow for the eventual placement of targets in that region. This safety evaluation presents the analysis associated with operating the reactor in the steady state mode with the central cavity liner removed and the central region of the core filled with water and aluminum void targets. The reactor operation with enriched, uranium loaded targets will be analyzed in a future analysis document. This analysis describes only the operation of the reactor in the steady state mode; consideration of pulse mode operations with the liner removed is not presented

  9. Design and fabrication of the instrumented fuel elements for the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the design and fabrication techniques for the instrumented fuel elements of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR). The thermocouple assemblies were designed and fabricated at Sandia Laboratories while the instrumented elements were assembled at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory. In order to satisfy the ACRR's Technical Specifications, the thermocouples are required to measure temperature in excess of 18000C under rapid heating conditions. Because of the potentially high failure rates for thermocouples in such environments, the instrumented fuel elements are designed so that the thermocouples can be replaced easily

  10. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  11. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Krista; Chantel Nowlen, K.; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1) available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  12. ACRR [Annular Core Research Reactor] fission product release tests: ST-1 and ST-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two experiments (ST-1 and ST-2) have been performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACER) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNLA) to obtain time-resolved data on the release of fission products from irradiated fuels under light water reactor (LWR) severe accident conditions. Both experiments were conducted in a highly reducing environment at maximum fuel temperatures of greater than 2400 K. These experiments were designed specifically to investigate the effect of increased total pressure on fission product release; ST-1 was performed at approximately 0.16 MPa and ST-2 was run at 1.9 MPa, whereas other parameters were matched as closely as possible. Release rate data were measured for Cs, I, Ba, Sr, Eu, Te, and U. The release rates were higher than predicted by existing codes for Ba, Sr, Eu, and U. Te release was very low, but Te did not appear to be sequestered by the zircaloy cladding; it was evenly distributed in the fuel. In addition, in posttest analysis a unique fuel morphology (fuel swelling) was observed which may have enhanced fission product release, especially in the high pressure test (ST-2). These data are compared with analytical results from the CORSOR correlation and the VICTORIA computer model. 8 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Neutron Environment Characterization of the Central Cavity in the Annular Core Research Reactor *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parma Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the neutron environment in the central cavity of the Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR is important in order to provide experimenters with the most accurate spectral information and maintain a high degree of fidelity in performing reactor experiments. Characterization includes both modeling and experimental efforts. Building accurate neutronic models of the ACRR and the central cavity “bucket” environments that can be used by experimenters is important in planning and designing experiments, as well as assessing the experimental results and quantifying uncertainties. Neutron fluence characterizations of two bucket environments, LB44 and PLG, are presented. These two environments are used frequently and represent two extremes in the neutron spectrum. The LB44 bucket is designed to remove the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and significantly attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The PLG bucket is designed to enhance the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The neutron characterization for each bucket was performed by irradiating 20 different activation foil types, some of which were cadmium covered, resulting in 37 different reactions at the peak axial flux location in each bucket. The dosimetry results were used in the LSL-M2 spectrum adjustment code with a 640-energy group MCNP-generated trial spectrum, self-shielding correction factors, the SNLRML or IRDFF dosimetry cross-section library, trial spectrum uncertainty, and trial covariance matrix, to generate a least-squares adjusted neutron spectrum, spectrum uncertainty, and covariance matrix. Both environment character-izations are well documented and the environments are available for use by experimenters.

  14. Neutron Environment Characterization of the Central Cavity in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parma, Edward J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Lippert, Lance L.; Vehar, David W.

    2016-02-01

    Characterization of the neutron environment in the central cavity of the Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is important in order to provide experimenters with the most accurate spectral information and maintain a high degree of fidelity in performing reactor experiments. Characterization includes both modeling and experimental efforts. Building accurate neutronic models of the ACRR and the central cavity "bucket" environments that can be used by experimenters is important in planning and designing experiments, as well as assessing the experimental results and quantifying uncertainties. Neutron fluence characterizations of two bucket environments, LB44 and PLG, are presented. These two environments are used frequently and represent two extremes in the neutron spectrum. The LB44 bucket is designed to remove the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and significantly attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The PLG bucket is designed to enhance the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The neutron characterization for each bucket was performed by irradiating 20 different activation foil types, some of which were cadmium covered, resulting in 37 different reactions at the peak axial flux location in each bucket. The dosimetry results were used in the LSL-M2 spectrum adjustment code with a 640-energy group MCNP-generated trial spectrum, self-shielding correction factors, the SNLRML or IRDFF dosimetry cross-section library, trial spectrum uncertainty, and trial covariance matrix, to generate a least-squares adjusted neutron spectrum, spectrum uncertainty, and covariance matrix. Both environment character-izations are well documented and the environments are available for use by experimenters. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned

  15. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public

  16. Safety analysis for operating the Annular Core Research Reactor with Cintichem-type targets installed in the central region of the core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PARMA JR.,EDWARD J.

    2000-01-01

    Production of the molybdenum-99 isotope at the Annular Core Research Reactor requires highly enriched, uranium oxide loaded targets to be irradiated for several days in the high neutron-flux region of the core. This report presents the safety analysis for the irradiation of up to seven Cintichem-type targets in the central region of the core and compares the results to the Annular Core Research Reactor Safety Analysis Report. A 19 target grid configuration is presented that allows one to seven targets to be irradiated, with the remainder of the grid locations filled with aluminum ''void'' targets. Analyses of reactor, neutronic, thermal hydraulics, and heat transfer calculations are presented. Steady-state operation and accident scenarios are analyzed with the conclusion that the reactor can be operated safely with seven targets in the grid, and no additional risk to the public.

  17. Critical heat flux predictions for the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides best estimate predictions of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and the Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) to support the proposed upgrade of the Annual Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) from its present value of 2 MWt to 4 MWt. These predictions are based on the University of New Mexico (UNM) - CHF correlation, originally developed for uniformly heated vertical annuli. The UNM-CHF correlation is applicable to low-flow and low-pressure conditions, which are typical of those in the ACRR. The three hypotheses that examined the effect of the nonuniform axial heat flux distribution in the ACRR core are (1) the local conditions hypotheses, (2) the total power hypothesis, and (3) the global conditions hypothesis. These hypotheses, in conjunction with the UNM-CHF correlation, are used to estimate the CHF and CHFR in the ACRR. Because the total power hypothesis predictions of power per rod at CHF are approximately 15%-20% lower than those corresponding to saturation exit conditions, it can be concluded that the total power hypothesis considerably underestimates the CHF for nonuniformly heated geometries. This conclusion is in agreement with previous experimental results. The global conditions hypothesis, which is more conservative and more accurate of the other two, provides the most reliable predictions of CHF/CHFR for the ACRR. The global conditions hypothesis predictions of CHFR varied between 2.1 and 3.9, with the higher value corresponding to the lower water inlet temperature of 20 degrees C

  18. Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation

  19. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  20. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  1. Annular core for modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The active core of the 350 MW(t) MHTGR is annular in configuration, shaped to provide a large external surface-to-volume ratio for the transport of heat radially to the reactor vessel in case of a loss of coolant flow. For a given fuel temperature limit, the annular core provides approximately 40 % greater power output over a typical cylindrical configuration. The reactor core is made up of columns of hexagonal blocks, each 793-mm high and 360-mm wide. The active core is 3.5 m in o.d., 1.65 m in i.d., and 7.93 m tall. Fuel elements contain TRISO-coated microspheres of 19.8 % enriched uranium oxycarbide and of fertile thorium oxide. The core is controlled by 30 control rods which enter the inner and outer side reflectors from above. (author)

  2. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  3. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  4. Annular seed-blanket thorium fuel core concepts for heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New reactor concepts to implement thorium-based fuel cycles have been explored to achieve maximum resource utilization. Pressure tube heavy water reactors (PT-HWR) are highly advantageous for implementing the use of thorium-based fuels because of their high neutron economy and on-line re-fuelling capability. The use of heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts in a PT-HWR where higher-fissile-content seed fuel bundles are physically separate from lower-fissile-content blanket bundles allows more flexibility and control in fuel management to maximize the fissile utilization and conversion of fertile fuel. The lattice concept chosen is a 35-element bundle made with a homogeneous mixture of reactor grade Pu and Th, and with a central zirconia rod to help reduce coolant void reactivity. Several annular heterogeneous seed-blanket core concepts with plutonium-thorium-based fuels in a 700-MWe-class PT-HWR were analyzed, using a once-through thorium (OTT) cycle. Different combinations of seed and blanket fuel were tested to determine the impact on core-average burnup, fissile utilization, power distributions, and other performance parameters. It was found that the various core concepts can achieve a fissile utilization that is up to 30% higher than is currently achieved in a PT-HWR using conventional natural uranium fuel bundles. Up to 67% of the Pu is consumed; up to 43% of the energy is produced from thorium, and up to 363 kg/year of U-233 is produced. Seed-blanket cores with ∼50% content of low-power blanket bundles may require power de-rating (∼58% to 65%) to avoid exceeding maximum limits for peak channel power, bundle power and linear element ratings. (authors)

  5. Conceptual design study of Pebble Bed Type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor with annular core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the Conceptual Design Study of Pebble Bed Type High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor with Annular Core Structure. From this study, it is made clear that the thermal power of the Pebble Bed Type Reactor can be increased to 500MW through introducing the annular core structure without losing the inherent safe characteristics (in the coolant depressurization accident, the fuel temperature does not exceed the temperature where the fuel defect begins.) This thermal power is two times higher than the inherent safe Pebble Bed Type High temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (MHTGR) designed in West Germany. From this result, it is foreseen that the ratio of the plant cost to the reactor power is reduced and the economy of the plant operation is improved. The reactor performances e.g. fuel burnup and fuel temperature are maintained in same level of the MHTGR. (author)

  6. Research on plasma core reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, G. A.; Barton, D. M.; Helmick, H. H.; Bernard, W.; White, R. H.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with one-meter diameter by one-meter long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17 cm thick by 89 cm diameter beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials were measured. Finally, an 85,000 cu cm aluminum canister in the central region was fueled with UF6 gas and fission density distributions determined. These results are to be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation.

  7. Dual-core TRIGA research and materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic Company is under contract from the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Technologies to design, fabricate, and install a research reactor in support of the Romanian National Program for Power Reactor Development. The goal was to select a design concept that provided reasonably high neutron fluxes for long term testing of various fuel-cladding-coolant combinations and also provide high performance pulsing for transient testing of fuel specimens. An effective solution was achieved by the selection of a 14 MW steady-state TRIGA reactor for high flux endurance testing, and an Annular Core Pulsing Reactor (ACPR) for high performance pulsing testing, with both reactors mounted in the same reactor tank and operated independently. The fuel bundles for the steady-state reactor consist of 25 uranium-zirconium hydride rods clad in stainless steel arranged in a square 5 x 5 array. The steady-state core is provided with downflow cooling at a rate of approximately 275 gpm/bundle. Bundle flow tests will be performed with both heated and unheated models. The core will be optimized for peak thermal neutron flux and reactivity lifetime within the constraint of a peak fuel meat temperature of 7500C. The operation of the steady-state reactor at a power level of 14 MW will yield peak unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes in the central experiment position of 2.9 x 1014 n/cm2-sec. The corresponding fast neutron flux (less than 1.125 keV) will be 2.6 x 1014 nv. (U.S.)

  8. Reactivity initiated accident (RIA) type tests and annular core pulse reactor (ACPR) operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the test conducted to investigate the failure threshold of the fuel when subject to RIA, accomplished in the TRIGA ACPR Nuclear Research Institute, Pitesti. The reactor facility, the capsule used in experiments and the experimental results are presented. The failure threshold was determined at 200 cal/g for an atmospheric gap pressure comparable with similar tests. The failure threshold decreases with increasing gap pressure. The tests proved useful for a better understanding of the fuel behavior in the transient conditions. As it is known RIA is not a common accident for the CANDU reactors, but the fuel failure mechanism can be similar to other type of accidents as LOCA and PCM. The program will be continued, with better instrumentation for the fuel sample and also independent instrumentation to measure pulse characteristics with better statistics. A new project for the experimental fuel elements must be considered to eliminate fuel-endcap interactions. (author)

  9. Core neutronics of a swimming pool research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial cores of the 5 MW swimming pool research reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre, Tehran have been analyzed using the computer codes METHUSELAH and EQUIPOISE. The effective multiplication factor, critical mass, moderator temperature and void coefficients of the core have been calculated and compared with vendor's values. Calculated values agree reasonably well with the vendor's results. (author)

  10. Effect of moderator density distribution of annular flow on fuel assembly neutronic characteristics in boiling water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the moderator density distribution of annular flow on the fuel assembly neutronic characteristics in a boiling water nuclear reactor was investigated using the SRAC95 code system. For the investigation, a model of annular flow for fuel assembly calculation was utilized. The results of the assembly calculation with the model (Method 1) and those of the fuel assembly calculation with the uniform void fraction distribution (Method 2) were compared. It was found that Method 2 underestimates the infinite multiplication factor in the fuel assembly including the gadolinia rod (type 1 assembly). This phenomenon is explained by the fact that the capture rate in the thermal energy region in gadolinia fuel is estimated to be smaller when the liquid film of annular flow at the fuel rod surface is considered. A burnup calculation was performed under the condition of a void fraction of 65% and a volumetric fraction of the liquid film in liquid phase of 1. It is found that Method 2 underestimates the infinite multiplication factor in comparison to Method 1 in the early stage of burnup, and that Method 2 becomes to overestimate the factor after a certain degree of burnup. This is because Method 2 overestimates the depletion rate of the gadolinia. (author)

  11. Core Management of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dalat nuclear research reactor (DNRR) is a pool-type research reactor which was reconstructed from the 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The reconstructed reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained its nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. The DNRR uses Russian fuel assemblies, type WWR-SM. The first fuel reloading was executed in April 1994 after more than ten years of operation with 89 fuel assemblies. Research on core management of DNRR with the purpose of maintaining safe operation and effective utilization of reserve fuel assem- blies is being carried out at the Nuclear Research Institute. Calculations of fuel burn-up for the Dalat nuclear research reactor are carried out based on the cell calculation program WIMS and two diffusion calculation programs HEXAGA and HEXNOD. Experimental measurement of fuel burn-up for the Dalat nuclear research reactor was realized by a measurement method of long-life isotopes from fission products. Optimum second fuel reloading and future refuelling for DNRR have been gained. A second fuel reloading for the Dalat nuclear research reactor was realized in March 2002. After reloading the working configuration of the reactor, the core consisted of 104 fuel assemblies. Research results for future refuelling for DNRR show that with 36 reserve fuel assemblies, the reactor will be operated for at least 17 851 h at nominal power since the second fuel reloading. (author)

  12. Core conversion effects on the safety analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety related parameters of the 5 MW Democritus research reactor that will be affected by the scheduled core conversion to use LEU instead of HEU are considered. The analysis of the safety related items involved in such a core conversion, mainly the consequences due to MCA, DBA, etc., is of a general nature and can, therefore, be applied to other similar pool type reactors as well. (T.A.)

  13. Uncertainty Evaluation for Core Thermal Power in a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) also has three separated and independent channels of the neutron detectors to measure the core power. To calibrate these detectors, the thermal power of Primary Cooling System (PCS) which cools down the heat generated in reactor core is used as calibration reference. The core thermal power can be estimated by the measured values of the mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, and core outlet temperature of coolant in the PCS. In general, the uncertainty of the core thermal power is required to be controlled below a certain value. To meet this requirement, the uncertainty of core thermal power should be evaluated based on the uncertainty of the measured parameters. In this paper, the uncertain evaluation is conducted with variation of the uncertainty of the measured parameters such as mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, core outlet temperature. In addition, the numbers of inlet and outlet temperature are considered to get a higher allowable uncertainty of temperature sensors. The core thermal power uncertainty has been valuated according to measuring parameters such as mass flow rate, temperatures, and number of RTDs. In this parametric study, allowable uncertainties for measuring devices have been obtained to guarantee 5% of the core thermal power uncertainty

  14. Uncertainty Evaluation for Core Thermal Power in a Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sunil; Seo, Kyoung-Woo; Kim, Seong-Hoon; Chi, Dae-Young; Park, Cheol [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) also has three separated and independent channels of the neutron detectors to measure the core power. To calibrate these detectors, the thermal power of Primary Cooling System (PCS) which cools down the heat generated in reactor core is used as calibration reference. The core thermal power can be estimated by the measured values of the mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, and core outlet temperature of coolant in the PCS. In general, the uncertainty of the core thermal power is required to be controlled below a certain value. To meet this requirement, the uncertainty of core thermal power should be evaluated based on the uncertainty of the measured parameters. In this paper, the uncertain evaluation is conducted with variation of the uncertainty of the measured parameters such as mass flow rate, core inlet temperature, core outlet temperature. In addition, the numbers of inlet and outlet temperature are considered to get a higher allowable uncertainty of temperature sensors. The core thermal power uncertainty has been valuated according to measuring parameters such as mass flow rate, temperatures, and number of RTDs. In this parametric study, allowable uncertainties for measuring devices have been obtained to guarantee 5% of the core thermal power uncertainty.

  15. Experimental research of reactor core flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are presented of experiments performed with the aim of finding the influence of the method of fixing the thermocouples for measuring the distribution of temperature to the wall of fuel pin simulator. This influence was found for the purpose of emergency core flooding. First experimental results on the effect of nitrogen dissolved in the water on the velocity of the cooling wave are given. These experiments were carried out under the following conditions: initial temperature in pin centre 300 to 600 degC, velocity of water at the inlet into the measuring section 3.5 to 20 cm/s, and atmospheric pressure in the model. (author)

  16. Approach to development of high flux research reactor with pebble-bed core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The research nuclear reactor of a basin-type IRT with the designed power of 1 MW was put into operation in 'Sosny' settlement not far from Minsk-city in the Republic of Belarus in 1962. In 1971 after its modernization the power was increased up to 4 MW and maximum density of neutron flux in the core was: Thermal 5·1013 neutr./cm2.s Fast (E>0.8 MeV) 2·1013 neutr./cm2.s The reactor has been used for carrying out investigations in the field of solid-state physics, radiation construction materials, radiobiology, gaseous chemically reacting coolants and others. After the Chernobyl NPP accident, in the former USSR the requirements on safety of nuclear reactors have become sufficiently stricter. As to some parameters these requirements became the same as for reactors of nuclear power plants. In this connection the reactor in 'Sosny' settlement did not answer these new requirements by a number of performances such as seismicity of building, efficiency of control and protection system, corrosion in the reactor vessel and others, and it was shutdown in 1987 and its decommissioning was performed during 1988-1999. At the Joint Institute of Power and Nuclear Research -'SOSNY' have been carried out investigations on feasibility of creation of the research reactor with pebble-bed core. The concept of such reactor supposes using the following technical approaches: - Using as fuel the brought sphere micro fuel elements with the diameter of 500-750 mkm to an industrial level; - Organization of reactor operation in the regime with minimum possible fueling with 235U; - Implementation of hydraulic loading - unloading of micro fuel elements with the frequency of one or several days. Physical calculations of the core were carried out with the help of MCU-RFFI program based on the Monte-Carlo method. Two configurations of the pebble-bed core in the high flux reactor have been considered. The first configuration is the core with a neutron trap and an annular fuel layer formed

  17. Physics research for molten salt reactor with different core boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Unlike the traditional solid fuel reactor with fixed boundary conditions, the inlet and outlet pipe and the core of molten salt reactor fuel is connected so that the flowing liquid fuel can travel freely between the pipe and core. Purpose: This article has made systematic study of the influence of different molten salt fuel regions on reactor physics, including the top and bottom fuel of the core vessel and the pipe fuel. The core physics was researched under different boundary conditions, and the region of the effective core was indicated subsequently. Methods: MSRE was taken as the reference reactor and the calculation was completed based on the Monte Carlo Code MCNP. Results: Results show that the fuel in the top and bottom of vessel impacts on keff and energy spectrum obviously. The influence of outlet pipe on keff was negligible when pipe radius less than 25 cm, and the perturbation of outlet pipe on the keff could be neglected when its length more than 20 cm. Conclusions: Results provide rational theory for the design of MSR and the development of computation code. (authors)

  18. Core management and full core conversion status of the Dalat nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) is a pool type research reactor which was reconstructed in 1982 from the old 250 kW TRIGA-MARK II reactor. The reconstructed reactor reached its initial criticality in November 1983 and attained it nominal power of 500 kW in February 1984. The DNRR uses Russian fuel assemblies (FAs) type VVR-M2. The first fuel reloading was executed in April 1994 after more than 10 years of operation with 89 HEU FAs. The 11 new HEU FAs were added in the core periphery, at previous beryllium element locations. After reloading the working configuration of reactor core consisted of 100 HEU FAs. Second reloading for Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor was realized in March 2002. The 4 new HEU FAs were added in the core periphery, at previous beryllium element locations. After reloading the working configuration of reactor core consisted of 104 HEU FAs. The third fuel reloading by shuffling of HEU FAs was executed in June 2004. The shuffling of 16 HEU FAs with highest burn up in the centre of the core and 16 HEU FAs with low burn up in the core periphery was done. The working configuration of reactor core kept unchanged of 104 HEU FAs. The fourth fuel reloading was executed in November 2006. The 2 new HEU FAs were loaded in the core periphery, at previous locations of wet irradiation channel and dry irradiation channel. After reloading the working configuration of reactor core consisted of 106 HEU FAs. Contracts for reactor core conversion between USA, Russia, Vietnam and the International Atomic Energy Agency for Nuclear fuel manufacture and supply for DNRR and Return of Russian-origin non-irradiated highly enriched uranium fuel to the Russian Federation have been realized in 2007. The 35 fresh HEU FAs were sent back to Russian Federation. The 36 new LEU FAs from Russian Federation have been received. According to the results of design and safety analyses performed by the joint study between RERTR Program at Argonne National Laboratory and Vietnam

  19. Reactor core materials research and integrated material database establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mainly two research areas were covered in this project. One is to establish the integrated database of nuclear materials, and the other is to study the behavior of reactor core materials, which are usually under the most severe condition in the operating plants. During the stage I of the project (for three years since 1999) in- and out of reactor properties of stainless steel, the major structural material for the core structures of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), were evaluated and specification of nuclear grade material was established. And the damaged core components from domestic power plants, e.g. orifice of CVCS, support pin of CRGT, etc. were investigated and the causes were revealed. To acquire more resistant materials to the nuclear environments, development of the alternative alloys was also conducted. For the integrated DB establishment, a task force team was set up including director of nuclear materials technology team, and projector leaders and relevant members from each project. The DB is now opened in public through the Internet

  20. Development of a core follow calculational system for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last few years a comprehensive Pressurized Water Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor core analysis code system based on modern reactor physics methods has been under development by the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa. This system, known as OSCAR-3, will incorporate a customized graphical user interface and data management system to ensure user-friendliness and good quality control. The system has now reached the stage of development where it can be used for practical MTR core analyses. This paper describes the current capabilities of the components of the OSCAR-3 package, their integration within the package, and outlines future developments. 10 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig

  1. Core conversion of the Portuguese research reactor to LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core conversion of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) to LEU fuel is being performed within IAEA's Technical Cooperation project POR/4/016, with financial support from the US and Portugal. CERCA was selected as manufacturer of the LEU assemblies by the IAEA after an international call for bids. CERCA provided a comprehensive package to the RPI which included the mechanical verification of the design of the assemblies, their manufacture and arrangements for a joint inspection of the finished assemblies. The LEU fuel assemblies were manufactured within 8 months upon final approval of the design. The safety analyses for the core conversion to LEU fuel were made with the assistance of the RERTR program and were submitted for review by the IAEA and by Portuguese authorities in January 2007. Revised documents were submitted in June 2007 addressing the issues raised during review. Regulatory approval was received in early August and core conversion was done in early September. All measured safety parameters are within the defined acceptance limits. Operation at full power is expected by the end of October. (author)

  2. core calculations for ETRR-1 research reactor upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    nuclear research reactors play an important role in supporting the nuclear energy program for most countries. research reactors are categorized according to the type of fuel, fuel enrichment, type of moderator and reflector, the power of the reactor and its application. most reactors initially operated at low power then an era began to up-rate the power by changing the fuel type, improving the thermal-hydraulic system performance and modifying the control system to comply with the new trends in research reactors and its applications. in this thesis, we carried out static calculation for the egyptian first research reactor ETRR-1 to evaluate its power upgrade possibility. firstly, we carried out cell calculation using WIMSD/4 code to study the variation of the infinite multiplication factor with the variation of fuel enrichment, lattice pitch and adding heavy water by increasing percentage to the ordinary water coolant

  3. The VVER Core Physics, Reactor Dosimetry, and Shielding Researches in the LR-0 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zero-power water reactor LR-0 was created by the Nuclear Research Institute Rez, Nuclear Machinery Skoda, and RRC 'Kurchatov Institute' for researches of neutron parameters of the WWER type power reactors core, fuel storages, and-first of all-for researches in the reactor pressure vessel and internals dosimetry. Suitable geometrical conditions and flexible technical arrangements of the LR-0 facility enabled to carry out the wide experimental program on several full-scale models (mock-ups) of the WWER-440 and WWER-1000 reactors. The tasks of that experiments were the measurements of the neutron (from thermal energy up to 10 MeV) and gamma (from 0.1 up to 10 MeV) spectra and integral parameters of neutron and gamma fields in the different representative points of the mock-ups from the core to the outer pressure vessel surface and the biological shielding (including channel for ex-reactor ionizing chamber), as well as the measurement of spatial power distribution in the core. Fast neutron (energy from 0.5 to 10 MeV) and gamma spectra were measured in several representative points of the mock-ups by the two-parameter spectrometer with the cylindrical stilbene scintillation detectors. Measurements in the thermal and epithermal neutron region were carried out with the activation method using a broad set of activation monitors and with the 3He(n,p) counter. Activation measurements with threshold fast neutron detectors enlarge also the proton-recoil spectra measurements, such activation measurements were carried out especially in cases, when a spectrometer couldn't be put in the necessary position. The core fission rate distribution was obtained by means of gamma-scanning of the fuel pins. The calculations were carried out by different methods (deterministic and Monte Carlo). Experimental and calculation results in the core, internals, pressure vessel and shielding are reviewed and compared. (Authors)

  4. Researches on a reactor core in heavy ion inertial fusion

    CERN Document Server

    Kondo, S; Iinuma, T; Kubo, K; Kato, H; Kawata, S; Ogoyski, A I

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a study on a fusion reactor core is presented in heavy ion inertial fusion (HIF), including the heavy ion beam (HIB) transport in a fusion reactor, a HIB interaction with a background gas, reactor cavity gas dynamics, the reactor gas backflow to the beam lines, and a HIB fusion reactor design. The HIB has remarkable preferable features to release the fusion energy in inertial fusion: in particle accelerators HIBs are generated with a high driver efficiency of ~30-40%, and the HIB ions deposit their energy inside of materials. Therefore, a requirement for the fusion target energy gain is relatively low, that would be ~50 to operate a HIF fusion reactor with a standard energy output of 1GW of electricity. In a fusion reactor the HIB charge neutralization is needed for a ballistic HIB transport. Multiple mechanical shutters would be installed at each HIB port at the reactor wall to stop the blast waves and the chamber gas backflow, so that the accelerator final elements would be protected from the ...

  5. Reactor core conversion studies of Ghana: Research Reactor-1 and proposal for addition of safety rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The inclusion of an additional safety rod in conjunction with a core conversion study of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) was carried out using neutronics, thermal hydraulics and burnup codes. The study is based on a recommendation by Integrated Safety Assessment for Research Reactors (INSARP) mission to incorporate a safety rod to the reactor safety system as well as the need to replace the reactor fuel with LEU. Conversion from one fuel type to another requires a complete re-evaluation of the safety analysis. Changes to the reactivity worth, shutdown margin, power density and material properties must be taken into account, and appropriate modifications made. Neutronics analysis including burnup was studied followed by thermal hydraulics analyses which comprise steady state and transients. Four computer codes were used for the analysis; MCNP, REBUS, PLTEP and PARET. The neutronics analysis revealed that the LEU core must be operated at 34 Kw in order to attain the flux of 1.0E12 n/cm2.s as the nominal flux of the HEU core. The auxiliary safety rod placed at a modified irradiation site gives a better worth than the cadmium capsules. For core excess reactivity of 4 mk, 348 fuel pins would be appropriate for the GHARR-1 LEU core. Results indicate that flux level of 1.0E12 n/cm2.s in the inner irradiation channel will not be compromised, if the power of the LEU core is increased to 34 kW. The GHARR-1 core using LEU-U02-12.5% fuel can be operated for 23 shim cycles, with cycles length 2.5 years, for over 57 years at the 17 kW power level. All 23 LEU cycles meet the ∼ 4.0 mk excess reactivity required at the beginning of cycle . For comparison, the MNSR HEU reference core can also be operated for 23 shim cycles, but with a cycle length of 2.0 years for just over 46 years at 15.0kW power level. It is observed that the GHARR-1 core with LEU UO2 fuel enriched to 12.5% and a power level of 34 kW can be operated ∼25% longer than the current HEU core operated at 30 k

  6. Analytical solution of neutron transport equation in an annular reactor with a rotating pulsed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, an analytical solution of the neutron transport equation in an annular reactor is presented with a short and rotating neutron source of the type S(x) δ (x- Vt), where V is the speed of annular pulsed reactor. The study is an extension of a previous study by Williams [12] carried out with a pulsed source of the type S(x) δ (t). In the new concept of annular pulsed reactor designed to produce continuous high flux, the core consists of a subcritical annular geometry pulsed by a rotating modulator, producing local super prompt critical condition, thereby giving origin to a rotating neutron pulse. An analytical solution is obtained by opening up of the annular geometry and applying one energy group transport theory in one dimension using applied mathematical techniques of Laplace transform and Complex Variables. The general solution for the flux consists of a fundamental mode, a finite number of harmonics and a transient integral. A condition which limits the number of harmonics depending upon the circumference of the annular geometry has been obtained. Inverse Laplace transform technique is used to analyse instability condition in annular reactor core. A regenerator parameter in conjunction with perimeter of the ring and nuclear properties is used to obtain stable and unstable harmonics and to verify if these exist. It is found that the solution does not present instability in the conditions stated in the new concept of annular pulsed reactor. (author)

  7. McCARD for neutronics design and analysis of research reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCARD is a Monte Carlo (MC) neutron-photon transport simulation code developed exclusively for the neutronics design and analysis of nuclear reactor cores. McCARD is equipped with the hierarchical modeling and scripting functions, the CAD-based geometry processing module, the adjoint-weighted kinetics parameter and source multiplication factor estimation modules as well as the burnup analysis capability for the neutronics design and analysis of both research and power reactor cores. This paper highlights applicability of McCARD for the research reactor core neutronics analysis, as demonstrated for Kyoto University Critical Assembly, HANARO research reactor, and YALINA subcritical facility. (authors)

  8. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2009-11-01

    One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

  9. Criticality Benchmark Analysis of the HTTR Annular Startup Core Configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the high priority benchmarking activities for corroborating the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project and Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program is evaluation of Japan's existing High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR). The HTTR is a 30 MWt engineering test reactor utilizing graphite moderation, helium coolant, and prismatic TRISO fuel. A large amount of critical reactor physics data is available for validation efforts of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs). Previous international reactor physics benchmarking activities provided a collation of mixed results that inaccurately predicted actual experimental performance.1 Reevaluations were performed by the Japanese to reduce the discrepancy between actual and computationally-determined critical configurations.2-3 Current efforts at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) involve development of reactor physics benchmark models in conjunction with the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) for use with verification and validation methods in the VHTR Program. Annular cores demonstrate inherent safety characteristics that are of interest in developing future HTGRs.

  10. Innovative research reactor core designed. Estimation and analysis of gamma heating distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gamma heating value is an important factor needed for safety analysis of each experiments that will be realized on research reactor core. Gamma heat is internal heat source occurs in each irradiation facilities or any material irradiated in reactor core. This value should be determined correctly because of the safety related problems. The gamma heating value is in general depend on. reactor core characteristics, different one and other, and then each new reactor design should be completed by gamma heating data. The Innovative Research Reactor is one of the new reactor design that should be completed with any safety data, including the gamma heating value. For this reasons, calculation and analysis of gamma heating in the hole of reactor core and irradiation facilities in reflector had been done by using of modified and validated Gamset computer code. The result shown that gamma heating value of 11.75 W/g is the highest value at the center of reactor core, higher than gamma heating value of RSG-GAS. However, placement of all irradiation facilities in reflector show that safety characteristics for irradiation facilities of innovative research reactor more better than RSG-GAS reactor. Regarding the results obtained, and based on placement of irradiation facilities in reflector, can be concluded that innovative research reactor more safe for any irradiation used. (author)

  11. Neutronics conceptual design of the innovative research reactor core using uranium molybdenum fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The multipurpose of research reactor utilization make many countries build the new research reactor. Trend of this reactor for this moment is multipurpose reactor type with a compact core to get high neutron flux at the low or medium level of power. The research newest. Reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 year old. Therefore, it is needed to design a new research reactor, called innovative research reactor (IRR) and then as an alternative to replace the old research reactor. The aim of this research is to get the optimal configuration of equilibrium core with the acceptance criteria are minimum thermal neutron flux is 2.5E14 n/cm2 s at the power level of 20 MW (minimum), length of cycle of more than 40 days, and the most efficient of using fuel in the core. Neutronics design has been performed for new fuel of U-9Mo-AI with various fuel density and reflector. Design calculation has been performed using WIMSD-5B and BATAN-FUEL computer codes. The calculation result of the conceptual design shows four core configurations namely 5x5, 5x7, 6x5 and 6x6. The optimalization result for equilibrium core of innovative research reactor is the 5x5 configuration with 450 gU fuel loading, berilium reflector, maximum thermal neutron flux at reflector is 3.33E14 n/cm2 sand length of cycle is 57 days is the most optimal of IRR. (author)

  12. Vibration model of a pressurized water reactor which takes into account the fluid influence in the annular gap between core barrel and pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical vibration model of a pressurized water reactor is established and studied which takes into account the fluid-structure interaction of the coupled three-dimensional system reactor pressure vessel-core barrel (reactor cavity). Vibration differential equations are derived only for the two-dimensional movement; the eigenfrequencies and amplitude ratios of the undamped system as well as a dimensionless damping factor of cavity vibrations are calculated with the data of the WWER-440, and discussed. (orig.)

  13. Development of conceptual nuclear design of 10MWt research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI has been devoted to develop export-oriented research reactors for a growing world-wide demand of new research reactor construction. Their ambition is that design of Korean research reactor must be competitive in commercial and technological based on the experience of the HANARO core design concept with thermal power of 30MW. They are developing a new research reactor named Advanced HANARO research Reactor (AHR) with thermal power of 20 MW. KAERI has export records of nuclear technology. In 1954-1967 two series of pool type research reactors based on the Russian design, VVR type and IRT type, have been constructed and commissioned in some countries as well as Russia. Nowadays Russian design is introducing again for export to developing countries such as Union of Myanmar. Therefore the objective of this research is that to build and innovative 10 MW research reactor core design based on the concept of HANARO core design to be competitive with Russian research reactor core design. system tool of HELIOS was used at the first stage in both cases which are research reactor using tubular type fuel assemblies and that reactor using pin type fuel assemblies. The reference core design of first kind of research reactor includes one in-core irradiation site at the core center. The neutron flux evaluations for core as well as reflector region were done through logical consistency of neutron flux distributions for individual assemblies. In order to find the optimum design, the parametric studies were carried out for assembly pitch, active fuel length, number of fuel ring in each assembly and so on. Design result shows the feasibility to have high neutron flux at in-core irradiation site. The second kind of research reactor is used the same kind of assemblies as HANARO and hence there is no optimization about basic design parameters. That core has only difference composition of assemblies and smaller specific power than HANARO. Since it is a reference core at first stage

  14. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  15. Design study of eventual core conversion for the research reactor RA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main options are specified for the future status of the 6.5 MW heavy water research reactor RA. Arguments pro and contra restarting the reactor are presented. When considering the option to restart the RA reactor, possibilities to improve its neutronic parameters, such as neutron flux values and irradiation capabilities are discussed, as well as the compliance with the worldwide activities of Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program. Possibility of core conversion is examined. Detailed reactor physics design calculations are performed for different fuel types and uranium loading. For different fuel management schemes results are presented for the effective, multiplication factor, power distribution, fuel burnup and consumption. It is shown that, as far as reactor core parameters are considered, conversion to lower enrichment fuel could be easily accomplished. However, conversion to the lower enrichment could only be justified if combined with improvement of some other reactor attributes. (author)

  16. Analysis of fuel management pattern of research reactor core of the MTR type design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactor core design needs neutronics parameter calculation use computer codes. Research reactor MTR type is very interested because can be used as research and also a radioisotope production. The research reactor in Indonesia right now is already 25 years old. Therefore, it is needed to design a new research reactor as a compact core. Recent research reactor core is not enough to meet criteria acceptance in the UCD which already determined namely thermal neutron flux in the core is 1.0x1015 n/cm2s. so that it is necessary to be redesign the alternative core design. The new research reactor design is a MTR type with 5x5 configuration core, uses U9Mo-Al fuel, 70 cm of high and uses two certainly fuel management pattern. The aim of this research is to achieve neutron flux in the core to meet the criteria acceptance in the UCD. Calculation is done by using WIMSD-B, Batan-FUEL and Batan-3DIFF codes. The neutronic parameters to be achieved by this calculation are the power level of 50 MW thermal and core cycle of 20 days. The neutronics parameter calculation is done for new U-9Mo-Al fuel with variation of densities.The result of calculation showed that the fresh core with 5x5 configuration, 360 gram, 390 gram and 450 gram of fuel loadings have meet safety margin and acceptance criteria in the UCD at the thermal neutron flux is more then 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2s. But for equilibrium core is only the 450 gram of loading meet the acceptance criteria. (author)

  17. 14 MW INR-TRIGA research reactor core conversion - emergency preparedness challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INR-Pitesti TRIGA research reactor is basically a pool type reactor with a special design in order to fulfil the requirements for material testing, power reactor fuel and nuclear safety studies. The safety evaluation involved a several design basis accidents. For training purposes, and to exercise our ability to conduct Level-3 PSA studies, a severe accident scenario involving 14-MW INR-TRIGA research reactor has been developed. In this scenario is assumed that a large part of the reactor hall roof or a heavy object escaped from the crane hook is dropped over the 14-MW TRIGA-SSR core, resulting in mechanical damage of the core. It is assumed, also, that no core melting is occurring, but only fuel-cladding rupture being involved for several 25-pins fuel bundles. The paper evaluates the radiological consequences, both early and late consequences, from the emergency preparedness point of view. (author)

  18. Comparative study of research reactor core utilizing LEU and mixed (LEU and HEU) fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cores of a swimming pool type research reactor, PARR-1, comprising of i) Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel only , ii) LEU fuel mixed with High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel, have been analyzed. This study aims to utilize the partially burnt HEU spent fuel elements from the spent fuel rack, with burnup much less than their designed discharge burnup limit, discharged from the reactor core at the time of dismantling the HEU core during the implementation of world wide core conversion project from HEU to LEU in mid 1980's. For this, some reactor physics characteristic parameters , important from reactor operation, control and safety point of view, have been calculated and compared for the above mentioned two cores. These results included, core criticality, excess reactivity, shutdown margin, integrated control rods' worth, flux/power distribution, power peaking factors and the reactivity feed back coefficients for both these cores. Reactor lattice and 3- dimensional core analysis codes, WIMS-D/4 and CITATION were employed for the calculations. For the mix-fueled core, excess reactivity is found to be on higher side, 617 pcm, and accordingly decrease in its shutdown margin is predicted as compared with the values for LEU core. This is due to the effectiveness of less burnt HEU fuel elements in the mix-fueled core. However, other parameters do not show any significant difference for both these cores, due to the location of less burnt HEU fuel element at the core periphery. These results provide the basis for the operation of the research reactor utilizing mixed fuel without affecting its performance from safety and utilization point of view. (author)

  19. Research progress and recommendations on reactor pressure vessel integrity under hypothetical core melt down accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: It is very important to ensure the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel under core melt down accident. The high-temperature creep failure is the main failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel under core melt down accident. Purpose: This paper is to present an overview of research status and progress on high-temperature creep behavior of reactor pressure vessel considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario. Methods: Emphasis is placed on accomplished achievements in creep tests, scale model experiments and numerical simulation, and the domestic newly research productions on high-temperature creep behavior of reactor pressure vessel structure integrity. Conclusions: This paper also discusses the limitations of existing researches and indicates future research directions, such as multi-axis tensile tests, analysis of three-dimensional coupling temperature field, scaled model tests, and so on. (authors)

  20. Safety And Transient Analyses For Full Core Conversion Of The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparing for full core conversion of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR), safety and transient analyses were carried out to confirm about ability to operate safely of proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) working core. The initial LEU core consisting 92 LEU fuel assemblies and 12 Beryllium rods was analyzed under initiating events of uncontrolled withdrawal of a control rod, cooling pump failure, earthquake and fuel cladding fail. Working LEU core response were evaluated under these initial events based on RELAP/Mod3.2 computer code and other supported codes like ORIGEN, MCNP and MACCS2. Obtained results showed that safety of the reactor is maintained for all transients/accidents analyzed. (author)

  1. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of the equilibrium core of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) has been carried out. RELAP5/Mod 3.4 (a best-estimate system code) was employed. PARR-1 is a swimming pool type research reactor using MTR (Material Testing Reactor) type fuel. It uses low enriched uranium (<20%) fuel with light water flowing from top to bottom under gravity. Standard correlations were employed to compute various parameters, which include: coolant velocity distribution in the core; critical velocity; pressure drop; saturation temperature; temperature distribution in the core, OFI (onset of flow instability) and DNB (departure from nucleate boiling)

  2. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of the equilibrium core of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, I.H. [SDTP User Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: ihbokhari@yahoo.co.uk; Mahmood, T.; Chaudri, K.S. [SDTP User Group, Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pakistan Institute of Engineering and Applied Sciences, P.O. Nilore 45650, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2007-10-15

    Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) has been carried out. RELAP5/Mod 3.4 (a best-estimate system code) was employed. PARR-1 is a swimming pool type research reactor using MTR (Material Testing Reactor) type fuel. It uses low enriched uranium (<20%) fuel with light water flowing from top to bottom under gravity. Standard correlations were employed to compute various parameters, which include: coolant velocity distribution in the core; critical velocity; pressure drop; saturation temperature; temperature distribution in the core, OFI (onset of flow instability) and DNB (departure from nucleate boiling)

  3. Safe operation of TRIGA reactor in the situation of LEU-HEU core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanian TRIGA reactor was commissioned in 1980. The location of the research institute is Pitesti, 100 Km west of Bucharest. In fact there are two independent cores sharing the same pool. There are a 14 MW Steady State Reactor (SSR), high flux, and materials testing reactor and an Annular Core Pulsing Reactor (ACPR). The SSR reactor is a forced convection reactor cooled via a primary circuit with 4 pumps and 3 heat exchangers. The ACPR is natural convection reactor cooled by the pool water. The characteristics of the two reactors are presented. The reactor core configuration is shown as well as the original start-up core configuration. Fuel management of TRIGA steady state core allows obtaining the requested fluxes for experimental purposes in safe operation condition. One can firmly state that the present operation of the reactor and the HEU-LEU (High Enriched Uranium - Low Enriched Uranium), core conversion fully respect the provisions of the National Regulatory Body and IAEA. (authors)

  4. Demonstration of core neutronic calculation for research and training reactors via SCALE4.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, full core modelling is performed to improve neutronic analyses capability for nuclear research reactors using SCALE4.4 system. KENOV.a module of SCALE4.4 system is utilized for full core neutronic analysis. The ORIGEN-S module is also coupled with the KENOV.a module to perform burnup dependent core analyses. Results of control rod worths for 1st cycle of Cekmece TR-2 research reactor are presented. In particular, coupling of KENOV.a and ORIGEN-S modules of SCALE4.4 is discussed. The preliminary results of 2-D burnup dependent neutronic calculations are also given. (author)

  5. In core gamma dosimetry using thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs) in research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since gamma flux co-exists with the neutrons in the reactor core of a research reactor, it becomes difficult to measure exclusively gamma dose rate. Whereas it is quite important to know the gamma dose rates while performing controlled experiments in a research reactor. With this urge experiments have been performed to measure gamma dose rate at central vertical port (CVP) of the University of Florida Training Reactor (UFTR) using thermoluminescence detectors (TLDs). It is demonstrated that among the commercially available TLDs, LiF/sub 2/ can be used to determine the in-core gamma dose rate at low rector power levels (a few hundred watts). The gamma dose rate depending upon reactor power at CVP of UFTR has been determined to be 0.66+- 0.09 Ghy/sup -1/W/sup -1/. Extrapolation of gamma dose higher power is discussed. (author)

  6. Development of Core Design Model for Small-Sized Research Reactor and Establishment of Infrastructure for Reactor Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within 10 years a growing world-wide demand of new research reactor construction is expected because of obsolescence. In Korea, a new research reactor is also required in order to meet domestic demand of utilization. KAERI has been devoted to develop an export-oriented research reactors for these kinds of demand. A next generation research reactor should comply with general requirements for safety, economics, environment-friendliness and non-proliferation as well as high performance requirement of high flux level. A export-tailored reactor should be developed for the demand of developing counties or under-developed countries. A new design concept is to be developed for a long cycle length core which has excellent irradiation facility with high flux

  7. Activities of research-reactor-technology project in FNCA from FY2005 to FY2007. Sharing neutronics calculation technique for core management and utilization of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RRT project (Research-Reactor-Technology Project) was carried out with the theme of 'sharing neutronics calculation technique for core management and utilization of research reactors' in the framework of FNCA (Forum for Nuclear Cooperation in Asia) from FY2005 to FY2007. The objective of the project was to improve and equalize the level of neutronics calculation technique for the reactor core management among participating countries to assure the safe and stable operation of research reactors and the promotion of the effective utilization. Neutronics calculation codes, namely SRAC code system and MVP code, were adopted as common codes. Participating countries succeeded in applying the common codes to analyzing the core of each domestic research reactor. Some participating countries succeeded in applying the common codes to analyzing for utilization of own research reactors. Activities of RRT project have improved and equalized the level of neutronics calculation technique among participating countries. (author)

  8. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe: Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference betwe

  9. Complex degradation and ageing phenomena of research reactor core structural materials - experience at 14 MW TRIGA reactor from INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 14 MW TRIGA Research Reactor designed in the early '70s is a relative new research reactor with an operational experience of 30 years. The specific design of reactor core objectives, were to manufacture, build and operate a flexible structure which incorporate previous experience of pool type research reactors. Aluminum alloy 6061 and stainless steel are only materials used for core structural components, which are all easily remotely removable and replaceable by simple hand tools. Properties of those categories of materials were well characterized / known for many other reactors predecessors, and no special criteria or preliminary tests were performed. The mechanical core structure is presented in the paper and designed procedure for periodic testing and inspection is also described. In spite of well known materials properties, the behavior uncertainties of those materials in each reactor case may have special aspects related to design of components, manufacturing technologies, surface finishing and processing, quality control methods, price of specific components, complex conditions in core and vicinity, history of operation, inspection and verification of components, radioactive waste characterization at the end of life of components. Limited assessment of materials properties and suitability for certain application without considering the each individual component load, exposure and life time, may produce limited information on material itself, in fact the issue is the selection criteria for a standard material suitable for a certain application and consequent failure of components. The degradation and ageing are specific to components starting from design, manufacturing technology and expected life when the component should be replaced. The paper presents the practical experience on maintenance requirements specific to TRIGA core components and some techniques of material investigations available at Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti Post Irradiation

  10. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor mixed-core have been calculated. ► Burn-up effect on TRR kinetics parameters has been studied. ► Replacement of LEU-CFE with HEU-CFE in the TRR core has been investigated. ► Results of each mixed core were compared to the reference core. ► Calculation of kinetic parameters are necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. - Abstract: In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTRPC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change

  11. Neutronic Design of the First Core of the Replacement Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes the general neutronic characteristics of the first core of the replacement research reactor (RRR) for the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO). A compact core with 16 FA has been designed to fulfil all the very demanding neutronic requirements of the RRR facility. The contractual performance parameters must be verified for the equilibrium core; a very important design effort was carried out in the initial fresh core to have a similar performance. The description covers different aspects of the neutronic design: a detailed nuclear design of U3Si2 first core, the design calculation tools, together with a comparison of the first core performance against the core design criteria and the equilibrium core performance. (author)

  12. Dual annular rotating open-quotes windowedclose quotes nuclear reflector reactor control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor control system is provided in a nuclear reactor having a core operating in the fast neutron energy spectrum where criticality control is achieved by neutron leakage. The control system includes dual annular, rotatable reflector rings. There are two reflector rings: an inner reflector ring and an outer reflector ring. The reflectors are concentrically assembled, surround the reactor core, and each reflector ring includes a plurality of openings. The openings in each ring are capable of being aligned or non-aligned with each other. Independent driving means for each of the annular reflector rings is provided so that reactor criticality can be initiated and controlled by rotation of either reflector ring such that the extent of alignment of the openings in each ring controls the reflection of neutrons from the core. 4 figures

  13. Demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach on SNL's annual core research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the initial demonstration of the reactivity constraint approach and its implementing algorithm, the MIT-CSDL Non-Linear Digital Controller, on the annual core research reactor (ACCR) that is operated by the Sandia National Laboratories. This demonstration constituted the first use of reactivity constraints for the closed-loop, digital control of reactor power on a facility other than the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) research reactor (MITR-II). Also, because the ACRR and the MITR-II are of very different design, these trials established the generic nature of the reactivity constraint approach

  14. Reference equilibrium core with central flux irradiation facility for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to assess various core parameters a reference equilibrium core with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel for Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) was assembled. Due to increased volume of reference core, the average neutron flux reduced as compared to the first higher power operation. To get a higher neutron flux an irradiation facility was created in centre of the reference equilibrium core where the advantage of the neutron flux peaking was taken. Various low power experiments were performed in order to evaluate control rods worth and neutron flux mapping inside the core. The neutron flux inside the central irradiation facility almost doubled. With this arrangement reactor operation time was cut down from 72 hours to 48 hours for the production of the required specific radioactivity. (author)

  15. Selecting a MAPLE research reactor core for 1-10 mW operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MAPLE class of research reactors is designed so that a single reactor concept can satisfy a wide range of practical applications. This paper reports the results of physics studies performed on a number of potential core configurations fuelled with either 5 w/o or 8 w/o enriched UO2 or 20 w/o U3Si-Al and assesses the relative merits of each. Recommended core designs are given to maximize the neutron fluxes available for scientific application and isotope production

  16. An Evaluation of the Annular Fuel and Bottle-Shaped Fuel Concepts for Sodium Fast Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Memmott, Matthew; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hejzlar, Pavel

    2010-01-01

    Two innovative fuel concepts, the internally and externally cooled annular fuel and the bottle-shaped fuel, were investigated with the goal of increasing the power density and reduce the pressure drop in the sodium-cooled fast reactor, respectively. The concepts were explored for both high- and low-conversion core configurations, and metal and oxide fuels. The annular fuel concept is best suited for low-conversion metal-fuelled cores, where it can enable a power uprate of ~20%; the magnitude ...

  17. Status of the compact core design for the Munich research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel 'compact core' has been proposed for our project of substantially modernizing the research reactor FRM at Munich. This core has about 20 cm diameter and 70 cm height, is cooled by H2O and surrounded by a large D2O moderator tank. It makes essential use of the new U3Si/Al dispersion fuel with very high Uranium density now available. We present the results of new, two-dimensional neutronic calculations and give an estimate of the probable burnup and reactivity behaviour of the compact core. We expect that this core can be effectively operated with an unperturbed multiplication factor of about 1.22, and that a maximum thermal neutron flux of 7 to 8·1014cm-,2s-1 can be achieved in the D2O tank at 20 MW reactor power. (author)

  18. Evaluating the core damage frequency of a TRIGA research reactor using risk assessment tool software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamyab, Shahabeddin [School of Engineering, Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nematollahi, Mohammadreza, E-mail: mrnema@yahoo.com [School of Engineering, Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Safety Research Center of Shiraz University, 71348-51154 Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: {center_dot} In this study, level-I PSA is performed, to reveal and modify the weak points threatening the safe operation of a typical TRIGA reactor. {center_dot} After identification of the initiating events and developing the appropriate event trees and fault trees, by the risk assessment tool interface, the core damage frequency has been estimated to be 8.368E-6 per year of reactor operation, which meets the IAEA standards. {center_dot} The results also indicate the significant effects of the common cause failures. - Abstract: After all preventive and mitigative measures considered in the design of a nuclear reactor, the installation still represents a residual risk to the outside world. Probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) is a powerful method to survey the safety of nuclear reactors. In this study the occurrence frequency of different types of core damage states (CDS) which may potentially arise in Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) is evaluated by use of the recently developed risk assessment tool (RAT) software which has been designed and represented in the Safety Research Center of Shiraz University. RAT uses event trees and fault trees to evaluate the total final core damage frequency (CDF) through studying the frequencies of initiation events, and following their consequences has resulted in one type of the CDS. The criterion must be of the order of smaller than 1E-04 through IAEA standards for research reactors (). Results show that the total final CDF for TRR is of the order of 10{sup -6}, which meets the criterion of nuclear research reactor.

  19. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V. 5: Operations (Appendices L-N)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 5 consists of detailed Appendices L-N, which contain a variety of useful information on the operation of research reactors with reduced enrichment fuels. Summaries of these appendices can be found in Chapters 12-14 of Volume 1 of this guidebook. Appendix L contains a summary of necessary and recommended experiments for reactor startup. Appendix M provides information on the procedures and experiences of several reactor operators with both mixed and full cores with reduced enrichment fuels. Appendix N contains information on transportation of both fresh and spent fuel elements, on spent fuel storage, and on the US Department of Energy's receipt and financial settlement provisions for nuclear research reactor fuels. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. ORPHEE research reactor: 3D core depletion calculation using Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, F.; Brun, E.

    2014-06-01

    ORPHEE is a research reactor located at CEA Saclay. It aims at producing neutron beams for experiments. This is a pool-type reactor (heavy water), and the core is cooled by light water. Its thermal power is 14 MW. ORPHEE core is 90 cm height and has a cross section of 27x27 cm2. It is loaded with eight fuel assemblies characterized by a various number of fuel plates. The fuel plate is composed of aluminium and High Enriched Uranium (HEU). It is a once through core with a fuel cycle length of approximately 100 Equivalent Full Power Days (EFPD) and with a maximum burnup of 40%. Various analyses under progress at CEA concern the determination of the core neutronic parameters during irradiation. Taking into consideration the geometrical complexity of the core and the quasi absence of thermal feedback for nominal operation, the 3D core depletion calculations are performed using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® [1,2,3]. A preliminary validation of the depletion calculation was performed on a 2D core configuration by comparison with the deterministic transport code APOLLO2 [4]. The analysis showed the reliability of TRIPOLI-4® to calculate a complex core configuration using a large number of depleting regions with a high level of confidence.

  1. MTR research reactor core behavior under a loss of shutdown heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows: Introduction: Heat removal during operation of medium power research reactors is assumed to be safely performed by forced convection and the adequate removal of residual decay heat after reactor shutdown need to continue forced convection removal for a certain period of time when the operating power before shut-down is above a certain power level. This is among the requirement for the overall safety of research reactor operation. Objective: The purpose of the present work is: - to estimate the maximum temperature in the core and to investigate the minimum power operating level before shutdown that needs a continuation forced convection after shutdown; - to evaluate occurrence of cladding damage following a shutdown reactor without forced convection Problem: The simulation process is undertaken using the RELAP5/Mod 3.2 code system. The IAEA 10 MW benchmark core which is a representative of medium pool type MTR research reactors was chosen here in order to investigate the cladding maximum fuel temperature without forced heat removal after shutdown of the reactor that was operating at different powers up to 10 MW. Nodalization: The benchmark core consists of 25 fuels elements placed in a 5 x 5 gird placed within pool filled by 9 m of light water. The primary loop is represented by pumps, pipes and heat exchangers. Each of the 25 fuel elements is represented individually. Results: The simulation process has shown that the cladding maximum temperature did not reach the melting point for aluminum (660 deg. C) but void is expected to be produced in the hot channels. Hence, the loss of forced heat removal after reactor scram did not induce any melting of the cladding by much deeper investigation may be undertaken because presence of void in channels could enhance corrosion phenomena and may induce some fission products release in the pools following localized fuel rupture due to corrosion. (authors)

  2. Introduction of Kyoto University Research Reactor with low enriched uranium core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) is a light water moderated / cooled tank-type reactor. The project to convert the KUR fuel from HEU to LEU was achieved on March 24, 2010. After the successful achievement of first criticality on April 15 and the reactor has been operating since May 28. The nuclear design of KUR with LEU core is calculated using SRAC code system with JENDL-3.3 and the burn-up calculations are performed using SRAC-COREBN. In this paper, the purpose of the project to convert the KUR fuel, the fuel transport, the experimental results, the burn-up characteristics and calculation of KUR LEU core are presented. (author)

  3. Comparing neutronics codes performance in analyzing a fresh-fuelled research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Calculation of neutron fluence rate with different neutronic codes is examined. • MCNP, TRIPOLI and CITATION were used for neutron fluence rate calculations. • The recently converted core of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI) was used. • Fresh fuel of low enrichment in U-235 was assumed. • Thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates were computed. - Abstract: In this paper the relative performance of different simulation approaches is examined, focusing on the neutron fluence rate distribution in a nuclear reactor core. The main scope of the work is to benchmark and validate the neutronics code systems utilized in the Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1) for a high-density Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) core of compact size. For this purpose the recently converted core of the Portuguese Research Reactor (RPI), fueled with fresh, low enrichment in U-235 fuel, was simulated with the stochastic code TRIPOLI and the deterministic code system XSDRN/CITATION. RPI was selected on the basis that it is a similar to GRR-1 pool-type reactor, using same fuel and control rods type, as well as same types of coolant, moderator and reflector. The neutron fluence rate in RPI was computed using each numerical approach with changed approximations. In this frame the stochastic code TRIPOLI was tested using two different nuclear data libraries, i.e., ENDF/B-VI versus JEFF3.1, and two different ways of source definition, i.e., “point sources”, placed in the center of each fuel cell, versus a “distributed source”, where each fuel volume was considered as a neutron source. The deterministic code system XSDRN/CITATION was tested with respect to the definition of the transverse leakages associated to each one-dimensional, user-defined core zone, as analyzed by the XSDRN code in order to provide the zone equivalent cross sections. Thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluence rates were computed and local values found in a 15 cm segment immediately below the

  4. Feasibility of maintaining natural convection mode core cooling in research reactor power upgrades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two operational concerns for natural convection coooled research reactors using plate type fuels are: 1) pool top 16N activity (PTNA), and 2) nucleate boiling in core channels. The feasibility assessment of a power upgrade while maintaining natural convection mode core cooling requires addressing these operational concerns. Previous studies have shown that: a) The conventional technique for reducing PTNA by plume dispersion may not be effective in a large power upgrade of research reactors with small pools. b) Currently used correlations to predict onset of nucleate boiling (ONB) in thin, rectangular core channels are not valid for low-velocity, upward flows such as encountered in natural convection cooling. The PTNA depends on the velocity distribution in the reactor pool. COMMIX-1A code is used to determine the three-dimensional velocity fields in The Ohio State University Research Reactor (OSURR) pool as a function of varying design conditions, following a power upgrade to 500 kW with LEU fuel. It is shown that a sufficiently deep stagnant water layer can be created below the pool top by properly choosing the disperser flow rate. The ONB heat flux is experimentally determined for channel gaps and upward flow velocities in the range 2mm-4mm and 3-16 cm/sec., respectively. Two alternatives to plume dispersion for reducing PTNA and a new correlation to determine the ONB heat flux in thin, rectangular channels under low-velocity, upward flow conditions are proposed. (Author)

  5. Analysis and core-life calculation of 3 MW Triga Mark II research reactor including effects of central thimble modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this study was to formulate an effective optimal fuel management strategy for TRIGA MARK II research reactor at AERE, Savar. The core management study has been performed by utilizing four basic types of information calculated for the reactor: criticality, power peaking, neutron flux and burnup calculation. Reshuffling at 20,000 MWh step gives the longest core life of the reactor which is 64500 MWh. Central thimble modification altered the shape of the flux which increased the core reactivity by c 12 and the core-life by 500 MWh. Besides, the study gives valuable insight into the behaviour of the reactor

  6. Engineered safety feature, an emergency core cooling system at Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study effectiveness of emergency core cooling system (ECCS) has been studied in case loss of coolant accident occurs at Pakistan research reactor (PARR-1). The reactor is a swimming pool type using MTR fuel. It was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1992. It was also upgraded from a steady-state power level of 5-10 MW. Several additional facilities were provided to satisfy the requirements of enhanced power level. For safety consideration, emergency core cooling system (ECCS) was also installed to avoid any possibility of core meltdown. Evaluation of ECCS has been carried out for which standard correlations have been employed to find peak clad temperature profile after loss of coolant accident

  7. Engineered safety feature, an emergency core cooling system at Pakistan research reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)], E-mail: ishtiaq@pinstech.org.pk; Mahmood, Tariq [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2008-06-15

    In the present study effectiveness of emergency core cooling system (ECCS) has been studied in case loss of coolant accident occurs at Pakistan research reactor (PARR-1). The reactor is a swimming pool type using MTR fuel. It was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1992. It was also upgraded from a steady-state power level of 5-10 MW. Several additional facilities were provided to satisfy the requirements of enhanced power level. For safety consideration, emergency core cooling system (ECCS) was also installed to avoid any possibility of core meltdown. Evaluation of ECCS has been carried out for which standard correlations have been employed to find peak clad temperature profile after loss of coolant accident.

  8. Monte Carlo simulation of core physics parameters of the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code, version 4C (MCNP4C) and a set of neutron cross-section data were used to develop an accurate three-dimensional computational model of the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1). The geometry of the reactor core was modeled as closely as possible including the details of all the fuel elements, reactivity regulators, the control rod, all irradiation channels, and Be reflectors. The following reactor core physics parameters were calculated for the present highly enriched uranium (HEU) core: clean cold core excess reactivity (ρex), control rod (CR) and shim worth, shut down margin (SDM), neutron flux distributions in the irradiation channels, reactivity feedback coefficients and the kinetics parameters. The HEU input model was validated by experimental data from the final safety analyses report (SAR). The model predicted various key neutronics parameters fairly accurately and the calculated thermal neutron fluxes in the irradiation channels agree with the values obtained by foil activation method. Results indicate that the established Monte Carlo model is an accurate representation of the NIRR-1 HEU core and will be used to perform feasibility for conversion to low enriched uranium (LEU)

  9. Core Management and Calculation Tools for the WWR-M Research Reactor in Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Location of fuel assemblies in the core satisfying all the safety constraints and fuel requirements, fuel types used, number of fuel assemblies of each type and their discharged burn-ups, as well as the number of beryllium blocks at the periphery of the core, are optimized for the WWR-M research reactor in Ukraine using the code PORT. To determine the best core layout providing high neutron flux and low fuel expenditures under the safety and fuel constraints, two optimization algorithms using successive integer linear programming and simulated annealing are applied. For neutronics calculation, the iterational hybrid method combining the diffusion model with higher approx- imations of the neutron transport equation is used. The thermal-hydraulics model is based on an empirical formula for the heat transfer coefficient and measurement data for hydraulic parameters, including relative coolant velocities and pressure drops. It has been shown that a mixed core consisting of WWR-M2 and WWR-M5 fuel provides higher neutron flux and even less fuel expenditures in comparison with the core consisting of only WWR-M2 fuel. Utilization of mixed fuel is especially effective for high 'neutron price'. The WWR-M reactor in Ukraine is being studied for conversion from HEU to LEU fuel. It is feasible to convert the reactor to LEU fuel using qualified LEU WWR-M2 fuel assemblies, which are currently available for this purpose. (author)

  10. Progress in the neutronic core conversion (HEU-LEU) analysis of Ghana research reactor-1.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anim-Sampong, S.; Maakuu, B. T.; Akaho, E. H. K.; Andam, A.; Liaw, J. J. R.; Matos, J. E.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Ghana Atomic Energy Commission; Kwame Nkrumah Univ. of Science and Technology

    2006-01-01

    The Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) and has operated at different power levels since its commissioning in March 1995. As required for all nuclear reactors, neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis are being performed for the HEU-LEU core conversion studies of the Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) facility, which is a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). Stochastic Monte Carlo particle transport methods and tools (MCNP4c/MCNP5) were used to fine-tune a previously developed 3-D MCNP model of the GHARR-1 facility and perform neutronic analysis of the 90.2% HEU reference and candidate LEU (UO{sub 2}, U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}, U-9Mo) fresh cores with varying enrichments from 12.6%-19.75%. In this paper, the results of the progress made in the Monte Carlo neutronic analysis of the HEU reference and candidate LEU fuels are presented. In particular, a comparative performance assessment of the LEU with respect to neutron flux variations in the fission chamber and experimental irradiation channels are highlighted.

  11. Thermal-hydraulic analysis of the MIT research reactor low enrichment uranium (LEU) Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIT research reactor (MITR) is converting from the existing high enrichment uranium (HEU) core to a low enrichment uranium (LEU) core using a high-density monolithic UMo fuel. The design of an optimum LEU core for the MIT reactor is evolving. The in-house multi-channel thermal-hydraulics code, MULCH, was developed specifically for the MITR. This code has been benchmarked against PLTEMP for steady-state analysis, and RELAP5 and temperature measurements for the loss of primary flow transient. In this paper, thermal hydraulic analyses using MULCH and RELAP5 in support of the MITR conversion tasks are described. Various fuel configurations are evaluated in order to support the LEU core design optimization study. The results show that a preferable LEU core design employs a fuel meat thickness of 20 mils with 18 plates per element with a hot channel factor less than 1.76. Simulation results also show that the LEU-fueled MITR can potentially operate at a higher power level, about 30 % higher than the current core. (authors)

  12. A 3D transport-based core analysis code for research reactors with unstructured geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A core analysis code package based on 3D neutron transport calculation in complex geometry is developed. • The fine considerations on flux mapping, control rod effects and isotope depletion are modeled. • The code is proved to be with high accuracy and capable of handling flexible operational cases for research reactors. - Abstract: As an effort to enhance the accuracy in simulating the operations of research reactors, a 3D transport core analysis code system named REFT was developed. HELIOS is employed due to the flexibility of describing complex geometry. A 3D triangular nodal SN method transport solver, DNTR, endows the package the capability of modeling cores with unstructured geometry assemblies. A series of dedicated methods were introduced to meet the requirements of research reactor simulations. Afterwards, to make it more user friendly, a graphical user interface was also developed for REFT. In order to validate the developed code system, the calculated results were compared with the experimental results. Both the numerical and experimental results are in close agreement with each other, with the relative errors of keff being less than 0.5%. Results for depletion calculations were also verified by comparing them with the experimental data and acceptable consistency was observed in results

  13. A novel reactor concept for boron neutron capture therapy: annular low-low power reactor (ALLPR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, B.; Levine, S.H. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    1998-07-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNC), originally proposed in 50's, has been getting renewed attention over the last {approx}10 years. This is in particular due to its potential for treating deep-seated brain tumors by employing epithermal neutron beams. Large (several MW) research reactors are currently used to obtain epithermal beams for BNCT, but because of cost and licensing issues it is not likely that such high-power reactors can be placed in regular medical centers. This paper describes a novel reactor concept for BNCT devised to overcome this obstacle. The design objective was to produce a beam of epithermal neutrons of sufficient intensity for BNCT at <50 kW using low enriched uranium. It is achieved by the annular reactor design, which is called Annular Low-Low Power Reactor (ALLPR). Preliminary studies using Monte Carlo simulations are summarized in this paper. The ALLPR should be relatively economical to build, and safe and easy to operate. This novel concept may increase the viability of using BNCT in medical centers worldwide. (author)

  14. The New Emergency Core Cooling (NECC) system for the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The New Emergency Core Cooling (NECC) system is the penultimate of seven major safety upgrades being implemented at the National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor in Chalk River. The NECC upgrade was designed to improve the original systems for core cooling in the event of an unisolable failure within the primary cooling circuit. The NECC upgrade ensures that water is automatically made available to the emergency cooling circuit pumps in the event of a break. Reactor core cooling is achieved from the discharge of these pumps which distribute emergency coolant to the individual fuel rods. Heated water from the vessel returns to the heat exchangers within the emergency cooling circuits for heat removal to the secondary coolant. The NECC upgrade significantly improves protection for a wide range of Loss Of Coolant Accidents (LOCAs) through the use of design features such as component redundancy, automatic initiation and hazard qualification. The introduction of the NECC upgrade combined with previous improvements in liquid confinement capability provide a closed loop system that ensures stable long term reactor core cooling. CATHENA (Canadian Algorithm for THErmalhydraulic Network Analysis) analysis was performed to assess the NECC upgrade and to validate the design for credible leak scenarios. (author)

  15. Research on intelligent monitor for 3D power distribution of reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Core power distribution of ex-core measurement system has been reconstructed. • Building up an artificial intelligence model for 3-D core power distribution. • Error of the experiments has been reduced to 0.76%. • Methods for improving the accuracy of the model have been obtained. - Abstract: A real-time monitor for 3D reactor power distribution is critical for nuclear safety and high efficiency of NPP’s operation as well as for optimizing the control system, especially when the nuclear power plant (NPP) works at a certain power level or it works in load following operation. This paper was based on analyzing the monitor for 3D reactor power distribution technologies used in modern NPPs. Furthermore, considering the latest research outcomes, the paper proposed a method based on using an ex-core neutron detector system and a neural network to set up a real time monitor system for reactor’s 3D power distribution supervision. The results of the experiments performed on a reactor simulation machine illustrated that the new monitor system worked very well for a certain burn-up range during the fuel cycle. In addition, this new model could reduce the errors associated with the fitting of the distribution effectively, and several optimization methods were also obtained to improve the accuracy of the simulation model

  16. Design of a novel compact core with reduced enrichment for upgrading the research reactor Munich FRM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an important result of the international reduced enrichment programs new fuel materials with very high uranium densities have been made available to users. This progress in fuel technology should also allow the realization of advanced core concepts for research reactors. Following this idea we are presently designing a novel ''compact core'' of about 20 cm diameter and 60 cm height, which will be cooled by H2O and surrounded by a large D2O moderator tank. For a reactor power P=20 MW we expect a maximum thermal neutron flux phisub(th)sup(max) asymptotically equals 8.1014 cm-2 s-1 outside of the core, and in any case the ''quality factor'' phisub(th)sup(max)/P would be the highest ever achieved at a beam tube reactor. While we started out neutronic calculations assuming high U235-enrichment, our present results for reduced enrichment (around 45%) are very promising; further calculations are in progress. The power density radial formfactor of the compact core can be reduced significantly by varying the uranium density in the individual concentric fuel plate rings. (author)

  17. Full Core modeling techniques for research reactors with irregular geometries using Serpent and PARCS applied to the CROCUS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Modeling of research reactors. • Serpent and PARCS coupling. • Lattice physics codes modeling techniques. - Abstract: This paper summarizes the results of modeling methodologies developed for the zero-power (100 W) teaching and research reactor CROCUS located in the Laboratory for Reactor Physics and Systems Behavior (LRS) at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Lausanne (EPFL). The study gives evidence that the Monte Carlo code Serpent can be used effectively as a lattice physics tool for small reactors. CROCUS’ core has an irregular geometry with two fuel zones of different lattice pitches. This and the reactor’s small size necessitate the use of nonstandard cross-section homogenization techniques when modeling the full core with a 3D nodal diffusion code (e.g. PARCS). The primary goal of this work is the development of these techniques for steady-state neutronics and future transient neutronics analyses of not only CROCUS, but research reactors in general. In addition, the modeling methods can provide useful insight for analyzing small modular reactor concepts based on light water technology. Static computational models of CROCUS with the codes Serpent and MCNP5 are presented and methodologies are analyzed for using Serpent and SerpentXS to prepare macroscopic homogenized group cross-sections for a pin-by-pin model of CROCUS with PARCS. The most accurate homogenization scheme lead to a difference in terms of keff of 385 pcm between the Serpent and PARCS model, while the MCNP5 and Serpent models differed in terms of keff by 13 pcm (within the statistical error of each simulation). Comparisons of the axial power profiles between the Serpent model as a reference and a set of PARCS models using different homogenization techniques showed a consistent root-mean-square deviation of ∼8%, indicating that the differences are not due to the homogenization technique but rather arise from the definition of the diffusion coefficients produced

  18. Real time simulation research in 200 MW low temperature nuclear heating reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    200 MW low temperature nuclear heating reactor is an important new-type reactor. Natural circulation is adopted in the flowage of reactor core. High precise models are built and selected, which are low temperature reactor power model, residual power releasing model, heat conductivity model in reactor core, thermo-hydraulic model, subcooling boiling model, CHF calculation model and so on. These models are solved using Gear arithmetic and Adams arithmetic, which are testified each other. Using appropriate arithmetic, the real time simulation of thermo-hydraulic process in the core is truly fulfilled. (authors)

  19. A Coupled Calculation System for Optimal In-Core Fuel Management in Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents a coupled method to solve the problem of finding an optimal configuration of fuel elements in research reactor cores. Finding the optimal solution always requires a huge amount of calculations by traditional methods. Thus, in performing this work, the investigated way followed to overcome such difficulties, was a judicious combination of the artificial neural network (ANN) technique, together with the well known stochastic method which is simulated annealing (SA). It has been shown that the most distinguishing and attractive feature of such a system is the computational efficiency and an increasing probability in obtaining optimized solutions with reasonable error. Neural network offers a very fast core parameter prediction tool with reasonable accuracy, and the simulated annealing method offers a very effective searching procedure which avoids local minimum. A series of tests have been performed using a modified core configuration of the benchmark 10 MW IAEA low enriched uranium (LEU) research reactor and the result achieved is the optimum configuration of the studied core. (author)

  20. Neutronic analysis for core conversion (HEU-LEU) of Pakistan research reactor-2 (PARR-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutronic analyses for the core conversion of Pakistan research reactor-2 (PARR-2) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel has been performed. Neutronic model has been verified for 90.2% enriched HEU fuel (UAl4-Al). For core conversion, UO2 fuel was chosen as an appropriate fuel option because of higher uranium density. Clad has been changed from aluminum to zircalloy-4. Uranium enrichment of 12.6% has been optimized based on the design basis criterion of excess reactivity 4 mk in miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR). Lattice calculations for cross-section generation have been performed utilizing WIMS while core modeling was carried out employing three dimensions option of CITATION. Calculated neutronic parameters were compared for HEU and LEU fuels. Comparison shows that to get same thermal neutron flux at inner irradiation sites, reactor power has to be increased from 30 to 33 kW for LEU fuel. Reactivity coefficients calculations show that doppler and void coefficient values of LEU fuel are higher while moderator coefficient of HEU fuel is higher. It is concluded that from neutronic point of view LEU fuel UO2 of 12.6% enrichment with zircalloy-4 clad is suitable to replace the existing HEU fuel provided that dimensions of fuel pin and total number of fuel pins are kept same as for HEU fuel

  1. Research reactor in-core fuel management optimisation using the multiobjective cross-entropy method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-core fuel management optimisation (ICFMO) problem has been studied for several decades. Very little research has, however, been aimed at multiobjective optimisation involving the fundamental notion of Pareto optimality. In this paper, the recently developed multiobjective optimisation using the cross-entropy method (MOO CEM) algorithm is applied to a multiobjective ICFMO problem for the first time. A derivation of the MOO CEM algorithm is presented for ICFMO, along with a constraint handling technique. The algorithm is applied to a biobjective test problem for the SAFARI-1 nuclear research reactor. The Pareto set approximated by the algorithm is compared to solutions obtained by typical operational reload strategies. The results indicate that the MOO CEM algorithm for multiobjective ICFMO is a robust and efficient method which is able to obtain a good spread of trade-off solutions. The method may therefore greatly aid in the decision making of a reactor operator tasked with designing reload configurations. (author)

  2. Safety analysis for core conversion (from HEU to LEU) of Pakistan research reactor-2 (PARR-2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARR-2 (Pakistan Research Reactor-2), an MNSR (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) is to be converted from HEU (High Enriched Uranium) to LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel, along with all current MNSRs in various other countries. The purpose of conversion is to minimize the use of HEU for non-proliferation of high-grade nuclear fuel. The present report presents thermal hydraulic and safety analyses of PARR-2 using existing HEU fuel as well as proposed LEU fuel. Presently, the core is comprised of 90.2% enriched UAl4-Al fuel. There are 344 fuel pins of 5.5 mm diameter. The core has a total of 994.8 g of U235. Standard computer code PARET/ANL (version 1992) was employed to perform steady-state and transient analyses. Various parameters were computed, which included: coolant outlet, maximum clad surface and maximum fuel centerline temperatures; and peak power and corresponding peak core temperatures resulting from a transient initiated by 4 mK positive reactivity insertion. Results were compared with the reported data in Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). It was found that the PARET results were in reasonable agreement with the manufacturer's results. Calculations were also carried out for the proposed LEU core with two suggested fuel pin sizes (5.5 mm and 5.1 mm diameter with 12.6% and 12.3% enrichment, respectively). Comparison of the LEU results with the existing HEU fuel has been made and discussed.

  3. KNK II third core: design report for the annular fuel elements on the central position to accommodate material test inserts NZ 402 and NZ 403

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since August 1984 irradiation experiments with temperature controlled pressure tube probes are being performed in the central position of KNK II. This is part of a long-term experimental program for the development of irradiation resistant reactor materials, which shall also be continued in the third core. The necessary irradiation channel is provided by a special annular fuel element. The present report describes the annular fuel elements for the third core. Aspects of the subassembly design are considered on the basis of the annular element design for the second core and the standard elements of the third core. Two annular elements NZ 402 and NZ 403 (as reserve) are available. It is demonstrated that the expected loadings will allow an unperturbed operation of the annular elements on the central position of the third core

  4. Developments in fabrication of annular MOX fuel pellet for Indian fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechanical rotary presses along with adoption of core rod feature were inducted for fabrication of intricate annular Mixed Oxide (MOX) pellets for Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR). In the existing tooling, bottom plungers contain core rod whereas top plungers contain a central hole for the entry of core rod during compaction. Frequent manual clean up of top plungers after few operations were required due to settling of powder in the annular hole of top plungers during compaction. Delay in cleaning can also result in breakage of tooling apart from increase in the dose to extremities of personnel. New design of tooling has been introduced to clean up the top plungers online during the operation of rotary press. It leads to increase in the productivity, reduces the spillage of valuable nuclear material and also reduces man-rem to operators significantly. The present paper describes the modification in tooling design and compaction sequence established for online cleaning of top plungers. (author)

  5. Performance of the WWR-M research reactor in Ukraine with a mixed-fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in-core fuel management optimization problem was studied for the WWR-M research reactor in Ukraine. Two available types of fuel assemblies were considered: WWR-M2 with 36% enrichment and WWR-M5 with 90% enrichment. It has been demonstrated that a mixed core consisting of WWR-M2 and WWR-M5 fuel provides higher neutron flux and even less fuel expenditures in comparison with the core consisting of only WWR-M2 fuel. Utilization of mixed-fuel is especially effective for high 'neutron prices'. The optimum core configuration, as well as the number and location of fuel assemblies of different types in the core strongly depend on 'neutron price'. With growth of the 'neutron price', the total number of fuel assemblies in the core should be decreased, while the number of WWR-M5 fuel assemblies should be increased. For a not too low 'neutron price', WWR-M5 fuel assemblies should be located near the irradiation channels to make power density in these areas, limited by the maximum allowed temperature of fuel surface, as high as possible, thus increasing neutron flux. (author)

  6. Reactor core monitoring method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mori, Michitsugu [Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Kanemoto, Shigeru; Enomoto, Mitsuhiro; Ebata, Shigeo

    1998-05-06

    The present invention provides a method of monitoring the state of coolant flow in a reactor of a BWR power plant. Namely, a plurality of local power region monitors (LPRM) are disposed to the inside of the reactor core for monitoring a power distribution. Signals of at least two optional LPRM detectors situated at positions different in axial or radial positions of the reactor core are obtained. General fluctuation components which nuclear hydrothermally fluctuate in overall reactor core are removed from the components of the signals. Then, correlational functions between these signals are determined. The state of coolant flow in the reactor is monitored based on the correlational function. When the axial flowing rate and radial flow interference are monitored, the accuracy upon monitoring axial and radial local behaviors of coolants can be improved by thus previously removing the general fluctuation components from signals of LPRM detectors and extracting local void information near to LPRM detectors at high accuracy. (I.S.)

  7. Assessment of core structural materials and surveillance programme of research reactors in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main structural materials to be used in the reactor core, support structures are stainless steel, aluminum and zirconium alloys (zircadyne). Other materials are also used, for example such as polymers in seals and protective coating, and hafnium (HF) as absorber materials in the control rod plates. Stainless steel is used for the reactor pool. The mechanical properties of stainless steel alloys change when they are subjected to irradiation. The main phenomena observed are swelling and irradiation - induced creep. The swelling phenomenon depends on the operating temperature and neutron fluence. For the reactor facility, components will operate at temperature below 70 o C and are expected to see a lifetime fluence of approximately 1 x 1023 n.cm-2.these conditions are well below the conditions where swelling becomes significant. Stainless steels have strong resistance to corrosion over a wide range of environments and temperature. The reactor pool and primary circuit water is demineralized water with controlled low conductivity of less than 100 μ.sm-1 no failure mechanism is known under such process conditions. Aluminum alloys will be used for the constructions of some reactor internals which working in radiation environment as their properties are well understood and show predictable behavior under such conditions. Aluminum is extensively used in water - cooled research reactors because of its low cross-section for the capture of thermal neutrons, excellent corrosion resistance and thermal conductivity. Irradiation damage of polymers strongly depends on the fluence received by the materials. Irradiation effects of polymers also depend on their compositions and molecular structure. if the content of natural rubber is high, irradiation induces an increase in the tensile strength. Where the content of polypropylene is high, irradiation reduces the strength. A materials surveillance plan has been developed and will be implemented from the commencement of reactor

  8. Thermohydraulic and mechanical analysis of the research reactor Munich II Compact-Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new research reactor Munich II (Forschungsreaktor Muenchen II, FRM-II), which is under construction at the Technical University of Munich, Germany, contains a compact reactor core consisting of one single fuel element, assembled by two concentric tubes between which 113 involutely bent fuel plates are located rotationally symmetric. In order to perform the hydraulic and mechanical testing of the FRM-II fuel element, two test facilities have been built at the Department for Nuclear and New Energy Systems of the Ruhr University Bochum. The first mocks up the central region of the reactor coolant system of the FRM-II in a 1:1 scale with emphasis on the fuel element and the inflow and discharge section in order to enable the analysis of the FRM-II core. In the course of the testing the vibration behaviour and the flow resistance of the core were investigated. Likewise start-up and shut down tests of the main pump unit were simulated and the flow profile at the outlet of the element as well as the flow division inside the core were determined. Furthermore an endurance test lasting 60 days (equivalent to 12 operating cycles) was performed, too. Tests including blockages of parts of the reactor cooling system cross section at the core entrance sieve proved the efficiency of the cooling capacity. No major resonances occurred during operation and an endurance test neither showed any incidents nor irregularities. In order to investigate the concept of the decay heat removal in the FRM-II a second test facility was built. This facility simulates the thermohydraulic conditions in one cooling channel of the FRM-II by means of an electrically heated test section, which enables different operating conditions of the decay heat removal system as well as enhanced safety investigations. In the FRM-II the decay heat, which is produced after a shutdown, is removed by means of decay heat removal pumps, which maintain a downward flow in the fuel element for at least three hours

  9. Fast reactor core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Reactor (FR) core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency were conducted. A heterogeneous MA loaded core was designed based on the 1000MWe-ABR breakeven core. The heterogeneous MA loaded core with Zr-H loaded moderated targets had a better transmutation performance than the MA homogeneous loaded core. The annular pellet rod design was proposed as one of the possible design options for the MA target. It was shown that using annular pellet MA rods mitigates the self-shielding effect in the moderated target so as to enhance the transmutation rate

  10. THACT-RR, Analysis of Thermal Hydraulics Transients in Research Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: A Computer Program for Analyzing Thermal-Hydraulics transients in Research Reactors. THACT-RR is a channel code. It analyses the transient response of a research reactor core after power excursions or coolant flow and/or coolant temperature changes. The THACT-RR code provides a homogeneous one-dimensional compressible fluid flow capability with an optional voiding model that estimates the void produced by sub-cooled boiling. It allows flow reversal and sub-cooled nucleate boiling. It also includes a selection of flow instability, departure from nucleate boiling, single and two-phase heat transfer correlations, and a physical properties library adapted to pressures, temperatures, and flow rates encountered in research reactors. 2 - Method of solution: The conservation laws are solved by the method of Characteristics coupled with an implicit finite difference technique to insure stability and convergence of the numerical scheme. The conduction equation is solved by an implicit finite difference method. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The code is not adapted to very fast transient problems

  11. Parametric evaluation of mixed (low and high enriched) fuel core for a swimming pool type research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakhtyar, S.; Iqbal, M.; Israr, M.; Pervez, S.; Salahuddin, A. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2004-07-01

    A study has been carried out to evaluate the performance of a swimming pool type research reactor core comprised of mixed (low and high enriched) uranium fuel. The study includes the calculations of core reactivity, worth of control rods and core criticality at the Beginning Of Life (BOL) of the core and for two operating conditions Cold Zero Power (CZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP). Further, to ensure safe and stable operation of the core from nuclear design point of view, average power densities in the fuel region, power peaking factors, axial power distribution in the hot channel and reactivity feed back coefficients have also been calculated. Two group fluxes have also been determined at different irradiation locations. All these calculations have been carried out employing reactor lattice code WIMS-D14 and reactor analysis code CITATION The calculated results show reasonably good agreement with the quoted operational data of the previous LEU cores. (Author)

  12. Parametric evaluation of mixed (low and high enriched) fuel core for a swimming pool type research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been carried out to evaluate the performance of a swimming pool type research reactor core comprised of mixed (low and high enriched) uranium fuel. The study includes the calculations of core reactivity, worth of control rods and core criticality at the Beginning Of Life (BOL) of the core and for two operating conditions Cold Zero Power (CZP) and Hot Full Power (HFP). Further, to ensure safe and stable operation of the core from nuclear design point of view, average power densities in the fuel region, power peaking factors, axial power distribution in the hot channel and reactivity feed back coefficients have also been calculated. Two group fluxes have also been determined at different irradiation locations. All these calculations have been carried out employing reactor lattice code WIMS-D14 and reactor analysis code CITATION The calculated results show reasonably good agreement with the quoted operational data of the previous LEU cores. (Author)

  13. Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martens, Frederick H. [Argonne National Laboratory; Jacobson, Norman H.

    1968-09-01

    This booklet discusses research reactors - reactors designed to provide a source of neutrons and/or gamma radiation for research, or to aid in the investigation of the effects of radiation on any type of material.

  14. Optimization of the core configuration design using a hybrid artificial intelligence algorithm for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To successfully carry out material irradiation experiments and radioisotope productions, a high thermal neutron flux at irradiation box over a desired life time of a core configuration is needed. On the other hand, reactor safety and operational constraints must be preserved during core configuration selection. Two main objectives and two safety and operational constraints are suggested to optimize reactor core configuration design. Suggested parameters and conditions are considered as two separate fitness functions composed of two main objectives and two penalty functions. This is a constrained and combinatorial type of a multi-objective optimization problem. In this paper, a fast and effective hybrid artificial intelligence algorithm is introduced and developed to reach a Pareto optimal set. The hybrid algorithm is composed of a fast and elitist multi-objective genetic algorithm (GA) and a fast fitness function evaluating system based on the cascade feed forward artificial neural networks (ANNs). A specific GA representation of core configuration and also special GA operators are introduced and used to overcome the combinatorial constraints of this optimization problem. A software package (Core Pattern Calculator 1) is developed to prepare and reform required data for ANNs training and also to revise the optimization results. Some practical test parameters and conditions are suggested to adjust main parameters of the hybrid algorithm. Results show that introduced ANNs can be trained and estimate selected core parameters of a research reactor very quickly. It improves effectively optimization process. Final optimization results show that a uniform and dense diversity of Pareto fronts are gained over a wide range of fitness function values. To take a more careful selection of Pareto optimal solutions, a revision system is introduced and used. The revision of gained Pareto optimal set is performed by using developed software package. Also some secondary operational

  15. Technical basis in support of the conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) core from highly-enriched to low-enriched uranium - core neutron physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stillman, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Feldman, E. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Foyto, L [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Kutikkad, K [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; McKibben, J C [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Peters, N. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States). Columbia Research Reactor; Stevens, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report contains the results of reactor design and performance for conversion of the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) from the use of highly-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to the use of low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. The analyses were performed by staff members of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) Reactor Conversion Program at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the MURR Facility. The core conversion to LEU is being performed with financial support of the U. S. government.

  16. Georgia Institute of Technology research on the Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.; Schneider, A.; Hohl, F.

    1976-01-01

    The program reviewed is a study of the feasibility, design, and optimization of the GCATR. The program is designed to take advantage of initial results and to continue work carried out on the Gas Core Breeder Reactor. The program complements NASA's program of developing UF6 fueled cavity reactors for power, nuclear pumped lasers, and other advanced technology applications. The program comprises: (1) General Studies--Parametric survey calculations performed to examine the effects of reactor spectrum and flux level on the actinide transmutation for GCATR conditions. The sensitivity of the results to neutron cross sections are to be assessed. Specifically, the parametric calculations of the actinide transmutation are to include the mass, isotope composition, fission and capture rates, reactivity effects, and neutron activity of recycled actinides. (2) GCATR Design Studies--This task is a major thrust of the proposed research program. Several subtasks are considered: optimization criteria studies of the blanket and fuel reprocessing, the actinide insertion and recirculation system, and the system integration. A brief review of the background of the GCATR and ongoing research is presented.

  17. Safety analysis for core conversion (from HEU to LEU) of Pakistan research reactor-2 (PARR-2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, Ishtiaq Hussain, E-mail: ishtiaq@pinstech.org.p [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan); Pervez, Showket [Nuclear Engineering Division, Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology, P.O. Nilore, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2010-01-15

    PARR-2 (Pakistan Research Reactor-2), an MNSR (Miniature Neutron Source Reactor) is to be converted from HEU (High Enriched Uranium) to LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) fuel, along with all current MNSRs in various other countries. The purpose of conversion is to minimize the use of HEU for non-proliferation of high-grade nuclear fuel. The present report presents thermal hydraulic and safety analyses of PARR-2 using existing HEU fuel as well as proposed LEU fuel. Presently, the core is comprised of 90.2% enriched UAl{sub 4}-Al fuel. There are 344 fuel pins of 5.5 mm diameter. The core has a total of 994.8 g of U{sup 235}. Standard computer code PARET/ANL (version 1992) was employed to perform steady-state and transient analyses. Various parameters were computed, which included: coolant outlet, maximum clad surface and maximum fuel centerline temperatures; and peak power and corresponding peak core temperatures resulting from a transient initiated by 4 mK positive reactivity insertion. Results were compared with the reported data in Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR). It was found that the PARET results were in reasonable agreement with the manufacturer's results. Calculations were also carried out for the proposed LEU core with two suggested fuel pin sizes (5.5 mm and 5.1 mm diameter with 12.6% and 12.3% enrichment, respectively). Comparison of the LEU results with the existing HEU fuel has been made and discussed.

  18. Whole core analysis of an open pool research reactor under the most severe loss of coolant accident conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the accident in which either the outlet or the inlet coolant pipe connected to the bottom of the reactor tank in an open pool research reactor is completely ruptured has been analyzed. The 3-D transient computer code ThEAP-I developed at Democritus NRC has been utilized and applied to the 5 MW Greek Research Reactor (GRR-1). The results show that a partial melting of the reactor core is possible for the GRR-1, the amount of melting being roughly and conservatively estimated to be of the order of 20%. (author)

  19. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type nuclear reactor, the number of first fuel assemblies (uranium) loaded in a reactor core is smaller than that of second fuel assemblies (mixed oxide), the average burnup degree upon take-out of the first fuel assemblies is reduced to less than that of the second fuel assemblies, and the number of the kinds of the fuel rods constituting the first fuel assemblies is made smaller than that of the fuel rods constituting the second fuel assemblies. As a result, the variety of the plutonium enrichment degree is reduced to make the distribution of the axial enrichment degree uniform, thereby enabling to simplify the distribution of the enrichment degree. Then the number of molding fabrication steps for MOX fuel assemblies can be reduced, thereby enabling to reduce the cost for molding and fabrication. (N.H.)

  20. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are currently 284 research reactors in operation, and 12 under construction around the world. Of the operating reactors, nearly two-thirds are used exclusively for research, and the rest for a variety of purposes, including training, testing, and critical assembly. For more than 50 years, research reactor programs have contributed greatly to the scientific and educational communities. Today, six of the world's research reactors are being shut down, three of which are in the USA. With government budget constraints and the growing proliferation concerns surrounding the use of highly enriched uranium in some of these reactors, the future of nuclear research could be impacted

  1. Alternative core design for the Innovative Research Reactor (RRI) from neutronics aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on its User Requirement Document and main function, RRI shall be able to provide a maximum thermal neutron flux of 1×1015 neutron cm-2s-1. The reason is that the RRI reactor can serve targets requiring a high neutron flux. From the previous results it was obtained that RRI design using fuel of RSG-GAS type was not possible to produce that high neutron flux. One among other reasons is that the geometry dimension is the large, as the neutron flux is inversely proportional to core volume. The objective of the study is to find an alternative core for RRI which meets the high neutron flux requirement. It was chosen an alternative fuel element one like used in JMTR (Japan Material Testing Reactor) that has smaller dimension compared to that of the RSG-GAS reactor. Besides that, active core's height was also varied for 70 cm and 75 cm. Design was carried out by means of analytic codes WIMS-D5B, Batan-FUEL and Batan-3DIFF. Alternative core applied compact core configuration concept of 5×5 with 4 follower control elements. The calculations resulted 3 (three) alternative cores fulfill the requirement, including core using RSG-GAS fuel type but of 70 cm height instead of 60 cm. Through analyzing from over all aspects of core safety and efficiency as well as effectively, core using JMTR fuel type with height of 70 cm represent the best alternative core. (author)

  2. Effective height of the core of the nuclear research reactor Dalat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of thermal neutron relative distributions in axial direction at different positions in the reactor core and for various control rod configurations have been carried out, and axial buckling and effective height of the core deduced. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  3. Development of a 3-dimensional calculation model of the Danish research reactor DR3 to analyse a proposal to a new core design called ring-core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 3-dimensional calculation model of the Danish research reactor DR3 has been developed. Demands of a more effective utilization of the reactor and its facilities has required a more detailed calculation tool than applied so far. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the treatment of the coarse control arms. The model has been tested against measurements with satisfying results. Furthermore the model has been used to analyse a proposal to a new core design called ring-core where 4 central fuel elements are replaced by 4 dummy elements to increase the thermal flux in the center of the reactor. (author)

  4. Development of core technology for research reactors using plate type fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Around 250 research reactors are under operation over the world. However, about 2/3 have been operated more than 30 years and demands for replacements are expected in the near future. The number of expected units is around 110, and around 55 units from 40 countries will be expected to be bid in the world market. In 2007, Netherlands started international bidding process to construct a new 80MW RR (named PALLAS) with the target of commercial operation in 2016, which will replace the existing HFR(45MW). KAERI consortium has been participated in that bid. Most of RRs use plate type fuels as a fuel assembly, Be and Graphite as a reflector. On the other hand, in Korea, the KAERI is operating the HANARO, which uses a rod type fuel assembly and heavy water as a reflector. Hence, core technologies for RRs using plate type fuels are in short. Therefore, core technologies should be secured for exporting a RR. In chapter 2, the conceptual design of PALLAS which use plate type fuels are described including core, cooling system and connected systems, layout of general components. Experimental verification tests for the plate type fuel and second shutdown system and the code verification for nuclear design are explained in Chapter 3 and 4, respectively

  5. Replacement of the Core Beryllium Reflector in the SAFARI-1 Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAFARI-1 Research Reactor is a 20 MW high flux MTR and has been continuously operational for more than 46 years. In this period, the core beryllium reflector had never been replaced. An ageing management action to replace the reflector received priority due to the risks involved with failure or deformation of elements. This paper elaborates on the actions taken to replace the old and manage the new reflector. To this extent a reflector replacement procedure, backed up by core neutronic calculations and a test plan, was developed for the safe replacement of the reflector. A reflector management programme will ensure that records of reflector elements are kept and used to optimally manage usage of every element. Due to the historic nature of reflector utilisation in the SAFARI-1 core, deformation of the elements was unavoidable. These deformations will be monitored in the management programme for the new reflector. Deformation measurement of the old reflector is planned and could yield interesting comparisons with analytical results. The action plan for final disposal of the old reflector, although still in development, is also mentioned in this paper. (author)

  6. Neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analysis of new irradiation channels inside the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chham, E; El Bardouni, T; Benaalilou, K; Boukhal, H; El Bakkari, B; Boulaich, Y; El Younoussi, C; Nacir, B

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the capacity of radioisotope production in the Moroccan TRIGA Mark II research reactor, which is considered as one of the most important applications of research reactors. The aim of this study is to enhance the utilization of TRIGA core in the field of neutron activation and ensure an economic use of the fuel. The main idea was to create an additional irradiation channel (IC) inside the core. For this purpose, three new core configurations are proposed, which differ according to the IC position in the core. Thermal neutron flux distribution and other neutronic safety parameters such as power peaking factors, excess reactivity, and control rods worth reactivity were calculated using the Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport (MCNP) code and neutron cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VII evaluation. The calculated thermal flux in the central thimble (CT) and in the added IC for the reconfigured core is compared with the thermal flux in the CT of the existing core, which is taken as a reference. The results show that all the obtained fluxes in CTs are very close to the reference value, while a remarkable difference is observed between the fluxes in the new ICs and reference. This difference depends on the position of IC in the reactor core. To demonstrate that the Moroccan TRIGA reactor could safely operate at 2MW, with new configurations based on new ICs, different safety-related thermal-hydraulic parameters were investigated. The PARET model was used in this study to verify whether the safety margins are met despite the new modifications of the core. The results show that it is possible to introduce new ICs safely in the reactor core, because the obtained values of the parameters are largely far from compromising the safety of the reactor. PMID:27552124

  7. Shut-down margin study for the next generation VVER-1000 reactor including 13 x 13 hexagonal annular assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 x 13 assemblies are calculated. → The MCNP-5 code is run for many cases with different core burn up at various core temperatures. → There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. → SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated for specific average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC. - Abstract: Shut-Down Margin (SDM) for the next generation annular fuel core of typical VVER-1000, 13 x 13 assemblies are calculated as the main aim of the present research. We have applied the MCNP-5 code for many cases with different values of core burn up at various core temperatures, and therefore their corresponding coolant densities and boric acid concentrations. There is a substantial drop in SDM in the case of annular fuel for the same power level. Specifically, SDM for our proposed VVER-1000 annular pins is calculated when the average fuel burn up values at the BOC, MOC, and EOC are 0.531, 11.5, and 43 MW-days/kg-U, respectively.

  8. Servicing and safe operation constraints for initial and compact loading of WWR-K research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WWR-K research reactor with the design power of 10 MWt was put into operation in 1967 year. Its operation was ceased in 1988 year due to the absence of its safety validation under seismicity conditions (9 points by MSK-64 scale). After the activity aimed at enhancement of the reactor and technological equipment seismic resistance was completed in 1997 year, a decision to restart the reactor was made. The enhancement activity also implied a revision of the reactor core configuration and its optimization to reduce the environmental impact in case of unexpected events.There was conduction of analysis of parameters of an initial compact loading of WWR-K reactor and establishment of its reactivity margin rated for the beginning of the operating cycle. The margin allows a continuous operation of the reactor during 10 days. The nominal reactor power value is 6 MWt

  9. Technical meeting on assessment of core structural materials and surveillance programme of research reactors. Program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors have played and continue to play a key role in the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology, particularly in various domains of research as, fundamental and applied science, industry, human health care and environmental studies, as well as nuclear energy applications and the development of nuclear science and technology related human resources. However, more than 50% of operating research reactors today are over 40 years old and continued operation has to be carefully assessed, especially from the structural materials point of view. In many instances data for the radiation-induced changes of research reactor core materials resulting from exposure to very high neutron fluences are not generally available. Further data is needed in order to evaluate the reliability of research reactor core components. Age-related degradation mechanisms can cause unplanned outages of the research reactors which could in many cases have been predicted by implementation of appropriate surveillance programs. Typically, neutron-based irradiation programmes are carried out at research reactors for several purposes, with particular attention to structural and moderator materials and fuel samples from conventional nuclear power plants. The aim of such experiments is to determine the neutron fluence effects on mechanical properties of materials. Research and development of new advanced materials is also carried out and many member states with research reactors are involved or interested in such R and D projects. Unfortunately, very little information from analysed structural materials can be used as inputs to evaluating research reactor structural materials because of marked differences in the materials and operating environment between power reactors and research reactors. However, the methods used in such programs could be applied to research reactors, especially in the preparation of a predictive/preventive maintenance program supporting extended

  10. Critical and power experiments on the low-enriched uranium core of the upgraded Pakistan Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pakistan Research Reactor was converted from 93% highly enriched uranium fuel to 20% low-enriched uranium fuel in October 1991. The reactor power was also upgraded from 5 to 9 MW. A series of critical and power experiments were performed on the new core for verification of design data and to determine the nuclear performance of the reactor. The characteristics tests included a criticality experiment, reactivity measurements on reflected and unreflected, critical and full-power cores, and flux distribution in and around the core, as well as thermal-hydraulic measurements. A comparison of the measured and the calculated results was also made. The results of the characteristics tests indicate that the performance of the new reactor is within design limits

  11. Thermal radiation in gas core nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A diffusive model of the radial transport of thermal radiation out of a cylindrical core of fissioning plasma is presented. The diffusion approximation is appropriate because the opacity of uranium is very high at the temperatures of interest (greater than 3000 K). We make one additional simplification of assuming constant opacity throughout the fuel. This allows the complete set of solutions to be expressed as a single function. This function is approximated analytically to facilitate parametric studies of the performance of a test module of the nuclear light bulb gas-core nuclear-rocket-engine concept, in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. Our findings indicate that radiation temperatures in range of 4000-6000 K are attainable, which is sufficient to test the high specific impulse potential (approximately 2000 s) of this concept. 15 refs

  12. Thermal radiation in gas core nuclear reactors for space propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slutz, S.A.; Gauntt, R.O.; Harms, G.A.; Latham, T.; Roman, W.; Rodgers, R.J. (Sandia National Lab, Albuquerque, NM (United States))

    1994-05-01

    A diffusive model of the radial transport of thermal radiation out of a cylindrical core of fissioning plasma is presented. The diffusion approximation is appropriate because the opacity of uranium is very high at the temperatures of interest (greater than 3000 K). We make one additional simplification of assuming constant opacity throughout the fuel. This allows the complete set of solutions to be expressed as a single function. This function is approximated analytically to facilitate parametric studies of the performance of a test module of the nuclear light bulb gas-core nuclear-rocket-engine concept, in the Annular Core Research Reactor at Sandia National Laboratories. Our findings indicate that radiation temperatures in range of 4000-6000 K are attainable, which is sufficient to test the high specific impulse potential (approximately 2000 s) of this concept. 15 refs.

  13. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, K.C. [Univ. of Turabo, Gurabo, Puerto (Puerto Rico). College of Engineering; Yahr, G.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-08-01

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in K{sub Q} due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail.

  14. Preliminary fracture analysis of the core pressure boundary tube for the Advanced Neutron Source Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The outer core pressure boundary tube (CPBT) of the Advanced neutron Source (ANS) reactor being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is currently specified as being composed of 6061-T6 aluminum. ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code fracture analysis rules for nuclear components are based on the use of ferritic steels; the expressions, tables, charts and equations were all developed from tests and analyses conducted for ferritic steels. Because of the nature of the Code, design with thin aluminum requires analytical approaches that do not directly follow the Code. The intent of this report is to present a methodology comparable to the ASME Code for ensuring the prevention of nonductile fracture of the CPBT in the ANS reactor. 6061-T6 aluminum is known to be a relatively brittle material; the linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) approach is utilized to determine allowable flaw sizes for the CPBT. A J-analysis following the procedure developed by the Electric Power Research Institute was conducted as a check; the results matched those for the LEFM analysis for the cases analyzed. Since 6061-T6 is known to embrittle when irradiated, the reduction in KQ due to irradiation is considered in the analysis. In anticipation of probable requirements regarding maximum allowable flaw size, a survey of nondestructive inspection capabilities is also presented. A discussion of probabilistic fracture mechanics approaches, principally Monte Carlo techniques, is included in this report as an introduction to what quantifying the probability of nonductile failure of the CPBT may entail

  15. Cold neutron tomography of annular coolant flow in a double subchannel model of a boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dryout of the liquid coolant film on fuel pins at the top of boiling water reactor (BWR) cores constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is a limiting factor in the thermal power, and therefore the economy, of BWRs. Ongoing research on multiphase annular flow, specifically the liquid film thickness, is fundamental not only to nuclear reactor safety and operation but also to that of evaporators, condensers, and pipelines in a general industrial context. We have performed cold neutron tomography of adiabatic air water annular flow in a scaled up model of the subchannel geometry found in BWR fuel assemblies today. All imaging has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institut in Switzerland. Neutron tomography is shown to excel in investigating the interactions of air water two phase flows with spacer vanes of different geometry. The high resolution, high contrast measurements provide spatial distributions of the coolant on top of the surfaces of the spacer, including the vanes, and in the subchannel downstream of the spacers.

  16. Selection and benchmarking of computer codes for research reactor core conversions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A group of computer codes have been selected and obtained from the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Data Bank in France for the core conversion study of highly enriched research reactors. ANISN, WIMSD-4, MC2, COBRA-3M, FEVER, THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR were selected for the study. For the final work THERMOS, GAM-2, CINDER and EXTERMINATOR have been selected and used. A one dimensional thermal hydraulics code also has been used to calculate temperature distributions in the core. THERMOS and CINDER have been modified to serve the purpose. Minor modifications have been made to GAM-2 and EXTERMINATOR to improve their utilization. All of the codes have been debugged on both CDC and IBM computers at the University of IL. IAEA 10 MW Benchmark problem has been solved. Results of this work has been compared with the IAEA contributor's results. Agreement is very good for highly enriched fuel (HEU). Deviations from IAEA contributor's mean value for low enriched fuel (LEU) exist but they are small enough in general. Deviation of keff is about 0.5% for both enrichments at the beginning of life (BOL) and at the end of life (EOL). Flux ratios deviate only about 1.5% from IAEA contributor's mean value. (author)

  17. Substantiation of parameters of the geometric model of the research reactor core for the calculation using the Monte Carlo method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radaev, A. I., E-mail: radaev-aleksandr@mail.ru; Schurovskaya, M. V., E-mail: mvhchurovskaya@mephi.ru [National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    The choice of the spatial nodalization for the calculation of the power density and burnup distribution in a research reactor core with fuel assemblies of the IRT-3M and VVR-KN type using the program based on the Monte Carlo code is described. The influence of the spatial nodalization on the results of calculating basic neutronic characteristics and calculation time is investigated.

  18. Survey of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A survey of reasearch reactors based on the IAEA Nuclear Research Reactor Data Base (RRDB) was done. This database includes information on 273 operating research reactors ranging in power from zero to several hundred MW. From these 273 operating research reactors 205 reactors have a power level below 5 MW, the remaining 68 reactors range from 5 MW up to several 100 MW thermal power. The major reactor types with common design are: Siemens Unterrichtsreaktors, 1.2 Argonaut reactors, Slowpoke reactors, the miniature neutron source reactors, TRIGA reactors, material testing reactors and high flux reactors. Technical data such as: power, fuel material, fuel type, enrichment, maximum neutron flux density and experimental facilities for each reactor type as well as a description of their utilization in physics and chemistry, medicine and biology, academic research and teaching, training purposes (students and physicists, operating personnel), industrial application (neutron radiography, silicon neutron transmutation doping facilities) are provided. The geographically distribution of these reactors is also shown. As conclusions the author discussed the advantages (low capital cost, low operating cost, low burn up, simple to operate, safe, less restrictive containment and sitting requirements, versatility) and disadvantages (lower sensitivity for NAA, limited radioisotope production, limited use of neutron beams, limited access to the core, licensing) of low power research reactors. 24 figs., refs. 15, Tab. 1 (nevyjel)

  19. Assessment of core structural materials and surveillance programme of research reactors. Report of the consultants meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of presentations on the assessment of core structural components and materials at their facilities were given by the experts. The different issues related to degradation mechanisms were discussed. The outputs include a more thorough understanding of the specific challenges related to Research Reactors (RRs) as well as proposals for activities which could assist RR organizations in their efforts to address the issues involved. The experts recommend that research reactor operators consider implementation of surveillance programs for materials of core structural components, as part of ageing management program (TECDOC-792 and DS-412). It is recognised by experts that adequate archived structural material data is not available for many RRs. Access to this data and extension of existing material databases could help many operating organisations extend the operation of their RRs. The experts agreed that an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM) on Assessment of Core Structural Materials should be organised in December 2009 (IAEA HQ Vienna). The proposed objectives of the TM are: (i) exchange of detailed technical information on the assessment and ageing management of core structural materials, (ii) identification of materials of interest for further investigation, (iii) proposal for a new IAEA CRP on Assessment of Core Structural Materials, and (iv) identification of RRs prepared to participate in proposed CRP. Based on the response to a questionnaire prepared for the 2008 meeting of the Technical Working Group for Research Reactors, the number of engineering capital projects related to core structural components is proportionally lower than those related to,for example, I and C or electrical power systems. This implies that many operating research reactors will be operating longer using their original core structural components and justifies the assessment and evaluation programmes and activities proposed in this report. (author)

  20. Research reactor core conversion from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels. Guidebook addendum: Heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Guidebook on Research Reactor Core Conversion from the Use of Highly Enriched Uranium to the Use of Low Enriched Uranium Fuels (IAEA-TECDOC--233) was issued by the International Atomic Energy Agency in August 1980. This document contains a wide variety of information of the physics, thermal-hydraulics, fuels, and fuel cycle economics for light water moderated research and test reactors. In consideration of the special features of heavy water moderated research and test reactors (hereafter referred to as heavy water research reactors), this Addendum to IAEA-TECDOC--233 has been prepared to assist operators and physicists from these reactors in determining whether conversion from HEU to LEU fuel designs is technically feasible for their specific reactor, and to assist in making a smooth transition to the use of LEU fuel designs where appropriate. The organization of this Addendum follows that of IAEA-TECDOC--233 as closely as possible in order to provide a consistent presentation of the information and to minimize the repetition of information that is common to both heavy water and light water research reactors. Distinctive features of the heavy water reactors are addressed where applicable

  1. Characteristic differences of LEU and HEU cores at the German FRJ-2 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabbi, R.; Wolters, J.; Damm, G. [Central Research Reactor Division, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2002-07-01

    As a sophisticated computational method for reactor physics analysis and fuel management an MCNP model in very high fidelity was developed and coupled with a depletion code and applied to the HEU-LEU core conversion study. The analysis show that as a consequence of the high amount of U-238, the amount of U-235 in the LEU core is about 14% higher than in the HEU core. The reduction of the thermal flux varies between 16% (core) and 5% in the reflector zone. The rate of U-235 burnup in the LEU core is approx. 11.5% lower which allows an extension of irradiation time. Due to the effect of neutron spectrum the worth of the absorber system decreases in an LEU core by 17% resulting in a decrease of shutdown and excess reactivity. The kinetic parameters of the core are slightly reduced causing changes in the reactivity values and transient behavior of the core. The moderator coefficient is decreased by 18% and the Doppler coefficient is increased by 63%. Due to shortening of the absorption length of the fission neutrons the prompt neutron lifetime is reduced by 7%. (author)

  2. Characteristic differences of LEU and HEU cores at the German FRJ-2 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a sophisticated computational method for reactor physics analysis and fuel management an MCNP model in very high fidelity was developed and coupled with a depletion code and applied to the HEU-LEU core conversion study. The analysis show that as a consequence of the high amount of U-238, the amount of U-235 in the LEU core is about 14% higher than in the HEU core. The reduction of the thermal flux varies between 16% (core) and 5% in the reflector zone. The rate of U-235 burnup in the LEU core is approx. 11.5% lower which allows an extension of irradiation time. Due to the effect of neutron spectrum the worth of the absorber system decreases in an LEU core by 17% resulting in a decrease of shutdown and excess reactivity. The kinetic parameters of the core are slightly reduced causing changes in the reactivity values and transient behavior of the core. The moderator coefficient is decreased by 18% and the Doppler coefficient is increased by 63%. Due to shortening of the absorption length of the fission neutrons the prompt neutron lifetime is reduced by 7%. (author)

  3. Core calculations for the upgrading of the IEA-R1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adimir dos; Perrotta, Jose A.; Bastos, Jose Luis F.; Yamaguchi, Mitsuo; Umbehaun, Pedro E. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: asantos@net.ipen.br; perrotta@net.ipen.br; mitsuo@net.ipen.br

    1998-07-01

    The IEA-R1 Research Reactor is a multipurpose reactor. It has been used for basic and applied research in the nuclear area, training and radioisotopes production since 1957. In 1995, the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) took the decision to modernize and upgrade the power from 2 to 5 MW and increase the operational cycle. This work presents the design requirements and the calculations effectuated to reach this goal. (author)

  4. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  5. Kinetic study of the Tehran research reactor core with low enriched fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pazirandeh, A.; Afshar Bakeshloo, A. [Tehran Univ. (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Physics Dept.; Bartsch, G. [Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik

    1997-11-01

    For evaluating the performance of the newly refuelled Tehran Research Reactor core with low enriched uranium fuel (LEU) in transient states a two group time dependent diffusion equation code (COSTANZA) was used. This paper presents results of calculations of the fast transients, revealing the steady performance of the core and fuel integrity during transient for a probable reactivity insertion of less than or equal dollar 1.5/0.5 s. The temperature dependant reactivity coefficients of the Doppler resonance broadening effect and of the moderator absorption cross section change and density dilution were calculated using cell-averaged 69 energy group WIMS-D/4 for two main libraries, old library and WIMKAL88, to 13 groups. The two group parameters for the COSTANZA code were also obtained by WIMS-D/4. (orig.) [Deutsch] Zur Bewertung der Leistungsfaehigkeit des neu beladenen Teheraner Forschungsreaktors mit niedrig angereichertem Uranbrennstoff bei Reaktivitaetstransienten wurde ein 2-Gruppen zeitabhaengiges Diffusionsprogramm COSTANZA verwendet. In der vorliegenden Arbeit werden Ergebnisse der Berechnung schneller Transienten vorgestellt, die das Verhalten des Reaktorkerns bzw. die Integritaet der Brennstaebe waehrend der Transienten fuer eine Reaktivitaetsaenderung von kleiner oder gleich Dollar 1.5/0.5 s zeigen. Die temperaturabhaengigen Reaktivitaetskoeffizienten der Doppler-Verbreitung im Brennstoff sowie der Dichteaenderung und der Neutronenabsorption im Moderator wurden mit Hilfe zellengemittelter 69 Energie-Gruppen der Datenbank WIMS-D/4 und fuer 13 Energiegruppen mit der Datenbank WIMKAL 88 ermittelt. Die Zweigruppendaten fuer das COSTANZA-Programm wurden ebenfalls mit Hilfe von WIMS-D/4 bestimmt. (orig.)

  6. Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of LEU cores for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maximum operating power levels of the high power and equilibrium LEU cores for PARR-1 have been assessed. The criterion followed is that nucleate boiling should not commence at any point in the core, when reactor power approaches overpower limiting set point of 115% and simultaneously the coolant flow rate reduces low flow set point of 90%. Steady state operating conditions have been calculated for the assessed maximum power. These include coolant velocity distribution in the core, critical velocity, pressure drop, saturation temperature, temperature distribution in the core and margins to onset of nucleate boiling, onset of flow instability and departure from nucleate boiling. Cooling conditions for the end fuel plates have also been analyzed. (author)

  7. Full-Core Conversion of the WWR-M Research Reactor in Ukraine to the Use of LEU Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full-core conversion of the WWR-M research reactor in Ukraine with simultaneous replacement of all remaining HEU fuel by fresh LEU fuel requires the new safety analysis of the reactor because of great decrease of the number of fuel assemblies in the core. Because of considerable increase of reactivity due to loading a fuel assembly into the core and reactivity worth of control rods, the following potential accidents are analysed for the new LEU core: incidental falling of a fuel assembly in a cell of the core and spontaneous withdrawal of a control rod group because of malfunction of electronic equipment. To provide the safety of the reactor, some limiting conditions for operation are revised. In particular, maximum allowed effective multiplication factor when all control rods are fully in and all safety rods are fully out is decreased from 0.988 to 0.977, and maximum allowed power of the reactor is decreased from 10 MW to 7 MW. The safety analysis shows that with the revised limiting conditions for operation, such the events with accompanying one additional equipment malfunction and one error of personnel do not lead to damage of fuel elements and release of radioactivity exceeding allowed level. For neutronics calculations, the MCNP code based on the Monte Carlo method is applied. Thermal-hydraulics is calculated with the PLTEMP code. (author)

  8. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V.2: Analysis (Appendices A-F)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volume 2 consists of detailed Appendices, covering safety analyses for generic 10 MW reactor, safety analysis - probabilistic methods, methods for preventing LOCA, radiological consequence analyses, examples of safety report amendments and safety specifications. Included in Volume 2 are example analyses for cores with with highly enriched uranium and low enriched uranium fuels showing differences that can be expected in the safety parameters and radiological consequences of postulated accidents. There are seven examples of licensing documents related to core conversion and two examples of methods for determining power limits for safety specifications in the document. Refs, figs, bibliographies and tabs

  9. Research on the annular lithium jet concept for future laser-fusion reactors. Final report No. 3, Sept 1977--Dec 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments have been performed to determine the length for convergence or closure of a vertical, hollow annular water jet due to the action of surface tension forces. The data agree well with theoretical predictions up to a velocity of about 3 m/s. At higher velocities, the convergence lengths are less than predicted and this is attributed to the jet acting as an ejector pump and thereby reducing the air pressure inside the annulus to slightly sub-atmospheric values. The stability of such a jet is also discussed in the light of the fact that no hydrodynamic instabilities have been observed to date. Finally the results of a series of experiments on the flow spreading or splitting due to the presence of wedge-shaped obstacles in the path of the annular jet flow are described

  10. Research and development of a super fast reactor. (2) Core design improvement on local void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 700MWe Supercritical-pressure water-cooled fast reactor (Super Fast Reactor) was designed with negative overall void reactivity. As there is no cross flow between the fuel assemblies, the local void reactivity, defined as the reactivity change when the coolant of one assembly disappears, also need to be kept negative throughout the cycle. In this study, we found out the mechanism of the local void reactivity and improved the core design to keep the local void reactivity negative for all the seed fuel assemblies. According to the theory analysis, several core configurations, including the thickness of ZrH layer, the layout of the seed fuel assembly, the layout of the core and the loading pattern, will affect the local void reactivity distribution. Sensitivity of those configurations on the local void reactivity was analyzed. 1.15cm of ZrH layer thickness is the best choice for reducing the local void reactivity for the current core design. The assembly layout has no obvious effect on the local void reactivity. It is necessary to load more blanket assemblies in the inner region of the core in order to reduce the local void reactivity of the inner seed fuel assemblies. Loading pattern is also important for flattening the local void reactivity distribution. A hybrid loading method can be employed to make the distribution of the local void reactivity more uniform. Based on those conclusions, a Super Fast Reactor is successfully designed with satisfying all of the design criteria and design goals as well as keeping the local void reactivity of all the seed fuel assemblies less than -30pcm. (author)

  11. Research nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the divergence of the first nuclear reactor in 1942, about 600 research or test reactors have been built throughout the world. Today 255 research reactors are operating in 57 countries and about 70% are over 25 years old. Whereas there are very few reactor types for power plants because of rationalization and standardisation, there is a great diversity of research reactors. We can divide them into 2 groups: heavy water cooled reactors and light water moderated reactors. Heavy water cooled reactors are dedicated to the production of high flux of thermal neutrons which are extracted from the core by means of neutronic channels. Light water moderated reactors involved pool reactors and slightly pressurized closed reactors, they are polyvalent but their main purposes are material testing, technological irradiations, radionuclide production and neutron radiography. At the moment 8 research reactors are being built in Canada, Germany, Iran, Japan, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Russia and Slovakia and 8 others are planned in 7 countries (France, Indonesia, Nigeria, Russia, Slovakia, Thailand and Tunisia. Different research reactors are described: Phebus, Masurca, Phenix and Petten HFR. The general principles of nuclear safety applied to test reactors are presented. (A.C.)

  12. A lumped parameter core dynamics model for MTR type research reactors under natural convection regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A model is presented to simulate the reactivity insertion transient in MTR reactors. ► Transient dynamics of IAEA 10 MW MTR type research reactor are evaluated. ► Maximum unprotected reactivity insertion for safe condition is calculated. ► The model predictions are validated with corresponding results in the literature. - Abstract: On the basis of lumped parameter modeling of both the kinetic and thermal–hydraulic effects, a reasonably accurate simplified model has been developed to predict the dynamic response of MTR reactors following to an unprotected reactivity insertion under natural convection regime. By this model the reactor transient behavior at a given initial steady-state can be solved by a set of ordinary differential equations. The model predictions have an acceptable consent with corresponding results of reactivity insertion transients analyzed in the literature. The inherent safety characteristics of MTR research reactors utilizing natural convection is clearly demonstrated by the expanded model. The safety margin of reactor operating is selected ONB condition and thereby the proposed model determines that any slight increase in the value of $0.73 for inserted reactivity will cause the maximum cladding surface temperature to exceed the ONB condition

  13. In-Reactor Densification of Dual Cooled Annular Fuel Pellet during Irradiation Test at HANARO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kwon, Hyoung Mun; Kim, Keon Sik; Kim, Jong Hun; Oh, Jang Soo; Yang, Jae Ho; Koo, Yang Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    These advantages result in a considerably low pellet centerline temperature. Because of this considerably low pellet temperature, in-reactor behavior of an annular pellet, such as densification and swelling may be significantly different from that of the conventional PWR solid pellet. Since the pellet temperature of an annular fuel rod is lower than that of a PWR solid fuel rod by several hundred degrees, the in-reactor densification and swelling of a dual cooled annular fuel pellet might be considered as athermal phenomena due to a low pellet temperature. In order to investigate the in-reactor behavior of the annular UO{sub 2} pellet, HANARO irradiation test was planned and conducted for annular pellets with 5 different types. Post irradiation test is being carried out in the KAERI's PIE facility. In this study, we are going to report the preliminary results of PIE test on the inreactor densification behavior of a dual cooled annular fuel pellet. Irradiation test of dual cooled annular UO{sub 2} pellet was conducted at the OR-4 hole in HANARO by using a non-instrumented test rig. The preliminary results of PIE test on the in-reactor densification behavior showed that the irradiated pellets densified much more than expected values based on MATPRO relations of inreactor densification at low temperature in the annular pellet with low initial sintered density. It might be attributed to the higher fission rate during HANARO irradiation.

  14. Upgrading of the coupled neutronics-fluid dynamics code SIMMER to simulate the research reactors core disruptive RIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biaut, Guillaume; Couturier, Jean [IRSN, Fontenay-aux-roses (France); Wilhelm, Dirk; Ping, Liu [FzK, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Up to now, the French aluminium plate-type, water-moderated research reactors have been designed by taking into account the consequences of a core disruptive RIA with a constant bounding thermal energy released of 135 MJ during the power transient and a mechanical energy, rising from the thermodynamic interaction between molten aluminium and the liquid water, accounting for 9% of the thermal energy. Nevertheless, for the IRSN, both BORAX-I, SPERT-I destructive tests and SL-1 accident do not show restrictive phenomena on the thermal energy released which mainly depends on reactivity insertions rates and core characteristics. Consequently, the IRSN has adopted a new approach, within the framework of the 'Beyond Design Basis Accidents' (BDBA), while studying scenarios representative of large reactivity insertions sequences by upgrading the coupled neutronics-fluid dynamics code SIMMER, designed for LMFR, to treat BDBA in water-moderated research reactors. A method for taking into account the heterogeneities of the core on the resonance self-shielded fuel cross sections has been developed; a model to treat fuel plate geometry has been implemented and also a new clad-to-coolant heat transfer coefficients suitable for extremely fast transient conditions. At the present stage of the studies, it is found that, for large reactivity insertion sequences tested, the geometry around the core has a dominant influence on pressures inside the reactor. (authors)

  15. The Whole-Core LEU U3Si2-Al Fuel Demonstration in the 30-MW Oak Ridge Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ORR Whole-Core LEU Fuel Demonstration, conducted as part of the US Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor Program, has been successfully completed. Using commercially-fabricated U3Si2-Al 20%-enriched fuel elements (4.8 g U/cc) and fuel followers (3.5 g U/cc), the 30-MW Oak Ridge Research Reactor was safely converted from an all-HEU core, through a series of HEU/LEU mixed transition cores, to an all-LEU core. There were no fuel element failures and average discharge burnups were measured to be as high as 50% for the standard elements and 75% for the fuel followers. Experimental results for burnup-dependent critical configurations, cycle-averaged fuel element powers, and fuel-element-averaged 235U burnups, validated predictions based on three-dimensional depletion calculations. Calculated values for plutonium production and isotopic mass ratios as functions of 235U burnup support the corresponding measured quantities. In general, calculations for 60Co and 198Au reaction rate distributions, differential and integral control rod worths, prompt neutron decay constants, and isothermal temperature coefficients were found to agree with corresponding measured values. Experimentally determined critical configurations for fresh HEU and LEU cores radially reflected with water and with beryllium are well-predicted by both Monte Carlo and diffusion calculations. 44 refs., 57 figs., 45 tabs

  16. A coupled calculational system for optimal in-core fuel management in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-core fuel management is one of the frequently complex task faced during a useful life of a nuclear reactor, because of the huge number of possible patterns (configurations) existing for a particular fuel set and its associated decision which should be taken about the potential good pattern satisfying established safety constraints. Thus, a sensible way to handle safely such kind of problem one have to provide an automatic procedure to generate appropriate reload pattern in nuclear reactor core. In the present work, the investigated way followed to solve this problem, was the combination use of the well known stochastic method which is Simulated Annealing (SA), together with Artificial Neural Network (ANN) technique. The strategy, which is inspired from Kim's paper, was proposed to solve adequately this problem. It requires two calculational stages involved by the use of coupled method connected to each other. In the first stage, an adaptive back-propagation network (BPN), is used to predicts safety core parameters Pmax and Keff. The BPN receives the allowed configurations from a previous calculation using heuristics rules and thereafter predicts Pmax and Keff very quickly. The Simulated Annealing method, in a second stage, determines whether a current candidate is better than the reference one based on the predicted results and consequently on value of the objective function stated. The most distinguishing and attractive feature of such system is the computational efficiency in obtaining optimized loading patterns with adequate fidelity. Neural network offers very fast prediction of core parameters with reasonable accuracy, and simulated annealing method offers very effective searching procedure which avoid local minimum. An objective function was developed based on two performance parameters: cycle length which can be determined through the evaluation of the effective multiplication factor Keff and power peaking factor Pmax. The system uses optimization of

  17. Biofilm Community Dynamics in Bench-Scale Annular Reactors Simulating Arrestment of Chloraminated Drinking Water Nitrification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annular reactors (ARs) were used to study biofilm community succession and provide an ecological insight during nitrification arrestment through simultaneously increasing monochloramine (NH2Cl) and chlorine to nitrogen mass ratios, resulting in four operational periods (I to IV)....

  18. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conversion of research and test reactor cores from the use of high enrichment uranium to the use of low enrichment uranium depends on the cooperation of many research organizations, reactor operators, and government agencies. At a technical level, it involves almost all aspects of the fuel cycle, including fuel development, testing, shipping and reprocessing; experiment performance; economics; and safety and licensing aspects. The reactors involved and the conversion activities are distributed among approximately 25 countries, making this a subject which is best dealt with on an international basis. To foster direct communication in this area, the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, at the Argonne National Laboratory, sponsored this meeting as the fifth of a series which began in 1978. The previous meetings were held at Argonne (International Meeting of Research Reactor Fuel Designers, Developers, and Fabricators, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 910, 1978), at Saclay (IAEA Consultants' Meeting on Research Reactor Core Conversions from HEU to LEU, Centre d'etudes Nucleaires de Saclay, Saclay, France, December 12-14, 1979), at Argonne (International Meeting on Development, Fabrication and Application of Reduced Enrichment Fuels for Research and Test Reactors, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, U.S.A., November 12-14, 1980) and at Juelich (Seminar on Research Reactor Operation and Use, Juelich Nuclear Research Center, Juelich, F.R.G., September 48, 1981). Proceedings from the two most recent previous meetings were published as ANL/RERTR/TM-3 (CONF-801144) and IAEA-SR-77. The spirit of this meeting differs slightly from that of the previous meetings. The advances which have been made and the growing maturity of the effort have caused a gradual shift of emphasis away from those topics which dominated the floor during the first meetings, such as fuel and methods development, and towards topics which concern more

  19. Burnup analysis and in-core fuel management study of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principal objective of this study is to formulate an effective optimal fuel management strategy for the TRIGA MARK II research reactor at AERE, Savar. The core management study has been performed by utilizing four basic types of information calculated for the reactor: criticality, power peaking, neutron flux and burnup calculation. This paper presents the results of the burnup calculations for TRIGA LEU fuel elements. The fuel element burnup for approximately 20 years of operation was calculated using the TRIGAP compute code. The calculation is performed in one-dimensional radial geometry in TRIGAP. Inter-comparison of TRIGAP results with other two calculations performed by MVP-BURN and MCNP4C-ORIGEN2.1 show very good agreement. Reshuffling at 20,000 MWh step provides the highest core lifetime of the reactor, which is 64,500 MWh. Besides, the study gives valuable insight into the behaviour of the reactor and will ensure better utilization and operation of the reactor in future

  20. INVAP's Research Reactor Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INVAP, an Argentine company founded more than three decades ago, is today recognized as one of the leaders within the research reactor industry. INVAP has participated in several projects covering a wide range of facilities, designed in accordance with the requirements of our different clients. For complying with these requirements, INVAP developed special skills and capabilities to deal with different fuel assemblies, different core cooling systems, and different reactor layouts. This paper summarizes the general features and utilization of several INVAP research reactor designs, from subcritical and critical assemblies to high-power reactors IAEA safety

  1. Research reactors in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentine Nuclear Development started in early fifties. In 1957, it was decided to built the first a research reactor. RA-1 reactor (120 kw, today licensed to work at 40 kW) started operation in January 1958. Originally RA-1 was an Argonaut (American design) reactor. In early sixties, the RA-1 core was changed. Fuel rods (20% enrichment) was introduced instead the old Argonaut core design. For that reason, a critical facility named RA-0 was built. After that, the RA-3 project started, to build a multipurpose 5 MW nuclear reactor MTR pool type, to produce radioisotopes and research. For that reason and to define the characteristics of the RA-3 core, another critical facility was built, RA-2. Initially RA-3 was a 90 % enriched fuel reactor, and started operation in 1967. When Atucha I NPP project started, a German design Power Reactor, a small homogeneous reactor was donated by the German Government to Argentina (1969). This was RA-4 reactor (20% enrichment, 1W). In 1982, RA-6 pool reactor achieved criticality. This is a 500 kW reactor with 90% enriched MTR fuel elements. In 1990, RA-3 started to operate fueled by 20% enriched fuel. In 1997, the RA-8 (multipurpose critical facility located at Pilcaniyeu) started to operate. RA-3 reactor is the most important CNEA reactor for Argentine Research Reactors development. It is the first in a succession of Argentine MTR reactors built by CNEA (and INVAP SE ) in Argentina and other countries: RA-6 (500 kW, Bariloche-Argentina), RP-10 (10MW, Peru), NUR (500 kW, Algeria), MPR (22 MW, Egypt). The experience of Argentinian industry permits to compete with foreign developed countries as supplier of research reactors. Today, CNEA has six research reactors whose activities have a range from education and promotion of nuclear activity, to radioisotope production. For more than forty years, Argentine Research Reactors are working. The experience of Argentine is important, and argentine firms are able to compete in the design and

  2. Physical start up of the Dalat nuclear research reactor with the core configuration having a central neutron trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the reactor has reached physical criticality with the core configuration exempt from central neutron trap on 1 November 1983, the core configuration with a central neutron trap has been arranged in the reactor and the reactor has reached physical criticality with this core configuration at 17h48 on 18 December 1983. The integral worths of different control rods are determined with accuracy. 2 refs., 24 figs., 18 tabs

  3. Analysis of partial and total flow blockage of a single fuel assembly of an MTR research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the following study is to perform a safety analysis of the IAEA 10 MW MTR Pool type Research Reactor [IAEA-TECDOC-233, 1980. IAEA Research Reactor Core Conversion from the use of high-enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels Guidebook] under flow blockage of a single Fuel Assembly (FA) conditions. Such event was rarely investigated in the open literature notwithstanding the fat that it constitutes a severe accident that may lead to local dryout and eventually to loss of the FA integrity. The transients herein considered are related to partial and total obstruction of the cooling channel of a single Fuel Assembly of the reactor core. This study constitutes the first step of a larger work, which consists in performing a 3D simulation using the Best Estimate coupled code technique. However, as a first approach the instantaneous reactor power is derived through the point kinetic approach of the used thermal-hydraulic system code

  4. Neutron flux parameters for k{sub 0}-NAA method at the Malaysian nuclear agency research reactor after core reconfiguration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavar, A.R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Sarmani, S. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Wood, A.K. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, Kajang, Selangor 43000 (Malaysia); Fadzil, S.M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Masood, Z. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, Kajang, Selangor 43000 (Malaysia); Khoo, K.S., E-mail: khoo@ukm.m [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    The Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA) research reactor, commissioned in 1982, is a TRIGA Mark II swimming pool type reactor. When the core configuration changed in June 2009, it became essential to re-determine such neutron flux parameters as thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio (f), epithermal neutron flux shape factor ({alpha}), thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th}) and epithermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub epi}) in the irradiation positions of MNA research reactor in order to guarantee accuracy in the application of k{sub 0}-neutron activation analysis (k{sub 0}-NAA).The f and {alpha} were determined using the bare bi-isotopic monitor and bare triple monitor methods, respectively; Au and Zr monitors were utilized in present study. The results for four irradiation positions are presented and discussed in the present work. The calculated values of f and {alpha} ranged from 33.49 to 47.33 and -0.07 to -0.14, respectively. The {phi}{sub th} and the {phi}{sub epi} were measured as 2.03 x 10{sup 12} (cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and 6.05 x 10{sup 10} (cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) respectively. These results were compared to those of previous studies at this reactor as well as to those of reactors in other countries. The results indicate a good conformity with other findings.

  5. Hydraulic lift-off issues for application of high performance annular fuels in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Pin and assembly lift-off forces are compared between solid and annular fuel. • Annular fuel experiences much stronger uplift forces. • Much stronger hold-down forces are required by annular fuel assembly. • Engineering modifications for hold-down mechanisms are required by annular fuel. - Abstract: In the PWR core, the fuel assembly is firmly seated on the lower core plate during operation. However, if the hydraulic force exerted on the fuel assembly by coolant flow is too large and the fuel assembly is lifted-off from the lower core plate, the excessive vibration will cause fuel failure. Therefore, the hydraulic lift-off issue needs to be addressed when the advanced fuel assembly is developed. It has been shown that the advanced annular fuel design with internal cooling allows power uprating up to 50% while the peak temperature of the fuel can be reduced and the MDNBR can be maintained. However, if the coolant condition in the core is kept unchanged, increasing the core power by 50% requires the core flow rate also increase proportionally, which will give rise to the hydraulic lift-off, an important issue to be addressed. In this paper, taking the 17 × 17 solid fuel design as the reference, the hydraulic lift-off issue is investigated for proposed 12 × 12 and 13 × 13 annular fuel designs. Both the steady-state and start-up operating conditions are evaluated. It is found that the hydraulic lift-off indeed is an issue for annular fuel design which requires careful analysis. By comparison, the lift-off forces and hold-down forces required for the externally and internally cooled annular fuels (13 × 13 and 12 × 12 arrays) are several times larger than that of the referenced solid fuel (17 × 17 array). Therefore, the hold-down mechanism for annular fuel needs to be carefully designed

  6. Analysis of Accidents at the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 Using Proposed Mixed-Fuel (HEU and LEU) Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) was converted from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel in 1991. The reactor is running successfully, with an upgraded power level of 10 MW. To save money on the purchase of costly fresh LEU fuel elements, the use of less burnt HEU spent fuel elements along with the present LEU fuel elements is being considered. The proposal calls for the HEU fuel elements to be placed near the thermal column to gain the required excess reactivity. In the present study the safety analysis of a proposed mixed-fuel core has been carried out at a calculated steady-state power level of 9.8 MW. Standard computer codes and correlations were employed to compute various parameters. Initiating events in reactivity-induced accidents involve various modes of reactivity insertion, namely, start-up accident, accidental drop of a fuel element on the core, flooding of a beam tube with water, and removal of an in-pile experiment during reactor operation. For each of these transients, time histories of reactor power, energy released, temperature, and reactivity were determined

  7. Georgia Institute of Technology research on the gas core actinide transmutation reactor (GCATR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gas Core Actinide Transmutation Reactor (GCATR) offers several advantages including (1) the gaseous state of the fuel may reduce problems of processing and recycling fuel and wastes, (2) high neutron fluxes are achievable, (3) the possibility of using a molten salt in the blanket may also simplify the reprocessing problem and permit breeding, (4) the spectrum can be varied from fast to thermal by increasing the moderation in the blanket so that the trade-off of critical mass versus actinide and fission product burnup can be studied for optimization, and (5) the U233-Th cycle, which can be used, appears superior to the U235-Pu cycle in regard to actinide burnup. The program at Georgia Tech is a study of the feasibility, design, and optimization of the GCATR

  8. Analytical solution of neutron transport equation in an annular reactor with a rotating pulsed source; Resolucao analitica da equacao de transporte de neutrons em um reator anelar com fonte pulsada rotativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Paulo Cleber Mendonca

    2002-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution of the neutron transport equation in an annular reactor is presented with a short and rotating neutron source of the type S(x) {delta} (x- Vt), where V is the speed of annular pulsed reactor. The study is an extension of a previous study by Williams [12] carried out with a pulsed source of the type S(x) {delta} (t). In the new concept of annular pulsed reactor designed to produce continuous high flux, the core consists of a subcritical annular geometry pulsed by a rotating modulator, producing local super prompt critical condition, thereby giving origin to a rotating neutron pulse. An analytical solution is obtained by opening up of the annular geometry and applying one energy group transport theory in one dimension using applied mathematical techniques of Laplace transform and Complex Variables. The general solution for the flux consists of a fundamental mode, a finite number of harmonics and a transient integral. A condition which limits the number of harmonics depending upon the circumference of the annular geometry has been obtained. Inverse Laplace transform technique is used to analyse instability condition in annular reactor core. A regenerator parameter in conjunction with perimeter of the ring and nuclear properties is used to obtain stable and unstable harmonics and to verify if these exist. It is found that the solution does not present instability in the conditions stated in the new concept of annular pulsed reactor. (author)

  9. Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) core design. Joint research report (FY1998-1999)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-01

    The Reduce-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor aiming at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started a joint research program for conceptual design of RMWR core in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) since 1998. The research area includes the RMWR core conceptual designs, development of analysis methods for rector physics and thermal-hydraulics to design the RMWR cores with higher accuracy and preparation of MOX critical experiment to confirm the feasibility from the reactor physics point of view. The present report describes the results of joint research program 'RMWR core design Phase 1' performed by JAERI and JAPC in FY 1998 and 1999. The results obtained from the joint research program are as follows: Conceptual design study on the RMWR core has been performed. A core concept with a conversion ratio more than about 1 is basically feasible to multiple recycling of plutonium. Investigating core characteristics at the equilibrium, some promising core concepts to satisfy above aims have been established. As for BWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, three types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.1, (2) one feasible to attain operation cycle of about 2 years and burn-up of about 60 GWd/t with conversion ratio more than 1 or (3) one in simple design based on the ABWR assembly and without blanket attaining conversion ratio more than 1. And as for PWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, two types of design have been obtained as follows; (1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.05 by using heavy water as a coolant and (2) one feasible to attain conversion ratio about l by using light water. In the study of nuclear calculation method, a reactor analysis code

  10. Study on Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) core design. Joint research report (FY1998-1999)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reduce-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a next generation water-cooled reactor aiming at effective utilization of uranium resource, high burn-up and long operation cycle, and plutonium multi-recycle. Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) started a joint research program for conceptual design of RMWR core in collaboration with the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) since 1998. The research area includes the RMWR core conceptual designs, development of analysis methods for rector physics and thermal-hydraulics to design the RMWR cores with higher accuracy and preparation of MOX critical experiment to confirm the feasibility from the reactor physics point of view. The present report describes the results of joint research program 'RMWR core design Phase 1' performed by JAERI and JAPC in FY 1998 and 1999. The results obtained from the joint research program are as follows: Conceptual design study on the RMWR core has been performed. A core concept with a conversion ratio more than about 1 is basically feasible to multiple recycling of plutonium. Investigating core characteristics at the equilibrium, some promising core concepts to satisfy above aims have been established. As for BWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, three types of design have been obtained as follows; 1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.1, 2) one feasible to attain operation cycle of about 2 years and burn-up of about 60 GWd/t with conversion ratio more than 1 or 3) one in simple design based on the ABWR assembly and without blanket attaining conversion ratio more than 1. And as for PWR-type concepts with negative void reactivity coefficients, two types of design have been obtained as follows; 1) one feasible to attain high conversion ratio about 1.05 by using heavy water as a coolant and 2) one feasible to attain conversion ratio about l by using light water. In the study of nuclear calculation method, a reactor analysis code applicable to the

  11. Study of startup conditions of a pulsed annular reactor; Estudo das reacoes de partida de um reator anelar pulsado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mario Augusto Bezerra da

    2003-10-15

    A new concept of reactor, which combines features of pulsed and stationary reactors, was proposed so as to produce intense neutronic fluxes. Such a reactor, known as VICHFPR (Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor), consists of a subcritical core with an annular geometry and pulsed by a rotating reflector which acts as a reactivity modulator as it produces a short pulse (approximately equal to 1 ms) of high intensity, guiding the region near the pulser to super-prompt critical state. This dissertation intends to analyze the startup conditions of a Pulsed Annular Reactor. The evolution of the neutron pulse intensity is analyzed when the reactivity modulator is brought upwards according to a helicoidal path from its initial position (far away from the core), when the multiplication factor has a subcritical value, up to the final position (near the core), in which a super-prompt critical state is reached. Part of the analysis is based on the variation of neutron reflection, which is a uniform function of the exit and reflection angles between the core and the modulator. It must be emphasized that this work is an approximation of the real situation. As the initial and final reactor parameters are known, a programming code in Fortran is worked out to provide the multiplication factor and the flux intensity evolution. According to the results obtained with this code, the conditions under which the modulator must be lifted up during the startup are established. Basically, these conditions are related to the analysis of the rising and the rotation velocities, the reflector saving and the initial distance between the reactor and the modulator. The Pulsed Annular Reactor startup was divided into three stages. Because of its negative reactivity in the first two stages, the neutron multiplication is not large, while the last one, having a positive reactivity, shows an intense multiplication as is usually expected when handling pulsed systems. This last stage is quite

  12. Unstructured 3D core calculations with the descartes system application to the JHR research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the DESCARTES system enable neutronics calculations dealing with very complex unstructured geometrical configurations. The discretization can be made either by using a very fine Cartesian mesh and the fast simplified transport (SPN) solver MINOS, or a discretization based on triangles and the SP1 solver MINARET. In order to perform parallel calculations dealing with a very fine mesh in 3D, a domain decomposition with non overlapping domains has been implemented. To illustrate these capabilities, we present an application on the future European research reactor JHR dedicated to technological irradiations. (authors)

  13. Description of Thermos reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of the 100 MWth Thermos reactor core (fuel, assembly, plates, casings, control rods) and its neutron thermohydraulic operation (steady state, transient state, fast stopping of a pump, primary circuit depressurization)

  14. Exploitation limits and safety operation limits for initial compact loading of the WWR-K research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of initial compact loading of the WWR-K reactor is carried out. It is defined, that reactor reactivity supply should not exceed of 5,24 % (ΔK/K) under calculated efficiencies values of reactor control and protection control systems units in operation cycle start. Value of reactivity supply one should be corrected with taking into account real values of protection control system units efficiencies. Values of normal operation limits are defined by reactor power level in dependence of water expense in first contour and water temperature on entrance of reactor core. Values of reactor operation limits norms are chosen by reactor power (precautionary signalling (PS) setting). The PS setting of reactor core for thermo-hydraulic parameters monitoring is chosen as well

  15. Thai research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP) was established in 1962, as a reactor center, by the virtue of the Atomic Energy for Peace Act, under operational policy and authority of the Thai Atomic Energy for Peace Commission (TAEPC); and under administration of Ministry of Science, Technology and Energy. It owns and operates the only Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1/M1). The TRR-1/M1 is a mixed reactor system constituting of the old MTR type swimming pool, irradiation facilities and cooling system; and TRIGA Mark III core and control instrumentation. The general performance of TRR-1/M1 is summarized in Table I. The safe operation of TRR-1/M1 is regulated by Reactor Safety Committee (RSC), established under TAEPC, and Health Physics Group of OAEP. The RCS has responsibility and duty to review of and make recommendations on Reactor Standing Orders, Reactor Operation Procedures, Reactor Core Loading and Requests for Reactor Experiments. In addition,there also exist of Emergency Procedures which is administered by OAEP. The Reactor Operation Procedures constitute of reactor operating procedures, system operating procedures and reactor maintenance procedures. At the level of reactor routine operating procedures, there is a set of Specifications on Safety and Operation Limits and Code of Practice from which reactor shift supervisor and operators must follow in order to assure the safe operation of TRR-1/M1. Table II is the summary of such specifications. The OAEP is now upgrading certain major components of the TRR-1/M1 such as the cooling system, the ventilation system and monitoring equipment to ensure their adequately safe and reliable performance under normal and emergency conditions. Furthermore, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing assistance in areas of operation and maintenance and safety analysis. (author)

  16. Development of an emergency core cooling system for the converted IEA-R1m research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This present work describes the development program carried out in the design and construction of the Emergency Core Cooling System for the IEA-R1m Research Reactor, including the system design, the experiments performed to validate the design, manufacturing, installation and commissioning. The experiments were performed in two phases. In the first phase, the spray flow rate and distribution were measured, using a full scale mock-up of the entire core, to establish the spray header geometry and specifications. In the second phase, a test section was fitted with electrically heated plates to simulate the fuel plates. Temperature measurements were carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the system to keep the temperatures below the limiting value. The experimental results were shown to the licensing authorities during the certification process. The main difficulties during the system assembly are also described. (author)

  17. Safety core parameters prediction in research reactors using artificial neural networks: A comparative study of various learning algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) were applied successfully as an advanced and promising tool for simulating several reactor physics parameters in nuclear engineering applications. The main objective in using such Artificial Intelligent (AI) methods, in the field of nuclear engineering, is to develop simple and 1st estimate models capable of simulating adequately, with reasonable error, important reactor physics parameters in relatively short time comparatively to time consuming and cumbersome reactor physics computer codes. The feasibility of this application has been demonstrated through a previous work done for a typical benchmark 10 Mw IAEA LEU (Low Enriched Uranium) core research reactor, using an adaptive learning rate procedure in a typical back-propagation algorithm in the training process. However, even tough the predictive results achieved are within ±0.7% for Keff and within ±8.5% for Pmax, the convergence time spent during the training phase were of about 36 and 24 hours, respectively for both cited parameters, on a small computational system (300 Mhz Pentium II PC). Hence, this paper suggests one of the suitable ways explored to speed up the training process and to improve neural networks performances by carrying out a comprehensive sensitivity studies on an iterative and multistage calculation process using Neural Network MATLAB Toolbox

  18. Safe operation of a TRIGA reactor in the situation of LEU-HEU core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanian TRIGA reactor was commissioned in 1980. The location of the research institute is Pitesti, 100 Km west of Bucharest. In fact there are two independent cores sharing the same pool. There are a 14 MW Steady State Reactor (SSR), high flux, and materials testing reactor and an Annular Core Pulsing Reactor (ACPR). The SSR reactor is a forced convection reactor cooled via a primary circuit with 4 pumps and 3 heat exchangers. The ACPR is natural convection cooled by the pool water. Modifications performed concerning core configuration resulted in the following. Removal the central pin from the bundle leads to slightly temperature increase of approximately 1% for the corner and edge pins, for the same pin power density. Also, the temperature slightly decreases for the 4 pins adjacent to the water hole. This is caused by the coolant flow redistribution. But, according to preliminary neutronic computations, PPF-s are decreasing, the edge and corner temperatures changes are no more detectable. DNB are decreasing, leading to a safer operation. Fuel management of TRIGA steady state core allows to obtain the requested fluxes for experimental reasons in the safer operation conditions. We can firmly state that the present operation of the reactor and the HEU-LEU core conversion fully respect the provisions of the National Regulatory Body and the IAEA. On the other side, we have to mention the common fact that research reactors cannot sustain themselves in the financial domain. The lack of sufficient financial support leads to shortage of the maintenance programs and to reduce of activities and personnel member; this is a real danger in maintaining the actual standards of nuclear safety. During this transition period, the Romanian TRIGA reactor is used much its capability in the frame of international cooperation this facility can ensure support for various research programmes in the fields of interest

  19. Research Reactor Benchmarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A criticality benchmark experiment performed at the Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II research reactor is described. This experiment and its evaluation are given as examples of benchmark experiments at research reactors. For this reason the differences and possible problems compared to other benchmark experiments are particularly emphasized. General guidelines for performing criticality benchmarks in research reactors are given. The criticality benchmark experiment was performed in a normal operating reactor core using commercially available fresh 20% enriched fuel elements containing 12 wt% uranium in uranium-zirconium hydride fuel material. Experimental conditions to minimize experimental errors and to enhance computer modeling accuracy are described. Uncertainties in multiplication factor due to fuel composition and geometry data are analyzed by sensitivity analysis. The simplifications in the benchmark model compared to the actual geometry are evaluated. Sample benchmark calculations with the MCNP and KENO Monte Carlo codes are given

  20. Operational safety experience at 14 MW TRIGA research reactor from INR Pitesti, Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safe operation of TRIGA-14 MW Core and Annular Pulsed TRIGA Core in the assembly of Research Reactor in Pitesti, Romania for 27 years is presented from historical perspective as well in the light of evolving safety experience. The accomplishment of safety objectives and responsibilities of operating organization is described and sustained with practical examples including management responsibilities, resources of management, performance indicators, measurement analysis and monitoring. Further improvement of safety of Research Reactor trough a large refurbishment and modernization program under way is also presented in the paper. (author)

  1. Establishing a quality assurance program for in-core fuel management of the Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor using low enriched fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quality assurance program for calculating of in-core fuel management of research reactor plays very important role in safety operation and effective utilization. The main objective of the program is to ensure the safe, reliable and optimum use of nuclear fuel and to meet the reactor utilization, which remains reactor operation within the limits imposed by the design safety considerations and the operational limits and conditions (OLCs) on the basis of safety analysis. The management of reactor core and nuclear fuel must be organized in a coherent way and comply with safety requirements. After successfully converting from HEU to LEU fuel for Dalat Research Reactor, a work to be in place is to study and implement the management of reactor core and nuclear fuel. This not only helps to ensure safety operation and efficient utilization but also contributes to build the safety culture and to be valuable experience for other nuclear projects. In addition, the application of the quality assurance program for in-core fuel management will contribute to avoid subjective mistakes, to clearly define responsibilities and to ensure legacy of expertise, which is also an urgent requirement. The selected computer code systems, data libraries and computation models must be fully met the requirements for analyzing status and characteristics of reactor core as well as the requirements for selecting, verifying and evaluating according to the regulations of the IAEA. (author)

  2. Modern research reactors in the world and RA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper covers the following topics: fundamentals of research reactors, thermal neutron flux density, classification of research reactors in the world, properties of research reactors of higher power in the world according to IAEA data for 1995, their application, and trend of development, experimental feasibility and status of RA reactor. Trend of research reactors development in the world (after 1980) is directed towards increasing the neutron production quality factor, i.e. ratio between thermal neutron flux density and reactor power, which is achieved by designing compact reactor cores. With the aim of renewal of RA reactor (without analysis of reactor components and staff aging, possibility of restart and commercialization), according to the analysis in this paper, it can be concluded: there is very few reactors under construction in the world, all the important countries in Europe have research reactors; RA reactor is not very interesting for development of reactor physics; nowadays RA reactor is in the group of reactors which are 30-40 years old; its inventories of fuel and heavy water are enough for about 20 years of operation; it has achieved high quality factor of neutron production with low and highly enriched fuel; core transfer from low highly enriched to low enriched fuel should be carefully studies from operation, experimental and economical point of view; it is necessary to use the advantages of RA reactor (minimum investment): volume of the core and reflector which enables availability of neutron flux for the users (numerous experimental loops), fuel in shape of slugs enabling efficient fuel management and flexible neutron flux distribution in the core in the reflector, reactor operation should be directed towards commercial applications. Bibliography of more than 140 relevant papers used is included in this paper

  3. Physical start up of the Dalat nuclear research reactor with the core configuration exempt from neutron trap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nominal power of the reconstructed Dalat reactor is of 500 KW. After a meticulous preparation the Russian and Vietnamese teams have proceeded to the physical reactor start-up in November 1983 with the core configuration exempt from the neutron trap. The reactor has reached the physical criticality at 19h50 on 1 November 1983. The report delineates different steps of the start-up procedure. 2 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Research reactor support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors (RRs) have been used in a wide range of applications including nuclear power development, basic physics research, education and training, medical isotope production, geology, industry and other fields. However, many research reactors are fuelled with High Enriched Uranium (HEU), are underutilized and aging, and have significant quantities of spent fuel. HEU inventories (fresh and spent) pose security risks Unavailability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel hinders conversion and limits back-end options and represents a survival dilemma for many RRs. Improvement of interim spent fuel storage is required at some RRs. Many RRs are under-utilized and/or inadequately funded and need to find users for their services, or permanently shut down and eventually decommission. Reluctance to decommission affect both cost and safety (loss of experienced staff ) and many shut down but not decommissioned RR with fresh and/or spent fuel at the sites invoke serious concern. The IAEA's research reactor support helps to ensure that research reactors can be operated efficiently with fuels and targets of lower proliferation and security concern and that operators have appropriate technology and options to manage RR fuel cycle issues, especially on long term interim storage of spent research reactor fuel. Availability of a high-density-reprocessable fuel would expand and improve back end options. The International Atomic Energy Agency provides assistance to Member States to convert research reactors from High Enriched Uranium fuel and targets (for medical isotope production) to qualified Low Enriched Uranium fuel and targets while maintaining reactor performance levels. The assistance includes provision of handbooks and training in the performance of core conversion studies, advice for the procurement of LEU fuel, and expert services for LEU fuel acceptance. The IAEA further provides technical and administrative support for countries considering repatriation of its

  5. Analysis of the loss of coolant accident for leu cores of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, L.A.; Bokhari, I.H.; Raza, S.S.

    1993-12-01

    Response of LEU cores for PARR-1 to a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) has been studied. It has been assumed that pool water drains out due to double ended rupture of the primary coolant pipe or complete shearing off an experimental beam tube. Results show that for an operating power level of 10 MW, both the first high power and equilibrium cores would enter into melting conditions if the pool drain time is less than 22 h and 11 h respectively. However, an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) capable of spraying the core at a flow rate of 8.3 m3/h, for the above mentioned duration, would keep the peak core temperature much below the critical value. Maximum operating power levels below which melting would not occur have been assessed to be 3.4 MW and 4.8 MW, respectively, for the first high power and equilibrium cores.

  6. Analysis of the loss of coolant accident for LEU cores of Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Response of LEU cores for PARR-1 to a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) has been studied. It has been assumed that pool water drains out to double ended rupture of primary coolant pipe or complete shearing of an experimental beam tube. Results show that for an operating power level of 10 MW, both the first high power and equilibrium cores would enter into melting conditions if the pool drain time is less than 22 h and 11 h respectively. However, an Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) capable of spraying the core at flow rate of 8.3 m/sup 3/h, for the above mentioned duration, would keep the peak core temperature much below the critical value. Maximum operating power levels below which melting would not occur have been assessed to 3.4 MW and 4.8 MW, respectively, for the first high power and equilibrium cores. (author) 5 figs

  7. Advances in reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Safety Project is an important part of the German reactor safety research programme. It works on problems concerning safety and environemental risks of LWR reactors and reprocessing plants and investigates accident consequences. At the 1978 annual meeting, the core behaviour on cooling and reactivity disturbances was discussed, as well as release, retention, and possible radiological effects of radioactive pollutants. Among other subjects, fission product retention in LWR reactors and reprocessing plants were reported on as well as hypothetic core meltdown. (orig.)

  8. Functional reliability evaluation of an MTR-pool type research reactor core using the load–capacity interference model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Load–capacity concept is used for reliability evaluation. • Functional Reliability is evaluated in normal operation. • Status of reactor core in normal operation is considered as multiple states. • Latin Hypercube Sampling is used for sampling in uncertainty propagation. • Core heat transfer coefficient is identified as the dominant parameter. - Abstract: This paper presents the functional reliability evaluation of Tehran Research Reactor (TRR) core in normal operation. The concept of functional reliability, borrowed from reliability physics, uses the well-known resistance–stress or load–capacity interference model that is used in the structural reliability framework. To use the load–capacity interference model, uncertainties of significant parameters in system performance are propagated into system dynamics modeled with RELAP5/Mod 3.2 using Latin Hypercube Sampling (LHS) method and exceedance probability (EP) model is used as quantification method. The proposed method in this paper solves a common problem in reliability analysis, i.e., lack of sufficient failure data in specific operating conditions. Although defining failure criteria in normal operation are difficult, this paper focuses on the application of multiple states criteria to determine the status of a system. The status of the reactor core in normal operation is considered multiple states regarding to a performance representative parameter that is temperature in this work. Outlet temperatures of fuel hot and average channels were selected to be performance indicators in normal operation. Consulting with TRR engineers and operators as well as safety analysis report, two failure states were considered exceeding 65.1 °C and 58.9 °C for the hot channel and 50.4 °C and 45.6 °C for the average channel as upper and lower limits respectively. The calculated reliability was 9.1e−01 with 95% of confidence interval, which is in good agreement with experimental results. Using

  9. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  10. Reactor core monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The device of the present invention reliably and conveniently detects an event of rapid increase of a coolant void coefficient at a portion of a channel by flow channel clogging event in a PWR-type reactor. Namely, upon flow channel clogging event, the coolant void coefficient is increased, an effective density is lowered, and a coolant shielding effect is lowered. Therefore, fast neutron fluxes at the periphery of a pressure tube are increased. The increase of the fast neutron fluxes is detected by a fast neutron flux detector disposed in a guide tube of an existent neutron flux detector. Based on the result, increase of coolant void coefficient can be detected. When an average void coefficient reaches from 30% to 100%, for example, the fast neutron fluxes are increased by about twice at a neutron permeation distance of coolants of about 10cm, thereby enabling to perform effective detection. (I.S.)

  11. Development of space reactor core heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Space Power Advance Reactor (SPAR) core heat pupes are being developed to transport 15 kW of power at 1400 K. A straight, 2-m-long, 15.9-mm-diam heat pipe was fabricated of low-carbon arc-cast molybdenum and filled with sodium as the working fluid. This nonconcentric, annular, screen-tube-wick pipe was tested successfully at 16.1 kW at 1310 K, at which point a boiling limit was encountered. Follow-on work has produced an as yet untested heat pipe which has its wick centered in the evaporator by spacer wires to alleviate the boiling limit problem. A dual artery wick heat pipe is being fabricated to further improve on the boiling limit and increase redundancy. Because the heat pipe must bend around the radiation shield of the SPAR reactor, a series of bending experiments was performed. Promising results were achieved by filling the pipe completely with sodium and bending at 3650 K

  12. In-core fuel management, safety, and thermal hydraulics studies for upgrading TRIGA MARK II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission has approved a project to upgrade the research reactor to higher flux to meet the growing demand of medical radio-isotopes production and other irradiation facilities. Preliminary studies with the various core parameters showed that it might be possible to create new irradiation flux traps, increase the neutron flux at desired location, and at the same time the fuel burn-up can be made optimal. This will need major reshuffling and reconfiguration of the core with fuel rods initially loaded. The principal objective of this study is focused to make the above improvements in the core without disturbing the safety parameters. This presentation deals with the neutronic and thermal hydraulic analysis of the 3 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor to upgrade it to a higher flux. To realize this objective, the overall strategy followed is: (I) generation of problem dependent cross section library from basic Evaluated Nuclear Data Files such as ENDF/B-VI, JENDL 3.2 with NJOY94.10+, (ii) use WIMSD-5 package to generate cell constants for all of the materials in the core and its immediate neighborhood, (iii) use CITATION to perform 3-D global analysis of the core to study multiplication factor, neutron flux and power distribution, power peaking factors, temperature reactivity coefficients, etc., (iv) check the validity of the deterministic codes with the Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B2, (v) couple output of CITATION with PARET to study thermal hydraulic behavior to predict safety margins, and (vi) reshuffle the current core configuration to achieve the desired objectives. The computational methods, tools and techniques, customization of cross section libraries, various models for cells and super cells, and a lot of associated utilities have been standardized and established/validated for the overall core analysis. Analyses using the 4-group, and 7-group libraries of macroscopic cross sections generated from the 69-group WIMSD-5 library were performed

  13. Research reactors - an overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    West, C.D.

    1997-03-01

    A broad overview of different types of research and type reactors is provided in this paper. Reactor designs and operating conditions are briefly described for four reactors. The reactor types described include swimming pool reactors, the High Flux Isotope Reactor, the Mark I TRIGA reactor, and the Advanced Neutron Source reactor. Emphasis in the descriptions is placed on safety-related features of the reactors. 7 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. Design research of the possible replacement of IVG.1M reactor core fuel into U - Mo alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of neutron-physics calculations, characteristics of IVG. 1M reactor in case of core fuel replacement to low enrichment fuel from U-Mo alloy was represented. By means of MCNP/4B design code, assigned for radioactive transport in three-dimensional geometry task solving, effective multiplication factor for reactor, initial reactivity margin, relative neutron flux density, specific energy release were defined. (author)

  15. Fission product and chemical energy releases during core melt events in U-Al research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission product releases data from heated uranium-aluminum reactor fuels are analyzed. Extensive library of correlations was developed for predicting releases which may vary with time, burnup ambient, fuel-type subject to certain assumptions. Correlations were developed in various forms for U-Al. (dispersed/alloy), U308-Al (dispersed) and dispersed U3Si2-AL, and U3Si-Al Fuels. Overall statistics is quite favorable. Unresolved issues and data needs demand best estimate analyses of reactors using U3Si2-Al fuel. Importance of capturing fragment size distribution was demonstrated. Results agree with Nelson's observations for onset ignition. The need to develop an appropriate fragmentation model was evident

  16. Reactor core and fueling method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When MOX fuel assemblies are used in a portion of fuel assembly of a BWR type nuclear reactor, neutron spectra are hardened due to the difference of the nuclear property between uranium and plutonium. As a result, the reactivity controllability of burnable poisons such as gadolinia is lowered, and the multiplication factor of the MOX fuel assembly at the initial stage of burning is increased greater than that of an uranium fuel assembly, to reduce thermal margin and reactor shutdown margin. Then, in the present invention, fresh fuel assemblies containing plutonium are disposed in a first region at the second layer from the outermost circumference of the reactor core and in a second region in adjacent with a control cell. Since the MOX fuel assemblies with increasing reactivity are disposed in the first and the second regions of small neutron importance, the power at the periphery of the reactor core and the circumference of the control cell can be kept substantially constant throughout the operation period. Further, satisfactory reactor operation can be kept without causing excess distortion of power distribution. (N.H.)

  17. Conceptual design of second safety system for an advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent IAEA recommends that at least one automatic shutdown system shall be incorporated in the design of research reactor, and a second independent shutdown system shall be considered and may be required, depending on the characteristics of the reactor. It would be required to reflect the strengthening of IAEA's safety policy to developing project of an advanced research reactor which was based on the experiences in HANARO construction and operation. The reflector dump system for an advanced research reactor is required for safety system diversity. The safety system shuts the reactor down to a safe sub-critical state by dropping hafnium control absorber rods into the reactor core and by dumping the inner annular volume of the D2O reflector tank into the dump tank

  18. Conceptual design of second safety system for an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Sang Ik; Park, Y. C.; Cho, Y. G.; Lee, J. H.; Ryu, J. S.; Park, C

    2005-01-01

    In recent IAEA recommends that at least one automatic shutdown system shall be incorporated in the design of research reactor, and a second independent shutdown system shall be considered and may be required, depending on the characteristics of the reactor. It would be required to reflect the strengthening of IAEA's safety policy to developing project of an advanced research reactor which was based on the experiences in HANARO construction and operation. The reflector dump system for an advanced research reactor is required for safety system diversity. The safety system shuts the reactor down to a safe sub-critical state by dropping hafnium control absorber rods into the reactor core and by dumping the inner annular volume of the D{sub 2}O reflector tank into the dump tank.

  19. Neutronic analysis for core conversion (HEU–LEU of the low power research reactor using the MCNP4C code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldawahra Saadou

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Comparative studies for conversion of the fuel from HEU to LEU in the miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR have been performed using the MCNP4C code. The HEU fuel (UAl4-Al, 90% enriched with Al clad and LEU (UO2 12.6% enriched with zircaloy-4 alloy clad cores have been analyzed in this study. The existing HEU core of MNSR was analyzed to validate the neutronic model of reactor, while the LEU core was studied to prove the possibility of fuel conversion of the existing HEU core. The proposed LEU core contained the same number of fuel pins as the HEU core. All other structure materials and dimensions of HEU and LEU cores were the same except the increase in the radius of control rod material from 0.195 to 0.205 cm and keeping the outer diameter of the control rod unchanged in the LEU core. The effective multiplication factor (keff, excess reactivity (ρex, control rod worth (CRW, shutdown margin (SDM, safety reactivity factor (SRF, delayed neutron fraction (βeff and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes for the existing and the potential LEU fuel were investigated. The results showed that the safety parameters and the neutron fluxes in the irradiation tubes of the LEU fuels were in good agreements with the HEU results. Therefore, the LEU fuel was validated to be a suitable choice for fuel conversion of the MNSR in the future.

  20. Startup testing of Romania dual-core test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late in 1979 both the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) and the 14-MW steady-state reactor (SSR) were loaded to critical. The fuel loading in both was then carried to completion and low-power testing was conducted. Early in 1980 both reactors successfully underwent high-power testing. The ACPR was operated for several hours at 500 kW and underwent pulse tests culminating in pulses with reactivity insertions of $4.60, peak power levels of about 20,000 MW, energy releases of 100 MW-sec, and peak measured fuel temperatures of 830 deg. C. The SSR was operated in several modes, both with natural convection and forced cooling with one or more pumps. The reactor successfully completed a 120-hr full-power test. Subsequent fuel element inspections confirmed that the fuel has performed without fuel damage or distortion. (author)

  1. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    This study focused on developing a better understanding of granular dynamics in pebble bed reactor cores through experimental work and computer simulations. The work completed includes analysis of pebble motion data from three scaled experiments based on the annular core of the Pebble Bed Fluoride Salt-Cooled High- Temperature Reactor (PB-FHR). The experiments are accompanied by the development of a new discrete element simulation code, GRECO, which is designed to offer a simple user interface and simplified two-dimensional system that can be used for iterative purposes in the preliminary phases of core design. The results of this study are focused on the PB-FHR, but can easily be extended for gas-cooled reactor designs. Experimental results are presented for three Pebble Recirculation Experiments (PREX). PREX 2 and 3.0 are conventional gravity-dominated granular systems based on the annular PB-FHR core design for a 900 MWth commercial prototype plant and a 16 MWth test reactor, respectively. Detailed results are presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing at the radial zone interfaces, and pebble residence times. A new Monte Carlo algorithm was developed to study the residence time distributions of pebbles in different radial zones. These dry experiments demonstrated the basic viability of radial pebble zoning in cores with diverging geometry before pebbles reach the active core. Results are also presented from PREX 3.1, a scaled facility that uses simulant materials to evaluate the impact of coupled fluid drag forces on the granular dynamics in the PB-FHR core. PREX 3.1 was used to collect first of a kind pebble motion data in a multidimensional porous media flow field. Pebble motion data were collected for a range of axial and cross fluid flow configurations where the drag forces range from half the buoyancy force up to ten times greater than the buoyancy force. Detailed analysis is presented for the pebble velocity field, mixing behavior, and residence time

  2. Proceedings of the international meeting on research and test reactor core conversions from HEU to LEU fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Separate abstracts have been prepared for each paper presented in the following areas of interest: (1) fuel development; (2) post-irradiation examinations; (3) reprocessing; (4) thermite reaction; (5) fuel fabrication; (6) element tests; (7) core tests; (8) criticals; (9) shipping; and (10) reactors and methods

  3. Research reactor core conversion from the use of highly enriched uranium to the use of low enriched uranium fuels guidebook

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the proliferation concerns caused by the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and in anticipation that the supply of HEU to research and test reactors will be more restricted in the future, this document has been prepared to assist reactor operators in determining whether conversion to the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel designs is technically feasible for their specific reactor, and to assist in making a smooth transition to the use of LEU fuel designs where appropriate

  4. Reactor core design of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a highly efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and existing fossil fired gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original design features of this system are the reactor core design based on a newly proposed refueling scheme named sandwich shuffling, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an innovative coolant flow scheme and a horizontally installed gas turbine unit. The GTHTR300 can be continuously operated without the refueling for 2 years. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200,000 yen (1667 US$)/kW e, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 yen (3.3 US cents)/kW h. This paper describes the original design features focusing on the reactor core design and the in-core structure design, including the innovative coolant flow scheme for cooling the RPV. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan

  5. Investigation of primary cooling water chemistry following the partial meltdown of Pu-Be neutron source in Tehran Research Reactor Core (TRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Effect of Pu-Be neutron source meltdown in core on reactor water chemistry. → Water chemistry of primary cooling before, during and after of above incident was compared. → Training importance. → Management of nuclear incident and accident. - Abstract: Effect of Pu-Be neutron source meltdown in core on reactor water chemistry was main aim of this study. Leaving the neutron source in the core after reactor power exceeds a few hundred Watts was the main reason for its partial meltdown. Water chemistry of primary cooling before, during and after of above incident was compared. Activity of some radio-nuclides such as Ba-140, La-140, I-131, I-132, Te-132 and Xe-135 increased. Other radio-nuclides such as Nd-147, Xe-133, Sr-91, I-133 and I-135 are also detected which were not existed before this incident.

  6. Evaluation of NSRR reactor characteristics using a core transient behavior simulation code EXCURS-NSRR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor(NSRR) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is a modified TRIGA-ACPR(Annular Core Pulse Reactor) which was constructed in 1975 in order to investigate the fuel behavior mainly under reactivity initiated accident (RIA) conditions. This reactor generates very sharp pulse power with the maximum of 23GW by rapid reactivity insertion of the maximum of 4.7$, and has capability to simulate a power burst in RIAs of power reactors. Fuel failure mechanisms and the fuel failure threshold in RIAs have been investigated through irradiation of test fuel rods in the NSRR. The control system and the operation data acquisition system of the NSRR were modified in 1989. By the modification, the controlled high power operation with various power shape became possible. Also on-line data acquisition of reactor data such as reactor power, regulating rod position, and so on, became possible by the modification. Evaluation of reactor characteristics became easy and accurate by detailed comparison of the time history of operation data and calculation results. Authors have tried to evaluate some parameters or constants of reactor characteristics by using a core transient behavior simulation code EXCURS-NSRR which consists of one point reactor kinetic equations and thermal equations of driver fuel and coolant. Especially in a relatively small and slow pulse power generation with reactivity insertion of less than 1$, evaluation of feedback reactivity coefficient and relation between reactivity insertion and regulating rod position was conducted. This article presents the evaluation results by the comparison between obtained reactor data and parametric calculation results. (author)

  7. Enrichment reduction for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The worldwide activities on enrichment reduction for research reactors are reviewed and the national and international programs are described. Especially the following points are discussed: Benchmark calculations, reactor safety, fuel element development, irradiation tests, post irradiation examinations, full core demonstrations, activities of the GKSS and economical questions. (orig.)

  8. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper dwells upon the design and the operation of one of the German test reactors, namely, the TRIGA Mainz one (TRIGA: Training Research Isotope Production General Atomic). The TRIGA reactor is a pool test reactor the core of which contains a graphite reflector and is placed into 2 m diameter and 6.25 m height aluminum vessel. There are 75 fuel elements in the reactor core, and any of them contains about 36 g of 235U. The TRIGA reactors under the stable operation enjoy wide application to ensure tests and irradiation, namely: neutron activation analysis, radioisotope production, application of a neutron beam to ensure the physical, the chemical and the medical research efforts. Paper presents the reactor basic experimental program lines

  9. Experimental study on large diameter drilling in hard rock annular coring

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yinzhu WU; Guochun YANG; Wenchen WANG

    2008-01-01

    Based on analyzing method of large diameter hard rock drilling at home and abroad, the authors proposed a set of drilling of large diameter hard rock annular coring in low energy consumption, low cost and high efficiency. The prototype of drilling tools was designed and was made. The experimental result of the prototype indicates that this plan and technology are feasible and reach the anticipated object of design. A set of drilling tools has been offered for the constructs of large diameter hard rock coring.

  10. Neutronics analysis of the initial core of the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R., E-mail: rustamzia@yahoo.co [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitute (ATI), Stadion allee 2, A-1020, Vienna (Austria); Stummer, T.; Boeck, H.; Villa, M. [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitute (ATI), Stadion allee 2, A-1020, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: The TRIGA Mark II Vienna is modeled employing MCNP5. The model is confirmed through three different experiments. Initial critical, reactivity distribution and flux mapping experiment. - Abstract: The Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor since March 1962. Its initial criticality was achieved on 7th March 1962 when 57th Fuel Element (FE) was loaded to the core. This paper describes the development of the MCNP model of the TRIGA reactor and its validation through three different experiments i.e. initial criticality, reactivity distribution and a thermal flux mapping experiment in the reactor core. All these experiments were performed on the initial core configuration. The MCNP model includes all necessary core components i.e. FE, Graphite Element GE, neutron Source Element (SE), Central IRradiation channel (CIR) etc. Outside the core, this model simulates the annular grooved graphite reflector, the thermal and thermalizing column, four beam tubes and the reactor water tank up to 100 cm in radial and +60 and -60 cm in axial direction. Each grid position at its exact location is modeled. This model employs the ENDF/B-VI data library except for the Sm-isotopes which are taken from JEFF 3.1 because ENDF/B-VI lacks samarium (Sm) cross sections. For the first experiment, the model predicts an effective multiplication factor ({kappa}{sub eff}) of 1.00183 with an estimated standard deviation 0.00031 which is very close to the experimental value 1.00114. The second experiment measures the reactivity values of four FE and one GE. In comparison to the MCNP results, the percent difference ranges from 4 to 22. The third experiment verifies the model at a local level with the radial and axial thermal flux density distribution in the core. Though the trends are similar, the MCNP model overestimates the radial thermal flux density in the core and underestimates these results at the core periphery.

  11. Neutronics analysis of the initial core of the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The TRIGA Mark II Vienna is modeled employing MCNP5. → The model is confirmed through three different experiments. → Initial critical, reactivity distribution and flux mapping experiment. - Abstract: The Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor since March 1962. Its initial criticality was achieved on 7th March 1962 when 57th Fuel Element (FE) was loaded to the core. This paper describes the development of the MCNP model of the TRIGA reactor and its validation through three different experiments i.e. initial criticality, reactivity distribution and a thermal flux mapping experiment in the reactor core. All these experiments were performed on the initial core configuration. The MCNP model includes all necessary core components i.e. FE, Graphite Element GE, neutron Source Element (SE), Central IRradiation channel (CIR) etc. Outside the core, this model simulates the annular grooved graphite reflector, the thermal and thermalizing column, four beam tubes and the reactor water tank up to 100 cm in radial and +60 and -60 cm in axial direction. Each grid position at its exact location is modeled. This model employs the ENDF/B-VI data library except for the Sm-isotopes which are taken from JEFF 3.1 because ENDF/B-VI lacks samarium (Sm) cross sections. For the first experiment, the model predicts an effective multiplication factor (κeff) of 1.00183 with an estimated standard deviation 0.00031 which is very close to the experimental value 1.00114. The second experiment measures the reactivity values of four FE and one GE. In comparison to the MCNP results, the percent difference ranges from 4 to 22. The third experiment verifies the model at a local level with the radial and axial thermal flux density distribution in the core. Though the trends are similar, the MCNP model overestimates the radial thermal flux density in the core and underestimates these results at the core periphery.

  12. In-reactor testing of the closed cycle gas core reactor---the nuclear light bulb concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Light Bulb (NLB) concept is an advanced closed cycle space propulsion rocket engine design that offers unprecidented performance characteristics in terms of specific impulse (>1800 s) and thrust (>445 kN). The NLB is a gas-core nuclear reactor making use of thermal radiation from a high temperature U-plasma core to heat the hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (∼4000 K). The following paper describes analyses performed in support of the design of in-reactor tests that are planned to be performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories in order to demonstrate the technical feasibility of this advanced concept. The tests will examine the stability of a hydrodynamically confined fissioning U-plasma under steady and transient conditions. Testing will also involve study of propellant heating by thermal radiation from the plasma and materials performance in the nuclear environment of the NLB. The analyses presented here include neutronic performance studies and U-plasma radiation heat-transport studies of small vortex-confined fissioning U-plasma experiments that are irradiated in the ACRR. These analyses indicate that high U-plasma temperatures (4000 to 9000 K) can be sustained in the ACRR for periods of time on the order of 5 to 20 s. These testing conditions are well suited to examine the stability and performance requirements necessary to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept

  13. RETRAC, Reactor Core Accident Simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: The RETRAC code uses a set of coupled neutron point-kinetics equations and thermal-hydraulic conservation laws to simulate nuclear reactor core behaviour under transient or accident conditions. The reactor core is represented by single equivalent unit cells composed of three regions: fuel, clad, and moderator (coolant). 2 - Method of solution: At each time step, core thermal power is calculated by solving a set of six delayed neutron group kinetics equations with adjusted reactivity feedbacks. The numerical resolution is performed by using the Runge-Kutta-Gill method. The externally inserted reactivity is specified in the input data file, whereas Doppler, fuel, clad, and water temperature reactivity feedbacks are calculated by the code itself. Core cooling is treated as a homogeneous one-dimensional fluid flow through a representative unit cell composed of three successive regions: fuel, clad, and coolant. Several flow regime models are considered for both single- and two-phase states of the coolant. The conservation laws are solved by the method of characteristics coupled with an implicit finite difference scheme to ensure stability and convergence of the numerical algorithm. Validation tests of the RETRAC code were performed by using the International Atomic Energy Agency 10-MW benchmark cores, for protected transients. Further assessment studies are in progress using experimental data. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: The RETRAC code uses steady-state thermal-hydraulic correlations. Their use is not always justified, but it seems to be quite useful in quasi-steady cases such as as loss-of-flow transients

  14. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  15. Core thermal-hydraulics behaviour within the framework of the feasibility studies of the RJH research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to give a preliminary evaluation of the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the reactor Jules Horowitz (RJH project). These performances are evaluated by using computer codes. First a calculation procedure was drawn then the output data have been elaborated. The calculations are performed by using the operating code SIRENE which provides us with the boundary limits of the core. The 3-dimension thermal-hydraulic code FLICA-4 has allowed us to get an accurate behaviour of the core in various operating modes (nominal, accidental, natural convection). This work is only an introduction and further studies have to be led. (A.C.)

  16. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of (232Th, 235U)O2 fuel using MCNPX2.6 code

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Seyed Amir Hossein Feghhi; Marzieh Rezazadeh; Yachine Kadi; Claudio Tenreiro; Morteza Aref; Zohreh Gholamzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The small reactor design for the remote and less developed areas of the user countries should have simple features in view of the lack of infra-structure and resources. Many researchers consider long core life with no on-site refuelling activity as a primary feature for the small reactor design. Long core life can be achieved by enhancing internal conversion rate of fertile to fissile materials. For that purpose, thorium cycle can be adopted because a high fissile production rate of 233U converted from 232Th can be expected in the thermal energy region. A simple nuclear reactor core arranged 19 assemblies in hexagonal structure, using thorium-based fuel and heavy water as coolant and moderator was simulated using MCNPX2.6 code, aiming an optimized critical assembly. Optimized reflector thickness and gap between assemblies were determined to achieve minimum neutron leakage and void reactivity. The result was a more compact core, where assemblies were designed having 19-fuel pins in 1.25 pitch-to-diameter ratio. Optimum reflector thickness of 15 cm resulted in minimal neutron leakage in view of economic limitations. A 0.5 cm gap between assembles achieved more safety and 2.2% enrichment requirements. The present feasibility study suggests a thermal core of acceptable neutronic parameters to achieve a simple and safe core.

  17. Final Report, Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) Project: An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    OAK (B204) Final Report, NERI Project: ''An Innovative Reactor Analysis Methodology Based on a Quasidiffusion Nodal Core Model'' The present generation of reactor analysis methods uses few-group nodal diffusion approximations to calculate full-core eigenvalues and power distributions. The cross sections, diffusion coefficients, and discontinuity factors (collectively called ''group constants'') in the nodal diffusion equations are parameterized as functions of many variables, ranging from the obvious (temperature, boron concentration, etc.) to the more obscure (spectral index, moderator temperature history, etc.). These group constants, and their variations as functions of the many variables, are calculated by assembly-level transport codes. The current methodology has two main weaknesses that this project addressed. The first weakness is the diffusion approximation in the full-core calculation; this can be significantly inaccurate at interfaces between different assemblies. This project used the nodal diffusion framework to implement nodal quasidiffusion equations, which can capture transport effects to an arbitrary degree of accuracy. The second weakness is in the parameterization of the group constants; current models do not always perform well, especially at interfaces between unlike assemblies. The project developed a theoretical foundation for parameterization and homogenization models and used that theory to devise improved models. The new models were extended to tabulate information that the nodal quasidiffusion equations can use to capture transport effects in full-core calculations

  18. Using 6- and 8-tube IRT-4M fuel assemblies in WWR-SM research reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WWR-SM reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of Academy of Sciences (INP AS) in Uzbekistan was converted to 6-tube IRT-4M LEU (19.7%) fuel. Presently, INP intends to also use IRT-4M 8-tube FA, and a safety analysis for these 'mixed' (8-tube and 6-tube FA) cores is required by the regulatory authorities. This paper presents results of the safety analysis being performed for the 'mixed' cores. Neutronics analysis (burnup, power distributions and shutdown margin), steady-state thermal hydraulics analysis, kinetics parameters for these mixed cores are discussed in this paper. These results will be used to amend the present SAR. (authors)

  19. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  20. Generation of a library for reactor calculations and some applications in core and safety parameter studies of the 3-MW TRIGA MARK-II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a data base of the TRIGAP code that is generated for the 3-MW TRIGA MARK-II research reactor in Bangladesh. The library is created using the WIMS-D/4 code. Cross sections are calculated from zero burnup to 37% of initial 235U in 20 burnup steps. The created TRIGAP library is tested through practical calculations and is compared with experimental values or with values in the safety analysis report (SAR). Excess reactivity of the fresh core configuration is measured and determined to be 10.27 dollars, while a value of 10.267 dollars is obtained using the generated library. By choosing burnup steps of 0, 50, 350, and 750, WM · h, the whole operating history is covered. The calculated temperature defect at 1 and 3 MW is 1.15 and 3.59 dollars compared with the experimental value of 1.02 and 3.64 dollars, respectively. The xenon value obtained at 1 and 3 MW is 2.21 and 3.20 dollars, respectively, compared with 3.57 dollars at 3 MW in the SAR. The TRIGAP code with its new library is used for calculating fast and thermal flux distributions close to values from the SAR

  1. IAEA Coordinated Research Project on the Establishment of a Material Properties Database for Irradiated Core Structural Components for Continued Safe Operation and Lifetime Extension of Ageing Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today more than 50% of operating Research Reactors (RRs) are over 45 years old. Thus, ageing management is one of the most important issues to face in order to ensure availability (including life extension), reliability and safe operation of these facilities for the future. Management of the ageing process requires, amongst others, the predictions for the behavior of structural materials of primary components subjected to irradiation such as reactor vessel and core support structures, many of which are extremely difficult or impossible to replace. In fact, age-related material degradation mechanisms resulted in high profile, unplanned and lengthy shutdowns and unique regulatory processes of relicensing the facilities in recent years. These could likely have been prevented by utilizing available data for the implementation of appropriate maintenance and surveillance programmes. This IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) will provide an international forum to establish a material properties Database for irradiated core structural materials and components. It is expected that this Database will be used by research reactor operators and regulators to help predict ageing related degradation. This would be useful to minimize unpredicted outages due to ageing processes of primary components and to mitigate lengthy and costly shutdowns. The Database will be a compilation of data from RRs operators' inputs, comprehensive literature reviews and experimental data from RRs. Moreover, the CRP will specify further activities needed to be addressed in order to bridge the gaps in the new created Database, for potential follow-on activities. As per today, 13 Member States (MS) confirmed their agreement to contribute to the development of the Database, covering a wide number of materials and properties. The present publication incorporates two parts: the first part includes details on the pre-CRP Questionnaire, including the conclusions drawn from the answers received from the MS

  2. Liquid metal reactor core material HT9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A state-of-the art is surveyed on the liquid metal reactor core materials HT9. The purpose of this report is to give an insight for choosing and developing the materials to be applied to the KAERI prototype liquid metal reactor which is planned for the year of 2010. In-core stability of cladding materials is important to the extension of fuel burnup. Austenitic stainless steel (AISI 316) has been used as core material in the early LMR due to the good mechanical properties at high temperatures, but it has been found to show a poor swelling resistance. So many efforts have been made to solve this problem that HT9 have been developed. HT9 is 12Cr-1MoVW steel. The microstructure of HT9 consisted of tempered martensite with dispersed carbide. HT9 has superior irradiation swelling resistance as other BCC metals, and good sodium compatibility. HT9 has also a good irradiation creep properties below 500 dg C, but irradiation creep properties are degraded above 500 dg C. Researches are currently in progress to modify the HT9 in order to improve the irradiation creep properties above 500 dg C. New design studies for decreasing the core temperature below 500 dg C are needed to use HT9 as a core material. On the contrary, decrease of the thermal efficiency may occur due to lower-down of the operation temperature. (author). 51 refs., 6 tabs., 19 figs

  3. Reactor core of FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas sealed assemblies are disposed in rows between reactor core fuel assemblies. The gas sealed assembly incorporates inflowed sodium (coolants) and sealed gas in a gas sealing cylinder and an inner hollow of a wrapper tube. A cylindrical heat generating member is disposed in the gas sealing cylinder. The sealed gas is compressed by a discharging pressure of a pump by way of sodium in the wrapper tube. During normal operation, the liquid level of the coolants is present above than a backwarding flow hole, and the temperature of the coolants is raised by the cylindrical heat generation member to raise the temperature of sodium in the backwarding flow hole. High temperature sodium is mixed with low temperature sodium from a lower flow hole at the lower portion of the backwarding flow hole, and sodium at a leak flow hole becomes sodium at a middle temperature. The temperature of the middle temperature sodium is detected by a thermometer. With such procedures, the liquid level in the gas sealed assembly can be detected and confirmed during normal operation. (I.N.)

  4. Improvement of research reactor sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Reactors as is well known have numerous applications in a wide range of science technology, nuclear power development, medicine, to enumerate only the most important. The requirements of clients and stack-holders are fluctuating for the reasons out of control of Research Reactor Operating Organization, which may ensure with priority the safety of facility and nuclear installation. Sustainability of Research Reactor encompasses several aspects which finally are concentrated on safety of Research Reactor and economical aspects concerning operational expenses and income from external resources. Ensuring sustainability is a continuous, permanent activity and also it requests a strategic approach. The TRIGA - 14 MW Research Reactor detains a 30 years experience of safe utilization with good performance indicators. In the last 4 years the reactor benefited of a large investment project for modernization, thus ensuring the previous performances and opening new perspectives for power increase and for new applications. The previous core conversion from LEU to HEU fuel accomplished in 2006 ensures the utilization of reactor based on new qualified European supplier of TRIGA LEU fuel. Due to reduction of number of performed research reactors, the 14 MW TRIGA modernized reactor will play a significant role for the following two decades. (author)

  5. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V.1: Validation of seismic analysis codes using reactor core experiments. Proceedings of a research co-ordination meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Co-ordination Meeting held in Vienna, 16-17 November 1993, was attended by participants from France, India, Italy, Japan and the Russian Federation. The meeting was held to discuss and compare the results obtained by various organizations for the analysis of Italian tests on PEC mock-up. The background paper by A. Martelli, et al., Italy, entitled Fluid-Structure Interaction Experiments of PEC Core Mock-ups and Numerical Analysis Performed by ENEA presented details on the Italian PEC (Prova Elementi di Combustibile, i.e. Fuel Element Test Facility) test data for the benchmark. Several papers were presented on the analytical investigations of the PEC reactor core experiments. The paper by M. Morishita, Japan, entitled Seismic Response Analysis of PEC Reactor Core Mock-up, gives a brief review of the Japanese data on the Monju mock-up core experiment which had been distributed to the participating countries through the IAEA. Refs, figs and tabs

  6. The review of fuel types for Russian research reactors. Their fabrication and quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of tubular fuel elements (FEs) for research reactor fuel assemblies (FAs) is considered. Commercial extrusion and annular-type technologies for tubular FE fabrication are described. 'Extrusion' technology is based on fabrication of tubular billet of fuel core by means of powder metallurgy followed by hot extrusion of fuel core tubular billet and tubular cladding billet. The process is completed with FE assembly operation. 'Annular' technology is based on fuel core fabrication using powder metallurgy followed by chemical treatment of fuel core surface and fuel core insertion into the cladding. The list of FE and FA control operations to check their conformance to the required quality level is given. The most common FA designs (WWR-M2, WWR-M5, IRT-2M, IRT-3M, MR, MIR, WWR-TS, IVV-2M, IVV-10, TWR-S, IR-100) for research reactors built according to the Russian projects are described. The Quality Assurance System in operation at 'Novosibirsk' Chemical Concentrates Plant' is presented. (author)

  7. Full conversion of the core of a research, nuclear fuel testing and material testing reactor of TRIGA SSR 14 MW type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All the TRIGA type reactors have power levels between 100 kW and 14 MW and use a nuclear fuel formed of a uranium - hydride zirconium alloy. The reactor cores made of this fuel are intrinsically secure against any accident of reactivity insertion. This type of fuel presents a low coefficient of fission product release and a remarkable stability to the temperature cycling up to high burnups. All the TRIGA type reactors except the 14 MW reactors, as the type of the TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti is, make use of low enrichment uranium (19.9%), LEU. Due to the international policy of non-proliferation and nuclear safeguard requirements as well, the highly enriched uranium fuel fabrication ceased in 1978. Subsequently, only LEU type fuel continued to be used. The process of using LEU fuel instead of HEU fuel, coined as conversion, was supported by DOE of USA and the IAEA member states in the frame of the 'Reduced Enrichment in Research and Testing Reactors' (RERTR project) together with the technical cooperation projects (TC) between IAEA and the member states. INR Pitesti enjoyed the both forms of international support since 1984. The conversion process at the TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti began in 1992 by feeding the reactor core with LEU fuel produced by General Atomics. The report of General Atomics from 1998, titled 'Final Results from TRIGA - LEU fuel Postirradiation Examination and Evaluation following Long-term Irradiation Testing in the OAK Ridge Reactor (ORR)' (UZR-22) presents the results of irradiation testing of the LEU f 13,22 fuel for a burnup of about 65% and an irradiation period of about 900 FPD (full power days). The report confirmed the reliability of the LEU fuel replaced in the conversion process. Similar results were obtained by irradiation of LEU fuel, produced by General Atomics, in the 14 MW TRIGA reactor of INR Pitesti and by post irradiation examination of some fuel element selected from the batch of fuel provided by the Argonne National

  8. Fast breeder reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The meeting was attended by 15 participants from seven countries and two international organizations. The Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) was attended by representatives from France, Fed. Rep. Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America - countries that have made significant progress in developing the technology and physics of sodium cooled fast reactors and have extensive national programmes in this field - as well as by representatives of the Commission of the European Communities and the IAEA. The design of fast-reactor power plants is a more difficult task than developing facilities with thermal reactors. Different reactor kinetics and dynamics, a hard neutron spectrum, larger integral doses of fuel and structural material irradiation, higher core temperatures, the use of an essentially novel coolant, and, as a result of all these factors, the additional reliability and safety requirements that are imposed on the planning and operation of sodium cooled fast reactors - all these factors pose problems that can be solved comprehensively only by countries with a high level of scientific and technical development. The exchange of experience between these countries and their combined efforts in solving the fundamental problems that arise in planning, constructing and operating fast reactors are promoting technical progress and reducing the relative expenditure required for various studies on developing and introducing commercial fast reactors. For this reason, the meeting concentrated on reviewing and discussing national fast reactor programmes. The situation with regard to planning, constructing and operating fast experimental and demonstration reactors in the countries concerned, the experience accumulated in operating them, the difficulties arising during operation and ways of over-coming them, the search for optimal designs for the power

  9. Progress with the Australian replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Construction of the new Australian Research Reactor, the replacement for the now 46 year old HIFAR research reactor, is approximately 80% completed. Construction of the reactor facility began in April 2002 at ANSTO's Lucas Heights site near Sydney and commissioning is still on track for late 2005. Some details of the progress of construction and licensing and an outline of ANSTO research related to the use of Zircaloy-4 in the core region and reflector vessel of the reactor are given. (author)

  10. Light water reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the technology of light water reactors (LWR) was being commercialized, the German Federal Government funded the reactor safety research program, which was conducted by national research centers, universities, and industry, and which led to the establishment, in early 1972, of the Nuclear Safety Project in Karlsruhe. In the seventies, the PNS project mainly studied the loss-of-coolant accident. Numerous experiments were run and computer codes developed for this purpose. In the eighties, the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center contributed to the German Risk Study, investigating especially core meltdown accidents under the impact of the events at Three Mile Island-2 and Chernobyl-4. Safety research in the nineties is concentrated on the requirements of future reactor generations, such as the European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) or potential approaches which, at the present time, are discernible only as tentative theoretical designs. (orig.)

  11. Research reactors: design, safety requirements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are two types of reactors: research reactors or power reactors. The difference between the research reactor and energy reactor is that the research reactor has working temperature and fuel less than the power reactor. The research reactors cooling uses light or heavy water and also research reactors need reflector of graphite or beryllium to reduce the loss of neutrons from the reactor core. Research reactors are used for research training as well as testing of materials and the production of radioisotopes for medical uses and for industrial application. The difference is also that the research reactor smaller in terms of capacity than that of power plant. Research reactors produce radioactive isotopes are not used for energy production, the power plant generates electrical energy. In the world there are more than 284 reactor research in 56 countries, operates as source of neutron for scientific research. Among the incidents related to nuclear reactors leak radiation partial reactor which took place in three mile island nuclear near pennsylvania in 1979, due to result of the loss of control of the fission reaction, which led to the explosion emitting hug amounts of radiation. However, there was control of radiation inside the building, and so no occurred then, another accident that lead to radiation leakage similar in nuclear power plant Chernobyl in Russia in 1986, has led to deaths of 4000 people and exposing hundreds of thousands to radiation, and can continue to be effect of harmful radiation to affect future generations. (author)

  12. Embrittlement of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over a core lifetime, the reactor materials Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium may become embrittled due to the absorption of corrosion-generated hydrogen and neutron irradiation damage. Results are presented on the effects of fast fluence on the fracture toughness of: (1) wrought Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium; (2) Zircaloy-4 to hafnium butt welds; and (3) hydrogen-precharged beta-treated and weld-metal Zircaloy-4 for fluences up to a maximum of approximately 150 x 1024 n/m2 (>1 MeV). While Zircaloy-4 did not exhibit a decrement in KIC due to irradiation, hafnium and butt welds between hafnium and Zircaloy-4 are susceptible to embrittlement with irradiation. The embrittlement can be attributed to irradiation strengthening, which promotes void formation in the high-strain crack-tip region, and, in part, to the lower chemical potential of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 compared to hafnium, which causes hydrogen to drift over time from the hafnium end toward the Zircaloy-4 end and to precipitate at the interface between the weld and base-metal interface. Neutron radiation apparently affects the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium in different ways. Possible explanations for these differences are suggested. It was found that Zircaloy-4 is preferred over Zircaloy-2 in hafnium-to-Zircaloy butt-weld applications due to absence of a radiation-induced reduction in KIC plus its lower hydrogen absorption characteristics compared with Zircaloy-2

  13. Neutronic calculations in core conversion of the IAN-R1 research reactor from MTR HEU to TRIGA LEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With cooperation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), neutronic calculations were carried out for conversion of the Ian-R1 Reactor from MTR-HEU fuel to TRIGA-LEU fuel. In order to establish a staff for neutronic calculation at the Instituto de Cancan's Nucleares y Energia s Alternatives (INEA) a program was established. This program included training, acquisition of hardware, software and calculation for the core with MTR-HEU fuel , enriched nominally to 93% and calculation for several arrangements with the TRIGA-LEU fuel, enriched to 19.7%. The results were verified and compared with several groups of calculation at the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ) in Mexico, and General Atomics (GA) in United States. As a result of this program, several technical reports have been wrote. (author)

  14. Fuel and core testing plan for a target fueled isotope production reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    pins can be removed after the experiment and using Sandia's metrology lab, relative power profiles (radially and axially) can be determined. In addition to validating neutronic analyses, confirming heat transfer properties of the target/fuel pins and core will be conducted. Fuel/target pin power limits can be verified with out-of-pile (electrical heating) thermal-hydraulic experiments. This will yield data on the heat flux across the Zircaloy clad and establish safety margin and operating limits. Using Sandia's Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) a 4 MW TRIGA type research reactor, target/fuel pins can be driven to desired fission power levels for long durations. Post experiment inspection of the pins can be conducted in the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility to observe changes in the mechanical properties of the LEU matrix and burn-up effects. Transient tests can also be conducted at the ACRR to observe target/fuel pin performance during accident conditions. Target/fuel pins will be placed in double experiment containment and driven by pulsing the ACRR until target/fuel failure is observed. This will allow for extrapolation of analytical work to confirm safety margins.

  15. Theoretical and experimental research of natural convection in the core of the high temperature pebble bed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physical model of the developed THERMIX-2D-code for computing thermohydraulic behaviour of the core of high temperature pebble bed reactors is verified by experiments with natural convection flow. Such fluid flow behaviour can be of very high importance for the real reactor in the case of natural heat removal decay. The experiments are performed in a special set up testing-stand with pressures up to 30 bars and temperatures up to 3000C by using air and helium as fluid. In comparison with the experimental data the numerical results show that a good and useful simulation is given by the program. Pure natural convection flow in packed pebble beds is calculated with a very high degree of reliability. The investigation of flow stability demonstrate that radial-symmetric relations are not given temporarily when national convection is overlayed by forced convection flow. In the discussion it is explained when and to what extent the program leds to useful results in such situations. The test of the effective heat conductivity lambdasub(eff) results in an improvement of the lambdasub(eff)-data used so far for temperatures below 13000C. (orig.)

  16. Steady-state thermal hydraulic and safety analyses of a proposed mixed fuel (HEU and LEU) core for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) was converted from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, in 1992. The reactor is running successfully with an upgraded power level of 10 MW. In order to save money on the purchase of costly fresh LEU fuel elements, it is being thought to use some of the less burnt HEU spent fuel elements along with the present LEU fuel elements. In the present study steady-state thermal hydraulics of a proposed mixed fuel core (see Fig. 2) has been carried out. Results show that the proposed core, comprising of 24 LEU and 5 HEU standard fuel elements, with 4 LEU and one HEU control fuel elements, can be safely operated at a power level of 9.86 MW without compromising on safety. Standard computer codes and correlations were employed to compute various parameters, which include: coolant velocity distribution in the core; critical velocity; pressure drop; saturation temperature; temperature distribution in the core and margins to Onset of Nucleate Boiling (ONB), Onset of Flow Instability (OFI) and Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB)

  17. Steady-state thermal hydraulic and safety analyses of a proposed mixed fuel (HEU and LEU) core for Pakistan research reactor-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bokhari, I.H. E-mail: ishtiaq@pinstech.org.pk

    2004-07-01

    Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) was converted from Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel, in 1992. The reactor is running successfully with an upgraded power level of 10 MW. In order to save money on the purchase of costly fresh LEU fuel elements, it is being thought to use some of the less burnt HEU spent fuel elements along with the present LEU fuel elements. In the present study steady-state thermal hydraulics of a proposed mixed fuel core (see Fig. 2) has been carried out. Results show that the proposed core, comprising of 24 LEU and 5 HEU standard fuel elements, with 4 LEU and one HEU control fuel elements, can be safely operated at a power level of 9.86 MW without compromising on safety. Standard computer codes and correlations were employed to compute various parameters, which include: coolant velocity distribution in the core; critical velocity; pressure drop; saturation temperature; temperature distribution in the core and margins to Onset of Nucleate Boiling (ONB), Onset of Flow Instability (OFI) and Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB)

  18. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Fixed bed suspended core nuclear reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fixed bed nuclear reactor (FBNR) is essentially a pressurized light water reactor having spherical fuel elements constituting a suspended reactor core at its lowest bed porosity. The principle features of the proposed reactor are that the concept is polyvalent, simple in design, may operate either as fixed or fluidized bed, have the core suspended contributing to inherent safety, passive cooling features of the reactor. The reactor is modular and has an integrated primary system utilizing either water, supercritical steam or helium gas as its coolant. Some of the advantages of the proposed reactor are being modular, low environmental impact, exclusion of severe accidents, short construction period, flexible adaptation to demand, excellent load following characteristics, and competitive economics. (orig.)

  20. Design study of marine reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI have carried out four core designs for three different type Reactor of Trial design in FY 1983 ∼ 1986 and one core (the optimum core) and three survey cores for conceptual design Reactor in 1987. Based on these cores study results, we are now studying to design MRX CORE. On the other side, we started design study of super-miniaturized 2 MWt core concept for deep-sea submersible. This report describes the results of comparison and studies of the core specification, specific characteristics etc of these cores, and we study that more thick fuel outer diameter (9.5 mm) core was possible or not as for the MRX CORE that has now thin fuel outer diameter (7.0 mm) in consideration of rapid power change etc especially with marine reactor. As the results, it was found that 9.5 mm diameter fuel core was possible and some methods were found, therefore it will be necessary to study the 9.5 mm diameter fuel core in detail continuously. (author)

  1. Dynamic Response Control of Three-Layered Annular Plate Due to Various Parametres of Electrorheological Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlus Dorota

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents dynamic responses of annular plate composed of three layers. The middle layer of the plate has electrorheological properties expressed by the Bingham body model. The plate is loaded in the plane of facings with time-dependent forces. The electrorheological effect is observed in the area of supercritical plate behaviour. The influence of both material properties and geometrical dimensions of the core on plate behaviour is examined. The problem is solved analytically and numerically using the orthogonalization method and the finite difference method. Comparison of the results obtained using the finite difference and the finite element methods for a plate in critical state is shown. The numerical calculations are carried out for axisymmetric and asymmetric plate modes. The presented diagrams show the plate reaction to the changes in values of plate parameters and indicate that the supercritical control of plate work is possible.

  2. Development of dual cooled annular fuel and its possibility to enhance both economy and safety of light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Yanghyun; Kim, Keonsik; Park, Jeongyong; Yang, Yongsik; Kim, Hyungkyu; In, Wangkee; Song, Kunwoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Over the past few decades, extensive studies have been performed to improve the reliability and safety of light water reactor (LWR) fuel. In recent years, power updating of about 10% is being achieved by modifying safety analysis methodology and subsequent increase in safety margin. But departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and loss of coolant accident (LOCA) are still two of the most important limiting factors which would restrict power updating more than 10%. Duel cooled annular fuel, cooled in both internal and external cooling channel, has advantages of considerably lower heat flux and lower fuel temperature than conventional solid fuel. While lower heat flus gives higher DNB margin for the same power retie, lower temperature reduces the stored energy of fuel. However, there are many technical issues that should be addressed before any new type of fuel can be considered for application to LWR. This paper describes the key technologies that Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed for dual cooled annular fuel and discusses the feasibility of its application to LWR.

  3. Development of dual cooled annular fuel and its possibility to enhance both economy and safety of light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past few decades, extensive studies have been performed to improve the reliability and safety of light water reactor (LWR) fuel. In recent years, power updating of about 10% is being achieved by modifying safety analysis methodology and subsequent increase in safety margin. But departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) and loss of coolant accident (LOCA) are still two of the most important limiting factors which would restrict power updating more than 10%. Duel cooled annular fuel, cooled in both internal and external cooling channel, has advantages of considerably lower heat flux and lower fuel temperature than conventional solid fuel. While lower heat flus gives higher DNB margin for the same power retie, lower temperature reduces the stored energy of fuel. However, there are many technical issues that should be addressed before any new type of fuel can be considered for application to LWR. This paper describes the key technologies that Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has developed for dual cooled annular fuel and discusses the feasibility of its application to LWR

  4. Falling the fuel assembly in core mesh of reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accident reflecting drop of a fuel assembly (FA) in core mesh during the overload operations in the INP AS RUz research reactor is observed. Calculations and analysis of the accident situation were carried out for the reactor cores formed from fully high enriched IRT-3M type fuel (36% enrichment on '235U), the first mixed core consisting from 16 IRT-3M and 4 IRT-4M with low enriched fuel (19.7% enrichment on 235U), and the core fully formed from low enriched fuel. (authors)

  5. A complete fuel development facility utilizing a dual core TRIGA reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A TRIGA Dual Core Reactor System has been chosen by the Romanian Government as the heart of a new fuel development facility which will be operated by the Romanian Institute for Nuclear Technologies. The Facility, which will be operational in 1976, is an integral part of the Romanian National Program for Power Reactor Development, with particular emphasis being placed on fuel development. The unique combination of a new 14 MW steady state TRIGA reactor, and the well-proven TRIGA Annular Core Pulsing Reactor (ACPR) in one below-ground reactor pool resulted in a substantial construction cost savings and gives the facility remarkable experimental flexibility. The inherent safety of the TRIGA fuel elements in both reactor cores means that a secondary containment building is not necessary, resulting in further construction cost savings. The 14 MW steady state reactor gives acceptably high neutron fluxes for long- term testing of various prototype fuel-cladding-coolant combinations; and the TRIGA ACPR high pulse capability allows transient testing of fuel specimens, which is so important for accurate prediction of the performance of power reactor fuel elements under postulated failure conditions. The 14 MW steady state reactor has one large and three small in-core irradiation loop positions, two large irradiation loop positions adjacent to the core face, and twenty small holes in the beryllium reflector for small capsule irradiation. The power level of 14 MW will yield peak unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes in the central experiment position approaching 3.0 x 1014 n/cm2-sec. The ACPR has one large dry central experimental cavity which can be loaded at pool level through a shielded offset loading tube; a small diameter in-core flux trap; and an in-core pneumatically-operated capsule irradiation position. A peak pulse of 15,000 MW will yield a peak fast neutron flux in the central experimental cavity of about 1.5 x 1017 n/cm2-sec. The pulse width at half maximum during a

  6. Review of neutronic assessments applied to small reactor core physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its design division for material test reactors and research reactors, AREVA TA has to characterize these manufactured cores. This step is sequential with neutronics benchmarks associated with validation (standard Verification and Validation approach). The previous two points are embedded in core projects and can be run separately especially when experimental tests are foreseen for validation database enrichment. Methodological standard is given in order to match validation and benchmark process illustrated alongside with two specific items on critical research reactors (AZUR - JHR) and subcritical mock up (AZUR). (author)

  7. Reactor core heterogeneity effects on radionuclide inventory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Reactor core heterogeneity effects on radionuclide inventory are studied. ► A methodology for inventory estimation of individual fuel assembly is developed. ► Estimated inventory using presently developed and conventional method is compared. ► Radionuclide density peak and its location in equilibrium VVER core are investigated. - Abstract: Understanding fission product behavior is an important aspect of nuclear safety studies. A nuclear reactor core contains complex mixture of fuel elements with different levels of enrichment, power and burnup. Conventional method of core radionuclide inventory estimation is based on use of homogenized core parameters like burnup, enrichment, specific power etc. This approach does not reveal the variation in radionuclide density among different fuel elements within the core. The present work aims to bridge this knowledge gap by estimating the distribution of radionuclides in the nuclear reactor core taking into account the heterogeneity of the core explicitly. The analysis has brought out peak radionuclide density in the core which can be helpful in appropriate estimation of the radiological release in the accidental scenarios involving failures of few fuel assemblies. A quantitative comparison of total core inventory estimated based conventional core average parameters and detailed core inventory using individual fuel assembly inventory estimate has been made

  8. Ageing of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Historically, many of the research institutions were centred on a research reactor facility as main technological asset and major source of neutrons for research. Important achievements were made in time in these research institutions for development of nuclear materials technology and nuclear safety for nuclear energy. At present, ageing of nuclear research facilities among these research reactors and ageing of staff are considerable factors of reduction of competence in research centres. The safe way of mitigation of this trend deals with ageing management by so called, for power reactors, Plant Life Management and new investments in staff as investments in research, or in future resources of competence. A programmatic approach of ageing of research reactors in correlation with their actual and future utilisation, will be used as a basis for safety evaluation and future spending. (author)

  9. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  10. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keung Koo; Noh, J.M.; Hwang, D.H. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  11. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  12. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  13. Assumed mode approach to fast reactor core seismic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for a time history approach, rather than a response spectrum approach, to the seismic analysis of fast breeder reactor core structures is described. The use of a Rayleigh-Ritz/Assumed Mode formalism for developing mathematical models of reactor cores is presented. Various factors including structural nonlinearity, fluid inertia, and impact which necessitate abandonment of response spectrum methods are discussed. The use of the assumed mode formalism is described in some detail as it applies to reactor core seismic analysis. To illustrate the use of this formal approach to mathematical modeling, a sample reactor problem with increasing complexities of modeling is presented. Finally, several problem areas--fluid inertia, fluid damping, coulomb friction, impact, and modal choice--are discussed with emphasis on research needs for use in fast reactor seismic analysis

  14. Structural assessment of the IEA-R1 research reactor core matrix plate under loads from a new pneumatic irradiation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most recent actions related to the continuous modernization of the IEA-R1 research reactor is the replacement of the old pneumatic irradiation system by a new one. The new system has two positions supported by the core matrix plate introducing loads up to five times greater than the usual loads over it in those positions. From the safety point of view, a structural assessment of the core matrix plate under the new loads is strongly recommended. So, this paper presents this assessment considering that the core matrix plate is simply supported on its corners by the core support frame and its holes in several positions to support fuel elements, control elements, reflectors, etc., and to provide the coolant flow through it. To obtain a realistic structural behavior of the plate a three dimensional finite element model was developed and processed considering its support conditions in the corners and the usual loads from a typical core configuration plus the loads from the new pneumatic system in the most unfavorable positions in terms of stress. The obtained results from the finite element analysis show that there are adequate safety margins under the applied loads described above indicating that no modification or reinforcement of the plate is necessary. (author)

  15. Initial verification and validation of RAZORBACK - A research reactor transient analysis code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, Darren G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    This report describes the work and results of the initial verification and validation (V&V) of the beta release of the Razorback code. Razorback is a computer code designed to simulate the operation of a research reactor (such as the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)) by a coupled numerical solution of the point reactor kinetics equations, the energy conservation equation for fuel element heat transfer, and the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations for the water cooling of the fuel elements. This initial V&V effort was intended to confirm that the code work to-date shows good agreement between simulation and actual ACRR operations, indicating that the subsequent V&V effort for the official release of the code will be successful.

  16. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a consequences of the government decision in September 1997. ANSTO established a replacement research reactor project to manage the procurement of the replacement reactor through the necessary approval, tendering and contract management stages This paper provides an update of the status of the project including the completion of the Environmental Impact Statement. Prequalification and Public Works Committee processes. The aims of the project, management organisation, reactor type and expected capabilities are also described

  17. Safety of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of research reactors that have been constructed worldwide for civilian applications is about 651. Of the reactors constructed, 284 are currently in operation, 258 are shut down and 109 have been decommissioned. More than half of all operating research reactors worldwide are over thirty years old. During this long period of time national priorities have changed. Facility ageing, if not properly managed, has a natural degrading effect. Many research reactors face concerns with the obsolescence of equipment, lack of experimental programmes, lack of funding for operation and maintenance and loss of expertise through ageing and retirement of the staff. Other reactors of the same vintage maintain effective ageing management programmes, conduct active research programmes, develop and retain high calibre personnel and make important contributions to society. Many countries that operate research reactors neither operate nor plan to operate power reactors. In most of these countries there is a tendency not to create a formal regulatory body. A safety committee, not always independent of the operating organization, may be responsible for regulatory oversight. Even in countries with nuclear power plants, a regulatory regime differing from the one used for the power plants may exist. Concern is therefore focused on one tail of a continuous spectrum of operational performance. The IAEA has been sending missions to review the safety of research reactors in Member States since 1972. Some of the reviews have been conducted pursuant to the IAEA' functions and responsibilities regarding research reactors that are operated within the framework of Project and Supply Agreements between Member States and the IAEA. Other reviews have been conducted upon request. All these reviews are conducted following procedures for Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety

  18. Evaluation of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present status of research reactors with highly enriched (93%) uranium fuel at JAERI, JRR-2 and JMTR is described. JRR-2 is a heterogeneous type of reactor, using heavy water as moderator and coolant. It uses both MTR type and cylindrical type of fuel elements. The maximum thermal power and the thermal neutron flux are 10 MW and 2x1014 n/cm2 see respectively. The reactor has been used for various experiments such as solid state physics, material irradiation, reactor fuel irradiation and radioisotope production. The JMTR is a multi-purpose tank type material testing reactor, and light water moderator and coolant, operated at 50 MW. The evaluation of lower enriched fuel and its consequences for both reactors is considered more especially

  19. Study of the 99Mo production effect on some of research reactor core specification using DARE-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the major basis of Mo- production using irradiation method for targets of enriched uranium is presented. Factors such as neutron flux, time of irradiation, and enrichment ration have also been analyzed. It was concluded that Mo-production requires nuclear reactors having high neutron fluxes, and that raising the neutron flux results in increasing the Mo-activities especially at fluxes that are higher than 1014n.cm-2.s-1. Time of irradiation was found to have adverse i.e. positive and negative effects on Mo activity. Therefore, the optimum irradiation time should be determined. The Mo-production was modeled through a set of differential equation with respect to time with aim to study the most influencing factors on Mo production, especially the effects of neutron flux and time of irradiation. In addition, the mass of plutonium produced during the irradiation of low enriched uranium has been evaluated. An investigation as to whether 99Mo could be produced in the Syrian MNSR has been made. The result shows that a specific activity of 0.3773 Ci/g for 99Mo could be produced. In future, a nuclear research reactor having neutron flux of 1014n.cm-2.s-1 and 8 irradiation sites suitable for targets of 5 g of 235U could produce about 5000 Ci on a weekly. Calculation and simulation have been achieved using the already developed DARE-P simulation language which was modified and improved in the nuclear Engineering Department in the Atomic Energy Commission of Syria. (author)

  20. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 1014 n/cm2/sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  1. TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  2. Dossier: research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors are used at the CEA (the French atomic energy commission) since many years. Their number has been reduced but they remain unique tools that CEA valorize continuously. The results of the programs involving such reactors are of prime importance for the operation of Electricite de France (EdF) park of existing power plants but also for the design of future nuclear power plants and future research reactors. This dossier presents three examples of research reactors in use at the CEA: Osiris and Orphee (CEA-Saclay), devoted to nuclear energy and fundamental research, respectively, and the critical mockups Eole, Minerve and Masurca (CEA-Cadarache) devoted to nuclear data libraries and neutronic calculation. (J.S.)

  3. Investigation of the maximal values of the fuel surface temperatures in the active zone of the Dalat research reactor for operating core configuration of 89 fuel assembles and fundamental core configuration of 94 fuel assembles at limited power level of 550 kW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculation for defining the maximal values of fuel surface temperature in active zone of the Dalat nuclear research reactor (DNRR) is one of the important items in Safety Analyses for the reactor. The operating core configuration of 89 VVR-M2 fuel assemblies and fundamental core configuration of 94 fuel assemblies are used. The reactor is on limited power level of 550 kW. The calculated results for different operating core configuration and fundamental core configuration of 94 fuel assemblies and the comparison with the experimental data received on the DNRR and other data are reasonable. (author)

  4. Description of the Korean multipurpose research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korean Multipurpose Research Reactor (KMRR) was still under construction at the time of the conference, and was scheduled for completion in 1994. It has since been completed. Owned by Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), KMRR is designed for fuel and materials testing, production of key nuclides (including 99Mo, 131I, 192Ir, 60Co, and transmutation doped Si), neutron activation analysis, and neutron radiography. KMRR is a 30 MWth open pool type research reactor, with a forced upward light water moderator and coolant flow, and a heavy water annular reflector. The fuel is made from low-enriched U-Si-Al alloy, with finned aluminum cladding. Two configurations of fuel bundle have been designed, namely, hexagonal 36 element and circular 18 element. The reactor has seven tangential beam tubes, the position of which has been carefully selected to maximize thermal neutron flux while minimizing fast neutrons and gamma. Heat is transported to two heat exchangers by the primary coolant circuit, and thence by the secondary coolant circuit to a set of cooling towers. The reactor regulating system has two stepping motors that drive four hafnium control rods. The control functions are performed by two redundant programmable controllers. The reactor protection system is equipped with four hafnium shutoff rods driven by a fail-safe hydraulic circuit. The design of KMRR uses leading edge technology, and it might well figure among the best multipurpose research reactors in the world. 5 figs., 1 tab

  5. Monte Carlo modelling of VR-1 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities of reactor core analysis by precise Monte Carlo codes are gradually increasing along with the accessibility of computing power. In the case of zero power research reactors, where temperature and burn-up effects remain negligible, model can approximate the reality to a very high degree. In such a case, most of calculation uncertainty can be caused by uncertainties in technical specifications of fuel and reactor internals. Thus performance of the modelling and its predictive power can be significantly improved via comparison with a large set of experimental data that can be acquired during reactor operation and via subtle tuning and improving the calculation model. The paper describes the case for neutronics calculations of VR-1 zero power reactor core. (author)

  6. Innovative reactor core: potentialities and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gen IV nuclear reactors are considered a very attractive answer for the demand of energy. Because public acceptance they have to fulfil very clearly the requirement of sustainable development. In this sense a reactor concept, having by itself a rather no significant interaction with the environment both on the front and back end ('adiabatic concept'), is vital. This goal in mind, a new way of designing such a core has to be assumed. The starting point must be the 'zero impact'. Therefore the core will be designed having as basic constraints: a) fed with only natural or depleted Uranium, and b) discharges only fission products. Meantime its potentiality as a net burner of Minor Actinide has to be carefully estimated. This activity, referred to the ELSY reactor, shows how to design such an 'adiabatic' core and states its reasonable capability of burning MA legacy in the order of 25-50 kg/GWey. (authors)

  7. Validation of reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor COre Protection System (RCOPS), an advanced core protection calculator system, is a digitized one which provides core protection function based on two reactor core operation parameters, Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). It generates a reactor trip signal when the core condition exceeds the DNBR or LPD design limit. It consists of four independent channels adapted a two-out-of-four trip logic. System configuration, hardware platform and an improved algorithm of the newly designed core protection calculator system are described in this paper. One channel of RCOPS was implemented as a single channel facility for this R and D project where we performed final integration software testing. To implement custom function blocks, pSET is used. Software test is performed by two methods. The first method is a 'Software Module Test' and the second method is a 'Software Unit Test'. New features include improvement of core thermal margin through a revised on-line DNBR algorithm, resolution of the latching problem of control element assembly signal and addition of the pre-trip alarm generation. The change of the on-line DNBR calculation algorithm is considered to improve the DNBR net margin by 2.5%-3.3%. (author)

  8. Method of evaluating the reactor core performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable exact evaluation for the core performance in a short period. Constitution: A reactor core is equally divided into 2, 4 or 8 sections considering the structure of the symmetricalness and calculation for the evaluation the core performance is carried out to at least one region of the divided core. However, the reactor core can not be said to be completely symmetrical and there is a difference more or less, because if identical type fuels are loaded the way of burning is different depending on the positions, thereby causing difference in the total heat calorie generated. Accordingly, the performance evaluation is conducted for the entire core at a predetermined time interval, the compensation value for each of the fuels is calculated based on the result of the calculation for the entire core and the corresponding result of the calculation in each of the divided cores and the compensated values are added to the calculation result for the divided cores to compensate the calculated evaluation value. This enables to shorten the calculation time and improve the calculation accuracy. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Removing the heat from fast reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whatever the view about the time when fast breeder reactors will reach the commercial and industrial stage, there is a growing and widespread interest in developing their technology. The reactors are called breeders because they can produce more fissile material than they use in their own cores. As part of an Agency programme related to their technology and economics a symposium on Alkali Metal Coolants - Corrosion Studies and System Operating Experience was held in Vienna from 28 November to 2 December

  10. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  11. Cold-neutron tomography of annular flow and functional spacer performance in a model of a boiling water reactor fuel rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Annular flows w/wo functional spacers are investigated by cold neutron imaging. → Liquid film thickness distribution on fuel pins and on spacer vanes is measured. → The influence of the spacers on the liquid film distributions has been quantified. → The cross-sectional averaged liquid hold-up significantly affected by the spacers. → The sapers affect the fraction of the entrained liquid hold up in the gas core. - Abstract: Dryout of the coolant liquid film at the upper part of the fuel pins of a boiling water reactor (BWR) core constitutes the type of heat transfer crisis relevant for the conditions of high void fractions. It is both a safety concern and a limiting factor in the thermal power and thus for the economy of BWRs. We have investigated adiabatic, air-water annular flows in a scaled-up model of two neighboring subchannels as found in BWR fuel assemblies using cold-neutron tomography. The imaging of the double suchannel has been performed at the ICON beamline at the neutron spallation source SINQ at the Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland. Cold-neutron tomography is shown here to be an excellent tool for investigating air-water annular flows and the influence of functional spacers of different geometries on such flows. The high-resolution, high-contrast measurements provide the spatial distributions of the coolant liquid film thickness on the fuel pin surfaces as well as on the surfaces of the spacer vanes. The axial variations of the cross-section averaged liquid hold-up and its fraction in the gas core shows the effect of the spacers on the redistribution of the two phases.

  12. First Algerian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1985, both the Algerian Commissariat of New Energies and the Argentine National Atomic Energy Commission plus the firm INVAP S.E., started a series of mutual visits aimed at defining the mechanisms for cooperation in the nuclear field. Within this framework, a commercial contract was undersigned covering the supply of a low-power reactor (RUN), designed for basic and applied research in the fields of reactor physics and nuclear engineering. The reactor may also be used for performing experiences with neutron beams, for the irradiation of several materials and for the training of technicians, scientists and operators

  13. The replacement research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contract for the design, construction and commissioning of the Replacement Research Reactor was signed in July 2000. This was followed by the completion of the detailed design and an application for a construction licence was made in May 2001. This paper will describe the main elements of the design and their relation to the proposed applications of the reactor. The future stages in the project leading to full operation are also described

  14. Determining wall superheat under fully developed nucleate boiling in plate-type research reactor cores with low-velocity upward flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on plate-type research reactor cores that have involute or rectangular coolant channels with channel gap size in the range 2 ≤ d ≤ 5 mm. Heat transfer under fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB) and low-velocity (sat) in thin channels under FDNB decreases with increasing probability of bubble contact, ΔTsat is a function of the bubble departure diameter Db as well as d, and ΔTsat can be significantly overestimated by the FDNB correlations that are conventionally used in plate-type research reactor analysis but that are based on higher pressure and larger d flow data and that predict ΔTsat as a function of local channel heat flux and pressure only (e.g., as in the Jens- Lottes and Thom correlations). A new FDNB correlation is proposed that represents the bubble contact mechanism through the dimensionless number (d -cDb)/d, where c is a fitting parameter that accounts for the statistical aspects of bubble formation and contact. The ΔTsat predictions of the new correlation agree with the experimental data to within 16% and approach those obtained from the Jens-Lottes correlation with decreasing Db/d

  15. Liquid Metal Cooled Reactor Core Design and Structural Material Research by the Institute for Energy and Transport at the European Commission's Joint Research Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JRC supports, in accordance with the SET Plan, nuclear energy as one of the options in a future sustainable energy mix for Europe. JRC supports the policy instruments for coordination and implementation of research, financing, demonstration and deployment of next generation nuclear energy systems, incl. ESNII prototypes and demonstrators. JRC performs independent and contributes to collaborative R&D on important safety issues for next generation reactors

  16. Usage of burnable poison on research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel assemblies with burnable poison are widely used on power reactors, but there are not commonly used on research reactors. This paper shows a neutronic analysis of the advantages and disadvantages of the burnable poison usage on research reactors. This paper analyses both burnable poison design used on research reactors: Boron on the lateral wall and Cadmium wires. Both designs include a parametric study on the design parameters like the amount and geometry of the burnable poison. This paper presents the design flexibility using burnable poisons, it does not find an optimal or final design, which it will strongly depend on the core characteristics and fuel management strategy. (author)

  17. IRIS reactor core with thorium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is aimed at running the first IRIS reactor core with mixed thorium dioxide fuel (ThO2-UO2 and ThO2-PuO2). Calculations are performed by using Dragon 4.0.4 and Citation codes. The results show the multiplication factor(Keff) for central and peripheral assemblies as a function of burnup. To ensure the proliferation resistance,the value of 235U enrichment is ≤ 20%. The Keff is calculated using Dragon 4.0.4 for a single fuel rod and the model developed to fuel assembly, while the whole core was calculated using Citation code. For a fuel burnup, the use of increased enrichment fuel in the IRIS core leads to high reserve of reactivity, which is compensated with an integral fuel burnable absorber. The self-shielding of boron is in an IRIS reactor fuel. The effect of increased enrichment to the burn-up rates, and burnable poison distribution on the reactor performance, are evaluated. The equipment used in traditional light water reactors is evaluated for designing a small unit IRIS reactor. (authors)

  18. Reactor core flow rate measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To accurately measure the reactor core flow rate of coolants compulsorily circulated to the reactor core. Constitution: The discharge flow rate from internal pumps has been measured by disposing a flow nozzle, an orifice, etc. to the suction or discharge port of the internal pump and determining the pressure difference thereof or by the pumping stroke. Although such a method enables easy measurement, it involves problems in view of accuracy and maintenance. According to the present invention, a post-like member of a definite length is disposed to the opening of the reactor core shroud support leg just before an internal pump and the vortex frequency emitted from the member is measured to thereby determine the flow velocity and thus the flow rate. the vortex frequency is in proportion with the flow velocity, not depending on the composition, density, temperature, pressure of fluid. The vortex frequency is measured by a piezoelectric sensor or a strain gage. Accordingly, it is possible to accurately measure the discharge flow rate of individual internal pumps to thereby easily control the reactor core power. (K.M.)

  19. Industrial structure at research reactor suppliers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the recent joining of the forces of Framatome S. A. from France and the Nuclear Division of Siemens AG Power Generation (KWU) from Germany to a Joint Venture named Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power S.A.S., the issue of the necessary and of the optimal industrial structure for nuclear projects as a research reactor is, was discussed internally often and intensively. That discussion took place also in the other technical fields such as Services for NPPs but also in the field of interest here, i. e. Research Reactors. In summarizing the statements of this presentation one can about state that: Research Reactors are easier to build than NPPs, but not standardised; Research Reactors need a wide spectrum of skills and experiences; to design and build Research Reactors needs an experienced team especially in terms of management and interfaces; Research Reactors need background from built reference plants more than from operating plants; Research Reactors need knowledge of suitable experienced subsuppliers. Two more essential conclusions as industry involved in constructing and upgrading research reactors are: Research Reactors by far are more than a suitable core that generates a high neutron flux; every institution that designs and builds a Research Reactor lacks quality or causes safety problems, damages the reputation of the entire community

  20. Nuclear reactor with a reactor core composed of fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tube surrounding a fuel element projects above the liquid level. The tube is situated in a pot, whose upper edge lies between the top of the reactor core and the liquid level. A greater pressure is therefore produced, which ensures a reduction of the steam bubble proportion in the cooling liquid at the other fuel elements. (orig./HP)

  1. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  2. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

  3. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2002-04-01

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel.

  4. Reactor core flowing monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type reactor, a regression model is applied to signals of two local neutron detectors on the same string. Estimated values of signals of a detector disposed at an upper position (at downstream) obtained by inputting the signals of the detector on the lower position (at upstream) to the model do not contain a fluctuation ingredient caused by bubbles generated between the detectors. Then, if the difference of the observed values of the detector at the upper position and estimated values of the detector at the upper position obtained by the regression model is determined, time series data of the fluctuation ingredient of the bubbles generated between the detectors can be obtained. The regression model is a mathematical model estimating regression of the output by a linear linkage of the values of input signals in the past. Since the fluctuation ingredient caused by the bubbles contained in each of the detectors can be separated irrespective of frequency, the transferring time and the speed of the bubbles between the detectors can be calculated accurately. (N.H.)

  5. Neutronic Core Performance of CAREM-25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The actual design state of core of CAREM-25 reactor is presented.It is shown that the core design complains with the safety and operation established requirements.It is analyzed the behavior of the reactor safety and control systems (single failure of the fast shut down system, single failure of the shut down system, single failure of the second shut down system, reactivity worth of the adjust and control system in normal operation and hot shut down, reactivity worth of the adjust and control system and the scheme of movement of the control rod during the operation cycle).It is shown the burnup profile of fuel elements with the proposed scheme of refueling and the burnup and power density distribution at different moments of the operation cycle.The power peaking factor of the equilibrium core is 2.56, the minimum DNBR is 1.90 and its average is 2.09 during the operation cycle

  6. Research Reactors Types and Utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor, in gross terms, is a device in which nuclear chain reactions are initiated, controlled, and sustained at a steady rate. The nuclei of fuel heavy atoms (mostly 235U or 239Pu), when struck by a slow neutron, may split into two or more smaller nuclei as fission products,releasing energy and neutrons in a process called nuclear fission. These newly-born fast neutrons then undergo several successive collisions with relatively low atomic mass material, the moderator, to become thermalized or slow. Normal water, heavy water, graphite and beryllium are typical moderators. These neutrons then trigger further fissions, and so on. When this nuclear chain reaction is controlled, the energy released can be used to heat water, produce steam and drive a turbine that generates electricity. The fission process, and hence the energy release, are controlled by the insertion (or extraction) of control rods through the reactor. These rods are strongly neutron absorbents, and thus only enough neutrons to sustain the chain reaction are left in the core. The energy released, mostly in the form of heat, should be continuously removed, to protect the core from damage. The most significant use of nuclear reactors is as an energy source for the generation of electrical power and for power in some military ships. This is usually accomplished by methods that involve using heat from the nuclear reaction to power steam turbines. Research reactors are used for radioisotope production and for beam experiments with free neutrons. Historically, the first use of nuclear reactors was the production of weapons grade plutonium for nuclear weapons. Currently all commercial nuclear reactors are based on nuclear fission. Fusion power is an experimental technology based on nuclear fusion instead of fission.

  7. Assessment Of Radiation And Criticality Safety For Keeping 106 Spent HEU Fuel Assemblies At Interim Storage Support To Full Core Conversion Of The Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents calculation results of gamma dose rate and other parameters of Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) to evaluate radiation and criticality safety with the changing of water level in reactor tank and cooling time of burnt High Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel assemblies (FAs) when keeping in interim storages. Before using ORIGEN code to calculate spent fuel photon source and decay heat, the library was modified with WWR-M2 burn-up dependent cross-sections of actinides generated by WIMS-ANL. The MCNP was used to estimate gamma dose rate and multiplication coefficient of spent fuel storages. The calculation was also benchmarked to measured gamma dose rate of a HEU burnt FA to affirm the calculation method. To obtain the conservative results of criticality safety, the all burnt FAs were assumed to be fresh ones. The calculation results show that retention 106 burnt HEU FAs at interim storage along with new LEU core 92 LEU FAs is met all requirements about radiation and criticality safety. (author)

  8. Modeling of thermal hydraulics behaviour in reactor core of reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) in Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Nuclear Malaysia) is the one and only research reactor in Malaysia and had been used exclusively for research and development (R and D), training for reactor operators and education purposes. The RTP is a 1 MWt pool type reactor with natural convection cooling system and pulsing capability up to 1200 MWt. It went critical on 28 June 1982 and the core configuration has been changed twelve times to date. The core is a mixed type using 20% enriched U-ZrH fuel element containing 8.5, 12 and 20wt% uranium. This paper will discuss the modeling of thermal-hydraulics behaviour in reactor core of RTP using computer code namely PARET. The results of the calculation that were carried out at RTP are modelled and temperature profiles of the thermal hydraulics data at different locations and power levels are developed. s a comparison to the thermal hydraulics calculation using PARET, an experiment were carried out at several different locations and power levels in the reactor core for temperature profile in the core to compare the result obtained from PARET. Finally, an overall analysis of the result of PARET calculation and experimental measurement were exhibited in this paper. (author)

  9. Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) as a facility for reactor safety research and its modification for the future test plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NSRR is a modified TRIGA-ACPR (annular core pulse reactor), and attained the initial criticality in May, 1975. It was built for studying reactor fuel behavior under a reactivity-initiated accident condition. The reactor is installed in a pool of 3.6 m width, 4.5 m length and 9 m depth, and water above the reactor core serves as a radiation shield. The reactor core contains 149 driver fuel rods, 6 regulating rods, 2 safety rods and 3 transient rods. An arbitrary reactivity up to 4.67 $ can be set up almost instantaneously in the reactor core. The pulse power generation is terminated by the large negative reactivity induced by prompt temperature feedback without inserting the control rods. This is brought about by an excellent property of the driver fuel which contains 12 wt.% U-ZrH enriched to 20 wt.% U-235. As a unique feature, the NSRR is equipped with a big experimental cavity through the center of the reactor core. It has the diameter of 220 mm, and is called loading tube. It is branched into a vertical loading tube and an offset loading tube. The characteristics of the pulse operation in the NSRR, the outline of fuel irradiation experiment, the future test plan and the modification of the NSRR are described. (Kako, I.)

  10. Mechanical core coupling and reactors stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Structural parts of nuclear reactors are complex mechanical systems, able to vibrate with a set of proper frequencies when suitably excited. Cyclical variations in the strain state of the materials, including density perturbations, are produced. This periodic changes may affect reactor reactivity. But a variation in reactivity affects reactor thermal power, thus modifying the temperature field of the abovementiones materials. If the variation in temperature fields is fast enough, thermal-mechanical coupling may produce fast variations in strain states, and this, at its turn, modifies the reactivity, and so on. This coupling between mechanical vibrations of the structure and the materials of the core, with power oscillations of the reactor, not only may not be excluded a priori, but it seems that it has been present in some stage of the incidents or accidents that happened during the development of nuclear reactor technology. The purpose of the present communication is: (a) To review and generalize some mathematical models that were proposed in order to describe thermal-mechanical coupling in nuclear reactors. (b) To discuss some conditions in which significant instabilities could arise, including large amplitude power oscillations coupled with mechanical vibrations whose amplitudes are too small to be excluded by conventional criteria of mechanical design. Enough Certain aspects of thr physical safety of nuclear power reactors, that are objected by people that opposes to the renaissance of nucleoelectric generation, are discussed in the framework of the mathematical model proposed in this paper

  11. Intercomparison of liquid metal fast reactor seismic analysis codes. V. 3: Comparison of observed effects with computer simulated effects on reactor cores from seismic disturbances. Proceedings of a final research co-ordination meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication contains the final papers summarizing the validation of the codes on the basis of comparison of observed effects with computer simulated effects on reactor cores from seismic disturbances. Refs, figs tabs

  12. Investigation of heat transfer and distribution in the core of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1) using STAR-CCM+ CFD Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, STAR-CCM+ CFD code was used to investigate steady state thermal hydraulic parameters in the core of Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1). The core was segmented into 21 axial segments. 3D-CAD parametric solid modeler embedded in STAR-CCM+ was used to model the geometry. The geometry was discretized by the use of appropriate meshing models. GHARR-1 operating conditions were set as boundary conditions for the STAR-CCM+ simulation conducted. Heat flux specific to individual axial segment computed based on segment power peaking factors and surface area was applied at the wall of the flow channel. For each power level, mass flow rate and temperature were imposed as boundary conditions at the inlet. Standard k-ε turbulence model was adopted for the solution of the transported variables namely turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results obtained were validated with experimental data from GHARR-1 operation and observed to be in appreciable agreement. The plots of the evaluated flow parameters show that the heat applied at the surface of the flow channel is efficiently transferred to the bulk of the fluid. In addition, effective distribution of temperature in the domain was observed. With effective heat transfer coupled with uniform heat distribution, it could be stated that cooling of GHARR-1 fuel which is needed for safety operation of the facility is assured. (au)

  13. Control Rod Ejection Accident while Using 6- and 8-Tube IRT-4M Fuel Assemblies in WWR-SM Research Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WWR-SM reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Academy of Sciences (INP AS) in Uzbekistan was converted to 6-tube IRT-4M LEU (19.7%) fuel in 2009. Presently, INP intends to also use IRT-4M 8-tube FA, and a safety analysis for these 'mixed' (8-tube and 6-tube FA) cores is required by the regulatory authorities. This paper presents results of control rod ejection transient analysis for these mixed cores

  14. Gaseous fuel reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, K.; Schneider, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews studies dealing with the concept of a gaseous fuel reactor and describes the structure and plans of the current NASA research program of experiments on uranium hexafluoride systems and uranium plasma systems. Results of research into the basic properties of uranium plasmas and fissioning gases are reported. The nuclear pumped laser is described, and the main results of experiments with these devices are summarized.

  15. NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY (NRAD) REACTOR 64-ELEMENT CORE UPGRADE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately +/-1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  16. Relocation of a Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research reactor RA-8 is placed in Pilcaniyeu Technological Centre (PTC) in the province of Rio Negro, approximately 70 km east from San Carlos de Bariloche city. The first time the reactor went critical was in June 1997 and it is out of operation since March 1999. Due to the intention to relocate the reactor in Bariloche Atomic Centre (BAC) a study has been done in order to assess the technical and economical feasibility. The scope of this study covers the disassembly and transport from PTC to BAC. Relocation of the reactor will reduce costs, time and difficulties in the transport of personnel (operators, researcher, and students) to Pilcaniyeu allowing the performance of nuclear research as well as academic application. The RA-8 is basically a critical facility of enriched uranium with light water as moderator. It is a pool type reactor with low thermal power, maximum 100 W and nominal 10 W. The principal assembly and the associated systems are placed in the reactor hall: consisting of a core, tanks, block, nuclear and conventional instrumentation, moderator system and the neutron source system. Also there is a control room with computers for monitoring together with the safety and control systems. The core is inside two stainless steel concentric tanks communicated with each other that contain water during the operation. The technical feasibility consists in: radiological characterization of the facility, visual inspection of the systems, structures and components, dismantling engineering, mass estimation for disassembly, packing, transport and storage. Economical feasibility has been done in order to evaluate time and costs necessaries for the disassembly and transport from Pilcaniyeu to Bariloche. Regulatory aspects that must be fulfilled were considered in this study. Nothing detectable was found in water samples from pipes of the pumps' well. The systems, structures and components of the RA-8 present in general a good condition of preservation that would

  17. Site Investigation for Detection of KIJANG Reactor Core Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Tae-Hyun; Kim, Jun Yeon; Kim, Jeeyoung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    It was planned for the end of March 2017 and extended to April 2018 according to the government budget adjustment. The KJRR project is intended for filling the self-sufficiency of RI demand including Mo-99, increasing the NTD capacity and developing technologies related to the research reactor. In project, site investigation is the first activity that defines seismologic and related geologic aspects of the site. Site investigation was carried out from Oct. 2012 to Jan. 2014 and this study is intended to describe detail procedures in locating the reactor core center. The location of the reactor core center was determined by collectively reviewing not only geological information but also information from architects engineering. EL 50m was selected as ground level by levering construction cost. Four recommended locations (R-1a - R-1d) are displayed for the reactor core center. R-1a was found optimal in consideration of medium rock contour, portion of medium rock covering reactor buildings, construction cost, physical protection and electrical resistivity. It is noted that engineering properties of the medium rock is TCR/RQD 100/53, elastic modulus 7,710 - 8,720MPa, permeability coefficient 2.92E-06cm/s, and S-wave velocity 1,380m/s, sound for foundations of reactor buildings.

  18. PROTEUS research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PROTEUS zero power reactor at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland achieved first criticality in 1968 and since then has been operated as an experimental tool for reactor physics research on test lattices representative of a wide range of reactor concepts. Reactor design codes and their associated data libraries are validated on the basis of the experimental results obtained. PROTEUS is normally configured as a driven system, in which a subcritical test zone is made critical by the surrounding driver zones. The advantages of driven systems can be summarized as follows: - Smaller amount of test fuel is required; - Large range of test zone conditions (including k∞ < 1 states) can be investigated by changes in the driver loading alone, thus avoiding undesirable perturbations to the test zone which would influence the measurement conditions and thus affect the interpretability of the results; - Necessary reactor control and instrumentation equipment (usually perturbing from the experimental viewpoint) can be located in the outer driver regions, thereby avoiding disturbance of the test lattice

  19. Sodium-cooled fast reactor core designs for transmutation of MHR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the core design analyses of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) are performed for the effective transmutation of the DB (Deep Burn)-MHR (Modular Helium Reactor). In this concept, the spent fuels of DB-MHR are transmuted in SFRs with a closed fuel cycle after TRUs from LWR are first incinerated in a DB-MHR. We introduced two different type SFR core designs for this purpose, and evaluated their core performance parameters including the safety-related parameters. In particular, the cores are designed to have lower transmutation rate relatively to our previous work so as to make the fuel characteristics more feasible. The first type cores which consist of two enrichment regions are typical homogeneous annular cores and they rate 900 MWt power. On the other hand, the second type cores which consist of a central non-fuel region and a single enrichment fuel region rate relatively higher power of 1500 MWt. For these cores, the moderator rods (YH1.8) are used to achieve less positive sodium void worth and the more negative Doppler coefficient because the loading of DB-MHR spent fuel leads to the degradation of these safety parameters. The analysis results show that these cores have low sodium void worth and negative reactivity coefficients except for the one related with the coolant expansion but the coolant expansion reactivity coefficient is within the typical range of the typical SFR cores. (authors)

  20. Tajoura reactor core conversion neutrons analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the preliminary neutronics studies and results of the Tajoura reactor core conversion calculations from currently used highly enriched (80% U235) fuel to low enriched fuel (36% U''2''3''5) by using the TAJN computer package. The compact core loading consists of 16 fuel assemblies type IRT-2M surrounded by removable and stationary beryllium reflector and ordinary water for moderation and cooling. The study was undertaken to compare results of TAJN computer package and the vendor documented results. The results of these calculations at the BOL and EOL conditions with equilibrium Xe at 10 MWt are shown. (author)

  1. Modification of the Core Cooling System of TRIGA 2000 Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar, Efrizon; Fiantini, Rosalina

    2010-06-01

    To accomplish safety requirements, a set of actions has to be performed following the recommendations of the IAEA safety series 35 applied to research reactor. Such actions are considered in modernization of the old system, improving the core cooling system and safety evaluations. Due to the complexity of the process and the difficulty in putting the apparatus in the reactor core, analytical and experimental study on the determination of flow and temperature distribution in the whole coolant channel are difficult to be done. In the present work, a numerical study of flow and temperature distribution in the coolant channel of TRIGA 2000 has been carried out using CFD package. For this study, simulations were carried out on 3-D tested model. The model consists of the reactor tank, thermal and thermalizing column, reflector, rotary specimen rack, chimney, fuel element, primary pipe, diffuser, beam tube and a part of the core are constructed by 1.50 million unstructured tetrahedral cell elements. The results show that for the initial condition (116 fuel elements in the core) and for the inlet temperature of 24°C and the primary velocity of 5.6 m/s, there no boiling phenomena occur in the coolant channel. Due to this result, it is now possible to improve the core cooling system of TRIGA 2000 reactor. Meanwhile, forced flow from the diffuser system only affected the flow pattern in the outside of chimney and put on a small effect to the fluid flow's velocity in the inside of chimney.

  2. PC-Reactor-core transient simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PC-REATOR, a reactor core transient simulation code has been developed for the real-time operator training on a IBM-PC microcomputer. The program presents capabilities for on-line exchange of the operating parameters during the transient simulation, by friendly keyboard instructions. The model is based on the point-kinetics approximation, with 2 delayed neutron percursors and up to 11 decay power generating groups. (author)

  3. RB research reactor Safety Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This RB reactor safety report is a revised and improved version of the Safety report written in 1962. It contains descriptions of: reactor building, reactor hall, control room, laboratories, reactor components, reactor control system, heavy water loop, neutron source, safety system, dosimetry system, alarm system, neutron converter, experimental channels. Safety aspects of the reactor operation include analyses of accident causes, errors during operation, measures for preventing uncontrolled activity changes, analysis of the maximum possible accident in case of different core configurations with natural uranium, slightly and highly enriched fuel; influence of possible seismic events

  4. Dynamic detection of nuclear reactor core incident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surveillance, safety and security of evolving systems area challenge to prevent accident. The dynamic detection of a hypothetical and theoretical blockage incident in the Phenix nuclear reactor is investigated. Such an incident is characterized by abnormal temperature rises in the neighbourhood of the concerned reactor core assembly. The data set is the output temperature map of the reactor, it is provided by the Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA). A real time approach is proposed, based on a sliding temporal window, it is divided into two steps. The first one behaves like a sieve, its function is to detect simultaneous temperature evolutions in a close neighbourhood which may induce a potential incident. When such evolutions are detected, the second step computes the temperature contrast between each assembly having these evolutions and its neighbourhood. This method permits to monitor the system evolution in real time while only few observations are required. Results are validated on various noisy realistic simulated perturbations. (authors)

  5. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  6. Nuclear Research Center IRT reactor dynamics calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main features of the code DIRT, for dynamical calculations are described in the paper. With the results obtained by the program, an analysis of the dynamic behaviour of the Research Reactor IRT of the Nuclear Research Center (CIN) is performed. Different transitories were considered such as variation of the system reactivity, coolant inlet temperature variation and also variations of the coolant velocity through the reactor core. 3 refs

  7. Research Reactor Spent Fuel Transfer/Storage Cask with Application to TRIGA Fuel - Designed Cask Shielding Independent Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margeanu, C.A.; Iorgulis, C. [Reactor Physics, Nuclear Fuel Performances and Nuclear Safety Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Street, no.1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania); Ciocanescu, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Street, no.1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania); Prava, M. [Design Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Str, no.1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania); Margeanu, S. [Radiation Protection Department, Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti, Campului Street, no.1, 115400 Mioveni (Romania)

    2011-07-01

    Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti owns and operates a TRIGA dual-core Research Reactor for material testing, power reactor fuel and nuclear safety studies (dual-core concept involves independent operation of TRIGA 14 MW Steady-State Reactor and TRIGA Annular-Core Pulsing Reactor at each end of a large pool). In May 2006, TRIGA 14 MW SSR core was fully converted to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU 20 wt% {sup 235}U) fuel, according to Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors agreements and current worldwide non-proliferation efforts. Paper presents a shielding independent evaluation applied to designed transfer/ storage cask for TRIGA INR spent fuel, a mandatory step in preparation of the documentation required for spent fuel transfer/storage cask authorisation process. Fuel elements irradiation was modelled by assuming constant power for entire residence time inside reactor core, for 14 MW reactor operation power and two different scenarios characteristic for accident calculations according to TRIGA 14 MW SSR safety report and reactor operation experience. The discharged spent LEU fuel was cooled down for 2 and 5 years, respectively. Source term assessment and spent fuel characteristic parameters estimation were done by means of ORIGEN-S burn-up code (included in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's SCALE6 package) with specific cross-sections libraries, updating data for each burn-up step. For the transfer/storage cask shielding analysis, two different cases have been considered, the main difference residing in TRIGA fuel elements loading. The radiation dose rates to the transfer/storage cask wall and in air at different distances from the cask have been estimated by means of MAVRIC/Monaco shielding 3D Monte Carlo code included in ORNL's SCALE6 package. (author)

  8. Research Reactor Spent Fuel Transfer/Storage Cask with Application to TRIGA Fuel - Designed Cask Shielding Independent Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Institute for Nuclear Research (INR) Pitesti owns and operates a TRIGA dual-core Research Reactor for material testing, power reactor fuel and nuclear safety studies (dual-core concept involves independent operation of TRIGA 14 MW Steady-State Reactor and TRIGA Annular-Core Pulsing Reactor at each end of a large pool). In May 2006, TRIGA 14 MW SSR core was fully converted to Low Enriched Uranium (LEU 20 wt% 235U) fuel, according to Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors agreements and current worldwide non-proliferation efforts. Paper presents a shielding independent evaluation applied to designed transfer/ storage cask for TRIGA INR spent fuel, a mandatory step in preparation of the documentation required for spent fuel transfer/storage cask authorisation process. Fuel elements irradiation was modelled by assuming constant power for entire residence time inside reactor core, for 14 MW reactor operation power and two different scenarios characteristic for accident calculations according to TRIGA 14 MW SSR safety report and reactor operation experience. The discharged spent LEU fuel was cooled down for 2 and 5 years, respectively. Source term assessment and spent fuel characteristic parameters estimation were done by means of ORIGEN-S burn-up code (included in Oak Ridge National Laboratory's SCALE6 package) with specific cross-sections libraries, updating data for each burn-up step. For the transfer/storage cask shielding analysis, two different cases have been considered, the main difference residing in TRIGA fuel elements loading. The radiation dose rates to the transfer/storage cask wall and in air at different distances from the cask have been estimated by means of MAVRIC/Monaco shielding 3D Monte Carlo code included in ORNL's SCALE6 package. (author)

  9. Emergency reactor core cooling system of BWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling system which can reduce a capacity of a power source required upon occurrence of emergency, extending an start-up time of an emergency reactor core cooling system (ECCA) to provide a plant endurable to a common factor accident and can provide time margin up to the start-up time. Namely, the system of the present invention comprises a division I equipped with an isolation condenser (IC), an after-heat removing system (low pressure system)(LPFL/RHR) and an emergency gas turbine generator (GT), a division II equipped with a diesel driving water injection system (high pressure system)(HDIS), LPFL/RHR, and GT, and a division III equipped with a reactor isolation time cooling system (high pressure system)(ARCIC), LPFL/RHR and GT. With such a constitution, since the IC, HDIS and ARCIC are used in combination as a high pressure system, an electromotive pump required to be operated upon high pressure state can be saved. In addition, if a static reactor cooling system (PCCS) is adopted and is provided with a back-up function for LPFL/RHR with respect to heat removal of the container upon occurrence of an accident, the countermeasure for occurrence of severe accidents can be enhanced. (I.S.)

  10. Condensed phase thermochemistry of reactor core debris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses a nonideal solution model of the metallic phases of reactor core debris. The metal phase model is based on the Kohler equation for a 37 component system. The binary subsystems are assumed to have subregular interactions. The model is parameterized by comparison to available data and by estimating subregular interactions using the methods developed by Miedama et al. The model is shown to predict phase separation in the metallic phase of core debris. The model also predicts reduced chemical activities of zirconium and tellurium in the metal phase. A model of the oxide phase of core debris is described briefly. The model treats the oxide phase as an associated solution. The chemical activities of solution components are determined by the existence and interactions of species formed from the components

  11. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  12. Design Requirements of an Advanced HANARO Reactor Core Cooling System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced HANARO Reactor (AHR) is an open-tank-type and generates thermal power of 20 MW and is under conceptual design phase for developing it. The thermal power is including a core fission heat, a temporary stored fuel heat in the pool, a pump heat and a neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor. In order to remove the heat load, the reactor core cooling system is composed of a primary cooling system, a primary cooling water purification system and a reflector cooling system. The primary cooling system must remove the heat load including the core fission heat, the temporary stored fuel heat in the pool and the pump heat. The purification system must maintain the quality of the primary cooling water. And the reflector cooling system must remove the neutron reflecting heat in the reflector vessel of the reactor and maintain the quality of the reflector. In this study, the design requirement of each system has been carried out using a design methodology of the HANARO within a permissible range of safety. And those requirements are written by english intend to use design data for exporting the research reactor

  13. Research Reactors of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukraine today operates two nuclear research reactors: WWR-M (total capacity of 10 MW), which is located on the site of the Kyiv Nuclear Research Institute of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, and IR-100 (total capacity of 200 kW), which is located on the site of Sevastopol National University of Nuclear Energy and Industry. Both of them have been in operation since the 1960s. The operation project period of WWR-M for which it is licensed is limited to 31 December 2013. In order to improve safety at WWR-M several modernization projects, development of the reactor vessel and the first loop equipment ageing management programme were conducted. According to the license for operation of IR-100 the operation period of the reactor depends upon results from assessments of critical safety elements such as the tank, control and protection system, cable lines and electrical switchgear. Currently the operation period of this equipment has been justified until 2013. (author)

  14. Decommissioning of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors of WWR-S type were built in countries under Soviet influence in '60, last century and consequently reached their service life. Decommissioning implies removal of all radioactive components, processing, conditioning and final disposal in full safety of all sources on site of radiological pollution. The WWR-S reactor at Bucuresti-Magurele was put into function in 1957 and operated until 1997 when it was stopped and put into conservation in view of decommissioning. Presented are three decommissioning variants: 1. Reactor shut-down for a long period (30-50 years) what would entail a substantial decrease of contamination with lower costs in dismantling, mechanical, chemical and physical processing followed by final disposal of the radioactive wastes. The drawback of this solution is the life prolongation of a non-productive nuclear unit requiring funds for personnel, control, maintenance, etc; 2. Decommissioning in a single stage what implies large funds for a immediate investment; 3. Extending the operation on a series of stages rather phased in time to allow a more convenient flow of funds and also to gather technical solutions, better than the present ones. This latter option seems to be optimal for the case of the WWR-S Research at Bucharest-Magurele Reactor. Equipment and technologies should be developed in order to ensure the technical background of the first operations of decommissioning: equipment for scarification, dismantling, dismemberment in a highly radioactive environment; cutting-to-pieces and disassembling technologies; decontamination modern technologies. Concomitantly, nuclear safety and quality assurance regulations and programmes, specific to decommissioning projects should be implemented, as well as a modern, coherent and reliable system of data acquisition, recording and storing. Also the impact of decommissioning must be thoroughly evaluated. The national team of specialists will be assisted by IAEA experts to ensure the

  15. REX 2000 core : a new material testing reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    REX 2000 is a new research reactor project entirely dedicated to technological irradiations, which should be located on the CEA site of CADARACHE. It will be aimed at satisfying the future needs for the validation of new concepts of nuclear materials and fuels, and will take over and replace the present experimental reactors, which are 30 to 40 years old. The fundamental studies started by the CEA in 1993, on future irradiation needs expected in 2005, lead to the design of a reactor which will essentially meet the needs of PWRs, without forgetting the other fields such as FBRs, fusion... The current reactor project is based on a light water open pool concept, with a thermal power of 100 MW, in about 150 l, and characterized by an in-core-central hole. It reaches neutronic flux levels twice those of present French reactor fluxes. It allows many irradiations in the central loop under high fast neutron flux, in order to accelerate the aging of materials and analyze their behaviour. It also enables the achievement of power transient tests under high thermal neutron flux gradients. These performances are obtained with high forced flow rates and upward flow in the core, in order to preserve the operating flexibility of the reactor. This leads to the design of a specific assembly design. (author)

  16. Control Rod Ejection Accident while Using 6- and 8-Tube IRT-4M Fuel Assemblies in WWR-SM Research Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baytelesov, S.; Kungurov, F.; Safarov, A.; Salikhbaev, U.

    2011-07-01

    The WWR-SM reactor at the Institute of Nuclear Physics of the Academy of Sciences (INP AS) in Uzbekistan was converted to 6-tube IRT-4M LEU (19.7%) fuel in 2009. Presently, INP intends to also use IRT-4M 8-tube FA, and a safety analysis for these 'mixed' (8-tube and 6-tube FA) cores is required by the regulatory authorities. This paper presents results of control rod ejection transient analysis for these mixed cores

  17. Applications of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. The purpose of the earlier publication, The Application of Research Reactors, IAEA-TECDOC-1234, was to present descriptions of the typical forms of research reactor use. The necessary criteria to enable an application to be performed were outlined for each one, and, in many cases, the minimum as well as the desirable requirements were given. This revision of the publication over a decade later maintains the original purpose and now specifically takes into account the changes in service requirements demanded by the relevant stakeholders. In particular, the significant improvements in

  18. In-core instrument for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This invention concerns, in particular, an improvement for in-core equipments in a nuclear reactor having sliding members. Deposition layers of particles of metal carbides and metal nitrides are formed at the sliding surface of members in the in-core eqiupments. The matrix materials constituting the members are melted under irradiation of laser beams to form a welded layer integrated with the deposition layer. In this way, since the thickness of the welded layer is remarkably thin as compared with of the substrate material, when the irradiation of the laser beams is interrupted, corrosion resistance in water at high temperature can be improved remarkably since the melted portion is quenched and no chromium carbide is deposited at the crystal boudary. Accordingly, due to excellent corrosion resistance and abrasion resistance of the welded layer relative to the in-core equipments in the reactor having sliding surfaces, sliding incapability does not occur between each of the members under crevice conditions. Accordingly, no withdrawal incapability for equipments, for example, neutron monitors should occur upon periodical inspection. (I.S.)

  19. Benchmark Evaluation of the NRAD Reactor LEU Core Startup Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. D. Bess; T. L. Maddock; M. A. Marshall

    2011-09-01

    The Neutron Radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250-kW TRIGA-(Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics)-conversion-type reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory; it is primarily used for neutron radiography analysis of irradiated and unirradiated fuels and materials. The NRAD reactor was converted from HEU to LEU fuel with 60 fuel elements and brought critical on March 31, 2010. This configuration of the NRAD reactor has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment and is available in the 2011 editions of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP Handbook) and the International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments (IRPhEP Handbook). Significant effort went into precisely characterizing all aspects of the reactor core dimensions and material properties; detailed analyses of reactor parameters minimized experimental uncertainties. The largest contributors to the total benchmark uncertainty were the 234U, 236U, Er, and Hf content in the fuel; the manganese content in the stainless steel cladding; and the unknown level of water saturation in the graphite reflector blocks. A simplified benchmark model of the NRAD reactor was prepared with a keff of 1.0012 {+-} 0.0029 (1s). Monte Carlo calculations with MCNP5 and KENO-VI and various neutron cross section libraries were performed and compared with the benchmark eigenvalue for the 60-fuel-element core configuration; all calculated eigenvalues are between 0.3 and 0.8% greater than the benchmark value. Benchmark evaluations of the NRAD reactor are beneficial in understanding biases and uncertainties affecting criticality safety analyses of storage, handling, or transportation applications with LEU-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  20. Thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A loss of coolant accident (LOCA) can cause total or partial core uncovery which is followed by substantial fuel element temperature increase due to fuel residual heat. It is essential to demonstrate that such a temperature increase does not lead to excessive core melting and to significant radioactive material release into the reactor building and consequently to the environment. The THEAP computer codes able to perform reliable analysis of such accidents have been developed. THEAP-I is a computer code developed with the aim to contribute to the safety analysis of the MTR open pool research reactors. THEAP-I is designed for three dimensional, transient thermal/hydraulic analysis of a thermally interacting channel bundle totally immersed into water or air, such as the reactor core. The mathematical and physical models and methods of the solution are given as well as the code description and the input data. A sample problem is included, referring to the Greek Research Reactor analysis, under a hypothetical severe loss of coolant accident. The micro computer version of the code is also described. More emphasis is given in the new features of the code (i.e. input data structure). A set of instructions for running in an IBM-AT2 computer with the microsoft FORTRAN V4.0 is included together with a sample problem referring to the Greek Research Reactor. THEAP-I can be used also for other MTR open pool research reactors. Refs and figs

  1. Fuel behavior comparison for a research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negut, Gh.; Mladin, M.; Prisecaru, I.; Danila, N.

    2006-06-01

    The paper presents the behavior and properties analysis of the low enriched uranium fuel, which will be loaded in the Romanian TRIGA 14 MW steady state research reactor compared with the original high enriched uranium fuel. The high and low enriched uranium fuels have similar thermal properties, but different nuclear properties. The research reactor core was modeled with both fuel materials and the reactor behavior was studied during a reactivity insertion accident. The thermal hydraulic analysis results are compared with that obtained from the safety analysis report for high enriched uranium fuel core. The low enriched uranium fuel shows a good behavior during reactivity insertion accident and a revised safety analysis report will be made for the low enriched uranium fuel core.

  2. Fuel behavior comparison for a research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negut, Gh. [Institute for Nuclear Research (ICN), 1, Campului Street, P.O. Box 78, 0300 Mioveni, Pitesti (Romania)]. E-mail: joenegut@yahoo.com; Mladin, M. [Institute for Nuclear Research (ICN), 1, Campului Street, P.O. Box 78, 0300 Mioveni, Pitesti (Romania); Prisecaru, I. [University Politehnica Bucharest (Romania); Danila, N. [University Politehnica Bucharest (Romania)

    2006-06-30

    The paper presents the behavior and properties analysis of the low enriched uranium fuel, which will be loaded in the Romanian TRIGA 14 MW steady state research reactor compared with the original high enriched uranium fuel. The high and low enriched uranium fuels have similar thermal properties, but different nuclear properties. The research reactor core was modeled with both fuel materials and the reactor behavior was studied during a reactivity insertion accident. The thermal hydraulic analysis results are compared with that obtained from the safety analysis report for high enriched uranium fuel core. The low enriched uranium fuel shows a good behavior during reactivity insertion accident and a revised safety analysis report will be made for the low enriched uranium fuel core.

  3. Core concepts for 'zero-sodium-void-worth core' in metal fuelled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core design options to reduce the sodium void worth in metal fuelled LMRs are investigated. Two core designs which achieve a zero sodium void worth are analyzed in detail. The first design is a 'pancaked' and annular core with enhanced transuranic burning capabilities; the high leakage in this design yields a low breeding ratio and small void worth. The second design is an axially multilayered annular core which is fissile self-sufficient; in this design, the upper and lower core regions are neutronically decoupled for reduced void worth while fissile self-sufficiency is achieved using internal axial blankets plus external radial and axial blanket-zones. The neutronic performance characteristics of these low void worth designs are assessed here; their passive safety properties are discussed in a companion paper. (author)

  4. Behavior of an heterogeneous annular FBR core during an unprotected loss of flow accident: Analysis of the primary phase with SAS-SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of a substantial improvement on FBR core safety connected to the development of a new Gen IV reactor type, heterogeneous core with innovative features are being carefully analyzed in France since 2009. At EDF R and D, the main goal is to understand whether a strong reduction of the Na-void worth - possibly attempting a negative value - allows a significant improvement of the core behavior during an unprotected loss of flow accident. Also, the physical behavior of such a core is of interest, before and beyond the (possible) onset of Na boiling. Hence, a cutting-edge heterogeneous design, featuring an annular shape, a Na-plena with a B4C plate and a stepwise modulation of fissile core heights, was developed at EDF by means of the SDDS methodology, with a total Na-void worth of -1 $. The behavior of such a core during the primary phase of a severe accident, initiated by an unprotected loss of flow, is analyzed by means of the SAS-SFR code. This study is carried-out at KIT and EDF, in the framework of a scientific collaboration on innovative FBR severe accident analyses. The results show that the reduction of the Na-void worth is very effective, but is not sufficient alone to avoid Na-boiling and, hence, to prevent the core from entering into the primary phase of a severe accident. Nevertheless, the grace time up to boiling onset is greatly enhanced in comparison to a more traditional homogeneous core design, and only an extremely low fraction of the fuel (<0.1%) enters into melting at the end of this phase. A sensitivity analysis shows that, due to the inherent neutronic characteristics of such a core, the gagging scheme plays a major role on the core behavior: indeed, an improved 4-zones gagging scheme, associated with an enhanced control rod drive line expansion feed-back effect, finally prevents the core from entering into sodium boiling. This major conclusion highlights both the progress already accomplished and the need for more detailed future

  5. Investigative studies on the effects of cadmium rabbits on high enriched uranium-fueled and low enriched uranium-fueled cores of Ghana Research Reactor-1 using MCNP5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The operating parameters for both the HEU core and proposed LEU core were similar. • The length of the Cd in the capsules must be increased for its use in the LEU core. • Cd rabbits can emergently be used to shut down MNSRs. - Abstract: Miniature Neutron Source Reactors (MNSRs) are noted to be among highly safe research reactors. However, because of its use of one control rod for reactivity control and shutdown purposes, alternative methods of shutting it down are important. The Ghana MNSR uses four cadmium rabbits of approximate dimensions 6.5 cm × 5.0 cm × 0.1 cm and mass of 9.48 g each to emergently shut down the reactor. The Monte Carlo N-Particle code; version 5, (MCNP5) was used to design the high enriched uranium (HEU) and low enriched uranium (LEU) cores of the MNSR with four cadmium rabbits inserted in four inner irradiation sites of each core. The operating parameters and shutdown parameters for both cores with the central control rod (CCR) either fully withdrawn or fully inserted had similar results with the HEU core having slightly better results in terms of safety. However, the results show that the four inserted cadmium rabbits make the HEU core subcritical whiles in the LEU core, it still remains critical (keff = 1.00005 ± 0.00007). The length of the cadmium material in each cadmium rabbit must therefore be increased by at least 0.5 cm in order to attain subcriticality (keff = 0.99989 ± 0.00006) and shutdown margin of 0.11 mk when inserted in the LEU core

  6. Computer based core monitoring system for an operating CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research was performed to develop a CANDU-6 Core Monitoring System(CCMS) that enables operators to have efficient core management by monitoring core power distribution, burnup distribution, and the other important core variables and managing the past core history for Wolsong nuclear power plant unit 1. The CCMS uses Reactor Fueling Simulation Program(RFSP, developed by AECL) for continuous core calculation by integrating the algorithm and assumptions validated and uses the information taken from Digital Control Computer(DCC) for the purpose of producing basic input data. The CCMS has two modules; CCMS server program and CCMS client program. The CCMS server program performs automatic and continuous core calculation and manages overall output controlled by DataBase Management System. The CCMS client program enables users to monitor current and past core status in the predefined GUI(Graphic-User Interface) environment. For the purpose of verifying the effectiveness of CCMS, we compared field-test data with the data used for Wolsong unit 1 operation. In the verification the mean percent differences of both cases were the same(0.008%), which showed that the CCMS could monitor core behaviors well

  7. The first university research reactor in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the first university research reactor in India, the low power, pool type with fixed core and low enriched uranium fuel research reactor is under construction in the Andhra university campus, Andhra Pradesh, India. The reactor is expected to be commissioned during 2001-2002. The mission of the reactor is to play the research center as a regional research facility catering to the needs of academic institutions and industrial organizations of this region of the country. Further, to encourage interdisplinary and multidisplinary research activities, to supply radioisotope and labelled compounds to the user institutions and to create awareness towards the peaceful uses of atomic energy. This report describes its objectives, status and future plans in brief. (H. Itami)

  8. Turkey's regulatory plans for high enriched to low enriched conversion of TR-2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turkey is a developing country and has three nuclear facilities two of which are research reactors and one pilot fuel production plant. One of the two research reactors is TR-2 which is located in Cekmece site in Istanbul. TR-2 Reactor's core is composed of both high enriched and low enriched fuel and from high enriched to low enriched core conversion project will take place in year 2005. This paper presents the plans for drafting regulations on the safety analysis report updates for high enriched to low enriched core conversion of TR-2 reactor, the present regulatory structure of Turkey and licensing activities of nuclear facilities. (author)

  9. Sensors for use in nuclear reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron sensor is described for use in nuclear reactor cores which does not require external power but merely an emitter, a collector and an insulator material between the two to generate an electric current that is indicative of the intensity of the radiation. The sensor is manufactured in such a way that brazed joints or spices are avoided and the insulation material used may be of relatively low density of compaction and will center the emitter and the lead wire with respect to the outer sheath or tube without deformation or varying geometry of the center wire or emitter. (UK)

  10. Core surveillance of boiling-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods suitable for a calculational procedure which determines the three-dimensional power distribution in boilingwater reactors on the basis of in-core detector readings are described. A two- dimensional equation based on diffusion theory is set up, and a method for incorporating detector readings in the solution of this equation is presented. A three-dimensional calculational method based on nodal theory is developed. Calculations are carried out using this method, and the results are compared with a three-dimensional nodal theory calculation . Finally, parameters affecting the detector readings are examined. (author)

  11. Computation system for nuclear reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents a system which contains computer codes as modules developed to evaluate nuclear reactor core performance. The diffusion theory approximation to neutron transport may be applied with the VENTURE code treating up to three dimensions. The effect of exposure may be determined with the BURNER code, allowing depletion calculations to be made. The features and requirements of the system are discussed and aspects common to the computational modules, but the latter are documented elsewhere. User input data requirements, data file management, control, and the modules which perform general functions are described. Continuing development and implementation effort is enhancing the analysis capability available locally and to other installations from remote terminals

  12. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  13. MINT research reactor safety program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad Idris bin Taib [Division of Special Project, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi (Malaysia)

    2000-11-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) Research Reactor Safety Program has been done along with Reactor Power Upgrading Project, Reactor Safety Upgrading Project and Development of Expert System for On-Line Nuclear Process Control Project. From 1993 up to date, Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulics analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment as well as installation of New 2 MW Secondary Cooling System were done. Installations of New Reactor Building Ventilation System, Reactor Monitoring System, Updating of Safety Analysis Report and Upgrading Primary Cooling System are in progress. For future activities, Reactor Modeling will be included to add present activities. (author)

  14. Analytical study on flux distribution in 5 MW HEU [high enriched uranium] and LEU [low enriched uranium] TRR [Teheran Research Reactor] core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In HEU to LEU fuel conversion LEU core suffers unformidable changes in core arrangement and fuel element design structure. These lead to some redesign calculations as regard to heat removal and control potentiality. In this paper, some results related to flux distribution are given. Two core configurations with 18 (flat) plates/FE and two types of control elements, oval (8 pl/FE) and Fork-type (12 pl/FE) fork-type were considered. In oval type control element thermal flux depression in LEU fuel as compared to HEU fuel is about 30%. In case of LEU fuel flux distributions are mainly cosine and general power distribution follows more or less the flux shape. Two shuffling patterns were studied and indicate some slight changes in flux level. Our calculations showed that based on reactor operational requirements to an optimum fuel loading and fuel element design characteristics can be reached. (Author)

  15. Higher power density TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The uranium zirconium hydride (U-ZrH) fuel is the fundamental feature of the TRIGA family of reactors that accounts for its widely recognized safety, good performance, economy of operation, and its acceptance worldwide. Of the 65 TRIGA reactors or TRIGA fueled reactors, several are located in hospitals or hospital complexes and in buildings that house university classrooms. These examples are a tribute to the high degree of safety of the operating TRIGA reactor. In the early days, the majority of the TRIGA reactors had power levels in the range from 10 to 250 kW, many with pulsing capability. An additional number had power levels up to 1 MW. By the late 1970's, seven TRIGA reactors with power levels up to 2 MW had been installed. A reduction in the rate of worldwide construction of new research reactors set in during the mid 1970's but construction of occasional research reactors has continued until the present. Performance of higher power TRIGA reactors are presented as well as the operation of higher power density reactor cores. The extremely safe TRIGA fuel, including the more recent TRIGA LEU fuel, offers a wide range of possible reactor configurations. A long core life is assured through the use of a burnable poison in the TRIGA LEU fuel. In those instances where large neutron fluxes are desired but relatively low power levels are also desired, the 19-rod hexagonal array of small diameter fuel rods offers exciting possibilities. The small diameter fuel rods have provided extremely long and trouble-free operation in the Romanian 14 MW TRIGA reactor

  16. Reliability studies in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fault trees and event trees are widely used in industry to model and to evaluate the reliability of safety systems. Detailed analyzes in nuclear installations require the combination of these two techniques. This study uses the methods of FT (Fault Tree) and ET (Event Tree) to accomplish the PSA (Probabilistic Safety Assessment) in research reactors. According to IAEA (lnternational Atomic Energy Agency), the PSA is divided into Level 1, Level 2 and Level 3. At the Level 1, conceptually, the security systems perform to prevent the occurrence of accidents, At the Level 2, once accidents happened, this Level seeks to minimize consequences, known as stage management of accident, and at Level 3 accident impacts are determined. This study focuses on analyzing the Level 1, and searching through the acquisition of knowledge, the consolidation of methodologies for future reliability studies. The Greek Research Reactor, GRR-1, is a case example. The LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident) was chosen as the initiating event and from it, using ET, possible accidental sequences were developed, which could lead damage to the core. Moreover, for each of affected systems, probabilities of each event top of FT were developed and evaluated in possible accidental sequences. Also, the estimates of importance measures for basic events are presented in this work. The studies of this research were conducted using a commercial computational tool SAPHIRE. Additionally, achieved results thus were considered satisfactory for the performance or the failure of analyzed systems. (author)

  17. Experimental research on dryout point of flow boiling in narrow annular channels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    An experimental research on the dryout point of flow boiling in narrow annular channels under low mass flux with 1.55 mm and 1.05 mm annular gap, respectively, is conducted. Distilled water is used as working fluid and the range of pressure is limited within 2.0~4.0 MPa and that of mass flux is 26.0~69.0 kg·m-2·s-1. The relation of critical heat flux (CHF) and critical qualities with mass flux and pressure are revealed. It is found that the critical qualities decrease with the increasing mass flux and increase with the increasing inlet qualities in externally heated annuli.Under the same conditions, critical qualities in the outer tube are always larger than those in the inner tube. The appearance of dryout point in bilaterally heated narrow annuli can be judged according to the ratio of qo/qi.

  18. Laser anemometer measurements in an annular cascade of core turbine vanes and comparison with theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, L. J.; Seashultz, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    Laser measurements were made in an annular cascade of stator vanes operating at an exit critical velocity ratio of 0.78. Velocity and flow angles in the blade to blade plane were obtained at every 10 percent of axial chord within the passage and at 1/2 axial chord downstream of the vanes for radial positions near the hub, mean and tip. Results are presented in both plot and tabulated form and are compared with calculations from an inviscid, quasi three dimensional computer program. The experimental measurements generally agreed well with these theoretical calculations, an indication of the usefulness of this analytic approach.

  19. Monte Carlo analysis of Musashi TRIGA mark II reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Tetsuo [Atomic Energy Research Laboratory, Musashi Institute of Technology, Kawasaki, Kanagawa (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    The analysis of the TRIGA-II core at the Musashi Institute of Technology Research Reactor (Musashi reactor, 100 kW) was performed by the three-dimensional continuous-energy Monte Carlo code (MCNP4A). Effective multiplication factors (k{sub eff}) for the several fuel-loading patterns including the initial core criticality experiment, the fuel element and control rod reactivity worth as well as the neutron flux measurements were used in the validation process of the physical model and neutron cross section data from the ENDF/B-V evaluation. The calculated k{sub eff} overestimated the experimental data by about 1.0%{delta}k/k for both the initial core and the several fuel-loading arrangements. The calculated reactivity worths of control rod and fuel element agree well the measured ones within the uncertainties. The comparison of neutron flux distribution was consistent with the experimental ones which were measured by activation methods at the sample irradiation tubes. All in all, the agreement between the MCNP predictions and the experimentally determined values is good, which indicated that the Monte Carlo model is enough to simulate the Musashi TRIGA-II reactor core. (author)

  20. Using deterministic methods for research reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an alternative to prohibitive Monte Carlo simulations, deterministic methods can be used to simulate research reactors. Using various microscopic cross section libraries currently available in Canada, flux distributions were obtained from DRAGON cell and supercell transport calculations. Then, homogenization/condensation is done to produce few-group nuclear properties, and diffusion calculations were performed using DONJON core models. In this paper, the multigroup modular environment of the code DONJON is presented, and the various steps required in the modelling of SLOWPOKE hexagonal cores are described. Numerical simulations are also compared with experimental data available for the EPM Slowpoke reactor. (author)

  1. Research nuclear reactor operation management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    arising in nuclear field and especially in works implying research reactors result first from the synthesis of the problems which sometimes are conventionally treated depending on the experience of the decision staff. Abnormal or un-specific problems from the technical point of view but always with economic consequences, as risk doses may occur. A series of such aspects and corresponding measures are discussed for the different situations as follows: a. Startup, operation, and shutdown of the reactor and, where appropriate, experimental devices; b. Loading, unloading, and movement within the reactor of fuel and other core and reflector components, including experimental devices; c. Routine maintenance of major components or systems that could have an effect on reactor safety; d. Inspections and tests of structures, systems and components that may have an effect on reactor safety, including those specified in the approved programme of periodic testing and inspection; e. Personnel radiation protection consistent with applicable regulations; f. Authorization of operation and maintenance and the conduct of irradiations and experiments that could affect reactor safety or radioactivity; g. Operator response to appropriate anticipated operational occurrences and, to the extent feasible, accident conditions; h. Emergency actions; i. Safety issues. Finally the handling of radioactive wastes and control monitoring of radioactive release are discussed

  2. The effects of annular flow on dynamics of AP1000 reactor coolant pump rotor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feature of AP1000 RCP rotor system is that the whole rotor system is immersed in the annular flow. The rotor in annular flow induces fluctuating fluid forces, thereby causes vibration and noise, even rotor instability. The effects of annular flow on AP1000 RCP rotor system are different from that in bearings and seals and should be considered in a new approach. Based on the turbulent bulk flow theory and perturbation analysis, the rotor-flow coupled linear dynamic model is developed to predict the dynamics of AP1000 RCP immersed rotor. During the analysis, the rotor eccentricity, stator and rotor wall friction effects are emphasized. The analytic results show the rotor eccentricity induces divergence instability and significant decrease of instability speed for system with moderate or large eccentricity; however, stator and rotor wall friction effects distinctly suppress divergence instability and increase instability speed for system with small or moderate eccentricity. Finally, we can have the conclusion that the flow-structure interaction induced by annular flow has great effects on the dynamics of AP1000 RCP immersed rotor, which should be considered in rotor dynamic analysis and design of AP1000 RCP. The method and results in the paper have theoretical significance and practical importance. (author)

  3. Nonlinear stability of oscillatory core-annular flow: A generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with time periodic coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Smyrlis, Yiorgos S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the nonlinear stability of two-phase core-annular flow in a pipe is examined when the acting pressure gradient is modulated by time harmonic oscillations and viscosity stratification and interfacial tension is present. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is used as the background state to develop an asymptotic theory valid for thin annular layers, which leads to a novel nonlinear evolution describing the spatio-temporal evolution of the interface. The evolution equation is an extension of the equation found for constant pressure gradients and generalizes the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects found by Papageorgiou, Maldarelli & Rumschitzki, Phys. Fluids A 2(3), 1990, pp. 340-352, to a similar system with time periodic coefficients. The distinct regimes of slow and moderate flow are considered and the corresponding evolution is derived. Certain solutions are described analytically in the neighborhood of the first bifurcation point by use of multiple scales asymptotics. Extensive numerical experiments, using dynamical systems ideas, are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the oscillatory pressure gradient on the solutions in the presence of a constant pressure gradient.

  4. Cyclic gaseous core reactors for space nuclear power applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive theoretical-experimental investigations have been performed at the University of Florida on cyclic gaseous core reactors. Neutronics-energetics analyses have led to a basic scientific understanding of the behavior associated with conceptual operation of these devices. Thermal-physical properties studies have resulted in the identification of desirable working fluids and UF6-materials interaction studies have identified a number of potential problems as well as corresponding potential solutions. The results of these research efforts indicate that the cyclic gaseous core reactor is a versatile and promising nuclear energy concept that has attractive features for space power generation. These include low critical mass, high fuel utilization, high output temperature and good thermal efficiency, wide operating ranges, excellent control and safety characteristics, and adaptability to a wide variety of different energy conversion systems

  5. Stability of core-annular flow of power-law fluids in the presence of interfacial surfactant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The shear-thinning influence on the core-annular flow stability of two immiscible power-law fluids is considered by making a linear stability analysis.The flow is driven by an axial pressure gradient in a straight pipe with the interface between the two fluids occupied by an insoluble surfactant.Given the basic flow for this core-annular arrangement,the analytical solution is obtained with respect to the power-law fluid model.The linearized equations for the evolution of infinitesimal disturbances are derived and the stability problem is formulated as a generalized matrix eigenvalue problem,which is solved by using the software package Matlab based on the QZ algorithm.The shear-thinning property is found to have marked influence on the power-law fluid core-annular flow stability,which is reflected in various aspects.First,the capillary instability is magnified by the shear-thinning property,which may lead to an essential difference between power-law and Newtonian fluid flows.Especially when the interface is close to the pipe wall,the power-law fluid flow may be unstable while the Newtonian fluid flow is stable.Second,under disturbances to the interface a velocity discontinuity at the interface appears which is destabilizing to the flow.The magnitude of this velocity discontinuity is affected by the power-law index and the flow stability is influenced correspondingly.Besides,the shear-thinning property may induce new stability modes which do not appear in the Newtonian fluid flow.The flow stability shows much dependence on the interface location,the role of which was neglected in most previous studies.The shear-thinning fluid flow is more unstable to long wave disturbances when the interface is close to the pipe wall,while the Newtonian fluid flow is more unstable when the interface is close to the pipe centerline.But this trend is changed by the addition of interfacial surfactant,for which the power-law fluid flow is more stable no matter where the interface is

  6. Effective utilization and management of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problem of utilizing a research reactor effectively is closely related to its management and therefore should not be considered separately. Too often, attention has been focused on specific techniques and methods rather than on the overall programme of utilization, with the result that skills and equipment have been acquired without any active continuing programme of applications and services. The seminar reported here provided a forum for reactor managers, users, and operators to discuss their experience. At the invitation of the Government of Malaysia, it was held at the Asia Pacific Development Centre, Kuala Lumpur, from 7 to 11 November 1983. It was attended by about 50 participants from 19 Member States; it is hoped that a report on the seminar, including papers presented, can be published and thus reach a wider audience. Thirty-one lectures and contributions were presented at a total of seven sessions: Research reactor management; Radiation exposure and safety; Research reactor utilization (two sessions); PUSPATI Research Reactor Project Development; Core conversion to low-enriched uranium, and safeguards; Research reactor technology. In addition, a panel discussed the causes and resolutions of the under-utilization of research reactors

  7. Nuclear research reactors in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cota, Anna Paula Leite; Mesquita, Amir Zacarias, E-mail: aplc@cdtn.b, E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The rising concerns about global warming and energy security have spurred a revival of interest in nuclear energy, giving birth to a 'nuclear power renaissance' in several countries in the world. Particularly in Brazil, in the recent years, the nuclear power renaissance can be seen in the actions that comprise its nuclear program, summarily the increase of the investments in nuclear research institutes and the government target to design and build the Brazilian Multipurpose research Reactor (BMR). In the last 50 years, Brazilian research reactors have been used for training, for producing radioisotopes to meet demands in industry and nuclear medicine, for miscellaneous irradiation services and for academic research. Moreover, the research reactors are used as laboratories to develop technologies in power reactors, which are evaluated today at around 450 worldwide. In this application, those reactors become more viable in relation to power reactors by the lowest cost, by the operation at low temperatures and, furthermore, by lower demand for nuclear fuel. In Brazil, four research reactors were installed: the IEA-R1 and the MB-01 reactors, both at the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas Nucleares (IPEN, Sao Paulo); the Argonauta, at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN, Rio de Janeiro) and the IPR-R1 TRIGA reactor, at the Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN, Belo Horizonte). The present paper intends to enumerate the characteristics of these reactors, their utilization and current academic research. Therefore, through this paper, we intend to collaborate on the BMR project. (author)

  8. Physical security at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Of the 84 non-power research facilities licensed under 10 CFR Part 50, 73 are active (two test reactors, 68 research reactors and three critical facilities) and are required by 10 CFR Part 73.40 to provide physical protection against theft of SNM and against industrial sabotage. Each licensee has developed a security plan required by 10 CFR Part 50.34(c) to demonstrate the means of compliance with the applicable requirements of 10 CFR Part 73. In 1974, the Commission provided interim guidance for the organization and content of security plans for (a) test reactors, (b) medium power research and training reactors, and (c) low power research and training reactors. Eleven TRIGA reactors, with power levels greater than 250 kW and all other research and training reactors with power levels greater than 100 kW and less than or equal to 5,000 kW are designated as medium power research and training reactors. Thirteen TRIGA reactors with authorized power levels less than 250 kW are considered to be low power research and training reactors. Additional guidance for complying with the requirements of 73.50 and 73.60, if applicable, is provided in the Commission's Regulatory Guides. The Commission's Office of Inspection and Enforcement inspects each licensed facility to assure that an approved security plan is properly implemented with appropriate procedures and physical protection systems

  9. Fast reactor calculational route for Pu burning core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document provides a description of a calculational route, used in the Reactor Physics Research Section for sensitivity studies and initial design optimization calculations for fast reactor cores. The main purpose in producing this document was to provide a description of and user guides to the calculational methods, in English, as an aid to any future user of the calculational route who is (like the author) handicapped by a lack of literacy in Japanese. The document also provides for all users a compilation of information on the various parts of the calculational route, all in a single reference. In using the calculational route (to model Pu burning reactors) the author identified a number of areas where an improvement in the modelling of the standard calculational route was warranted. The document includes comments on and explanations of the modelling assumptions in the various calculations. Practical information on the use of the calculational route and the computer systems is also given. (J.P.N.)

  10. Interfacial friction in low flowrate vertical annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During boil-off and reflood transients in nuclear reactors, the core liquid inventory and inlet flowrate are largely determined by the interfacial friction in the reactor core. For these transients, annular flow occurs at relatively modest liquid flowrates and at the low heat fluxes typical of decay heat conditions. The resulting low vapor Reynolds numbers, are out of the data range used to develop the generally accepted interfacial friction relations for annular flow. In addition, most existing annular flow data comes from air/liquid adiabatic experiments with fully developed flows. By contrast, in a reactor core, the flow is continuously developing along the heated length as the vapor flowrate increases and the flow regimes evolve from bubbly to annular flow. Indeed, the entire annular flow regime may exist only over tens of L/D's. Despite these limitations, many of the advanced reactor safety analysis codes employ the Wallis model for interfacial friction in annular flow. Our analyses of the conditions existing at the end-of-reflood in the PERICLES tests have indicated that the Wallis model seriously underestimates the interfacial shear for low vapor velocity cocurrent upflow. To extend the annular flow data base to diabatic low flowrate conditions, the DADINE tests were re-analyzed. In these tests, both pressure drop and local cross-section averaged void fractions were measured. Thus, both the wall and interfacial shear can be deduced. Based on the results of this analysis, a new correlation is proposed for interfacial friction in annular flow. (authors). 5 figs., 12 refs

  11. Survey of dust production in pebble bed reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We review potential sources of the graphite dust found in the German pebble bed reactors. → Available literature on graphite wear coefficients in pebble bed core-like conditions is reviewed. → Limited conclusions and remaining open questions are discussed. - Abstract: Graphite dust produced via mechanical wear from the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor is an area of concern for licensing. Both the German pebble bed reactors produced graphite dust that contained activated elements. These activation products constitute an additional source term of radiation and must be taken under consideration during the conduct of accident analysis of the design. This paper discusses the available literature on graphite dust production and measurements in pebble bed reactors. Limited data is available on the graphite dust produced from the AVR and THTR-300 pebble bed reactors. Experiments that have been performed on wear of graphite in pebble-bed-like conditions are reviewed. The calculation of contact forces, which are a key driving mechanism for dust in the reactor, are also included. In addition, prior graphite dust predictions are examined, and future areas of research are identified.

  12. Management of research reactor ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As of December 1993, about one quarter of the operating research reactors were over 30 years old. The long life of research reactors has raised some concern amongst research reactor operators, regulators and, to some extent, the general public. The International Atomic Energy Agency commenced activities on the topic of research reactor ageing by appointing an internal working group in 1988 and convening a Consultants Meeting in 1989. The subject was also discussed at an international symposium and a regional seminar held in 1989 and 1992 respectively. A draft document incorporating information and experience exchanged at the above meetings was reviewed by a Technical Committee Meeting held in Vienna in 1992. The present TECDOC is the outcome of this meeting and contains recommendations, guidelines and information on the management of research reactor ageing, which should be used in conjunction with related publications of the IAEA Research Reactor Safety Programme, which are referenced throughout the text. This TECDOC will be of interest to operators and regulators involved with the safe operation of any type of research reactor to (a) understand the behaviour and influence of ageing mechanisms on the reactor structures, systems and components; (b) detect and assess the effect of ageing; (c) establish preventive and corrective measures to mitigate these effects; and (d) make decisions aimed at the safe and continued operation of a research reactor. 32 refs, tabs

  13. Research reactors and alternative devices for research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes papers on research reactors and alternatives to the research reactors - radioisotopic neutron sources, cyclotrons, D-T neutron generators and small accelerators, used for radioisotope production, neutron activation analysis, material science, applied and basic research using neutron beams. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the 7 papers

  14. SIMULATE-3 core model for nuclear reactor training simulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the adaptation of the Studsvik nuclear reactor analysis code, SIMULATE-3, to nuclear reactor training simulation. This adaption to real-time applications permits training simulation to be performed using the same 'engineering grade' core model used for core design, loading optimisation, safety analysis, and plant technical support. Use of SIMULATE-3R in training simulation permits simple initialisation of simulator core-models (without need for tuning) and facilitates application of cycle-specific core models. SIMULATE-3R permits training simulation of reactor cores with the accuracy normally associated with engineering analysis and enhances the simulator's 'plant analyser' functions. (author)

  15. A New Generation of Research Reactors Fuelled with LEU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of countries have recently shown interest in new research reactors. In response to such willingness to develop nuclear technologies, we have prepared technical proposals on typical research reactors (RR) which will be built as part of nuclear research centres (NRC) according to base design principles. The requirements for such research reactors are defined to represent their competitive service parameters, including capabilities to support a wide spectrum of studies in various areas of theoretical and applied researches. Analysis of the current and projected uses of research reactors and assessment of the external market demands have prompted two design options of a pool-type reactor at a nuclear research centre, namely, a small (up to 0.5 MW) reactor with natural coolant circulation through its core and a reactor with forced coolant circulation scaled up to 10-15 MW. The research reactors under development will run with commercially available and well-proven fuel of low enrichment. (author)

  16. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosteller, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input.

  17. Development of an automated core model for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The objective of this project was to develop an automated package of computer codes that can model the steady-state behavior of nuclear-reactor cores of various designs. As an added benefit, data produced for steady-state analysis also can be used as input to the TRAC transient-analysis code for subsequent safety analysis of the reactor at any point in its operating lifetime. The basic capability to perform steady-state reactor-core analysis already existed in the combination of the HELIOS lattice-physics code and the NESTLE advanced nodal code. In this project, the automated package was completed by (1) obtaining cross-section libraries for HELIOS, (2) validating HELIOS by comparing its predictions to results from critical experiments and from the MCNP Monte Carlo code, (3) validating NESTLE by comparing its predictions to results from numerical benchmarks and to measured data from operating reactors, and (4) developing a linkage code to transform HELIOS output into NESTLE input

  18. Neutron measurements at the TRIGA reactor Ljubljana for core inventory verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safeguards inspections are periodically made in nuclear facilities as a consequence to the Nonproliferation Treaty. The inspection methods are permanently being improved and should not cause serious interference with the reactor operation. Therefore, Core Inventory Verifier (CIVR) is being developed as an indirect quantitative method for verification of the core inventory and detection of the declared operation of research reactors. The CIVR method measures the kinetic behavior of the reactor as well as the neutron flux and its energy distribution at several points inside or outside the core. Measured data taken during inspection is compared with the set of reference data determined previously. The inspection result ''nothing has changed'' indicates that all declared nuclear material really exists in the core. TRIGA reactors are one of the target groups for the CIVR method. The TRIGA reactor Ljubljana was chosen as a reference facility. First results of test series at the TRIGA reactor Ljubljana will be presented in this paper.(author)

  19. Fusion reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work covers four separate areas: (1) development of technology for processing liquid lithium from blankets, (2) investigation of hydrogen isotope permeation in candidate structural metals and alloys for near-term fusion reactors, (3) analytical studies encompassing fusion reactor thermal hydraulics, tritium facility design, and fusion reactor safety, and (4) studies involving dosimetry and damage analysis. Recent accomplishments in each of these areas are summarized

  20. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1978 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  1. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, steam generator research and development, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1979 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  2. Optimum burnup of BAEC TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Optimum loading scheme for BAEC TRIGA core is out-to-in loading with 10 fuels/cycle starting with 5 for the first reload. ► The discharge burnup ranges from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element for full power (3 MW) operation. ► Optimum extension of operating core life is 100 MWD per reload cycle. - Abstract: The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of BAEC (Bangladesh Atomic Energy Commission) has been operating since 1986 without any reshuffling or reloading yet. Optimum fuel burnup strategy has been investigated for the present BAEC TRIGA core, where three out-to-in loading schemes have been inspected in terms of core life extension, burnup economy and safety. In considering different schemes of fuel loading, optimization has been searched by only varying the number of fuels discharged and loaded. A cost function has been defined and evaluated based on the calculated core life and fuel load and discharge. The optimum loading scheme has been identified for the TRIGA core, the outside-to-inside fuel loading with ten fuels for each cycle starting with five fuels for the first reload. The discharge burnup has been found ranging from 17% to 24% of U235 per fuel element and optimum extension of core operating life is 100 MWD for each loading cycle. This study will contribute to the in-core fuel management of TRIGA reactor

  3. Loss of Coolant Accident Analysis for Israel Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main objectives of reactor safety systems is to keep the reactor core in condition that does not permit any release of radioactivity into the environment. In order to ensure this, the reactor must have sufficient safety margins during all possible operational and accident conditions. This paper focuses on the analysis of loss of coolant accident (LOCA), which is one of the most severe scenarios among other hypothetical events such as reactivity induced accidents, loss of flow accident, etc. The analysis was carried out for the Israel Research Reactor 1 (IRR-1), which is a 5MW swimming pool type research reactor. The IRR-1 core consists of MTR highlyenriched uranium (HEU) fuel type, and is reflected by Graphite elements. During normal operation, the reactor core is cooled by downward forced flow of light water circulated by a primary cooling circuit pump. But during shutdown stage, the reactor core is cooled by upward natural convection flow through a safety flapper valve. There could be several primary causes to initiate a LOCA in research reactors, such as breaks in the piping system, ruptures of the beam tubes, and concrete wall failures of the reactor pool. Although probability of large break accident in research reactors is very low, once the accident occurs, it may cause major core damages, so it must be considered

  4. TRIGA research reactors with higher power density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent trend in new or upgraded research reactors is to higher power densities (hence higher neutron flux levels) but not necessarily to higher power levels. The TRIGA LEU fuel with burnable poison is available in small diameter fuel rods capable of high power per rod (∼48 kW/rod) with acceptable peak fuel temperatures. The performance of a 10-MW research reactor with a compact core of hexagonal TRIGA fuel clusters has been calculated in detail. With its light water coolant, beryllium and D2O reflector regions, this reactor can provide in-core experiments with thermal fluxes in excess of 3 x 1014 n/cm2·s and fast fluxes (> 0.1 MeV) of 2 x 1014 n/cm2·s. The core centerline thermal neutron flux in the D2O reflector is about 2 x 1014 n/cm2·s and the average core power density is about 230 kW/liter. Using other TRIGA fuel developed for 25-MW test reactors but arranged in hexagonal arrays, power densities in excess of 300 kW/liter are readily available. A core with TRIGA fuel operating at 15-MW and generating such a power density is capable of producing thermal neutron fluxes in a D2O reflector of 3 x 1014 n/cm2·s. A beryllium-filled central region of the core can further enhance the core leakage and hence the neutron flux in the reflector. (author)

  5. Design of radiation shields in nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article consists of designing radiation shields in the core of nuclear reactors to control and restrain the harmful nuclear radiations in the nuclear reactor cores. The radiation shields protect the loss of energy. caused by nuclear radiation in a nuclear reactor core and consequently, they cause to increase the efficiency of the reactor and decrease the risk of being under harmful radiations for the staff. In order to design these shields, by making advantages of the Oppenheim Electrical Networkmethod, the structure of the shields are physically simulated and by obtaining a special algorithm, the amount of optimized energy caused by nuclear radiations, is calculated

  6. Status report of Indonesian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description of the three Indonesia research reactors, their irradiation facilities and future prospect are given. The 250 kW Triga Mark II in Bandung has been in operation since 1965 and in 1972 its designed power was increased to 1000 kW. The core grid from the previous 250 kW Triga Mark II was then used by Batan for designing and constructing the Kartini reactor in Yogyakarta. This reactor commenced its operation in 1979. Both Triga reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilization such as for manpower training in nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, isotope production, and beam research in solid state physics. The Triga reactor management in Bandung has a strong cooperation with the Bandung Institute of Technology and the one in Yogyakarta with the Gadjah Mada University which has a Nuclear Engineering Department at its Faculty of Engineering. In 1976 there emerged an idea to have a high flux reactor appropriate for Indonesia's intention to prepare an infrastructure for both nuclear energy and non-energy industry era. Such an idea was then realized with the achievement of the first criticality of the RSG-GAS reactor at the Serpong area. It is now expected that by early 1992 the reactor will reach its full 30 MW power level and by the end of 1992 the irradiation facilities be utilizable fully for future scientific and engineering work. As a part of the national LEU fuel development program a study has been underway since early 1989 to convert the RSG-GAS reactor core from using oxide fuel to using higher loading silicide fuel. (author)

  7. Pakistan research reactor-1 and its upgradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this article the author describes the procedure of renovation and upgradation of a swimming pool type Pakistan Research Reactor-1 (PARR-1) installed at PINSTECH. The reactor originally designed for a thermal power of 5 MW using highly enriched uranium as has been upgraded 10 MW with low enriched uranium as fuel. All the required safety precaution has been also modified with the new requirements. The cooling system of PARR-1 was modified to meet the requirements of upgraded power of 10 MW. In order to ensure safety for upgraded PARR-1 and to bring the reactor the current safety standards, some additional safety systems have been provided. An emergency core cooling system ECCS has been installed to remove core decay heat in case of loss of coolant accident (LOCA). (A.B.)

  8. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  9. Development of thermal hydraulic analysis code for nuclear reactors with annular fuels and assessment of the KAIST DNB-type theoretical critical heat flux model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of thermal hydraulic analysis code for Gas-Cooled Reactors (GCRs) and for annular fuel and its application to various types of nuclear reactors, and the assessment of the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) Departure from Nucleate Boiling (DNB)-type theoretical Critical Heat Flux (CHF) model for rod bundles with non-uniform axial power shapes were investigated. Thermal hydraulic characteristics of thorium-based fuel assemblies with annular seed pins were analyzed using Thermal-Hydraulic analysis code for Annular Fuel (THAF) combined with Multichannel Analyzer for steady states and Transients in Rod Arrays (MATRA), and compared with those of existing thorium-based assemblies. This study investigates the possibilities of using annular fuel pins in a pressurized water reactor with emphasis on coolant flow distribution and heat transfer fraction in internal and external sub-channels. MATRA and THAF showed good agreements for the pressure drops at the internal sub-channels. Mass fluxes were high in inner sub-channels of the seed pins due to the grid form losses in the outer sub-channels. About 43% of heat generated from the seed pin flowed into the inner sub-channel. The remaining heat flowed into the outer sub-channel. The inner to outer wall heat flux ratio was approximately 1.2. Maximum temperatures of annular seed pins were slightly above 500 .deg. C. Minimum DNB Ratios (MDNBRs) of the assemblies loaded with annular seed pins were higher than those of the existing assemblies. Temperatures and enthalpies were higher in the inner sub-channels due to the fact that inter-channel mixing cannot occur in the inner sub-channels. A thermal-hydraulic analysis code for annular fuel-based Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs) has been developed. About 41% of the heat generated from the fuel pin flowed into the inner sub-channel and the rest into the outer sub-channel. The inner to outer wall heat flux ratio was equal to approximately 1.44. A new 37

  10. Thermo-hydraulic simulations of the experimental fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the core and performance of metallic fuel of the experimental fast reactor, from the thermal-hydraulic point of view, was carried out employing the COBRA IV-I code. The good safety characteristics of this reactor and the feasibility of using metallic fuel in experimental fast reactor were demonstrated. (Author)

  11. Replacement research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992, the Australian Government commissioned a review into the need for a replacement research reactor. That review concluded that in about years, if certain conditions were met, the Government could make a decision in favour of a replacement reactor. A major milestone was achieved when, on 3 September 1997, the Australian Government announced the construction of a replacement research reactor at the site of Australia's existing research reactor HIFAR, subject to the satisfactory outcome of an environmental assessment process. The reactor will be have the dual purpose of providing a first class facility for neutron beam research as well as providing irradiation facilities for both medical isotope production and commercial irradiations. The project is scheduled for completion before the end of 2005. (author)

  12. Neutronics design of upgraded JRR-3 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research reactor JRR-3 is currently planned to be upgraded by replacing the core and related cooling system. The proposed reactor is a water-moderated and -cooled pool type of 20 MW thermal output. The neutronics calculation was carried out on the core using 20% enriched U.Alsub(x) fuel. The results show that the core performances, such as reactivity, neutron flux, and burnup, are sufficient for beam experiments, material testing, and isotope production. (author)

  13. The seismic assessment of fast reactor cores in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) has evolved over a number of years. The design has to meet two seismic requirements: (i) the reactor must cause no hazard to the public during or after the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE); (ii) there must be no sudden reduction in safety for an earthquake exceeding the SSE. The core is a complicated component in the whole reactor. It is usually represented in a very simplified manner in the seismic assessment of the whole reactor station. From this calculation, a time history or response spectrum can be generated for the diagrid, which supports the core, and for the above core structure, which supports the main absorber rods. These data may then be used to perform a detailed assessment of the reactor core. A new simplified model of the core response may then be made and used in a further calculation of the whole reactor. The calculation of the core response only, is considered in the remainder of this paper. One important feature of the fast reactor core, compared with other reactors, is that the components are relatively thin and flexible to promote neutron economy and heat transfer. A further important feature is that there are very small gaps between the wrapper tubes. This leads to very strong fluid-coupling effects. These effects are likely to be beneficial, but adequate techniques to calculate them are only just being developed. 9 refs, figs

  14. Research reactor decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Of the ∼ 800 research reactors constructed worldwide to date, ∼50% have been shut down and are at various stages of decommissioning. Many reached the end of their design lives or were shut down due to strategic, economic or regulatory considerations. 27% of those in operation are over 40 years old and will need to be decommissioned soon. Decommissioning normally takes the facility permanently out of service and subjects it to progressive hazard reduction, dismantling and decontamination in a safe, secure economically viable way, using best practicable means to meet the best practicable environmental option, such that the risks and doses to workers and the general public are maintained as low as reasonably practicable. Whilst most decommissioning techniques are well established there are still some challenging and important issues that need resolution. Perhaps the most challenging issue is radioactive waste management and storage. It is vitally important that all local and national waste classification, transportation, storage and end point requirements are known, as the adopted strategy will be heavily influenced by these factors. Other equally important but softer issues include the requirement for early decommissioning plans, adequate funding/cost estimates and the involvement of all relevant stakeholders. A comprehensive decommissioning plan should be produced up front that encompasses an early radiological characterisation survey of the facility/site. An appropriate funding mechanism needs to be assured. Whilst regular revisions of the decommissioning cost study should help to determine required funds, it is important to validate these cost estimates by benchmarking other decommissioning projects and accumulated experience. The use of appropriate 'stakeholder dialogue' methods by the facility operator to inform and communicate with all interested parties, such as government and non-government organisations, regulators, trades unions, anti

  15. Research Reactors Coalitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When considering the potential role of an existing RR or possibly the construction of a new RR, it is clear that a nuclear science and technology programme (including nuclear power) could benefit provided the RR is safely and competently managed, well utilised and adequately funded. Based on MSs experience, a domestic RR may not be required to develop a nuclear power programme, provided the decision takes advantage of foreign expertise, including access to foreign RRs facilities and RRs regional/international networks. If a country decides to gain access to a foreign research reactor, it may need considering the potential risk of change in the political relationship with the host country that could compromise the achievement of its national relevant objectives. This risk may be offset by availability of many options within one or more regional/international RRs networks and coalitions. Examples include the use of existing RRs in vendor, non-vendor countries and, in some cases non-nuclear power countries, to develop human resources in support of the introduction of nuclear power elsewhere. International RR networking trends are most evident with high flux, higher capability, and more complex fuel and material testing RRs being shared through international partnerships. However, networks involving low-medium power RRs for education and training purposes are also gaining a more prominent role to support nuclear capacity building in newcomer MSs. Networking through the internet seems also to be a promising way to support, as complementary offer to direct access to RRs facilities, MSs nuclear capacity building objectives (e.g. the IRL project)

  16. Meeting on reactor safety research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting 'Reactor Safety Research' organized for the second time by the GRS by order of the BMFT gave a review of research activities on the safety of light water reactors in the Federal Repulbic of Germany, international co-operation in this field and latest results of this research institution. The central fields of interest were subjects of man/machine-interaction, operational reliability accident sequences, and risk. (orig.)

  17. Status report of Indonesian research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general description of three Indonesian research reactor, its irradiation facilities and its future prospect are described. Since 1965 Triga Mark II 250 KW Bandung, has been in operation and in 1972 the design powers were increased to 1000 KW. Using core grid form Triga 250 KW BATAN has designed and constructed Kartini Reactor in Yogyakarta which started its operation in 1979. Both of this Triga type reactors have served a wide spectrum of utilization such as training manpower in nuclear engineering, radiochemistry, isotope production and beam research in solid state physics. Each of this reactor have strong cooperation with Bandung Institute of Technology at Bandung and Gajah Mada University at Yogyakarta which has a faculty of Nuclear Engineering. Since 1976 the idea to have high flux reactor has been foreseen appropriate to Indonesian intention to prepare infrastructure for nuclear industry for both energy and non-energy related activities. The idea come to realization with the first criticality of RSG-GAS (Multipurpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy) in July 1987 at PUSPIPTEK Serpong area. It is expected that by early 1992 the reactor will reached its full power of 30 MW and by end 1992 its expected that irradiation facilities will be utilized in the future for nuclear scientific and engineering work. (author)

  18. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses

  19. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  20. Proposal of a benchmark for core burnup calculations for a VVER-1000 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of a project supported by the German BMU the code DYN3D should be further validated and verified. During the work a lack of a benchmark on core burnup calculations for VVER-1000 reactors was noticed. Such a benchmark is useful for validating and verifying the whole package of codes and data libraries for reactor physics calculations including fuel assembly modelling, fuel assembly data preparation, few group data parametrisation and reactor core modelling. The benchmark proposed specifies the core loading patterns of burnup cycles for a VVER-1000 reactor core as well as a set of operational data such as load follow, boron concentration in the coolant, cycle length, measured reactivity coefficients and power density distributions. The reactor core characteristics chosen for comparison and the first results obtained during the work with the reactor physics code DYN3D are presented. This work presents the continuation of efforts of the projects mentioned to estimate the accuracy of calculated characteristics of VVER-1000 reactor cores. In addition, the codes used for reactor physics calculations of safety related reactor core characteristics should be validated and verified for the cases in which they are to be used. This is significant for safety related evaluations and assessments carried out in the framework of licensing and supervision procedures in the field of reactor physics. (authors)

  1. Ageing management for research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the past several years, ageing of research reactor facilities continues to be an important safety issue. Despite the efforts exerted by operating organizations and regulatory authorities worldwide to address this issue, the need for an improved strategy as well as the need for establishing and implementing a systematic approach to ageing management at research reactors was identified. This paper discusses, on the basis of the IAEA Safety Standards, the effect of ageing on the safety of research reactors and presents a proactive strategy for ageing management. A systematic approach for ageing management is developed and presented together with its key elements, along with practical examples for their application. (author)

  2. Lifetime embrittlement of reactor core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over a core lifetime, the reactor materials Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium may become embrittled due to the absorption of corrosion- generated hydrogen and to neutron irradiation damage. Results are presented on the effects of fast fluence on the fracture toughness of wrought Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium; Zircaloy-4 to hafnium butt welds; and hydrogen precharged beta treated and weld metal Zircaloy-4 for fluences up to a maximum of approximately 150 x 1024 n/M2 (> 1 Mev). While Zircaloy-4 did not exhibit a decrement in KIC due to irradiation, hafnium and butt welds between hafnium and Zircaloy-4 are susceptible to embrittlement with irradiation. The embrittlement can be attributed to irradiation strengthening, which promotes cleavage fracture in hafnium and hafnium-Zircaloy welds, and, in part, to the lower chemical potential of hydrogen in Zircaloy-4 compared to hafnium, which causes hydrogen, over time, to drift from the hafnium end toward the Zircaloy-4 end and to precipitate at the interface between the weld and base-metal interface. Neutron radiation apparently affects the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-2, Zircaloy-4, and hafnium in different ways. Possible explanations for these differences are suggested. It was found that Zircaloy-4 is preferred over Zircaloy-2 in hafnium-to- Zircaloy butt-weld applications due to its absence of a radiation- induced reduction in KIC plus its lower hydrogen absorption characteristics compared with Zircaloy-2

  3. Cronos 2: a neutronic simulation software for reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CRONOS2 software is that part of the SAPHYR code system dedicated to neutronic core calculations. CRONOS2 is a powerful tool for reactor design, fuel management and safety studies. Its modular structure and great flexibility make CRONOS2 an unique simulation tool for research and development for a wide variety of reactor systems. CRONOS2 is a versatile tool that covers a large range of applications from very fast calculations used in training simulators to time and memory consuming reference calculations needed to understand complex physical phenomena. CRONOS2 has a procedure library named CPROC that allows the user to create its own application environment fitted to a specific industrial use. (authors)

  4. Physics and behaviour during a ULOF of an innovative heterogeneous annular FBR core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major conclusions: • The reduction of the Na void worth is a way allowing a strong improvement of the dynamic behavior in very severe ULOF transient (10 s halving time), possibly allowing to avoid Na boiling; • 1st order effects: Na density ( 0); • 2nd order effects: - Mass flow gaggling scheme (as a function of the core neutronics); - Other feed-back effects: diagrid, driveline feed-back. → Very strong impact of uncertainties: Thermalhydraulic models & codes, drive-line feed-back modeling; • Methodology for feed-back coefficient calculation (example: in this calculation the Na density effect is linearized from nominal to 100% void, anticonservative in case of no Na boiling); • Core neutronics: nuclear data, models. → Even in case of no Na boiling, the critical events will be: • Fuel cladding and S/A wrapper behavior at very high temperature; • Upper core structures behavior

  5. Current activities at the MIT Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MIT Research Reactor (MITR) is a MW nuclear research reactor that is owned and operated by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to further its educational and research goals at both the undergraduate and graduate level. The reactor first achieved criticality in 1958. It was largely rebuilt in 1973/1974 by MIT staff and students, and its current license expires in August 1999. The current facility, which is designated as the MITR-H, uses a compact core with finned, aluminum-clad, plate-type fuel that is cooled and moderated by light water and reflected by heavy water. The reactor core can hold twenty-seven fuel elements. However, the normal configuration is twenty-four elements. A maximum of four fuel elements can be replaced with in-core experimental facilities. A unique feature of the MITR-II's design is that fixed absorber plates can be inserted in the upper half of the core. These cause the flux to peak in the lower half which benefits experimenters and also facilitates a fuel strategy that involves inversion of fuel elements midway through their life cycle. The MITR-II currently operates continuously for four weeks followed by shutdown of a few days for maintenance. This paper provides an overview of current activities at the MITR including preparations for re-licensing. The status of an on-going Phase-I clinical trial of boron neutron capture therapy for both glioblastoma multiforme and metastatic melanoma is described as well as the design of a fission converter facility for BNCT. Environmental research using neutron activation analysis is summarized as well as in-pile research focussed on LWR water chemistry and structural materials. (author)

  6. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.b, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  7. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  8. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  9. Gas cooled fast reactor research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development work in the field of core thermal-hydraulics, experimental and analytical physics and carbide fuel development carried out 1978 for the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor at the Swiss Federal Institute for Reactor Research is described. (Auth.)

  10. Status of Research Reactor Utilization in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil has four research reactors in operation: the IEA-R1, a pool type research reactor of 5 MW; the IPR-R1, a TRIGA Mark I type research reactor of 100 kW; the ARGONAUTA, an Argonaut type research reactor of 500 W; and the IPEN/MB-01 a critical facility of 100 W. Research reactor utilization has more than fifty years in Brazil. The first three reactors, constructed in the late 50's and early 60's at university campus in Sao Paulo, Belo Horizonte and Rio de Janeiro, had their utilization for training, teaching and nuclear research. The IPEN/MB-01, designed and constructed in IPEN in the late 80's, is utilized for the development and qualification of reactor physics calculation for PWR core application. The IEA-R1 has had its application and utilization increased through the years and it is presently used for radioisotope production, neutron beam application, neutrongraphy, neutron activation analysis, and limited fuel and material irradiation tests, besides the regular use for training and teaching. The low power of the reactor and the lack of hot cells for post irradiation analysis limits its technical application for the nuclear fuel industry. Brazil has two nuclear power plants in operation, one unit starting construction and four more units planned for the next two decades. Brazil has significant quantities of uranium ore and has expertise in all the fuel cycle steps, including uranium enrichment, and produces the fuel assemblies for the nuclear power plants. These industrial activities demand the need of material and fuel irradiation tests. IPEN produces radiopharmaceutical kits for the treatment of more than three million patients each year. The majority of the radiopharmaceutical kits is produced from imported radioisotopes. The increasing price and shortage of world supply of 99mTc leads also to the need of increasing the radioisotope production in Brazil. Due to these new demands, the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission is analyzing the costs and benefits

  11. Dynamic behavior of the Fast Reactor cores: the Symphony program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast reactor core is schematically constituted of Fuel Assemblies and Neutronic Shields, immersed in the primary coolant (sodium) which circulates inside the assemblies. Two main physical phenomena have a strong influence on the dynamic behavior of this system: the impacts between the beams and the interactions with the fluid. The impacts between the beams limit the relative displacements. The fluid leads to “inertial effects”, with globally lower vibration frequencies, and “dissipative effects”, with higher damping. Symphony is an important research program on the seismic behaviour of the fast reactor cores, developed from 1993 to 1998 at the CEA Saclay, with both experimental and theoretical parts. The experiments are at a representative scale, with Fuel Assemblies (or FA) and Neutronic Shields (or NS). Test are made “in air” (without fluid) and “in water”, to study the influence of the fluid (the sodium). A numerical model has been built for the interpretation of the tests. The interpretation of the tests is made by using a simple and efficient numerical method, based on the Euler equations for the fluid and homogenization techniques, which yields low computational costs. Impacts between the beams are taken into account also. The gaps between the feet and the grid plate lead to high damping for the beams if the gaps are important. The fluid leads to a strong coupling between the FA and the NS in the whole core, and limits the relative displacement. (author)

  12. IAEA safeguards at research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency applies safeguards to almost 150 facilities classified as research reactors. From a safeguards point of view, these facilities present a spectrum of features that must be addressed both from the nuclear material and from the operational viewpoints. The nuclear fuel used by these reactors varies from high enriched uranium (NEU), up to 93 U-235, to natural uranium and the thermal power output from over 100 megawatt to less than ten watts. Research reactors are also used for a wide variety of purposes, including materials testing, radiosotope production, training and nuclear physics studies. The effort spent by the Agency in safeguarding these reactors is dependant upon the thermal power of the reactor and on the quantity and type of nuclear material present. On some research reactors, the Agency devotes more inspection effort than on a large power reactor. On others, very little effort is reguired. Safeguards that are applied are done so according to Agency State agreements and consist of a combiination of nuclear material accounting and containment and surveillance. In this paper, the safeguards activities performed by the State and by the Agency will be reviewed for a large (≤50MWt) and for a small (≥ 1 MWt) reactor according to the most common type agreement. (author)

  13. Current status and prospects of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The first nuclear research reactors (RR) appeared in the 1940s. Their initial purpose was to provide knowledge of the main processes associated with neutron-induced nuclear reactions. Later, the rang of problems addressed expanded substantially. Besides fundamental research in the properties of matter, such reactors are successfully used for dealing with problems in the fields of materials science, nuclear engineering, medicine, isotope production, education, etc. Over the whole period of RR fleet growth, more than six hundred nuclear research facilities were built in 70 countries of the world. As of the end of 2008, the number of Russian research reactors in service was about 20% of the globally operating RR fleet. This paper discusses the current status of the world's RR fleet and describes the capabilities of the experimental reactor facilities existing in Russia. In the 21st century, research reactors will remain in demand to solve scientific and technological problems for innovative development of society. The emerging renaissance of nuclear power, the expanding RR uses for production of isotopes and other applications, the increase in the number of countries willing to use nuclear technologies in energy production, industry and science - all contribute to a rebirth of interest in research reactors. One of the ways to improve the experimental capabilities lies in radical upgrading of the reactor facilities with qualitative changes in the main neutronic characteristics of the core. The associated design approaches are illustrated with the example of the IBR-2M reactor at the JNRI in Dubna. The imperative need restricting the spread of nuclear threat leads us to give up using highly enriched uranium in most research reactors. Development of RR fuel with reduced enrichment in uranium has been one of the priority objectives of NIKIET for many years. This paper presents the latest results obtained along these lines, as applied to pool-type research

  14. Current status and prospects of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The first nuclear research reactors (RR) appeared in the 1940s. Their initial purpose was to provide knowledge of the main processes associated with neutron-induced nuclear reactions. Later, the range of problems addressed expanded substantially. Besides fundamental research in the properties of matter, such reactors are successfully used for dealing with problems in the fields of materials science, nuclear engineering, medicine, isotope production, education, etc. Over the whole period of RR fleet growth, more than six hundred nuclear research facilities were built in 70 countries of the world. As of the end of 2008, the number of Russian research reactors in service was about 20% of the globally operating RR fleet. This paper discusses the current status of the world's RR fleet and describes the capabilities of the experimental reactor facilities existing in Russia. In the 21st century, research reactors will remain in demand to solve scientific and technological problems for innovative development of society. The emerging renaissance of nuclear power, the expanding RR uses for production of isotopes and other applications, the increase in the number of countries willing to use nuclear technologies in energy production, industry and science - all contribute to a rebirth of interest in research reactors. One of the ways to improve the experimental capabilities lies in radical upgrading of the reactor facilities with qualitative changes in the main neutronic characteristics of the core. The associated design approaches are illustrated with the example of the IBR-2M reactor at the JNRI in Dubna. The imperative need for restricting the spread of nuclear threat leads us to give up using highly enriched uranium in most research reactors. Development of RR fuel with reduced enrichment in uranium has been one of the priority objectives of NIKIET for many years. This paper presents the latest results obtained along these lines, as applied to pool-type research

  15. Design for reactor core safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Guide covers the neutronic, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and irradiation considerations important to the safe design of a nuclear reactor core. The Guide applies to the types of thermal neutron reactor power plants that are now in common use and fuelled with oxide fuels: advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR), boiling water reactor (BWR), pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) (pressure tube and pressure vessel type) and pressurized water reactor (PWR). It deals with the individual components and systems that make up the core and associated equipment and with design provisions for the safe operation of the core and safe handling of the fuel and other core components. The Guide discusses the reactor vessel internals and the reactivity control and shutdown devices mounted on the vessel. Possible effects on requirements for the reactor coolant, the reactor coolant system and its pressure boundary (including the pressure vessel) are considered only as far as necessary to clarify the interface with the Safety Guide on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13) and other Guides. In relation to instrumentation and control systems the guidance is mainly limited to functional requirements

  16. Thermal calculations for water cooled research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formulae and the more important numerical data necessary for thermic calculations on the core of a research reactor, cooled with low pressure water, are presented. Most of the problems met by the designer and the operator are dealt with (calculations margins, cooling after shut-down). Particular cases are considered (gas release, rough walls, asymmetric cooling slabs etc.), which are not generally envisaged in works on general thermics

  17. Defuelling of the UTR-300 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, R.D.; Banford, H.M.; East, B.W. [Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Ord, M.A.; Gaffka, A.P. [AEA Technology, Harwell, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RA (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-01

    A description is given of the movement of fuel elements from the core of the UTR-300 research reactor to the UNIFETCH flask, which is normally loaded under water, through a specially designed shielding arrangement which permits a dry transfer. The regulatory requirements and the safety case are summarised along with the predicted and measured doses to operators. The task was successfully completed to a tight time schedule with recorded doses which were well within the allocated dose budget. (orig.) 3 refs.

  18. The research reactors their contribution to the reactors physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 19 october 2000, the french society of nuclear energy organized a day on the research reactors. This associated report of the technical session, reactors physics, is presented in two parts. The first part deals with the annual meeting and groups general papers on the pressurized water reactors, the fast neutrons reactors and the fusion reactors industry. The second part presents more technical papers about the research programs, critical models, irradiation reactors (OSIRIS and Jules Horowitz) and computing tools. (A.L.B.)

  19. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; Shamsuddin, Mustaffa; M, Wan Munirah W.; Abdullah, M. Adib

    2014-07-01

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  20. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core

  1. State space modeling of reactor core in a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashaari, A.; Ahmad, T.; M, Wan Munirah W. [Department of Mathematical Science, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Shamsuddin, Mustaffa [Institute of Ibnu Sina, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Abdullah, M. Adib [Swinburne University of Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Computing and Science, Jalan Simpang Tiga, 93350 Kuching, Sarawak (Malaysia)

    2014-07-10

    The power control system of a nuclear reactor is the key system that ensures a safe operation for a nuclear power plant. However, a mathematical model of a nuclear power plant is in the form of nonlinear process and time dependent that give very hard to be described. One of the important components of a Pressurized Water Reactor is the Reactor core. The aim of this study is to analyze the performance of power produced from a reactor core using temperature of the moderator as an input. Mathematical representation of the state space model of the reactor core control system is presented and analyzed in this paper. The data and parameters are taken from a real time VVER-type Pressurized Water Reactor and will be verified using Matlab and Simulink. Based on the simulation conducted, the results show that the temperature of the moderator plays an important role in determining the power of reactor core.

  2. Conversion and evaluation of the THOR reactor core to TRIGA fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The THOR reactor is a pool type 1 MW research reactor and has been operated since 1961. The original MTR fuel elements have been gradually replaced by TRIGA fuel elements since 1977 and the conversion completed in 1987. The calculations were performed for various core configurations by using computer codes, WIMS/CITATION. The computing results have been evaluated and compared with the core measurements after the fuel conversion. The analysis results are in good correspondence with the measurements. (author)

  3. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-07-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  4. Annular pancreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001142.htm Annular pancreas To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An annular pancreas is a ring of pancreatic tissue that encircles ...

  5. Evaluations of two-phase natural circulation flow induced in the reactor vessel annular gap under ERVC conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Two-phase natural circulation flow induced in insulation gap was investigated. ► Half-scaled non-heating experiments were performed to evaluate flow behavior. ► The loop-integrated momentum equation was formulated and solved asymptotically. ► First-order approximate solution was obtained and agreed with experimental data. - Abstract: The process of two-phase natural circulation flow induced in the annular gap between the reactor vessel and the insulation under external reactor vessel cooling conditions was investigated experimentally and analytically in this study. HERMES-HALF experiments were performed to observe and quantify the induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the annular gap. A half-scaled non-heating experimental facility was designed by utilizing the results of a scaling analysis to simulate the APR1400 reactor and its insulation system. The behavior of the boiling-induced two-phase natural circulation flow in the annular gap was observed, and the liquid mass flow rates driven by the natural circulation loop and the void fraction distribution were measured. Direct flow visualization revealed that choking would occur under certain flow conditions in the minimum gap region near the shear keys. Specifically, large recirculation flows were observed in the minimum gap region for large air injection rates and small outlet areas. Under such conditions, the injected air could not pass through the minimum gap region, resulting in the occurrence of choking near the minimum gap with a periodical air back flow being generated. Therefore, a design modification of the minimum gap region needs to be done to facilitate steam venting and to prevent choking from occurring. To complement the HERMES-HALF experimental effort, an analytical study of the dependence of the induced natural circulation mass flow rate on the inlet area and the volumetric air injection rate was performed using a loop integration of the momentum equation. The loop

  6. USGS Core Research Center (CRC) Collection of Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Core Research Center (CRC) was established in 1974 by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to preserve valuable rock cores for use by scientists and educators from...

  7. Assessment of Inner Channel Blockage on the Annular Fuel Rod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, C. H.; In, W. K.; Oh, D. S.; Chun, T. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    A dual-cooled annular fuel for a pressurized water reactor (PWR) has been introduced for a significant amount of reactor power uprate. The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been performing a research to develop a dual-cooled annular fuel for the power uprate of 20% in an optimized PWR in Korea, OPR1000. An inner channel blockage is principal one of technical issues of the annular fuel rod. The inner channel in an annular fuel is isolated from the neighbor channels unlike the outer channels. The inner channel will be faced with a DNB accident by the partial blockage. In this paper, the largest fractional channel blockage was assessed by subchannel analysis code MATRA-AF and an end plug design to complement inlet blockage of inner channel was estimated by CFD code, CFD-ACE

  8. The axisymmetric long-wave interfacial stability of core-annular flow of power-law fluid with surfactant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue-Wei; Peng, Jie; Zhu, Ke-Qin

    2012-02-01

    The long wave stability of core-annular flow of power-law fluids with an axial pressure gradient is investigated at low Reynolds number. The interface between the two fluids is populated with an insoluble surfactant. The analytic solution for the growth rate of perturbation is obtained with long wave approximation. We are mainly concerned with the effects of shear-thinning/thickening property and interfacial surfactant on the flow stability. The results show that the influence of shear-thinning/thickening property accounts to the change of the capillary number. For a clean interface, the shear-thinning property enhances the capillary instability when the interface is close to the pipe wall. The converse is true when the interface is close to the pipe centerline. For shear-thickening fluids, the situation is reversed. When the interface is close to the pipe centerline, the capillary instability can be restrained due to the influence of surfactant. A parameter set can be found under which the flow is linearly stable.

  9. Determination of research reactor safety parameters by reactor calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Main research reactor safety parameters such as power density peaking factors, shutdown margin and temperature reactivity coefficients are treated. Reactor physics explanation of the parameters is given together with their application in safety evaluation performed as part of research reactor operation. Reactor calculations are presented as a method for their determination assuming use of widely available computer codes. (author)

  10. Proceedings of first SWCR-KURRI academic seminar on research reactors and related research topics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These are the proceedings of an academic seminar on research reactors and related research topics held at the Southwest Centre for Reactor Engineering Research and Design in Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China in September 24-26 in 1985. Included are the chairmen's addresses and 10 papers presented at the seminar in English. The titles of these papers are: (1) Nuclear Safety and Safeguards, (2) General Review of Thorium Research in Japanese Universities, (3) Comprehensive Utilization and Economic Analysis of the High Flux Engineering Test Reactor, (4) Present States of Applied Health Physics in Japan, (5) Neutron Radiography with Kyoto University Reactor, (6) Topics of Experimental Works with Kyoto University Reactor, (7) Integral Check of Nuclear Data for Reactor Structural Materials, (8) The Reactor Core, Physical Experiments and the Operation Safety Regulation of the Zero Energy Thermal Reactor for PWR Nuclear Power Plant, (9) HFETR Core Physical Parameters at Power, (10) Physical Consideration for Loads of Operated Ten Cycles in HFETR. (author)

  11. A neutronic study on advanced sodium cooled fast reactor cores with thorium blankets for effective burning of transuranic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • SFR burner core configurations are explored and analyzed for effective use of thorium blankets. • Thorium blankets can significantly improve SFR burner core performances. • No recycling or partial recycling of Th blankets with multi-batches is very effective. - Abstract: In this paper, new design concepts of sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) cores having thorium blanket are suggested for pursuing effective burning of TRU (transuranics) nuclides from LWR spent fuels and their neutronic performances are analyzed. Several core configurations having different arrangements of thorium blankets are explored to improve the core performances and safety-related parameters including sodium void worth which is one of main concerns on safety of SFR cores. Specifically, axial and radial thorium blankets are considered for two type cores. The first one is the typical annular type cores having two different fuel regions where axial thorium blankets are placed in the axially central regions while the second one is the single fuel region cores having central non-fuel region where the axial blanket and radial blankets are considered. Also, the effects of the recycling options and fuel management schemes of the used thorium blanket on the core performances are analyzed. The core performance analyses show that thorium blankets with no recycling option and multi-batch fuel management schemes are very effective to improve the core performances including burnup reactivity swing, sodium void worth and TRU consumption rate

  12. Gaseous fuel nuclear reactor research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, F. C.; Thom, K.

    1975-01-01

    Gaseous-fuel nuclear reactors are described; their distinguishing feature is the use of fissile fuels in a gaseous or plasma state, thereby breaking the barrier of temperature imposed by solid-fuel elements. This property creates a reactor heat source that may be able to heat the propellant of a rocket engine to 10,000 or 20,000 K. At this temperature level, gas-core reactors would provide the breakthrough in propulsion needed to open the entire solar system to manned and unmanned spacecraft. The possibility of fuel recycling makes possible efficiencies of up to 65% and nuclear safety at reduced cost, as well as high-thrust propulsion capabilities with specific impulse up to 5000 sec.

  13. Monte Carlo neutron transport simulation of the Ghana Research Reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stochastic Monte Carlo neutron particle transport methods have been applied to successfully model in 3-D, the HEU-fueled Ghana Research Reactor-1 (GHARR-1), a commercial version of the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) using the MCNP version 4c3 particle transport code. The preliminary multigroup neutronic criticality calculations yielded a keff is contained in 1.00449 with a corresponding cold clean excess reactivity of 4.47mk (447pcm) compared with experimental values of keff is contained in 1.00402 and excess reactivity of 4.00mk (400pcm). The Monte Carlo simulations also show comparable results in the neutron fluxes in the HEU core and some regions of interest. The observed trends in the radial and axial flux distributions in the core, beryllium annular reflector and the water region in the top shim reflector tray were reproduced, indicating consistency of the results, accuracy of the model, precision of the MCNP transport code and the comparability of the Monte Carlo simulations. The results further illustrate the close agreement between stochastic transport theory and the experimental measurements conducted during off-site zero power cold tests. (author)

  14. Optimization of the core of a 600 MV HTGR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through a thermal analysis, several reactor core parameters are considered, viz.: cooling channel diameter, juel channel diameter, distance between two channels power generated for lenght unit, etc. Using several criteria, the best solution or solutions are chosen

  15. Plastic-dynamic analysis on shock absorber of reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plastic-dynamic process under the condition of impact is studied for the shock absorbing device. The safety of the reactor core and vessel can be ensured by reasonably selecting the dimensions to lessen the dynamic loading factor

  16. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  17. Thermal reactor safety CNEN research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of CNEN (National Committee for Nuclear Energy, Italy) programs in the field of thermal reactor safety research is given. The ASCOT program (research program on safety aspects of thermal reactor cores) is briefly described. ASCOT is a program aiming at studying fuel behavior under accident conditions; it is mainly focused on development and experimental testing of analytical models and computer codes relevant to thermohydraulic and mechanical behavior of fuel under transient conditions. The program, fully financed by CNEN, is carried out in CNEN laboratories, in CISE laboratories (particularly for thermohydraulic experiments) and in JRC Ispra Centre (in pile experiments, by ESSOR reactor). Other CNEN research programs in the field of water reactor safety are also described; they concern thermohydraulics and mechanics problems (model development and experimental tests on pressure suppression, ECCS, etc.) and are performed both in CNEN laboratories and in other Italian organizations, under CNEN sponsorship. A short description of some facilities used for ASCOT and other CNEN programs is given: SARA loop (a loop of ESSOR reactor, basically conceived for safety tests, including operation with failed fuel rods); CIRCE and IETI loops (CISE, large-scale facilities for thermohydraulic experiments on blow-down, ECCS, etc.); ADI (a CNEN, large-scale loop where pressure suppression experiments are performed), and so on. Finally, the report describes interesting safety researches on various types of reactors: researches on external events (seismology, etc.), radioactive effluent control (e.g., filtration, effects to environment); these researches also are carried out directly in CNEN laboratories or in other Italian organizations, under CNEN sponsorship. Information is given on a national seismological network and on other installations for these experimental researches

  18. RRFM 2009 transactions: 13. international topical meeting on Research Reactor Fuel Management (RRFM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Conference covers topics in the area of research reactor fuel handling, performance, properties, core conversion, accident analysis etc. Different types of fuels for research reactors and their behaviour are presented in details

  19. A multipurpose research reactor design using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Australian Replacement Research Reactor (RRR) is one of the most recently built advanced neutron research facilities. It is a 20 megawatt open-pool reactor fueled with low enriched uranium and cooled by forced light water. The core is located inside a chimney, surrounded by heavy water as reflector. This paper describes modeling and simulation of the RRR using MCNP. Three changes in the core design are also suggested and simulated. Neutron flux distribution and k(eff) for each model is calculated and compared with those of the original model. Model A is the original RRR design. It is modeled as close as possible to the original design for benchmark and comparison purposes. In the second model (Model B), a vertical square cavity is added in the center of the core, thus providing an irradiation channel with high harder-spectrum neutron flux. A simulation shows that a fast flux as high as 3.0*1014 n/cm2.s is available in a cavity whose area is 64 cm2 while minimally disturbing the rest of the core. The original central cross-shaped control blade is split into four smaller pieces and moved to outer regions. In the third model (Model C), control blades are placed asymmetrically, leading to higher thermal flux in some locations in the reflector, which can be used, for example, for cold neutron source. In the last model (Model D), the control blades never occupy the central part of the core leading to a flux trap and higher harder-spectrum flux around z-equals-0 plane in the central cavity. Individual or combination of these changes may be incorporated in future research reactor designs

  20. Burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core using MCNPX.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    This report describes a reactor design with a burnup concept for a long-life fast reactor core that was evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX). The current trend in advanced reactor design is the concept of a small modular reactor (SMR). However, very few of the SMR designs attempt to substantially increase the lifetime of a reactor core, especially without zone loading, fuel reshuffling, or other artificial mechanisms in the core that %E2%80%9Cflatten%E2%80%9D the power profile, including non-uniform cooling, non-uniform moderation, or strategic poison placement. Historically, the limitations of computing capabilities have prevented acceptable margins in the temporal component of the spatial excess reactivity in a reactor design, due primarily to the error in burnup calculations. This research was performed as an initial scoping analysis into the concept of a long-life fast reactor. It can be shown that a long-life fast reactor concept can be modeled using MCNPX to predict burnup and neutronics behavior. The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional Light Water Reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs. For the purpose of this study, a single core design was investigated: a relatively small reactor core, yielding a medium amount of power (~200 to 400 MWth). The results of this scoping analysis were successful in providing a preliminary reactor design involving metal U-235/U-238 fuel with HT-9 fuel cladding and sodium coolant at a 20% volume fraction.

  1. Improvements in the management of safety in research reactor operation through appropriate application of selected power reactor good practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactor managers are increasingly implementing improvements in their management of safety through the application of good practices originally developed as power reactor programs. This paper considers ways to select practices to emulate, effectively incorporate them into a research reactor program and evaluate their contribution to safety. Relative to research reactors, power reactor programs look relatively homogeneous when considering source terms, stored energy, core power density, operating cycles, plant systems and staff sizes. They have potential hazard consequences that require effective safety management programs. Finally, power reactors generate a stream of revenue to fund these programs. The power reactor community has combined their resources with the homogeneity of their challenge to create impressive safety management tools, many of which can be effectively implemented in the research reactor community. However, not all programs can be effectively implemented in all research reactors. number of power reactor programs are analyzed in the paper with consideration of their effective implementation and potential contribution to research reactor. (author)

  2. Refueling strategy at the Budapest research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refueling strategy is very important for nuclear power plants and for highly utilized research reactors with power level in the megawatt range. New core design shall fulfill several demands and needs which can contradict each other sometimes. The loaded uranium quantity should assure the scheduled operation time (energy generation) and the maneuvering capability even at the end of the campaign. On the other hand the built in excess reactivity cannot be too high, because otherwise it would jeopardize the shutdown margin and reactor safety. Moreover the core arrangement should be optimum for in-core irradiation purposes and for the beam port experiments too. Sometimes this demand can be in contradiction with the desired burnup level. The achieved burnup level is very important from the fresh fuel consumption point of view, which has direct economic significance, however the generated spent fuel quantity is an important issue too. The refueling technique presented here allowed us at the Budapest Research Reactor to reach average burnup levels superseding 60%. (author)

  3. Core Seismic Tests for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koo, Gyeong Hoi; Lee, J. H

    2007-01-15

    This report describes the results of the comparison of the core seismic responses between the test and the analysis for the reduced core mock-up of a sodium-cooled fast reactor to verify the FAMD (Fluid Added Mass and Damping) code and SAC-CORE (Seismic Analysis Code for CORE) code, which implement the application algorithm of a consistent fluid added mass matrix including the coupling terms. It was verified that the narrow fluid gaps between the duct assemblies significantly affect the dynamic characteristics of the core duct assemblies and it becomes stronger as a number of duct increases within a certain level. As conclusion, from the comparison of the results between the tests and the analyses, it is verified that the FAMD code and the SAC-CORE code can give an accurate prediction of a complex core seismic behavior of the sodium-cooled fast reactor.

  4. Method of controlling the heterogeneous reactor core in FBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To maintain the power distribution of fuel assemblies constant all over the reactor operation period by operating the control rods depending on the power change in blanket fuels. Method: Blanket fuels (internal blanket) are loaded at a central region of a reactor core comprising plutonium enriched region. Further, control rods for the start-up and shutdown of a reactor and fuel compensation and back-up control rods are arranged within the reactor core. The reactor core is surrounded with an axial blanket and a neutron shielding body. 21 fuel compensating control rods are present in the reactor core and 18 rods out of them are arranged at the outer region of the inner blanket. At the initial stage of the reactor operation, the control rods are divided into three blocks and they are inserted into the reactor core by 0%, 21% and 20% respectively required for the compensation of the burning reactivity at the initial stage of the reactor operation and inserted by 2%, 18% and 15% respectively at the initial balanced stage of the reactor core. (Horiuchi, T.)

  5. Thermal-hydraulic behavior of physical quantities at critical velocities in a nuclear research reactor core channel using plate type fuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidi Ali Kamel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal-hydraulic study presented here relates to a channel of a nuclear reactor core. This channel is defined as being the space between two fuel plates where a coolant fluid flows. The flow velocity of this coolant should not generate vibrations in fuel plates. The aim of this study is to know the distribution of the temperature in the fuel plates, in the cladding and in the coolant fluid at the critical velocities of Miller, of Wambsganss, and of Cekirge and Ural. The velocity expressions given by these authors are function of the geometry of the fuel plate, the mechanical characteristics of the fuel plate’s material and the thermal characteristics of the coolant fluid. The thermal-hydraulic study is made under steady-state; the equation set-up of the thermal problem is made according to El Wakil and to Delhaye. Once the equation set-up is validated, the three critical velocities are calculated and then used in the calculations of the different temperature profiles. The average heat flux and the critical heat flux are evaluated for each critical velocity and their ratio reported. The recommended critical velocity to be used in nuclear channel calculations is that of Wambsganss. The mathematical model used is more precise and all the physical quantities, when using this critical velocity, stay in safe margins.

  6. Estimative of core damage frequency in IPEN'S IEA-R1 research reactor due to the initiating event of loss of coolant caused by large rupture in the pipe of the primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN), which is the Brazilian nuclear regulatory commission, imposes safety and licensing standards in order to ensure that the nuclear power plants operate in a safe way. For licensing a nuclear reactor one of the demands of CNEN is the simulation of some accidents and thermalhydraulic transients considered as design base to verify the integrity of the plant when submitted to adverse conditions. The accidents that must be simulated are those that present large probability to occur or those that can cause more serious consequences. According to the FSAR (Final Safety Analysis Report) the initiating event that can cause the largest damage in the core, of the IEA-R1 research reactor at IPEN-CNEN/SP, is the LOCA (Loss of Coolant Accident). The objective of this paper is estimate the frequency of the IEA-R1 core damage, caused by this initiating event. In this paper we analyze the accident evolution and performance of the systems which should mitigate this event: the Emergency Coolant Core System (ECCS) and the isolated pool system. They will be analyzed by means of the event tree. In this work the reliability of these systems are also quantified using the fault tree. (author)

  7. Reactor vessel model flow tests for 145-fuel assembly core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydraulic tests on a one-sixth-scale model of a two-loop pressurized water reactor with 145 fuel assemblies are described. Core inlet and outlet flow distributions and reactor vessel pressure drop were investigated. The core inlet flow distribution was developed to be independent of the flow conditions in the inlet annulus. A flow distribution system, consisting of several flow splitters in the inlet annulus and a spherical plate flow distributor in the lower head region, was developed to obtain a symmetric and stable core inlet flow distribution. A minimum core inlet flow factor of 0.99 was established in the core. Reactor vessel unrecoverable pressure drops were measured on the model to predict losses that will occur in the prototype

  8. Simulation of a TRIGA Reactor Core Blockage Using RELAP5 Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia A. L. Reis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cases of core coolant flow blockage transient have been simulated and analysed for the TRIGA IPR-R1 research reactor using the RELAP5-MOD3.3 code. The transients are related to partial and to total obstruction of the core coolant channels. The reactor behaviour after the loss of flow was analysed as well as the changes in the coolant and fuel temperatures. The behaviour of the thermal hydraulic parameters from the transient simulations was analysed. For a partial blockage, it was observed that the reactor reaches a new steady state operation with new values for the thermal hydraulic parameters. The total core blockage brings the reactor to an abnormal operation causing increase in core temperature.

  9. CANDU 6 reactor core physics and site physicist role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor is fuelled on-line. There is thus an on-going need for fuel and core management which is supported by an on-site Reactor Physics group. The author outlines the role of the on-site Physics group at the Point Lepreau Generating Station. This role covers Production, Technical as well as Safety and Compliance aspects

  10. Thermohydraulics of emergency core cooling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, by a group of experts of the OECD-NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, reviews the current state-of-knowledge in the field of emergency core cooling (ECC) for design-basis, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and core uncover transients in pressurized- and boiling-water reactors. An overview of the LOCA scenarios and ECC phenomenology is provided for each type of reactor, together with a brief description of their ECC systems. Separate-effects and integral-test facilities, which contribute to understanding and assessing the phenomenology, are reviewed together with similarity and scaling compromises. All relevant LOCA phenomena are then brought together in the form of tables. Each phenomenon is weighted in terms of its importance to the course of a LOCA, and appraised for the adequacy of its data base and analytical modelling. This qualitative procedure focusses attention on the modelling requirements of dominant LOCA phenomena and the current capabilities of the two-fluid models in two-phase flows. This leads into the key issue with ECC: quantitative code assessment and the application of system codes to predict with a well defined uncertainty the behaviour of a nuclear power plant. This issue, the methodologies being developed for code assessment and the question of how good is good enough are discussed in detail. Some general conclusions and recommendations for future research activities are provided

  11. The core design of the advanced power reactor plus (APR+)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advance Power Reactor Plus (APR+), a pressurized water reactor and an improved nuclear power reactor based on the Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe (APR1400) in Korea, has been developed with 18-month cycle operation strategy from its initial core. The APR+ core power is 4290 MWth which corresponds to a 1500 MWe class nuclear power plant. The reactor core consists of 257 fuel assemblies. Comparing with APR1400 core design, 16 fuel assemblies are added. Its cycle length is expected about 450 EFPD directly from initial core, although most of previous other plants had been started according to their annual or 15-month cycle operation schedule at their initial core and gone to 18-month after third - fourth cycle. In order to reduce the peaking power, fuel pin configurations of the assembly, are optimized by using some low enriched fuel pins and gadolinia bearings. APR+ core has been met the requirements as well as the above cycle length requirement; 1) peaking factor, 2) Negative MTC(Moderator Temperature Coefficient), 3) sufficient shutdown margin, 4) convergent Xenon stability Index. The maximum rod burnup and the discharge fuel assembly burnup are also satisfied those of the limit. It is expected to acquire the standard design approval by the end of 2012 by the Korean nuclear regulatory. (authors)

  12. The reactor core analysis code CITATION-1000VP for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor core analysis with full core model has been necessary for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) design. The CITATION-1000VP code has been developed to enable reactor core analysis of HTTR with full core model through extending the number of zones and meshes, and enhancing the calculation speed of CITATION code. This report describes the program changes for extending the number of zones and meshes, and for vectorization. The maximum number of zones and meshes becomes 999 and 500, respectively. The calculation speed is enhanced up to 21 times. (author)

  13. Power distributions in fresh and depleted LEU and HEU cores of the MITR reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, E.H.; Horelik, N.E.; Dunn, F.E.; Newton, T.H., Jr.; Hu, L.; Stevens, J.G. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (2MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory and Nuclear Science and Engineering Department)

    2012-04-04

    The Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR-II) is a research reactor in Cambridge, Massachusetts designed primarily for experiments using neutron beam and in-core irradiation facilities. It delivers a neutron flux comparable to current LWR power reactors in a compact 6 MW core using Highly Enriched Uranium (HEU) fuel. In the framework of its non-proliferation policies, the international community presently aims to minimize the amount of nuclear material available that could be used for nuclear weapons. In this geopolitical context, most research and test reactors both domestic and international have started a program of conversion to the use of Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel. A new type of LEU fuel based on an alloy of uranium and molybdenum (UMo) is expected to allow the conversion of U.S. domestic high performance reactors like the MITR-II reactor. Toward this goal, core geometry and power distributions are presented. Distributions of power are calculated for LEU cores depleted with MCODE using an MCNP5 Monte Carlo model. The MCNP5 HEU and LEU MITR models were previously compared to experimental benchmark data for the MITR-II. This same model was used with a finer spatial depletion in order to generate power distributions for the LEU cores. The objective of this work is to generate and characterize a series of fresh and depleted core peak power distributions, and provide a thermal hydraulic evaluation of the geometry which should be considered for subsequent thermal hydraulic safety analyses.

  14. Global stability analysis of pressurized water reactor core nonlinear system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determining the global stability of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) core nonlinear system is the problem to be solved. In the paper, the core nonlinear system was modeled and the linearized model of the system was obtained via the small perturbation method. According to the distributing situation of the core nonlinearity measure in the power level range based on the equilibrium manifold, seven linear models corresponding to seven power levels respectively were chosen as local models of the core and the set of seven local models was used to approximately substitute the core system. The global stability of the PWR core nonlinear system was analyzed by utilizing Lyapunov stability theory. The calculated result shows that the core nonlinear system is globally and asymptotically stable. The modeling method of the core is effective in analyzing the global stability of a PWR core nonlinear system. (authors)

  15. Utilization of nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Report on an IAEA interregional training course, Budapest, Hungary, 5-30 November 1979. The course was attended by 19 participants from 16 Member States. Among the 28 training courses which the International Atomic Energy Agency organized within its 1979 programme of technical assistance was the Interregional Training Course on the Utilization of Nuclear Research Reactors. This course was held at the Nuclear Training Reactor (a low-power pool-type reactor) of the Technical University, Budapest, Hungary, from 5 to 30 November 1979 and it was complemented by a one-week Study Tour to the Nuclear Research Centre in Rossendorf near Dresden, German Democratic Republic. The training course was very successful, with 19 participants attending from 16 Member States - Bangladesh, Bolivia, Czechoslovakia, Ecuador, Egypt, India, Iraq, Korean Democratic People's Republic, Morocco, Peru, Philippines, Spain, Thailand, Turkey, Vietnam and Yugoslavia. Selected invited lecturers were recruited from the USA and Finland, as well as local scientists from Hungarian institutions. During the past two decades or so, many research reactors have been put into operation around the world, and the demand for well qualified personnel to run and fully utilize these facilities has increased accordingly. Several developing countries have already acquired small- and medium-size research reactors mainly for isotope production, research in various fields, and training, while others are presently at different stages of planning and installation. Through different sources of information, such as requests to the IAEA for fellowship awards and experts, it became apparent that many research reactors and their associated facilities are not being utilized to their full potential in many of the developing countries. One reason for this is the lack of a sufficient number of trained professionals who are well acquainted with all the capabilities that a research reactor can offer, both in research and

  16. Axial heterogeneous core concept applied for super phoenix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Always maintaining the current design rules, this paper presents a parametric study on the type of axial heterogeneous core concept (CHA), utilizing a core of fast reactor Super Phenix type, reaching a maximum thermal burnup rate of 150000 M W d/t and being managed in single batch. (author)

  17. Split core experiments; Part I. Axial neutron flux distribution measurements in the reactor core with a central horizontal reflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of critical experiments were performed on the RB reactor in order to determine the thermal neutron flux increase in the central horizontal reflector formed by a split reactor core. The objectives of these experiments were to study the possibilities of improving the thermal neutron flux characteristics of the neutron beam in the horizontal beam tube of the RA research reactor. The construction of RA reactor enables to split the core in two, to form a central horizontal reflector in front of the beam tube. This is achieved by replacing 2% enriched uranium slugs in the fuel channel by dummy aluminium slugs. The purpose of the first series of experiments was to study the gain in thermal neutron component inside the horizontal reflector and the loss of reactivity as a function of the lattice pitch and central reflector thickness

  18. Research reactor education and training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CORYS T.E.S.S. and TECHNICATOME present in this document some of the questions that can be rightfully raised concerning education and training of nuclear facilities' staffs. At first, some answers illustrate the tackled generic topics: importance of training, building of a training program, usable tools for training purposes. Afterwards, this paper deals more specifically with research reactors as an actual training tool. The pedagogical advantages they can bring are illustrated through an example consisting in the description of the AZUR facility training capabilities followed by the detailed experiences CORYS T.E.S.S. and TECHNICATOME have both gathered and keeps on gaining using research reactors for training means. The experience shows that this incomparable training material is not necessarily reserved to huge companies or organisations' numerous personnel. It offers enough flexibility to be adapted to the specific needs of a thinner audience. Thus research reactor staffs can also take advantages of this training method. (author)

  19. The WWR-SM-20 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper the design features and experimental capabilities of the WWR-SM-20 research reactor are described. The reactor uses fuel assemblies consisting of six coaxial fuel tubes with a square cross-section. IRT-3M fuel assemblies can be used with both 90% enriched and 36% enriched uranium. The main characteristics of the IRT-3M fuel assemblies are given, as are the technical and physical parameters of the WWR-SM-20 reactor. The core can hold up to ten ampoule-type channels with a diameter of up to 68 mm. For irradiation purposes, up to 22 26-mm-diameter channels in the fuel assemblies, and up to 48 42-mm-diameter channels in the beryllium blocks of the reflector can be used. In the graphite blanket between the horizontal channels, channels with a diameter of up to 130 mm can be used. The thermal neutron flux density has a maximum value of 1.5 X 1018 m-2 · s-1 in the core and 2.3 X 1018 m-2 · s-1 in the reflector, and the fast neutron flux density (cE > 0.821 MeV) a maximum of 1.9 X 1018 m-2 · s-1. A number of design features have been incorporated in the WWR-SM-20 reactor to make it effectively safe

  20. European ERANOS formulaire for fast reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ERANOS code scheme was developed within the European collaboration on fast reactors. It contains all the functions required to calculate a complete set of core, shielding and fuel cycle parameters for LMFR cores. Nuclear data are taken from recent evaluations (JEF2.2) and adjusted on integral experiments (ERALIB1). Calculational scheme uses the ECCO cell code to generate cross section data. Whole core calculations are carried out using the spatial modules BISTRO (Sn) and TGVNARIANT (nodal method). Validation is based on integral and power reactor experiments. Integral experiments are also used for adjustment of nuclear data

  1. Overview of core simulation methodologies for light water reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current in-core fuel management calculation methods provide a very efficient route to predict neutronics behavior of light water reactor (LWR) cores and their prediction accuracy for current generation LWRs is generally sufficient. However, since neutronics calculations for LWRs are based on various assumptions and simplifications, we should also recognize many implicit limitations that are 'embedded' in current neutronics calculation methodologies. Continuous effort for improvement of core simulation methodologies is also discussed. (author)

  2. Research reactor modernization and refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many recent, high profile research reactor unplanned shutdowns can be directly linked to different challenges which have evolved over time. The concept of ageing management is certainly nothing new to nuclear facilities, however, these events are highlighting the direct impact unplanned shutdowns at research reactors have on various stakeholders who depend on research reactor goods and services. Provided the demand for these goods and services remains strong, large capital projects are anticipated to continue in order to sustain future operation of many research reactors. It is within this context that the IAEA organized a Technical Workshop to launch a broader Agency activity on research reactor modernization and refurbishment (M and R). The workshop was hosted by the operating organization of the HOR Research Reactor in Delft, the Netherlands, in October 2006. Forty participants from twenty-three countries participated in the meeting: with representation from Africa, Asia Pacific, Eastern Europe, North America, South America and Western Europe. The specific objectives of this workshop were to present facility reports on completed, existing and planned M and R projects, including the project objectives, scope and main characteristics; and to specifically report on: - the project impact (planned or actual) on the primary and key supporting motivation for the M and R project; - the project impact (planned or actual) on the design basis, safety, and/or regulatory-related reports; - the project impact (planned or actual) on facility utilization; - significant lessons learned during or following the completion of M and R work. Contributions from this workshop were reviewed by experts during a consultancy meeting held in Vienna in December 2007. The experts selected final contributions for inclusion in this report. Requests were also distributed to some authors for additional detail as well as new authors for known projects not submitted during the initial 2006 workshop

  3. Transient analysis for PWR reactor core using neural networks predictors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, transient analysis for a Pressurized Water Reactor core has been performed. A lumped parameter approximation is preferred for that purpose, to describe the reactor core together with mechanism which play an important role in dynamic analysis. The dynamic behavior of the reactor core during transients is analyzed considering the transient initiating events, wich are an essential part of Safety Analysis Reports. several transients are simulated based on the employed core model. Simulation results are in accord the physical expectations. A neural network is developed to predict the future response of the reactor core, in advance. The neural network is trained using the simulation results of a number of representative transients. Structure of the neural network is optimized by proper selection of transfer functions for the neurons. Trained neural network is used to predict the future responses following an early observation of the changes in system variables. Estimated behaviour using the neural network is in good agreement with the simulation results for various for types of transients. Results of this study indicate that the designed neural network can be used as an estimator of the time dependent behavior of the reactor core under transient conditions

  4. Upgrading the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a nearly two-year long detailed review, AECL Research decided that its NRU research reactor will complete its mission around the turn of the century. The company's original intentions for major refurbishment have been revised and upgrading work will now mainly comprise add-ons to existing systems - so that research projects and isotope production schedules can be met - and procedure modifications to ensure continued safe operation. (Author)

  5. Station blackout core damage frequency in an advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Even though nuclear reactors are provided with protection systems so that they can be automatically shut down in the event of a station blackout, the consequences of this event can be severe. This is because many safety systems that are needed for removing residual heat from the core and for maintaining containment integrity, in the majority of the nuclear power plants, are AC dependent. In order to minimize core damage frequency, advanced reactor concepts are being developed with safety systems that use natural forces. This work shows an improvement in the safety of a small nuclear power reactor provided by a passive core residual heat removal system. Station blackout core melt frequencies, with and without this system, are both calculated. The results are also compared with available data in the literature. (author)

  6. Vessel core seismic interaction for a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report deals with the analysis carried out in collaboration between ENEA and NIRA for optimizing the iterative procedure applied for the evaluation of the effects of the vessel core dynamic interaction for a fast reactor in the case of a earthquake. In fact, as shown in a previous report the convergence of such procedure was very slow for the design solution adopted for the PEC reactor, i.e. with a core restraint plate located close to the top of the core elements. This study, although performed making use of preliminary data (the same of the cited previous report) demonstrates that the convergence is fast if a suitable linear core model is applied in the first iteration linear calculations carried out by NIRA, with an intermediate stiffness with respect to those corresponding to the two limit models previously assumed and increased damping coefficients. Thus, the optimized iterative procedures is now applied in the PEC reactor block seismic verification analysis

  7. COMSORS: A light water reactor chemical core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate lightwater reactor (LWR) core-melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass made of lead oxide (PbO) and boron oxide (B2O3) is placed under the reactor vessel. If molten core debris is released onto the glass, the following sequence happens: (1) the glass absorbs decay heat as its temperature increases and the glass softens; (2) the core debris dissolves into the molten glass; (3) molten glass convective currents create a homogeneous high-level waste (HLW) glass; (4) the molten glass spreads into a wider pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or transfer to water on top of the molten glass; and (5) the glass solidifies as increased surface cooling area and decreasing radioactive decay heat generation allows heat removal to exceed heat generation

  8. In-reactor experiments in fast breeder test reactor for assessment of core structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) at Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam, India is a sodium cooled reactor with neutron flux level of the order of 1015 n/cm2/s and temperature of coolant in the range of 650-790K (380-520oC). This reactor is being used as a test bed for the development of fuel and structural materials required for Indian Fast Reactor Programme. FBTR is also used as a test facility to carry out accelerated irradiation tests on thermal reactor structural materials. In-reactor experiments on core structural materials are being carried out by subjecting prefabricated specimens to desired conditions of temperature and neutron fluence levels in FBTR. Non-instrumented irradiation capsules that can be loaded at any location of FBTR core are used for the experiments. Pressurised capsules of zirconium alloys have been developed and subjected to irradiation in FBTR to determine the irradiation creep rate of indigenously developed zirconium alloys (Zircaloy-2 and Zr-2.5%Nb alloy) for life assessment of pressure tubes of Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs). Technology development of pressurised capsules was carried out at IGCAR. These pressurised capsules were filled with argon and a small fraction of helium at a high pressure (5.0-6.5 MPa at room temperature) in such a way that the target stresses were attained in the walls of the pressurised capsules at the desired temperature of irradiation in the reactor. FBTR was operated at a low power of 8 MWt during this irradiation campaign to have an inlet temperature of about 579 K (306oC) which was close to the temperature of pressure tubes at full power in PHWR. Irradiation of thirty pressurised capsules was carried out in FBTR using six irradiation capsules for different durations (upto 79 days). The fluence levels attained by the pressurised capsules were up to 1.1 x 1021 n/cm2 (E> 1 MeV) at temperatures of 579 to 592 K. Post-irradiation increase in diameter of the pressurised

  9. Training reactor deployment. Advanced experimental course on designing new reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czech Technical University in Prague (CTU) operating its training nuclear reactor VR1, in cooperation with the North West University of South Africa (NWU), is applying for accreditation of the experimental training course ''Advanced experimental course on designing the new reactor core'' that will guide the students, young nuclear engineering professionals, through designing, calculating, approval, and assembling a new nuclear reactor core. Students, young professionals from the South African nuclear industry, face the situation when a new nuclear reactor core is to be build from scratch. Several reactor core design options are pre-calculated. The selected design is re-calculated by the students, the result is then scrutinized by the regulator and, once all the analysis is approved, physical dismantling of the current core and assembling of the new core is done by the students, under a close supervision of the CTU staff. Finally the reactor is made critical with the new core. The presentation focuses on practical issues of such a course, desired reactor features and namely pedagogical and safety aspects. (orig.)

  10. Development and application of neutron transport methods and uncertainty analysis for reactor core calculations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the research and development goals reached within the reactor safety research project RS1503 ''Development and Application of Neutron Transport Methods and Uncertainty Analyses for Reactor Core Calculations''. The superordinate goal of the project is the development, validation, and application of neutron transport methods and uncertainty analyses for reactor core calculations. These calculation methods will mainly be applied to problems related to the core behaviour of light water reactors and innovative reactor concepts. The contributions of this project towards achieving this goal are the further development, validation, and application of deterministic and stochastic calculation programmes and of methods for uncertainty and sensitivity analyses, as well as the assessment of artificial neutral networks, for providing a complete nuclear calculation chain. This comprises processing nuclear basis data, creating multi-group data for diffusion and transport codes, obtaining reference solutions for stationary states with Monte Carlo codes, performing coupled 3D full core analyses in diffusion approximation and with other deterministic and also Monte Carlo transport codes, and implementing uncertainty and sensitivity analyses with the aim of propagating uncertainties through the whole calculation chain from fuel assembly, spectral and depletion calculations to coupled transient analyses. This calculation chain shall be applicable to light water reactors and also to innovative reactor concepts, and therefore has to be extensively validated with the help of benchmarks and critical experiments.

  11. Optimization of a Potential New Core of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor Vienna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R.; Villa, M.; Bock, H.; Abele, H.; Steinhauser, G. [Vienna University of Technology-Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-07-01

    The TRIGA Mark II Vienna is one of the last TRIGA reactors utilizing a mixed core with High Enrich Uranium (HEU) fuel. Due to the US Fuel Return Program, the Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut (ATI) is obliged to return its HEU fuel by 2019. There is no final decision on any further utilization of the Vienna research reactor beyond that point. However, of all possible scenarios of the future, the conversion of the current core into Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel and the complete replacement of all existing 83 burned FE(s) by new fresh FE(s) are investigated herein. This paper presents detailed reactor design calculations for three different reactor cores. The core 1 employs 104-type, core 2 uses 108-type and core 3 is loaded with mixed TRIGA fuels (i.e. 104 and 108). The combination of the Monte Carlo based neutronics code MCNP5, Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and depletion code ORIGEN2 and diffusion theory based reactor physics program TRIGLAV is used for this study. On the basis of this neutronics study, the amount of fuel required for a possible future reactor operation and its cost minimization is presented in this paper. The criticality, core excess reactivity, length of initial life cycle and thermal flux density distribution is simulated for three different cores. Keeping the utilization of existing fourteen 104-type FE(s) (i.e. six burned and eight fresh FE(s)) in view, the core 3 is found the most economical, enduring and safe option for future of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna. (author)

  12. Optimization of a Potential New Core of the TRIGA Mark II Reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II Vienna is one of the last TRIGA reactors utilizing a mixed core with High Enrich Uranium (HEU) fuel. Due to the US Fuel Return Program, the Vienna University of Technology/Atominstitut (ATI) is obliged to return its HEU fuel by 2019. There is no final decision on any further utilization of the Vienna research reactor beyond that point. However, of all possible scenarios of the future, the conversion of the current core into Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel and the complete replacement of all existing 83 burned FE(s) by new fresh FE(s) are investigated herein. This paper presents detailed reactor design calculations for three different reactor cores. The core 1 employs 104-type, core 2 uses 108-type and core 3 is loaded with mixed TRIGA fuels (i.e. 104 and 108). The combination of the Monte Carlo based neutronics code MCNP5, Oak Ridge Isotope Generation and depletion code ORIGEN2 and diffusion theory based reactor physics program TRIGLAV is used for this study. On the basis of this neutronics study, the amount of fuel required for a possible future reactor operation and its cost minimization is presented in this paper. The criticality, core excess reactivity, length of initial life cycle and thermal flux density distribution is simulated for three different cores. Keeping the utilization of existing fourteen 104-type FE(s) (i.e. six burned and eight fresh FE(s)) in view, the core 3 is found the most economical, enduring and safe option for future of the TRIGA Mark II reactor in Vienna. (author)

  13. Core reactivity estimation in space reactors using recurrent dynamic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recurrent Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) network topology is used in the identification of nonlinear dynamic systems from only the input/output measurements. This effort is part of a research program devoted in developing real-time diagnostics and predictive control techniques for large-scale complex nonlinear dynamic systems. The identification is performed in the discrete time domain, with the learning algorithm being a modified form of the Back Propagation (BP) rule. The Recurrent Dynamic Network (RDN) developed is applied for the total core reactivity prediction of a spacecraft reactor from only neutronic power level measurements. Results indicate that the RDN can reproduce the nonlinear response of the reactor while keeping the number of nodes roughly equal to the relative order of the system. As accuracy requirements are increased, the number of required nodes also increases, however, the order of the RDN necessary to obtain such results is still in the same order of magnitude as the order of the matematical model of the system. There are a number of issues identified regarding the behavior of the RDN, which at this point are unresolved and require further research. Nevertheless, it is believed that use of the recurrent MLP structure with a variety of different learning algorithms may prove useful in utilizing artifical neural networks (ANNs) for recognition, classification and prediction of dynamic systems

  14. Burn up calculations for the Iranian miniature reactor: A reliable and safe research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faghihi, F. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Research Center for Radiation Protection, Shiraz University, Shiraz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: faghihif@shirazu.ac.ir; Mirvakili, S.M. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, School of Engineering, Shiraz University, Shiraz 71345 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Presenting neutronic calculations pertaining to the Iranian miniature research reactor is the main goal of this article. This is a key to maintaining safe and reliable core operation. The following reactor core neutronic parameters were calculated: clean cold core excess reactivity ({rho}{sub ex}), control rod and shim worth, shut down margin (SDM), neutron flux distribution of the reactor core components, and reactivity feedback coefficients. Calculations for the fuel burnup and radionuclide inventory of the Iranian miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR), after 13 years of operational time, are carried out. Moreover, the amount of uranium burnup and produced plutonium, the concentrations and activities of the most important fission products, the actinide radionuclides accumulated, and the total radioactivity of the core are estimated. Flux distribution for both water and fuel temperature increases are calculated and changes of the central control rod position are investigated as well. Standard neutronic simulation codes WIMS-D4 and CITATION are employed for these studies. The input model was validated by the experimental data according to the final safety analysis report (FSAR) of the reactor. The total activity of the MNSR core is calculated including all radionuclides at the end of the core life and it is found to be equal to 1.3 x 10{sup 3}Ci. Our investigation shows that the reactor is operating under safe and reliable conditions.

  15. Burn up calculations for the Iranian miniature reactor: A reliable and safe research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presenting neutronic calculations pertaining to the Iranian miniature research reactor is the main goal of this article. This is a key to maintaining safe and reliable core operation. The following reactor core neutronic parameters were calculated: clean cold core excess reactivity (ρex), control rod and shim worth, shut down margin (SDM), neutron flux distribution of the reactor core components, and reactivity feedback coefficients. Calculations for the fuel burnup and radionuclide inventory of the Iranian miniature neutron source reactor (MNSR), after 13 years of operational time, are carried out. Moreover, the amount of uranium burnup and produced plutonium, the concentrations and activities of the most important fission products, the actinide radionuclides accumulated, and the total radioactivity of the core are estimated. Flux distribution for both water and fuel temperature increases are calculated and changes of the central control rod position are investigated as well. Standard neutronic simulation codes WIMS-D4 and CITATION are employed for these studies. The input model was validated by the experimental data according to the final safety analysis report (FSAR) of the reactor. The total activity of the MNSR core is calculated including all radionuclides at the end of the core life and it is found to be equal to 1.3 x 103Ci. Our investigation shows that the reactor is operating under safe and reliable conditions.

  16. Intelligent system for conceptural design of new reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The software system IRDS has been developed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute to support the conceptual design of a new type of reactor core in the fields of neutronics, thermohydraulics, and fuel behavior. IRDS involves various analysis codes, database, and man-machine interfaces that efficiently support a whole design process on a computer. The main purpose of conceptual design is to decide an optimal set of basic design parameters. Designers usually carry out many parametric survey calculations and search a design window (DW), which is a feasible parameter range satisfying design criteria and goals. An automatic DW search function is installed to support such works. The man-machine interface based on menu windows will enable nonspecialists to use various analysis codes easily

  17. Analysis of core calculation schemes for advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis addresses the analysis of the core control of sub-moderated water reactors with plutonium fuel and varying spectrum. Firstly, a calculation scheme is defined, based on transport theory for the three existing assembly configurations. It is based on the efficiency analysis of the control cluster and of the flow sheet shape in the assembly. Secondly, studies of the assembly with control cluster and within a theory of diffusion with homogenization or detailed assembly representation are performed by taking the environment into account in order to assess errors. Thirdly, due to the presence of a very efficient absorbent in control clusters, a deeper physical analysis requires the study of the flow gradient existing at the interface between assemblies. A parameter is defined to assess this gradient, and theoretically calculated by using finite elements. Developed software is validated

  18. Nodal expansion method for reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To perform realistic space dependent reactor dynamics analyses in large power reactor with all asymmetric material, control and shutdown devices, a full three dimensional calculation model is essential. A code FEMINA (Flux Expansion Method In Nodal Analysis) implementing a higher order nodal scheme employing a nodal flux expansion method in 3D is being developed. In this report the first part of this code viz., the theory of the static version and its validation with well known benchmark problems are described. The code has been found to be quite accurate as well as fast. It is available on DEC 10'', CYBER 170/730 and ND 540 computers. (author)

  19. Reactor Physics and Core Design Issues: India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In ADS, since reactor control system is not required to maintain criticality, it is possible to increase burnup i.e. to extract more energy from a given mass of fuel till such time that the keff of the system falls to a value below which it is no more economical to maintain the fission power merely by increasing accelerator current. An interesting argument in support of ADS-based thorium utilization emanates from possibility of starting such reactor without a seed fissile species. On the basis to these possibilities, development of calculation codes and some investigative simulations of ADS operation with them were carried out, which are presented in the following section

  20. MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) cores fuel management. Application of a low enrichment reactor for the equilibrium and transitory core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes a methodology to define the equilibrium core and a MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) type reactor's fuel management upon multiple boundary conditions, such as: end cycle and permitted maximum reactivities, burn-up extraction and maximun number of movements by rechange. The methodology proposed allows to determine the best options through conceptual relations, prior to a detailed calculation with the core code, reducing the test number with these codes and minimizing in this way CPU cost. The way to better systematized search of transient cores from the first one to the equilibrium one is presented. (Author)

  1. A Core design study on the fuel displacement options for an effective transition between breakeven and TRU burning fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A core design study to convert a breakeven core into a TRU burner is performed for a 600 MWe rated fast reactor. No change in the core and subassembly layouts is assumed, which only allows geometry variations within the fuel rods. Investigated alternatives are to use variable cladding thicknesses, smearing fraction adjustments and annular fuel rod concepts with a central liner of a variable diameter consisting of void, Zr, B4C, Al, W, etc. The variable cladding thickness concept could not be employed due to too high a clad inner wall temperature. A smearing fraction adjustment below a typical fraction of 75% leads to a moderate TRU burning and reduced sodium void worth, but to a relatively high burnup swing. Placing a central non-fuel rod with the fuel arranged in an annular ring affects the core performance and reactivity coefficients, depending on whether it is a moderator or an absorber. In general, candidate materials of high atomic numbers contribute to large positive sodium void worths, but enhanced negative expansion effects. Among the light elements, vanadium reveals a favourable performance with a comparable TRU burning and a reduced sodium void worth, suggesting this material can be regarded as a solid substitute for sodium. (authors)

  2. Fast reactor research in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small Swiss research program on fast reactors serves to further understanding of the role of LMFR for energy production and to convert radioactive waste to more environmentally benign forms. These activities are on the one hand the contribution to the comparison of advanced nuclear systems and bring on the other to our physical and engineers understanding. (author)

  3. Advanced eddy current technique for measurement of annular gap between pressure tube and calandria tube in Indian Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs), the PT (pressure tube) is designed to be nominally concentric with the encircling CT (calandria tube). Due to various factors PT becomes eccentric with respect to CT over the life of reactor. If this becomes excessive, hot PT will come in contact with cold CT. Such a cold spot could act as potential location for initiating blister formation and premature failure of PT. Hence it is important to periodically measure annular gap between PT and CT. An advanced eddy current technique has been successfully developed and incorporated in BARCIS (BARC Channel Inspection System) for measurement of PT-CT gap. (author). 4 refs., 3 figs

  4. Seismic study on high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistance against earthquakes of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) core with block-type fuel is not yet fully ascertained. Seismic studies must be made if such a reactor plant is to be installed in the areas with frequent earthquakes. The experimental and analytical studies for the seismic response of the HTGR core were carried out. First, the fundamental behavior, such as the softening characteristic of a single stacked column (which is piled up with blocks) and the hardening characteristic with the block impact were clarified from the seismic experiments. Second, the displacement and the impact characteristics of the two-dimensional vertical core and the two-dimensional horizontal core were studied from the seismic experiments. Finally, analytical methods and computer programs for the seismic response of HTGR cores were developed. (author) 57 refs

  5. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  6. Australia's replacement research reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIFAR, a 10 MW tank type DIDO Class reactor has operated at the Lucas Heights Science and Technology Centre for 43 years. HIFAR and the 10 kW Argonaut reactor 'Moata' which is in the Care and Maintenance phase of decommissioning are Australia's only nuclear reactors. The initial purpose for HIFAR was for materials testing to support a nuclear power program. Changing community attitude through the 1970's and a Government decision not to proceed with a planned nuclear power reactor resulted in a reduction of materials testing activities and a greater emphasis being placed on neutron beam research and the production of radioisotopes, particularly for medical purposes. HIFAR is not fully capable of satisfying the expected increase in demand for medical radiopharmaceuticals beyond the next 5 years and the radial configuration of the beam tubes severely restricts the scope and efficiency of neutron beam research. In 1997 the Australian Government decided that a replacement research reactor should be built by the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation at Lucas Heights subject to favourable results of an Environmental Impact Study. The Ei identified no reasons on the grounds of safety, health, hazard or risk to prevent construction on the preferred site and it was decided in May 1999 that there were no environmental reasons why construction of the facility should not proceed. In recent years ANSTO has been reviewing the operation of HIFAR and observing international developments in reactor technology. Limitations in the flexibility and efficiency achievable in operation of a tank type reactor and the higher intrinsic safety sought in fundamental design resulted in an early decision that the replacement reactor must be a pool type having cleaner and higher intensity tangential neutron beams of wider energy range than those available from HIFAR. ANSTO has chosen to use it's own resources supported by specialised external knowledge and experience to identify

  7. 3D computer visualization and animation of CANDU reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer visualization and animation models of typical CANDU reactor cores (Darlington, Point Lepreau) have been developed using world-wide-web (WWW) browser based tools: JavaScript, hyper-text-markup language (HTML) and virtual reality modeling language (VRML). The 3D models provide three-dimensional views of internal control and monitoring structures in the reactor core, such as fuel channels, flux detectors, liquid zone controllers, zone boundaries, shutoff rods, poison injection tubes, ion chambers. Animations have been developed based on real in-core flux detector responses and rod position data from reactor shutdown. The animations show flux changing inside the reactor core with the drop of shutoff rods and/or the injection of liquid poison. The 3D models also provide hypertext links to documents giving specifications and historical data for particular components. Data in HTML format (or other format such as PDF, etc.) can be shown in text, tables, plots, drawings, etc., and further links to other sources of data can also be embedded. This paper summarizes the use of these WWW browser based tools, and describes the resulting 3D reactor core static and dynamic models. Potential applications of the models are discussed. (author)

  8. Estimative of core damage frequency in IPEN IEA-R1 research reactor due to the initiating events of loss of flow caused by channel blockage and loss of coolant caused by a large rupture in the pipe of the primary circuit - PSA level 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirata, Daniel Massami [Centro Tecnologico da Marinha em Sao Paulo (CTMSP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Sabundjian, Gaiane, E-mail: gdjian@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP) Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    This work applies the methodology of Probabilistic Safety Assessment Level 1 to the research reactor IEA-R1 IPEN-CNEN/SP. Two categories of identified initiating events of accidents in the reactor are studied: loss of flow and loss of primary coolant. Among the initiating events, blockage of flow channel and loss of cooling fluid caused by large pipe rupture in the primary circuit are chosen for a detailed analysis. The event tree technique is used to analyze the evolution of the accident, including the actuation or the fail of actuation of the safety systems and the reactor damages. Using the fault tree the reliability of the following reactor safety systems is evaluated: reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool, Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) and the electric system. Estimative for the frequency of damage to the reactor core and the probability of failure of the analyzed systems are calculated. The estimated values for the frequencies of core damage are within the expected margins and are of the same order of magnitude as those found for similar reactors. The reliability of the reactor shutdown system, isolation of the reactor pool and ECCS are satisfactory for the conditions in which these systems are required. However, for the electric system it is suggested an upgrade to increase its reliability. (author)

  9. 2012 review of French research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proposed by the French Reactor Operators' Club (CER), the meeting and discussion forum for operators of French research reactors, this report first gives a brief presentation of these reactors and of their scope of application, and a summary of highlights in 2012 for each of them. Then, it proposes more detailed presentations and reviews of characteristics, activities, highlights, objectives and results for the different types of reactors: neutron beam reactors (Orphee, High flux reactor-Laue-Langevin Institute or HFR-ILL), technological irradiation reactors (Osiris and Phenix), training reactors (Isis and Azur), reactors for safety research purposes (Cabri and Phebus), reactors for neutronic studies (Caliban, Prospero, Eole, Minerve and Masurca), and new research reactors (the RES facility and the Jules Horowitz reactor or JHR)

  10. Radiological consequence analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the project is to study the environmental effects of research reactors having low enriched uranium as fuel in case of accident by using standard computer code KORIGEN. The study includes fission product inventory in core, atmospheric dispersion of radioactive effluents and dose rates at different receptor locations in order to determine the boundaries of extension and low population zones. Computer code KORIGEN has been employed to calculate the core inventory. Mathematical models were used to calculate the activity behavior and dose rates. Pakistan research reactor-1 (PARR-1) has been considered for the analysis. A continuous run for 123 days was assumed to achieve the target burn up of core. For a cooling time of 90 days the decay of total activity and decay heat was also studied. During this time activity and decay heat were reduced to 2.63% and 0.847% of their shut down values. The code may also be used to calculate fuel burn up and multiplication factor. (author)

  11. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  12. A research on the mechanisms of transition from annular flow in two-phase pipeline flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various kinds mechanisms of transitions from two-phase annular flow in tubes were studied and modelled, and the affection factors on the transitions were also discussed. Some mathematical equations and transition criteria for every mechanisms presented were derived, and an unified general criterion for the annular flow transitions in whole range of pipe inclinations was recommended. The boundaries predicted show good agreement with the air-water two-phase experimental data

  13. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  14. Investigation of the core melt accident in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the thesis the core melt accident, heating up and collapsing of the reactor core were investigated. The most important parameters of influence were found and their effect on the development of the accident were shown. A causal diagram was developed representing the great number of events occurring in the course of the core melt accident as well as their mutual dependences. Models were developed and applied for a detailed description of the collapse process, melting of materials, heat and material transport at flow-off of the melted mass and for taking into account steam blocking in the destroyed core sections. (orig.)

  15. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Bakkari, B., E-mail: bakkari@gmail.co [Reactor Operating Unit (UCR), National Centre of Sciences, Energy and Nuclear Techniques (CNESTEN/CENM), POB 1382, Rabat (Morocco); ERSN-LMR, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, POB 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); Nacir, B. [Reactor Operating Unit (UCR), National Centre of Sciences, Energy and Nuclear Techniques (CNESTEN/CENM), POB 1382, Rabat (Morocco); El Bardouni, T. [ERSN-LMR, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, POB 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); El Younoussi, C. [Reactor Operating Unit (UCR), National Centre of Sciences, Energy and Nuclear Techniques (CNESTEN/CENM), POB 1382, Rabat (Morocco); ERSN-LMR, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, POB 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); Merroun, O. [ERSN-LMR, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, POB 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); Htet, A. [Reactor Technology Unit (UTR), National Centre of Sciences, Energy and Nuclear Techniques (CNESTEN/CENM), POB 1382, Rabat (Morocco); Boulaich, Y. [Reactor Operating Unit (UCR), National Centre of Sciences, Energy and Nuclear Techniques (CNESTEN/CENM), POB 1382, Rabat (Morocco); ERSN-LMR, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, POB 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H. [ERSN-LMR, Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, POB 2121, Tetuan (Morocco); Chakir, M. [EPTN-LPMR, Faculty of Sciences, Kenitra (Morocco)

    2010-10-15

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucleaires de la Maamora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S({alpha}, {beta}) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file 'up259'. The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  16. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucleaires de la Maamora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S(α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file 'up259'. The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  17. Monte Carlo modelling of TRIGA research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Bakkari, B.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; El Younoussi, C.; Merroun, O.; Htet, A.; Boulaich, Y.; Zoubair, M.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Moroccan 2 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Centre des Etudes Nucléaires de la Maâmora (CENM) achieved initial criticality on May 2, 2007. The reactor is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the neutronic analysis of the 2-MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at CENM and validation of the results by comparisons with the experimental, operational, and available final safety analysis report (FSAR) values. The study was prepared in collaboration between the Laboratory of Radiation and Nuclear Systems (ERSN-LMR) from Faculty of Sciences of Tetuan (Morocco) and CENM. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP (version 5) was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data evaluations (ENDF/B-VI.8, ENDF/B-VII.0, JEFF-3.1, and JENDL-3.3) as well as S( α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. The cross-section libraries were generated by using the NJOY99 system updated to its more recent patch file "up259". The consistency and accuracy of both the Monte Carlo simulation and neutron transport physics were established by benchmarking the TRIGA experiments. Core excess reactivity, total and integral control rods worth as well as power peaking factors were used in the validation process. Results of calculations are analysed and discussed.

  18. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie; Mamat @ Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal; Roslan, Ridha; Sadri, Abd Aziz; Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd

    2016-01-01

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH1.6, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  19. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH1.6, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D® computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M

  20. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz, E-mail: mohdfaizs@tnb.com.my; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: rafies@tnb.com.my [Nuclear Energy Department, Regulatory Economics & Planning Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (Malaysia); Mamat Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal, E-mail: m-rizal@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Prototypes & Plant Development Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia); Roslan, Ridha, E-mail: ridha@aelb.gov.my; Sadri, Abd Aziz [Nuclear Installation Divisions, Atomic Energy Licensing Board (Malaysia); Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd [Reactor Technology Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH{sub 1.6}, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D{sup ®} computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  1. Assessment of HCDA energetics in the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of hypothetical core disruptive event analyses for the CRBRP heterogeneous reactor core are reported. The analytical results cover a large number of parametric cases including variations in design parameters and phenomenological assumptions. Reactor core configurations at the beginning of cycle one and end of cycle four are evaluated. The energetic consequences are evaluated based upon both fuel expansion thermodynamic work potential and a relative probability assignment. It is concluded that the structural loads, which result from 101 megajoules of available expansion work at sodium slug impact on the reactor closure head (equivalent to 661 megajoules of fuel expansion work to one atmosphere), is an adequate energetic consequence envelope for use in specifying the Structural Margins Beyond the Design Basis

  2. In-core fuel management for pebble-bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milian Perez, Daniel; Rodriguez Garcia, Lorena; Garcia Hernandez, Carlos; Milian Lorenzo, Daniel, E-mail: dperez@instec.cu, E-mail: cgh@instec.cu, E-mail: dmilian@instec.cu [Higher Institute of Technologies and Applied Sciences, Havana (Cuba); Velasco, Abanades, E-mail: abanades@etsii.upm.es [Department of Simulation of Thermo Energy Systems, Polytechnic University of Madrid (Spain)

    2013-07-01

    In this paper a calculation procedure to reduce the power peak in the core of a Very High Temperature pebble bed Reactor is presented. This procedure combines the fuel depletion and the neutronic behavior of the fuel in the reactor core, modeling once-through-then-out cycles as well as cycles in which pebbles are recirculated through the core an arbitrary number of times, obtaining the asymptotic fuel-loading pattern. The procedure consists in several coupled computational codes, which are used iteratively until convergence is reached. The utilization of the MCNPX 2.6e, as one of these computational codes, is validated through the calculation of benchmarks announced by IAEA (IAEA-TECDOC-1249, 2001). To complete the verification of the calculation procedure a base case described in (Annals of Nuclear Energy 29 (2002) 1345-1364), was performed. The procedure has been applied to a model of Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (200 MW) design. (author)

  3. 77 FR 30435 - In-core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... assigned Docket ID PRM-50-84 (73 FR 71564; November 25, 2008). In addition, the petition states that the... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 50 In-core Thermocouples at Different Elevations and Radial Positions in Reactor Core... ``require all holders of operating licenses for nuclear power plants (``NPP'') to operate NPPs with...

  4. Xenon characteristics analysis for the HANARO research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xenon is very important in the operation of a research reactor. For a convenient operation, several xenon characteristics are analyzed using the reactor physics code system of HANARO. During the reactor physics commissioning test and the power ascension test to 30 MW, equilibrium xenon loads are measured and compared with the calculated results. At the initial core, the measured xenon loads agree well with the calculated results within 5%. At the core of a 30 MW power, the measured xenon load is 4.61$, which is lower than the calculated load, 4.94$

  5. Research for enhancing reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent research for enhanced reactor safety covers extensive and numerous experiments and computed modelling activities designed to verify and to improve existing design requirements. The lectures presented at the meeting report GRS research results and the current status of reactor safety research in France. The GRS experts present results concerning expert systems and their perspectives in safety engineering, large-scale experiments and their significance in the development and verification of computer codes for thermohydraulic modelling of safety-related incidents, the advanced system code ATHLET for analysis of thermohydraulic processes of incidents, the analysis simulator which is a tool for fast evaluation of accident management measures, and investigations into event sequences and the required preventive emergency measures within the German Risk Study. (DG)

  6. Research reactor's role in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a TRIGA MARK-II was constructed in 1962, new research activity of a general nature, utilizing neutrons, prevailed in Korea. Radioisotopes produced from the MARK-II played a good role in the 1960's in educating people as to what could be achieved by a neutron source. Because the research reactor had implanted neutron science in the country, another TRIGA MARK-III had to be constructed within 10 years after importing the first reactor, due to increased neutron demand from the nuclear community. With the sudden growth of nuclear power, however, the emphasis of research changed. For a while research activities were almost all oriented to nuclear power plant technology. However, the specifics of nuclear power plant technology created a need for a more highly capable research reactor like HANARO 30MWt. HANARO will perform well with irradiation testing and other nuclear programs in the future, including: production of key radioisotopes, doping of silicon by transmutation, neutron activation analysis, neutron beam experiments, cold neutron source. 3 tabs., 2 figs

  7. New research reactor for Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HIFAR, Australia's major research reactor was commissioned in 1958 to test materials for an envisaged indigenous nuclear power industry. HIFAR is a Dido type reactor which is operated at 10 MW. With the decision in the early 1970's not to proceed to nuclear power, HIFAR was adapted to other uses and has served Australia well as a base for national nuclear competence; as a national facility for neutron scattering/beam research; as a source of radioisotopes for medical diagnosis and treatment; and as a source of export revenue from the neutron transmutation doping of silicon for the semiconductor industry. However, all of HIFAR's capabilities are becoming less than optimum by world and regional standards. Neutron beam facilities have been overtaken on the world scene by research reactors with increased neutron fluxes, cold sources, and improved beams and neutron guides. Radioisotope production capabilities, while adequate to meet Australia's needs, cannot be easily expanded to tap the growing world market in radiopharmaceuticals. Similarly, neutron transmutation doped silicon production, and export income from it, is limited at a time when the world market for this material is expanding. ANSTO has therefore embarked on a program to replace HIFAR with a new multi-purpose national facility for nuclear research and technology in the form of a reactor: a) for neutron beam research, - with a peak thermal flux of the order of three times higher than that from HIFAR, - with a cold neutron source, guides and beam hall, b) that has radioisotope production facilities that are as good as, or better than, those in HIFAR, c) that maximizes the potential for commercial irradiations to offset facility operating costs, d) that maximizes flexibility to accommodate variations in user requirements during the life of the facility. ANSTO's case for the new research reactor received significant support earlier this month with the tabling in Parliament of a report by the Australian Science

  8. The research reactor TRIGA Mainz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Institut fuer Kernchemie became first critical on August 3rd, 1965. It can be operated in the steady state mode with a maximum power of 100 kWth and in the pulse mode with a peak power of 250 MWth. A survey of the research programmes performed at the TRIGA Mainz is given covering applications in basic research as well as applied science in nuclear chemistry and nuclear physics. Furthermore, the reactor is used for neutron activation analysis and for education and training of scientists, teachers, students and technical personal. Important projects for the future of the TRIGA Mainz are the UCN (ultra cold neutrons) experiment, fast chemical separation, medical applications and the use of the NAA as well as the use of the reactor facility for the training of students in the fields of nuclear chemistry, nuclear physics and radiation protection. Taking into account the past and future operation schedule and the typically low burn-up of TRIGA fuel elements (∝4 g U-235/a), the reactor can be operated for at least the next decade taking into account the fresh fuel elements on stock and without changing spent fuels. (orig.)

  9. Reactor Physics Modeling Of Spent Nuclear Research Reactor Fuel For SNM Attribution And Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle. The

  10. Vibration tests on some models of PEC reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the aims of the experimental tests carried out at ISMES, within an agreement with the Department of Fast Reactors of ENEA, on some models of the elements of PEC Fast Nuclear Reactor Core in the frame of the activities for the seismic verification of the PEC core. The seismic verification is briefly described with particular attention to the problems arising from the shocks among the various elements during an earthquake, as well as the computer code used, the purpose and the techniques used to perform tests, some results and the first comparison between the theory and the experimental data

  11. A study of passive safety conditions for fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been made for passive safety conditions of fast reactor cores. Objective of the study is to develop a concept of a core with passive safety as well as a simple safety philosophy. A simple safety philosophy, which is wore easy to explain to the public, is needed to enhance the public acceptance for nuclear reactors. The present paper describes a conceptual plan of the study including the definition of the problem a method of approach and identification of tasks to be solved

  12. Core burnup characteristics of high conversion light water reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to evaluate core burnup characteristics of a high conversion light water reactor (HCLWR) with tight pitched lattice, core burnup calculation was made using two dimensional diffusion method. The volume ratio of moderator to fuel is about 0.8 in the reactor (HCLWR-J1) under study. The burnup calculations were carried out under the assumption of three batch and out-in fuel loading from the first cycle to the equilibrium cycle. A detailed evaluation was made for discharge burnup, conversion ratio, power distribution, and reactivity coefficients and so on. (author)

  13. Simulation of defects in (Be, Al) by neutron irradiation in the Ghana Research Reactor (GHARR-1) core using the MCNP5 and TRIM codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer simulations of defects created by neutrons in the annular beryllium reflector and aluminium clad material of GHARR - 1 using the MCNP5 and TRIM codes were carried out. A model of the beryllium reflector and aluminium clad as well as FMn tallies were built on the MCNP5 platform to generate neutron reaction data for three energy levels of epithermal, thermal and fast neutrons. The helium and tritium gas production in the (Be) reflector at a neutron flux of 1.0 x 1012 n/cm2 were determined to be 4.043*10-2 and 8.079*10-4 [atoms/source neutron.cm3] respectively. The nuclear heating number and the average heating number were calculated to be 22.59 (MeV/g) and 6.52*10-2 MeV/collision respectively. Similarly, the helium and hydrogen gases produced in the Al clad were determined to be 8.44*10-6 and 4.64*10-5 [atoms/source neutron.cm3] respectively. Also, the total neutron heating value and the total average neutron heating number evaluated for all the 10 lattices of the clad were 1.48(MeV/g) and 1.06*10-3 MeV/collision respectively. The average number of displacements per ion from TRIM simulation output for the entire recoil cascade history was recorded as 110 for annular beryllium reflector and 184 for aluminium clad material. The average normalized neutron flux distribution calculated over (Be) reflector and (Al) clad were 4.90*1011(n/cm2.s) and 3.18*1011(n/cm2.s) respectively. The final defect distribution of beryllium vacancies at a target depth of 2.04*103 μm was determined to be 5.21*10-10 μm-ion and for the (Al) clad at a target depth of 2.06*104 μm was determined to be 8.45*10-11 μm-ion. The values of nuclear parameters obtained were in agreement with other similar data in literature but were also below levels which could lead to hazards such as swelling of the flux level of 1*1012n/cm2s. Finally, further work regarding the damage levels within the control rod may be considered. [au

  14. Influence of nuclear data covariance on reactor core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of nuclear data uncertainties on reactor core calculations were investigated systematically using the sampling based uncertainty and sensitivity software XSUSA developed at GRS. Varied nuclear data are generated randomly corresponding to the uncertainty information from the covariance matrices. After performing a large number of calculations with these data, the results are statistically evaluated; this can be done not only for integral, but also for local output quantities like the assembly power distribution of a reactor core. The method is applied to multi-group Monte Carlo calculations stationary states of the PWR MOX/UO2 core transient benchmark, and to corresponding nodal diffusion calculations. Unexpectedly large uncertainties result for the radial power distribution. The uncertainties in the nodal results agree very well with those in the Monte Carlo reference results; thus, it is possible to apply the random sampling method to determine the influence of nuclear data uncertainties on transient core calculations. (author)

  15. Fast-core thermal-blanket breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary assessment of the performance expected from a specific type of FCTB reactor, consisting of a gas-cooled fast system for the core and natural-uranium light-water thermal system for the blanket is reported. Both the core and the blanket use the 238U-Pu fuel cycle. When all the neutrons leaking out of the core reach the blanket, the blanket-to-core power ratio is estimated to be about 1.3. By reducing its water-to-fuel volume ratio below 1.5, the light water blanket can be designed to have a higher ksub(eff), while maintaining an equilibrium fissile fuel content. Compared with conventional FBRs, having the same power output, the FCTB reactor considered offers the following advantages: a lower fissile fuel content, easier and safer control, no need for Pu separation. (B.G.)

  16. Safe operation and maintenance of research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1) was established in 1961 at the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), Bangkok. The reactor was light water moderated and cooled, using HEU plate-type with U3O8- Al fuel meat and swimming pool type. The reactor went first critical on October 27, 1962 and had been licensed to operate at 1 MW (thermal). On June 30, 1975 the reactor was shutdown for modification and the core and control system was disassemble and replaced by that of TRIGA Mark III type while the pool cooling system, irradiation facilities and other were kept. Thus the name TRR-1/M1' has been designed due to this modification the fuel has been changed from HEU plate type to Uranium Zirconium Hydride (UZrH) Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) which include 4 Fuel Follower Control Rods and 1 Air Follower Control Rod. The TRR-1/M1 went critical on November 7, 1977 and the purpose of the operation are training, isotope production and research. Nowadays the TRR-1/M1 has been operated with core loading No.12 which released power of 1,056 MWD. (as of October 1998). The TRR-1/M1 has been operated at the power of 1.2 MW, three days a week with 34 hours per week, Shut-down on Monday for weekly maintenance and Tuesday for special experiment. The everage energy released is about 40.8 MW-hour per week. Every year, the TRR-1/M1 is shut-down about 2 months between February to March for yearly maintenance. (author)

  17. Shielding design for research and education reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of education and research at the University, 20-KW powered SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor has been chosen as a prototype reactor. In order to study the safety characteristics of the reactor, exposure rate has been estimated at the pool boundary. Reactor core as a radiation source is assumed to be cylindrical volume source. Thus point kernel integration method can be applied to determine the exposure rate. For the sake of simplicity, calculation was done only for the prompt fission gamma rays and fission product gamma rays. As a result, the maximum exposure rate at the pool boundary was estimated to be 18R/min at the same height of the center of the core. In order to examine the accuracy for the point kernel integration method, two shielding experiments were carried out: one for the water tank only and the other for with concrete blocks outside the water tank. Water tank was made of wood pieces which is 13.4cm wide, 1.5cm thick and 2.15m long. Thus the water tank has the total dimension of 1 m radius and 2.1 m height. The experiment was carried out for the radiation source of 0.968 mCi Co-60 at the center of the water tank and the penetrated gamma rays were measured at 5 different detector positions. For the measurement and analysis of the responses, NaI(T1) 3''x3'' detector and 256 channel multichannel analyzer was utilized. To convert pulse height distribution to the exposure rate, Moriuchi conversion factor was adopted. Data from the calculations by point kernel method were well agreed within 10% band with the data from the the experiments. (Author)

  18. Safe operation and maintenance of research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munsorn, S. [Reactor Operation Division, Office of Atomic Energy for Peace, Chatuchak, Bangkok (Thailand)

    1999-10-01

    The first Thai Research Reactor (TRR-1) was established in 1961 at the Office of Atomic Energy for Peace (OAEP), Bangkok. The reactor was light water moderated and cooled, using HEU plate-type with U{sub 3}O{sub 8}- Al fuel meat and swimming pool type. The reactor went first critical on October 27, 1962 and had been licensed to operate at 1 MW (thermal). On June 30, 1975 the reactor was shutdown for modification and the core and control system was disassemble and replaced by that of TRIGA Mark III type while the pool cooling system, irradiation facilities and other were kept. Thus the name TRR-1/M1' has been designed due to this modification the fuel has been changed from HEU plate type to Uranium Zirconium Hydride (UZrH) Low Enrichment Uranium (LEU) which include 4 Fuel Follower Control Rods and 1 Air Follower Control Rod. The TRR-1/M1 went critical on November 7, 1977 and the purpose of the operation are training, isotope production and research. Nowadays the TRR-1/M1 has been operated with core loading No.12 which released power of 1,056 MWD. (as of October 1998). The TRR-1/M1 has been operated at the power of 1.2 MW, three days a week with 34 hours per week, Shut-down on Monday for weekly maintenance and Tuesday for special experiment. The everage energy released is about 40.8 MW-hour per week. Every year, the TRR-1/M1 is shut-down about 2 months between February to March for yearly maintenance. (author)

  19. Hydraulic characteristics of the N Reactor core and reactor cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In conjunction with the NUSAR program, the need was recognized for well substantiated pressure drop correlations for the N Reactor core to support in-depth safety analysis consistent with currently-available technology. Additionally, it was considered desirable to reconfirm the hydraulic characteristics of the reactor coolant system in the light of improved understanding of the hydraulic features of the current reactor fuel loading. The report summarizes the results of laboratory tests and analysis accomplished to meet the above objectives

  20. Accident analysis in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the sustained development in computer technology, the possibilities of code capabilities have been enlarged substantially. Consequently, advanced safety evaluations and design optimizations that were not possible few years ago can now be performed. The challenge today is to revisit the safety features of the existing nuclear plants and particularly research reactors in order to verify that the safety requirements are still met and - when necessary - to introduce some amendments not only to meet the new requirements but also to introduce new equipment from recent development of new technologies. The purpose of the present paper is to provide an overview of the accident analysis technology applied to the research reactor, with emphasis given to the capabilities of computational tools. (author)