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Sample records for annular core pulse reactor

  1. Pulsed irradiation of enriched UO2 in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.R.; Lucoff, D.M.; Reil, K.O.; Croucher, D.W.

    1974-01-01

    A series of experiments have been conducted in the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) to determine the energy deposition and behavior of enriched UO 2 under pulse conditions. In the experiment single unirradiated pellets with enrichments up to 25 percent were pulse heated to melt temperatures. Temperature and fission product inventory measurements were made and compared with neutron transport calculations. (author)

  2. Binary breeder reactor with annular core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, J.A. do; Ishiguro, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Characteristics of a 1200 MWe binary breeder reactor with annular core fueled with metallic 233 U- 238 U-Zr, Pu- 238 U-Zr and Th in the blankets have been analyzed. The Doppler effect is small as expected in a metal fueled fast reactor. The sodium void reactivity is, in general, smaller than in homogeneous fast reactors fueled with metallic fuel and with 1 m core height. The worths of available control is high and there is a large shutdown margin throughout the operational cycle. There are flexibility in blankets fueling in the two cycles, uranium and thorium, with doubling times of about 20 years. (author) [pt

  3. Study of startup conditions of a pulsed annular reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Mario Augusto Bezerra da

    2003-10-01

    A new concept of reactor, which combines features of pulsed and stationary reactors, was proposed so as to produce intense neutronic fluxes. Such a reactor, known as VICHFPR (Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor), consists of a subcritical core with an annular geometry and pulsed by a rotating reflector which acts as a reactivity modulator as it produces a short pulse (approximately equal to 1 ms) of high intensity, guiding the region near the pulser to super-prompt critical state. This dissertation intends to analyze the startup conditions of a Pulsed Annular Reactor. The evolution of the neutron pulse intensity is analyzed when the reactivity modulator is brought upwards according to a helicoidal path from its initial position (far away from the core), when the multiplication factor has a subcritical value, up to the final position (near the core), in which a super-prompt critical state is reached. Part of the analysis is based on the variation of neutron reflection, which is a uniform function of the exit and reflection angles between the core and the modulator. It must be emphasized that this work is an approximation of the real situation. As the initial and final reactor parameters are known, a programming code in Fortran is worked out to provide the multiplication factor and the flux intensity evolution. According to the results obtained with this code, the conditions under which the modulator must be lifted up during the startup are established. Basically, these conditions are related to the analysis of the rising and the rotation velocities, the reflector saving and the initial distance between the reactor and the modulator. The Pulsed Annular Reactor startup was divided into three stages. Because of its negative reactivity in the first two stages, the neutron multiplication is not large, while the last one, having a positive reactivity, shows an intense multiplication as is usually expected when handling pulsed systems. This last stage is quite

  4. Annular Core Pulse Reactor upgrade quarterly report, April--June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Information is presented concerning safety, compliance, and documentation requirements; core design; console development; containment systems; fuel element design; UO 2 -BeO fuel development; secondary fuel material studies; and driver core fuel element

  5. Analytical solution of neutron transport equation in an annular reactor with a rotating pulsed source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixeira, Paulo Cleber Mendonca

    2002-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution of the neutron transport equation in an annular reactor is presented with a short and rotating neutron source of the type S(x) δ (x- Vt), where V is the speed of annular pulsed reactor. The study is an extension of a previous study by Williams [12] carried out with a pulsed source of the type S(x) δ (t). In the new concept of annular pulsed reactor designed to produce continuous high flux, the core consists of a subcritical annular geometry pulsed by a rotating modulator, producing local super prompt critical condition, thereby giving origin to a rotating neutron pulse. An analytical solution is obtained by opening up of the annular geometry and applying one energy group transport theory in one dimension using applied mathematical techniques of Laplace transform and Complex Variables. The general solution for the flux consists of a fundamental mode, a finite number of harmonics and a transient integral. A condition which limits the number of harmonics depending upon the circumference of the annular geometry has been obtained. Inverse Laplace transform technique is used to analyse instability condition in annular reactor core. A regenerator parameter in conjunction with perimeter of the ring and nuclear properties is used to obtain stable and unstable harmonics and to verify if these exist. It is found that the solution does not present instability in the conditions stated in the new concept of annular pulsed reactor. (author)

  6. Replacement fuel scoping studies for the Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hays, K.; Martin, L.; Parma, E.

    1995-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) is undertaking a new mission for the Department of Energy: production of the radioisotope 99 Mo used in nuclear medicine applications. Isotope production is significantly different from previous programs conducted at the ACRR that typically required high intensity, short duration pulses. The current UO 2 -BeO fuel will power the initial startup phase of the production program, and can perform exceptionally well for this mission. However, this type of fuel is no longer available, commercially or otherwise. This paper presents the results of some preliminary studies of commercially available fuels

  7. Annular core liquid-salt cooled reactor with multiple fuel and blanket zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Per F.

    2013-05-14

    A liquid fluoride salt cooled, high temperature reactor having a reactor vessel with a pebble-bed reactor core. The reactor core comprises a pebble injection inlet located at a bottom end of the reactor core and a pebble defueling outlet located at a top end of the reactor core, an inner reflector, outer reflector, and an annular pebble-bed region disposed in between the inner reflector and outer reflector. The annular pebble-bed region comprises an annular channel configured for receiving pebble fuel at the pebble injection inlet, the pebble fuel comprising a combination of seed and blanket pebbles having a density lower than the coolant such that the pebbles have positive buoyancy and migrate upward in said annular pebble-bed region toward the defueling outlet. The annular pebble-bed region comprises alternating radial layers of seed pebbles and blanket pebbles.

  8. Study of startup conditions of a pulsed annular reactor; Estudo das reacoes de partida de um reator anelar pulsado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mario Augusto Bezerra da

    2003-10-15

    A new concept of reactor, which combines features of pulsed and stationary reactors, was proposed so as to produce intense neutronic fluxes. Such a reactor, known as VICHFPR (Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor), consists of a subcritical core with an annular geometry and pulsed by a rotating reflector which acts as a reactivity modulator as it produces a short pulse (approximately equal to 1 ms) of high intensity, guiding the region near the pulser to super-prompt critical state. This dissertation intends to analyze the startup conditions of a Pulsed Annular Reactor. The evolution of the neutron pulse intensity is analyzed when the reactivity modulator is brought upwards according to a helicoidal path from its initial position (far away from the core), when the multiplication factor has a subcritical value, up to the final position (near the core), in which a super-prompt critical state is reached. Part of the analysis is based on the variation of neutron reflection, which is a uniform function of the exit and reflection angles between the core and the modulator. It must be emphasized that this work is an approximation of the real situation. As the initial and final reactor parameters are known, a programming code in Fortran is worked out to provide the multiplication factor and the flux intensity evolution. According to the results obtained with this code, the conditions under which the modulator must be lifted up during the startup are established. Basically, these conditions are related to the analysis of the rising and the rotation velocities, the reflector saving and the initial distance between the reactor and the modulator. The Pulsed Annular Reactor startup was divided into three stages. Because of its negative reactivity in the first two stages, the neutron multiplication is not large, while the last one, having a positive reactivity, shows an intense multiplication as is usually expected when handling pulsed systems. This last stage is quite

  9. Analysis of the neutron flux in an annular pulsed reactor by using finite volume method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Mário A.B. da; Narain, Rajendra; Bezerra, Jair de L., E-mail: mabs500@gmail.com, E-mail: narain@ufpe.br, E-mail: jairbezerra@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro de Tecnologia e Geociências. Departamento de Energia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Production of very intense neutron sources is important for basic nuclear physics and for material testing and isotope production. Nuclear reactors have been used as sources of intense neutron fluxes, although the achievement of such levels is limited by the inability to remove fission heat. Periodic pulsed reactors provide very intense fluxes by a rotating modulator near a subcritical core. A concept for the production of very intense neutron fluxes that combines features of periodic pulsed reactors and steady state reactors was proposed by Narain (1997). Such a concept is known as Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) and was analyzed by using diffusion equation with moving boundary conditions and Finite Difference Method with Crank-Nicolson formalism. This research aims to analyze the flux distribution in the Very Intense Continuous Flux High Pulsed Reactor (VICHFPR) by using the Finite Volume Method and compares its results with those obtained by the previous computational method. (author)

  10. Analytical solution of neutron transport equation in an annular reactor with a rotating pulsed source; Resolucao analitica da equacao de transporte de neutrons em um reator anelar com fonte pulsada rotativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teixeira, Paulo Cleber Mendonca

    2002-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution of the neutron transport equation in an annular reactor is presented with a short and rotating neutron source of the type S(x) {delta} (x- Vt), where V is the speed of annular pulsed reactor. The study is an extension of a previous study by Williams [12] carried out with a pulsed source of the type S(x) {delta} (t). In the new concept of annular pulsed reactor designed to produce continuous high flux, the core consists of a subcritical annular geometry pulsed by a rotating modulator, producing local super prompt critical condition, thereby giving origin to a rotating neutron pulse. An analytical solution is obtained by opening up of the annular geometry and applying one energy group transport theory in one dimension using applied mathematical techniques of Laplace transform and Complex Variables. The general solution for the flux consists of a fundamental mode, a finite number of harmonics and a transient integral. A condition which limits the number of harmonics depending upon the circumference of the annular geometry has been obtained. Inverse Laplace transform technique is used to analyse instability condition in annular reactor core. A regenerator parameter in conjunction with perimeter of the ring and nuclear properties is used to obtain stable and unstable harmonics and to verify if these exist. It is found that the solution does not present instability in the conditions stated in the new concept of annular pulsed reactor. (author)

  11. Medical isotope production: A new research initiative for the Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coats, R.L.; Parma, E.J.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation has been performed to evaluate the capabilities of the Annular Core Research Reactor and its supporting Hot Cell Facility for the production of 99 Mo and its separation from the fission product stream. Various target irradiation locations for a variety of core configurations were investigated, including the central cavity, fuel and reflector locations, and special target configurations outside the active fuel region. Monte Carlo techniques, in particular MCNP using ENDF B-V cross sections, were employed for the evaluation. The results indicate that the reactor, as currently configured, and with its supporting Hot Cell Facility, would be capable in meeting the current US demand if called upon. Modest modifications, such as increasing the capacity of the external heat exchangers, would permit significantly higher continuous power operation and even greater 99 Mo production ensuring adequate capacity for future years

  12. Characterization of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR Neutron Radiography System Imaging Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaiser Krista

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL is an epithermal pool-type research reactor licensed up to a thermal power of 2.4 MW. The ACRR facility has a neutron radiography facility that is used for imaging a wide range of items including reactor fuel and neutron generators. The ACRR neutron radiography system has four apertures (65:1, 125:1, 250:1, and 500:1 available to experimenters. The neutron flux and spectrum as well as the gamma dose rate were characterized at the imaging plane for the ACRR's neutron radiography system for the 65:1, 125:1 and 250:1 apertures.

  13. Neutron Environment Characterization of the Central Cavity in the Annular Core Research Reactor *

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parma Edward J.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Characterization of the neutron environment in the central cavity of the Sandia National Laboratories' Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR is important in order to provide experimenters with the most accurate spectral information and maintain a high degree of fidelity in performing reactor experiments. Characterization includes both modeling and experimental efforts. Building accurate neutronic models of the ACRR and the central cavity “bucket” environments that can be used by experimenters is important in planning and designing experiments, as well as assessing the experimental results and quantifying uncertainties. Neutron fluence characterizations of two bucket environments, LB44 and PLG, are presented. These two environments are used frequently and represent two extremes in the neutron spectrum. The LB44 bucket is designed to remove the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and significantly attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The PLG bucket is designed to enhance the thermal component of the neutron spectrum and attenuate the gamma-ray fluence. The neutron characterization for each bucket was performed by irradiating 20 different activation foil types, some of which were cadmium covered, resulting in 37 different reactions at the peak axial flux location in each bucket. The dosimetry results were used in the LSL-M2 spectrum adjustment code with a 640-energy group MCNP-generated trial spectrum, self-shielding correction factors, the SNLRML or IRDFF dosimetry cross-section library, trial spectrum uncertainty, and trial covariance matrix, to generate a least-squares adjusted neutron spectrum, spectrum uncertainty, and covariance matrix. Both environment character-izations are well documented and the environments are available for use by experimenters.

  14. Optimization of the binary breeder reactor. VIII annular core fueled with 233U - 238U and Pu-238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, J.A. do; Ishiguro, Y.

    1988-04-01

    First cycle burnup characteristics of a 1200 MWe binary breeder reactor with annular core fueled with metallic 233 U- 238 U-Zr, Pu- 238 U-Zr and Th in the blankets have been analysed. The Doppler effect is small as expected in a metal fueled fast reactor. The sodium void reactivity is, in general, smaller than in metal fueled homogeneous fast reactors of 1 m core height. The estimates of the required and available control rod worths show a large shutdown margin throughout the operational cycle. There are flexibilities in the blanket fueling and well balanced breeding in the two cycles, uranium and thorium, with doubling times of about 20 years are possible. (author) [pt

  15. Lessons Learned from Sandia National Laboratories' Operational Readiness Review of the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bendure, Albert O.; Bryson, James W.

    1999-01-01

    The Sandia ACRR (a Hazard Category 2 Nuclear Reactor Facility) was defueled in June 1997 to modify the reactor core and control system to produce medical radioisotopes for the Department of Energy (DOE) Isotope Production Program. The DOE determined that an Operational Readiness Review (ORR) was required to confirm readiness to begin operations within the revised safety basis. This paper addresses the ORR Process, lessons learned from the Sandia and DOE ORRS of the ACRR, and the use of the ORR to confirm authorization basis implementation

  16. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  17. Nuclear piston engine and pulsed gaseous core reactor power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dugan, E.T.

    1976-01-01

    The investigated nuclear piston engines consist of a pulsed, gaseous core reactor enclosed by a moderating-reflecting cylinder and piston assembly and operate on a thermodynamic cycle similar to the internal combustion engine. The primary working fluid is a mixture of uranium hexafluoride, UF 6 , and helium, He, gases. Highly enriched UF 6 gas is the reactor fuel. The helium is added to enhance the thermodynamic and heat transfer characteristics of the primary working fluid and also to provide a neutron flux flattening effect in the cylindrical core. Two and four-stroke engines have been studied in which a neutron source is the counterpart of the sparkplug in the internal combustion engine. The piston motions which have been investigated include pure simple harmonic, simple harmonic with dwell periods, and simple harmonic in combination with non-simple harmonic motion. The results of the conducted investigations indicate good performance potential for the nuclear piston engine with overall efficiencies of as high as 50 percent for nuclear piston engine power generating units of from 10 to 50 Mw(e) capacity. Larger plants can be conceptually designed by increasing the number of pistons, with the mechanical complexity and physical size as the probable limiting factors. The primary uses for such power systems would be for small mobile and fixed ground-based power generation (especially for peaking units for electrical utilities) and also for nautical propulsion and ship power

  18. Evaluation of the Start-Up Core Physics Tests at Japan's High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (Annular Core Loadings)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Nozomu Fujimoto; James W. Sterbentz; Luka Snoj; Atsushi Zukeran

    2010-03-01

    The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a 30 MWth, graphite-moderated, helium-cooled reactor that was constructed with the objectives to establish and upgrade the technological basis for advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) as well as to conduct various irradiation tests for innovative high-temperature research. The core size of the HTTR represents about one-half of that of future HTGRs, and the high excess reactivity of the HTTR, necessary for compensation of temperature, xenon, and burnup effects during power operations, is similar to that of future HTGRs. During the start-up core physics tests of the HTTR, various annular cores were formed to provide experimental data for verification of design codes for future HTGRs. The Japanese government approved construction of the HTTR in the 1989 fiscal year budget; construction began at the Oarai Research and Development Center in March 1991 and was completed May 1996. Fuel loading began July 1, 1998, from the core periphery. The first criticality was attained with an annular core on November 10, 1998 at 14:18, followed by a series of start-up core physics tests until a fully-loaded core was developed on December 16, 1998. Criticality tests were carried out into January 1999. The first full power operation with an average core outlet temperature of 850ºC was completed on December 7, 2001, and operational licensing of the HTTR was approved on March 6, 2002. The HTTR attained high temperature operation at 950 ºC in April 19, 2004. After a series of safety demonstration tests, it will be used as the heat source in a hydrogen production system by 2015. Hot zero-power critical, rise-to-power, irradiation, and safety demonstration testing , have also been performed with the HTTR, representing additional means for computational validation efforts. Power tests were performed in steps from 0 to 30 MW, with various tests performed at each step to confirm

  19. Annular pulse column development studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedict, G.E.

    1980-01-01

    The capacity of critically safe cylindrical pulse columns limits the size of nuclear fuel solvent extraction plants because of the limited cross-sectional area of plutonium, U-235, or U-233 processing columns. Thus, there is a need to increase the cross-sectional area of these columns. This can be accomplished through the use of a column having an annular cross section. The preliminary testing of a pilot-plant-scale annular column has been completed and is reported herein. The column is made from 152.4-mm (6-in.) glass pipe sections with an 89-mm (3.5-in.) o.d. internal tube, giving an annular width of 32-mm (1.25-in.). Louver plates are used to swirl the column contents to prevent channeling of the phases. The data from this testing indicate that this approach can successfully provide larger-cross-section critically safe pulse columns. While the capacity is only 70% of that of a cylindrical column of similar cross section, the efficiency is almost identical to that of a cylindrical column. No evidence was seen of any non-uniform pulsing action from one side of the column to the other

  20. The Liquid Annular Reactor System (LARS) propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Horn, F.; Lenard, R.

    1990-01-01

    A concept for very high specific impulse (greater than 2000 seconds) direct nuclear propulsion is described. The concept, termed the liquid annular reactor system (LARS), uses liquid nuclear fuel elements to heat hydrogen propellant to very high temperatures (approximately 6000 K). Operating pressure is moderate (approximately 10 atm), with the result that the outlet hydrogen is virtually 100 percent dissociated to monatomic H. The molten fuel is contained in a solid container of its own material, which is rotated to stabilize the liquid layer by centripetal force. LARS reactor designs are described, together with neutronic and thermal-hydraulic analyses. Power levels are on the order of 200 megawatts. Typically, LARS designs use seven rotating fuel elements, are beryllium moderated, and have critical radii of approximately 100 cm (core L/D approximately equal to 1.5)

  1. Experimental investigation of the vibration response of a flexible tube due to simulated reactor core, cross and annular exit flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haslinger, K.H.; Martin, M.L.; Higgins, W.H.; Rossano, F.V.

    1989-01-01

    Instrumentation tubes in pressurized nuclear reactors have experienced wear due to excessive flow-induced vibrations. Experiments to identify the predominant flow excitation mechanism at a particular plant, and to develop a sleeve design to remedy the wear problem are reported. An instrumented flow visualization model enabled simulation of a wide range of individual or combined reactor core flow, cross flow and thimble flow conditions. The instrumentation scheme adopted for these experiments used proximity displacement transducers and a force transducer to measure respectively tube motion and contact/impact forces at the wear region. Extensive testing of the original, in-plant configuration identified the normal core flow as the primary source of excitation. Shielding the In-Core-Instrumentation thimble tube from the normal core flow curtailed vibration amplitudes; however, thimble flow excitation then became more pronounced. Various outlet nozzle configurations were investigated. An internal cavity combined with radial outlet slots became the optimum solution for the problem. The paper presents typical test data in the form of orbital tube motion, spectrum analysis and time history collages. The effectiveness of shielding the instrumentation tube from the flow is demonstrated. (author)

  2. Limited Diffraction Maps for Pulsed Wave Annular Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Paul D.

    2002-01-01

    A procedure is provided for decomposing the linear field of flat pulsed wave annular arrays into an equivalent set of known limited diffraction Bessel beams. Each Bessel beam propagates with known characteristics, enabling good insight into the propagation of annular fields to be obtained...

  3. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  4. Characterization of graphite-matrix pulsed reactor fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karnes, C.H.; Marion, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    The performance of the Annular Core Pulsed Reactor (ACPR) is being upgraded in order to accommodate higher fluence experiments for fast reactor fuel element transient and safety studies. The increased fluence requires a two-zone core with the inner zone containing fuel having a high enthalpy and the capability of withstanding very high temperatures during both pulsed and steady state operation. Because the fuel is subjected to a temperature risetime of 2 to 5 ms and to a large temperature difference across the diameter, fracture due to thermal stresses is the primary failure mode. One of the fuels considered for the high enthalpy inner region is a graphite-matrix fuel containing a dispersion of uranium--zirconium carbide solid solution particles. A program was initiated to optimize the development of this class of fuel. This summary presents results on formulations of fuel which have been fabricated by the Materials Technology Group of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory

  5. Numerical and experimental study of an annular pulse tube used in the pulse tube cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiaomin; Chen, Yanyan; Wang, Xiaotao; Dai, Wei; Luo, Ercang

    2017-12-01

    Multi-stage pulse tube coolers normally use a U-type configuration. For compactness, it is attractive to build a completely co-axial multi-stage pulse tube cooler. In this way, an annular shape pulse tube is inevitable. Although there are a few reports about previous annular pulse tubes, a detailed study and comparison with a circular pulse tube is lacking. In this paper, a numeric model based on CFD software is carried out to compare the annular pulse tube and circular pulse tube used in a single stage in-line type pulse tube cooler with about 10 W of cooling power at 77 K. The length and cross sectional area of the two pulse tubes are kept the same. Simulation results show that the enthalpy flow in the annular pulse tube is lower by 1.6 W (about 11% of the enthalpy flow) compared to that in circular pulse tube. Flow and temperature distribution characteristics are also analyzed in detail. Experiments are then conducted for comparison with an in-line type pulse tube cooler. With the same acoustic power input, the pulse tube cooler with a circular pulse tube obtains 7.88 W of cooling power at 77 K, while using an annular pulse tube leads to a cooling power of 7.01 W, a decrease of 0.9 W (11.4%) on the cooling performance. The study sets the basis for building a completely co-axial two-stage pulse tube cooler.

  6. Study on two phase flow characteristics in annular pulsed extraction column with different ratio of annular width to column diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Wei; Dai Youyuan; Wang Jiading

    1994-01-01

    Annular pulsed extraction column can successfully provide large throughput and can be made critically safe for fuel reprocessing. This investigation is to study the two phase flow characteristics in annular pulsed extraction column with four different annular width. 30% TBP (in kerosene)-water is used (water as continuous phase). Results show that modified Pratt correlation is valid under the experimental operation conditions for the annular pulsed extraction column. The characteristic velocity U K decreased with the increase of energy input and increased with the increase of the ratio of annular width to column diameter. Flooding velocity correlation is suggested. The deviation of the calculated values from the experimental data is within +20% for four annular width in a pulsed extraction column

  7. Core-annular flow through a horizontal pipe : Hydrodynamic counterbalancing of buoyancy force on core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooms, G.; Vuik, C.; Poesio, P.

    2007-01-01

    A theoretical investigation has been made of core-annular flow: the flow of a high-viscosity liquid core surrounded by a low-viscosity liquid annular layer through a horizontal pipe. Special attention is paid to the question of how the buoyancy force on the core, caused by a density difference

  8. Recent operational history of the new Sandia Pulsed Reactor III (SPR III)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, T.R.; Estes, B.F.; Reuscher, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    The Sandia Pulsed Reactor III (SPR III) is a fast-pulse research reactor which was designed and built at Sandia Laboratories and achieved criticality in August 1975. The reactor is now characterized and is in an operational configuration. The core consists of 18 fuel plates (258 kg fuel mass) of fully enriched uranium alloyed with 10 wt.% molybdenum. It is arranged in an annular configuration with an inside diameter of 17.78 cm, an outside diameter of 29.72 cm, and a height of 35.9 cm. The reactor core uses reflectors of copper and aluminum for control and an external bolting arrangement to secure the fuel plates. SPR III and SPR II are operated on an interchangeable basis using the same facility and control system. As of June 1977, SPR III has had over 240 operations with core temperatures up to 541 0 C

  9. Operation of the annular pulsed column, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Keiki; Tsukada, Takeshi

    1988-01-01

    The heat of reaction generated form the uranium extraction is considered to from the temperature profile inside the pulsed column. A simulation code was developed to estimate the temperature profile, considering heat generation and counter-current heat transfer. The temperature profiles calculated using this code was found to depend on both the position of the extraction zone and the operating condition. The reported experimental result was fairly represented by this simulation code. We consider that this presented simulation code is capable of providing with the temperature profile in the pulsed column and useful for the monitoring of the uranium extraction zone. (author)

  10. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  11. Experimental study of neutron streaming through steel-walled annular ducts in reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toshimas, M.; Nobuo, S.

    1983-01-01

    For the purpose of providing experimental data to assess neutron streaming calculations, neutron flux measurements were performed along the axes of the steel-walled annular ducts set up in a water shield of the pool-type reactor JRR-4. An annular duct simulated the air gap around the main coolant pipe. Another duct simulated the streaming path around the primary circulating pump of the integrated-type marine reactor. A 90-deg bend annular duct was also studied. In a set of measurements, the distance Z between the core center and the duct axis and the annular gap width delta were taken as parameters, that is, Z = 0, 80, and 160 cm and delta = 2.2, 4.7, and 10.1 cm. The reaction rates and the fluxes measured by the activation method are given in terms of absolute magnitude within an accuracy of + or - 30%. An empirical formula is derived based on those measured data, which describes the axial distribution of the neutron flux in the steel-walled annular duct in reactor shields. It is expressed by a simple function of the axial distance in units of the square root of the line-of-sight area, S /SUB l/ . The accuracy of the formula is examined by taking into account the duct location with respect to the reactor core, the neutron energy, the steel wall thickness, and the media outside of the steel wall. The accuracy of the formula is, in general, <30% in the axial distance between 3√S /SUB l/ and 30√S /SUB l/

  12. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  13. Reactor core of nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasagawa, Masaru; Masuda, Hiroyuki; Mogi, Toshihiko; Kanazawa, Nobuhiro.

    1994-01-01

    In a reactor core, a fuel inventory at an outer peripheral region is made smaller than that at a central region. Fuel assemblies comprising a small number of large-diameter fuel rods are used at the central region and fuel assemblies comprising a great number of smalldiameter fuel rods are used at the outer peripheral region. Since a burning degradation rate of the fuels at the outer peripheral region can be increased, the burning degradation rate at the infinite multiplication factor of fuels at the outer region can substantially be made identical with that of the fuels in the inner region. As a result, the power distribution in the direction of the reactor core can be flattened throughout the entire period of the burning cycle. Further, it is also possible to make the degradation rate of fuels at the outer region substantially identical with that of fuels at the inner side. A power peak formed at the outer circumferential portion of the reactor core of advanced burning can be lowered to improve the fuel integrity, and also improve the reactor safety and operation efficiency. (N.H.)

  14. Study and optimization of an annular photocatalytic slurry reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camera-Roda, Giovanni; Santarelli, Francesco; Panico, Mauro

    2009-05-01

    The experimental results obtained for the photocatalytic degradation of a model organic dye in an annular slurry reactor are analyzed with the aid of a mathematical model. The model is used also to study the effects on the performances of many operative conditions: flow rate, photocatalyst concentration, power of the lamp, size of the photocatalytic particles, dimensions of the reactor. The investigation demonstrates that the rate of the process is often limited by the radiant energy transfer and that some simple rules can be followed in order to optimize different yields and the observed rate of reaction.

  15. Reactor core control device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Norihiko

    1991-01-01

    The device of the present invention comprises a control line having a control pump and a control tank for injecting liquids for neutron reflectors to an annular tank disposed in a reactor container, a supply line having a supply pump and a supply tank for supplying the liquids for the reflectors to the control tank, a drain line having a control valve, a drain valve and a drain tank disposed to the annular tank and a make-up line for supplying the liquids for the reflectors from the drain tank to the control tank. Liquids such as water or oil for the neutron reflectors are injected in the annular tank disposed at the periphery of the reactor core to raise the level of the liquids in the tank and conduct burning in the reactor core. The liquid level may be controlled by an appropriate ON/OFF operation of a pump with no requirement for a motor or a driving device at a high accuracy and rotational portions. Periodical maintenances are not necessary. Reactor scram can be conducted only by opening the drain valve and the reflectors may be made of inexpensive materials. (N.H.)

  16. Device for protecting deformations of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Yasuyoshi; Urushihara, Hiroshi.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To provide a fluid pressure cylinder, which is operated according to change in temperature of coolant for a reactor to restrain or release a core, to simply and effectively protect deformation of the core. Structure: A closed fluid pressure cylinder interiorly filled with suitable fluid is disposed in peripherally equally spaced relation in an annular space between a core barrel of a reactor and a reactor vessel. A piston is mounted in fluid-tight fashion in a plurality of piston openings made in the cylinder, the piston being slidably moved according to expansion and contraction of the fluid filled in the cylinder. The piston has a movable frame mounted at the foremost end thereof, the movable frame being moved integral with the piston, and the surface opposite the mount thereof biasing the outermost peripheral surface of the core. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Fast reactor core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Fast Reactor (FR) core concepts to improve transmutation efficiency were conducted. A heterogeneous MA loaded core was designed based on the 1000MWe-ABR breakeven core. The heterogeneous MA loaded core with Zr-H loaded moderated targets had a better transmutation performance than the MA homogeneous loaded core. The annular pellet rod design was proposed as one of the possible design options for the MA target. It was shown that using annular pellet MA rods mitigates the self-shielding effect in the moderated target so as to enhance the transmutation rate

  18. Reactor core control device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sano, Hiroki

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides a reactor core control device, in which switching from a manual operation to an automatic operation, and the control for the parameter of an automatic operation device are facilitated. Namely, the hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter by an manual operation input means is stored. The hysteresis of the control for the operation parameter is collected. The state of the reactor core simulated by an operation control to which the collected operation parameters are manually inputted is determined as an input of the reactor core state to the automatic input means. The record of operation upon manual operation is stored as a hysteresis of control for the operation parameter, but the hysteresis information is not only the result of manual operation of the operation parameter. This is results of operation conducted by a skilled operator who judge the state of the reactor core to be optimum. Accordingly, it involves information relevant to the reactor core state. Then, it is considered that the optimum automatic operation is not deviated greatly from the manual operation. (I.S.)

  19. Subchannel analysis of sodium-cooled reactor fuel assemblies with annular fuel pins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmott, Matthew; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Hejzlar, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Using a RELAP5-3D subchannel analysis model, the thermal-hydraulic behavior of sodium-cooled fuel assemblies with internally and externally cooled annular fuel rods was investigated, in an effort to enhance the economic performance of sodium-fast reactors by increasing the core power density, decreasing the core pressure drop, and extending the fuel discharge burnup. Both metal and oxide fuels at high and low conversion ratios (CR=0.25 and CR=1.00) were investigated. The externally and internally cooled annular fuel design is most beneficial when applied to the low CR core, as clad temperatures are reduced by up to 62.3degC for the oxide fuel, and up to 18.5degC for the metal fuel. This could result in a power uprates of up to ∼44% for the oxide fuel, and up to ∼43% for the metal fuel. The use of duct ribs was explored to flatten the temperature distribution at the core outlet. Subchannel analyses revealed that no fuel melting would occur in the case of complete blockage of the hot interior-annular channel for both metal and oxide fuels. Also, clad damage would not occur for the metal fuel if the power uprate is 38% or less, but would indeed occur for the oxide fuel. (author)

  20. Nuclear reactor core assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.

    1978-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to provide a fast reactor core assembly design for use with a fluid coolant such as liquid sodium or carbon monoxide incorporating a method of increasing the percentage of coolant flow though the blanket elements relative to the total coolant flow through the blanket and fuel elements during shutdown conditions without using moving parts. It is claimed that deterioration due to reactor radiation or temperature conditions is avoided and ready modification or replacement is possible. (U.K.)

  1. BWR type reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatemichi, Shin-ichiro.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To eliminate the variation in the power distribution of a BWR type reactor core in the axial direction even if the flow rate is increased or decreased by providing a difference in the void coefficient between the upper part and the lower parts of the reactor core, and increasing the void coefficient at the lower part of the reactor core. Constitution: The void coefficient of the lower region from the center to the lower part along the axial direction of a nuclear fuel assembly is increased to decrease the dependence on the flow rate of the axial power distribution of the nuclear fuel assembly. That is, a water/fuel ratio is varied, the water in non-boiled region is increased or the neutron spectrum is varied so as to vary the void coefficient. In order to exemplify it, the rate of the internal pellets of the fuel rod of the nuclear fuel assembly or the shape of the channel box is varied. Accordingly, the power does not considerably vary even if the flow rate is altered since the power is varied in the power operation. (Yoshihara, H.)

  2. Analytical evaluation of neutron diffusion equation for the geometry of very intense continuous high flux pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narain, Rajendra

    1995-01-01

    Using the concept of Very Intense Continuous High Flux Pulsed Reactor to obtain a rotating high flux pulse in an annular core an analytical treatment for the quasi-static solution with a moving reflector is presented. Under quasi-static situation, time averaged values for important parameters like multiplication factor, flux, leakage do not change with time. As a result the instantaneous solution can be considered to be separable in time and space after correcting for the coordinates for the motion of the pulser. The space behaviour of the pulser is considered as exp(-αx 2 ). Movement of delayed neutron precursors is also taken into account. (author). 4 refs

  3. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  4. Reactor core lower support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent refers to the lower support of a nuclear reactor core, and is intended for supporting each fuel assembly of the core and for distributing the primary coolant through these assemblies. It is composed of: - A first thick plate supporting the fuel assemblies. Vertical channels are machined in this plate directly facing each assembly for the passage of the primary fluid: - A second thin plate drilled with orifices, fixed under the first plate, with no space between them, and so positioned that each orifice is directly facing one of the channels. The section of the orifices diminishes from the centre of the plate towards its periphery. The second plate can also be constituted of an assembly of juxtaposed smaller plates, each small plate being secured to the first plate independently of the neighbouring plates [fr

  5. A coaxial-output capacitor-loaded annular pulse forming line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Li, Yongdong; Su, Jiancang; Yu, Binxiong; Xu, Xiudong; Zhao, Liang; Cheng, Jie; Zeng, Bo

    2018-04-01

    A coaxial-output capacitor-loaded annular pulse forming line (PFL) is developed in order to reduce the flat top fluctuation amplitude of the forming quasi-square pulse and improve the quality of the pulse waveform produced by a Tesla-pulse forming network (PFN) type pulse generator. A single module composed of three involute dual-plate PFNs is designed, with a characteristic impedance of 2.44 Ω, an electrical length of 15 ns, and a sustaining voltage of 60 kV. The three involute dual-plate PFNs connected in parallel have the same impedance and electrical length. Due to the existed small inductance and capacitance per unit length in each involute dual-plate PFN, the upper cut-off frequency of the PFN is increased. As a result, the entire annular PFL has better high-frequency response capability. Meanwhile, the three dual-plate PFNs discharge in parallel, which is much closer to the coaxial output. The series connecting inductance between adjacent two modules is significantly reduced when the annular PFL modules are connected in series. The pulse waveform distortion is reduced when the pulse transfers along the modules. Finally, the shielding electrode structure is applied on both sides of the module. The electromagnetic field is restricted in the module when a single module discharges, and the electromagnetic coupling between the multi-stage annular PFLs is eliminated. Based on the principle of impedance matching between the multi-stage annular PFL and the coaxial PFL, the structural optimization design of a mixed PFL in a Tesla type pulse generator is completed with the transient field-circuit co-simulation method. The multi-stage annular PFL consists of 18 stage annular PFL modules in series, with the characteristic impedance of 44 Ω, the electrical length of 15 ns, and the sustaining voltage of 1 MV. The mixed PFL can generate quasi-square electrical pulses with a pulse width of 43 ns, and the fluctuation ratio of the pulse flat top is less than 8% when the

  6. Reactor core simulations in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, R.; Koclas, J.; Shen, W.; Jenkins, D. A.; Altiparmakov, D.; Rouben, B.

    2004-01-01

    This review will address the current simulation flow-chart currently used for reactor-physics simulations in the Canadian industry. The neutron behaviour in heavy-water moderated power reactors is quite different from that in other power reactors, thus the core physics approximations are somewhat different Some codes used are particular to the context of heavy-water reactors, and the paper focuses on this aspect. The paper also shows simulations involving new design features of the Advanced Candu Reactor TM (ACR TM), and provides insight into future development, expected in the coming years. (authors)

  7. Reactor core monitor for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo; Kurihara, Kunitoshi.

    1992-01-01

    The device of the present invention provides a various information of a wide adaptability, such as a power distribution, to an operator by determining a reactor core performance of the reactor by a performance calculation with improved accuracy. That is, a calculation means determines a neutron flux distribution of the reactor and coolant temperature based on the neutron flux distribution. A measuring means measures a cooled temperature of a reactor core inlet and a temperature at the exit of a fuel assembly. The result of coolant temperature by the measuring means and the result of the calculation by the calculation means are compared. The result of the calculation for the neutron flux distribution obtained by the calculation means is corrected based on the result of the comparison. The calculation means introduces calculation at higher accuracy by adopting two-dimensional balance in the fuel assembly. Further, a more accurate three-dimensional neutron diffusion calculation model is introduced in an on-line computer. Then, the accuracy of the calculation for the neutron flux distribution, power distribution, temperature distribution, etc. is improved. In view of the above, adaptability of a reactor core monitor is widened. (I.S.)

  8. Nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jabsen, F.S.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core stabilizing arrangement is described wherein a plurality of actuators, disposed in a pattern laterally surrounding a group of elongated fuel assemblies, press against respective contiguous fuel assemblies on the periphery of the group to reduce the clearance between adjacent fuel assemblies thereby forming a more compacted, vibration resistant core structure. 7 claims, 4 drawing figures

  9. Annular fuel element for high-temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bujas, R.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given of a compacted fuel element of annular shape which is enclosed in a graphite casing constituted by an inner tube and an outer tube. The inner tube is formed of graphite having a lower coefficient of shrinkage than the graphite of the outer tube under irradiation and is of smaller thickness than the outer tube

  10. High quantum efficiency annular backside silicon photodiodes for reflectance pulse oximetry in wearable wireless body sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duun, Sune Bro; Haahr, Rasmus Grønbek; Hansen, Ole

    2010-01-01

    The development of annular photodiodes for use in a reflectance pulse oximetry sensor is presented. Wearable and wireless body sensor systems for long-term monitoring require sensors that minimize power consumption. We have fabricated large area 2D ring-shaped silicon photodiodes optimized...

  11. Reactor core performance estimating device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Akira; Yamamoto, Toru; Shinpuku, Kimihiro; Chuzen, Takuji; Nishide, Fusayo.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention can autonomously simplify a neural net model thereby enabling to conveniently estimate various amounts which represents reactor core performances by a simple calculation in a short period of time. Namely, a reactor core performance estimation device comprises a nerve circuit net which divides the reactor core into a large number of spacial regions, and receives various physical amounts for each region as input signals for input nerve cells and outputs estimation values of each amount representing the reactor core performances as output signals of output nerve cells. In this case, the nerve circuit net (1) has a structure of extended multi-layered model having direct coupling from an upper stream layer to each of downstream layers, (2) has a forgetting constant q in a corrected equation for a joined load value ω using an inverse error propagation method, (3) learns various amounts representing reactor core performances determined using the physical models as teacher signals, (4) determines the joined load value ω decreased as '0' when it is to less than a predetermined value upon learning described above, and (5) eliminates elements of the nerve circuit net having all of the joined load value decreased to 0. As a result, the neural net model comprises an autonomously simplifying means. (I.S.)

  12. Development of an internally cooled annular fuel bundle for pressurized heavy water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamilton, H.; Armstrong, J.; Kittmer, A.; Zhuchkova, A.; Xu, R.; Hyland, B.; King, M.; Nava-Dominguez, A.; Livingstone, S.; Bergeron, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd., Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    A number of preliminary studies have been conducted at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited to explore the potential of using internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) in CANDU reactors including finite element thermo-mechanical modelling, reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, fabrication and mechanical design. The most compelling argument for this design compared to the conventional solid-rod design is the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperature for equivalent LERs (linear element ratings). This feature presents the potential for power up-rating or higher burnup and a decreased defect probability due to in-core power increases. The thermal-mechanical evaluation confirmed the significant reduction in maximum fuel temperatures for ICAF fuel compared to solid-rod fuel for equivalent LER. The maximum fuel temperature increase as a function of LER increase is also significantly less for ICAF fuel. As a result, the sheath stress induced by an equivalent power increase is approximately six times less for ICAF fuel than solid-rod fuel. This suggests that the power-increase thresholds to failure (due to stress-corrosion cracking) for ICAF fuel should be well above those for solid-rod fuel, providing improvement in operation flexibility and safety.

  13. Nuclear characteristic simulation device for reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arakawa, Akio; Kobayashi, Yuji.

    1994-01-01

    In a simulation device for nuclear characteristic of a PWR type reactor, there are provided a one-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic model for simulating one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core and average reactor power based on each of inputted signals of control rod pattern, a reactor core flow rate, reactor core pressure and reactor core inlet enthalphy, and a three-dimensional reactor core dynamic characteristic mode for simulating three-dimensional power distribution of the reactor core, and a nuclear instrumentation model for calculating read value of the nuclear instrumentation disposed in the reactor based on the average reactor core power and the reactor core three-dimensional power distribution. A one-dimensional neutron flux distribution in the axial direction of the reactor core, a reactor core average power, a reactor core three-dimensional power distribution and a nuclear instrumentation read value are calculated. As a result, the three-dimensional power distribution and the power level are continuously calculated. Further, since the transient change of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution is calculated accurately on real time, more actual response relative to a power monitoring device of the reactor core and operation performance can be simulated. (N.H.)

  14. Nuclear reactor core cooling arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redding, A.H.

    1978-01-01

    A core cooling system for a nuclear reactor having a plurality of primary fluid flow systems is described. The reactor coolant flow from the primary systems is joined upon entering the pressure vessel. Jointure is accomplished in a common chamber causing high coolant flow velocities at low static pressures. If a pipe ruptures in one of the primary fluid flow systems, the low pressure in the common chamber minimizes leakage from the intact flow systems. This allows continuation of coolant flow through the nuclear core for a sufficient length of time to effectively eliminate the possibility of thermal damage

  15. Coolant distribution device on reactor core side of HTGR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masuba, Yoshitaka.

    1993-01-01

    The coolant distribution device comprises an annular main body and a pressure loss source member having a plurality of blow ports perforated at positions equally dividing the circumference of the main body. The coolant distribution device is disposed to the outer circumference of a plurality of support columns disposed between the reactor core support plate and a rectification plate at a reactor floor portion. Coolants uprising in the reactor core and flowing under heating to a reactor floor portion are blown out from main cooling system pipelines and auxiliary cooling system pipelines, passed through the gap of the reactor core support plate and the rectification plate and sealed by the pressure loss source member. Since the difference of a speed head caused by geometrical shape in the circumferential direction of a flow channel is reduced as a pressure loss, the pressure in the pressure loss source member is kept uniform. Accordingly, a uniform amount of coolants is distributed from the blow ports of the pressure loss source member to the side of the reactor core of the reactor floor portion, to cool the outer circumference of the reactor core uniformly. (I.N.)

  16. Modeling of the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    In order to improve technical - economical parameters fuel with 2.4% enrichment and burnable absorber is started to be used at Ignalina NPP. Using code QUABOX/CUBBOX the main neutronic - physical characteristics were calculated for selected reactor core conditions

  17. Fast reactor core monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanda, Toshio; Inoue, Kotaro; Azekura, Kazuo.

    1982-01-01

    Purpose: To enable the rapid and accurate on-line identification of the state of a fast reactor core by effectively utilizing the measured data on the temperature and flow rate of the coolant. Constitution: The spacial power distribution and average assembly power are quickly calculated using an approximate calculating method, the measured values and the calculated values of the inlet and outlet temperature difference, flow rate and coolant physical values of an assembly are combined and are individually obtained, the most definite respective values and their errors are obtained by a least square method utilizing a formula of the relation between these values, and the power distribution and the temperature distribution of a reactor core are estimated in this manner. Accordingly, even when the measuring accuracy and the calculating accuracy are equal as in a fast reactor, the power distribution and the temperature distribution can be accurately estimated on-line at a high speed in a nuclear reactor, information required for the operator is provided, and the reactor can thus be safely and efficiently operated. (Yoshihara, H.)

  18. In-core instrumentation and reactor assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1984-01-01

    Information on the conditions in the reactor core is essential for the safe and economic operation of nuclear reactors. This book reviews the important aspects of measurement and interpretation of reactor core parameters. Contributions of industry and research laboratories on the state of the art cover measurement methods, core performance evaluation, and operating experience

  19. Core catchers for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntyre, Micheal; Gardner, I.P.

    1991-01-01

    A core catcher for containing nuclear core debris in the event of a breach in the reactor pressure vessel caused by a core meltdown is described. It has a multilayer sandwich construction comprising a middle layer of interlocking tongue-and-groove jointed refractory (e.g. zirconia) tiles or bricks sandwiched between inner and outer steel plates in the form of domes. The refractory bricks are fixed against movement relative to each other and the inner and outer steel plates by means of refractory cement. The inner steel plate is sacrificial in the event that it comes into contact with molten nuclear material but gives the sandwich construction greater shock resistance during normal operational service. The outer steel plate provides the main structural support for the core catcher. (author)

  20. Emergency reactor core cooling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Kinoshita, Shoichiro; Iwata, Yasutaka

    1996-11-01

    The present invention provides an emergency reactor core cooling device for a BWR type nuclear power plant. Namely, D/S pit (gas/water separator storage pool) water is used as a water source for the emergency reactor core cooling facility upon occurrence of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) by introducing the D/S pit water to the emergency reactor core cooling (ECCS) pump. As a result, the function as the ECCS facility can be eliminated from the function of the condensate storage tank which has been used as the ECCS facility. If the function is unnecessary, the level of quality control and that of earthquake resistance of the condensate storage tank can be lowered to a level of ordinary facilities to provide an effect of reducing the cost. On the other hand, since the D/S pit as the alternative water source is usually a facility at high quality control level and earthquake resistant level, there is no problem. The quality of the water in the D/S pit can be maintained constant by elevating pressure of the D/S pit water by a suppression pool cleanup (SPCU) pump to pass it through a filtration desalter thereby purifying the D/S pit water during the plant operation. (I.S.)

  1. Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed, designed and operated fast burst reactors for over 20 years. These reactors have been used for a variety of radiation effects programs. During this period, programs have required larger irradiation volumes primarily to expose complex electronic systems to postulated threat environments. As experiment volumes increased, a new reactor was built so that these components could be tested. The Sandia Pulse Reactor-IV is a logical evolution of the two decades of fast burst reactor development at Sandia

  2. Nuclear reactor core servicing apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, C.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved core servicing apparatus for a nuclear reactor of the type having a reactor vessel, a vessel head having a head penetration therethrough, a removable plug adapted to fit in the head penetration, and a core of the type having an array of elongated assemblies. The improved core servicing apparatus comprises a plurality of support columns suspended from the removable plug and extending downward toward the nuclear core, rigid support means carried by each of the support columns, and a plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns for servicing a plurality of assemblies. Each of the plurality of servicing means for each of the support columns is fixedly supported in a fixed array from the rigid support means. Means are provided for rotating the rigid support means and servicing means between condensed and expanded positions. When in the condensed position, the rigid support means and servicing means lie completely within the coextensive boundaries of the plug, and when in the expanded position, some of the rigid support means and servicing means lie without the coextensive boundaries of the plug

  3. Design of the pulse rod drive mechanism for pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Keyi

    1988-07-01

    The pulse rod drive mechanism is a critical movable device for a pulsed reactor. It is an executor under pulse operations, and it may be used in a shim rod under steady-state operations. The pneumatic-electromechanical driving method is taken in the designing. The structure, operating, calculation of parameters and designing methods of the pulse rod drive mechanism are briefly described in this paper. The testing results of the prototypical mechanism are also presented

  4. Design and neutronic investigation of the Nano fluids application to VVER-1000 nuclear reactor with dual cooled annular fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansarifar, G.R.; Ebrahimian, M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The change in neutronic parameters to the use of nanofluid as coolant is presented. • Nanoparticle deposition on fuel clad is investigated. • Radial and axial local power peaking factors are presented. • ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 have the lowest rate of K eff drop off. - Abstract: Nowadays, many efforts have been made to improve the efficiency of nuclear power plants. One of which is use of the dual cooled annular fuel which is an internally and externally cooled annular fuel with many advantages in heat transfer characteristics. Another is the use of nanoparticle/water (nanofluid) as coolant. In this paper, by combining these two methods, the change in neutronic parameters of the VVER-1000 nuclear reactor core with dual cooled annular fuel attributable to the use of nanoparticle/water (nanofluid) as coolant is presented. Optimization of type and volume fraction of nanoparticles in water that affect the safety enhancement of core primary parameters is intended in this study. Reactivity change, radial and axial local power peaking factors (LPPF), and the consequence of nanoparticle deposition on fuel clad are investigated. As a result of changing the effective multiplication factor and PPF calculations for six types of nanoparticles which have been studied extensively for their heat transfer properties including Alumina, Aluminum, Copper oxide, Copper, Titania, and Zirconia with different volume fractions, it can be concluded that at low concentration (0.03 volume fraction), Zirconia and Alumina are the optimum nanoparticles for normal operation. The maximum radial and axial PPF are found to be invariant to the type of nanofluid at low volume fractions. With an increase in nanoparticle deposition thickness on the outer and inner clad, a flux and K eff depression occurred and ZrO 2 and Al 2 O 3 have the lowest rate of drop off.

  5. Research on plasma core reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jarvis, G.A.; Barton, D.M.; Helmick, H.H.; Bernard, W.; White, R.H.

    1976-01-01

    Experiments and theoretical studies are being conducted for NASA on critical assemblies with one-meter diameter by one-meter long low-density cores surrounded by a thick beryllium reflector. These assemblies make extensive use of existing nuclear propulsion reactor components, facilities, and instrumentation. Due to excessive porosity in the reflector, the initial critical mass was 19 kg U(93.2). Addition of a 17-cm-thick by 89-cm-diameter beryllium flux trap in the cavity reduced the critical mass to 7 kg when all the uranium was in the zone just outside the flux trap. A mockup aluminum UF 6 container was placed inside the flux trap and fueled with uranium-graphite elements. Fission distributions and reactivity worths of fuel and structural materials were measured. Finally, an 85,000 cm 3 aluminum canister in the central region was fueled with UF 6 gas and fission density distributions determined. These results will be used to guide the design of a prototype plasma core reactor which will test energy removal by optical radiation

  6. Nuclear reactor neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speaker, Daniel P; Neeley, Gary W; Inman, James B

    2017-09-12

    A nuclear reactor includes a reactor pressure vessel and a nuclear reactor core comprising fissile material disposed in a lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel. The lower portion of the reactor pressure vessel is disposed in a reactor cavity. An annular neutron stop is located at an elevation above the uppermost elevation of the nuclear reactor core. The annular neutron stop comprises neutron absorbing material filling an annular gap between the reactor pressure vessel and the wall of the reactor cavity. The annular neutron stop may comprise an outer neutron stop ring attached to the wall of the reactor cavity, and an inner neutron stop ring attached to the reactor pressure vessel. An excore instrument guide tube penetrates through the annular neutron stop, and a neutron plug comprising neutron absorbing material is disposed in the tube at the penetration through the neutron stop.

  7. Seismic research on graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Shigang; Sun Libin; Zhang Zhengming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Reactors with graphite core structure include production reactor, water-cooled graphite reactor, gas-cooled reactor, high-temperature gas-cooled reactor and so on. Multi-body graphite core structure has nonlinear response under seismic excitation, which is different from the response of general civil structure, metal connection structure or bolted structure. Purpose: In order to provide references for the designing and construction of HTR-PM. This paper reviews the history of reactor seismic research evaluation from certain countries, and summarizes the research methods and research results. Methods: By comparing the methods adopted in different gas-cooled reactor cores, inspiration for our own HTR seismic research was achieved. Results and Conclusions: In this paper, the research ideas of graphite core seismic during the process of designing, constructing and operating HTR-10 are expounded. Also the project progress of HTR-PM and the research on side reflection with the theory of similarity is introduced. (authors)

  8. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directed restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements

  9. Characterization of Interfacial Waves and Pressure Drop in Horizontal Oil-Water Core-Annular Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Amitabh; Tripathi, Sumit; Singh, Ramesh; Tabor, Rico; Vinay, K. S.

    2017-11-01

    Core-Annular Flows (CAF) consist of a highly viscous fluid (e.g. oils, emulsions) being pumped through pipelines while being lubricated by a fluid of a much lower viscosity (e.g. water). In a series of experiments, we study CAF with the core fluid as oil. We find a clear scaling for the energy spectra of the interfacial waves with respect to the shear Reynolds number Rec of the fluid flow in the annulus. Specifically, we find that, at low values of Rec , the low wavenumber modes of the interface appear to dominate, while, at high values of Rec , the high wavenumber modes of the interface appear to dominate. Linear stability analysis of viscosity stratified flows appears to confirm this trend. The effective friction factor does not appear to change strongly with Rec , suggesting that the interfacial waves do not significantly change the effective shear stress felt by the core fluid. This weak dependence of the friction factor on Rec , along with a model for the holdup ratio, allows us to propose a very straightforward relationship between the pressure gradient and the flow rates of the core and annular fluids, which agrees with the experimental data. We thank Orica Limited (Australia) for funding the experiment via the IITB-Monash Research Academy.

  10. From reactors to long pulse sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, F.

    1995-01-01

    We will show, that by using an adapted instrumentation concept, the performance of a continuous source can be emulated by one switch on in long pulses for only about 10% of the total time. This 10 fold gain in neutron economy opens up the way for building reactor like sources with an order of magnitude higher flux than the present technological limits. Linac accelerator driven spallation lends itself favorably for the realization of this kind of long pulse sources, which will be complementary to short pulse spallation sources, the same way continuous reactor sources are

  11. On the nonlinear interfacial instability of rotating core-annular flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Aidrian V.; Hall, Philip

    1993-01-01

    The interfacial stability of rotating core-annular flows is investigated. The linear and nonlinear effects are considered for the case when the annular region is very thin. Both asymptotic and numerical methods are used to solve the flow in the core and film regions which are coupled by a difference in viscosity and density. The long-term behavior of the fluid-fluid interface is determined by deriving its nonlinear evolution in the form of a modified Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation. We obtain a generalization of this equation to three dimensions. The flows considered are applicable to a wide array of physical problems where liquid films are used to lubricate higher or lower viscosity core fluids, for which a concentric arrangement is desired. Linearized solutions show that the effects of density and viscosity stratification are crucial to the stability of the interface. Rotation generally destabilizes non-axisymmetric disturbances to the interface, whereas the centripetal forces tend to stabilize flows in which the film contains the heavier fluid. Nonlinear affects allow finite amplitude helically travelling waves to exist when the fluids have different viscosities.

  12. Reactor core design aiding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanazawa, Nobuhiro; Hamaguchi, Yukio; Nakao, Takashi; Kondo, Yasuhide

    1995-01-01

    A two-dimensional radial power distribution and an axial one-dimensional power distribution are determined based on a distribution of a three-dimensional infinite multiplication factor, to obtain estimated power distribution estimation values. The estimation values are synthesized to obtain estimated three-dimensional power distribution values. In addition, the distribution of a two-dimensional radial multiplication factor and the distribution of an one-dimensional axial multiplication factor are determined based on the three-dimensional power distribution, to obtain estimated values for the multiplication factor distribution. The estimated values are synthesized to form estimated values for the three-dimensional multiplication factor distribution. Further, estimated fuel loading pattern value is determined based on the three-dimensional power distribution or the two-dimensional radial power distribution. Since the processes for determining the estimated values comprise only additive and multiplying operations, processing time can be remarkably saved compared with calculation based on a detailed physical models. Since the estimation is performed on every fuel assemblies, a nervous circuit network not depending on the reactor core system can be constituted. (N.H.)

  13. Influence of Parameters of Core Bingham Material on Critical Behaviour of Three-Layered Annular Plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlus, Dorota

    2017-12-01

    The paper presents the dynamic response of annular three-layered plate subjected to loads variable in time. The plate is loaded in the plane of outer layers. The plate core has the electrorheological properties expressed by the Bingham body model. The dynamic stability loss of plate with elastic core is determined by the critical state parameters, particularly by the critical stresses. Numerous numerical observations show the influence of the values of viscosity constant and critical shear stresses, being the Bingham body parameters, on the supercritical viscous fluid plate behaviour. The problem has been solved analytically and numerically using the orthogonalization method and finite difference method. The solution includes both axisymmetric and asymmetric plate dynamic modes.

  14. Characterization of interfacial waves and pressure drop in horizontal oil-water core-annular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Sumit; Tabor, Rico F.; Singh, Ramesh; Bhattacharya, Amitabh

    2017-08-01

    We study the transportation of highly viscous furnace-oil in a horizontal pipe as core-annular flow (CAF) using experiments. Pressure drop and high-speed images of the fully developed CAF are recorded for a wide range of flow rate combinations. The height profiles (with respect to the centerline of the pipe) of the upper and lower interfaces of the core are obtained using a high-speed camera and image analysis. Time series of the interface height are used to calculate the average holdup of the oil phase, speed of the interface, and the power spectra of the interface profile. We find that the ratio of the effective velocity of the annular fluid to the core velocity, α , shows a large scatter. Using the average value of this ratio (α =0.74 ) yields a good estimate of the measured holdup for the whole range of flow rate ratios, mainly due to the low sensitivity of the holdup ratio to the velocity ratio. Dimensional analysis implies that, if the thickness of the annular fluid is much smaller than the pipe radius, then, for the given range of parameters in our experiments, the non-dimensional interface shape, as well as the non-dimensional wall shear stress, can depend only on the shear Reynolds number and the velocity ratio. Our experimental data show that, for both lower and upper interfaces, the normalized power spectrum of the interface height has a strong dependence on the shear Reynolds number. Specifically, for low shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with large wavelengths dominate, while, for large shear Reynolds numbers, interfacial modes with small wavelengths dominate. Normalized variance of the interface height is higher at lower shear Reynolds numbers and tends to a constant with increasing shear Reynolds number. Surprisingly, our experimental data also show that the effective wall shear stress is, to a large extent, proportional to the square of the core velocity. Using the implied scalings for the holdup ratio and wall shear stress, we can derive

  15. Core monitoring at the WNP-2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skeen, D.R.; Torres, R.H.; Burke, W.J.; Jenkins, I.; Jones, S.W.

    1992-01-01

    The WNP-2 reactor is a 3,323-MW(thermal) boiling water reactor (BWR) that is operated by the Washington Public Power Supply System. The WNP-2 reactor began commercial operation in 1984 and is currently in its eighth cycle. The core monitoring system used for the first cycle of operation was supplied by the reactor vendor. Cycles 2 through 6 were monitored with the POWERPLEX Core Monitoring Software System (CMSS) using the XTGBWR simulation code. In 1991, the supply system upgraded the core monitoring system by installing the POWERPLEX 2 CMSS prior to the seventh cycle of operation for WNP-2. The POWERPLEX 2 CMSS was developed by Siemens Power Corporation (SPC) and is based on SPC's advanced state-of-the-art reactor simulator code MICROBURN-B. The improvements in the POWERPLEX 2 system are possible as a result of advances in minicomputer hardware

  16. High burnup irradiation performance of annular fuel pins irradiated in fast reactor PFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naganuma, M.; Koyama, S.; Asaga, T.; Noirot, J.; Lespiaux, D.; Rouault, J.; Crittenden, G.; Brown, C.

    2000-01-01

    The UK Prototype Fast Reactor (PFR) has irradiated MOX annular pelleted fuel pins clad with PE16 up to burn-up of over 20% heavy atom (ha) without failure, these high burn-up fuel pins can provide the valuable data for the study of high burn-up capability. Thus, post irradiation examinations (PIE) have been performed on PFR high burn-up fuel pins, and the irradiation performance is evaluated focusing especially on the mechanical and thermal performance at high burn-up. The fuel pins from LVD and ANT assemblies were irradiated up to 23.2 and 18.9%ha (at peak burn-up). The results of LVD test pins have been evaluated, which demonstrate that these fuel pins have excellent mechanical and thermal performances at high burn-up because of the high swelling resistance of PE16, the maintenance of initial annular geometry up to high burn-up and the behavior of Fuel to Clad Joint (JOG) formation. In this paper, the newly obtained results of ANT test pins with different O/M ratio (ANT: 1.985, LVD: 1.965) are added, and compared with the LVD pins. The ANT results indicate that FCCI becomes larger and the fuel swelling behavior is different at high burn-up. However, the effects are evaluated not to be severe for the capability of high burn-up (-20%ha). Therefore, we conclude that MOX annular pelleted fuel pins clad with low swelling material have high burn-up capability in O/M ratios ranging from 1.965 to 1.985. (author)

  17. Single-mode annular chirally-coupled core fibers for fiber lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haitao; Hao, He; He, Linlu; Gong, Mali

    2018-03-01

    Chirally-coupled core (CCC) fiber can transmit single fundamental mode and effectively suppresses higher-order mode (HOM) propagation, thus improve the beam quality. However, the manufacture of CCC fiber is complicated due to its small side core. To decrease the manufacture difficulty in China, a novel fiber structure is presented, defined as annular chirally-coupled core (ACCC) fiber, replacing the small side core by a larger side annulus. In this paper, we designed the fiber parameters of this new structure, and demonstrated that the new structure has a similar property of single mode with traditional CCC fiber. Helical coordinate system was introduced into the finite element method (FEM) to analyze the mode field in the fiber, and the beam propagation method (BPM) was employed to analyze the influence of the fiber parameters on the mode loss. Based on the result above, the fiber structure was optimized for efficient single-mode transmission, in which the core diameter is 35 μm with beam quality M2 value of 1.04 and an optical to optical conversion efficiency of 84%. In this fiber, fundamental mode propagates in an acceptable loss, while the HOMs decay rapidly.

  18. Sensors for use in nuclear reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, W.L.; Geronime, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    Sensors including radiation detectors and the like for use within the core of nuclear reactors and which are constructed in a manner to provide optimum reliability of the sensor during use are described

  19. Lateral restraint assembly for reactor core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorholt, Wilhelm; Luci, Raymond K.

    1986-01-01

    A restraint assembly for use in restraining lateral movement of a reactor core relative to a reactor vessel wherein a plurality of restraint assemblies are interposed between the reactor core and the reactor vessel in circumferentially spaced relation about the core. Each lateral restraint assembly includes a face plate urged against the outer periphery of the core by a plurality of compression springs which enable radial preloading of outer reflector blocks about the core and resist low-level lateral motion of the core. A fixed radial key member cooperates with each face plate in a manner enabling vertical movement of the face plate relative to the key member but restraining movement of the face plate transverse to the key member in a plane transverse to the center axis of the core. In this manner, the key members which have their axes transverse to or subtending acute angles with the direction of a high energy force tending to move the core laterally relative to the reactor vessel restrain such lateral movement.

  20. Annular flow induced vibration associated with on-load refuelling of advanced gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fox, M.J.H.; Hodson, D.E.; Parkin, M.W.

    1987-01-01

    On-load refuelling of Advanced Gas Cooled Reactors results in a long, slender, articulated fuel assembly being suspended within a fuel channel, up which flows the high density gaseous coolant. The gas flow in the fuel assembly-channel annulus can cause vibration of the fuel assembly. This paper reports on continuing studies of this phenomenon. In particular it outlines the latest findings on the excitation mechanism, flow instabilities in an annular diffuser; successful developments in finite element modelling of the fuel assembly vibration which now include flow effects and non linearities caused by fuel assembly-channel impact; and finally experimental demonstration of the beneficial effect of introducing friction dampers into the fuel assembly. (author)

  1. Core catcher for nuclear reactor core meltdown containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Driscoll, M.J.; Bowman, F.L.

    1978-01-01

    A bed of graphite particles is placed beneath a nuclear reactor core outside the pressure vessel but within the containment building to catch the core debris in the event of failure of the emergency core cooling system. Spray cooling of the debris and graphite particles together with draining and flooding of coolant fluid of the graphite bed is provided to prevent debris slump-through to the bottom of the bed

  2. Longer life cores for SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irish, J.D.; Hilborn, J.W.

    1985-06-01

    A method has been devised to increase the lifetime of SLOWPOKE-2 cores by increasing the initial fuel loading by about 7 percent. The method was implemented during the commissioning of the SLOWPOKE-2 (Kanata) reactor. Calculations indicate that the core lifetime will be doubled

  3. Intrinsically secure fast reactors with dense cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slessarev, Igor

    2007-01-01

    Secure safety, resistance to weapons material proliferation and problems of long-lived wastes remain the most important 'painful points' of nuclear power. Many innovative reactor concepts have been developed aimed at a radical enhancement of safety. The promising potential of innovative nuclear reactors allows for shifting accents in current reactor safety 'strategy' to reveal this worth. Such strategy is elaborated focusing on the priority for intrinsically secure safety features as well as on sure protection being provided by the first barrier of defence. Concerning the potential of fast reactors (i.e. sodium cooled, lead-cooled, etc.), there are no doubts that they are able to possess many favourable intrinsically secure safety features and to lay the proper foundation for a new reactor generation. However, some of their neutronic characteristics have to be radically improved. Among intrinsically secure safety properties, the following core parameters are significantly important: reactivity margin values, reactivity feed-back and coolant void effects. Ways of designing intrinsically secure safety features in fast reactors (titled hereafter as Intrinsically Secure Fast Reactors - ISFR) can be found in the frame of current reactor technologies by radical enhancement of core neutron economy and by optimization of core compositions. Simultaneously, respecting resistance to proliferation, by using non-enriched fuel feed as well as a core breeding gain close to zero, are considered as the important features (long-lived waste problems will be considered in a separate paper). This implies using the following reactor design options as well as closed fuel cycles with natural U as the reactor feed: ·Ultra-plate 'dense cores' of the ordinary (monolithic) type with negative total coolant void effects. ·Modular type cores. Multiple dense modules can be embedded in the common reflector for achieving the desired NPP total power. The modules can be used also independently (as

  4. Reactor Structure Materials: Corrosion of Reactor Core Internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, S.

    2000-01-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on the corrosion of reactor core internals are: (1) to gain mechanistic insight into the Irradition Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) phenomenon by studying the influence of separate parameters in well controlled experiments; (2) to develop and validate a predictive capability on IASCC by model description and (3) to define and validate countermeasures and monitoring techniques for application in reactors. Progress and achievements in 1999 are described

  5. Reactor core design of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunitomi, Kazuhiko; Katanishi, Shoji; Takada, Shoji; Yan Xing; Tsuji, Nobumasa

    2004-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a highly efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and existing fossil fired gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original design features of this system are the reactor core design based on a newly proposed refueling scheme named sandwich shuffling, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an innovative coolant flow scheme and a horizontally installed gas turbine unit. The GTHTR300 can be continuously operated without the refueling for 2 years. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200,000 yen (1667 US$)/kW e, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 yen (3.3 US cents)/kW h. This paper describes the original design features focusing on the reactor core design and the in-core structure design, including the innovative coolant flow scheme for cooling the RPV. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan

  6. Validation of reactor core protection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang-Hoon; Bae, Jong-Sik; Baeg, Seung-Yeob; Cho, Chang-Ho; Kim, Chang-Ho; Kim, Sung-Ho; Kim, Hang-Bae; In, Wang-Kee; Park, Young-Ho

    2008-01-01

    Reactor COre Protection System (RCOPS), an advanced core protection calculator system, is a digitized one which provides core protection function based on two reactor core operation parameters, Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio (DNBR) and Local Power Density (LPD). It generates a reactor trip signal when the core condition exceeds the DNBR or LPD design limit. It consists of four independent channels adapted a two-out-of-four trip logic. System configuration, hardware platform and an improved algorithm of the newly designed core protection calculator system are described in this paper. One channel of RCOPS was implemented as a single channel facility for this R and D project where we performed final integration software testing. To implement custom function blocks, pSET is used. Software test is performed by two methods. The first method is a 'Software Module Test' and the second method is a 'Software Unit Test'. New features include improvement of core thermal margin through a revised on-line DNBR algorithm, resolution of the latching problem of control element assembly signal and addition of the pre-trip alarm generation. The change of the on-line DNBR calculation algorithm is considered to improve the DNBR net margin by 2.5%-3.3%. (author)

  7. Core baffle for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, O.J.; Berringer, R.T.

    1977-01-01

    The invention concerns the design of the core of a LWR with a large number of fuel assemblies formed by fuel rods and kept in position by spacer grids. According to the invention, at the level of the spacer grids match plates are mounted with openings so the flow of coolant directed upwards will not be obstructed and a parallel bypass will be obtained in the space between the core barrel and the baffle plates. In case of an accident, this configuration reduces or avoids damage from overpressure reactions. (HP) [de

  8. Method of evaluating the reactor core performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eguchi, Yumiko.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To enable exact evaluation for the core performance in a short period. Constitution: A reactor core is equally divided into 2, 4 or 8 sections considering the structure of the symmetricalness and calculation for the evaluation the core performance is carried out to at least one region of the divided core. However, the reactor core can not be said to be completely symmetrical and there is a difference more or less, because if identical type fuels are loaded the way of burning is different depending on the positions, thereby causing difference in the total heat calorie generated. Accordingly, the performance evaluation is conducted for the entire core at a predetermined time interval, the compensation value for each of the fuels is calculated based on the result of the calculation for the entire core and the corresponding result of the calculation in each of the divided cores and the compensated values are added to the calculation result for the divided cores to compensate the calculated evaluation value. This enables to shorten the calculation time and improve the calculation accuracy. (Yoshino, Y.)

  9. Pressurized core shroud for aligning a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burger, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    A core shroud is disclosed including flexible panels sealingly attached to the inner surface of the shroud at an elevation opposite the fuel assembly grids nearest the core midplane. Each panel forms the outer wall of a deformable chamber which is pressurized through a conduit carried by the shroud. One end of the conduit is in fluid communication with the reactor coolant at a high pressure location remote from the panels, producing a pressure differential across the panel which urges the panel against the adjacent grid to prevent core bowing

  10. Design, in-sodium testing and performance evaluation of annular linear induction pump for a sodium cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashine, B.K.; Rao, B.P.C.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Derivation of applicable design equations. • Design of an annular induction pump based on these equations. • Testing of the designed pump in a sodium test facility. • Performance evaluation of the designed pump. - Abstract: Annular linear induction pumps (ALIPs) are used for pumping electrically conducting liquid metals. These pumps find wide application in fast reactors since the coolant in fast reactors is liquid sodium which a good conductor of electricity. The design of these pumps is usually done using equivalent circuit approach in combination with numerical simulation models. The equivalent circuit of ALIP is similar to that of an induction motor. This paper presents the derivation of equivalent circuit parameters using first principle approach. Sodium testing of designed ALIP using the equivalent circuit approach is also described and experimental results of the testing are presented. Comparison between experimental and analytical calculations has also been carried out. Some of the reasons for variation have also been listed in this paper

  11. Reactor core flow rate control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakuma, Hitoshi; Tanikawa, Naoshi; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Miyakawa, Tetsuya.

    1996-01-01

    When an internal pump is started by a variable frequency power source device, if magnetic fields of an AC generator are introduced after the rated speed is reached, neutron flux high scram occurs by abrupt increase of a reactor core flow rate. Then, in the present invention, magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced at a speed previously set at which the fluctuation range of the reactor core flow rate (neutron flux) by the start up of the internal pump is within an allowable value. Since increase of the speed of the internal pump upon its start up is suppressed to determine the change of the reactor core flow rate within an allowable range, increase of neutron fluxes is suppressed to enable stable start up. Then, since transition boiling of fuels caused by abrupt decrease of the reactor core flow rate upon occurrence of abnormality in an external electric power system is prevented, and the magnetic fields for the AC generator are introduced in such a manner to put the speed increase fluctuation range of the internal pump upon start up within an allowable value, neutron flux high scram is not caused to enable stable start-up. (N.H.)

  12. Gas core reactors for coal gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinstein, H.

    1976-01-01

    The concept of using a gas core reactor to produce hydrogen directly from coal and water is presented. It is shown that the chemical equilibrium of the process is strongly in favor of the production of H 2 and CO in the reactor cavity, indicating a 98 percent conversion of water and coal at only 1500 0 K. At lower temperatures in the moderator-reflector cooling channels the equilibrium strongly favors the conversion of CO and additional H 2 O to CO 2 and H 2 . Furthermore, it is shown the H 2 obtained per pound of carbon has 23 percent greater heating value than the carbon so that some nuclear energy is also fixed. Finally, a gas core reactor plant floating in the ocean is conceptualized which produces H 2 , fresh water and sea salts from coal

  13. Core construction for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pettinger, D.S.

    1977-01-01

    HTR core construction with prismatic graphite blocks piled into columns. The front of the blocks is concavely curved. The lines of contact of two blocks are always not vertical, i.e. the blocks of one column are supported by the blocks of neighbouring columns so that ducts are formed. Groups of three or four of these columns may additionally be arranged around a central column which has recesses in order to lock the blocks of one group together. With this arrangement, dimensional changes of the graphite blocks under operating conditions can be taken up. (DG) [de

  14. Investigation into adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Qijin; Tang, Shankang; Wang, Lintong; Zhang, Yunchen

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption and photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene were investigated considering the operating variables and kinetic mechanism using nano-titania agglomerates in an annular fluidized bed photocatalytic reactor (AFBPR) designed. The special adsorption equilibrium constant, adsorption active sites, and apparent reaction rate coefficient of benzene were determined by linear regression analysis at various gas velocities and relative humidities (RH). Based on a series of photocatalytic degradation kinetic equations, the influences of operating variables on degradation efficiency, apparent reaction rate coefficient and half-life were explored. The findings indicated that the operating variables have obviously influenced the adsorption/photocatalytic degradation and corresponding kinetic parameters. In the photocatalytic degradation process, the relationship between photocatalytic degradation efficiency and RH indicated that water molecules have a dual-function which was related to the structure characteristics of benzene. The optimal operating conditions for photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene in AFBPR were determined as the fluidization number at 1.9 and RH required related to benzene concentration. This investigation highlights the importance of controlling RH and benzene concentration in order to obtain the desired synergy effect in photocatalytic degradation processes.

  15. Core of a liquid-cooled nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wright, J.R.; McFall, A.

    1975-01-01

    The core of a liquid-cooled nuclear reactor, e.g. of a sodium-cooled fast reactor, is protected in such a way that the recoil wave resulting from loss of coolant in a cooling channel and caused by released gas is limited to a coolant inlet chamber of this cooling channel. The channels essentially consist of the coolant inlet chamber and a fuel chamber - with a fission gas storage plenum - through which the coolant flows. Between the two chambers, a locking device within a tube is provided offering a much larger flow resistance to the backflow of gas or coolant than in flow direction. The locking device may be a hydraulic countertorque control system, e.g. a valvular line. Other locking devices have got radially helical vanes running around an annular flow space. Furthermore, the locking device may consist of a number of needles running parallel to each other and forming a circular grid. Though it can be expanded by the forward flow - the needles are spreading - , it acts as a solid barrier for backflows. (TK) [de

  16. Theory and experiment of Fourier-Bessel field calculation and tuning of a pulsed wave annular array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fox, Paul D.; Jiqi, Cheng; Jian-yu, Lu

    2003-01-01

    A one-dimensional (1D) Fourier-Bessel series method for computing and tuning (beamforming) the linear lossless field of flat pulsed wave annular arrays is developed and supported with both numerical simulation and experimental verification. The technique represents a new method for modeling...... and tuning the propagated field by linking the quantized surface pressure profile to a known set of limited diffraction Bessel beams propagating into the medium. This enables derivation of an analytic expression for the field at any point in space and time in terms of the transducer surface pressure profile....... Tuning of the field then also follows by formulating a least-squares design for the transducer surface pressure with respect to a given desired field in space and time. Simulated and experimental results for both field computation and tuning are presented in the context of a 10-ring annular array...

  17. Interactions of solitary waves and compression/expansion waves in core-annular flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Michelle; Anderson, Dalton; El, Gennady; Franco, Nevil; Hoefer, Mark

    2017-11-01

    The nonlinear hydrodynamics of an initial step leads to the formation of rarefaction waves and dispersive shock waves in dispersive media. Another hallmark of these media is the soliton, a localized traveling wave whose speed is amplitude dependent. Although compression/expansion waves and solitons have been well-studied individually, there has been no mathematical description of their interaction. In this talk, the interaction of solitons and shock/rarefaction waves for interfacial waves in viscous, miscible core-annular flows are modeled mathematically and explored experimentally. If the interior fluid is continuously injected, a deformable conduit forms whose interfacial dynamics are well-described by a scalar, dispersive nonlinear partial differential equation. The main focus is on interactions of solitons with dispersive shock waves and rarefaction waves. Theory predicts that a soliton can either be transmitted through or trapped by the extended hydrodynamic state. The notion of reciprocity is introduced whereby a soliton interacts with a shock wave in a reciprocal or dual fashion as with the rarefaction. Soliton reciprocity, trapping, and transmission are observed experimentally and are found to agree with the modulation theory and numerical simulations. This work was partially supported by NSF CAREER DMS-1255422 (M.A.H.) and NSF GRFP (M.D.M.).

  18. Neutronic Core Performance of CAREM-25 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarino, Eduardo; Hergenreder, Daniel; Matzkin, S

    2000-01-01

    The actual design state of core of CAREM-25 reactor is presented.It is shown that the core design complains with the safety and operation established requirements.It is analyzed the behavior of the reactor safety and control systems (single failure of the fast shut down system, single failure of the shut down system, single failure of the second shut down system, reactivity worth of the adjust and control system in normal operation and hot shut down, reactivity worth of the adjust and control system and the scheme of movement of the control rod during the operation cycle).It is shown the burnup profile of fuel elements with the proposed scheme of refueling and the burnup and power density distribution at different moments of the operation cycle.The power peaking factor of the equilibrium core is 2.56, the minimum DNBR is 1.90 and its average is 2.09 during the operation cycle

  19. Core clamping device for a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, R.W.

    1974-01-01

    The core clamping device for a fast neutron reactor includes clamps to support the fuel zone against the pressure vessel. The clamps are arranged around the circumference of the core. They consist of torsion bars arranged parallel at some distance around the core with lever arms attached to the ends whose force is directed in the opposite direction, pressing against the wall of the pressure vessel. The lever arms and pressure plates also actuated by the ends of the torsion bars transfer the stress, the pressure plates acting upon the fuel elements or fuel assemblies. Coupling between the ends of the torsion bars and the pressure plates is achieved by end carrier plates directly attached to the torsion bars and radially movable. This clamping device follows the thermal expansions of the core, allows specific elements to be disengaged in sections and saves space between the core and the neutron reflectors. (DG) [de

  20. Mechanical core coupling and reactors stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez Antola, R.

    2006-01-01

    Structural parts of nuclear reactors are complex mechanical systems, able to vibrate with a set of proper frequencies when suitably excited. Cyclical variations in the strain state of the materials, including density perturbations, are produced. This periodic changes may affect reactor reactivity. But a variation in reactivity affects reactor thermal power, thus modifying the temperature field of the abovementiones materials. If the variation in temperature fields is fast enough, thermal-mechanical coupling may produce fast variations in strain states, and this, at its turn, modifies the reactivity, and so on. This coupling between mechanical vibrations of the structure and the materials of the core, with power oscillations of the reactor, not only may not be excluded a priori, but it seems that it has been present in some stage of the incidents or accidents that happened during the development of nuclear reactor technology. The purpose of the present communication is: (a) To review and generalize some mathematical models that were proposed in order to describe thermal-mechanical coupling in nuclear reactors. (b) To discuss some conditions in which significant instabilities could arise, including large amplitude power oscillations coupled with mechanical vibrations whose amplitudes are too small to be excluded by conventional criteria of mechanical design. Enough Certain aspects of thr physical safety of nuclear power reactors, that are objected by people that opposes to the renaissance of nucleoelectric generation, are discussed in the framework of the mathematical model proposed in this paper [es

  1. Nuclear reactor core modelling in multifunctional simulators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puska, E.K. [VTT Energy, Nuclear Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1999-06-01

    The thesis concentrates on the development of nuclear reactor core models for the APROS multifunctional simulation environment and the use of the core models in various kinds of applications. The work was started in 1986 as a part of the development of the entire APROS simulation system. The aim was to create core models that would serve in a reliable manner in an interactive, modular and multifunctional simulator/plant analyser environment. One-dimensional and three-dimensional core neutronics models have been developed. Both models have two energy groups and six delayed neutron groups. The three-dimensional finite difference type core model is able to describe both BWR- and PWR-type cores with quadratic fuel assemblies and VVER-type cores with hexagonal fuel assemblies. The one- and three-dimensional core neutronics models can be connected with the homogeneous, the five-equation or the six-equation thermal hydraulic models of APROS. The key feature of APROS is that the same physical models can be used in various applications. The nuclear reactor core models of APROS have been built in such a manner that the same models can be used in simulator and plant analyser applications, as well as in safety analysis. In the APROS environment the user can select the number of flow channels in the three-dimensional reactor core and either the homogeneous, the five- or the six-equation thermal hydraulic model for these channels. The thermal hydraulic model and the number of flow channels have a decisive effect on the calculation time of the three-dimensional core model and thus, at present, these particular selections make the major difference between a safety analysis core model and a training simulator core model. The emphasis on this thesis is on the three-dimensional core model and its capability to analyse symmetric and asymmetric events in the core. The factors affecting the calculation times of various three-dimensional BWR, PWR and WWER-type APROS core models have been

  2. Fluidized-bed atomic layer deposition reactor for the synthesis of core-shell nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didden, Arjen P; Middelkoop, Joost; Besling, Wim F A; Nanu, Diana E; van de Krol, Roel

    2014-01-01

    The design of a fluidized bed atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor is described in detail. The reactor consists of three parts that have all been placed in one protective cabinet: precursor dosing, reactor, and residual gas treatment section. In the precursor dosing section, the chemicals needed for the ALD reaction are injected into the carrier gas using different methods for different precursors. The reactor section is designed in such a way that a homogeneous fluidized bed can be obtained with a constant, actively controlled, reactor pressure. Furthermore, no filters are required inside the reactor chamber, minimizing the risk of pressure increase due to fouling. The residual gas treatment section consists of a decomposition furnace to remove residual precursor and a particle filter and is installed to protect the pump. In order to demonstrate the performance of the reactor, SiO2 particles have been coated with TiO2 using tetrakis-dimethylamino titanium (TDMAT) and H2O as precursors. Experiments with varying pulse times show that saturated growth can be obtained with TDMAT pulse times larger than 600 s. Analysis of the powder with High-Angle Annular Dark-Field Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy (HAADF-STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy confirmed that after 50 cycles, all SiO2 particles were coated with a 1.6 nm homogenous shell of TiO2.

  3. Modular core component support for nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finch, L.M.; Anthony, A.J.

    1975-01-01

    The core of a nuclear reactor is made up of a plurality of support modules for containing components such as fuel elements, reflectors and control rods. Each module includes a component support portion located above a grid plate in a low-pressure coolant zone and a coolant inlet portion disposed within a module receptacle which depends from the grid plate into a zone of high-pressure coolant. Coolant enters the module through aligned openings within the receptacle and module inlet portion and flows upward into contact with the core components. The modules are hydraulically balanced within the receptacles to prevent expulsion by the upward coolant forces. (U.S.)

  4. Transient rod failure in a pulsing TRIGA Mark I reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Draper, E.L. Jr.; Atkinson, G.D. Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Full text: On July 7, 1970 the University of Texas at Austin TRIGA Mark I Pulsing Reactor experienced a failure of the transient control rod. Although no danger to personnel or damage to the reactor other than the pulse rod occurred, the failure was promptly reported to the USAEC regional compliance office. The first indication of an abnormal situation was unusual multiplication behavior during the first start-up of the day. As usual for steady state operation, the operator removed the transient rod and began to withdraw the shim and regulating rods. After partial withdrawal, he noticed that the count rate was not increasing as rapidly as was customary. While remaining at the console,the operator had a technician make a visual inspection of the core. The technician observed the transient drive rod was swinging freely in the pool and the poison section was detached. It was concluded, based on the indications of the.reactor instrumentation and visual inspection, that the transient control rod had broken off and remained in position in the core. The regulating and shim rods were inserted and the transient rod was manually cranked to the down position. The manual manipulation of the transient rod, instead of dropping the rod by gravity, was used so that the connecting rod could be reinserted in the control rod guide tube. The reactor core was then partially unloaded so that a critical mass was not present. The transient rod drive and connecting rod were removed from the pool. The poison section was retrieved from its position in the core by welding a tap to a long rod and tapping into the top of the poison section. Visual inspection of the poison section showed that the weld joining the male threads on the poison section to the main body of the control rod had failed. The threads remained screwed in the control rod drive shaft upon separation and the poison section remained fully inserted in the core. A new control rod was fabricated by Gulf General Atomic and shipped

  5. Core Monitoring System for TSN EPR Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeiffer, Maxime [AREVA NP SAS, in AREVA Tower, 1 place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Defense, (France)

    2015-07-01

    In the context of Chinese (TSN) EPR reactors project, a new on-line support system was introduced to give information, either continuously or upon request, to the plant operators about some advanced physics parameters corresponding to the current state of the nuclear core. This document provides a description of the functions that are available and the advantages provided by using their results. For each function the Human Machine Interface (HMI) is illustrated. (authors)

  6. PC-Reactor-core transient simulation code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakata, H.

    1989-10-01

    PC-REATOR, a reactor core transient simulation code has been developed for the real-time operator training on a IBM-PC microcomputer. The program presents capabilities for on-line exchange of the operating parameters during the transient simulation, by friendly keyboard instructions. The model is based on the point-kinetics approximation, with 2 delayed neutron percursors and up to 11 decay power generating groups. (author) [pt

  7. Sodium-cooled fast reactor core designs for transmutation of MHR spent fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, S. G.; Kim, Y. H.; Venneri, F.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the core design analyses of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) are performed for the effective transmutation of the DB (Deep Burn)-MHR (Modular Helium Reactor). In this concept, the spent fuels of DB-MHR are transmuted in SFRs with a closed fuel cycle after TRUs from LWR are first incinerated in a DB-MHR. We introduced two different type SFR core designs for this purpose, and evaluated their core performance parameters including the safety-related parameters. In particular, the cores are designed to have lower transmutation rate relatively to our previous work so as to make the fuel characteristics more feasible. The first type cores which consist of two enrichment regions are typical homogeneous annular cores and they rate 900 MWt power. On the other hand, the second type cores which consist of a central non-fuel region and a single enrichment fuel region rate relatively higher power of 1500 MWt. For these cores, the moderator rods (YH 1.8 ) are used to achieve less positive sodium void worth and the more negative Doppler coefficient because the loading of DB-MHR spent fuel leads to the degradation of these safety parameters. The analysis results show that these cores have low sodium void worth and negative reactivity coefficients except for the one related with the coolant expansion but the coolant expansion reactivity coefficient is within the typical range of the typical SFR cores. (authors)

  8. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  9. Reactor core and control rod assembly in FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Koji; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Itooka, Satoshi.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel assemblies and control rod assemblies are attached respectively to reactor core support plates each in a cantilever fashion. Intermediate spacer pads are disposed to the lateral side of a wrapper tube just above the fuel rod region. Intermediate space pads are disposed to the lateral side of a control rod guide tube just above a fuel rod region. The thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the control rod assembly is made smaller than the thickness of the intermediate spacer pad for the fuel assembly. This can prevent contact between intermediate spacer pads of the control guide tube and the fuel assembly even if the temperature of coolants is elevated to thermally expand the intermediate spacer pad, by which the radial displacement amount of the reactor core region along the direction of the height of the control guide tube is reduced substantially to zero. Accordingly, contribution of the control rod assembly to the radial expansion reactivity can be reduced to zero or negative level, by which the effect of the negative radial expansion reactivity of the reactor is increased to improve the safety upon thermal transient stage, for example, loss of coolant flow rate accident. (I.N.)

  10. Study of a Slightly Enriched R Reactor Fuel by Means of a Pulsed Neutron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sagot, M.; Tellier, H.

    1962-04-01

    A Be O moderated reactor using slightly enriched uranium oxide as fuel was studied by the pulsed neutron source technique. The neutron lifetime was measured in two different cores without reflector, then attempts were made at the measurement of great negative reactivities introduced into the reactor under the following forms: decrease of the volume of the un reflected core, introduction of absorbing cadmium rods, removal of fuel at the periphery of the critical core while maintaining a constant height, and substitution of fuel elements by less reactive elements. In all cases, the results are compared with the data obtained by another type of experiment or by computation. (author) [fr

  11. In core system mapping reactor power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoriyaz, H.; Moreira, J.M.L.

    1989-01-01

    Based on the signals of SPND'S (Self Powered Neutron Detectors) distributed inside of a core, the spatial power distribution is obtained using the MAP program, developed in this work. The methodology applied in MAP program uses a least mean square technique to calculate expansion coefficients that depend on the SPND'S signals. The final power or neutron flux distribution is obtained by a combination of certains functions or expansion modes that are provided from diffusion calculation with the CITATION code. The MAP program is written in PASCAL language and will be used in IEA-R1 reactor for assisting its operation. (author) [pt

  12. Core of a fast neutron nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacometti, Christian; Mougniot, J.-C.; Ravier, Jean.

    1974-01-01

    The fast neutron nuclear reactor described includes an internal area in fissile material completely enclosed in an area of fertile material forming the outside blanket. The internal fissile area is provided with housings exclusively filled with fertile material forming one or more inside blankets. In this core the internal blankets are shaped like rings vertically separating superimposed rings of fissile material. The blanket of material nearest to the periphery is circumscribed externally by a contour having an indented shape on its straight section so as to increase the contact area between this blanket and the external blanket [fr

  13. Core arrangement in BWR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Masayuki.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the number of fuel assemblies whose locations are to be changed upon fuel exchange, as well as unify the power distribution in the core by arranging, in a chess board configuration, a plurality pattern of unit reactor lattices each containing fuel assemblies of different burnup degrees in orthogonal positions to each other. Constitution: A first pattern of unit reactor lattice is formed by disposing fuel assemblies of burnup degree 1 and fuel assemblies of burnup degree 3 at orthogonal positions to each other. A second pattern of unit reactor lattice is formed by disposing fuel assemblies of burnup degree 2 and fuel assemblies of burnup degree 1 at orthogonal positions to each other. The unit lattices each in such a dispositions are arranged in a chess board arrangement. Since, the fuel assemblies of the burnup degree 1 in the first pattern unit lattices proceed to the burnup degree 2 and the fuel assemblies of the burnup degree 2 in the second pattern unit lattices proceed to the burnup degree 3 up to the fuel exchange stage, fuel exchange and movement have only to be made, not for those fuel assemblies, but for another half of the fuel assemblies. (Kawakami, Y.)

  14. Core concepts for 'zero-sodium-void-worth core' in metal fuelled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Hill, R.N.; Fujita, E.K.; Wade, D.C.; Kumaoka, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Kawashima, M.; Nakagawa, H.

    1991-01-01

    Core design options to reduce the sodium void worth in metal fuelled LMRs are investigated. Two core designs which achieve a zero sodium void worth are analyzed in detail. The first design is a 'pancaked' and annular core with enhanced transuranic burning capabilities; the high leakage in this design yields a low breeding ratio and small void worth. The second design is an axially multilayered annular core which is fissile self-sufficient; in this design, the upper and lower core regions are neutronically decoupled for reduced void worth while fissile self-sufficiency is achieved using internal axial blankets plus external radial and axial blanket-zones. The neutronic performance characteristics of these low void worth designs are assessed here; their passive safety properties are discussed in a companion paper. (author)

  15. Core concepts for ''zero-sodium-void-worth core'' in metal fuelled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Y.I.; Hill, R.N.; Fujita, E.K.; Wade, D.C.; Kumaoka, Y.; Suzuki, M.; Kawashima, M.; Nakagawa, H.

    1991-01-01

    Core design options to reduce the sodium void worth in metal fueled LMRs are investigated. Two core designs which achieve a zero sodium void worth are analyzed in detail. The first design is a ''pancaked'' and annular core with enhanced transuranic burning capabilities; the high leakage in this design yields a low breeding ratio and small void worth. The second design is an axially multilayered annular core which is fissile self-sufficient; in this design, the upper and lower core regions are neutronically decoupled for reduced void worth while fissile self-sufficiency is achieved using internal axial blankets plus external radial and axial blanket zones. The neutronic performance characteristics of these low void worth designs are assessed here; their passive safety properties are discussed in a companion paper. 16 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Design and research of fuel element for pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Sheng

    1994-05-01

    The fuel element is the key component for pulsed reactor and its design is one of kernel techniques for pulsed reactor. Following the GA Company of US the NPIC (Nuclear Power Institute of China) has mastered this technique. Up to now, the first pulsed reactor in China (PRC-1) has been safely operated for about 3 years. The design and research of fuel element undertaken by NPIC is summarized. The verification and evaluation of this design has been carried out by using the results of measured parameters during operation and test of PRC-1 as well as comparing the design parameters published by others

  17. Neutronics analysis of the initial core of the TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, R., E-mail: rustamzia@yahoo.co [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitute (ATI), Stadion allee 2, A-1020, Vienna (Austria); Stummer, T.; Boeck, H.; Villa, M. [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitute (ATI), Stadion allee 2, A-1020, Vienna (Austria)

    2011-05-15

    Highlights: The TRIGA Mark II Vienna is modeled employing MCNP5. The model is confirmed through three different experiments. Initial critical, reactivity distribution and flux mapping experiment. - Abstract: The Atominstitute (ATI) of Vienna University of Technology (VUT) operates a TRIGA Mark II research reactor since March 1962. Its initial criticality was achieved on 7th March 1962 when 57th Fuel Element (FE) was loaded to the core. This paper describes the development of the MCNP model of the TRIGA reactor and its validation through three different experiments i.e. initial criticality, reactivity distribution and a thermal flux mapping experiment in the reactor core. All these experiments were performed on the initial core configuration. The MCNP model includes all necessary core components i.e. FE, Graphite Element GE, neutron Source Element (SE), Central IRradiation channel (CIR) etc. Outside the core, this model simulates the annular grooved graphite reflector, the thermal and thermalizing column, four beam tubes and the reactor water tank up to 100 cm in radial and +60 and -60 cm in axial direction. Each grid position at its exact location is modeled. This model employs the ENDF/B-VI data library except for the Sm-isotopes which are taken from JEFF 3.1 because ENDF/B-VI lacks samarium (Sm) cross sections. For the first experiment, the model predicts an effective multiplication factor ({kappa}{sub eff}) of 1.00183 with an estimated standard deviation 0.00031 which is very close to the experimental value 1.00114. The second experiment measures the reactivity values of four FE and one GE. In comparison to the MCNP results, the percent difference ranges from 4 to 22. The third experiment verifies the model at a local level with the radial and axial thermal flux density distribution in the core. Though the trends are similar, the MCNP model overestimates the radial thermal flux density in the core and underestimates these results at the core periphery.

  18. Performance of commercial off-the-shelf microelectromechanical systems sensors in a pulsed reactor environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobert, Keith Edwin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Heger, Arlen S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mccready, Steven S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-07-15

    Prompted by the unexpected failure of piezoresistive sensors in both an elevated gamma-ray environment and reactor core pulse tests, we initiated radiation testing of several MEMS piezoresistive accelerometers and pressure transducers to ascertain their radiation hardness. Some commercial off-the-shelf sensors are found to be viable options for use in a high-energy pulsed reactor, but others suffer severe degradation and even catastrophic failure. Although researchers are promoting the use of MEMS devices in radiation-harsh environment, we nevertheless find assurance testing necessary.

  19. The investigation of enviromental radioactivity background around a pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Tenghui; Zhao Zhongli

    1990-01-01

    The radioactivity background level of enviromental medium around a pulsed reactor for 5 km and external penetrating radioactivity dose level for 10 km are given. mediums measured include air, water, soil, organisms, fallout, etc

  20. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Locke, B

    1998-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  1. Reticulated Vitreous Carbon Electrodes for Gas Phase Pulsed Corona Reactors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    LOCKE, B

    1999-01-01

    A new design for gas phase pulsed corona reactors incorporating reticulated vitreous carbon electrodes is demonstrated to be effective for the removal of nitrogen oxides from synthetic air mixtures...

  2. High-voltage air-core pulse transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohwein, G. J.

    1981-01-01

    General types of air core pulse transformers designed for high voltage pulse generation and energy transfer applications are discussed with special emphasis on pulse charging systems which operate up to the multi-megavolt range. The design, operation, dielectric materials, and performance are described. It is concluded that high voltage air core pulse transformers are best suited to applications outside the normal ranges of conventional magnetic core transformers. In general these include charge transfer at high power levels and fast pulse generation with comparatively low energy. When properly designed and constructed, they are capable of delivering high energy transfer efficiency and have demonstrated superior high voltage endurance. The principal disadvantage of high voltage air core transformers is that they are not generally available from commercial sources. Consequently, the potential user must become thoroughly familiar with all aspects of design, fabrication and system application before he can produce a high performance transformer system. (LCL)

  3. Spring unit especially intended for a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, S.J.; Gorholt, Wilhelm.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a spring unit or a group of springs bearing up a sprung mass against an unsprung mass. For instance, a gas cooled high temperature nuclear reactor includes a core of relatively complex structure supported inside a casing or vessel forming a shielded cavity enclosing the reactor core. This core can be assembled from a large number of graphite blocks of different sizes and shapes joined together to form a column. The blocks of each column can be fixed together so as to form together a loose side support. Under the effect of thermal expansion and contraction, shrinkage resulting from irradiation, the effects of pressure and the contraction and creep of the reactor vessel, it is not possible to confine all the columns of the reactor core in a cylindrical rigid structure. Further, the working of the nuclear reactor requires that the reactivity monitoring components may be inserted at any time in the reactor core. A standard process consists in mounting this loosely assembled reactor core in a floating manner by keeping it away from the vessel enclosure around it by means of a number of springs fitted between the lateral surfaces of the core unit and the reactor vessel. The core may be considered as a spring supported mass whereas, relatively, the reactor vessel is a mass that is not flexibly supported [fr

  4. Interfacial friction in low flowrate vertical annular flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, J.M.; Freitas, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    During boil-off and reflood transients in nuclear reactors, the core liquid inventory and inlet flowrate are largely determined by the interfacial friction in the reactor core. For these transients, annular flow occurs at relatively modest liquid flowrates and at the low heat fluxes typical of decay heat conditions. The resulting low vapor Reynolds numbers, are out of the data range used to develop the generally accepted interfacial friction relations for annular flow. In addition, most existing annular flow data comes from air/liquid adiabatic experiments with fully developed flows. By contrast, in a reactor core, the flow is continuously developing along the heated length as the vapor flowrate increases and the flow regimes evolve from bubbly to annular flow. Indeed, the entire annular flow regime may exist only over tens of L/D's. Despite these limitations, many of the advanced reactor safety analysis codes employ the Wallis model for interfacial friction in annular flow. Our analyses of the conditions existing at the end-of-reflood in the PERICLES tests have indicated that the Wallis model seriously underestimates the interfacial shear for low vapor velocity cocurrent upflow. To extend the annular flow data base to diabatic low flowrate conditions, the DADINE tests were re-analyzed. In these tests, both pressure drop and local cross-section averaged void fractions were measured. Thus, both the wall and interfacial shear can be deduced. Based on the results of this analysis, a new correlation is proposed for interfacial friction in annular flow. (authors). 5 figs., 12 refs

  5. Sloshing of water in annular pressure-suppression pool of boiling water reactors under earthquake ground motions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslam, M.; Godden, W.G.; Scalise, D.T.

    1979-10-01

    This report presents an analytical investigation of the sloshing response of water in annular-circular as well as simple-circular tanks under horizontal earthquake ground motions, and the results are verified with tests. This study was motivated because of the use of annular tanks for pressure-suppression pools in Boiling Water Reactors. Such a pressure-suppression pool would typically have 80 ft and 120 ft inside and outside diameters and a water depth of 20 ft. The analysis was based upon potential flow theory and a computer program was written to obtain time-history plots of sloshing displacements of water and the dynamic pressures. Tests were carried out on 1/80th and 1/15th scale models under sinusoidal as well as simulated earthquake ground motions. Tests and analytical results regarding the natural frequencies, surface water displacements, and dynamic pressures were compared and a good agreement was found for relatively small displacements. The computer program gave satisfactory results as long as the maximum water surface displacements were less than 30 in., which is roughly the value obtained under full intensity of El Centro earthquake

  6. Kinetic studies on a repetitively pulsed fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, S.

    1982-01-01

    Neutronic analysis of an earlier proposed periodically pulsed fast reactor at Kalpakkam (KPFR) has been carried out numerically under equilibrium and transient conditions using the one-point model of reactor kinetics and the experimentally measured total worth of reactivity modulator, the parabolic coefficient of reactivity of the movable reflector and the mean prompt neutron lifetime. Results of steady-state calculations - treated on the basis of delayed neutron precursor and energy balances during a period of operation - have been compared with the analytical formulae of Larrimore for a parabolic reactivity input. Empirical relations for half-width of the fast neutron pulse, the peak pulse power and the power at first crossing of prompt criticality have been obtained and shown to be accurate enough for predicting steady-state power pulse characteristics of a periodically pulsed fast reactor. The concept of a subprompt-critical reactor has been used to calculate the fictitious delayed neutron fraction, β of the KPFR through a numerical experiment. Relative pulse height stability and pulse shape sensitivity to changes of maximum reactivity is discussed. With the aid of new safety concepts, the Power Amplification Factor (PAF) and the Pulse Growth Factor (Rsub(p)), the dynamics KPFR under accidental conditions has been studied for step and ramp reactivity perturbations. All the analysis has been done without taking account of reactivity feedback. (orig.)

  7. Criteria design of the CAREM 25 reactor's core: neutronic aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lecot, C.A.

    1990-01-01

    The criteria that guided the design, from the neutronic point of view, of the CAREM reactor's core were presented. The minimum set of objectives and general criteria which permitted the design of the particular systems constituting the CAREM 25 reactor's core is detailed and stated. (Author) [es

  8. Design of radiation shields in nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousavi Shirazi, A.; Daneshvar, Sh.; Aghanajafi, C.; Jahanfarnia, Gh.; Rahgoshay, M.

    2008-01-01

    This article consists of designing radiation shields in the core of nuclear reactors to control and restrain the harmful nuclear radiations in the nuclear reactor cores. The radiation shields protect the loss of energy. caused by nuclear radiation in a nuclear reactor core and consequently, they cause to increase the efficiency of the reactor and decrease the risk of being under harmful radiations for the staff. In order to design these shields, by making advantages of the O ppenheim Electrical Network m ethod, the structure of the shields are physically simulated and by obtaining a special algorithm, the amount of optimized energy caused by nuclear radiations, is calculated

  9. Nonlinear stability of oscillatory core-annular flow: A generalized Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with time periodic coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coward, Adrian V.; Papageorgiou, Demetrios T.; Smyrlis, Yiorgos S.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the nonlinear stability of two-phase core-annular flow in a pipe is examined when the acting pressure gradient is modulated by time harmonic oscillations and viscosity stratification and interfacial tension is present. An exact solution of the Navier-Stokes equations is used as the background state to develop an asymptotic theory valid for thin annular layers, which leads to a novel nonlinear evolution describing the spatio-temporal evolution of the interface. The evolution equation is an extension of the equation found for constant pressure gradients and generalizes the Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation with dispersive effects found by Papageorgiou, Maldarelli & Rumschitzki, Phys. Fluids A 2(3), 1990, pp. 340-352, to a similar system with time periodic coefficients. The distinct regimes of slow and moderate flow are considered and the corresponding evolution is derived. Certain solutions are described analytically in the neighborhood of the first bifurcation point by use of multiple scales asymptotics. Extensive numerical experiments, using dynamical systems ideas, are carried out in order to evaluate the effect of the oscillatory pressure gradient on the solutions in the presence of a constant pressure gradient.

  10. Thermo-hydraulic simulations of the experimental fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira Luz, M. da; Braz Filho, F.A.; Borges, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    A study of the core and performance of metallic fuel of the experimental fast reactor, from the thermal-hydraulic point of view, was carried out employing the COBRA IV-I code. The good safety characteristics of this reactor and the feasibility of using metallic fuel in experimental fast reactor were demonstrated. (Author) [pt

  11. Applications of plasma core reactors to terrestrial energy systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, T. S.; Biancardi, F. R.; Rodgers, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    Plasma core reactors offer several new options for future energy needs in addition to space power and propulsion applications. Power extraction from plasma core reactors with gaseous nuclear fuel allows operation at temperatures higher than conventional reactors. Highly efficient thermodynamic cycles and applications employing direct coupling of radiant energy are possible. Conceptual configurations of plasma core reactors for terrestrial applications are described. Closed-cycle gas turbines, MHD systems, photo- and thermo-chemical hydrogen production processes, and laser systems using plasma core reactors as prime energy sources are considered. Cycle efficiencies in the range of 50 to 65 percent are calculated for closed-cycle gas turbine and MHD electrical generators. Reactor advantages include continuous fuel reprocessing which limits inventory of radioactive by-products and thorium-U-233 breeder configurations with about 5-year doubling times.-

  12. Pulsed sphere measurements for weapons and fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    Pulsed sphere measurements provide a way of validating the Monte Carlo transport codes and the input cross sections used in the design of thermonuclear weapons and fusion reactors. In these measurements pulsed 14-MeV neutrons are generated at the center of spheres of materials to be investigated, and the emitted neutron spectrum is measured by time-of-flight techniques. The measurements described in this article cannot reproduce the complex conditions found in weapons and fusion reactors. However, agreement between measurement and calculations for a simple geometry and one material (or simple composites) is a necessary prerequisite to reliable fusion reactor calculations

  13. Influence of air flow parameters on nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges in a pin-annular electrode configuration

    KAUST Repository

    Heitz, Sylvain A

    2016-03-16

    The effect of various air flow parameters on the plasma regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed (NRP) discharges is investigated at atmospheric pressure. The two electrodes are in a pin-annular configuration, transverse to the mean flow. The voltage pulses have amplitudes up to 15 kV, a duration of 10 ns and a repetition frequency ranging from 15 to 30 kHz. The NRP corona to NRP spark (C-S) regime transition and the NRP spark to NRP corona (S-C) regime transition are investigated for different steady and harmonically oscillating flows. First, the strong effect of a transverse flow on the C-S and S-C transitions, as reported in previous studies, is verified. Second, it is shown that the azimuthal flow imparted by a swirler does not affect the regime transition voltages. Finally, the influence of low frequency harmonic oscillations of the air flow, generated by a loudspeaker, is studied. A strong effect of frequency and amplitude of the incoming flow modulation on the NRP plasma regime is observed. Results are interpreted based on the cumulative effect of the NRP discharges and an analysis of the residence times of fluid particles in the inter-electrode region. © 2016 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  14. Development and verification of SAC-CORE code for reactor core seismic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koo, K. H.; Lee, J. H.; Yu, B.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to develop the SAC-CORE code for core seismic analysis of Liquid Metal Reactor. Using the SAC-CORE code, the core seismic analysis for KALIMER reactor core is carried out to show the seismic isolation performance. For the verification of SAC-CORE code, the seismic analysis in air for RAPSODIE core mock-up is performed and the results are compared with those of the experiments. In this benchmark, SAC-CORE code gives good results

  15. The 2nd reactor core of the NS Otto Hahn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manthey, H.J.; Kracht, H.

    1979-01-01

    Details of the design of the 2nd reactor core are given, followed by a brief report summarising the operating experience gained with this 2nd core, as well as by an evaluation of measured data and statements concerning the usefulness of the knowledge gained for the development of future reactor cores. Quite a number of these data have been used to improve the concept and thus the specifications for the fuel elements of the 3rd core of the reactor of the NS Otto Hahn. (orig./HP) [de

  16. The seismic assessment of fast reactor cores in the UK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duthie, J.C.; Dostal, M.

    1988-01-01

    The design of the UK Commercial Demonstration Fast Reactor (CDFR) has evolved over a number of years. The design has to meet two seismic requirements: (i) the reactor must cause no hazard to the public during or after the Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE); (ii) there must be no sudden reduction in safety for an earthquake exceeding the SSE. The core is a complicated component in the whole reactor. It is usually represented in a very simplified manner in the seismic assessment of the whole reactor station. From this calculation, a time history or response spectrum can be generated for the diagrid, which supports the core, and for the above core structure, which supports the main absorber rods. These data may then be used to perform a detailed assessment of the reactor core. A new simplified model of the core response may then be made and used in a further calculation of the whole reactor. The calculation of the core response only, is considered in the remainder of this paper. One important feature of the fast reactor core, compared with other reactors, is that the components are relatively thin and flexible to promote neutron economy and heat transfer. A further important feature is that there are very small gaps between the wrapper tubes. This leads to very strong fluid-coupling effects. These effects are likely to be beneficial, but adequate techniques to calculate them are only just being developed. 9 refs, figs

  17. Heat Transfer in Pebble-Bed Nuclear Reactor Cores Cooled by Fluoride Salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huddar, Lakshana Ravindranath

    With electricity demand predicted to rise by more than 50% within the next 20 years and a burgeoning world population requiring reliable emissions-free base-load electricity, can we design advanced nuclear reactors to help meet this challenge? At the University of California, Berkeley (UCB) Fluoride-salt-cooled High Temperature Reactors (FHR) are currently being investigated. FHRs are designed with better safety and economic characteristics than conventional light water reactors (LWR) currently in operation. These reactors operate at high temperature and low pressure making them more efficient and safer than LWRs. The pebble-bed FHR (PB-FHR) variant includes an annular nuclear reactor core that is filled with randomly packed pebble fuel. It is crucial to characterize the heat transfer within this unique geometry as this informs the safety limits of the reactor. The work presented in this dissertation focused on furthering the understanding of heat transfer in pebble-bed nuclear reactor cores using fluoride salts as a coolant. This was done through experimental, analytical and computational techniques. A complex nuclear system with a coolant that has never previously been in commercial use requires experimental data that can directly inform aspects of its design. It is important to isolate heat transfer phenomena in order to understand the underlying physics in the context of the PB-FHR, as well as to make decisions about further experimental work that needs to be done in support of developing the PB-FHR. Certain organic oils can simulate the heat transfer behaviour of the fluoride salt if relevant non-dimensional parameters are matched. The advantage of this method is that experiments can be done at a much lower temperature and at a smaller geometric scale compared to FHRs, thereby lowering costs. In this dissertation, experiments were designed and performed to collect data demonstrating similitude. The limitations of these experiments were also elucidated by

  18. Hollow-core fibers for high power pulse delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Lyngsø, Jens K.; Jakobsen, Christian

    2016-01-01

    picosecond pulses. A novel fiber with 7 tubes and a core of 30 mu m was fabricated and it is here described and characterized, showing remarkable low loss, low bend loss, and good mode quality. Its optical properties are compared to both a 10 mu m and a 18 mu m core diameter photonic band gap hollow......We investigate hollow-core fibers for fiber delivery of high power ultrashort laser pulses. We use numerical techniques to design an anti-resonant hollow-core fiber having one layer of non-touching tubes to determine which structures offer the best optical properties for the delivery of high power......-core fiber. The three fibers are characterized experimentally for the delivery of 22 picosecond pulses at 1032nm. We demonstrate flexible, diffraction limited beam delivery with output average powers in excess of 70W. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  19. Proposal of a benchmark for core burnup calculations for a VVER-1000 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loetsch, T.; Khalimonchuk, V.; Kuchin, A.

    2009-01-01

    In the framework of a project supported by the German BMU the code DYN3D should be further validated and verified. During the work a lack of a benchmark on core burnup calculations for VVER-1000 reactors was noticed. Such a benchmark is useful for validating and verifying the whole package of codes and data libraries for reactor physics calculations including fuel assembly modelling, fuel assembly data preparation, few group data parametrisation and reactor core modelling. The benchmark proposed specifies the core loading patterns of burnup cycles for a VVER-1000 reactor core as well as a set of operational data such as load follow, boron concentration in the coolant, cycle length, measured reactivity coefficients and power density distributions. The reactor core characteristics chosen for comparison and the first results obtained during the work with the reactor physics code DYN3D are presented. This work presents the continuation of efforts of the projects mentioned to estimate the accuracy of calculated characteristics of VVER-1000 reactor cores. In addition, the codes used for reactor physics calculations of safety related reactor core characteristics should be validated and verified for the cases in which they are to be used. This is significant for safety related evaluations and assessments carried out in the framework of licensing and supervision procedures in the field of reactor physics. (authors)

  20. Development of high performance core for large fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Kotaro; Kawashima, Katsuyuki; Watari, Yoshio.

    1982-01-01

    Subsequently to the fast breeder prototype reactor ''Monju'', the construction of a demonstration reactor with 1000 MWe output is planned. This research aims at the establishment of the concept of a large core with excellent fuel breeding property and safety for a demonstration and commercial reactors. For the purpose, the optimum specification of fuel design as a large core was clarified, and the new construction of a core was examined, in which a disk-shaped blanket with thin peripheral edge is introduced at the center of a core. As the result, such prospect was obtained that the time for fuel doubling would be 1/2, and the energy generated in a core collapse accident would be about 1/5 as compared with a large core using the same fuel as ''Monju''. Generally, as a core is enlarged, the rate of breeding lowers. If a worst core collapse accident occurs, the scale of accident will be very large in the case of a ''Monju'' type large core. In an unhomogeneous core, an internal blanket is provided in the core for the purpose of improving the breeding property and safety. Hitachi Ltd. developed the concept of a large core unhomogeneous in axial direction and proposed it. The research on the fuel design for a large core, an unhomogeneous core and its core collapse accident is reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. Development of core design and analyses technology for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zee, Sung Quun; Lee, C. C.; Kim, K. Y.

    2002-03-01

    In general, small and medium-sized integral reactors adopt new technology such as passive and inherent safety concepts to minimize the necessity of power source and operator actions, and to provide the automatic measures to cope with any accidents. Specifically, such reactors are often designed with a lower core power density and with soluble boron free concept for system simplification. Those reactors require ultra long cycle operation for higher economical efficiency. This cycle length requirement is one of the important factors in the design of burnable absorbers as well as assurance of shutdown margin. Hence, both computer code system and design methodology based on the today's design technology for the current commercial reactor cores require intensive improvement for the small and medium-sized soluble boron free reactors. New database is also required for the development of this type of reactor core. Under these technical requirements, conceptual design of small integral reactor SMART has been performed since July 1997, and recently completed under the long term nuclear R and D program. Thus, the final objectives of this work is design and development of an integral reactor core and development of necessary indigenous design technology. To reach the goal of the 2nd stage R and D program for basic design of SMART, design bases and requirements adequate for ultra long cycle and soluble boron free concept are established. These bases and requirements are satisfied by the core loading pattern. Based on the core loading pattern, nuclear, and thermal and hydraulic characteristics are analyzed. Also included are fuel performance analysis and development of a core protection and monitoring system that is adequate for the soluble boron free core of an integral reactor. Core shielding design analysis is accomplished, too. Moreover, full scope interface data are produced for reactor safety and performance analyses and other design activities. Nuclear, thermal and

  2. Design for reactor core safety in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This Guide covers the neutronic, thermal, hydraulic, mechanical, chemical and irradiation considerations important to the safe design of a nuclear reactor core. The Guide applies to the types of thermal neutron reactor power plants that are now in common use and fuelled with oxide fuels: advanced gas cooled reactor (AGR), boiling water reactor (BWR), pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) (pressure tube and pressure vessel type) and pressurized water reactor (PWR). It deals with the individual components and systems that make up the core and associated equipment and with design provisions for the safe operation of the core and safe handling of the fuel and other core components. The Guide discusses the reactor vessel internals and the reactivity control and shutdown devices mounted on the vessel. Possible effects on requirements for the reactor coolant, the reactor coolant system and its pressure boundary (including the pressure vessel) are considered only as far as necessary to clarify the interface with the Safety Guide on Reactor Coolant and Associated Systems in Nuclear Power Plants (IAEA Safety Series No. 50-SG-D13) and other Guides. In relation to instrumentation and control systems the guidance is mainly limited to functional requirements

  3. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: amir@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Servico de Tecnologia de Reatores; Palma, Daniel A.P., E-mail: dapalma@cnen.gov.b [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L., E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.b, E-mail: dora@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  4. Experimental distribution of coolant in the IPR-R1 Triga nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesquita, Amir Z.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia; Veloso, Maria A.F.; Reis, Patricia A.L.

    2011-01-01

    The IPR-R1 is a typical TRIGA Mark I light-water and open pool type reactor. The core has an annular configuration of six rings and is cooled by natural circulation. The core coolant channels extend from the bottom grid plate to the top grid plate. The cooling water flows through the holes in the bottom grid plate, passes through the lower unheated region of the element, flows upwards through the active region, passes through the upper unheated region, and finally leaves the channel through the differential area between a triangular spacer block on the top of the fuel element and a round hole in the grid. Direct measurement of the flow rate in a coolant channel is difficult because of the bulky size and low accuracy of flow meters. The flow rate through the channel may be determined indirectly from the heat balance across the channel using measurements of the water inlet and outlet temperatures. This paper presents the experiments performed in the IPR-R1 reactor to monitoring some thermo-hydraulic parameters in the core coolant channels, such as: the radial and axial temperature profile, temperature, velocity, mass flow rate, mass flux and Reynolds's number. Some results were compared with theoretical predictions, as it was expected the variables follow the power distribution (or neutron flux) in the core. (author)

  5. Laser anemometer measurements and computations in an annular cascade of high turning core turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Louis J.; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1992-01-01

    An advanced laser anemometer (LA) was used to measure the axial and tangential velocity components in an annular cascade of turbine stator vanes designed for a high bypass ratio engine. These vanes were based on a redesign of the first-stage stator, of a two-stage turbine, that produced 75 degrees of flow turning. Tests were conducted on a 0.771 scale model of the engine size stator. The advanced LA fringe system was designed to employ thinner than usual laser beams resulting in a 50-micron-diameter probe volume. Window correction optics were used to ensure that the laser beams did not uncross in passing through the curved optical access port. Experimental LA measurements of velocity and turbulence were obtained both upstream, within, and downstream of the stator vane row at the design exit critical velocity ratio of 0.896 at the hub. Static pressures were also measured on the vane surface. The measurements are compared, where possible with calculations from a 3-D inviscid flow analysis. The data are presented in both graphic and tabulated form so that they may be readily used to compare against other turbomachinery computations.

  6. Core Design Studies for a 1000 MWth Advanced Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.K.; Yang, W.S.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R.N. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2008-07-01

    This paper describes the core design and performance characteristics of 1000 MWth Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts with a wide range of TRU conversion ratio. Using ternary metal alloy and mixed oxide fuels, reference core designs of a medium TRU conversion ratio of approx0.7 were developed by trade-off between burnup reactivity loss and TRU conversion ratio. Based on these reference core concepts, TRU burner cores with a wide range of TRU conversion ratio were developed by changing the intra-assembly design parameters and core configurations. Reactor performance characteristics were evaluated in detail, including equilibrium cycle core performances, reactivity feedback coefficients, and shutdown margins. The results showed that by employing different assembly designs, a wide range of TRU conversion ratios from approx0.2 to break-even can be achieved within the same core without introducing significant performance and safety penalties. (authors)

  7. Modular assembly for supporting, straining, and directing flow to a core in a nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, William E.

    1977-01-01

    A reactor core support arrangement for supporting, straining, and providing fluid flow to the core and periphery of a nuclear reactor during normal operation. A plurality of removable inlet modular units are contained within permanent liners in the lower supporting plate of the reactor vessel lower internals. During normal operation (1) each inlet modular unit directs main coolant flow to a plurality of core assemblies, the latter being removably supported in receptacles in the upper portion of the modular unit and (2) each inlet modular unit may direct bypass flow to a low pressure annular region of the reactor vessel. Each inlet modular unit may include special fluid seals interposed between mating surfaces of the inlet modular units and the core assemblies and between the inlet modular units and the liners, to minimize leakage and achieve an hydraulic balance. Utilizing the hydraulic balance, the modular units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the modular unit receptacles by their own respective weight. Included as part of the permanent liners below the horizontal support plate are generally hexagonal axial debris barriers. The axial debris barriers collectively form a bottom boundary of a secondary high pressure plenum, the upper boundary of which is the bottom surface of the horizontal support plate. Peripheral liners include radial debris barriers which collectively form a barrier against debris entry radially. During normal operation primary coolant inlet openings in the liner, below the axial debris barriers, pass a large amount of coolant into the inlet modular units, and secondary coolant inlet openings in the portion of the liners within the secondary plenum pass a small amount of coolant into the inlet modular units. The secondary coolant inlet openings also provide alternative coolant inlet flow paths in the unlikely event of blockage of the primary inlet openings. The primary inlet openings have characteristics which limit the

  8. Design and initial performance of the Sandia Pulsed Reactor-III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuscher, J.A.; Estes, B.F.

    1976-01-01

    The Sandia Pulsed Reactor-III (SPR-III) is a new fast pulsed reactor which has recently undergone initial testing at Sandia Laboratories. SPR-III is a uranium-10 weight percent molybdenum fuel assembly with a 17.78 cm irradiation cavity similar in design to SPR-II which has been in operation since 1967. The basic SPR-III design utilizes the same split-core configuration which has been proven with SPR-II; however, SPR-III uses external reflectors for control and external bolts to hold the fuel plates together. The core consists of sixteen fuel plates with an inside diameter of 17.78 cm, an outside diameter of 29.72 cm, and a core height of 31.9 cm. The fuel mass is about 227 kg of fully enriched uranium-10 weight percent molybdenum alloy. SPR III has completed the initial series of startup tests which included the critical experiment, zero and low-power tests, and pulse testing. The reactor design and results from the initial testing program are described in this paper. A portion of the startup experiments with SPR-III have been completed and this paper discusses the more important aspects of the initial testing program

  9. Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-09-30

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

  10. Fuel loading method to exchangeable reactor core of BWR type reactor and its core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koguchi, Kazushige.

    1995-01-01

    In a fuel loading method for an exchangeable reactor core of a BWR type reactor, at least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies having different reactivities between axial upper and lower portions are preliminarily prepared, and upon taking out fuel assemblies of advanced combustion and loading the fresh fuel assemblies dispersingly, they are disposed so as to attain a predetermined axial power distribution in the reactor. At least two kinds of fresh fuel assemblies have a content of burnable poisons different between the axial upper portion and lower portions. In addition, reactivity characteristics are made different at a region higher than the central boundary and a region lower than the central boundary which is set within a range of about 6/24 to 16/24 from the lower portion of the fuel effective length. There can be attained axial power distribution as desired such as easy optimization of the axial power distribution, high flexibility, and flexible flattening of the power distribution, and it requires no special change in view of the design and has a good economical property. (N.H.)

  11. Core conversion effects on the safety analysis of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anoussis, J.N.; Chrysochoides, N.G.; Papastergiou, C.N.

    1982-07-01

    The safety related parameters of the 5 MW Democritus research reactor that will be affected by the scheduled core conversion to use LEU instead of HEU are considered. The analysis of the safety related items involved in such a core conversion, mainly the consequences due to MCA, DBA, etc., is of a general nature and can, therefore, be applied to other similar pool type reactors as well. (T.A.)

  12. Sizing an external-fueled in-core thermionic reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, A. M.; Sawyer, C. D.

    1971-01-01

    Parametric studies on sizing of external-fueled in-core thermionic reactors are presented. Reactor physics results obtained for a variety of fuel element designs are used as a basis for nuclear criticality, power distribution, and control worth design. Thermionic performance results for a single fuel element for several sets of operating conditions are presented. An algorithm combining the electrical and reactor physics results in a form amenable to preliminary systems analysis is presented.

  13. Nuclear waste disposal utilizing a gaseous core reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paternoster, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    The feasibility of a gaseous core nuclear reactor designed to produce power to also reduce the national inventories of long-lived reactor waste products through nuclear transmutation was examined. Neutron-induced transmutation of radioactive wastes is shown to be an effective means of shortening the apparent half life.

  14. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and

  15. MCNP full-core modeling of the advanced test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S.S.; Jahshan, S.N.; Nielson, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    A full-core Monte Carlo neutron and photon (MCNP) transport model has been completed for the advanced test reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. This new model is a complete three-dimensional model that represents fuel elements, core structures, and target regions in adequate detail. The model can be used in evaluating heating and reaction rates in various target regions of the core. This model is especially useful in physics analysis of an asymmetric experiment loading in the core. The ATR is a light-water-cooled thermal reactor with aluminum/uranium-aluminide fuel plates grouped in arcuate fuel elements that form a serpentine arrangement, as shown in Fig. 1. The core is surrounded by a beryllium reflector. Nine test loops are nestled in the lobes of the serpentine core, and numerous other irradiation holes with varying dimensions and radiation environments are located in the reflector and in the core interior

  16. Core design studies for advanced burner test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W.S.; Kim, T.K.; Hill, R.N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the core design and performance characteristics of 250 MWt Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) designs. A phased approach was adopted with initial startup using conventional enrichment plutonium-based fuel and gradual transition to full core loading of transmutation fuel after its qualification phase. Reference core designs were developed for ternary metal alloy and mixed oxide fuels based on weapons-grade plutonium feed. The transuranics (TRU) transmutation fuel tests can be accommodated in the designated test assemblies, and if fully developed, core conversion to TRU transmutation fuel can be envisioned. For the startup core designs, the calculated TRU conversion ratio is 0.65 for the metal fuel core and 0.64 for the oxide fuel core. The metal fuel core requires an average TRU enrichment of 18.8% and has a TRU loading of 732 kg. Compared to the metal fuel core, the lower density oxide fuel core requires an average TRU enrichment of 21.8%, which results in a 780 kg TRU loading despite a {approx} 9% smaller heavy metal inventory. Alternative designs were also studied for a light water reactor spent fuel TRU feed and a low conversion ratio, including the recycle of the ABTR spent fuel TRU. Reactor performance characteristics were evaluated in detail, including equilibrium cycle core parameters, mass flow rates, power distributions, kinetic parameters, reactivity feedback coefficients, and reactivity control requirements and shutdown margins. (authors)

  17. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Central Cavity Free-Field Environment with the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-FF-CC-32-cl).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega, Richard Manuel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naranjo, Gerald E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lippert, Lance L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Griffin, Patrick J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    This document presents the facilit y - recommended characteri zation o f the neutron, prompt gamma - ray, and delayed gamma - ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor ( ACRR ) for the cen tral cavity free - field environment with the 32 - inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environmen t is ACRR - FF - CC - 32 - cl. The neutron, prompt gamma - ray , and delayed gamma - ray energy spectra , uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma - ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the cavity . Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples . Acknowledgements The authors wish to th ank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work . Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  18. A remote maintenance robot system for a pulsed nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thunborg, S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents a remote maintenance robot system for use in a hazardous environment. The system consists of turntable, robot and hoist subsystems which operate under the control of a supervisory computer to perform coordinated programmed maintenance operations on a pulsed nuclear reactor. The system is operational

  19. Assessment of TRIGA pulsing reactor safety without loss of coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baers, B.; Kaall, L.

    1979-11-01

    The fuel temperature, fuel can pressure and cladding stresses in the TRIGA fuel elements at various transient states has in part been measured and semiempirically estimated in cases where no experiments could be carried out. To the end of obtaining more reliable and up-to-date data and reactor parameters, reactor power and fuel temperatures were measured both at steady and transient states, including pulsing up to 280 MW. A novel and more realistic model for the fuel temperature at pulsing was also presented and used in the assessments. Based on the present assessment with the water coolant present and a maximum excess reactivity of (Δksub(max)/β = ) 4 $, no reactivity induced transients can bring about any undue hazards to the reactor or to the surroundings. (author)

  20. In core measurement and monitoring of reactor (neutron) radiation field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erben, O.

    1985-01-01

    A survey is presented of in core radiation detectors. The principles are described of activation detectors, fission chambers, self-powered neutron detectors and thermal sensors. Systems of in core measurement for WWER nuclear power plants, nuclear reactors of power plants operated by KWU, Babcock and Wilcox, Combustion Engineering and FRAMATOME are described. (E.S.)

  1. Axial heterogeneous core concept applied for super phoenix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batista, J.L.; Renke, C.A.C.; Waintraub, M.; Santos Bastos, W. dos; Brito Aghina, L.O. de.

    1991-11-01

    Always maintaining the current design rules, this paper presents a parametric study on the type of axial heterogeneous core concept (CHA), utilizing a core of fast reactor Super Phenix type, reaching a maximum thermal burnup rate of 150000 M W d/t and being managed in single batch. (author)

  2. Neutron spectrometric methods for core inventory verification in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellinger, A.; Filges, U.; Hansen, W.; Knorr, J.; Schneider, R.

    2002-01-01

    In consequence of the Non-Proliferation Treaty safeguards, inspections are periodically made in nuclear facilities by the IAEA and the EURATOM Safeguards Directorate. The inspection methods are permanently improved. Therefore, the Core Inventory Verification method is being developed as an indirect method for the verification of the core inventory and to check the declared operation of research reactors

  3. Research of core characteristics of the package-reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaki, Masao; Hino, Tetsushi; Matsuura, Masayoshi; Hibi, Koki; Takimoto, Hiroki

    2008-01-01

    A new small reactor concept called the Package-Reactor has been jointly developed by Hitachi, Ltd. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. The reactor technology was based on that of conventional LWRs. The reactor core consists of 12 cassettes containing fuel rods with a similar design to that of PWR fuel rods. Cassettes are placed in air at atmospheric pressure. Tube-type control clusters placed outside the pressure boundary are used as the core shutdown system. Natural circulation with two-phase flow is employed for the core cooling system and no recirculation pumps are required. With these concepts the Package-Reactor eliminates any active components that operate in high pressure regions of the reactor and its capital costs can be reduced. The feasibility of reactivity control by using moderator void feedback and burnable poisons was studied to reduce operational and maintenance costs. It was found that a continuous operation of more than 5 years without any operations to control reactivity would be feasible with a UO 2 fuel enrichment of 5.0 wt%, which is the upper limit for UO 2 fuel enrichment under the current regulations in Japan. In addition, we researched the core reflectors' characteristics of the Package-Reactor. (author)

  4. Reactor core and passive safety systems descriptions of a next generation pressure tube reactor - mechanical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yetisir, M.; Gaudet, M.; Rhodes, D.; Hamilton, H.; Pencer, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    Canada has been developing a channel-type supercritical water-cooled nuclear reactor concept, often called the Canadian SCWR. The objective of this reactor concept is to meet the technology goals of the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) for the next generation nuclear reactor development, which include enhanced safety features (inherent safe operation and deploying passive safety features), improved resource utilization, sustainable fuel cycle, and greater proliferation resistance than Generation III nuclear reactors. The Canadian SCWR core concept consists of a high-pressure inlet plenum, a separate low-pressure heavy water moderator contained in a calandria vessel, and 336 pressure tubes surrounded by the moderator. The reactor uses supercritical water as a coolant, and a direct steam power cycle to generate electricity. The reactor concept incorporates advanced safety features such as passive core cooling, long-term decay heat rejection to the environment and fuel melt prevention via passive moderator cooling. These features significantly reduce core damage frequency relative to existing nuclear reactors. This paper presents a description of the design concepts for the Canadian SCWR core, reactor building layout and the plant layout. Passive safety concepts are also described that address containment and core cooling following a loss-of coolant accident, as well as long term reactor heat removal at station blackout conditions. (author)

  5. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V.1: Summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    In view of the proliferation concerns caused by the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and in anticipation that the supply of HEU to research and test reactors will be more restricted in the future, this guidebook has been prepared to assist research reactor operators in addressing the safety and licensing issues for conversion of their reactor cores from the use of HEU fuel to the use of low enriched uranium fuel. This Guidebook, in five volumes, addresses the effects of changes in the safety-related parameters of mixed cores and the converted core. It provides an information base which should enable the appropriate approvals processes for implementation of a specific conversion proposal, whether for a light or for a heavy water moderated research reactor. Refs, figs, bibliographies and tabs

  6. Fuel requirements for experimental devices in MTR reactors. A perturbation model for reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beeckmans de West-Meerbeeck, A.

    1991-01-01

    Irradiation in neutron absorbing devices, requiring high fast neutron fluxes in the core or high thermal fluxes in the reflector and flux traps, lead to higher density fuel and larger core dimensions. A perturbation model of the reactor core helps to estimate the fuel requirements. (orig.)

  7. Safety characteristics of the US advanced liquid metal reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magee, P.M.; Dubberley, A.E.; Gyorey, G.L.; Lipps, A.J.; Wu, T.

    1991-01-01

    The U.S. Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) design employs innovative, passive features to provide an unprecedented level of public safety and the ability to demonstrate this safety to the public. The key features employed in the core design to produce the desired passive safety characteristics are: a small core with a tight restraint system, the use of metallic U-Pu-Zr fuel, control rod withdrawal limiters, and gas expansion modules. In addition, the reactor vessel and closure are designed to have the capability to withstand, with large margins, the maximum possible core disruptive accident without breach and radiological release. (author)

  8. Characteristics of fast reactor core designs and closed fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poplavsky, V.M.; Eliseev, V.A.; Matveev, V.I.; Khomyakov, Y.S.; Tsyboulya, A.M.; Tsykunov, A.G.; Chebeskov, A.N.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the results of recent studies, preliminary basic requirements related to characteristics of fast reactor core and nuclear fuel cycle were elaborated. Decreasing reactivity margin due to approaching breeding ratio to 1, requirements to support non-proliferation of nuclear weapons, and requirements to decrease amount of radioactive waste are under consideration. Several designs of the BN-800 reactor core have been studied. In the case of MOX fuel it is possible to reach a breeding ratio about 1 due to the use of larger size of fuel elements with higher fuel density. Keeping low axial fertile blanket that would be reprocessed altogether with the core, it is possible to set up closed fuel cycle with the use of own produced plutonium only. Conceptual core designs of advanced commercial reactor BN-1800 with MOX and nitride fuel are also under consideration. It has been shown that it is expedient to use single enrichment fuel core design in this reactor in order to reach sufficient flattening and stability of power rating in the core. The main feature of fast reactor fuel cycle is a possibility to utilize plutonium and minor actinides which are the main contributors to the long-living radiotoxicity in irradiated nuclear fuel. The results of comparative analytical studies on the risk of plutonium proliferation in case of open and closed fuel cycle of nuclear power are also presented in the paper. (authors)

  9. Effects of pulse-to-pulse residual species on discharges in repetitively pulsed discharges through packed bed reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruszelnicki, Juliusz; Engeling, Kenneth W.; Foster, John E.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2016-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) sustained in packed bed reactors (PBRs) are being investigated for conversion of toxic and waste gases, and CO2 removal. These discharges are repetitively pulsed having varying flow rates and internal geometries, which results in species from the prior pulse still being in the discharge zone at the time the following discharge pulse occurs. A non-negligible residual plasma density remains, which effectively acts as preionization. This residual charge changes the discharge properties of subsequent pulses, and may impact important PBR properties such as chemical selectivity. Similarly, the residual neutral reactive species produced during earlier pulses will impact the reaction rates on subsequent pulses. We report on results of a computational investigation of a 2D PBR using the plasma hydrodynamics simulator nonPDPSIM. Results will be discussed for air flowing though an array of dielectric rods at atmospheric pressure. The effects of inter-pulse residual species on PBR discharges will be quantified. Means of controlling the presence of residual species in the reactor through gas flow rate, pulse repetition, pulse width and geometry will be described. Comparisons will be made to experiments. Work supported by US DOE Office of Fusion Energy Science and the National Science Foundation.

  10. Uncertainty evaluation of fast reactor core seismic response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Forni, M.; Amendola, A.; Lucia, A.C.; Maresca, G.

    1983-01-01

    Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been applied to the evaluation of the uncertainties on the seismic behaviour of a fast reactor core. For this study preliminary data concerning the Italian PEC reactor test facility have been used. The structural dynamic analysis has been performed by means of the SAP IV code for the whole reactor block and CORALIE for the core. Once a certain acceleration time history at the ground has been assumed, the characteristics of the acceleration time-history at the core support grid, related to the vessel-core dynamic interaction, the reactor vessel stiffness, the frequency response, damping and impact coefficients of the core elements, and the number of core element rows assumed in the non-linear core calculations have been identified as the major contributors to the overall uncertainty. For each element type the responses calculated with CORALIE have been approximated by means of polynomial functions, whose adequacy in the variable space investigated has been tested by means of a further set of dynamic calculations. Finally the input uncertainties have been propagated by a Monte Carlo routine (MUP) under different assumptions to assess the sensitivity of the output distribution with respect to the kind of input probability distributions. The aim of this latter analysis step is the proposal of an adequate approach for verifying that the control rods succeed at a high probability to fall inside their guide-tubes in the case of an earth-quake, so that the reactor can be safely shut-down. The paper describes the details of the study and demonstrates RSM adequacy for the analysis of the input uncertainty effects on the core seismic response. It also shows that the core element frequencies and damping coefficients, as well as the vessel-core dynamic interaction parameters, are the main variables affecting such response, which therefore need a sufficiently precise definition. (orig.)

  11. Station blackout core damage frequency in an advanced nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, Luiz Sergio de

    2004-01-01

    Even though nuclear reactors are provided with protection systems so that they can be automatically shut down in the event of a station blackout, the consequences of this event can be severe. This is because many safety systems that are needed for removing residual heat from the core and for maintaining containment integrity, in the majority of the nuclear power plants, are AC dependent. In order to minimize core damage frequency, advanced reactor concepts are being developed with safety systems that use natural forces. This work shows an improvement in the safety of a small nuclear power reactor provided by a passive core residual heat removal system. Station blackout core melt frequencies, with and without this system, are both calculated. The results are also compared with available data in the literature. (author)

  12. Vessel core seismic interaction for a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Maresca, G.

    1984-01-01

    This report deals with the analysis carried out in collaboration between ENEA and NIRA for optimizing the iterative procedure applied for the evaluation of the effects of the vessel core dynamic interaction for a fast reactor in the case of a earthquake. In fact, as shown in a previous report the convergence of such procedure was very slow for the design solution adopted for the PEC reactor, i.e. with a core restraint plate located close to the top of the core elements. This study, although performed making use of preliminary data (the same of the cited previous report) demonstrates that the convergence is fast if a suitable linear core model is applied in the first iteration linear calculations carried out by NIRA, with an intermediate stiffness with respect to those corresponding to the two limit models previously assumed and increased damping coefficients. Thus, the optimized iterative procedures is now applied in the PEC reactor block seismic verification analysis

  13. Multi-megawatt pin core space reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornung, R.J.; Normand, E.; Stevens, A.; Teare, K.R.

    1989-01-01

    Boeing has assembled an experienced team to perform a concept definition study of a multi-megawatt (MMW) nuclear power system designed to provide burst power for a space based platform. The design uses the hydrogen needed for platform cooling as the working fluid in an open thermodynamic cycle. The hydrogen is heated by a pin-fuel, fast spectrum reactor and generates power through a pair of counter-rotating turbines which drive four wound rotor alternators. This paper gives an overview of the system, concentrating on features of the reactor design and operation

  14. MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) cores fuel management. Application of a low enrichment reactor for the equilibrium and transitory core calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relloso, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    This work describes a methodology to define the equilibrium core and a MTR (Materials Testing Reactors) type reactor's fuel management upon multiple boundary conditions, such as: end cycle and permitted maximum reactivities, burn-up extraction and maximun number of movements by rechange. The methodology proposed allows to determine the best options through conceptual relations, prior to a detailed calculation with the core code, reducing the test number with these codes and minimizing in this way CPU cost. The way to better systematized search of transient cores from the first one to the equilibrium one is presented. (Author) [es

  15. Study on core design for reduced-moderation water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okubo, Tsutomu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-12-01

    The Reduced-Moderation Water Reactor (RMWR) is a water-cooled reactor with the harder neutron spectrum comparing with the LWR, resulting from low neutron moderation due to reduced water volume fraction. Based on the difference from the spectrum from the LWR, the conversion from U-238 to Pu-239 is promoted and the new cores preferable to effective utilization of uranium resource can be possible Design study of the RMWR core started in 1997 and new four core concepts (three BWR cores and one PWR core) are recently evaluated in terms of control rod worths, plutonium multiple recycle, high burnup and void coefficient. Comparative evaluations show needed incorporation of control rod programming and simplified PUREX process as well as development of new fuel cans for high burnup of 100 GW-d/t. Final choice of design specifications will be made at the next step aiming at realization of the RMWR. (T. Tanaka)

  16. Thermal barrier and support for nuclear reactor fuel core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, W.S. Jr.; Pickering, J.L.; Black, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described having a thermal barrier for supporting a fuel column of a nuclear reactor core within a reactor vessel having a fixed rigid metal liner. The fuel column has a refractory post extending downward. The thermal barrier comprises, in combination, a metallic core support having an interior chamber secured to the metal liner; fibrous thermal insulation material covering the metal liner and surrounding the metallic core support; means associated with the metallic core support and resting on the top for locating and supporting the full column post; and a column of ceramic material located within the interior chamber of the metallic core support, the height of the column is less than the height of the metallic core support so that the ceramic column will engage the means for locating and supporting the fuel column post only upon plastic deformation of the metallic core support; the core support comprises a metallic cylinder and the ceramic column comprises coaxially aligned ceramic pads. Each pad has a hole located within the metallic cylinder by means of a ceramic post passing through the holes in the pads

  17. Automated Design and Optimization of Pebble-bed Reactor Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gougar, Hans D.; Ougouag, Abderrafi M.; Terry, William K.

    2010-01-01

    We present a conceptual design approach for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors using recirculating pebble-bed cores. The design approach employs PEBBED, a reactor physics code specifically designed to solve for and analyze the asymptotic burnup state of pebble-bed reactors, in conjunction with a genetic algorithm to obtain a core that maximizes a fitness value that is a function of user-specified parameters. The uniqueness of the asymptotic core state and the small number of independent parameters that define it suggest that core geometry and fuel cycle can be efficiently optimized toward a specified objective. PEBBED exploits a novel representation of the distribution of pebbles that enables efficient coupling of the burnup and neutron diffusion solvers. With this method, even complex pebble recirculation schemes can be expressed in terms of a few parameters that are amenable to modern optimization techniques. With PEBBED, the user chooses the type and range of core physics parameters that represent the design space. A set of traits, each with acceptable and preferred values expressed by a simple fitness function, is used to evaluate the candidate reactor cores. The stochastic search algorithm automatically drives the generation of core parameters toward the optimal core as defined by the user. The optimized design can then be modeled and analyzed in greater detail using higher resolution and more computationally demanding tools to confirm the desired characteristics. For this study, the design of pebble-bed high temperature reactor concepts subjected to demanding physical constraints demonstrated the efficacy of the PEBBED algorithm.

  18. Design of the HPLWR reactor core; Auslegung des HPLWR Reaktorkerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, Karlsruhe (Germany). IKET; Maraczy, C. [KFKI Atomenergia Kutatointezet (AEKI), Budapest (Hungary); Heinecke, J. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Bernnat, W. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). IKE

    2010-05-15

    The high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) is a LWR working with supercritical water as coolant medium and moderator. The operational pressure is 25 MPa and the fresh steam temperatures are above 500 C. In order to restrict the peak temperature in the reactor core to less than 630 C (upper limit of the corrosion resistance of stainless steel fuel cans) a three-step heating of the reactor core was proposed. The authors discuss the results of thermal hydraulic and neutronic calculations performed during the last three years. The coolant mixing is the key process of the concept. The design of the fuel and water cans is using double-walled constructions with ceramic insulations to avoid inadmissible heating o the moderator medium. Stress and deformation analysis of the core structures were performed. The calculated results still need experimental validation.

  19. Studying the effects of dynamical parameters on reactor core temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Khodabakhsh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to increase productivity, reduce depreciation, and avoid possible accidents in a system such as fuel rods' melting and overpressure, control of temperature changes in the reactor core is an important factor. There are several methods for solving and analysing the stability of point kinetics equations. In most previous analyses, the effects of various factors on the temperature of the reactor core have been ignored. In this work, the effects of various dynamical parameters on the temperature of the reactor core and stability of the system in the presence of temperature feedback reactivity with external reactivity step, ramp and sinusoidal for six groups of delayed neutrons were studied using the method of Lyapunov exponent. The results proved to be in good agreement with other works

  20. Investigation of the core melt accident in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koerber, H.

    1980-01-01

    In the thesis the core melt accident, heating up and collapsing of the reactor core were investigated. The most important parameters of influence were found and their effect on the development of the accident were shown. A causal diagram was developed representing the great number of events occurring in the course of the core melt accident as well as their mutual dependences. Models were developed and applied for a detailed description of the collapse process, melting of materials, heat and material transport at flow-off of the melted mass and for taking into account steam blocking in the destroyed core sections. (orig.) [de

  1. Core Flow Distribution from Coupled Supercritical Water Reactor Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an extended code package PARCS/RELAP5 to analyze steady state of SCWR US reference design. An 8 × 8 quarter core model in PARCS and a reactor core model in RELAP5 are used to study the core flow distribution under various steady state conditions. The possibility of moderator flow reversal is found in some hot moderator channels. Different moderator flow orifice strategies, both uniform across the core and nonuniform based on the power distribution, are explored with the goal of preventing the reversal.

  2. Core Design Studies for a 600 MWe TRU Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Yeong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    The conceptual core design for a 600-MWe sodium cooled fast reactor(SFR) for TRU burning is being developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) under the frame of the Gen-IV SFR development program. The KALIMER-600 has been adopted as a reference SFR system by the Gen-IV International Forum. Therefore, the development of the core design concept for a 600-MWe SFR for TRU burning has been implemented based on the design feature of the KALIMER-600. In this paper, a new core design concept for use of a single-enrichment fuel is described for a reference core. In this concept, power flattering is achieved by using the core region-wise cladding thickness. After the reference core design, a progressive design change of 600 MWe for TRU burning is performed for optimization. The core performance, including the reactivity coefficients, are analyzed and inter-compared.

  3. THE WHITE SANDS MISSILE RANGE PULSED REACTOR FACILITY, MAY 1963

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Robert L.; Boor, R.A.; Cole, W.M.; Elder, G.E.

    1963-05-15

    A brief statement of the mission of the White Sands Missile Range Nuclear Effects Laboratory is given. The new Nuclear Effects Laboratory Facility is described. This facility consists of two buildings-a laboratory and a reactor building. The White Sands Missile Range bare critical assembly, designated as the MoLLY-G, is described. The MoLLY-G, an unreflected, unmoderated right circular cylinder of uranium-molybdenum alloy designed for pulsed operation, will have a maximum burst capability of approximately 2 x 10/sup 17/ fissions with a burst width of 50 microseconds. The reactor construction and operating procedures are described. As designed, the MoLLY-G will provide an intense source of pulsed neutron and gamma radiation for a great variety of experimental and test arrangements. (auth)

  4. In-core moderator temperature measurement within candu reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sion, N.

    1983-03-01

    The temperature profile of the D 2O moderator inside a CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) reactor, within the calandria vessel, was measured by means of a specially instrumented probe introduced within the core. Measurements were made under steady and transient reactor conditions using two different sensors, viz. resistance temperature detectors (RTD) and type K chromel-alumel thermocouples. The results established the feasibility of in-core moderatortemperature measurement and indicated that the thermocouples used were relatively not affected by the intense radiation fields thus producing more accurate data.

  5. Vibration tests on some models of PEC reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonacina, G.; Castoldi, A.; Zola, M.; Cecchini, F.; Martelli, A.; Vincenzi, D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the aims of the experimental tests carried out at ISMES, within an agreement with the Department of Fast Reactors of ENEA, on some models of the elements of PEC Fast Nuclear Reactor Core in the frame of the activities for the seismic verification of the PEC core. The seismic verification is briefly described with particular attention to the problems arising from the shocks among the various elements during an earthquake, as well as the computer code used, the purpose and the techniques used to perform tests, some results and the first comparison between the theory and the experimental data

  6. Core damage frequency (reactor design) perspectives based on IPE results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camp, A.L.; Dingman, S.E.; Forester, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides perspectives gained from reviewing 75 Individual Plant Examination (IPE) submittals covering 108 nuclear power plant units. Variability both within and among reactor types is examined to provide perspectives regarding plant-specific design and operational features, and C, modeling assumptions that play a significant role in the estimates of core damage frequencies in the IPEs. Human actions found to be important in boiling water reactors (BWRs) and in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) are presented and the events most frequently found important are discussed

  7. Reactor core cooling device for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, Masahiko.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention concerns a reactor core cooling facility upon rupture of pipelines in a BWR type nuclear power plant. That is, when rupture of pipelines should occur in the reactor container, an releasing safety valve operates instantly and then a depressurization valve operates to depressurize the inside of a reactor pressure vessel. Further, an injection valve of cooling water injection pipelines is opened and cooling water is injected to cool the reactor core from the time when the pressure is lowered to a level capable of injecting water to the pressure vessel by the static water head of a pool water as a water source. Further, steams released from the pressure vessel and steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in a high pressure/low pressure emergency condensation device and the inside of the reactor container is depressurized and cooled. When the reactor is isolated, since the steams in the pressure vessel are condensed in the state that the steam supply valve and the return valve of a steam supply pipelines are opened and a vent valve is closed, the reactor can be maintained safely. (I.S.)

  8. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, J. D.; Rust, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions.

  9. Circuit designs for measuring reactor period, peak power, and pulse fluence on TRIGA and other pulse reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, R.D.; Thome, F.V.; Williams, R.L.

    1976-01-01

    Inexpensive circuits for use in evaluating reactor pulse prompt period, peak power, and pulse fluence (NVT) are presented. In addition to low cost, these circuits are easily assembled and calibrated and operate with a high degree of accuracy. The positive period measuring system has been used in evaluating reactivity additions as small as 5 cents (with an accuracy of ±0.1 cents) and as large as $4.50 (accuracy ±2 cents). Reactor peak power is measured digitally with a system accuracy of ±0.04% of a 10 Volt input (±4 mV). The NVT circuit measures over a 2-1/2 decade range, has 3 place resolution and an accuracy of better than 1%. (author)

  10. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Guoping [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  11. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-01-01

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  12. Seismic analysis of the core of a PWR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preumont, A.

    1981-01-01

    The author develops successively: - a method for the generation of accelerograms compatible with the response spectrum; a model for the analysis of lateral deformations of the core of a PWR reactor under seismic excitation; a simple dynamic model of the fuel assembly including a vibration model. (MD)

  13. Nonlinear seismic analysis of a graphite reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laframboise, W.L.; Desmond, T.P.

    1988-01-01

    Design and construction of the Department of Energy's N-Reactor located in Richland, Washington was begun in the late 1950s and completed in the early 1960s. Since then, the reactor core's structural integrity has been under review and is considered by some to be a possible safety concern. The reactor core is moderated by graphite. The safety concern stems from the degradation of the graphite due to the effects of long-term irradiation. To assess the safety of the reactor core when subjected to seismic loads, a dynamic time-history structural analysis was performed. The graphite core consists of 89 layers of numerous graphite blocks which are assembled in a 'lincoln-log' lattice. This assembly permits venting of steam in the event of a pressure tube rupture. However, such a design gives rise to a highly nonlinear structure when subjected to earthquake loads. The structural model accounted for the nonlinear interlayer sliding and for the closure and opening of gaps between the graphite blocks. The model was subjected to simulated earthquake loading, and the time-varying response of selected elements critical to safety were monitored. The analytically predicted responses (displacements and strains) were compared to allowable responses to assess margins of safety. (orig.)

  14. Methodology for reactor core physics analysis - part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ponzoni Filho, P.; Fernandes, V.B.; Lima Bezerra, J. de; Santos, T.I.C.

    1992-12-01

    The computer codes used for reactor core physics analysis are described. The modifications introduced in the public codes and the technical basis for the codes developed by the FURNAS utility are justified. An evaluation of the impact of these modifications on the parameter involved in qualifying the methodology is included. (F.E.). 5 ref, 7 figs, 5 tabs

  15. Nuclear reactor core supports, and flow control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This reactor core supporting structure consists of a single plate provided with canals situated under each fuel element for the crossing of the coolant. Each canal has a constricted intake part and a zone of larger diameter downstream this inlet port, in order for the coolant flow to be laminar at the canal outlets, and to be uniformly distributed inside the fuel elements [fr

  16. Measurements of neutron flux distributions in the core of the Ljubljana TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rant, J.; Ravnik, M.; Mele, I.; Dimic, V.

    2008-01-01

    Recently the Ljubljana TRIGA Mark II Reactor has been refurbished and upgraded to pulsed operation. To verify the core design calculations using TRIGAP and PULSTR1 codes and to obtain necessary data for future irradiation and neutron beam experiments, an extensive experimental program of neutron flux mapping and neutron field characterization was carried out. Using the existing neutron measuring thimbles complete axial and radial distributions in two radial directions were determined for two different core configurations. For one core configuration the measurements were also carried out in the pulsed mode. For flux distributions thin Cu (relative measurements) and diluted Au wires (absolute values) were used. For each radial position the cadmium ratio was determined in two axial levels. The core configuration was rather uniform, well defined (fresh fuel of a single type, including fuelled followers) and compact (no irradiation channels or gaps), offering unique opportunity to test the computer codes for TRIGA reactor calculations. The neutron flux measuring procedures and techniques are described and the experimental results are presented. The agreement between the predicted and measured power peaking factors are within the error limits of the measurements (<±5%) and calculations (±10%). Power peaking occurs in the B ring, and in the A ring (centre) there is a significant flux depression. (authors)

  17. In-core fuel management programs for nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-10-01

    In response to the interest shown by Member States, the IAEA organized a co-ordinated research programme to develop and make available in the open domain a set of programs to perform in-core fuel management calculations. This report summarizes the work performed in the context of the CRP. As a result of this programme, complete in-core fuel management packages for three types of reactors, namely PWR's, BWR's and PHWR are now available from the NEA Data Bank. For some reactor types, these program packages are available with three levels of sophistication ranging from simple methods for educational purposes to more comprehensive methods that can be used for reactor design and operation. In addition some operating data have been compiled to allow code validation. (author)

  18. Support arrangements for core modules of nuclear reactors. [PWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, L.R.

    1983-11-03

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  19. Support arrangement for core modules of nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollinger, Lawrence R.

    1987-01-01

    A support arrangement is provided for the core modules of a nuclear reactor which provides support access through the control drive mechanisms of the reactor. This arrangement provides axial support of individual reactor core modules from the pressure vessel head in a manner which permits attachment and detachment of the modules from the head to be accomplished through the control drive mechanisms after their leadscrews have been removed. The arrangement includes a module support nut which is suspended from the pressure vessel head and screw threaded to the shroud housing for the module. A spline lock prevents loosening of the screw connection. An installation tool assembly, including a cell lifting and preloading tool and a torquing tool, fits through the control drive mechanism and provides lifting of the shroud housing while disconnecting the spline lock, as well as application of torque to the module support nut.

  20. Replacement of core components in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durney, J.L.; Croucher, D.W.

    1990-01-01

    The core internals of the Advanced Test Reactor are subjected to very high neutron fluences resulting in significant aging. The most irradiated components have been replaced on several occasions as a result of the neutron damage. The surveillance program to monitor the aging developed the needed criteria to establish replacement schedules and maximize the use of the reactor. The methods to complete the replacements with minimum radiation exposures to workers have been developed using the experience gained from each replacement. The original design of the reactor core and associated components allows replacements to be completed without special equipment. The plant has operated for about 20 years and is expected to continue operation for at least and additional 25 years. Aging evaluations are in progress to address additional replacements that may be needed during this period

  1. Replacement of core components in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durney, J.L.; Croucher, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The core internals of the Advanced Test Reactor are subjected to very high neutron fluences resulting in significant aging. The most irradiated components have been replaced on several occasions as a result of the neutron damage. The surveillance program to monitor the aging developed the needed criteria to establish replacement schedules and maximize the use of the reactor. Methods to complete the replacements with minimum radiation exposures to workers have been developed using the experience gained from each replacement. The original design of the reactor core and associated components allows replacements to be completed without special equipment. The plant has operated for about 20 years and will continue operation for perhaps another 20 years. Aging evaluations are in program to address additional replacements that may be needed during this extended time period. 3 figs

  2. Neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor 64-element core upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bess, John D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The neutron radiography (NRAD) reactor is a 250 kW TRIGA (registered) (Training, Research, Isotopes, General Atomics) Mark II , tank-type research reactor currently located in the basement, below the main hot cell, of the Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). It is equipped with two beam tubes with separate radiography stations for the performance of neutron radiography irradiation on small test components. The interim critical configuration developed during the core upgrade, which contains only 62 fuel elements, has been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. The final 64-fuel-element operational core configuration of the NRAD LEU TRIGA reactor has also been evaluated as an acceptable benchmark experiment. Calculated eigenvalues differ significantly (approximately ±1%) from the benchmark eigenvalue and have demonstrated sensitivity to the thermal scattering treatment of hydrogen in the U-Er-Zr-H fuel.

  3. Preliminary core design calculations for the ACPR Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickard, P.S.

    1976-01-01

    The goal of the Annular Core Pulse Reactor (ACPR) Upgrade design studies is to define a core configuration that provides a significant increase in pulse fluence and fission energy deposition. The reactor modification should provide as flat an energy deposition profile for experiments as feasible. The fuels examined in this study were UO 2 -BeO (5-15 w/o UO 2 ), UC-ZrC-C (200-500 mg U/cc) and U-ZrH 1.5 . The basic core concept examined was a two region core, - a high heat capacity inner core region surrounded by an outer U-ZrH 1.5 region. Survey core calculations utilizing 1D transport calculations and cross sections libraries derived from the ORNL-AMPX code examined relative fuel loadings, fuel temperatures, reactivity requirements and pulse performance improvement. Reference designs for all candidate fuels were defined utilizing 2D transport and Monte Carlo calculations. The performance implications of alternative core designs were also examined for the UO 2 -BeO and UC-ZrC-C fuel candidates. (author)

  4. Partial oxidation of methane in the Pulsed compression Reactor: experiments and simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roestenberg, T.; Glushenkov, Maxim; Glouchenkov, Maxim Joerjevisj; Kronberg, Alexandre E.; Verbeek, Antonie Alex; van der Meer, Theodorus H.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Compression Reactor promises to be a compact, economical and energy efficient alternative to conventional chemical reactors. In this article, the production of synthesis gas using the Pulsed Compression Reactor is investigated. This is done experimentally as well as with simulations. The

  5. Operation trial at rated power and measurement of xenon poison on Xi'an pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu Zhengzhong; Deng Sheng; He Shaoqun; Huang Wenlou; Huang Liyuan; Song Jian; He Di

    2002-01-01

    The author introduces the general situation of 72 hours continuous operation trial at rated power on Xi'an Pulsed Reactor (XAPR) steady-state core. The experimental results of environmental irradiation dose testing, measurement of equilibrium Xenon poison and Iodine pit reactivity depth while operating at rated full power are also given. The experimental results show that the main body and process systems of XAPR are working order, and that the synthetic performance has reach the design requirements, and that the fuel temperature has more safety margin

  6. Reactor Core Design and Analysis for a Micronuclear Power Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Sun

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Underwater vehicle is designed to ensure the security of country sea boundary, providing harsh requirements for its power system design. Conventional power sources, such as battery and Stirling engine, are featured with low power and short lifetime. Micronuclear reactor power source featured with higher power density and longer lifetime would strongly meet the demands of unmanned underwater vehicle power system. In this paper, a 2.4 MWt lithium heat pipe cooled reactor core is designed for micronuclear power source, which can be applied for underwater vehicles. The core features with small volume, high power density, long lifetime, and low noise level. Uranium nitride fuel with 70% enrichment and lithium heat pipes are adopted in the core. The reactivity is controlled by six control drums with B4C neutron absorber. Monte Carlo code MCNP is used for calculating the power distribution, characteristics of reactivity feedback, and core criticality safety. A code MCORE coupling MCNP and ORIGEN is used to analyze the burnup characteristics of the designed core. The results show that the core life is 14 years, and the core parameters satisfy the safety requirements. This work provides reference to the design and application of the micronuclear power source.

  7. Analysis of the seismic response of a fast reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Maresca, G.

    1984-01-01

    This report deals with the methods to apply for a correct evaluation of the reactor core seismic response. Reference is made to up-to-date design data concerning the PEC core, taking into account the presence of the core-restraint plate located close to the PEC core elements top and applying the optimized iterative procedure between the vessel linear calculation and the non-linear ones limited to the core, which had been described in a previous report. It is demonstrated that the convergence of this procedure is very fast, similar to what obtained in the calculations of the cited report, carried out with preliminary data, and it is shown that the cited methods allow a reliable evaluation of the excitation time histories for the experimental tests in support of the seismic verification of the shutdown system and the core of a fast reactor, as well as relevant data for the experimental, structural and functional, verification of the core elements in the case of seismic loads

  8. Core Design Studies for a 300 MWe TRU Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Kim, Sang Ji; Kim, Yeong Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    KAERI has been developing the KALIMER-600 core design with a breakeven fissile conversion ratio. The core is loaded with a ternary metallic fuel (TRU-U-10Zr), and the breakeven characteristics are achieved without any blanket assembly. As an alternative plan, a KALIMER-600 burner core design has also been performed. In the early days of a fast reactor, the main purpose was an economical use of a uranium resource, but nowadays, in addition to the maximum utilization of a uranium resource, the burning of high level radioactive waste is taken as an additional interest for the harmony with the environment. In this paper, a 300 MWe burner core design is presented to demonstrate reactor performance for the reference KALIMER-600 burner. As a means to flatten the power distribution, instead of a single fuel enrichment scheme adapted in the design of the KALIMER-600 burner, the two enrichment zoning approach was adapted. Considering that the TRU fuel may not be qualified due to limited database, the uranium core was designed to permit the TRU core operation to cover after the uranium core is operated at an early stage.

  9. Thermodynamic cycle calculations for a pumped gaseous core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuijper, J.C.; Van Dam, H.

    1991-01-01

    Finite and 'infinitesimal' thermodynamic cycle calculations have been performed for a 'solid piston' model of a pumped Gaseous Core Fission Reactor with dissociating reactor gas, consisting of Uranium, Carbon and Fluorine ('UCF'). In the finite cycle calculations the influence has been investigated of several parameters on the thermodynamics of the system, especially on the attainable direct (nuclear to electrical) energy conversion efficiency. In order to facilitate the investigation of the influence of dissociation, a model gas, 'Modelium', was developed, which approximates, in a simplified, analytical way, the dissociation behaviour of the 'real' reactor gas. Comparison of the finite cycle calculation results with those of a so-called infinitesimal Otto cycle calculation leads to the conclusion that the conversion efficiency of a finite cycle can be predicted, without actually performing the finite cycle calculation, with reasonable accuracy, from the so-called 'infinitesimal efficiency factor', which is determined only by the thermodynamic properties of the reactor gas used. (author)

  10. Core Optimization of a Deep-Burn Pebble Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brian Boer; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2010-06-01

    Achieving a high fuel burnup in the Deep-Burn (DB) pebble bed reactor design, while remaining within the limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback, is challenging. The high content of Pu and Minor Actinides in the Deep-Burn fuel significantly impacts the thermal neutron energy spectrum as compared to a ’standard’ UO2 fueled core. This can result in power and temperature peaking in the pebble bed core in locally thermalized regions near the graphite reflectors. Furthermore, the interplay of the Pu resonances of the neutron absorption cross sections at low-lying energies can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator at certain operating conditions. The DB concept focuses on the destruction of spent fuel transuranics in TRISO coated particle fueled gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60-70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA), using a single-pass, multi in-core fuel (re)cycling scheme. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the present low enriched uranium core designs, i.e. the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). A Pu and Minor Actinide fueled PBMR-400 design serves as the starting point for a core optimization study. The fuel temperature, power peak, temperature reactivity coefficients, and burnup capabilities of the modified designs are analyzed with the PEBBED code. A code-to-code coupling with the PASTA code allows for the analysis of the TRISO fuel performance for both normal and Loss Of Forced Cooling conditions. An improved core design is sought, maximizing the fuel discharge burnup, while retaining negative temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range and avoiding high fuel temperatures (fuel failure probabilities).

  11. Preliminary Core Analysis of a Micro Modular Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Chang Keun; Chang, Jongwa [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Venneri, Francesco [Ultra Safe Nuclear Corporation, Los Alamos (United States); Hawari, Ayman [NC State Univ., Raleigh (United States)

    2014-05-15

    The Micro Modular Reactor (MMR) will be 'melt-down proof'(MDP) under all circumstances, including the complete loss of coolant, and will be easily transportable and retrievable, and suitable for use with very little site preparation and Balance of Plant (BOP) requirements for a variety of applications, from power generation and process heat applications in remote areas to grid-unattached locations, including ship propulsion. The Micro Modular Reactor design proposed in this paper has 3 meter diameter core (2 meter active core) which is suitable for 'factory manufactured' and has few tens year of service life for remote deployment. We confirmed the feasibility of long term service life by a preliminary neutronic analysis in terms of the excess reactivity, the temperature feedback coefficient, and the control margins. We are able to achieve a reasonably long core life time of 5 ∼ 10 years under typical thermal hydraulic condition of a helium cooled reactor. However, on a situation where longer service period and safety is important, we can reduce the power density to the level of typical pebble bed reactor. In this case we can design 10 MWt MMR with core diameter for 10 ∼ 40 years core life time without much loss in the economics. Several burnable poisons are studied and it is found that erbia mixed in the compact matrix seems reasonably good poison. The temperature feedback coefficients were remaining negative during lifetime. Drum type control rods at reflector region and few control rods inside core region are sufficient to control the reactivity during operation and to achieve safe cold shutdown state.

  12. Monitoring device for the stability of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Mikio; Yamauchi, Koki.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To avoid unnecessary limitation on the operation conditions for maintaining the reactor stability. Constitution: The reactor stability is judged by taking notice of the axial power distribution of the reactor and monitoring the same online. Specifically, signals are received from a plurality of local power distribution detectors arranged axially in the reactor core to calculate the axial power distribution in computer. Further, a certain distance L is set from the lower end of the reactor core and the total value S1 for the power distribution in the region below the set value L and the total value S2 for the region above the set value L are determined based on the thus calculated power distribution, to thereby determine the ratio: R = S1/S2 between them. Separately, a certain value r is previously determined based on analysis or experiment such as the result of operation. Then, R and r are compared in a comparator and an alarm is generated, if R >r, with respect to the stability. Since monitoring is made based on the actual index, the applicable range of the operation region can be extended. (Ikeda, J.)

  13. Core monitoring system for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azekura, Kazuo.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To determine power distribution ON-line after the change of the insertion degree of control rods by the provision of means for calculating power change coefficient at each of the points due to the change in the insertion degree from the specific change of insertion degree and multiplying the same with the newest power distribution determined periodically by the diffusion calculation. Constitution: The monitoring system additionally comprises a calculation device for power change coefficient that calculates the power change coefficient in a fuel assembly adjacent to a control rod based on the data concerning the operation of the control rod, and a provisional power distribution calculation device that executes multiplication between the power distribution calculated in a periodical power distribution calculation device based on the calculation instruction and stored in the core and the power change coefficient from the power change coefficient calculation device and forecasts the provisional power distribution. Then, based on the result of the foregoing calculations, 2-dimensional power distribution, maximum temperature for the cladding tube of the specified fuel assembly, maximum temperature of pellets in the specified fuel assembly, maximum power density and the like are calculated in various display value calculation devices and displayed on a display device. (Horiuchi, T.)

  14. Technical safety requirements for the Annular Core Research Reactor Facility (ACRRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldt, K.R.; Morris, F.M.; Talley, D.G.; McCrory, F.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Technical Safety Requirements (TSR) document is prepared and issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.22, Technical Safety Requirements. The bases for the TSR are established in the ACRRF Safety Analysis Report issued in compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The TSR identifies the operational conditions, boundaries, and administrative controls for the safe operation of the facility

  15. Expected value of finite fission chain lengths of pulse reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Jianjun; Zhou Zhigao; Zhang Ben'ai

    2007-01-01

    The average neutron population necessary for sponsoring a persistent fission chain in a multiplying system, is discussed. In the point reactor model, the probability function θ(n, t 0 , t) of a source neutron at time t 0 leading to n neutrons at time t is dealt with. The non-linear partial differential equation for the probability generating function G(z; t 0 , t) is derived. By solving the equation, we have obtained an approximate analytic solution for a slightly prompt supercritical system. For the pulse reactor Godiva-II, the mean value of finite fission chain lengths is estimated in this work and shows that the estimated value is reasonable for the experimental analysis. (authors)

  16. Pulsed neutron experiments on the graphite reactor EDF 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuster, S.; Tarabella, A.; Tellier, H.

    1967-04-01

    The use of pulsed neutron technique on the EDF 3 reactor has made possible to calibrate a rather great number of control elements. This technique which was tested on EDF 2 has given good results of which the interpretation is difficult due to the reactor size. As some processes ( geometrical location of sources and counters) were currently used to avoid this kind of difficulties another method for interpreting the results is proposed. The measurements are in good agreement with other experimental results obtained with the air-poisoning techniques and generally confirm the data obtained by preliminary computations. The experimental material was satisfying and seems particularly adapted to the problem to be solved. (author) [fr

  17. MHD stability regimes for steady state and pulsed reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-02-01

    A tokamak reactor will operate at the maximum value of β≡2μ 0 /B 2 that is compatible with MHD stability. This value depends upon the plasma current and pressure profiles, the plasma shape and aspect ratio, and the location of nearby conducting structures. In addition, a steady state reactor will minimize its external current drive requirements and thus achieve its maximum economic benefit with a bootstrap fraction near one, I bs /I p ∼ 1, which constrains the product of the inverse aspect ratio and the plasma poloidal beta to be near unity, ε β p ∼ 1. An inductively driven pulsed reactor has different constraints set by the steady-state Ohm's law which relates the plasma temperature and density profiles to the parallel current density. We present the results obtained during the ARIES I, II/IV, and III and the PULSAR reactor studies where these quantities were optimized subject to different design philosophies. The ARIES-II/IV and ARIES-III designs are both in the second stability regime, but differ in requirements on the form of the profiles at the plasma edge, and in the location of the conducting wall. The relation between these, as well as new attractive MHD regimes not utilized in the ARIES or PULSAR studies is also discussed

  18. On disruption of reactor core of the Chernobylsk-4 reactor (retrospective analysis of experiments and facts)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Platonov, P.A.

    2007-01-01

    Fragments of graphite blocks from the damaged Chernobyl NPP, unit 4 are studied, the results are analyzed. The temperature of the graphite blocks at the moment of accident release from the reactor is evaluated. Results of studying the fragments of fuel channel and fuel dispersion are considered. The fuel heat content at the moment of the explosion is evaluated and some conclusions are made about the character of the reactor core destruction [ru

  19. Gas core reactor concepts and technology - Issues and baseline strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Nils J.; Dugan, Edward T.; Kahook, Samer; Maya, Isaac

    1991-01-01

    Results of a research program including phenomenological studies, conceptual design, and systems analysis of a series of gaseous/vapor fissile fuel driven engines for space power platforms and for thermal and electric propulsion are reviewed. It is noted that gas and vapor phase reactors provide the path for minimum mass in orbit and trip times, with a specific impulse from 1020 sec at the lowest technololgical risk to 5200 sec at the highest technological risk. The discussion covers various configurations of gas core reactors and critical technologies and the nuclear vapor thermal rocket engine.

  20. The ''OPERA'' loop in the OSIRIS reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucot, M.

    1984-09-01

    The OPERA loop will allow fuel qualification tests, i.e., irradiations of parts of assemblies sufficiently representative, operating in the nominal conditions of advanced reactors. After a presentation of the general design and of the main characteristics, a brief description of the loop is given: in-pile and out-of-pile part, and connections. The installation of the loop in the core of the OSIRIS reactor involves an adaptation of some components of this last one. Complementary installations will allow larger field of applications concerning the representativity of irradiation conditions and the knowledge of these conditions. The OPERA loop should be operating in 1987 [fr

  1. Solid-Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehud Greenspan

    2008-01-01

    This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP). Like the SAFE 400 space nuclear reactor core, the HPENHS core is comprised of fuel rods and HPs embedded in a solid structure arranged in a hexagonal lattice in a 3:1 ratio. The core is oriented horizontally and has a square rather cylindrical cross section for effective heat transfer. The HPs extend from the two axial reflectors in which the fission gas plena are embedded and transfer heat to an intermediate coolant that flows by natural-circulation. The HP-ENHS is designed to preserve many features of the ENHS including 20-year operation without refueling, very small excess reactivity throughout life, natural circulation cooling, walkaway passive safety, and robust proliferation resistance. The target power level and specific power of the HP-ENHS reactor are those of the reference ENHS reactor. Compared to previous ENHS reactor designs utilizing a lead or lead-bismuth alloy natural circulation cooling system, the HP-ENHS reactor offers a number of advantageous features including: (1) significantly enhanced passive decay heat removal capability; (2) no positive void reactivity coefficients; (3) relatively lower corrosion of the cladding (4) a core that is more robust for transportation; (5) higher temperature potentially offering higher efficiency and hydrogen production capability. This preliminary study focuses on five areas: material compatibility analysis, HP performance analysis, neutronic analysis, thermal-hydraulic analysis and safety analysis. Of the four high-temperature structural materials evaluated, Mo TZM alloy is the preferred choice; its upper estimated feasible operating temperature is 1350 K. HP performance is evaluated as a function of working fluid type, operating temperature, wick design and HP diameter and length. Sodium is the

  2. Survey of dust production in pebble bed reactor cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cogliati, Joshua J., E-mail: Joshua.Cogliati@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Reactor Physics Analysis and Design, 2525 N Fremont Ave, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ougouag, Abderrafi M., E-mail: Abderrafi.Ougouag@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Reactor Physics Analysis and Design, 2525 N Fremont Ave, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ortensi, Javier, E-mail: Javier.Ortensi@inl.gov [Idaho National Laboratory, Reactor Physics Analysis and Design, 2525 N Fremont Ave, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Highlights: > We review potential sources of the graphite dust found in the German pebble bed reactors. > Available literature on graphite wear coefficients in pebble bed core-like conditions is reviewed. > Limited conclusions and remaining open questions are discussed. - Abstract: Graphite dust produced via mechanical wear from the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor is an area of concern for licensing. Both the German pebble bed reactors produced graphite dust that contained activated elements. These activation products constitute an additional source term of radiation and must be taken under consideration during the conduct of accident analysis of the design. This paper discusses the available literature on graphite dust production and measurements in pebble bed reactors. Limited data is available on the graphite dust produced from the AVR and THTR-300 pebble bed reactors. Experiments that have been performed on wear of graphite in pebble-bed-like conditions are reviewed. The calculation of contact forces, which are a key driving mechanism for dust in the reactor, are also included. In addition, prior graphite dust predictions are examined, and future areas of research are identified.

  3. 77 FR 36014 - Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    ... COMMISSION Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear...-1277, ``Initial Test Program of Emergency Core Cooling Systems for Boiling- Water Reactors.'' This... testing features of emergency core cooling systems (ECCSs) for boiling-water reactors (BWRs). DATES...

  4. Superconducting shielded core reactor with reduced AC losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Yung S.; Hull, John R.

    2006-04-04

    A superconducting shielded core reactor (SSCR) operates as a passive device for limiting excessive AC current in a circuit operating at a high power level under a fault condition such as shorting. The SSCR includes a ferromagnetic core which may be either closed or open (with an air gap) and extends into and through a superconducting tube or superconducting rings arranged in a stacked array. First and second series connected copper coils each disposed about a portion of the iron core are connected to the circuit to be protected and are respectively wound inside and outside of the superconducting tube or rings. A large impedance is inserted into the circuit by the core when the shielding capability of the superconducting arrangement is exceeded by the applied magnetic field generated by the two coils under a fault condition to limit the AC current in the circuit. The proposed SSCR also affords reduced AC loss compared to conventional SSCRs under continuous normal operation.

  5. Reactor core with rod-shaped fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dworak, A.

    1976-01-01

    The proposal refers to the optimization of the power distribution in a reactor core which is provided with several successive rod-shaped fuel cells. A uniform power output - especially in radial direction - is aimed at. This is achieved by variation of the dwelling periods of the fuel cells, which have, for this purpose, a fuel mixture changing from layer to layer. The fuel cells with the shortest dwelling period are arranged near the coolant inlet side of the reactor core. The dwelling periods of the fuel cells are adapted to the given power distribution. As neighboring cells have equal dwelling periods, the exchange can be performed much easier then with the composition currently known. (UWI) [de

  6. Micro-Reactor Physics of MOX-Fueled Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, T.

    2001-01-01

    Recently, fuel assemblies of light water reactors have become complicated because of the extension of fuel burnup and the use of high-enriched Gd and mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel, etc. In conventional assembly calculations, the detailed flux distribution, spectrum distribution, and space dependence of self-shielding within a fuel pellet are not directly taken into account. The experimental and theoretical study of investigating these microscopic properties is named micro-reactor physics. The purpose of this work is to show the importance of micro-reactor physics in the analysis of MOX fuel assemblies. Several authors have done related studies; however, their studies are limited to fuel pin cells, and they are never mentioned with regard to burnup effect, which is important for actual core design

  7. RMC - A Monte Carlo Code for Reactor Core Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kan; Li, Zeguang; She, Ding; Liang, Jin'gang; Xu, Qi; Qiu, Yishu; Yu, Jiankai; Sun, Jialong; Fan, Xiao; Yu, Ganglin

    2014-06-01

    A new Monte Carlo transport code RMC has been being developed by Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing as a tool for reactor core analysis on high-performance computing platforms. To meet the requirements of reactor analysis, RMC now has such functions as criticality calculation, fixed-source calculation, burnup calculation and kinetics simulations. Some techniques for geometry treatment, new burnup algorithm, source convergence acceleration, massive tally and parallel calculation, and temperature dependent cross sections processing are researched and implemented in RMC to improve the effciency. Validation results of criticality calculation, burnup calculation, source convergence acceleration, tallies performance and parallel performance shown in this paper prove the capabilities of RMC in dealing with reactor analysis problems with good performances.

  8. Reactor core materials research and integrated material database establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Woo Seog; Jang, J. S.; Kim, D. W.

    2002-03-01

    Mainly two research areas were covered in this project. One is to establish the integrated database of nuclear materials, and the other is to study the behavior of reactor core materials, which are usually under the most severe condition in the operating plants. During the stage I of the project (for three years since 1999) in- and out of reactor properties of stainless steel, the major structural material for the core structures of PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor), were evaluated and specification of nuclear grade material was established. And the damaged core components from domestic power plants, e.g. orifice of CVCS, support pin of CRGT, etc. were investigated and the causes were revealed. To acquire more resistant materials to the nuclear environments, development of the alternative alloys was also conducted. For the integrated DB establishment, a task force team was set up including director of nuclear materials technology team, and projector leaders and relevant members from each project. The DB is now opened in public through the Internet

  9. Development of Liquid-Vapor Core Reactors with MHD Generator for Space Power and Propulsion Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samim Anghaie

    2002-01-01

    . Still there are problems of containment since many of the proposed vessel materials such as W or Mo have high neutron cross sections making the design of a critical system difficult. There is also the possibility for a GCR to remain in a subcritical state, and by the use of a shockwave mechanism, increase the pressure and temperature inside the core to achieve criticality. This type of GCR is referred to as a shockwave-driven pulsed gas core reactor. These two basic designs were evaluated as advance concepts for space power and propulsion

  10. Comparative study between single core model and detail core model of CFD modelling on reactor core cooling behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, R.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear power industry is facing uncertainties since the occurrence of the unfortunate accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The issue of nuclear power plant safety becomes the major hindrance in the planning of nuclear power program for new build countries. Thus, the understanding of the behaviour of reactor system is very important to ensure the continuous development and improvement on reactor safety. Throughout the development of nuclear reactor technology, investigation and analysis on reactor safety have gone through several phases. In the early days, analytical and experimental methods were employed. For the last four decades 1D system level codes were widely used. The continuous development of nuclear reactor technology has brought about more complex system and processes of nuclear reactor operation. More detailed dimensional simulation codes are needed to assess these new reactors. Recently, 2D and 3D system level codes such as CFD are being explored. This paper discusses a comparative study on two different approaches of CFD modelling on reactor core cooling behaviour.

  11. Neutronic design of a traveling wave reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez S, R. C.; Francois L, J. L.

    2010-10-01

    The traveling wave reactor is an innovative kind of fast breeder reactor, capable of operate for decades without refueling and whose operation requires only a small amount of enriched fuel for the ignition. Also, one of its advantages is its versatility; it can be designed as small modules of about 100 M We or large scale units of 1000 M We. In this paper the behaviour of the traveling wave reactor core is studied in order to determine whether the traveling breeding/burning wave moves (as theoretically predicted) or not. To achieve this, we consider a two pieces cylinder, the first one, the ignition zone, containing highly enriched fuel and the second, the breeding zone, which is the larger, containing natural or depleted uranium or thorium. We consider that both zones are homogeneous mixtures of fuel, sodium as coolant and iron as structural material. We also include a reflector material outside the cylinder to reduce the neutron leakages. Simulations were run with MCNPX version 2.6 code. We observed that the wave does move as time passes as predicted by theory, and reactor remains supercritical in the time we have simulated (3000 days). Also, we found that thorium does not perform as well as uranium for breeding in this type of reactor. Further test with different reflectors are planned for both U-Pu and Th-U fuel cycles. (Author)

  12. Implementation of new core cooling monitoring system for light water reactors - BCCM (Becker Core Cooling Monitor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coville, Patrick; Eliasson, Bengt; Stromqvist, Erik; Ward, Olav; Fox, Georges; Ashjian, D. T.

    1998-01-01

    Core cooling monitors are key instruments to protect reactors from large accidents due to loss of coolant. Sensors presented here are based on resistance thermometry. Temperature dependent resistance is powered by relatively high and constant current. Value of this resistance depends on thermal exchange with coolant and when water is no more surrounding the sensors a large increase of temperature is immediately generated. The same instrument can be operated with low current and will measure the local temperature up to 1260 o C in case of loss of coolant accident. Sensors are manufactured with very few components and materials already qualified for long term exposure to boiling or pressurized water reactors environment. Prototypes have been evaluated in a test loop up to 160 bars and in the Barsebaeck-1 reactor. Industrial sensors are now in operation in reactor Oskarshamn 2. (author)

  13. Dynamics of Newtonian annular jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, D.D.

    1978-12-01

    The main objectives of this investigation are to identify the significant parameters affecting the dynamics of Newtonian annular jets, and to develop theoretical models for jet break-up and collapse. This study has been motivated by recent developments in laser-fusion reactor designs; one proposed cavity design involves the use of an annular lithium jet to protect the cavity wall from the pellet debris emanating from the microexplosion

  14. Pebble bed reactor with one-zone core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Frank, U.; Lohnert, G.

    1977-01-01

    The claim deals with measures to differentiate the flow rate and to remove spherical fuel elements in the core of a pebble bed reactor. Hence the vertical rate of the fuel elements in the border region is for example twice as much as in the centre. A central funnel-shaped outlet on the floor of the core container over which a conical body is placed with its peak pointing upwards, or also the forming of several outlets can be used to adjust to a certain exit rate for the fuel elements. The main target of the invention is a radially extensively constant coolant outlet temperature at the outlet of the core which determines the effectiveness of the connected heat exchanger and thus contributes to economy. (UA) [de

  15. Real-time advanced nuclear reactor core model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koclas, J.; Friedman, F.; Paquette, C.; Vivier, P.

    1990-01-01

    The paper describes a multi-nodal advanced nuclear reactor core model. The model is based on application of modern equivalence theory to the solution of neutron diffusion equation in real time employing the finite differences method. The use of equivalence theory allows the application of the finite differences method to cores divided into hundreds of nodes, as opposed to the much finer divisions (in the order of ten thousands of nodes) where the unmodified method is currently applied. As a result the model can be used for modelling of the core kinetics for real time full scope training simulators. Results of benchmarks, validate the basic assumptions of the model and its applicability to real-time simulation. (orig./HP)

  16. Core Design Studies for a 600 MWe Demonstration TRU Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Hoon; Park, Won Seok; Kim, Sang Ji [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    The conceptual core design of the demonstration sodium cooled fast reactor (SFR) for TRU burning is being developed by the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The main objective of demonstration reactor for the construction and operation is to test and demonstrate the TRU fuel, the operation of the large sized (1500 MWth) sodium fast reactor and the TRU burning capability of commercial burner reactor. In this paper, a 600 MWe demonstration burner core design is presented. It is scheduled to use the uranium fuel for start core due to the uncertainty of the demonstration of TRU fuel, and to change core fuel to the LTRU core fuel from LWR spent fuel and core fuel to the MTRU core which consists of the LMR spent fuel and the self recycled fuel progressively so that total 4 cores having the different function, which consists of uranium core, LTRU core, MTRU core and Mod.MTRU core, were designed

  17. Seismic responses of a pool-type fast reactor with different core support designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Ting-shu; Seidensticker, R.W.

    1989-01-01

    In designing the core support system for a pool-type fast reactor, there are many issues which must be considered in order to achieve an optimum and balanced design. These issues include safety, reliability, as well as costs. Several design options are possible to support the reactor core. Different core support options yield different frequency ranges and responses. Seismic responses of a large pool-type fast reactor incorporated with different core support designs have been investigated. 4 refs., 3 figs

  18. First wall and limiter lifetime in pulsed tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.; Majumdar, S.; Cha, Y.; Hassanein, A.

    1983-12-01

    This study concentrates on the structural integrity of certain reactor subsystems under cyclic operation to answer the question: how long a burn pulse is needed to achieve the benefits of steady-state operation. Component lifetime in the steady-state is limited by three effects: radiation damage, disruptions, and sputtering erosion. Cyclic operation modifies one of these (the number of disruptions may increase with the number of burn cycles) and introduces a fourth life limit, thermal fatigue. Our design strategy is to determine the structure and coating thicknesses which maximize component lifetime against all life limitations. After calculating disruption damage (vaporization, melting) for candidate materials we present the lifetime analysis for different structures

  19. Reactor physics innovations of the advanced CANDU reactor core: adaptable and efficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, P.S.W.; Hopwood, J.M.; Bonechi, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) is designed to have a benign, operator-friendly core physics characteristic, including a slightly negative coolant-void reactivity and a moderately negative power coefficient. The discharge fuel burnup is about three times that of natural uranium fuel in current CANDU reactors. Key features of the reactor physics innovations in the ACR core include the use of H 2 O coolant, slightly enriched uranium (SEU) fuel, and D 2 O moderator in a reduced lattice pitch. These innovations result in substantial improvements in economics, as well as significant enhancements in reactor performance and waste reduction over the current reactor design. The ACR can be readily adapted to different power outputs by increasing or decreasing the number of fuel channels, while maintaining identical fuel and fuel-channel characteristics. The flexibility provided by on-power refuelling and simple fuel bundle design enables the ACR to easily adapt to the use of plutonium and thorium fuel cycles. No major modifications to the basic ACR design are required because the benign neutronic characteristics of the SEU fuel cycle are also inherent in these advanced fuel cycles. (author)

  20. Report of the Panel on Kinetics and Applications of Pulsed Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1966-03-01

    The question of the dynamic behaviour of a reactor subjected to a highly supercritical condition has had special interest for reactor physicists because of the reactor safety implications involved. The large amount of experimental and theoretical work done during the past dozen years or sc to understand fast transient behaviour and the inherent safety characteristics of reactors has not only helped to ease the concern of reactor designers about the consequences of a prompt critical excursion, but, by demonstrating the feasibility of operating certain types of reactors in a pulsed fashion has led to the development of an extremely useful research tool. Pulsed research reactors of a number of different kinds are in operation, while newer, higher performance systems are presently being designed and constructed. Such devices are being used more and more for research in physics, chemistry and reactor engineering, and with the advent of the newer machines, new research areas will become accessible. Because of the rapidly growing interest in the utilization of pulsed reactors for research, the IAEA convened a panel of experts in this field to review recent progress in the design and application of pulsed reactors to consider the problems of converting an existing pool type research reactor to a pulsing types and to consider future potentialities. The panel met in Vienna from 17 to 21 May 1965. This report of the panel summarizes the discussions

  1. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Zhujie; Was, Gary; Bartels, David

    2015-01-01

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  2. Irradiation-Accelerated Corrosion of Reactor Core Materials. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiao, Zhujie [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Was, Gary [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bartels, David [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2015-04-02

    This project aims to understand how radiation accelerates corrosion of reactor core materials. The combination of high temperature, chemically aggressive coolants, a high radiation flux and mechanical stress poses a major challenge for the life extension of current light water reactors, as well as the success of most all GenIV concepts. Of these four drivers, the combination of radiation and corrosion places the most severe demands on materials, for which an understanding of the fundamental science is simply absent. Only a few experiments have been conducted to understand how corrosion occurs under irradiation, yet the limited data indicates that the effect is large; irradiation causes order of magnitude increases in corrosion rates. Without a firm understanding of the mechanisms by which radiation and corrosion interact in film formation, growth, breakdown and repair, the extension of the current LWR fleet beyond 60 years and the success of advanced nuclear energy systems are questionable. The proposed work will address the process of irradiation-accelerated corrosion that is important to all current and advanced reactor designs, but remains very poorly understood. An improved understanding of the role of irradiation in the corrosion process will provide the community with the tools to develop predictive models for in-reactor corrosion, and to address specific, important forms of corrosion such as irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking.

  3. Plant with nuclear reactor, in particular a thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straub, H.

    1988-01-01

    The reactor core of the plant has tubular and vertically movable control rods moved by a flow of coolant under pressure. Each control rod surrounds a similarly tubular guide rod, stationary relative to the reactor core, leaving an annular slot-like space therebetween. The inside of each guide rod forms a first pressure chamber supplied with the coolant under pressure. The upper end of each control rod is closed and has a vertical shaft that extends into the inside of the guide rod and forms therewith a second annular slot-like space. At least one first restriction is provided in the first annular slot-like space and at least one second restriction is provided in the second annular slot-like space. A second pressure chamber is formed between both restrictions. The coolant supplied to the guide rod thus returns to the pressure vessel surrounding the reactor core through the second annular slot-like space, the second pressure chamber and the first annular slot-like space. Controlling means are provided, with which pressure thrusts can be generated if necessary in the coolant within the first pressure chamber. (author) 5 refs., 10 figs

  4. Design and analysis of a nuclear reactor core for innovative small light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, Alexey I.

    In order to address the energy needs of developing countries and remote communities, Oregon State University has proposed the Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design. In order to achieve five years of operation without refueling, use of 8% enriched fuel is necessary. This dissertation is focused on core design issues related with increased fuel enrichment (8.0%) and specific MASLWR operational conditions (such as lower operational pressure and temperature, and increased leakage due to small core). Neutron physics calculations are performed with the commercial nuclear industry tools CASMO-4 and SIMULATE-3, developed by Studsvik Scandpower Inc. The first set of results are generated from infinite lattice level calculations with CASMO-4, and focus on evaluation of the principal differences between standard PWR fuel and MASLWR fuel. Chapter 4-1 covers aspects of fuel isotopic composition changes with burnup, evaluation of kinetic parameters and reactivity coefficients. Chapter 4-2 discusses gadolinium self-shielding and shadowing effects, and subsequent impacts on power generation peaking and Reactor Control System shadowing. The second aspect of the research is dedicated to core design issues, such as reflector design (chapter 4-3), burnable absorber distribution and programmed fuel burnup and fuel use strategy (chapter 4-4). This section also includes discussion of the parameters important for safety and evaluation of Reactor Control System options for the proposed core design. An evaluation of the sensitivity of the proposed design to uncertainty in calculated parameters is presented in chapter 4-5. The results presented in this dissertation cover a new area of reactor design and operational parameters, and may be applicable to other small and large pressurized water reactor designs.

  5. Global physical and numerical stability of a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morales-Sandoval, Jaime; Hernandez-Solis, Augusto

    2005-01-01

    Low order models are used to investigate the influence of integration methods on observed power oscillations of some nuclear reactor simulators. The zero-power point reactor kinetics with six-delayed neutron precursor groups are time discretized using explicit, implicit and Crank-Nicholson methods, and the stability limit of the time mesh spacing is exactly obtained by locating their characteristic poles in the z-transform plane. These poles are the s to z mappings of the inhour equation roots and, except for one of them, they show little or no dependence on the integration method. Conditions for stable power oscillations can be also obtained by tracking when steady state output signals resulting from reactivity oscillations in the s-Laplace plane cross the imaginary axis. The dynamics of a BWR core operating at power conditions is represented by a reduced order model obtained by adding three ordinary differential equations, which can model void and Doppler reactivity feedback effects on power, and collapsing all delayed neutron precursors in one group. Void dynamics are modeled as a second order system and fuel heat transfer as a first order system. This model shows rich characteristics in terms of indicating the relative importance of different core parameters and conditions on both numerical and physical oscillations observed by large computer code simulations. A brief discussion of the influence of actual core and coolant conditions on the reduced order model is presented

  6. Calculation of fundamental parameters for the dynamical study of TRIGA-3-Salazar reactor (Mixed reactor core)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viais J, J.

    1994-01-01

    Kinetic parameters for dynamic study of two different configurations, 8 and 9, both with standard fuel, 20% enrichment and Flip (Fuel Life Improvement Program with 70% enrichment) fuel, for TRIGA Mark-III reactor from Mexico Nuclear Center, are obtained. A calculation method using both WIMS-D4 and DTF-IV and DAC1 was established, to decide which of those two configurations has the best safety and operational conditions. Validation of this methodology is done by calculate those parameters for a reactor core with new standard fuel. Configuration 9 is recommended to be use. (Author)

  7. A solid reactor core thermal model for nuclear thermal rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W.; Liles, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    A Helium/Hydrogen Cooled Reactor Analysis (HERA) computer code has been developed. HERA has the ability to model arbitrary geometries in three dimensions, which allows the user to easily analyze reactor cores constructed of prismatic graphite elements. The code accounts for heat generation in the fuel, control rods, and other structures; conduction and radiation across gaps; convection to the coolant; and a variety of boundary conditions. The numerical solution scheme has been optimized for vector computers, making long transient analyses economical. Time integration is either explicit or implicit, which allows the use of the model to accurately calculate both short- or long-term transients with an efficient use of computer time. Both the basic spatial and temporal integration schemes have been benchmarked against analytical solutions

  8. Examination of core components removed from CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheadle, B.A.; Coleman, C.E.; Rodgers, D.K.; Davies, P.H.; Chow, C.K.; Griffiths, M.

    1988-11-01

    Components in the core of a nuclear reactor degrade because the environment is severe. For example, in CANDU reactors the pressure tubes must contend with the effects of hot pressurised water and damage by a flux of fast neutrons. To evaluate any deterioration of components and determine the cause of the occasional failure, we have developed a wide range of remote-handling techniques to examine radioactive materials. As well as pressure tubes, we have examined calandria tubes, garter springs, end fittings, liquid-zone control units and flux detectors. The results from these examinations have produced solutions to problems and continually provide information to help understand the processes that may limit the lifetime of a component

  9. Switching requirements for pulsed high-beta reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.

    1977-01-01

    Switching requirements for several high-B pulsed systems are described. These systems include linear and toroidal theta pinches, and toroidal z-pinches. The requirements are generally taken from detailed system studies. Several high-B reactor systems have been sufficiently studied to determine the switching requirements. In meeting the requirements for these devices it is likely that the technology will be useful for other systems which are at the moment less well defined. Swithcing systems for three devices are discussed here, the toroidal theta pinch, the toroidal z-pinch, and the linear theta pinch. Where possible the switching requirements are described. The toroidal theta pinch reactor (RTPR) uses 50 homopolar machines rated at 1.3 GJ each to provide its toroidal magnetic field. This energy is transferred in 30 ms at a level of 11 kV, 12.25 MA. There are 14 compression coil segments per meter of torus connected to each machine. These coil segments each have 62.5 kA, 21 kV switches in them, and the switches must act both as crowbar and interrupting switches

  10. Graphites and composites irradiations for gas cooled reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Laan, J.G.; Vreeling, J.A.; Buckthorpe, D.E.; Reed, J.

    2008-01-01

    Full text of publication follows. Material investigations are undertaken as part of the European Commission 6. Framework Programme for helium-cooled fission reactors under development like HTR, VHTR, GCFR. The work comprises a range of activities, from (pre-)qualification to screening of newly designed materials. The High Flux Reactor at Petten is the main test bed for the irradiation test programmes of the HTRM/M1, RAPHAEL and ExtreMat Integrated Projects. These projects are supported by the European Commission 5. and 6. Framework Programmes. To a large extent they form the European contribution to the Generation-IV International Forum. NRG is also performing a Materials Test Reactor project to support British Energy in preparing extended operation of their Advanced Gas-cooled Reactors (AGR). Irradiations of commercial and developmental graphite grades for HTR core structures are undertaken in the range of 650 to 950 deg C, with a view to get data on physical and mechanical properties that enable engineering design. Various C- and SiC-based composite materials are considered for support structures or specific components like control rods. Irradiation test matrices are chosen to cover commercial materials, and to provide insight on the behaviour of various fibre and matrix types, and the effects of architecture and manufacturing process. The programme is connected with modelling activities to support data trending, and improve understanding of the material behaviour and micro-structural evolution. The irradiation programme involves products from a large variety of industrial and research partners, and there is strong interaction with other high technology areas with extreme environments like space, electronics and fusion. The project on AGR core structures graphite focuses on the effects of high dose neutron irradiation and simultaneous radiolytic oxidation in a range of 350 to 450 deg C. It is aimed to provide data on graphite properties into the parameter space

  11. Core design studies for advanced burner test reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, W. S.; Kim, T. K.; Hill, R. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. government announced in February 2006 the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. The advanced burner reactor (ABR) based on a fast spectrum is one of the three major technologies to be demonstrated in GNEP. In FY06, a pre-conceptual design study was performed to develop an advanced burner test reactor (ABTR) that supports development of a prototype full-scale ABR, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR were (1) to demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics (TRU) as part of an advanced fuel cycle, (2) to qualify the TRU-containing fuels and advanced structural materials needed for a full-scale ABR, (3) to support the research, development and demonstration required for certification of an ABR standard design by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Based on these objectives, core design and fuel cycle studies were performed to develop ABTR core designs, which can accommodate the expected changes of the TRU feed and the conversion ratio. Various option and trade-off studies were performed to determine the appropriate power level and conversion ratio. Both ternary metal alloy (U-TRU-10Zr) and mixed oxide (UO{sub 2}-TRUO{sub 2}) fuel forms have been considered with TRU feeds from weapons-grade plutonium (WG-Pu) and TRU recovered from light water reactor spent fuel (LWR-SF). Reactor performances were evaluated in detail including equilibrium cycle core parameters, mass flow, power distribution, kinetic parameters, reactivity feedback coefficient, reactivity control requirements and shutdown margins, and spent fuel characteristics. Trade-off studies on power level suggested that about 250 MWt is a reasonable compromise to allow a low project cost, at the same time providing a reasonable prototypic irradiation environment for demonstrating

  12. Computation system for nuclear reactor core analysis. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Fowler, T.B.; Cunningham, G.W.; Petrie, L.M.

    1977-04-01

    This report documents a system which contains computer codes as modules developed to evaluate nuclear reactor core performance. The diffusion theory approximation to neutron transport may be applied with the VENTURE code treating up to three dimensions. The effect of exposure may be determined with the BURNER code, allowing depletion calculations to be made. The features and requirements of the system are discussed and aspects common to the computational modules, but the latter are documented elsewhere. User input data requirements, data file management, control, and the modules which perform general functions are described. Continuing development and implementation effort is enhancing the analysis capability available locally and to other installations from remote terminals.

  13. VIPRE modeling of VVER-1000 reactor core for DNB analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, Y.; Nguyen, Q. [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Cizek, J. [Nuclear Research Institute, Prague, (Czech Republic)

    1995-09-01

    Based on the one-pass modeling approach, the hot channels and the VVER-1000 reactor core can be modeled in 30 channels for DNB analyses using the VIPRE-01/MOD02 (VIPRE) code (VIPRE is owned by Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, California). The VIPRE one-pass model does not compromise any accuracy in the hot channel local fluid conditions. Extensive qualifications include sensitivity studies of radial noding and crossflow parameters and comparisons with the results from THINC and CALOPEA subchannel codes. The qualifications confirm that the VIPRE code with the Westinghouse modeling method provides good computational performance and accuracy for VVER-1000 DNB analyses.

  14. Study of the seismic behaviour of the fast reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, E.

    1998-01-01

    This work studies the seismic behaviour of fast neutrons reactor cores. It consists in analyzing the tests made on the models Rapsodie and Symphony by using the calculation code Castem 2000. Te difficulty is in the description of connections of the system and the effects of the fluid (calculation in water). The results for the programme Rapsodie are near the experimental results. For the programme Symphony, the calculations in air have allowed to represent the behaviour of fuel assemblies in a satisfying way. It is still to analyze the tests Symphony in water. (N.C.)

  15. Nuclear reactor ex-core startup neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyvill, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    A sensitive ex-core neutron detector is needed to monitor the power level of reactors during startup. The neutron detector of this invention has a photomultiplier with window resistant to radiation darkening at the input end and an electrical connector at the output end. The photomultiplier receives light signals from a neutron-responsive scintillator medium, typically a cerium-doped lithium silicate glass, that responds to neutrons after they have been thermalized by a silicone resin moderator. Enclosing and shielding the photmultiplier, the scintillator medium and the moderator is a combined lead and borated silicone resin housing

  16. Computer code for simulating pressurized water reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, A.M.B.

    1978-01-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numerically. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistance added to the film coefficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (author)

  17. Code for the core simulation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano, M.A.B.

    1978-08-01

    A computer code was developed for the simulation of the steady-state and transient behaviour of the average channel of a Pressurizer Water Reactor core. Point kinetics equations were used with the reactivity calculated for average temperatures in the channel with the fuel and moderator temperature feedbacks. The radial heat conduction equation in the fuel was solved numericaly. For calculating the thermodynamic properties of the coolant, the fundamental equations of conservation (mass, energy and momentum) were solved. The gap and clad were treated as a resistence added to the film coeficient. The fuel system equations were decoupled from the coolant equations. The program permitted the changes in the heat transfer correlations and the flow patterns along the coolant channel. Various test were performed to determine the steady-state and transient response employing the PWR core simulator developed, obtaining results with adequate precision. (Author) [pt

  18. A ``NEW'' Solid-Core Reactor Fuel Form that Maximizes the Performance of Nuclear Thermal and Electric Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rom, Frank E.; Finnegan, Patrick M.

    1994-07-01

    The ``NEW'' solid-core fuel form is the old Vapor Transport (VT) fuel pin investigated at NASA about 30 years ago. It is simply a tube sealed at both ends partially filled with UO2. During operation the UO2 forms an annular layer on the inside of the tube by vaporization and condensation. This form is an ideal structure for overall strength and retention of fission products. All of the structural material lies between the fuel (including fission products) and the reactor coolant. The isothermal inside fuel surface temperature that results from the vaporization and condensation of fuel during operation eliminates hotspots, significantly increasing the design fuel pin surface temperature. For NTP, W-UO2 fuel pins yield higher operating temperatures than for other fuel forms, because W has about a ten-fold lower vaporization rate compared to any other known material. The use of perigee propulsion using W-UO2 fuel pins can result in a more than ten-fold reduction in reactor power. Lower reactor power, together with zero fission product release potential, and the simplicity of fabrication of VT fuel pins should greatly simplify and reduce the cost of development of NTP. For NEP, VT fuel pins can increase fast neutron spectrum reactor life with no fission product release. Thermal spectrum NEP reactors using W184 or Mo VT fuel pins, with only small amounts of high neutron absorbing additives, offer benefits because of much lower fissionable fuel requirements. The VT fuel pin has application to commercial power reactors with similar benefits.

  19. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of (232 Th, 235 U ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 80; Issue 1. Neutronic simulation of a research reactor core of (232Th, 235U)O2 fuel using MCNPX2.6 code. Seyed Amir ... Many researchers consider long core life with no on-site refuelling activity as a primary feature for the small reactor design. Long core life can be ...

  20. Three component laser anemometer measurements in an annular cascade of core turbine vanes with contoured end wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Louis J.; Seasholtz, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The three mean velocity components were measured in a full-scale annular turbine stator cascade with contoured hub end wall using a newly developed laser anemometer system. The anemometer consists of a standard fringe configuration using fluorescent seed particles to measure the axial and tangential components. The radial component is measured with a scanning confocal Fabry-Perot interferometer. These two configurations are combined in a single optical system that can operate simultaneously in a backscatter mode through a single optical access port. Experimental measurements were obtained both within and downstream of the stator vane row and compared with calculations from a three-dimensional inviscid computer program. In addition, detailed calibration procedures are described that were used, prior to the experiment, to accurately determine the laser beam probe volume location relative to the cascade hardware.

  1. Core optimization studies for a small heating reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galperin, A.

    1986-11-01

    Small heating reactor cores are characterized by a high contribution of the leakage to the neutron balance and by a large power density variation in the axial direction. A limited number of positions is available for the control rods, which are necessary to satisfy overall reactivity requirements subject to a safety related constraint on the maximum worth of each rod. Design approaches aimed to improve safety and fuel utilization performance of the core include separation of the cooling and moderating functions of the water with the core in order to reduce hot-to-cold reactivity shift and judicious application of the axial Gd zoning aimed to improve the discharge burnup distribution. Several design options are analyzed indicating a satisfactory solution of the axial burnup distribution problem. The feasibility of the control rod system including zircaloy, stainless steel, natural boron and possibly enriched boron rods is demonstrated. A preliminary analysis indicates directions for further improvements of the core performance by an additional reduction of the hot-to-cold reactivity shift and by a reduction of the depletion reactivity swing adopting a higher gadolinium concentration in the fuel or a two-batch fuel management scheme. (author)

  2. Heat transfer in reactor cavity during core-concrete interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adroguer, B.; Cenerino, G.

    1989-08-01

    In the unlikely event of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, the core may melt through the vessel and slump into the concrete reactor cavity. The hot mixture of the core material called corium interacts thermally with the concrete basemat. The WECHSL code, developed at K.f.K. Karlsruhe in Germany is used at the Protection and Nuclear Safety Institute (I.P.S.N.) of CEA to compute this molten corium concrete interaction (MCCI). Some uncertainties remain in the partition of heat from the corium between the basemat and the upper surrounding structures in the cavity where the thermal conditions are not computer. The CALTHER code, under development to perform a more mechanistic evaluation of the upward heat flux has been linked to WECHSL-MOD2 code. This new version enables the modelling of the feedback effects from the conditions in the cavity to the MCCI and the computation of the fraction of upward flux directly added to the cavity atmosphere. The present status is given in the paper. Preliminary calculations of the reactor case for silicate and limestone common sand (L.C.S.) concretes are presented. Significant effects are found on concrete erosion, gases release and temperature of the upper part of corium, particularly for L.C.S. concrete

  3. Thermohydraulics of emergency core cooling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This report, by a group of experts of the OECD-NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, reviews the current state-of-knowledge in the field of emergency core cooling (ECC) for design-basis, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and core uncover transients in pressurized- and boiling-water reactors. An overview of the LOCA scenarios and ECC phenomenology is provided for each type of reactor, together with a brief description of their ECC systems. Separate-effects and integral-test facilities, which contribute to understanding and assessing the phenomenology, are reviewed together with similarity and scaling compromises. All relevant LOCA phenomena are then brought together in the form of tables. Each phenomenon is weighted in terms of its importance to the course of a LOCA, and appraised for the adequacy of its data base and analytical modelling. This qualitative procedure focusses attention on the modelling requirements of dominant LOCA phenomena and the current capabilities of the two-fluid models in two-phase flows. This leads into the key issue with ECC: quantitative code assessment and the application of system codes to predict with a well defined uncertainty the behaviour of a nuclear power plant. This issue, the methodologies being developed for code assessment and the question of how good is good enough are discussed in detail. Some general conclusions and recommendations for future research activities are provided

  4. Machine learning of the reactor core loading pattern critical parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trontl, K.; Pevec, D.; Smuc, T.

    2007-01-01

    The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. In this paper we investigate the applicability of a machine learning model which could be used for fast loading pattern evaluation. We employed a recently introduced machine learning technique, Support Vector Regression (SVR), which has a strong theoretical background in statistical learning theory. Superior empirical performance of the method has been reported on difficult regression problems in different fields of science and technology. SVR is a data driven, kernel based, nonlinear modelling paradigm, in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to evaluate the possibility of applying SVR method for reactor core loading pattern modelling. The starting set of experimental data for training and testing of the machine learning algorithm was obtained using a two-dimensional diffusion theory reactor physics computer code. We illustrate the performance of the solution and discuss its applicability, i.e., complexity, speed and accuracy, with a projection to a more realistic scenario involving machine learning from the results of more accurate and time consuming three-dimensional core modelling code. (author)

  5. Seismic behaviour of LMFBR reactor cores. The SYMPHONY program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broc, Daniel

    2001-01-01

    As part of a comprehensive program on the seismic behaviour of the LMFBR reactor cores, the SYMPHONY experimental program, performed at the CEA Saclay, is carried out from 1993 up to now. LMFBR reactor cores are composed of fuel assemblies and neutronic shields, immersed in sodium (the primary coolant) or water (for the experimental tests). The main objective of the seismic studies is to evaluate the assembly motions, with consequences on the reactivity and the control rod insertability, and to verify the structural integrity of the assemblies under the impact forces. The experimental program has reached its objectives. Tests have been performed in a satisfying way. Instrumentation allowed to collect displacements, accelerations, and shock forces. All the results constitute a comprehensive base of valuable and reliable data. The interpretation of the tests is based on beam models, taking into account the Fluid Structure Interaction, and the shocks between the assemblies. Theoretical results are in a quite good agreement with the experimental ones. The interpretation of the hexagonal tests in water pointed out very strong coupling between the assemblies and lead to the development of a specific Fluid Structure Interaction, taking into account not only inertial effects, but dissipative effects also. (author)

  6. A neural network to predict reactor core behaviors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juan Jose Ortiz-Servin; Jose Alejandro Castillo; Pelta, David A.

    2014-01-01

    The global fuel management problem in BWRs (Boiling Water Reactors) can be understood as a very complex optimization problem, where the variables represent design decisions and the quality assessment of each solution is done through a complex and computational expensive simulation. This last aspect is the major impediment to perform an extensive exploration of the design space, mainly due to the time lost evaluating non promising solutions. In this work, we show how we can train a Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) to predict the reactor behavior for a given configuration. The trained MLP is able to evaluate the configurations immediately, thus allowing performing an exhaustive evaluation of the possible configurations derived from a stock of fuel lattices, fuel reload patterns and control rods patterns. For our particular problem, the number of configurations is approximately 7.7 x 10 10 ; the evaluation with the core simulator would need above 200 years, while only 100 hours were required with our approach to discern between bad and good configurations. The later were then evaluated by the simulator and we confirm the MLP usefulness. The good core configurations reached the energy requirements, satisfied the safety parameter constrains and they could reduce uranium enrichment costs. (authors)

  7. Depletion analysis of the UMLRR reactor core using MCNP6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odera, Dim Udochukwu

    Accurate knowledge of the neutron flux and temporal nuclide inventory in reactor physics calculations is necessary for a variety of application in nuclear engineering such as criticality safety, safeguards, and spent fuel storage. The Monte Carlo N- Particle (MCNP6) code with integrated buildup depletion code (CINDER90) provides a high-fidelity tool that can be used to perform 3D, full core simulation to evaluate fissile material utilization, and nuclide inventory calculations as a function of burnup. The University of Massachusetts Lowell Research Reactor (UMLRR) reactor has been modeled with the deterministic based code, VENTURE and with an older version of MCNP (MCNP5). The MIT developed MCODE (MCNP ORIGEN DEPLETION CODE) was used previously to perform some limited depletion calculations. This work chronicles the use of MCNP6, released in June 2013, to perform coupled neutronics and depletion calculation. The results are compared to previously benchmarked results. Furthermore, the code is used to determine the ratio of fission products 134Cs and 137Cs (burnup indicators), and the resultant ratio is compared to the burnup of the UMLRR.

  8. Heating analysis of cobalt adjusters in reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei Qiliang; Li Kang; Fu Yaru

    2011-01-01

    In order to produce 60 Co source for industry and medicine applications in CANDU-6 reactor, the stainless steel adjusters were replaced with the cobalt adjusters. The cobalt rod will generate the heat when it is irradiated by neutron and γ ray. In addition, 59 Co will be activated and become 60 Co, the ray released due to 60 Co decay will be absorbed by adjusters, and then the adjusters will also generate the heat. So the heating rate of adjusters to be changed during normal operation must be studied, which will be provided as the input data for analyzing the temperature field of cobalt adjusters and the relative heat load of moderator. MCNP code was used to simulate whole core geometric configuration in detail, including reactor fuel, control rod, adjuster, coolant and moderator, and to analyze the heating rate of the stainless steel adjusters and the cobalt adjusters. The maximum heating rate of different cobalt adjuster based on above results will be provided for the steady thermal hydraulic and accident analysis, and make sure that the reactor is safe on the thermal hydraulic. (authors)

  9. Regulatory Audit Activities on Nuclear Design of Reactor Cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chae-Yong; Lee, Gil Soo; Lee, Jaejun; Kim, Gwan-Young; Bae, Moo-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory audit analyses are initiated on the purpose of deep knowledge, solving safety issues, being applied in the review of licensee's results. The current most important safety issue on nuclear design is to verify bias and uncertainty on reactor physics codes to examine the behaviors of high burnup fuel during rod ejection accident (REA) and LOCA, and now regulatory audits are concentrated on solving this issue. KINS develops regulatory audit tools on its own, and accepts ones verified from foreign countries. The independent audit tools are sometimes standardized through participating the international programs. New safety issues on nuclear design, reactor physics tests, advanced reactor core design are steadily raised, which are mainly drawn from the independent examination tools. It is some facing subjects for the regulators to find out the unidentified uncertainties in high burnup fuels and to systematically solve them. The safety margin on nuclear design might be clarified by precisely having independent tools and doing audit calculations by using them. SCALE-PARCS/COREDAX and the coupling with T-H code or fuel performance code would be certainly necessary for achieving these purposes

  10. Comparison between temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and of a hemoglobin shaped cross-section rod for PWR reactors in steady state conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Maria Vitória A. de; Alvim, Antônio Carlos Marques

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work is to make a comparison between the temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and a hemoglobin shaped cross-section for PWR reactors in steady state conditions. The motivation for this article is due to the fact that the symmetric form of the red globules particles allows the O 2 gases to penetrate the center of the cell homogeneously and quickly. The diffusion equation of gases in any environment is very similar to the heat diffusion equation: Diffusion - Fick's Law; Heat Flow - Fourier; where, the temperature (T) replaces the concentration (c). In previous works the comparison between the shape of solid fuel rods with circular section, and a with hemoglobin-shaped cross-section has proved that this new format optimizes the heat transfer, decreasing the thermal resistance between the center of the UO 2 pellets and the clad. With this, a significant increase in the specific power of the reactor was made possible (more precisely a 23% increase). Currently, the advantages of annular fuel rods are being studied and recent works have shown that 12 x 12 arrays of annular fuel rods perform better, increasing the specific power of the reactor by at least 20% in relation to solid fuel rods, without affecting the safety of the reactor. Our proposal is analyzing the temperature distribution in annular fuel rods with cross sections with red blood cell shape and compare with the theoretical results of the annular fuel rods of circular cross section, initially in steady state. (author)

  11. Comparison between temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and of a hemoglobin shaped cross-section rod for PWR reactors in steady state conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Maria Vitória A. de; Alvim, Antônio Carlos Marques, E-mail: moliveira@con.ufrj.br, E-mail: alvim@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this work is to make a comparison between the temperature distributions of an annular fuel rod of circular cross-section and a hemoglobin shaped cross-section for PWR reactors in steady state conditions. The motivation for this article is due to the fact that the symmetric form of the red globules particles allows the O{sub 2} gases to penetrate the center of the cell homogeneously and quickly. The diffusion equation of gases in any environment is very similar to the heat diffusion equation: Diffusion - Fick's Law; Heat Flow - Fourier; where, the temperature (T) replaces the concentration (c). In previous works the comparison between the shape of solid fuel rods with circular section, and a with hemoglobin-shaped cross-section has proved that this new format optimizes the heat transfer, decreasing the thermal resistance between the center of the UO{sub 2} pellets and the clad. With this, a significant increase in the specific power of the reactor was made possible (more precisely a 23% increase). Currently, the advantages of annular fuel rods are being studied and recent works have shown that 12 x 12 arrays of annular fuel rods perform better, increasing the specific power of the reactor by at least 20% in relation to solid fuel rods, without affecting the safety of the reactor. Our proposal is analyzing the temperature distribution in annular fuel rods with cross sections with red blood cell shape and compare with the theoretical results of the annular fuel rods of circular cross section, initially in steady state. (author)

  12. High energy nanosecond laser pulses delivered single-mode through hollow-core PBG fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shephard, Jonathan; Jones, J; Hand, D; Bouwmans, G; Knight, J; Russell, P; Mangan, B

    2004-02-23

    We report on the development of hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers for the delivery of high energy pulses for precision micromachining applications. Short pulses of (65ns pulse width) and energies of the order of 0.37mJ have been delivered in a single spatial mode through hollow-core photonic bandgap fibers at 1064nm using a high repetition rate (15kHz) Nd:YAG laser. The ultimate laser-induced damage threshold and practical limitations of current hollow-core fibers for the delivery of short optical pulses are discussed.

  13. On Statistically Optimal Algorithms of Regulation for Different Regimes of a Pulsed Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, A K

    2002-01-01

    The special features of pulsed reactor power stabilization are considered for reactor and joint reactor and injector regimes. Statistically optimal algorithms of regulation are obtained for providing a minimum of the mean-square deviation of energy from its basic value for the future power pulse based on information obtained from the previous pulses taking into account the information aging rate. It is shown as a result of the based simplification that the optimal algorithm is realized by means of the regulator as an integrating element.

  14. Digital multi-channel pulse height analyzer based on soft core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang Weiping; Li Jinglun; Hu Yingrui

    2012-01-01

    A kind of digital multi-channel pulse height analyzer (DMCA) was introduced. This system uses the NIOS Ⅱ soft-core processor embedded in a FPGA and the system processes nuclear pulse signal by digital signal processing methods, such as digital trapezoidal filter. The test shows that the system transformation gain is 4096 channel and maximum pulse passing is 200 kcps. (authors)

  15. Study on the reactivity behavior partially loaded reactor cores using SIMULATE-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, Robert; Zeitz, Andreas; Grimminger, Werner; Lubczyk, Tobias

    2009-01-01

    The reactor core design for the NPP Gundremmingen unit B and C is performed since several years using the validated 3D reactor core calculation program SIMULATE-3. The authors describe a special application of the program to study the reactivity for different partial core loadings. Based on the comparison with results of the program CASMO-4 the program SIMULATE-3 was validated for the calculation of partially loaded reactor cores. For the planned reactor operation in NPP Gundremmingen using new MOX fuel elements the reactivity behavior was studied with respect to the KTA-Code requirements.

  16. Research reactor core conversion programmes, Department of Research and Isotopes, International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muranaka, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    In order to put the problem of core conversion into perspective, statistical information on research reactors on a global scale is presented (from IAEA Research reactor Data Base). This paper describes the research reactor core conversion program of the Department of Research and Isotopes. Technical committee Meetings were held on the subject of research reactor core conversion since 1978, and results of these meetings are published in TECDOC-233, TECDOC-324, TECDOC-304. Additional publications are being prepared, several missions of experts have visited countries to discuss and help to plan core conversion programs; training courses and seminars were organised; IAEA has supported attendance of participants from developing countries to RERTR Meetings

  17. Evaluation of In-Core Fuel Management for the Transition Cores of RSG-GAS Reactor to Full-Silicide Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    S, Tukiran; MS, Tagor; P, Surian

    2003-01-01

    The core conversion of RSG-GAS reactor from oxide to silicide core with meat density of 2.96 gU/cc has been done. The core-of RSG-GAS reactor has been operated full core of silicide fuels which is started with the mixed core of oxide-silicide start from core 36. Based on previous work, the calculated core parameter for the cores were obtained and it is needed 9 transition cores (core 36 - 44) to achieve a full-silicide core (core 45). The objective of this work is to acquire the effect of the increment of the number of silicide fuel on the core parameters. Conversion core was achieved by transition cores mixed oxide-silicide fuels. Each transition core is calculated and measured core parameter such as, excess reactivity and shutdown margin. Calculation done by Batan-EQUIL-2D code and measurement of the core parameters was carried out using the method of compensation of couple control rods. The results of calculation and experiment shows that the excess reactivity trends lower with the increment of the number of silicide fuel in the core. However, the shutdown margin is not change with the increment of the number of silicide fuel. Therefore, the transition cores can be operated safely to a full-silicide core

  18. Photocatalytic degradation of two volatile fatty acids in an annular plug-flow reactor; kinetic modeling and contribution of mass transfer rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biard, Pierre-François; Bouzaza, Abdelkrim; Wolbert, Dominique

    2007-04-15

    This study investigates the influence of inlet concentration and of flow rate on the degradation rate of two Volatile Fatty Acids (butyric and propionic acids). TiO2-coated nonwoven fiber textile was used as the photocatalyst in an annular plug-flow reactor at laminar flow regime. The kinetic follows a Langmuir-Hinshelwood form. The oxidation rate increased with the flow rate, which emphasizes the influence of the mass transfer. A first design equation is proposed considering that the mass transfer could be neglected. Despite a good accuracy of the model, the determined kinetic constants are dependent on the flow rate which highlights the contribution of the mass transfer rate on the global degradation rate. Thus, a new design equation which includes the mass transfer rate was developed. Using this model, the degradation rate can be determined for any given flow rate. Moreover, it allows the estimation of the contribution of mass transfer and chemical reaction steps at given experimental conditions; and thus providing an interesting tool for reactor optimization or design.

  19. Tools and applications for core design and shielding in fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachamin, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Outline: • Modeling of SFR cores using the Serpent-DYN3D code sequence; • Core shielding assessment for the design of FASTEF-MYRRHA; • Neutron shielding studies on an advanced Molten Salt Fast Reactor (MSFR) design

  20. Laser anemometer measurements and computations for transonic flow conditions in an annular cascade of high turning core turbine vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced laser anemometer (LA) was used to measure the axial and tangential velocity components in an annular cascade of turbine stator vanes operating at transonic flow conditions. The vanes tested were based on a previous redesign of the first-stage stator in a two-stage turbine for a high-bypass-ratio engine. The vanes produced 75 deg of flow turning. Tests were conducted on a 0.771-scale model of the engine-sized stator. The advanced LA fringe system employed an extremely small 50-micron diameter probe volume. Window correction optics were used to ensure that the laser beams did not uncross in passing through the curved optical access port. Experimental LA measurements of velocity and turbulence were obtained at the mean radius upstream of, within, and downstream of the stator vane row at an exit critical velocity ratio of 1.050 at the hub. Static pressures were also measured on the vane surface. The measurements are compared, where possible, with calculations from a three-dimensional inviscid flow analysis. Comparisons were also made with the results obtained previously when these same vanes were tested at the design exit critical velocity ratio of 0.896 at the hub. The data are presented in both graphical and tabulated form so that they can be readily compared against other turbomachinery computations.

  1. Comparison of SANS instruments at reactors and pulsed sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Epperson, J.E.; Crawford, R.K.; Carpenter, J.M.; Hjelm, R.P. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Small angle neutron scattering is a general purpose technique to study long range fluctuations and hence has been applied in almost every field of science for material characterization. SANS instruments can be built at steady state reactors and at the pulsed neutron sources where time-of-flight (TOF) techniques are used. The steady state instruments usually give data over small q ranges and in order to cover a large q range these instruments have to be reconfigured several times and SANS measurements have to be made. These instruments have provided better resolution and higher data rates within their restricted q ranges until now, but the TOF instruments are now developing to comparable performance. The TOF-SANS instruments, by using a wide band of wavelengths, can cover a wide dynamic q range in a single measurement. This is a big advantage for studying systems that are changing and those which cannot be exactly reproduced. This paper compares the design concepts and performances of these two types of instruments

  2. Comparison of SANS instruments at reactors and pulsed sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiyagarajan, P.; Epperson, J.E.; Crawford, R.K.; Carpenter, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hjelm, R.P. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1992-09-01

    Small angle neutron scattering is a general purpose technique to study long range fluctuations and hence has been applied in almost every field of science for material characterization. SANS instruments can be built at steady state reactors and at the pulsed neutron sources where time-of-flight (TOF) techniques are used. The steady state instruments usually give data over small q ranges and in order to cover a large q range these instruments have to be reconfigured several times and SANS measurements have to be made. These instruments have provided better resolution and higher data rates within their restricted q ranges until now, but the TOF instruments are now developing to comparable performance. The TOF-SANS instruments, by using a wide band of wavelengths, can cover a wide dynamic q range in a single measurement. This is a big advantage for studying systems that are changing and those which cannot be exactly reproduced. This paper compares the design concepts and performances of these two types of instruments.

  3. Static analysis of material testing reactor cores:critical core calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nawaz, A. A.; Khan, R. F. H.; Ahmad, N.

    1999-01-01

    A methodology has been described to study the effect of number of fuel plates per fuel element on critical cores of Material Testing Reactors (MTR). When the number of fuel plates are varied in a fuel element by keeping the fuel loading per fuel element constant, the fuel density in the fuel plates varies. Due to this variation, the water channel width needs to be recalculated. For a given number of fuel plates, water channel width was determined by optimizing k i nfinity using a transport theory lattice code WIMS-D/4. The dimensions of fuel element and control fuel element were determined using this optimized water channel width. For the calculated dimensions, the critical cores were determined for the given number of fuel plates per fuel element by using three dimensional diffusion theory code CITATION. The optimization of water channel width gives rise to a channel width of 2.1 mm when the number of fuel plates is 23 with 290 g ''2''3''5U fuel loading which is the same as in the case of Pakistan Reactor-1 (PARR-1). Although the decrease in number of fuel element results in an increase in optimal water channel width but the thickness of standard fuel element (SFE) and control fuel element (CFE) decreases and it gives rise to compact critical and equilibrium cores. The criticality studies of PARR-1 are in good agreement with the predictions

  4. In-Core-Instrumentation Methods for 3-Dimensional Distribution Information of Reactor Core Temperatures and Melt-down

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Yeong Cheol [KHNP, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Eun, Myoung; Kim, Sung Jun [Woojin Inc., Hwaseong (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    The tsunami-induced nuclear accident at Japanese Fukushima power plants in March 2011 has revealed some weaknesses in the severe accident monitoring system. The plant instrumentation did not provide utility, safety experts, and government officials with adequate and reliable information. The information on the reactor core damage and coolability is critical for making decisions correctly as well as in a timely manner during the course of the mitigation of severe accidents. Current Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR)s have an In-Core-Instrumentation (ICI) system that measures the temperature distribution of the top surface (i.e. Core Exit Temperatures) of the reactor core mainly to indicate when to begin Severe Accident Mitigation Guidelines (SAMG). This design concept giving only the core exit temperature has limitations in terms of sufficiency as well as availability of the information necessary for diagnosis on the status of the degraded core and the effectiveness of the measures taken as mitigation strategies. The reactor core exit temperatures are not sufficient to support the assessment of the degree of the core damage and the location of the molten core debris and recognition whether the core damage progresses on or it is mitigated. The ICI location being at the top of the reactor core also makes the ICI thermocouples vulnerable to melt-down because the upper part of the reactor core uncovers first, thereby melt down at the early stage of the accident. This means that direct indication of reactor core temperature will be lost and unavailable during the later stages of severe accident. To address the aforementioned weaknesses of the current ICIs, it is necessary to develop a new ICI system that provides information that is more expanded and more reliable for accident mitigation. With the enhanced information available, the SAMG can be prepared in more refined and effective way based on the direct and suitable indication of status of damages and the 3-dimensional

  5. Oxidation during reflood of reactor core with melting cladding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siefken, L.J.; Allison, C.M.; Davis, K.L. [and others

    1995-09-01

    Models were recently developed and incorporated into the SCDAP/RELAP5 code for calculating the oxidation of fuel rods during cladding meltdown and reflood. Experiments have shown that a period of intense oxidation may occur when a hot partially oxidized reactor core is reflooded. This paper offers an explanation of the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes that cause this intense period of oxidation. Models for the cladding meltdown and oxidation processes are developed. The models are assessed by simulating a severe fuel damage experiment that involved reflood. The models for cladding meltdown and oxidation were found to improve calculation of the temperature and oxidation of fuel rods during the period in which hot fuel rods are reflooded.

  6. Analysis of core calculation schemes for advanced water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, Anne

    1989-01-01

    This research thesis addresses the analysis of the core control of sub-moderated water reactors with plutonium fuel and varying spectrum. Firstly, a calculation scheme is defined, based on transport theory for the three existing assembly configurations. It is based on the efficiency analysis of the control cluster and of the flow sheet shape in the assembly. Secondly, studies of the assembly with control cluster and within a theory of diffusion with homogenization or detailed assembly representation are performed by taking the environment into account in order to assess errors. Thirdly, due to the presence of a very efficient absorbent in control clusters, a deeper physical analysis requires the study of the flow gradient existing at the interface between assemblies. A parameter is defined to assess this gradient, and theoretically calculated by using finite elements. Developed software is validated [fr

  7. Detectors for hydrodynamical processes in the reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strube, D.

    1976-01-01

    The method described in this report is based on noise analytical measurements of electrical conductivity fluctuations of the cooling water stream in the reactor core. The conductivity fluctuations have their origin in steam and air bubbles and in cooling water mixing effects in regard to temperature and ionisation by gamma and neutron fields. The fluctuations are transformed into voltage signals by two electrodes in direction of the cooling water stream and then crosscorrelated. From the known distance of the two electrodes and the shift of the crosscorrelation function one can compute the velocity of the cooling medium and the bubbles. Void fractions were also determined with this detection device in out of pile experiments. (author)

  8. BR2 reactor core steady state transient modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makarenko, A.; Petrova, T.

    2000-01-01

    A coupled neutronics/hydraulics/heat-conduction model of the BR2 reactor core is under development at SCK-CEN. The neutron transport phenomenon has been implemented as steady state and time dependent nodal diffusion. The non-linear heat conduction equation in-side fuel elements is solved with a time dependent finite element method. To allow coupling between functional modules and to simulate subcooled regimes, a simple single-phase hydraulics has been introduced, while the two-phase hydraulics is under development. Multiple tests, general benchmark cases as well as calculation/experiment comparisons demonstrated a good accuracy of both neutronic and thermal hydraulic models, numerical reliability and full code portability. A refinement methodology has been developed and tested for better neutronic representation in hexagonal geometry. Much effort is still needed to complete the development of an extended cross section library with kinetic data and two-phase flow representation. (author)

  9. Machine Learning of the Reactor Core Loading Pattern Critical Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krešimir Trontl

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The usual approach to loading pattern optimization involves high degree of engineering judgment, a set of heuristic rules, an optimization algorithm, and a computer code used for evaluating proposed loading patterns. The speed of the optimization process is highly dependent on the computer code used for the evaluation. In this paper, we investigate the applicability of a machine learning model which could be used for fast loading pattern evaluation. We employ a recently introduced machine learning technique, support vector regression (SVR, which is a data driven, kernel based, nonlinear modeling paradigm, in which model parameters are automatically determined by solving a quadratic optimization problem. The main objective of the work reported in this paper was to evaluate the possibility of applying SVR method for reactor core loading pattern modeling. We illustrate the performance of the solution and discuss its applicability, that is, complexity, speed, and accuracy.

  10. Measurement and Analysis of Structural Integrity of Reactor Core Support Structure in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Saleem A.; Haroon, Muhammad; Rashid, Atif; Kazmi, Zafar

    2017-02-01

    Extensive calculation and measurements of flow-induced vibrations (FIV) of reactor internals were made in a PWR plant to assess the structural integrity of reactor core support structure against coolant flow. The work was done to meet the requirements of the Fukushima Response Action Plan (FRAP) for enhancement of reactor safety, and the regulatory guide RG-1.20. For the core surveillance measurements the Reactor Internals Vibration Monitoring System (IVMS) has been developed based on detailed neutron noise analysis of the flux signals from the four ex-core neutron detectors. The natural frequencies, displacement and mode shapes of the reactor core barrel (CB) motion were determined with the help of IVMS. The random pressure fluctuations in reactor coolant flow due to turbulence force have been identified as the predominant cause of beam-mode deflection of CB. The dynamic FIV calculations were also made to supplement the core surveillance measurements. The calculational package employed the computational fluid dynamics, mode shape analysis, calculation of power spectral densities of flow & pressure fields and the structural response to random flow excitation forces. The dynamic loads and stiffness of the Hold-Down Spring that keeps the core structure in position against upward coolant thrust were also determined by noise measurements. Also, the boron concentration in primary coolant at any time of the core cycle has been determined with the IVMS.

  11. Core reactivity estimation in space reactors using recurrent dynamic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Tsai, Wei K.

    1991-01-01

    A recurrent multilayer perceptron network topology is used in the identification of nonlinear dynamic systems from only the input/output measurements. The identification is performed in the discrete time domain, with the learning algorithm being a modified form of the back propagation (BP) rule. The recurrent dynamic network (RDN) developed is applied for the total core reactivity prediction of a spacecraft reactor from only neutronic power level measurements. Results indicate that the RDN can reproduce the nonlinear response of the reactor while keeping the number of nodes roughly equal to the relative order of the system. As accuracy requirements are increased, the number of required nodes also increases, however, the order of the RDN necessary to obtain such results is still in the same order of magnitude as the order of the mathematical model of the system. It is believed that use of the recurrent MLP structure with a variety of different learning algorithms may prove useful in utilizing artificial neural networks for recognition, classification, and prediction of dynamic systems.

  12. Core reactivity estimation in space reactors using recurrent dynamic networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parlos, A.G.; Tsai, W.K.

    1991-01-01

    A recurrent Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) network topology is used in the identification of nonlinear dynamic systems from only the input/output measurements. This effort is part of a research program devoted in developing real-time diagnostics and predictive control techniques for large-scale complex nonlinear dynamic systems. The identification is performed in the discrete time domain, with the learning algorithm being a modified form of the Back Propagation (BP) rule. The Recurrent Dynamic Network (RDN) developed is applied for the total core reactivity prediction of a spacecraft reactor from only neutronic power level measurements. Results indicate that the RDN can reproduce the nonlinear response of the reactor while keeping the number of nodes roughly equal to the relative order of the system. As accuracy requirements are increased, the number of required nodes also increases, however, the order of the RDN necessary to obtain such results is still in the same order of magnitude as the order of the matematical model of the system. There are a number of issues identified regarding the behavior of the RDN, which at this point are unresolved and require further research. Nevertheless, it is believed that use of the recurrent MLP structure with a variety of different learning algorithms may prove useful in utilizing artifical neural networks (ANNs) for recognition, classification and prediction of dynamic systems

  13. Design and performance of a pulse transformer based on Fe-based nanocrystalline core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Liu; Xibo, Feng; Lin, Fuchang

    2011-08-01

    A dry-type pulse transformer based on Fe-based nanocrystalline core with a load of 0.88 nF, output voltage of more than 65 kV, and winding ratio of 46 is designed and constructed. The dynamic characteristics of Fe-based nanocrystalline core under the impulse with the pulse width of several microseconds were studied. The pulse width and incremental flux density have an important effect on the pulse permeability, so the pulse permeability is measured under a certain pulse width and incremental flux density. The minimal volume of the toroidal pulse transformer core is determined by the coupling coefficient, the capacitors of the resonant charging circuit, incremental flux density, and pulse permeability. The factors of the charging time, ratio, and energy transmission efficiency in the resonant charging circuit based on magnetic core-type pulse transformer are analyzed. Experimental results of the pulse transformer are in good agreement with the theoretical calculation. When the primary capacitor is 3.17 μF and charge voltage is 1.8 kV, a voltage across the secondary capacitor of 0.88 nF with peak value of 68.5 kV, rise time (10%-90%) of 1.80 μs is obtained.

  14. Fast reactor core monitoring by analysis of temperature noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dubuisson, B.; Smolarz, A.

    1984-01-01

    The study shows, with the results obtained, how it is possible to approach the problem of diagnosis with a technique based on the use of algorithms for statistical pattern recognition was justifiable. The results presented here, with a view to their use for fast breeder reactor core surveillance, are very encouraging, the most important point being the data representation. For this study, it was difficult to find the most suitable parameters for characterizing the various simulated core states, however, despite this handicap, the classification algorithm provided quite acceptable results. The second point concerns the characterization of a system's evolution. The criterion defined was chosen for adaptation to our algorithm. One acertained that it was possible to characterize evolution on the basis of this criterion as long as the rejected points were not too far from the known learning sets. Under these circumstances, the advantage in characterizing evolution in that the changes in evolution occur when the rejected points have a tendency to agglomerate in a small area of space could be seen. This phenomenon thus makes it possible to forsee whether the creation of a new class is possible. Where the rejected points are far away from the known learning sets, the criterion used proved to be too sensitive and the characterization of evolution was less satisfactory

  15. Behaviour of steel pipe exposed to fouling by heavy oil during core-annular flow; Comportamento de tubo de aco exposto a sujeira de oleo pesado durante escoamento nucleo-anular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, Adriana; Bannwart, Antonio C. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Mecanica. Dept. de Engenharia de Petroleo

    2004-07-01

    The use of water-assisted technologies such as core-annular flow to the pipelines of viscous oils has been proposed as an attractive alternative for production and transportation of heavy crudes in both onshore and offshore scenarios. Usually, core-annular flow can be created by injecting a relatively small water flow rate laterally in the pipe, so as to form a thin water annulus surrounding the viscous oil, which is pumped through the center. The reduction in friction losses obtained thanks to lubrication by water is significant, since the pressure drop in a steady state core flow becomes comparable to water flow only. For a complete assessment of core flow technology, however, unwanted effects associated with possible oil adhesion onto the pipe wall should be investigated, since these may cause severe fouling of the wall and pressure drop increase. It has been observed that oil adhesion on metallic surfaces may occur for certain types of crude and oilphilic pipe materials. In this work we present results of pressure drop monitoring during 35 hour-operation of a heavy oil-water core annular flow in a 26.08 mm. i.d. horizontal steel pipe. The oil used is described in terms of its main components and the results of static wet ability tests are also presented for comparison (author)

  16. Determination of short circuit stresses in an air core reactor using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper shows the use and effectiveness of finite element method while designing an air core reactor for determining the short circuit forces and stress level due to short circuit. A 500 Amp air core series reactor having nominal voltage rating of 600 Volt was to be designed and to be subjected to a short circuit current of 8 ...

  17. Preliminary study for alternative conceptual core design of the MTR research reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surbakti, T.; Pinem, S.; Sembiring, T. M.; Subekti, M.; Sunaryo, G. R.

    2018-02-01

    The utilization of the research reactor is increasingly widespread, especially for radioisotope production and testing of advanced materials and preference to use a compact core. The reactor core design has been determined on the maximum thermal flux in the middle of the core per MW. BATAN has designed several alternative research reactor cores. The purpose of this research reactor is to obtain the optimum reactor core configurations with the criteria to have a thermal neutron flux in the centre of the core with minimum of 1.0×1015 n/cm2 s. Power level of the research reactor is 60 MWthwith U9Mo/Al fuel 85 cm of height. Design of plate-type fuels with a higher core results in the heat transfer to the coolant optimal. All 16 fuel assemblies and the 4 control rodsare inserted into the core for this reactor. The core design calculations were carried out with the WIMSD-5B and BATAN-FUEL codes. Conceptual design calculation results show that the core configuration with 5 × 5 grids, all the fresh fuel, fuel loading of 470 g, a D2O reflector, a maximum thermal neutron flux in the central core is 1.09 x 1015 n/cm2s and the cycle length is 33 days. The reactor core design is the most optimal for MTR type. For the equilibrium core, a fuel loading of 600 g results in the maximum thermal flux of 1.07x1015 n/cm2s and the two safety rods should be used in the core.

  18. About a fuel for burnup reactor of periodical pulsed nuclear pumped laser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, A.I.; Lukin, A.V.; Magda, L.E.; Magda, E.P.; Pogrebov, I.S.; Putnikov, I.S.; Khmelnitsky, D.V.; Scherbakov, A.P.

    1998-01-01

    A physical scheme of burnup reactor for a Periodic Pulsed Nuclear Pumped Laser was supposed. Calculations of its neutron physical parameters were made. The general layout and construction of basic elements of the reactor are discussed. The requirements for the fuel and fuel elements are established. (author)

  19. Analysis of a homogenous and heterogeneous stylized half core of a CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EL-Khawlani, Afrah [Physics Department, Sana' a (Yemen); Aziz, Moustafa [Nuclear and radiological regulatory authority, Cairo (Egypt); Ismail, Mahmud Yehia; Ellithi, Ali Yehia [Cairo Univ. (Egypt). Faculty of Science

    2015-03-15

    The MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code System) code has been used for modeling and simulation of a half core of CANDU (CANada Deuterium-Uranium) reactor, both homogenous and heterogeneous model for the reactor core are designed. The fuel is burnt in normal operation conditions of CANDU reactors. Natural uranium fuel is used in the model. The multiplication factor for homogeneous and heterogeneous reactor core is calculated and compared during fuel burnup. The concentration of both uranium and plutonium isotopes are analysed in the model. The flux and power distributions through channels are calculated.

  20. Turkey's regulatory plans for high enriched to low enriched conversion of TR-2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelol Oezdere, Oya

    2003-01-01

    Turkey is a developing country and has three nuclear facilities two of which are research reactors and one pilot fuel production plant. One of the two research reactors is TR-2 which is located in Cekmece site in Istanbul. TR-2 Reactor's core is composed of both high enriched and low enriched fuel and from high enriched to low enriched core conversion project will take place in year 2005. This paper presents the plans for drafting regulations on the safety analysis report updates for high enriched to low enriched core conversion of TR-2 reactor, the present regulatory structure of Turkey and licensing activities of nuclear facilities. (author)

  1. Test and application of thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an pulsed reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Jun; Zhao Xiang Feng; Wang Dao Hua

    2002-01-01

    A thermal neutron radiography facility at Xi'an Pulsed Reactor is described as well as its characteristics and application. The experiment results show the inherent unsharpness of BAS ND is 0.15 mm. The efficient thermal neutron n/gamma ratio is lower in not only steady state configuration but also pulsing state configuration and it is improved using Pb filter

  2. Review on Application of Control Algorithms to Power Regulations of Reactor Cores

    OpenAIRE

    Li Gang; Wang Xue-qian; Liang Bin; Li Xiu; Liang Rong-jian

    2016-01-01

    This research is to solve the stability analysis issue of nonlinear pressurized water reactor cores. On the basis of modeling a nonlinear pressurized water reactor core using the lumped parameter method, its linearized model is achieved via the small perturbation linearization way. Linearized models of the nonlinear core at six power levels are selected as local models of this core. The T-S fuzzy idea for the core is exploited to construct the T-S fuzzy model of the nonlinear core based on th...

  3. Estimation of a Reactor Core Power Peaking Factor Using Support Vector Regression and Uncertainty Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, In Ho; Naa, Man Gyun; Lee, Yoon Joon; Park, Goon Cherl

    2009-01-01

    The monitoring of detailed 3-dimensional (3D) reactor core power distribution is a prerequisite in the operation of nuclear power reactors to ensure that various safety limits imposed on the LPD and DNBR, are not violated during nuclear power reactor operation. The LPD and DNBR should be calculated in order to perform the two major functions of the core protection calculator system (CPCS) and the core operation limit supervisory system (COLSS). The LPD at the hottest part of a hot fuel rod, which is related to the power peaking factor (PPF, F q ), is more important than the LPD at any other position in a reactor core. The LPD needs to be estimated accurately to prevent nuclear fuel rods from melting. In this study, support vector regression (SVR) and uncertainty analysis have been applied to estimation of reactor core power peaking factor

  4. Analytical modeling of core hydraulics and flow management in breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carelli, M.D.; Willis, J.M.

    1979-01-01

    An analytical model representing the hydraulic behavior of the primary system of fast breeder nuclear reactors is discussed. A computer code capable of detailing the core flow distribution and characterizing the flow and pressure drop in each reactor component is presented. Application of this method to the reactor core thermal-hydraulic design has allowed optimization of the flow management with consequent upgrading in performance, reduction of unnecessary conservatism and very substantial cost savings. Typical quantitative examples are presented

  5. The Reactor Design for Diesel Exhaust Control Using a Magnetic Pulse Compressor

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Douyan; Namihira, Takao; Fujiya, Koji; Katsuki, Sunao; Akiyama, Hidenori; ナミヒラ, タカオ; フジヤ, コウジ; カツキ, スナオ; アキヤマ, ヒデノリ; オウ, トエン; 浪平, 隆男; 勝木, 淳; 秋山, 秀典; 王, 斗艶

    2004-01-01

    A magnetic pulse compressor (MPC) was used to control the exhaust gases from a diesel generator employing a wire-to-plate plasma reactor in this work. To obtain efficient NO/sub X/ removal, the energy transfer efficiency from the MPC to the plasma reactor and the pulse streamer discharge physics were investigated by varying the number of anode wires and wire-to-wire distance of the reactor. It was experimentally confirmed that the number of wires and the neighboring wire distance affected the...

  6. A system dynamics model for tritium cycle of pulsed fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Zuolong; Nie, Baojie; Chen, Dehong

    2017-01-01

    As great challenges and uncertainty exist in achieving steady plasma burning, pulsed plasma burning may be a potential scenario for fusion engineering test reactor, even for fusion DEMOnstration reactor. In order to analyze dynamic tritium inventory and tritium self-sufficiency for pulsed fusion systems, a system dynamics model of tritium cycle was developed on the basis of earlier version of Tritium Analysis program for fusion System (TAS). The model was verified with TRIMO, which was developed by KIT in Germany. Tritium self-sufficiency and dynamic tritium inventory assessment were performed for a typical fusion engineering test reactor. The verification results show that the system dynamics model can be used for tritium cycle analysis of pulsed fusion reactor with sufficient reliability. The assessment results of tritium self-sufficiency indicate that the fusion reactor might only need several hundred gram tritium to startup if achieved high efficient tritium handling ability (Referred ITER: 1 h). And the initial tritium startup inventory in pulsed fusion reactor is determined by the combined influence of pulse length, burn availability, and tritium recycle time. Meanwhile, tritium self-sufficiency can be achieved under the defined condition.

  7. DIFFUSION OF THE PULSED ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELD INTO THE MULTI-LAYER CORE OF INDUCTOR AT PULSED DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr T. Chemerys

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available  The problem of the pulsed magnetic field distribution in the cross section of the inductor core at the induction accelerator of electron beam is under consideration in this paper. Owing to multi-layer structure of the core package it has the magnetic and electric anisotropy with different speed of the field diffusion along the sheets of magnetic and across the sheets. At the pulse duration less than one microsecond the essential non-uniformity of the field along both axes of the core cross section can be found. This effect reduces the efficiency of the ferromagnetic material using with corresponding loss of the accelerator efficiency. The main conclusion of the paper consists of the necessity to check the field diffusion characteristics in the process of inductor design to be sure that the pulsed field is able to fill the cross section of the core during the pulse switching. The magnetic characteristics of the anisotropic core have been investigated in the paper by one-dimensional and two-dimensional simulation in the quasi-stationary approximation using the traditional equation of the field diffusion.

  8. An analysis of cobalt irradiation in CANDU 6 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gugiu, E.D.; Dumitrache, I.

    2003-01-01

    In CANDU reactors, one has the ability to replace the stainless steel adjuster rods with neutronically equivalent Co assemblies with a minimum impact on the power plant safety and efficiency. The 60 Co produced by 59 Co irradiation is used extensively in medicine and industry. The paper mainly describes some of the reactor physics and safety requirements that must be carried into practice for the Co adjuster rods. The computations related to the neutronically equivalence of the stainless steel adjusters with the Co adjuster assemblies, as well as the estimations of the activity and the heating of the irradiated cobalt rods are performed using the Monte Carlo codes MCNP5 and MONTEBURNS2.1. The 60 Co activity and heating evaluations are closely related to the neutronics computations and to the density evolution of cobalt isotopes during assumed in-core irradiation period. Unfortunately, the activities of these isotopes could not be evaluated directly using the burn-up capabilities of the MONTEBURNS code because of the lack of their neutron cross-section from the MCNP5 code library. Additional MCNP5 runs for all the cobalt assemblies have been done in order to compute the flux-spectrum, the 59 Co and the 60 Co radiative capture reaction rates in the adjusters. The 60m Co cross-section was estimated using the flux-spectrum and the ORIGEN2.1 code capabilities THERM and RES. These computational steps allowed the evaluation of the one-group cross-section for the radiative capture reactions of cobalt isotopes. The values obtained replaced the corresponding ones from the ORIGEN library, which have been estimated using the flux-spectrum specific to the fuel. The activity values are used to evaluate the dose at the surface of the device designed to transport the cobalt adjusters. (authors)

  9. Effects of phosphate addition on biofilm bacterial communities and water quality in annular reactors equipped with stainless steel and ductile cast iron pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hyun-Jung; Choi, Young-June; Ro, Hee-Myong; Ka, Jong-Ok

    2012-02-01

    The impact of orthophosphate addition on biofilm formation and water quality was studied in corrosion-resistant stainless steel (STS) pipe and corrosion-susceptible ductile cast iron (DCI) pipe using cultivation and culture-independent approaches. Sample coupons of DCI pipe and STS pipe were installed in annular reactors, which were operated for 9 months under hydraulic conditions similar to a domestic plumbing system. Addition of 5 mg/L of phosphate to the plumbing systems, under low residual chlorine conditions, promoted a more significant growth of biofilm and led to a greater rate reduction of disinfection by-products in DCI pipe than in STS pipe. While the level of THMs (trihalomethanes) increased under conditions of low biofilm concentration, the levels of HAAs (halo acetic acids) and CH (chloral hydrate) decreased in all cases in proportion to the amount of biofilm. It was also observed that chloroform, the main species of THM, was not readily decomposed biologically and decomposition was not proportional to the biofilm concentration; however, it was easily biodegraded after the addition of phosphate. Analysis of the 16S rDNA sequences of 102 biofilm isolates revealed that Proteobacteria (50%) was the most frequently detected phylum, followed by Firmicutes (10%) and Actinobacteria (2%), with 37% of the bacteria unclassified. Bradyrhizobium was the dominant genus on corroded DCI pipe, while Sphingomonas was predominant on non-corroded STS pipe. Methylobacterium and Afipia were detected only in the reactor without added phosphate. PCR-DGGE analysis showed that the diversity of species in biofilm tended to increase when phosphate was added regardless of the pipe material, indicating that phosphate addition upset the biological stability in the plumbing systems.

  10. A comparison of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Evans, K. Jr.; Kim, S.

    1985-01-01

    Pulsed operation of a tokamak reactor imposes cost penalties due to such problems as mechanical fatigue and the need to periodically transfer large amounts of energy to various reactor components. This study focuses on lifetime limitations and capital costs of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas include: fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plane bending fatigue in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive current driver costs. A capital cost comparison is made for tokamak reactors operating under the four distinct operating cycles which have been proposed. Since high availability and a low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, we can characterize improvements in physics and technology which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles. A key conclusion is that steady-state operation is likely to result in the least expensive tokamak reactor (perhaps 20% cheaper than the best pulsed reactor), provided noninductive current drive efficiency can be increased roughly four-fold over present-day experimental results. (orig.)

  11. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    OpenAIRE

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parame...

  12. Calculation of anti-seismic design for Xi'an pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Shuian

    2002-01-01

    The author describes the reactor safety rule, safety regulation and design code that must be observed to anti-seismic design in Xi'an pulsed reactor. It includes the classification of reactor installation, determination of seismic loads, calculate contents, program, method, results and synthetically evaluation. According to the different anti-seismic structure character of reactor installation, an appropriate method was selected to calculate the seismic response. The results were evaluated synthetically using the design code and design requirement. The evaluate results showed that the anti-seismic design function of reactor installation of Xi'an pules reactor is well, and the structure integrality and normal property of reactor installation can be protect under the designed classification of the earthquake

  13. Assessment of core protection and monitoring systems for an advanced reactor SMART

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In, Wang Kee; Hwang, Dae Hyun; Yoo, Yeon Jong; Zee, Sung Qunn

    2002-01-01

    Analogue and digital core protection/monitoring systems were assessed for the implementation in an advanced reactor. The core thermal margins to nuclear fuel design limits (departure from nucleate boiling and fuel centerline melting) were estimated using the design data for a commercial pressurized water reactor and an advanced reactor. The digital protection system resulted in a greater power margin to the fuel centerline melting by at least 30% of rated power for both commercial and advanced reactors. The DNB margin with the digital system is also higher than that for the analogue system by 8 and 12.1% of rated power for commercial and advanced reactors, respectively. The margin gain with the digital system is largely due to the on-line calculations of DNB ratio and peak local power density from the live sensor signals. The digital core protection and monitoring systems are, therefore, believed to be more appropriate for the advanced reactor

  14. Enhancement of peak intensity in a filament core with spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Bin; Chu Wei; Li Guihua; Zhang Haisu; Ni Jielei [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao Hui; Liu Weiwei [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin, 300071 (China); Yao Jinping; Cheng Ya; Xu Zhizhan [State Key Laboratory of High Field Laser Physics, Shanghai Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Chin, See Leang [Center for Optics, Photonics and Laser (COPL) and Department of Physics, Engineering Physics and Optics, Universite Laval, Quebec City, QC, G1V 0A6 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    We demonstrate that the peak intensity in the filament core, which is inherently limited by the intensity clamping effect during femtosecond laser filamentation, can be significantly enhanced using spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses. In addition, the filament length obtained by spatiotemporally focused femtosecond laser pulses is {approx}25 times shorter than that obtained by a conventional focusing scheme, resulting in improved high spatial resolution.

  15. The system of the measurement of reactor power and the monitoring of core power distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xianfeng

    1999-01-01

    The author mainly describes the measurement of the reactor power and the monitoring of the core power distribution in DAYA BAY nuclear power plant, introduces the calibration for the measurement system. Ex-core nuclear instrumentation system (RPN) and LOCA surveillance system (LSS) are the most important system for the object. they perform the measurement of the reactor power and the monitoring of the core power distribution on-line and timely. They also play the important roles in the reactor control and the reactor protection. For the same purpose there are test instrumentation system (KME) and in-core instrumentation system (RIC). All of them work together ensuring the exact measurement and effective monitoring, ensuring the safety of the reactor power plant

  16. Feasibility Study for Cobalt Bundle Loading to CANDU Reactor Core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Donghwan; Kim, Youngae; Kim, Sungmin

    2016-01-01

    CANDU units are generally used to produce cobalt-60 at Bruce and Point Lepreau in Canada and Embalse in Argentina. China has started production of cobalt-60 using its CANDU 6 Qinshan Phase III nuclear power plant in 2009. For cobalt-60 production, the reactor’s full complement of stainless steel adjusters is replaced with neutronically equivalent cobalt-59 adjusters, which are essentially invisible to reactor operation. With its very high neutron flux and optimized fuel burn-up, the CANDU has a very high cobalt-60 production rate in a relatively short time. This makes CANDU an excellent vehicle for bulk cobalt-60 production. Several studies have been performed to produce cobalt-60 using adjuster rod at Wolsong nuclear power plant. This study proposed new concept for producing cobalt-60 and performed the feasibility study. Bundle typed cobalt loading concept is proposed and evaluated the feasibility to fuel management without physics and system design change. The requirement to load cobalt bundle to the core was considered and several channels are nominated. The production of cobalt-60 source is very depend on the flux level and burnup directly. But the neutron absorption characteristic of cobalt bundle is too high, so optimizing design study is needed in the future

  17. Shape optimization of a Sodium Fast Reactor core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dombre Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We apply in this paper a geometrical shape optimization method for the design of the core of a SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor in order to minimize a thermal counter-reaction known as the sodium void effect. In this kind of reactors, by increasing the temperature, the core may become liable to a strong increase of reactivity, a key-parameter governing the chain-reaction at quasi-static states. We first use the one group energy diffusion model and give the generalization to the two groups energy equation. We then give some numerical results in the case of the one group energy equation. Note that the application of our method leads to some designs whose interfaces can be parametrized by very smooth curves which can stand very far from realistic designs. We don’t explain here the method that it would be possible to use for recovering an operational design but there exists several penalization methods (see [2] that could be employed to this end. On applique dans cet article une méthode d’optimisation géométrique dans le cadre de la conception d’un cœur de réacteur SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor, i.e. réacteur à neutron rapide refroidi au sodium dans le but de minimiser une contre réaction thermique connue sous le nom d’effet de vidange sodium. Lorsqu’une augmentation de température survient, ce type de réacteur peut être sujet à une forte augmentation de réactivité, un paramètre clé dans le contrôle de la réaction en chaîne en régime quasi-statique. On a recours à l’équation de diffusion à un groupe puis on donne la généralisation du modèle d’optimisation pour l’équation de la diffusion à deux groupes d’énergie. On présente ensuite quelques résultats numériques obtenus dans le cas de l’équation à un groupe d’énergie. On note que l’application de cette méthode conduit à des designs de cœur présentant des interfaces très régulières qui sont loin d’un design de cœur faisable sur le

  18. Selection method and device for reactor core performance calculation input indication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuto, Yoshihiro.

    1994-01-01

    The position of a reactor core component on a reactor core map, which is previously designated and optionally changeable, is displayed by different colors on a CRT screen by using data of a data file incorporating results of a calculation for reactor core performance, such as incore thermal limit values. That is, an operator specifies the kind of the incore component to be sampled on a menu screen, to display the position of the incore component which satisfies a predetermined condition on the CRT screen by different colors in the form of a reactor core map. The position for the reactor core component displayed on the CRT screen by different colors is selected and designated on the screen by a touch panel, a mouse or a light pen, thereby automatically outputting detailed data of evaluation for the reactor core performance of the reactor core component at the indicated position. Retrieval of coordinates of fuel assemblies to be data sampled and input of the coordinates and demand for data sampling can be conducted at once by one menu screen. (N.H.)

  19. Improvements to the sodium supply system of a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, Rene; Marchais, Christian.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns an improvement to the sodium supply system of a nuclear reactor core and, in particular, concerns the area included between the outlet of the primary circulation pumps and the core proper. A simplified structure and a lightening of all this linking area between the circulation pumps and the distribution tank under the core is achieved and this results in a very significant reduction in the risks of deterioration and in a definite increase in the reliability of the reactor. The invention is therefore an improvement to the sodium supply system of the nuclear reactor core vessel with incorporated exchangers, in which the cool sodium, after passing through the primary exchangers, is collected in a ring compartment from whence it is taken up by the pumps and moved to at least one pipe reaching a distribution tank located under the reactor core [fr

  20. Design of a reactor core in the Oma Full MOX-ABWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hama, Teruo

    1999-01-01

    The Electric Power Development Co., Ltd. has progressed a construction plan on an improved boiling-water reactor aiming at loading of MOX fuel in all reactor cores (full MOX-ABWR) at Oma-cho, Aomori prefecture, which is a last stage on application of approval on establishment at present. Here were described on outlines of reactor core in the full MOX-ABWR and its safety evaluation. For the full MOX-ABWR loading MOX fuel assembly into all reactor core, thermal and mechanical design analysis of fuel bars and core design analysis were conducted. As a result, it was confirmed that judgement standards in mixed core of MOX fuel and uranium fuel were also applicable as well as that in uranium fuel. (G.K.)

  1. Influence Of The Gas Multipurpose Reactor Core Conversion From Oxide To Silicide On The GAMMA Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto

    1996-01-01

    In order to prepare the reactor core conversion from oxide to silicide, analysis of the gamma heat generation in the fuel plate and its influence on the gamma density in the reactor core using the GAMSET computer code have been done. The heat generation was evaluated for oxide (U 3 O 8 -Al) and silicide (U 3 Si 2 -Al) plate for different uranium loading. The calculation result shows that the heat generation in the silicide fuel plate contains 400 gram of U-235 per fuel element increase of 10.64% related to the normal oxide plate. This means that the gamma density in the reactor core will consequently decrease. Regarding this result, it can be concluded that the core conversion from oxide to silicide fuel with higher uranium loading will be followed by the heat generation increases in the fuel plate and the gamma density decreases in the reactor core

  2. Identification of a nuclear reactor core (VVER) using recurrent neural networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boroushaki, M. E-mail: boroushaki@mehr.sharif.ac.ir; Ghofrani, M.B.; Lucas, C

    2002-07-01

    Recurrent neural networks (RNNs) in identification of complex nonlinear plants like nuclear reactor core, have difficulty in learning long-term dynamics. Therefore, in most papers in this area, the reactor core is used to identify just the short-term dynamics. In this paper we used a multi-NARX (nonlinear autoregressive with exogenous inputs) structure, including neural networks with different time steps and a heuristic compound learning method, consisting of off-line and on-line batch learnings. This multi-NARX was trained by an accurate 3-dimensional core calculation code. Network responses show that this procedure solves the difficulty in identification of complex nonlinear dynamic MIMO (multi-input multi-output) plants like nuclear reactor core, and can be used in fast prediction of nuclear reactor core dynamics behavior.

  3. Investigation of Equilibrium Core by recycling MA and LLFP in fast reactor cycle (I)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizutani, Akihiko; Shono, Akira; Ishikawa, Makoto

    1999-05-01

    Feasibility study on a self-consistent fuel cycle system is performed in the nuclear fuel recycle system with fast reactors. In this system, the self-generated MAs (Minor Actinides) and LLFPs (Long Lived Fission Products) are confined and incinerated in the fast reactor. Analyses of the nuclear properties for an 'Equilibrium Core', in which the self-generated MAs and LLFPs are confined, are investigated. A conventional sodium cooled oxide fuel fast reactor is selected as the core specifications for the 'Equilibrium Core'. This 600 MWe fast reactor does not have a radial blanket. In this study, the nuclear characteristics of the 'Equilibrium Core' are compared with those of a 'Standard Core' and '5 w/oMA Core'. The 'Standard Core' does not confine MAs and LLFPs in the core, and a 5 w/o-MA Rom LWR is loaded in the '5 w/oMA Core'. Through this comparison between 'Equilibrium Core' and the others, the specific characters of the 'Equilibrium Core' are investigated. In order to realize the 'Equilibrium Core' in the viewpoint of nuclear properties, whether the conventional design concept of fast reactors must be changed or not is also evaluated. The analyses for the nitride and metallic fuel cores are also performed because of their different nuclear characteristics compared with the oxide fuel core. Assuming the separation of REs (Rare Earth elements) from MAs and the isotope separation of LLFPs, most of the nuclear properties for the 'Equilibrium Core' are not beyond those for the '5 w/oMA Core'. It is, therefore, possible to bring the 'Equilibrium Core' into existence without any drastic modification for the design concept of the typical oxide fuel fast reactors. Although the 15.1[w/o] LLFPs are loading in the core of the oxide fuel 'Equilibrium Core', a breeding ratio is more than 1.0 and the difference in a amount of plutonium between a charging and discharging is only 0.04 [ton/year]. Without any drastic change for the design concept of the conventional oxide fuel

  4. CFD analysis of core melt spreading on the reactor cavity floor using ANSYS CFX code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeon, Wan-Sik; Bang, Kwang-Hyun; Choi, Youngjo; Kim, Yong Soo; Lee, Jaegon

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Spreading of core melt on nuclear reactor cavity is calculated using ANSYS CFX. ► Thermal radiation and viscosity of liquid–solid mixture of the melt are modeled. ► The code is validated with FARO and VULCANO spreading experiments. ► Calculation of a full-scale cavity shows the spreading completes within a minute. - Abstract: In the very unlikely event of a severe reactor accident involving core melt and reactor pressure vessel failure, it is important to provide an accident management strategy that would allow the molten core material to cool down, resolidify and bring the core debris to a coolable state for Light Water Reactors (LWRs). One approach to achieve a coolable state is to quench the core melt after its relocation from the reactor pressure vessel into the reactor cavity. This approach typically requires a large cavity floor area on which a large amount of core melt spreads well and forms a shallow melt thickness for small thermal resistance across the melt pool. Spreading of high temperature (∼3000 K), low superheat (∼200 K) core melt over a wide cavity floor has been a key question to the success of the ex-vessel core coolability. A computational model for the melt spreading requires a multiphase treatment of liquid melt, solidified melt, and air. Also solidification and thermal radiation physics should be included. This paper reports the approach and computational model development to simulate core melt spreading on the reactor cavity using ANSYS-CFX code. Solidification and thermal radiation heat transfer were modeled in the code and analyses of the FARO and VULCANO spreading experiments have been carried out to check the validity of the model. The calculation of 100 tons of core melt spreading over the full scale reactor cavity (6 m × 16 m) showed that the melt spread was completed within a minute.

  5. Turbulence coefficients and stability studies for the coaxial flow or dissimiliar fluids. [gaseous core nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, H.; Lavan, Z.

    1975-01-01

    Analytical investigations of fluid dynamics problems of relevance to the gaseous core nuclear reactor program are presented. The vortex type flow which appears in the nuclear light bulb concept is analyzed along with the fluid flow in the fuel inlet region for the coaxial flow gaseous core nuclear reactor concept. The development of numerical methods for the solution of the Navier-Stokes equations for appropriate geometries is extended to the case of rotating flows and almost completes the gas core program requirements in this area. The investigations demonstrate that the conceptual design of the coaxial flow reactor needs further development.

  6. Technical Meeting on Liquid Metal Reactor Concepts: Core Design and Structural Materials. Working Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the TM on “Liquid metal reactor concept: core design and structural materials” was to present and discuss innovative liquid metal fast reactor (LMFR) core designs with special focus on the choice, development, testing and qualification of advanced reactor core structural materials. Main results arising from national and international R&D programmes and projects in the field were reviewed, and new activities to be carried out under the IAEA aegis were identified on the basis of the analysis of current research and technology gaps

  7. Adaptive control method for core power control in TRIGA Mark II reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabri Minhat, Mohd; Selamat, Hazlina; Subha, Nurul Adilla Mohd

    2018-01-01

    The 1MWth Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI (RTP) Mark II type has undergone more than 35 years of operation. The existing core power control uses feedback control algorithm (FCA). It is challenging to keep the core power stable at the desired value within acceptable error bands to meet the safety demand of RTP due to the sensitivity of nuclear research reactor operation. Currently, the system is not satisfied with power tracking performance and can be improved. Therefore, a new design core power control is very important to improve the current performance in tracking and regulate reactor power by control the movement of control rods. In this paper, the adaptive controller and focus on Model Reference Adaptive Control (MRAC) and Self-Tuning Control (STC) were applied to the control of the core power. The model for core power control was based on mathematical models of the reactor core, adaptive controller model, and control rods selection programming. The mathematical models of the reactor core were based on point kinetics model, thermal hydraulic models, and reactivity models. The adaptive control model was presented using Lyapunov method to ensure stable close loop system and STC Generalised Minimum Variance (GMV) Controller was not necessary to know the exact plant transfer function in designing the core power control. The performance between proposed adaptive control and FCA will be compared via computer simulation and analysed the simulation results manifest the effectiveness and the good performance of the proposed control method for core power control.

  8. Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyama, Masahiro; Kasai, Shigeo.

    1978-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a lmfbr type reactor wherein effusion of coolants through a loop contact portion is reduced even when fuel assemblies float up, and misloading of reactor core constituting elements is prevented thereby improving the reactor safety. Constitution: The reactor core constituents are secured in the reactor by utilizing the differential pressure between the high-pressure cooling chamber and low-pressure cooling chamber. A resistance port is formed at the upper part of a connecting pipe, and which is connect the low-pressure cooling chamber and the lower surface of the reactor core constituent. This resistance part is formed such that the internal sectional area of the connecting pipe is made larger stepwise toward the upper part, and the cylinder is formed larger so that it profiles the inner surface of the connecting pipe. (Aizawa, K.)

  9. Three dimensional thermal hydraulic characteristic analysis of reactor core based on porous media method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Ronghua; Tian, Maolin; Chen, Sen; Tian, Wenxi; Su, G.H.; Qiu, Suizheng

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • This study constructed a full CFD model for the RPV of a PWR. • The reactor core was simplified using the porous model in CFX. • The CFX simulation result was in good agreement with the scaled test and design values. • The analysis of the SGTR accident was performed. - Abstract: Thermal-hydraulic performance in the reactor core was an essential factor in the nuclear power plant design. In this study, we analyzed the three-dimensional (3-D) thermal-hydraulic characteristic of reactor core based on porous media method. Firstly, a 3-D rector pressure vessel (RPV) model was built, including the inlet leg nozzle, downcomer, lower plenum, reactor core, upper plenum and outlet leg nozzle. Porous media model was used to simplify the reactor core and upper plenum. The commercial CFD code ANSYS CFX was employed to solve the governing equations and provide the 3-D local velocity, temperature and pressure field. After appropriate parameters and turbulent model being carefully selected, the simulation was validated against the 1:5 scaled steady-state hydraulic test. The predicted hydraulic parameters (normalized flowrate distribution and pressure drop) were in good agreement with the test results. And the predicted thermal parameters agreed well with the designed values. The validation indicated that this method was practicable in analyzing the 3-D thermal-hydraulic phenomena in the RPV. Finally, the thermal-hydraulic features in reactor core were analyzed under the condition of the Steam Generator Tube Rupture (SGTR) accident. The simulation results showed that the coolant temperature increased gradually from the center to the periphery in the reactor core in the accident. But the temperature decreased to safety level rapidly after the reactor shutdown and safety injection operation. The reactor core could keep in a safe state if appropriate safety operations were performed after accidents.

  10. Core design studies for a 1000 MW{sub th} Advanced Burner Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T.K. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)], E-mail: tkkim@anl.gov; Yang, W.S.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R.N. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-04-15

    This paper describes the core design and performance characteristics of 1000 MW{sub th} Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts with a wide range of TRU conversion ratio. Using ternary metal alloy and mixed oxide fuels, reference core designs of a medium TRU conversion ratio of {approx}0.7 were developed by trade-off between burnup reactivity loss and TRU conversion ratio. Based on these reference core concepts, TRU burner cores with low and high TRU conversion ratios were developed by changing the intra-assembly design parameters and core configurations. Reactor performance characteristics were evaluated in detail, including equilibrium cycle core performances, reactivity feedback coefficients, and shutdown margins. The results showed that by employing different assembly designs, a wide range of TRU conversion ratios from {approx}0.2 to break-even can be achieved within the same core without introducing significant performance and safety penalties.

  11. Core design studies for a 1000 MW{sub th} advanced burner reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Grandy, C.; Hill, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-04-01

    This paper describes the core design and performance characteristics of 1000 MW{sub th} Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) core concepts with a wide range of TRU conversion ratio. Using ternary metal alloy and mixed oxide fuels, reference core designs of a medium TRU conversion ratio of {approx}0.7 were developed by trade-off between burnup reactivity loss and TRU conversion ratio. Based on these reference core concepts, TRU burner cores with low and high TRU conversion ratios were developed by changing the intra-assembly design parameters and core configurations. Reactor performance characteristics were evaluated in detail, including equilibrium cycle core performances, reactivity feedback coefficients, and shutdown margins. The results showed that by employing different assembly designs, a wide range of TRU conversion ratios from {approx}0.2 to break-even can be achieved within the same core without introducing significant performance and safety penalties.

  12. In-core fuel management for the course on operational physics of power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    The heart of a nuclear power station is the reactor core producing power from the fissioning of uranium or plutonium fuel. Expertise in many different technical fields is required to provide fuel for continuous economical operation of a nuclear power plant. In general, these various technical disciplines can be dichotomized into ''Out-of-core'' and ''In-core'' fuel management. In-core fuel management is concerned, as the name implies, with the reactor core itself. It entails calculating the core reactivity, power distribution, and isotopic inventory for the first and subsequent cores of a nuclear power plant to maintain adequate safety margins and operating lifetime for each core. In addition, the selection of reloading schemes is made to minimize energy costs

  13. Fast spectrum space reactor sizing code for calandria-type cores (CORSCO Code)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Eugene R.; Villalobos, Antonio

    1991-01-01

    The CORSCO code rapidly sizes reactor cores that have calandria-type geometry. The fuel configuration modeled is a large ceramic zone that contains numerous small cylindrical coolant channels spaced apart with a triangular pitch. A minimum reactor weight is obtained for a fixed set of constraints (peak fuel temperature, peak coolant velocity, etc.) by obtaining a unique solution to a set of five thermal/hydraulic equations, as well as a required excess reactivity which is specified by a core size dependent one-group criticality expression. Typical results are shown for a W-Re/UN cermet-fueled, lithium-cooled space reactor over a power range of 25 to 100 MWt. Reactor sensitivity coefficients are also shown for changes in reactor weight and number of coolant channels due to changes in core thermal/hydraulic constraints.

  14. Conceptual design for the superconducting magnet system of a pulsed DEMO reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchateau, J.-L., E-mail: jean-luc.duchateau@cea.fr [CEA/IRFM, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France); Hertout, P.; Saoutic, B.; Magaud, P.; Artaud, J.-F.; Giruzzi, G.; Bucalossi, J.; Johner, J.; Sardain, P.; Imbeaux, F.; Ané, J.-M.; Li-Puma, A. [CEA/IRFM, 13108 St. Paul lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► A 1D design approach of a pulsed DEMO reactor is presented. ► The main CS and TF conductor design criteria are presented. ► A typical major radius for a 2 GW DEMO is 9 m. ► A typical plasma magnetic field is 4.9 T. ► The pulse duration is 1.85 h for an aspect ratio of 3. -- Abstract: A methodology has been developed to consistently investigate, taking into account main reactor components, possible magnet solutions for a pulsed fusion reactor aiming at a large solenoid flux swing duration within the 2–3 h range. In a conceptual approach, investigations are carried out in the equatorial plane, taking into account the radial extension of the blanket-shielding zone, of the toroidal field magnet system inner leg and of the central solenoid for estimation of the pulsed swing. Design criteria are presented for the radial extension of the superconducting magnets, which is mostly driven by the structures (casings and conductor jacket). Typical available cable current densities are presented as a function of the magnetic field and of the temperature margin. The magnet design criteria have been integrated into SYCOMORE, a code for reactor modeling presently in development at CEA/IRFM in Cadarache, using the tools of the EFDA Integrated Tokamak Modeling task force. Possible solutions are investigated for a 2 GW fusion power reactor with different aspect ratios. The final adjustment of the DEMO pulsed reactor parameters will have to be consistently done, considering all reactor components, when the final goals of the machine will be completely clarified.

  15. Termination of light-water reactor core-melt accidents with a chemical core catcher: the core-melt source reduction system (COMSORS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.; Parker, G.W.; Rudolph, J.C.; Osborne-Lee, I.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kenton, M.A. [Dames and Moore, Westmont, IL (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The Core-Melt Source Reduction System (COMSORS) is a new approach to terminate light-water reactor core melt accidents and ensure containment integrity. A special dissolution glass is placed under the reactor vessel. If core debris is released onto the glass, the glass melts and the debris dissolves into the molten glass, thus creating a homogeneous molten glass. The molten glass, with dissolved core debris, spreads into a wide pool, distributing the heat for removal by radiation to the reactor cavity above or by transfer to water on top of the molten glass. Expected equilibrium glass temperatures are approximately 600 degrees C. The creation of a low-temperature, homogeneous molten glass with known geometry permits cooling of the glass without threatening containment integrity. This report describes the technology, initial experiments to measure key glass properties, and modeling of COMSORS operations.

  16. An overview of the Indian program related to fast reactor core mechanical behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Govindarajan, S.; Bhoje, S.B.; Paranjpe, S.R.

    1984-01-01

    This Indian review paper presents the evolution of the fast breeder program which began with fast breeder test reactor (FBTR) commencing in 1972. The state-of-art in the field of core mechanical behaviour is reviewed

  17. LOGOS. HX: a core simulator for high conversion boiling water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuiki, Makoto; Sakurada, Koichi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki.

    1988-01-01

    A three-dimensional physics simulator 'LOGOS. HX' has been developed for the designing analysis of high conversion boiling water reactor (HCBWR) cores. Its functions, calculational methods, and verification results will briefly be discussed. (author)

  18. EDF's PWR power plants: anomalies concerning the reactor core instrumentation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-10-01

    This report presents the problems of fatigue and leaks found on the internal core instrumentation thimbles of several French PWR power plants, as also the solutions chosen according the reactor has already or not been operating [fr

  19. Vibration and acoustic noise emitted by dry-type air-core reactors under PWM voltage excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingsong; Wang, Shanming; Hong, Jianfeng; Yang, Zhanlu; Jiang, Shengqian; Xia, Shichong

    2018-05-01

    According to coupling way between the magnetic field and the structural order, structure mode is discussed by engaging finite element (FE) method and both natural frequency and modal shape for a dry-type air-core reactor (DAR) are obtained in this paper. On the basis of harmonic response analysis, electromagnetic force under PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) voltage excitation is mapped with the structure mesh, the vibration spectrum is gained and the consequences represents that the whole structure vibration predominates in the radial direction, with less axial vibration. Referring to the test standard of reactor noise, the rules of emitted noise of the DAR are measured and analyzed at chosen switching frequency matches the sample resonant frequency and the methods of active vibration and noise reduction are put forward. Finally, the low acoustic noise emission of a prototype DAR is verified by measurement.

  20. Thermal-Hydraulics analysis of pressurized water reactor core by using single heated channel model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Akbari

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal hydraulics of nuclear reactor as a basis of reactor safety has a very important role in reactor design and control. The thermal-hydraulic analysis provides input data to the reactor-physics analysis, whereas the latter gives information about the distribution of heat sources, which is needed to perform the thermal-hydraulic analysis. In this study single heated channel model as a very fast model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of pressurized water reactor core has been developed. For verifying the results of this model, we used RELAP5 code as US nuclear regulatory approved thermal hydraulics code. The results of developed single heated channel model have been checked with RELAP5 results for WWER-1000. This comparison shows the capability of single heated channel model for predicting thermal hydraulics behavior of reactor core.

  1. An analysis of reactor structural response to fuel sodium interaction in a hypothetical core disruptive accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, K.; Tashiro, M.; Sasanuma, K.; Nagashima, K.

    1976-01-01

    This study shows the effect of constraints around FSI zone on FSI phenomena and deformations of reactor structures. SUGAR-PISCES code system has been developed to evaluate the phenomena of FSI and the response of reactor structure. SUGAR calculates the phenomena of FSI. PISCES, developed by Physics International Company in U.S.A., calculates the dynamic response of reactor structure in two-dimensional, time-dependent finite-difference Lagrangian model. The results show that the peak pressure and energy by FSI and the deformation of reactor structures are about twice in case of FSI zone surrounding by blanket than by coolant. The FSI phenomena highly depend on the reactor structure and the realistic configuration around core must be considered for analyzing hypothetical core disruptive accident. This work was supported by a grant from Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. (auth.)

  2. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles

  3. Comparative study of pulsed and steady-state tokamak reactor burn cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.A.; Brooks, J.N.; Cha, Y.; Evans, K.; Hassanein, A.M.; Kim, S.; Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.

    1984-05-01

    Four distinct operating modes have been proposed for tokamaks. Our study focuses on capital costs and lifetime limitations of reactor subsystems in an attempt to quantify sensitivity to pulsed operation. Major problem areas considered include: thermal fatigue on first wall, limiter/divertor; thermal energy storage; fatigue in pulsed poloidal field coils; out-of-plant fatigue and eddy current heating in toroidal field coils; electric power supply costs; and noninductive driver costs. We assume a high availability and low cost of energy will be mandatory for a commercial fusion reactor, and we characterize improvements in physics and engineering which will help achieve these goals for different burn cycles.

  4. Development of Core Design Model for Small-Sized Research Reactor and Establishment of Infrastructure for Reactor Export

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, M. H.; Win, Naing; Lim, J. Y.

    2007-02-01

    Within 10 years a growing world-wide demand of new research reactor construction is expected because of obsolescence. In Korea, a new research reactor is also required in order to meet domestic demand of utilization. KAERI has been devoted to develop an export-oriented research reactors for these kinds of demand. A next generation research reactor should comply with general requirements for safety, economics, environment-friendliness and non-proliferation as well as high performance requirement of high flux level. A export-tailored reactor should be developed for the demand of developing counties or under-developed countries. A new design concept is to be developed for a long cycle length core which has excellent irradiation facility with high flux

  5. Development and study of a control and reactor shutdown device for FBR-type reactors with a modified open core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, S.

    1983-01-01

    The doctoral thesis at hand presents a newly designed control and shutdown device to be used for output control and fast shutdown of modified open core FBR-type reactors. The task was the design of a new control and shutdown device having economic and operation advantages, using reactor components time-tested under reactor conditions. This control and shutdown device was adapted to the specific needs concerning dimensions and design. The actuation is based on the magnetic-jack principle, which has been upgraded for the purpose. The principle is now combined with pneumatic acceleration. The improvements mainly concern a smaller number of piece parts and system simplification. (orig./RW) [de

  6. Safety and core design of large liquid-metal cooled fast breeder reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qvist, Staffan Alexander

    In light of the scientific evidence for changes in the climate caused by greenhouse-gas emissions from human activities, the world is in ever more desperate need of new, inexhaustible, safe and clean primary energy sources. A viable solution to this problem is the widespread adoption of nuclear breeder reactor technology. Innovative breeder reactor concepts using liquid-metal coolants such as sodium or lead will be able to utilize the waste produced by the current light water reactor fuel cycle to power the entire world for several centuries to come. Breed & burn (B&B) type fast reactor cores can unlock the energy potential of readily available fertile material such as depleted uranium without the need for chemical reprocessing. Using B&B technology, nuclear waste generation, uranium mining needs and proliferation concerns can be greatly reduced, and after a transitional period, enrichment facilities may no longer be needed. In this dissertation, new passively operating safety systems for fast reactors cores are presented. New analysis and optimization methods for B&B core design have been developed, along with a comprehensive computer code that couples neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and structural mechanics and enables a completely automated and optimized fast reactor core design process. In addition, an experiment that expands the knowledge-base of corrosion issues of lead-based coolants in nuclear reactors was designed and built. The motivation behind the work presented in this thesis is to help facilitate the widespread adoption of safe and efficient fast reactor technology.

  7. A Design Study on Experimental Power Reactor Core Fueled with UO2 CFP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz, Ferhat; Rivai, Abu Khalid

    2003-01-01

    A neutronic study on core design of a 300 MWt EPR was performed. In this study the use of 4.8% enriched UO 2 coated fuel particle was analyzed. The design was then compared to 5% enriched UO 2 pin fueled EPR based on existing PWRs. Both reactors are operated with single batch refueling system with a cycle length of 3 years. The core physics parameters analyzed were : effective multiplication factor in a cycle, flux distributions and cycle burnup. The results of calculation showed that the core effective multiplication factor for reactor with fuel compact can be maintained at 1.2841 at beginning of cycle (BOC) and 1.0060 at end of cycle (EOC). As for the UO 2 pin fueled reactor, the effective multiplication factor was 1.1927 at BOC and 1.0514 at EOC. The size of active core for the CFP fueled reactor were 320 cm in height and 320 cm in diameter. As for pin fueled reactor, the height was 200 cm and diameter was 180 cm. The results of calculations showed that neutron flux distribution was quite flat for both types of reactor designs, although the volume of CFP fueled reactor was 5 times as big as the pin fueled reactor

  8. Development of Structural Core Components for Breeder Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2013-01-01

    Core structural materials: • The desire is to have only fuel in the core, structural material form 25% of the total core: – To support and to retain the fuel in position; – Provide necessary ducts to make coolant flow through & transfer/remove heat. • For 500 MWe FBR with Oxide fuel (Peak Linear Power 450 W/cm), total fuel pins required in the core are of the order 39277 pins (both inner & outer core Fuel SA); • Considering 217 pins/Fuel SA there are 181 Fuel SA wrapper tubes • These structural materials see hostile core with max temperature and neutron flux

  9. Experimental detailed power distribution in a fast spectrum thermionic reactor fuel element at the core/BeO reflector interface region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, P. G.; Lantz, E.

    1973-01-01

    A zero-power critical assembly was designed, constructed, and operated for the prupose of conducting a series of benchmark experiments dealing with the physics characteristics of a UN-fueled, Li-7-cooled, Mo-reflected, drum-controlled compact fast reactor for use with a space-power conversion system. The critical assembly was modified to simulate a fast spectrum advanced thermionics reactor by: (1) using BeO as a reflector in place of some of the existing molybdenum, (2) substituting Nb-1Zr tubing for some of the existing Ta tubing, and (3) inserting four full-scale mockups of thermionic type fuel elements near the core and BeO reflector boundary. These mockups were surrounded with a buffer zone having the equivalent thermionic core composition. In addition to measuring the critical mass of this thermionic configuration, a detailed power distribution in one of the thermionic element stages in the mixed spectrum region was measured. A power peak to average ratio of two was observed for this fuel stage at the midplane of the core and adjacent to the reflector. Also, the power on the outer surface adjacent to the BeO was slightly more than a factor of two larger than the power on the inside surface of a 5.08 cm (2.0 in.) high annular fuel segment with a 2.52 cm (0.993 in. ) o.d. and a 1.86 cm (0.731 in.) i.d.

  10. LMFBR core design codes based on experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumaoka, Yoshio; Aoki, Katsutada; Kawashima, Masatoshi.

    1982-01-01

    In order to design the core for a 1,000-MWe-class fast breeder reactor, many kinds of computer codes as design tools are needed for analyzing the multicore components, mechanical behavior, nuclear performance and the thermal hydraulic performance of the core, and for designing the fuel. To meet these needs, Toshiba has endeavored for many years to develop highly reliable computer codes for core design, some of which are described in this article, and to continue their improvement by verifying them with actual fast reactor operation data. Above all, a series of nuclear design codes named COSMOS was successfully applied to the core design of the Japanese experimental fast breeder reactor ''JOYO'', and the excellent agreement between designed values and actual measured data has concluded that Toshiba's nuclear design codes are very useful for application to future large core design. (author)

  11. Survey of Dust Production in Pebble Bed Reactors Cores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshua J. Cogliati; Abderafi M. Ougouag; Javier Ortensi

    2011-06-01

    Graphite dust produced via mechanical wear from the pebbles in a pebble bed reactor is an area of concern for licensing. Both the German pebble bed reactors produced graphite dust that contained activated elements. These activation products constitute an additional source term of radiation and must be taken under consideration during the conduct of accident analysis of the design. This paper discusses the available literature on graphite dust production and measurements in pebble bed reactors. Limited data is available on the graphite dust produced from the AVR and THTR-300 pebble bed reactors. Experiments that have been performed on wear of graphite in pebble-bed-like conditions are reviewed. The calculation of contact forces, which are a key driving mechanism for dust in the reactor, are also included. In addition, prior graphite dust predictions are examined, and future areas of research are identified.

  12. Pebble Bed Reactor: core physics and fuel cycle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Worley, B.A.

    1979-10-01

    The Pebble Bed Reactor is a gas-cooled, graphite-moderated high-temperature reactor that is continuously fueled with small spherical fuel elements. The projected performance was studied over a broad range of reactor applicability. Calculations were done for a burner on a throwaway cycle, a converter with recycle, a prebreeder and breeder. The thorium fuel cycle was considered using low, medium (denatured), and highly enriched uranium. The base calculations were carried out for electrical energy generation in a 1200 MW/sub e/ plant. A steady-state, continuous-fueling model was developed and one- and two-dimensional calculations were used to characterize performance. Treating a single point in time effects considerable savings in computer time as opposed to following a long reactor history, permitting evaluation of reactor performance over a broad range of design parameters and operating modes.

  13. Estimation of power feedback parameters of pulse reactor IBR-2M on transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepyolyshev, Yu.N.; Popov, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    Parameters of the IBR-2M reactor power feedback (PFB) on a model of the reactor dynamics by mathematical treatment of two registered transients are estimated. Frequency characteristics and the pulse transient characteristics corresponding to these PFB parameters are calculated. PFB parameters received thus can be considered as their express tentative estimation as real measurements in this case occupy no more than 30 minutes. Total PFB is negative at 1 and 2 MW. At the received estimations of PFB parameters in a self-regulation mode it is possible to consider the stability margins of the IBR-2M reactor satisfactory

  14. Reactor core design calculations and fuel management in PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.

    1987-01-01

    Computer programs and methods developed at J. Stefan Institute for nuclear core design of Krsko NPP are treated. development, scope, verification and organisation of core design procedure are presented. The core design procedure is applicable to any NPP of PWR type. (author)

  15. Development of special welding processes for in-core components in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setty, D.S.; Kalyanakrishnan, G.; Saibaba, N.

    2016-01-01

    India has designed its three-stage nuclear power program based on domestic limited resources of uranium and vast availability of thorium, where natural and enriched uranium-dioxide fuel is utilized in Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR) and Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) respectively in the first stage. Plutonium based fuels are implemented for Fast Breeder Reactors (FBR) in the second stage and thorium based fuels are to be utilized using indigenously developed reactors in the third stage. Considering the harsh reactor operating conditions like high temperature and pressure and neutron flux, in-core components used in the above reactors are to be manufactured with different critical materials like Zirconium alloys, Special SS materials, ODS etc. Welding the best joining technique used for joining in-core components, and can perform satisfactorily in the reactors. The welding processes used in nuclear applications have to conform to stringent quality requirements to achieve zero failures rate. In view of the stringent weld quality requirements and amenable for automation various weld joint designs and welding processes were selected for fabrication of in-core components such as Resistance Welding, Tungsten Inert Gas welding and Electron Beam Welding. In this paper, overview is given for all the major welding processes used and its specific applications for fabrication of in-core components used in nuclear reactors. The welding process intricacies are explained and weld quality evaluation techniques are briefly brought out. The joint design modifications and improvements achieved with respect to welding operations over decades of reactor operating experiences are also explained, which helped in reducing fuel and in-core structural components failures for Indian nuclear reactors. (author)

  16. Subcutaneous granuloma annulare: radiologic appearance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kransdorf, M.J.; Murphey, M.D.; Temple, H.T.

    1998-01-01

    Objective. Granuloma annulare is an uncommon benign inflammatory dermatosis characterized by the formation of dermal papules with a tendency to form rings. There are several clinically distinct forms. The subcutaneous form is the most frequently encountered by radiologists, with the lesion presenting as a superficial mass. There are only a few scattered reports of the imaging appearance of this entity in the literature. We report the radiologic appearance of five cases of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. Design and patients. The radiologic images of five patients (three male, two female) with subcutaneous granuloma annulare were retrospectively studied. Mean patient age was 6.4 years (range, 2-13 years). The lesions occurred in the lower leg (two), foot, forearm, and hand. MR images were available for all lesions, gadolinium-enhanced imaging in three cases, radiographs in four, and bone scintigraphy in one. Results. Radiographs showed unmineralized nodular masses localized to the subcutaneous adipose tissue. The size range, in greatest dimension on imaging studies, was 1-4 cm. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences, with variable but generally relatively well defined margins. There was extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Conclusion. The radiologic appearance of subcutaneous granuloma annulare is characteristic, typically demonstrating a nodular soft-tissue mass involving the subcutaneous adipose tissue. MR images show a mass with relatively decreased signal intensity on all pulse sequences and variable but generally well defined margins. There is extensive diffuse enhancement following gadolinium administration. Radiographs show a soft-tissue mass or soft-tissue swelling without evidence of bone involvement or mineralization. This radiologic appearance in a young individual is highly suggestive of subcutaneous granuloma annulare. (orig.)

  17. Improvement of pulsing operation performance in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayasi, S.; Ishijima, K.; Tanzawa, S.; Fujishiro, T.; Horiki, O.

    1990-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Research Reactor (NSRR) is one of the TRIGA-type research reactors widely used in the world, and has mainly been used for studying reactor fuel behaviour during postulated reactivity-initiated accidents (RIAs). Its limited pulsing operation capability, however, could produce only a power burst from low power level simulating an RIA event from essentially zero power level. A computerized automatic reactor control system was developed and installed in the NSRR to simulate a wide range of abnormal events in nuclear power plants. This digitalized reactor control system requires no manipulation of the control rods by reactor operators during the course of the pulsing operation. Using this fully automated operation system, a variety of power transients such as power ramping, power bursts from high power level, and so on were made possible with excellent stability and safety. The present modification work in the NSRR and its fruitful results indicate new possibilities in the utilization of the TRIGA type research reactor

  18. CALANDRIA TYPE SODIUM GRAPHITE REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R.M.; Mahlmeister, J.E.; Vaughn, N.E.; Sanders, W.J.; Williams, A.C.

    1964-02-11

    A sodium graphite power reactor in which the unclad graphite moderator and fuel elements are contained within a core tank is described. The core tank is submersed in sodium within the reactor vessel. Extending longitudinally through the core thnk are process tubes with fuel elements positioned therein. A bellows sealing means allows axial expansion and construction of the tubes. Within the core tank, a leakage plenum is located below the graphite, and above the graphite is a gas space. A vent line regulates the gas pressure in the space, and another line removes sodium from the plenum. The sodium coolant flows from the lower reactor vessel through the annular space between the fuel elements and process tubes and out into the reactor vessel space above the core tank. From there, the heated coolant is drawn off through an outlet line and sent to the heat exchange. (AEC)

  19. A compact, high-voltage pulsed charging system based on an air-core pulse transformer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianyang; Chen, Dongqun; Liu, Jinliang; Liu, Chebo; Yin, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Charging systems of pulsed power generators on mobile platforms are expected to be compact and provide high pulsed power, high voltage output, and high repetition rate. In this paper, a high-voltage pulsed charging system with the aforementioned characteristics is introduced, which can be applied to charge a high-voltage load capacitor. The operating principle of the system and the technical details of the components in the system are described in this paper. The experimental results show that a 600 nF load capacitor can be charged to 60 kV at 10 Hz by the high-voltage pulsed charging system for a burst of 0.5 s. The weight and volume of the system are 60 kg and 600 × 500 × 380 mm(3), respectively.

  20. Experimental study of the APR+ reactor core flow and pressure distributions under 4-pump running conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kihwan, E-mail: kihwankim@kaeri.re.kr; Euh, Dong-Jin; Chu, In-Cheol; Youn, Young-Jung; Choi, Hae-Seob; Kwon, Tae-Soon, E-mail: tskwon@kaeri.re.kr

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • Experimental facility with a 1/5 scale was designed to perform various hydraulic tests of an APR+ reactor. • Two kinds of experiments, balanced and unbalanced flows under 4-pump running conditions were carried out. • The core inlet flow rates and exit pressure distributions were measured and analyzed at 257 discrete points. • The coolant mixing characteristics were investigated with the sectional pressure loss coefficients. - Abstract: The core inlet flow rates and exit pressure distributions of an APR+ (Advanced Power Reactor Plus) reactor were evaluated experimentally with the ACOP (APR+ Core Flow and Pressure) test facility. The ACOP test facility was constructed with a linear reduced scale of 1/5 referring to the APR+ reactor. The major flow path from the clod leg to hot leg was preserved with a principle of similarity. The core region was simulated using 257 core simulators, which are representative of the real HIPER fuel assemblies that APR+ reactor adopted. The core inlet flow rates and pressure distributions along the main flow path, which are significant information as an input data to evaluate the core thermal margin and reactor safety, were obtained by differential pressures measured at core simulators representing 257 fuel assemblies, and the static or differential pressures at 584 points, respectively. Two kinds of experiments, 4-pump balanced and unbalanced flow conditions, were conducted to examine the hydraulic characteristics of the reactor coolant flow. The mass balance and overall pressure drop were carefully examined to check the reliability of the obtained values. The inlet flow rates of the two test results showed similar distributions, which met the hydraulic performance requirement. The details of these experiments, the facility, and a data analysis are also described in this paper.

  1. An Idea of 20% test of the Initial Core Reactor Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roh, Kyung Ho; Yang, Sung Tae; Jung, Ji Eun

    2012-01-01

    Many tests have been performed on the OPR1000 and APR1400 before commercial operation. Some of these tests were performed at reactor power levels of 20% and 50%. The CPC (Core Protection Calculator) power distribution test is one of these tests. It is performed to assure the reliability of the Core Protection Calculator System (CPCS). Through this test, SAM1 is calculated using the snapshots2. The test takes about nine hours at a reactor power level of 20% and about thirty hours at a reactor power level of 50%. SAM used at each reactor power level is as follows: 1. Reactor power of 0% ∼ 20%: Designed SAM (DSAM) 2. Reactor power of 20% ∼ 50%: SAM calculated (C-SAM) at a reactor power of 20% 3. Reactor power 50% ∼ End of Cycle : SAM calculated at a reactor power of 50% As mentioned earlier, SAM is calculated and punched into CPC to assure the reliability of CPCS. Therefore, CPC is operated having penalties with D-SAM until3 reaching a reactor power of 20%. That is, the penalty of CPC will be removed when SAM is calculated and punched into the CPC at a reactor power of 20%. But these penalties are considered to be removed after a reactor power of 50% test in order to maintain the conservatism of the CPC. This is done because the final values calculated using C-SAM, in contrast to those calculated using SAM, a reactor power of 50%, are not correct. This paper began from an idea, 'If so, what would happen if we removed the CPC power distribution test at a reactor power of 20%?'

  2. Analysis of core meltdown accidents and containment performance in the Super Phenix reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaffres, R.; Natta, M.

    1987-12-01

    In spite of the feeble probability of core meltdown the Super Phenix containment has been conceived for a mechanical energy of 800 MJ. The studies on core meltdown show that this energy is envelop for the different accidents studied and that the post accidental cooling for the reactor is realized [fr

  3. Engineering review of the core support structure of the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-09-01

    The review of the core support structure of the gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) covered such areas as the design criteria, the design and analysis of the concepts, the development plan, and the projected manufacturing costs. Recommendations are provided to establish a basis for future work on the GCFR core support structure

  4. Seismic responses of N-Reactor core. Independent review of Phase II work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.C.; Lo, T.; Chinn, D.J.; Murray, R.C.; Johnson, J.J.; Maslenikov, O.R.

    1985-08-01

    Seismic response of the N-Reactor core was independently analyzed to validate the results of Impell's analysis. The analysis procedure consists of two major stages: linear soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis of the overall N-Reactor structure complex and nonlinear dynamic analysis of the reactor core. In the SSI analysis, CLASSI computer codes were used to calculate the SSI response of the structures and to generate the input motions for the nonlinear reactor core analysis. In addition, the response was compared to the response from the SASSI analysis under review. The impact of foundation modeling techniques and the effect of soil stiffness variation on SSI response were also investigated. In the core analysis, a nonlinear dynamic analysis model was developed. The stiffness representation of the model was calculated through a finite element analysis of several local core geometries. Finite element analyses were also used to study the block to block interaction characteristics. Using this nonlinear dynamic model along with the basemat time histories generated from CLASSI and SASSI, several dynamic analyses of the core were performed. A series of sensitivity studies was performed to investigate the discretization of the core, the effect of vertical acceleration, the effect of basemat rocking, and modeling assumptions. In general, our independent analysis of core response validates the order of magnitude of the displacement calculated by Impell. 11 refs., 110 figs., 12 tabs

  5. Engineering review of the core support structure of the Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-09-01

    The review of the core support structure of the gas cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) covered such areas as the design criteria, the design and analysis of the concepts, the development plan, and the projected manufacturing costs. Recommendations are provided to establish a basis for future work on the GCFR core support structure.

  6. Recent Development of Radioanalytical Methods at the IBR-2 Pulsed Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazarov, V.M.; Peresedov, V.F.

    1994-01-01

    Experience in the application of radioanalytical methods, including NAA, at the IBR-2 pulsed fast reactor is reviewed. Details of the instruments dedicated to neutron activation analysis and radiography studies are reported. Applications of resonance neutrons to environmental monitoring and to the investigation of high-purity materials, are examplified. 15 refs. 9 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Research progress and recommendations on reactor pressure vessel integrity under hypothetical core melt down accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Yangui; Ning Dong; Wu Zhiwei; Cao Ming; Xie Yongcheng; He Yinbiao; Yao Weida

    2013-01-01

    Background: It is very important to ensure the integrity of the reactor pressure vessel under core melt down accident. The high-temperature creep failure is the main failure mode of the reactor pressure vessel under core melt down accident. Purpose: This paper is to present an overview of research status and progress on high-temperature creep behavior of reactor pressure vessel considering the hypothetical core melt down scenario. Methods: Emphasis is placed on accomplished achievements in creep tests, scale model experiments and numerical simulation, and the domestic newly research productions on high-temperature creep behavior of reactor pressure vessel structure integrity. Conclusions: This paper also discusses the limitations of existing researches and indicates future research directions, such as multi-axis tensile tests, analysis of three-dimensional coupling temperature field, scaled model tests, and so on. (authors)

  8. A design study of reactor core optimization for direct nuclear heat-to-electricity conversion in a space power reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu; Takahashi, Makoto; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Takeoka, Satoshi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan); Nakagawa, Masayuki; Kugo, Teruhiko

    1998-01-01

    To propose a new design concept of a nuclear reactor used in the space, research has been conducted on the conceptual design of a new nuclear reactor on the basis of the following three main concepts: (1) Thermionic generation by thermionic fuel elements (TFE), (2) reactivity control by rotary reflector, and (3) reactor cooling by liquid metal. The outcomes of the research are: (1) A calculation algorithm was derived for obtaining convergent conditions by repeating nuclear characteristic calculation and thermal flow characteristic calculation for the space nuclear reactor. (2) Use of this algorithm and the parametric study established that a space nuclear reactor using 97% enriched uranium nitride as the fuel and lithium as the coolant and having a core with a radius of about 25 cm, a height of about 50 cm and a generation efficiency of about 7% can probably be operated continuously for at least more than ten years at 100 kW only by reactivity control by rotary reflector. (3) A new CAD/CAE system was developed to assist design work to optimize the core characteristics of the space nuclear reactor comprehensively. It is composed of the integrated design support system VINDS using virtual reality and the distributed system WINDS to collaboratively support design work using Internet. (N.H.)

  9. Heat exchanger for reactor core and the like

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Jay S.; Kissinger, John A.

    1986-01-01

    A compact bayonet tube type heat exchanger which finds particular application as an auxiliary heat exchanger for transfer of heat from a reactor gas coolant to a secondary fluid medium. The heat exchanger is supported within a vertical cavity in a reactor vessel intersected by a reactor coolant passage at its upper end and having a reactor coolant return duct spaced below the inlet passage. The heat exchanger includes a plurality of relatively short length bayonet type heat exchange tube assemblies adapted to pass a secondary fluid medium therethrough and supported by primary and secondary tube sheets which are releasibly supported in a manner to facilitate removal and inspection of the bayonet tube assemblies from an access area below the heat exchanger. Inner and outer shrouds extend circumferentially of the tube assemblies and cause the reactor coolant to flow downwardly internally of the shrouds over the tube bundle and exit through the lower end of the inner shroud for passage to the return duct in the reactor vessel.

  10. Modelling of reactor control and protection systems in the core simulator program GARLIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beraha, D.; Lupas, O.; Ploegert, K.

    1984-01-01

    For analysis of the interaction between control and limitation systems and the power distribution in the reactor core, a valuable tool is provided by the joint simulation of the core and the interacting systems. To this purpose, the core simulator GARLIC has been enhanced by models of the systems for controlling and limiting the reactor power and the power distribution in the core as well as by modules for calculating safety related core parameters. The computer-based core protection system, first installed in the Grafenrheinfeld NPP, has been included in the simulation. In order to evaluate the accuracy of GARLIC-simulations, the code has been compared with a design code in the train of a verification phase. The report describes the program extensions and the results of the verification. (orig.) [de

  11. Core concept of fast power reactor with zero sodium void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matveev, V.I.; Chebeskov, A.N.; Krivitsky, I.Y.

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents a core concept of BN-800 - type fast power reactor with zero sodium void reactivity (SVR). Consideration is given to the layout-and some design features of such a core. Some considerations on the determination of the required SVR value as one of the fast reactor safety criteria in accidents with coolant boiling are presented. Some methodical considerations an the development of calculation models that give a correct description of the new core features are stated. The results of the integral SVR calculation studies are included. reactivity excursions under different scenarios of sodium boiling are estimated, some corrections into the calculated SVR value are discussed. (author)

  12. INCA: method of analyzing in-core detector data in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ober, T.G.; Terney, W.B.; Marks, G.H.

    1975-04-01

    A method (INCA) is described by which signals from fixed in-core detectors are related to estimates of the three dimensional power distribution in an operating reactor core and to the maximum linear heat rate in the core. A description of the large library of data accompanying the method is provided. A detailed examination of the analytical verifications performed using the method is presented, and a summary of the uncertainty associated with the method is given. The uncertainty assigned to the maximum linear heat rate inferred by the method from operating reactor data is found to be 5.8 percent at a 95/95 confidence level. (U.S.)

  13. Development of in-core measurements in the reactor KS-150

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, S.B.

    1977-01-01

    Mapping of the neutron flux density distribution and of the neutron fluence distribution in the KS-150 reactor core was carried out using an in-core measuring system. The system allows the in-service monitoring of important operating properties of the reactor core and fuel elements and consists of a mapping fuel element assembly with built-in SPN detectors, of transmission paths and a computer facility. The measurement of the neutron flux, neutron fluence and temperature fields in the reactor core was carried out during the power start-up of the reactor using self-powered DPZ-1 detectors. The obtained data are given and the axial distribution of neutron flux is graphically represented for different values of burnup at the same configuration of regulating rods, as is the axial distribution of neutron fluence for different configurations of the regulating rods during operation, and the in-service neutron fluence distribution. The maximal fuel temperature of 500.2 degC was found at a distance of 291.2 cm from the upper boundary of the reactor core, at a neutron flux of 1.46x10 14 n/cm 2 s. In comparison with other methods, this method proved easy and quick, the results reliable, reactivity perturbance negligible and the fuel element cost increase a negligible 4%. Neutron flux mapping using in-core self-powered detectors will be performed on a wider scale. (J.P./J.O.)

  14. Simulation an Accelerator driven Subcritical Reactor core with thorium fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirmohammadi, L.; Pazirandeh, A.

    2011-01-01

    The main purpose of this work is simulation An Accelerator driven Subcritical core with Thorium as a new generation nuclear fuel. In this design core , A subcritical core coupled to an accelerator with proton beam (E p =1 GeV) is simulated by MCNPX code .Although the main purpose of ADS systems are transmutation and use MA (Minor Actinides) as a nuclear fuel but another use of these systems are use thorium fuel. This simulated core has two fuel assembly type : (Th-U) and (U-Pu) . Consequence , Neutronic parameters related to ADS core are calculated. It has shown that Thorium fuel is use able in this core and less nuclear waste ,Although Iran has not Thorium reserves but study on Thorium fuel cycle can open a new horizontal in use nuclear energy as a clean energy and without nuclear waste

  15. Reactor physics data for safety analysis of CANFLEX-NU CANDU-6 core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Chang Joon; Suk, Ho Chun

    2001-08-01

    This report contains the reactor physics data for safety analysis of CANFLEX-NU fuel CANDU-6 core. First, the physics parameters for time-average core have been described, which include the channel power and maximum bundle power map, channel axial power shape and bundle burnup. And, next the data for fuel performance such as relative ring power distribution and bundle burnup conversion ratio are represented. The transition core data from 0 to 900 full power day are represented by 100 full power day interval. Also, the data for reactivity devices of time-average core and 300 full power day of transition core are given

  16. On the chemical constitution of a molten oxide core of a fast breeder reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodkin, D.J.; Potter, P.E.

    1980-01-01

    A knowledge of the chemical constitution of a molten oxide fast reactor core is of great importance in the assessment of heat transfer from a cooling molten pool of debris and in the selection of materials for the construction of sacrificial beds for core containment. In this paper we describe some thermodynamic assessments of the likely chemical constitution of a molten oxide core, and then support our assessments by experimental observations

  17. A system for obtaining an optimized pre design of nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    This work proposes a method for obtaing a first design of nuclear reactor cores. It takes into consideration the objectives of the project, physical limits, economical limits and the reactor safety. For this purpose, some simplifications were made in the reactor model: one-energy-group, unidimensional and homogeneous core. The adopted model represents a typical PWR core and the optimized parameters are the fuel thickness, refletor thickness, enrichement and moderating ratio. The objective is to gain a larger residual reactivity at the end of the cycle. This work also presents results for a PWR core. From the results, many conclusions are established: system efficiency, limitations and problems. Also some suggestions are proposed to improve the system performance for futures works. (author) [pt

  18. A system to obtain an optimized first design of a nuclear reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mai, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    This work proposes a method for obtaining a first design of nuclear reactor cores. It takes into consideration the objectives of the project, physical limits, economical limits and the reactor safety. For this purpose, some simplifications were made in the reactor model: one energy-group, one-dimensional and homogeneous core. The adopted model represents a typical PWR core and the optimized parameters are the fuel thickness, reflector thickness, enrichment and moderating ratio. The objective is to gain a larger residual reactivity at the end of the cycle. This work also presents results for a PWR core. From the results, many conclusions are established: system efficiency, limitations and problems. Also some suggestions are proposed to improve the system performance for future works. (autor)

  19. Preliminary design of a borax internal core-catcher for a gas cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Dorner, S.; Schumacher, G.

    1976-09-01

    Preliminary thermal calculations show that a core-catcher appears to be feasible, which is able to cope with the complete meltdown of the core and blankets of a 1,000 MWe GCFR. This core-catcher is based on borax (Na 2 B 4 O 7 ) as dissolving material of the oxide fuel and of the fission products occuring in oxide form. The borax is contained in steel boxes forming a 2.1 meter thick slab on the base of the reactor cavity inside the prestressed concrete reactor vessel, just underneath the reactor core. The fission products are dispersed in the pool formed by the liquid borax. The heat power density in the pool is conveniently reduced and the resulting heat fluxes at the borders of the pool can be safely carried away through the PCRV liner and its water cooling system. (orig.) [de

  20. University of Illinois nuclear pumped laser program. [experiments with a TRIGA pulsed reactor with a broad pulse and a low peak flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, G. H.

    1979-01-01

    The development of nuclear pumped lasers with improved efficiency, energy storage capability, and UF6 volume pumping is reviewed. Results of nuclear pumped laser experiments using a TRIGA-type pulsed reactor are outlined.

  1. The reactor core TRIGA Mark-III with fuels type 30/20; El nucleo del reactor TRIGA Mark-III con combustible tipo 30/20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar H, F., E-mail: fortunato.aguilar@inin.gob.mx [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    This work describes the calculation series carried out with the program MCNP5 in order to define the configuration of the reactor core with fuels 30/20 (fuels with 30% of uranium content in the Or-Zr-H mixture and a nominal enrichment of 20%). To select the configuration of the reactor core more appropriate to the necessities and future uses of the reactor, the following criterions were taken into account: a) the excess in the reactor reactivity, b) the switch out margin and c) to have new irradiation facilities inside the reactor core. Taking into account these criterions is proceeded to know the characteristics of the components that form the reactor core (dimensions, geometry, materials, densities and positions), was elaborated a base model of the reactor core, for the MCNP5 code, with a configuration composed by 85 fuel elements, 4 control bars and the corresponding structural elements. The high reactivity excess obtained with this model, gave the rule to realize other models of the reactor core in which the reactivity excess and the switch out margin were approximate to the values established in the technical specifications of the reactor operation. Several models were realized until finding the satisfactory model; this is composite for 74 fuels, 4 control bars and 6 additional experimental positions inside the reactor core. (Author)

  2. Annular Flow Distribution test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielpinski, A.L. (ed.) (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Childerson, M.T.; Knoll, K.E.; Manolescu, M.I.; Reed, M.J. (Babcock and Wilcox Co., Alliance, OH (United States). Research Center)

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the Babcock and Wilcox (B W) Annular Flow Distribution testing for the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The objective of the Annular Flow Distribution Test Program is to characterize the flow distribution between annular coolant channels for the Mark-22 fuel assembly with the bottom fitting insert (BFI) in place. Flow rate measurements for each annular channel were obtained by establishing hydraulic similarity'' between an instrumented fuel assembly with the BFI removed and a reference'' fuel assembly with the BFI installed. Empirical correlations of annular flow rates were generated for a range of boundary conditions.

  3. Annular Flow Distribution test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kielpinski, A.L.; Childerson, M.T.; Knoll, K.E.; Manolescu, M.I.; Reed, M.J.

    1990-12-01

    This report documents the Babcock and Wilcox (B ampersand W) Annular Flow Distribution testing for the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The objective of the Annular Flow Distribution Test Program is to characterize the flow distribution between annular coolant channels for the Mark-22 fuel assembly with the bottom fitting insert (BFI) in place. Flow rate measurements for each annular channel were obtained by establishing ''hydraulic similarity'' between an instrumented fuel assembly with the BFI removed and a ''reference'' fuel assembly with the BFI installed. Empirical correlations of annular flow rates were generated for a range of boundary conditions

  4. The development of ex-core neutron flux monitoring system for integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kwon, H. J.; Park, H. Y.; Koo, I. S.

    2004-12-01

    Due to the arrangement of major components within the reactor vessel, the integral reactor has relatively long distance between the core support barrel and the reactor vessel when compared with the currently operating plants. So, a neutron flux leakage at the ex-vessel represents a relatively low flux level which may generate some difficulties in obtaining a wide range of neutron flux information including the source range one. This fact may have an impact upon the design and fabrication of an ex-core neutron flux detector. Therefore, it is required to study neutron flux detectors that are suitable for the installation location and characteristics of an integral reactor. The physical constraints of an integral reactor should be considered when one designs and develops the ex-core neutron flux monitoring detectors and their systems. As a possible installation location of the integral reactor ex-core neutron flux detector assembly, two candidate locations are considered, that is, one is between the core support barrel and the reactor vessel and the other is within the Internal Shielding Tank(IST). And, for these locations, some factors such as the environmental requirements and geometrical restrictions are investigated In the case of considering the inside of the IST as a ex-core neutron flux detector installation position, an electrical insulation problem and a low neutron flux measurement problem arose and when considering the inside of the reactor vessel, a detector's sensitivity variation problem, an electrical insulation problem, a detector's insertion and withdrawal problem, and a high neutron flux measurement problem were encountered. Through a survey of the detector installation of the currently operating plants and detector manufacturer's products, the proposed structure and specifications of an ex-core neutron flux detector are suggested. And, the joint ownership strategy for a proposed detector model is also depicted. At the end, by studying the ex-core

  5. Conversion of methane to hydrogen by a pulsed plasma reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbanzadeh, A. M.; Matin, N.; Parandvar, M. R.; Rasouli, C.; Mazouchi, A. M.

    2003-01-01

    A pulsed atmospheric glow discharge, employing corona as a preionization, was used to convert methane to hydrogen and higher hydrocarbons. The experimental results showed that the overall conversion and specific energy, defined as energy needed to dissociate one mole methane, was mainly dependent on E/P, banking capacitance, repetition rate and flow rate. The dependence on E/P, especially, is more pronounced. The minimum specific energy was less than 1 MJ and it is expected that it could be further lowered by choosing higher E/P, lower banking capacitance and introducing an oxidizer to enhance the conversion efficiency

  6. A New In-core Production Method of Co-60 in CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Jinqi; Kim, Woosong; Kim, Yonghee [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Younwon [BEES Inc, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    This study introduces an innovative method for Co-60 production in the CANDU6 core. In this new scheme, the central fuel element is replaced by a Co-59 target and Co-60 is obtained after the fuel bundle is discharged. It has been shown that the new method can produce significantly higher amount of Co-60 than the conventional Co production method in CANDU6 reactors without compromising the fuel burnup by removing some (<50%) of the adjuster rods in the whole core. The coolant void reactivity is noticeably reduced when a Co-59 target is loaded into the central pin of the fuel bundle. Meanwhile, the peak power in a fuel bundle is just a little higher due to the central Co-59 target than in conventional CANDU6 fuel design. The basic technology for Co-60 producing was developed by MDS Nordion and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in 1946 and the same technology was adapted and applied in CANDU6 power reactors. The standard CANDU6 reactor has 21 adjuster rods which are fully inserted into the core during normal operation. The stainless steel adjuster rods are replaced with neutronically-equivalent Co-59 adjusters to produce Co-60. Nowadays, the roles of the adjuster rods are rather vague since nuclear reactors cannot be quickly restarted after a sudden reactor trip due to more stringent regulations. In some Canadian CANDU6 reactors, some or all the adjuster rods are removed from the core to maximize the uranium utilization.

  7. Core construction in a pressure tube type heavy water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueda, Makoto; Aoki, Katsutada.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To replace a centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit with a reactor controlling machinery to decrease a distance between the fuel assemblies thereby saving use of heavy water and enhancing economy. Structure: A centrally positioned fuel assembly of a fuel assembly unit, which is composed of a plurality of fuel assemblies orderly arranged in lattice fashion, is replaced with a reactor controlling members such as control rods, poison tubes and the like to provide an arrangement of lattice-free type fuel assembly, thus reducing the pitch as small as possible. (Kamimura, M.)

  8. Review on Application of Control Algorithms to Power Regulations of Reactor Cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Gang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is to solve the stability analysis issue of nonlinear pressurized water reactor cores. On the basis of modeling a nonlinear pressurized water reactor core using the lumped parameter method, its linearized model is achieved via the small perturbation linearization way. Linearized models of the nonlinear core at six power levels are selected as local models of this core. The T-S fuzzy idea for the core is exploited to construct the T-S fuzzy model of the nonlinear core based on the local models and the triangle membership function, which approximates the nonlinear core model within the entire range of power level. This fuzzy model as a bridge is to cater to the stability analysis of the nonlinear core after defining its stability. One stability theorem is deduced to define the nonlinear core is globally asymptotically stable in the global range of power level. Finally, the simulation work and stability analyses are separately completed. Numerical simulations show that the fuzzy model can substitute the nonlinear core model; stability analyses verify the nonlinear core is globally asymptotically stable in the global range of power level.

  9. Liner of a thermonuclear pulse THETA-pinch reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, G.A.; Izotov, E.N.; Karasev, B.G.; Komin, A.V.; Krivosheev, M.V.; Levashov, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    Some possible constructive solutions to the problem of fabrication of the theta-pinch reactor liner by the method of centrifugal casting in a casting mould are considered. A scheme for liner manufacturing is presented, which includes the following elements: 1) a casting mould of dielectric material presenting a hollow cylinder of 4 m in diam., 3 m in length and 12 t in weight, which rotates at 8 rps in the reactor chamber; 2) a system for heat protection of the casting mould; the volume heat of the mould is suggested to remove by gaseous helium flowing under pressure along axial cooling channels of 5 mm in diam.; the channels are evenly distributed throughout the thickness of the mould shell; 3) a system for preparation and supply of a liquid metal to the casting mould, the metal is being supplied into the casting mould from its both ends at a rate of 1.7 t of the melt per second; 4) a system for rotation of the mould, which comprises two gas turbines mounted on both ends of the mould and two main stop-radial slip supports with gas lubrication

  10. Pulsed power supply and coaxial reactor applied to E. coli elimination in water by pulsed dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quiroz V, V. E.; Lopez C, R.; Rodriguez M, B. G.; Pena E, R.; Mercado C, A.; Valencia A, R.; Hernandez A, A. N.; Barocio, S. R.; Munoz C, A. E.; De la Piedad B, A.

    2013-01-01

    The design and instrumentation intended for ATTC8739 Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria elimination in water, based on non thermal plasma generation at room pressure have been carried out by means of dielectric pulsed discharges. The latter have been produced by a power supply capable of providing voltages up to the order of 45 kV, 1-500 μs pulse widths and variable frequencies between 100 Hz to 2000 Hz. This supply feeds a coaxial discharge reactor of the simple dielectric barrier type. The adequate operation of the system has been tested with the elimination of E. coli at 10 4 and 10 6 bacteria/ml concentrations, leading to reductions up to 85.3% and 95.1%, respectively, during the first 30 min of treatment. (Author)

  11. Pulsed power supply and coaxial reactor applied to E. coli elimination in water by pulsed dielectric barrier discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quiroz V, V. E.; Lopez C, R.; Rodriguez M, B. G.; Pena E, R.; Mercado C, A.; Valencia A, R.; Hernandez A, A. N.; Barocio, S. R.; Munoz C, A. E. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); De la Piedad B, A., E-mail: regulo.lopez@inin.gob.mx [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Ex-Rancho La Virgen, 52140 Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-01

    The design and instrumentation intended for ATTC8739 Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacteria elimination in water, based on non thermal plasma generation at room pressure have been carried out by means of dielectric pulsed discharges. The latter have been produced by a power supply capable of providing voltages up to the order of 45 kV, 1-500 {mu}s pulse widths and variable frequencies between 100 Hz to 2000 Hz. This supply feeds a coaxial discharge reactor of the simple dielectric barrier type. The adequate operation of the system has been tested with the elimination of E. coli at 10{sup 4} and 10{sup 6} bacteria/ml concentrations, leading to reductions up to 85.3% and 95.1%, respectively, during the first 30 min of treatment. (Author)

  12. An approach to model reactor core nodalization for deterministic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salim, Mohd Faiz, E-mail: mohdfaizs@tnb.com.my; Samsudin, Mohd Rafie, E-mail: rafies@tnb.com.my [Nuclear Energy Department, Regulatory Economics & Planning Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (Malaysia); Mamat Ibrahim, Mohd Rizal, E-mail: m-rizal@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my [Prototypes & Plant Development Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia); Roslan, Ridha, E-mail: ridha@aelb.gov.my; Sadri, Abd Aziz [Nuclear Installation Divisions, Atomic Energy Licensing Board (Malaysia); Farid, Mohd Fairus Abd [Reactor Technology Center, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Adopting good nodalization strategy is essential to produce an accurate and high quality input model for Deterministic Safety Analysis (DSA) using System Thermal-Hydraulic (SYS-TH) computer code. The purpose of such analysis is to demonstrate the compliance against regulatory requirements and to verify the behavior of the reactor during normal and accident conditions as it was originally designed. Numerous studies in the past have been devoted to the development of the nodalization strategy for small research reactor (e.g. 250kW) up to the bigger research reactor (e.g. 30MW). As such, this paper aims to discuss the state-of-arts thermal hydraulics channel to be employed in the nodalization for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor specifically for the reactor core. At present, the required thermal-hydraulic parameters for reactor core, such as core geometrical data (length, coolant flow area, hydraulic diameters, and axial power profile) and material properties (including the UZrH{sub 1.6}, stainless steel clad, graphite reflector) have been collected, analyzed and consolidated in the Reference Database of RTP using standardized methodology, mainly derived from the available technical documentations. Based on the available information in the database, assumptions made on the nodalization approach and calculations performed will be discussed and presented. The development and identification of the thermal hydraulics channel for the reactor core will be implemented during the SYS-TH calculation using RELAP5-3D{sup ®} computer code. This activity presented in this paper is part of the development of overall nodalization description for RTP-TRIGA Research Reactor under the IAEA Norwegian Extra-Budgetary Programme (NOKEBP) mentoring project on Expertise Development through the Analysis of Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics for Malaysia, denoted as EARTH-M.

  13. Transient bowing of core assemblies in advanced liquid metal fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, S.A.; Orechwa, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Two alternative core restraint concepts are considered for a conceptual design of a 900 MWth liquid metal fast reactor core with a heterogeneous layout. The two concepts, known as limited free bowing and free flowering, are evaluated based on core bowing criteria that emphasize the enhancement of inherent reactor safety. The core reactivity change during a postulated loss of flow transient is calculated in terms of the lateral displacements and displacement-reactivity-worths of the individual assemblies. The NUBOW-3D computer code is utilized to determine the assembly deformations and interassembly forces that arise when the assemblies are subjected to temperature gradients and irradiation induced creep and swelling during the reactor operation. The assembly ducts are made of the ferritic steel HT-9 and remain in the reactor core for four-years at full power condition. Whereas both restraint systems meet the bowing criteria, a properly designed limited free bowing system appears to be more advantageous than a free flowering system from the point of view of enhancing the reactor inherent safety

  14. Superheated Water-Cooled Small Modular Underwater Reactor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Koroush Shirvan; Mujid Kazimi

    2016-01-01

    A novel fully passive small modular superheated water reactor (SWR) for underwater deployment is designed to produce 160 MWe with steam at 500ºC to increase the thermodynamic efficiency compared with standard light water reactors. The SWR design is based on a conceptual 400-MWe integral SWR using the internally and externally cooled annular fuel (IXAF). The coolant boils in the external channels throughout the core to approximately the same quality as a conventional boiling water reactor and ...

  15. Preliminary Assessment of Two Alternative Core Design Concepts for the Special Purpose Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Werner, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Hummel, Andrew J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kennedy, John C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, Robert C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Dion, Axel M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wright, Richard N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ananth, Krishnan P. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Special Purpose Reactor (SPR) is a small 5 MWt, heat pipe-cooled, fast reactor based on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Mega-Power concept. The LANL concept features a stainless steel monolithic core structure with drilled channels for UO2 pellet stacks and evaporator sections of the heat pipes. Two alternative active core designs are presented here that replace the monolithic core structure with simpler and easier to manufacture fuel elements. The two new core designs are simply referred to as Design A and Design B. In addition to ease of manufacturability, the fuel elements for both Design A and Design B can be individually fabricated, assembled, inspected, tested, and qualified prior to their installation into the reactor core leading to greater reactor system reliability and safety. Design A fuel elements will require the development of a new hexagonally-shaped UO2 fuel pellet. The Design A configuration will consist of an array of hexagonally-shaped fuel elements with each fuel element having a central heat pipe. This hexagonal fuel element configuration results in four radial gaps or thermal resistances per element. Neither the fuel element development, nor the radial gap issue are deemed to be serious and should not impact an aggressive reactor deployment schedule. Design B uses embedded arrays of heat pipes and fuel pins in a double-wall tank filled with liquid metal sodium. Sodium is used to thermally bond the heat pipes to the fuel pins, but its usage may create reactor transportation and regulatory challenges. An independent panel of U.S. manufacturing experts has preliminarily assessed the three SPR core designs and views Design A as simplest to manufacture. Herein are the results of a preliminary neutronic, thermal, mechanical, material, and manufacturing assessment of both Design A and Design B along with comparisons to the LANL concept (monolithic core structure). Despite the active core differences, all three reactor concepts behave

  16. Reference equilibrium core with central flux irradiation facility for Pakistan research reactor-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israr, M.; Shami, Qamar-ud-din; Pervez, S.

    1997-11-01

    In order to assess various core parameters a reference equilibrium core with Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel for Pakistan Research Reactor (PARR-1) was assembled. Due to increased volume of reference core, the average neutron flux reduced as compared to the first higher power operation. To get a higher neutron flux an irradiation facility was created in centre of the reference equilibrium core where the advantage of the neutron flux peaking was taken. Various low power experiments were performed in order to evaluate control rods worth and neutron flux mapping inside the core. The neutron flux inside the central irradiation facility almost doubled. With this arrangement reactor operation time was cut down from 72 hours to 48 hours for the production of the required specific radioactivity. (author)

  17. HORECA. Hoger onderwijs reactor elementary core analysis system. User's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Battum, E. van; Serov, I.V.

    1993-07-01

    HORECA is developed at IRI Delft for quick analysis of power distribution, burnup and safety for the HOR. It can be used for the manual search of a better loading of the reactor. HORECA is based on the Penn State Fuel Management Package and uses the MCRAC code included in this package as a calculation engine. (orig./HP)

  18. Polarization-selective vortex-core switching by tailored orthogonal Gaussian-pulse currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Young-Sang; Lee, Ki-Suk; Jung, Hyunsung; Choi, Youn-Seok; Yoo, Myoung-Woo; Han, Dong-Soo; Im, Mi-Young; Fischer, Peter; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2011-05-01

    We experimentally demonstrate low-power-consumption vortex-core switching in magnetic nanodisks using tailored rotating magnetic fields produced with orthogonal and unipolar Gaussian-pulse currents. The optimal width of the orthogonal pulses and their time delay are found, from analytical and micromagnetic numerical calculations, to be determined only by the angular eigenfrequency ωD for a given vortex-state disk of polarization p, such that σ=1/ωD and Δt=π/2p/ωD. The estimated optimal pulse parameters are in good agreement with the experimental results. Finally, this work lays a foundation for energy-efficient information recording in vortex-core cross-point architecture.

  19. Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Deep Burn Core and Fuel Analysis -- Complete Design Selection for the Pebble Bed Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Boer; A. M. Ougouag

    2010-09-01

    The Deep-Burn (DB) concept focuses on the destruction of transuranic nuclides from used light water reactor fuel. These transuranic nuclides are incorporated into TRISO coated fuel particles and used in gas-cooled reactors with the aim of a fractional fuel burnup of 60 to 70% in fissions per initial metal atom (FIMA). This high performance is expected through the use of multiple recirculation passes of the fuel in pebble form without any physical or chemical changes between passes. In particular, the concept does not call for reprocessing of the fuel between passes. In principle, the DB pebble bed concept employs the same reactor designs as the presently envisioned low-enriched uranium core designs, such as the 400 MWth Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR-400). Although it has been shown in the previous Fiscal Year (2009) that a PuO2 fueled pebble bed reactor concept is viable, achieving a high fuel burnup, while remaining within safety-imposed prescribed operational limits for fuel temperature, power peaking and temperature reactivity feedback coefficients for the entire temperature range, is challenging. The presence of the isotopes 239-Pu, 240-Pu and 241-Pu that have resonances in the thermal energy range significantly modifies the neutron thermal energy spectrum as compared to a ”standard,” UO2-fueled core. Therefore, the DB pebble bed core exhibits a relatively hard neutron energy spectrum. However, regions within the pebble bed that are near the graphite reflectors experience a locally softer spectrum. This can lead to power and temperature peaking in these regions. Furthermore, a shift of the thermal energy spectrum with increasing temperature can lead to increased absorption in the resonances of the fissile Pu isotopes. This can lead to a positive temperature reactivity coefficient for the graphite moderator under certain operating conditions. The effort of this task in FY 2010 has focused on the optimization of the core to maximize the pebble discharge

  20. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Cadmium-Polyethylene (CdPoly) Bucket Located in the Central Cavity on the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parma, Edward J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naranjo, Gerald E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kaiser, Krista Irene [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Arnold, James F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lippert, Lance L. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Clovis, Ralph D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martin, Lonnie E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Quirk, Thomas J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vehar, David W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the cadmium-polyethylene (CdPoly) bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-CdPoly-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra, uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples. Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work. Also thanks to Drew Tonigan for helping field the activation experiments in ACRR, David Samuel for helping to finalize the drawings and get the parts fabricated, and Elliot Pelfrey for preparing the active dosimetry plots.

  1. Reactivity changes in hybrid thermal-fast reactor systems during fast core flooding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesic, M.

    1994-09-01

    A new space-dependent kinetic model in adiabatic approximation with local feedback reactivity parameters for reactivity determination in the coupled systems is proposed in this thesis. It is applied in the accident calculation of the 'HERBE' fast-thermal reactor system and compared to usual point kinetics model with core-averaged parameters. Advantages of the new model - more realistic picture of the reactor kinetics and dynamics during local large reactivity perturbation, under the same heat transfer conditions, are underlined. Calculated reactivity parameters of the new model are verified in the experiments performed at the 'HERBE' coupled core. The model has shown that the 'HERBE' safety system can shutdown reactor safely and fast even in the case of highly set power trip and even under conditions of big partial failure of the reactor safety system (author)

  2. Thermal hydraulic analysis of flow inversion in a research reactor with downward core cooling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jo, Dae Seong; Park, Jong Hark; Chae, Hee Taek [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-15

    Research reactors with forced downward core cooling experience flow inversion if the primary cooling pump (PCP) is failed. If PCP failure occurs, the downward flow decreases into zero flow and eventually turn into upward flow by natural circulation. During flow inversion phenomenon, reactor cores may undergo the most unfavorable thermal hydraulic condition, which results in the highest coolant and fuel temperatures and lowest thermal margins. The transient thermal hydraulic analyses of loss of flow accidents (LOFA) in IAEA 10MW benchmark MTR research reactor have been widely investigated by many institutes. In this study, a transient thermal hydraulic model of flow inversion is developed and applied to IAEA 10MW benchmark MTR research reactor. The results are compared against other analyses

  3. Three-dimensional Core Design of a Super Fast Reactor with a High Power Density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Liangzhi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Ikejiri, Satoshi; Ju, Haitao

    2010-01-01

    The SuperCritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) pursues high power density to reduce its capital cost. The fast spectrum SCWR, called a super fast reactor, can be designed with a higher power density than thermal spectrum SCWR. The mechanism of increasing the average power density of the super fast reactor is studied theoretically and numerically. Some key parameters affecting the average power density, including fuel pin outer diameter, fuel pitch, power peaking factor, and the fraction of seed assemblies, are analyzed and optimized to achieve a more compact core. Based on those sensitivity analyses, a compact super fast reactor is successfully designed with an average power density of 294.8 W/cm 3 . The core characteristics are analyzed by using three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulics coupling method. Numerical results show that all of the design criteria and goals are satisfied

  4. Three-dimensional core analysis on a super fast reactor with negative local void reactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao Liangzhi; Oka, Yoshiaki; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Ikejiri, Satoshi

    2009-01-01

    Keeping negative void reactivity throughout the cycle life is one of the most important requirements for the design of a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (super fast reactor). Previous conceptual design has negative overall void reactivity. But the local void reactivity, which is defined as the reactivity change when the coolant of one fuel assembly disappears, also needs to be kept negative throughout the cycle life because the super fast reactor is designed with closed fuel assemblies. The mechanism of the local void reactivity is theoretically analyzed from the neutrons balance point of view. Three-dimensional neutronics/thermal-hydraulic coupling calculation is employed to analyze the characteristics of the super fast reactor including the local void reactivity. Some configurations of the core are optimized to decrease the local void reactivity. A reference core is successfully designed with keeping both overall and local void reactivity negative. The maximum local void reactivity is less than -30 pcm

  5. Core and Refueling Design Studies for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Kelly, Ryan P [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a central generating station type [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). The overall goal of the AHTR development program is to demonstrate the technical feasibility of FHRs as low-cost, large-size power producers while maintaining full passive safety. This report presents the current status of ongoing design studies of the core, in-vessel structures, and refueling options for the AHTR. The AHTR design remains at the notional level of maturity as important material, structural, neutronic, and hydraulic issues remain to be addressed. The present design space exploration, however, indicates that reasonable options exist for the AHTR core, primary heat transport path, and fuel cycle provided that materials and systems technologies develop as anticipated. An illustration of the current AHTR core, reactor vessel, and nearby structures is shown in Fig. ES1. The AHTR core design concept is based upon 252 hexagonal, plate fuel assemblies configured to form a roughly cylindrical core. The core has a fueled height of 5.5 m with 25 cm of reflector above and below the core. The fuel assembly hexagons are {approx}45 cm across the flats. Each fuel assembly contains 18 plates that are 23.9 cm wide and 2.55 cm thick. The reactor vessel has an exterior diameter of 10.48 m and a height of 17.7 m. A row of replaceable graphite reflector prismatic blocks surrounds the core radially. A more complete reactor configuration description is provided in Section 2 of this report. The AHTR core design space exploration was performed under a set of constraints. Only low enrichment (<20%) uranium fuel was considered. The coated particle fuel and matrix materials were derived from those being developed and demonstrated under the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) advanced gas reactor program. The coated particle volumetric packing fraction was restricted to at most 40%. The pressure

  6. High-power picosecond pulse delivery through hollow core photonic band gap fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michieletto, Mattia; Johansen, Mette Marie; Lyngsø, Jens Kristian

    2016-01-01

    setup. It provided 22ps pulses with a maximum average power of 95W, 40MHz repetition rate at 1032nm (~2.4μJ pulse energy), with M2 cells hollow core photonic bandgap fiber and showed up to 59W average power output for a 5 meters fiber. The damage...... threshold for a 19-cell hollow core photonic bandgap fiber exceeded the maximum power provided by the light source and up to 76W average output power was demonstrated for a 1m fiber. In both cases, no special attention was needed to mitigate bend sensitivity. The fibers were coiled on 8 centimeters radius...... spools and even lower bending radii were present. In addition, stimulated rotational Raman scattering arising from nitrogen molecules was measured through a 42m long 19 cell hollow core fiber. © (2016) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE). Downloading of the abstract...

  7. Current status of restoration work for obstacle and upper core structure in reactor vessel of experimental fast reactor 'JOYO'. 2. Replacement of upper core structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushiki, Hiroshi; Ito, Hiromichi; Okuda, Eiji; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Sasaki, Jun; Oota, Katsu; Kawahara, Hirotaka; Takamatsu, Misao; Nagai, Akinori; Okawa, Toshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    In the experimental fast reactor Joyo, it was confirmed that the top of the irradiation test sub-assembly of MARICO-2 (material testing rig with temperature control) had bent onto the in-vessel storage rack as an obstacle and had damaged the upper core structure (UCS) in 2007. As a part of the restoration work, UCS replacement was begun at March 24, 2014 and was completed at December 17. In-vessel repair (including observation) for sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) is distinct from that for light water reactors and necessitates independent development. Application of developed in-vessel repair techniques to operation and maintenance of SFRs enhanced their safety and integrity. There is little UCS replacement experience in the world and this experience and insights, which were accumulated in the replacement work of in-vessel large structure (UCS) used for more than 30 years, are expected to improve the in-vessel repair techniques in SFRs. (author)

  8. Burnup dependent core neutronic calculations for research and training reactors via SCALE4.4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tombakoglu, M.; Cecen, Y.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, the full core modelling is performed to improve neutronic analyses capability for nuclear research reactors using SCALE4.4 code system. KENOV.a module of SCALE4.4 code system is utilized for full core neutronic analysis. The ORIGEN-S module is coupled with the KENOV.a module to perform burnup dependent neutronic analyses. Results of neutronic calculations for 1 st cycle of Cekmece TR-2 research reactor are presented. In particular, coupling of KENOV.a and ORIGEN-S modules of SCALE4.4 is discussed. The preliminary results of 2-D burnup dependent neutronic calculations are also given. These results are extended to burnup dependent core calculations of TRIGA Mark-II research reactors. The code system developed here is similar to the code system that couples MCNP and ORIGEN2.(author)

  9. Determination of the neutron fluence in the welding of the 'Core shroud' of the BWR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucatero, M.A.; Xolocostli M, J.V.; Gomez T, A.M.; Palacios H, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    With the purpose of defining the inspection frequency, in function of the embrittlement of the materials that compose the welding of the 'Core Shroud' or encircling of the core of a BWR type reactor, is necessary to know the neutron fluence received for this welding. In the work the calculated values of neutron fluence accumulated maxim (E > 1 MeV) during the first 8 operation cycles of the reactor are presented. The calculations were carried out according to the NRC Regulatory Guide 1.190, making use of the DORT code, which solves the transport equation in discreet ordinate in two dimensions (xy, rΘ, and rz). The results in 3D were obtained applying the Synthesis method according to the guide before mentioned. Results are presented for the horizontal welding H3, H4, and H5, showing the corresponding curves to the fluence accumulated to the cycle 8 and a projection for the cycle 14 is presented. (Author)

  10. Analysis of gamma heating at TRIGA mark reactor core Bandung using plate type fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setiyanto; Tukiran Surbakti

    2016-01-01

    In accordance with the discontinuation of TRIGA fuel element production by its producer, the operation of all TRIGA type reactor of at all over the word will be disturbed, as well as TRIGA reactor in Bandung. In order to support the continuous operation of Bandung TRIGA reactor, a study on utilization of fuel plate mode, as used at RSG-GAS reactor, to replace the cylindrical model has been done. Various assessments have been done, including core design calculation and its safety aspects. Based on the neutronic calculation, utilization of fuel plate shows that Bandung TRIGA reactor can be operated by 20 fuel elements only. Compared with the original core, the new reactor core configuration is smaller and it results in some empty space that can be used for in-core irradiation facilities. Due to the existing of in-core irradiation facilities, the gamma heating value became a new factor that should be evaluated for safety analysis. For this reason, the gamma heating for TRIGA Bandung reactor using fuel plate was calculated by Gamset computer code. The calculations based on linear attenuation equations, line sources and gamma propagation on space. Calculations were also done for reflector positions (Lazy Susan irradiation facilities) and central irradiation position (CIP), especially for any material samples. The calculation results show that gamma heating for CIP is significantly important (0.87 W/g), but very low value for Lazy Susan position (lest then 0.11 W/g). Based on this results, it can be concluded that the utilization of CIP as irradiation facilities need to consider of gamma heating as data for safety analysis report. (author)

  11. Expected performance of time-gradient magnetic field SESANS diffractometer at pulsed reactor IBR-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnarchuk, V.; Sadilov, V.; Manoshin, S.; Erhan, R. V.; Ioffe, A.

    2017-06-01

    The application of the time-gradient magnetic field neutron spin-echo technique (TGF-NSE) aiming to extend the possibilities of the REFLEX reflectometer at the pulsed reactor IBR-2 (Dubna, Russia) towards a high and medium resolution small-angle scattering is considered. This technique requires the use of a linearly increasing magnetic field in the form of the sequence of saw-teeth pulses. Such a technique is well-suited to the pulsed structure of the neutron beam at the IBR-2 reactor. The wide range of neutron wavelengths employed in the time-of-flight (TOF) operation mode allows for the simultaneous coverage of a wide range of spin-echo lengths (corresponding to a wide Q-range in conventional SANS). Virtual experiments carried out using the VITESS simulation package demonstrate that such a setup at IBR-2 will allow for the coverage of the length scales from 100 Å to 6000 Å in a single instrument setting. The use of the TGF-NSE technique in the TOF mode leads to gaps in the measured SANS curves due to the jumps of magnetic field at the end of saw-teeth pulses. However, crucially, these do not harm the quality of the data. Moreover, the lost data can be retrieved by an additional measurement with a delayed start of the magnetic pulse sequence.

  12. Dynamic functional characterization and phylogenetic changes due to Long Chain Fatty Acids pulses in biogas reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kougias, Panagiotis; Treu, Laura; Campanaro, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The process stability of biogas plants is often deteriorated by the accumulation of Long Chain Fatty Acids (LCFA). The microbial community shifts due to LCFA disturbances have been poorly understood as the molecular techniques used were not able to identify the genome characteristics of uncultured...... the dynamics of the microbial community during an inhibitory shock load induced by single pulses of unsaturated LCFA at two different concentrations (i.e. 2 g/L-reactor and 3 g/L-reactor). The metagenomic analysis showed that only the microbes associated with LCFA degradation could encode proteins related...

  13. Development of source range measurement instrument in Xi'an pulsed reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Li; Han Shiju

    2002-01-01

    Source range measurement instrument in Xi'an pulsed reactor is key equipment of low-side measuring in source range. At the same time, it is also weighty component of out-of-pile neutron-flux level observation system. The authors have done some researching and renovating based on the similar type devices used in nuclear reactor to improve the meter sensitivity, measuring range, noise proof features, reliability in running and maintainability which belong to the main performance index of the instrument. The design ideas, configurations, working principle, performance indexes, technique features and effect in utilizing are introduced briefly

  14. Core management, operational limits and conditions and safety aspects of the Australian High Flux Reactor (HIFAR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Town, S.L.

    1997-01-01

    HIFAR is a DIDO class reactor which commenced routine operation at approximately 10 MW in 1960. It is principally used for production of medical radio-isotopes, scientific research using neutron scattering facilities and irradiation of silicon ingots for the electronics industry. A detailed description of the core, including fuel types, is presented. Details are given of the current fuel management program HIFUEL and the experimental measurements associated with reactor physics analysis of HIFAR are discussed. (author)

  15. SUPERPHENIX: Reactor core temperatures survey by minicomputers - original aspects related to safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berlin, C.; Josue, M.; Pinoteau, J.

    1986-01-01

    The system for core temperatures fast processing (TRIC) utilized in SUPERPHENIX is part of the reactor protection system. Due to the number of temperature measurements taken into account, to the specific data processing and to the rapidity required in the treatment, the use of digital computing devices is justified. The present paper describes the conception of the system in order to satisfy the special requirements for the computers used in power reactors protection systems

  16. Advanced core physics and thermal hydraulics analysis of boiling water reactors using innovative fuel concepts

    OpenAIRE

    Winter, Dominik

    2014-01-01

    The economical operation of a boiling water reactor (BWR) is mainly achieved by the axially uniform utilization of the nuclear fuel in the assemblies which is challenging because the neutron spectrum in the active reactor core varies with the axial position. More precisely, the neutron spectrum becomes harder the higher the position is resulting in a decrease of the fuel utilization because the microscopic fission cross section is smaller by several orders of magnitude. In this work, the use ...

  17. HEU core conversion of Russian production reactors: a major threat to the international RERTR regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuperman, Alan J.; Leventhal, Paul L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper calls the attention for the major threat to the International Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, represented by the HEU core conversion of russian production reactors. This program aims to reduce and eventually eliminate international civilian commerce in nuclear weapons-usable, highly enriched uranium , and thereby significantly lower risks of the material being stolen or diverted by terrorist or states for producing nuclear weapons

  18. Exposure calculation code module for reactor core analysis: BURNER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vondy, D.R.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1979-02-01

    The code module BURNER for nuclear reactor exposure calculations is presented. The computer requirements are shown, as are the reference data and interface data file requirements, and the programmed equations and procedure of calculation are described. The operating history of a reactor is followed over the period between solutions of the space, energy neutronics problem. The end-of-period nuclide concentrations are determined given the necessary information. A steady state, continuous fueling model is treated in addition to the usual fixed fuel model. The control options provide flexibility to select among an unusually wide variety of programmed procedures. The code also provides user option to make a number of auxiliary calculations and print such information as the local gamma source, cumulative exposure, and a fine scale power density distribution in a selected zone. The code is used locally in a system for computation which contains the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code and other modules

  19. Exposure calculation code module for reactor core analysis: BURNER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vondy, D.R.; Cunningham, G.W.

    1979-02-01

    The code module BURNER for nuclear reactor exposure calculations is presented. The computer requirements are shown, as are the reference data and interface data file requirements, and the programmed equations and procedure of calculation are described. The operating history of a reactor is followed over the period between solutions of the space, energy neutronics problem. The end-of-period nuclide concentrations are determined given the necessary information. A steady state, continuous fueling model is treated in addition to the usual fixed fuel model. The control options provide flexibility to select among an unusually wide variety of programmed procedures. The code also provides user option to make a number of auxiliary calculations and print such information as the local gamma source, cumulative exposure, and a fine scale power density distribution in a selected zone. The code is used locally in a system for computation which contains the VENTURE diffusion theory neutronics code and other modules.

  20. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas LLC, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmingtonm, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@ge.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  1. A multichannel pulse acquisition system for reactor dosimetry data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talpalariu, C.; Talpalariu, J.; Matei, C.

    1999-01-01

    Simultaneous measurements of many dosimetry parameters require a complex instrumentation equipment, computers and interfaces. For a very large frequency range (10 -3 to 10 6 Hz) scale and mode selection (period or frequency), a big problem in multichannel pulse measurement is that of dead time, precision and response time. The dead time for normal scale selection and for data reading or writing for every channel can be as long as the active measuring time and response time for very large frequency variation can be very long, too. To solve this problem we have designed for a simultaneous 40 channel measurement, a pulse counter sampling system and an expert operating system. Based on a 486 PC and a 10 channel Timer/Counter Card, the hardware performance of the system was improved by an expert program for early rate change detection and rate prediction. The rate value was determined from optimizing between current value, medium and long time values and shorter response time for transient signals. Significant features and advantages of the system are the following: a marked reduction in panel complexity, as many of the indicators and controls can be replaced by an interactive CRT keyboard, a reduction in the instrumentation complexity, failure detection and diagnosis, system performance monitoring, intelligent alarm handling. The system was designed from high accuracy measurements on 40 simultaneous channels fed from field radiation detectors like ionizing chambers, fission chambers and photomultipliers.. The operating system is using an auto-organizing data memory for both computing the current value and for long-term management of data, so that only the status and significant values of the input are recorded. Consequently, the algorithms of decision, search and data processing are simplified and limited to the necessary memory, although enough memory is preserved for accurate representation of the dosimetry curves. The utilization of an inferential algorithm for the

  2. Modeling the reactor core of MNSR to simulate its dynamic behavior using the code PARET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hainoun, A.; Alhabet, F.

    2004-02-01

    Using the computer code PARET the core of the MNSR reactor was modelled and the neutronics and thermal hydraulic behaviour of the reactor core for the steady state and selected transients, that deal with step change of reactivity including control rod withdraw starting from steady state at various low power level, were simulated. For this purpose a PARET input model for the core of MNSR reactor has been developed enabling the simulation of neutron kinetic and thermal hydraulic of reactor core including reactivity feedback effects. The neutron kinetic model depends on the point kinetic with 15 groups delayed neutrons including photo neutrons of beryllium reflector. In this regard the effect of photo neutron on the dynamic behaviour has been analysed through two additional calculation. In the first the yield of photo neutrons was neglected completely and in the second its share was added to the sixth group of delayed neutrons. In the thermal hydraulic model the fuel elements with their cooling channels were distributed to 4 different groups with various radial power factors. The pressure lose factors for friction, flow direction change, expansion and contraction were estimated using suitable approaches. The post calculations of the relative neutron flux change and core average temperature were found to be consistent with the experimental measurements. Furthermore, the simulation has indicated the influence of photo neutrons of the Beryllium reflector on the neutron flux behaviour. For the reliability of the results sensitivity analysis was carried out to consider the uncertainty in some important parameters like temperature feedback coefficient and flow velocity. On the other hand the application of PARET in simulation of void formation in the subcooled boiling regime were tested. The calculation indicates the capability of PARET in modelling this phenomenon. However, big discrepancy between calculation results and measurement of axial void distribution were observed

  3. Study on Reactor Physics Characteristic of the PWR Core Using UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiran Surbakti

    2009-01-01

    Study on reactor physics characteristic of the PWR core using UO 2 fuel it is necessary to be done to know the characteristic of geometry, condition and configuration of pin cell in the fuel assembly Because the geometry, configuration and condition of the pin cell in fuel core determine the loading strategy of in-core fuel management Calculation of k e ff is a part of the neutronic core parameter calculation to know the reactor physics characteristic. Generally, core calculation is done using computer code starts from modelling one unit fuel lattice cell, fuel assembly, reflector, irradiation facility and until core reactor. In this research, the modelling of pin cell and fuel assembly of the PWR 17 ×17 is done homogeneously. Calculation of the k-eff is done with variation of the fuel volume fraction, fuel pin diameter, fuel enrichment. The calculation is using by NITAWL and CENTRM, and then the results will be compared to KENOVI code. The result showed that the value of k e ff for pin cell and fuel assembly PWR 17 ×17 is not different significantly with homogenous and heterogenous models. The results for fuel volume fraction of 0.5; rod pitch 1.26 cm and fuel pin diameter of 9.6 mm is critical with burn up of 35,0 GWd/t. The modeling and calculation method accurately is needed to calculation the core physic parameter, but sometimes, it is needed along time to calculate one model. (author)

  4. Post-accident core coolability of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michio, I.; Teruo, I.; Tomio, Y.; Tsutao, H.

    1983-01-01

    A study on post-accident core coolability of LWR is discussed based on the practical fuel failure behavior experienced in NSRR, PBF, PNS and others. The fuel failure behavior at LOCA, RIA and PCM conditions are reviewed, and seven types of fuel failure modes are extracted as the basic failure mechanism at accident conditions. These are: cladding melt or brittle failure, molten UO 2 failure, high temperature cladding burst, low temperature cladding burst, failure due to swelling of molten UO 2 , failure due to cracks of embrittled cladding for irradiated fuel rods, and TMI-2 core failure. The post-accident core coolability at each failure mode is discussed. The fuel failures caused actual flow blockage problems. A characteristic which is common among these types is that the fuel rods are in the conditions violating the present safety criteria for accidents, and UO 2 pellets are in melting or near melting hot conditions when the fuel rods failed

  5. Neutron detection in an atomic reactor core using semi-conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divoux, F.

    1968-01-01

    In this paper, the first part describes the principle of nuclear particle detection by means of semiconductor diodes and the general application of these. The second part describes fabrication of the device used to estimate thermic neutron fluxes in core of a swimming pool type reactor. The useful volume (2.9 mm thickness) is in the light water moderator, between combustible elements plates. The results, principally obtained in the core of Siloette reactor at the 'Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble' at low power, are mentioned in the third part. Flux maps have been set and comparison between converter's products: Bore 10, Lithium 6, Uranium 235 is made. (author) [fr

  6. Measurements in the IEA-R1 reactor core using self-powered neutron detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, A.A. da; Bitelli, U.D.; Alves, M.A.P.; Banados Perez, H.E.

    1989-01-01

    The use of self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) for incore instrumentation is steadly gaining importance for nuclear reactor operation and control. At IPEN-CNEN/SP an experimental program to design, built and test several spnd prototypes with cobalt and platinum emitters has been initiated. These detectors will be take part of an in-core detector system of the IEA-R1 Reactor. To investigate the performance of these spnd detectors an experiment was developed to irradiated the detector in the IEA-R1 core. The thermal sensivities, linearity, response and contribution of the corrent signal due to compensation cable to the total current were obtained. (author) [pt

  7. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a previous publication the author presented a method for undertaking statistical steady state thermal analyses of reactor cores. The present paper extends the technique to an assessment of confidence limits for the resulting probability functions which define the probability that a given thermal response value will be exceeded in a reactor core. Establishing such confidence limits is considered an integral part of any statistical thermal analysis and essential if such analysis are to be considered in any regulatory process. In certain applications the use of a best estimate probability function may be justifiable but it is recognised that a demonstrably conservative probability function is required for any regulatory considerations. (orig.)

  8. Calculations and selection of a TRIGA core for the Nuclear Reactor IAN-R1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castiblanco, L.A.; Sarta, J.A.

    1997-01-01

    The Reactor Group used the code WIMS reduced to five groups of energy, together with the code CITATION, and evaluated four configurations for a core, according to the grid actually installed. The four configurations were taken from the two proposals presented to the Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares y Energias Alternativas by General Atomics Company. In this paper, the Authors selected the best configuration according to the performance of flux distribution and excess reactivity, for a TRIGA core to be installed in the Nuclear Reactor IAN-R1

  9. An option for the Brazilian nuclear project: necessity of fast breeder reactors and core design for an experimental fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiguro, Y.

    1983-01-01

    In order to assure the continued utilization of fission energy, development of fast breeder reactors (FBRs) is a necessity. Binary fueled LMFBRs are proposed as the best type for future Brazilian nuclear systems. The inherent safety characteristics are superior to current FBRs and an efficient utilization of the abundant thorium is possible. A first step and a basic tool for the development of FBR technologies is the construction and operation of an experimental fast reactor (EFR). A series of core designs for a 90 MW EFR is studied and possible options and the magnitudes of principal parameters are identified. Flexible modifications of the core and sufficiently high fast fluxes for fuel and materials irradiations appear possible. (Author) [pt

  10. Design features affecting dynamic behaviour of fast reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kayser, G.; Gouriou, A.

    1981-06-01

    The study of dynamic response of an LMFBR to normal and accidental transients needs first of all a simulation code taking into account all the important effects. The DYN-1 code aims at this target. It represents with a sufficiently accurate meshing the core in a 20 geometry for the thermal and reactivity effects, while the kinetics of this core are calculated with a point model. The primary pool, secondary loops, steam generator are also represented, as well as the control and protective systems. We give a short description of this code. Simpler codes are sometimes good enough for parametric studies

  11. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia

    2017-01-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  12. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: ghnfernandes@gmail.com, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  13. Effect of the design change of the LSSBP on core flow distribution of APR+ Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kihwan; Euh, Dong-Jin; Choi, Hae-Seob; Kwon, Tae-Soon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The uniform core inlet flow distribution of an Advanced Power Reactor Plus (APR+) is required to prevent the failure rate of the HIPER fuel assembly and improve the core thermal margin. KEPCO-E and C and KAERI proposed a design change of the Lower Support Structure Bottom Plate (LSSBP), since the core flow rates were intense near the outer region of the intact LSSBP in a previous study. In this study, an experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of the design change of the LSSBP on the core flow distribution using the APR+ Core Flow and Pressure (ACOP) test facility. The results showed great improvement on the core flow distribution under a 4-pump balanced flow condition. Under the 4-pump balanced flow condition, fifteen tests were repeated using the ACOP test facility to verify the effect of the 50% blocked flow area at the outer region of the LSSBP on the core inlet flow distribution. The profiles of the core inlet mass flow rates were analyzed using ensemble averaged values, and compared with that of the intact LSSBP. The results showed great improvement for the overall core region. The change in design of the LSSBP is expected to improve the hydraulic performance of an APR+ reactor.

  14. Gas core reactors for actinide transmutation and breeder applications. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clement, J.D.; Rust, J.H.

    1978-01-01

    This work consists of design power plant studies for four types of reactor systems: uranium plasma core breeder, uranium plasma core actinide transmuter, UF6 breeder and UF6 actinide transmuter. The plasma core systems can be coupled to MHD generators to obtain high efficiency electrical power generation. A 1074 MWt UF6 breeder reactor was designed with a breeding ratio of 1.002 to guard against diversion of fuel. Using molten salt technology and a superheated steam cycle, an efficiency of 39.2% was obtained for the plant and the U233 inventory in the core and heat exchangers was limited to 105 Kg. It was found that the UF6 reactor can produce high fluxes (10 to the 14th power n/sq cm-sec) necessary for efficient burnup of actinide. However, the buildup of fissile isotopes posed severe heat transfer problems. Therefore, the flux in the actinide region must be decreased with time. Consequently, only beginning-of-life conditions were considered for the power plant design. A 577 MWt UF6 actinide transmutation reactor power plant was designed to operate with 39.3% efficiency and 102 Kg of U233 in the core and heat exchanger for beginning-of-life conditions

  15. Advanced calculational methods for power reactors and LWR core design parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the Specialists Meeting on Advanced Calculational Methods for Power Reactors, held in Cadarache, France, 10-14 September 1990, was to provide a forum for reviewing and discussing selected core physics of water cooled reactors (including high convertors). New methods of advanced calculation for advanced fuels and complex geometries of next generation reactors with a high level of accuracy were discussed and the importance of supercomputing and on-line monitoring was also acknowledged. The meeting was attended by about 60 participants from 20 countries who presented 30 papers. The Technical Committee Meeting on LWR Core Design Parameters, held in Rez, former Czechoslovakia, 7-11 October 1991, provided an opportunity for participants to exchange their experience on reactor physics aspects of benchmark calculations of various lattices, methods for core parameter calculations, core monitoring and in-core fuel management. At the Workshop there were further discussions related to the benchmark problems, homogenization techniques and cross-section representations. Thirty-five papers were presented by about 43 participants from 19 countries. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the mentioned papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Direct vessel inclined injection system for reduction of emergency core coolant direct bypass in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang H.; Lee, Jong G.; Suh, Kune Y.

    2006-01-01

    Multidimensional thermal hydraulics in the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MWe) downcomer during a large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) plays a pivotal role in determining the capability of the safety injection system. APR1400 adopts the direct vessel injection (DVI) method for more effective core penetration of the emergency core cooling (ECC) water than the cold leg injection (CLI) method in the OPR1000 (Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MWe). The DVI method turned out to be prone to occasionally lack in efficacious delivery of ECC to the reactor core during the reflood phase of a LBLOCA, however. This study intends to demonstrate a direct vessel inclined injection (DVII) method, one of various ideas with which to maximize the ECC core penetration and to minimize the direct bypass through the break during the reflood phase of a LBLOCA. The 1/7 scaled down THETA (Transient Hydrodynamics Engineering Test Apparatus) tests show that a vertical inclined nozzle angle of the DVII system increases the downward momentum of the injected ECC water by reducing the degree of impingement on the reactor downcomer, whereby lessening the extent of the direct bypass through the break. The proposed method may be combined with other innovative measures with which to ensure an enough thermal margin in the core during the course of a LBLOCA in APR1400

  17. Familial Granuloma Annulare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zennure Takci

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Granuloma annulare is a benign, asymptomatic, relatively common, often self-limited chronic granulomatos disorder of the skin that can affect both children and adults. The primary skin lesion usually is grouped papules in an enlarging annular shape, with color ranging from flesh-colored to erythematous. The two most common types of granuloma annulare are localized, which typically is found on the lateral or dorsal surfaces of the hands and feet; and disseminated, which is widespread. Rarely, familial cases of granuloma annulare has been reported. Herein, we report two sisters with annular papules and plaques diagnosed as granuloma annulare with the clinical and pathological findings. [J Contemp Med 2015; 5(3.000: 189-191

  18. Reaction behaviour of reactor materials, including concrete during core meltdown

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holleck, H.; Hofmann, P.; Skokan, A.

    1976-01-01

    The problems dealt with in the studies on the material behaviour of core meltdowns are sketched, and an outline is given on the experimental investigations now in progress. These studies aim at establishing a model which is as realistic as possible, and the paper tries to show that knowledge on the reaction behaviour is a basic prerequisite for this. (orig./TK) [de

  19. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, A; Khalafi, H; Kazeminejad, H

    2013-05-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change.

  20. A nuclear reactor core fuel reload optimization using Artificial-Ant-Colony Connective Networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Alan M.M. de; Schirru, Roberto

    2005-01-01

    A Pressurized Water Reactor core must be reloaded every time the fuel burnup reaches a level when it is not possible to sustain nominal power operation. The nuclear core fuel reload optimization consists in finding a burned-up and fresh-fuel-assembly pattern that maximizes the number of full operational days. This problem is NP-hard, meaning that complexity grows exponentially with the number of fuel assemblies in the core. Besides that, the problem is non-linear and its search space is highly discontinual and multimodal. In this work a parallel computational system based on Ant Colony System (ACS) called Artificial-Ant-Colony Networks is introduced to solve the nuclear reactor core fuel reload optimization problem. ACS is a system based on artificial agents that uses the reinforcement learning technique and was originally developed to solve the Traveling Salesman Problem, which is conceptually similar to the nuclear fuel reload problem. (author)

  1. Numerical analysis of temperature fluctuation in core outlet region of China experimental fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Huanjun; Xu Yijun

    2014-01-01

    The temperature fluctuation in core outlet region of China Experimental Fast Reactor (CEFR) was numerically simulated by the CFD software Star CCM+. With the core outlet temperatures, flows etc. under rated conditions given as boundary conditions, a 1/4 region model of the reactor core outlet region was established and calculated using LES method for this problem. The analysis results show that while CEFR operates under rated conditions, the temperature fluctuation in lower part of core outlet region is mainly concentrated in area over the edge components (steel components, control rod assembly), and one in upper part is remarkable in area above all the components. The largest fluctuation amplitude is 19 K and the remarkable frequency is below 5 Hz, and it belongs to typically low frequency fluctuation. The conclusion is useful for further experimental work. (authors)

  2. Effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime of Tehran research reactor mixed-core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lashkari, A.; Khalafi, H.; Kazeminejad, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, kinetic parameters of Tehran research reactor (TRR) mixed cores have been calculated. The mixed core configurations are made by replacement of the low enriched uranium control fuel elements with highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core. The MTR_PC package, a nuclear reactor analysis tool, is used to perform the analysis. Simulations were carried out to compute effective delayed neutron fraction and prompt neutron lifetime. Calculation of kinetic parameters is necessary for reactivity and power excursion transient analysis. The results of this research show that effective delayed neutron fraction decreases and prompt neutron lifetime increases with the fuels burn-up. Also, by increasing the number of highly enriched uranium control fuel elements in the reference core, the prompt neutron lifetime increases, but effective delayed neutron fraction does not show any considerable change. PMID:24976672

  3. Thermodynamic performance of a gas-core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to investigate the thermodynamic behaviour of a critical quantity of gaseous uranium-fluorides in chemical equilibrium with a graphite wall. From the very beginning a container was considered with cooled walls. As it was evident that a nuclear reactor working with gaseous fuel should run at much higher temperatures than classical LWR or HTGR reactors, most of the investigations were performed for walls with a surface temperature of 1800 to 2000 K. It was supposed that such a surface temperature would be technologically possible for a heat load between 1 and 5 MWatt m -2 . Cooling with high pressure helium-gas has to keep balance with this heat flux. The technical construction of such a wall will be a problem in itself. It is thought that the experiences with re-entry-vessels in space-technology can be used. A basic assumption in all the calculations is that the U-C-F reactor gas 'sees' a graphite wall, possibly graphite tiles supported by heat resistant materials like SiN 2 , SiC 2 and at a lower temperature level by niobium-steel. Such a gastight compound-system is not necessarily of high-tensile strength materials. It has to be surrounded by a cooled neutron moderator-reflector which in its turn must be supported by a steel-wall at room temperature holding pressure of the order of 100 bar (10 MPa). The design of such a compound-wall is a task for the future. 116 refs.; 28 figs.; 29 tabs

  4. Activation of cobalt 60 in the LVR-15 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melichar, F.

    1995-12-01

    Cobalt disks were irradiated in the LVR-15 reactor and the relevant cobalt-60 production parameters, particularly the formation rate, were measured. The data were compared with those from previous work by other authors and some discrepancies were found. It is concluded that additional experiments have to be performed in order to obtain reliable data, usable in economic balance assessment with respect to the use of hot chambers for the production of sealed cobalt-60 sources. (P.A.). 4 tabs., 3 refs., 10 annexes

  5. Loss-of-Fluid Test findings in pressurized water reactor core's thermal-hydraulic behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper summarizes the pressurized water reactor (PWR) core's thermal-hydraulic behavior findings from experiments performed at the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The potential impact of these findings on the safety and economics of PWR's generation of electricity is also discussed. Reviews of eight important findings in the core's physical behavior and in experimental methods are presented with supporting evidence

  6. Neutronics analysis of an open-cycle high-impulse gas core reactor concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitmarsh, C. L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A procedure was developed to calculate the critical fuel mass, including the effects of propellant pressure, for coaxial-flow gas-core reactors operating at 196,600 newtons thrust and 4400 seconds specific impulse. Data were generated for a range of cavity diameter, reflector-moderator thickness, and quantity of structural material. Also presented are such core characteristics as upper limits on cavity pressure, spectral hardening in very-high-temperature hydrogen, and reactivity coefficients.

  7. Core-adjacent instrumentation systems for pebble bed reactors for process heat application - state of planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benninghofen, G.; Serafin, N.; Spillekothen, H.G.; Hecker, R.; Brixy, H.; Serpekian, T.

    1982-06-01

    Planning and theoretical/experimental development work for core surveillance instrumentation systems is being performed to meet requirements of pebble bed reactors for process heat application. Detailed and proved instrumentation concepts are now available for the core-adjacent instrumentation systems. The current work and the results of neutron flux measurements at high temperatures are described. Operation devices for long-term accurate gas outlet temperature measurements up to approximately 1423 deg. K will also be discussed. (author)

  8. The effects of radiation on aluminium alloys in the core of energy nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrossian, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    One of the attractive directions in the worldwide practice of nuclear installations is the replacement of expensive zirconium alloy with more cheap materials, particularly aluminium allo. For Heat Supply Nuclear Plants (HSNP) with approximately 473 K core temperatures, the use of heat-resistant aluminium alloys seems to be reasonable. The present work is concerned with the studies on radiation effects on aluminium alloy, and interaction between the alloy and coolant in the reactor core. (author). 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  9. Impact on breeding rate of different Molten Salt reactor core structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Haiwei; Mei Longwei; Cai Xiangzhou; Chen Jingen; Guo Wei; Jiang Dazhen

    2013-01-01

    Background: Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) has several advantages over the other Generation IV reactor. Referred to the French CNRS research and compared to the fast reactor, super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor type is slightly lower and beading rate reaches 1.002. Purpose: The aim is to explore the best conversion zone layout scheme in the super epithermal neutron spectrum reactor. This study can make nuclear fuel as one way to solve the energy problems of mankind in future. Methods: Firstly, SCALE program is used for molten salt reactor graphite channel, molten salt core structure, control rods, graphite reflector and layer cladding structure. And the SMART modules are used to record the important actinides isotopes and their related reaction values of each reaction channel. Secondly, the thorium-uranium conversion rate is calculated. Finally, the better molten salt reactor core optimum layout scheme is studied comparing with various beading rates. Results: Breading zone layout scheme has an important influence on the breading rate of MSR. Central graphite channels in the core can get higher neutron flux irradiation. And more 233 Th can convert to 233 Pa, which then undergoes beta decay to become 233 U. The graphite in the breading zone gets much lower neutron flux irradiation, so the life span of this graphite can be much longer than that of others. Because neutron flux irradiation in the uranium molten salt graphite has nearly 10 times higher than the graphite in the breading zone, it has great impact on the thorium-uranium conversion rates. For the super epithermal neutron spectrum molten salt reactors, double salt design cannot get higher thorium-uranium conversion rates. The single molten salt can get the same thorium-uranium conversion rate, meanwhile it can greatly extend the life of graphite in the core. Conclusions: From the analysis of calculation results, Blanket breeding area in different locations in the core can change the breeding rates of thorium

  10. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor with a three-pass core arrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg, D-76661 Philippsburg (Germany)], E-mail: kai-fischer@gmx.de; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, P.O. Box 3640, D-76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurien, E. [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Systems (IKE), Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-04-15

    The Supercritical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) is one of the six concepts of the Generation IV International Forum. In Europe, investigations have been integrated into a joint research project, called High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). Due to the higher heat up within the core and a higher outlet temperature, a significant increase in turbine power and thermal efficiency of the plant can be expected. Besides the higher pressure and higher steam temperature, the design concept of this type of reactor differs significantly from a conventional LWR by a different core concept. In order to achieve the high outlet temperature of over 500 deg. C, a core with a three-step heat up and intermediate mixing is proposed to keep local cladding temperatures within today's material limits. A design for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) and the internals has been worked out to incorporate a core arrangement with three passes. All components have been dimensioned following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Additionally, a fuel assembly cluster with head and foot piece has been developed to facilitate the complex flow path for the multi-pass concept. The design of the internals and of the RPV is verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Furthermore, the reactor design ensures that the total coolant flow path remains closed against leakage of colder moderator water even in case of large thermal expansions of the components. The design of the RPV and internals is now available for detailed analyses of the core and the reactor.

  11. Application of RELAP5-3D code for thermal analysis of the ADS reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandes, Gustavo Henrique Nazareno

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear power is essential to supply global energy demand. Therefore, in order to use nuclear fuel more efficiently, more efficient nuclear reactors technologies researches have been intensified, such as hybrid systems, composed of particle accelerators coupled into nuclear reactors. In order to add knowledge to such studies, an innovative reactor design was considered where the RELAP5-3D thermal-hydraulic analysis code was used to perform a thermal analysis of the core, either in stationary operation or in situations transitory. The addition of new kind of coolants, such as, liquid salts, among them Flibe, lead, lead-bismuth, sodium, lithium-bismuth and lithium-lead was an important advance in this version of the code, making possible to do the thermal simulation of reactors that use these types of coolants. The reactor, object of study in this work, is an innovative reactor, due to its ability to operate in association with an Accelerator Driven System (ADS), considered a predecessor system of the next generation of nuclear reactors (GEN IV). The reactor selected was the MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High tech Applications) due to the availability of data to perform the simulation. In the modeling of the reactor with the code RELAP5-3D, the core was simulated using nodules with 1, 7, 15 and 51 thermohydraulic channels and eutectic lead-bismuth (LBE) as coolant. The parameters, such as, pressure, mass flow and coolant and heat structure temperature were analyzed. In addition, the thermal behavior of the core was evaluated by varying the type of coolant (sodium) in substitution for the LBE of the original design using the model with 7 thermohydraulic channels. The results of the steady-state calculations were compared with data from the literature and the proposed models were verified certifying the ability of the RELAP5-3D code to simulate this innovative reactor. After this step, it was analysed cases of transients with loss of coolant flow

  12. Application of gaseous core reactors for transmutation of nuclear waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, B. G.; Paternoster, R. R.; Schneider, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    An acceptable management scheme for high-level radioactive waste is vital to the nuclear industry. The hazard potential of the trans-uranic actinides and of key fission products is high due to their nuclear activity and/or chemical toxicity. Of particular concern are the very long-lived nuclides whose hazard potential remains high for hundreds of thousands of years. Neutron induced transmutation offers a promising technique for the treatment of problem wastes. Transmutation is unique as a waste management scheme in that it offers the potential for "destruction" of the hazardous nuclides by conversion to non-hazardous or more manageable nuclides. The transmutation potential of a thermal spectrum uranium hexafluoride fueled cavity reactor was examined. Initial studies focused on a heavy water moderated cavity reactor fueled with 5% enriched U-235-F6 and operating with an average thermal flux of 6 times 10 to the 14th power neutrons/sq cm-sec. The isotopes considered for transmutation were I-129, Am-241, Am-242m, Am-243, Cm-243, Cm-244, Cm-245, and Cm-246.

  13. Full core analysis of IRIS reactor by using MCNPX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, E A; Bashter, I I; Hassan, Nabil M; Mustafa, S S

    2016-07-01

    This paper describes neutronic analysis for fresh fuelled IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) reactor by MCNPX code. The analysis included criticality calculations, radial power and axial power distribution, nuclear peaking factor and axial offset percent at the beginning of fuel cycle. The effective multiplication factor obtained by MCNPX code is compared with previous calculations by HELIOS/NESTLE, CASMO/SIMULATE, modified CORD-2 nodal calculations and SAS2H/KENO-V code systems. It is found that k-eff value obtained by MCNPX is closer to CORD-2 value. The radial and axial powers are compared with other published results carried out using SAS2H/KENO-V code. Moreover, the WIMS-D5 code is used for studying the effect of enriched boron in form of ZrB2 on the effective multiplication factor (K-eff) of the fuel pin. In this part of calculation, K-eff is calculated at different concentrations of Boron-10 in mg/cm at different stages of burnup of unit cell. The results of this part are compared with published results performed by HELIOS code. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Research on the annular lithium jet concept for future laser-fusion reactors. Final report No. 3, Sept 1977--Dec 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, M.A.

    1978-12-01

    Experiments have been performed to determine the length for convergence or closure of a vertical, hollow annular water jet due to the action of surface tension forces. The data agree well with theoretical predictions up to a velocity of about 3 m/s. At higher velocities, the convergence lengths are less than predicted and this is attributed to the jet acting as an ejector pump and thereby reducing the air pressure inside the annulus to slightly sub-atmospheric values. The stability of such a jet is also discussed in the light of the fact that no hydrodynamic instabilities have been observed to date. Finally the results of a series of experiments on the flow spreading or splitting due to the presence of wedge-shaped obstacles in the path of the annular jet flow are described

  15. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie; Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung

    2015-04-01

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  16. Development of small, fast reactor core designs using lead-based coolant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cahalan, J. E.; Hill, R. N.; Khalil, H. S.; Wade, D. C.

    1999-01-01

    A variety of small (100 MWe) fast reactor core designs are developed, these include compact configurations, long-lived (15-year fuel lifetime) cores, and derated, natural circulation designs. Trade studies are described which identify key core design issues for lead-based coolant systems. Performance parameters and reactivity feedback coefficients are compared for lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) and sodium-cooled cores of consistent design. The results of these studies indicate that the superior neutron reflection capability of lead alloys reduces the enrichment and burnup swing compared to conventional sodium-cooled systems; however, the discharge fluence is significantly increased. The size requirement for long-lived systems is constrained by reactivity loss considerations, not fuel burnup or fluence limits. The derated lead-alloy cooled natural circulation cores require a core volume roughly eight times greater than conventional compact systems. In general, reactivity coefficients important for passive safety performance are less favorable for the larger, derated configurations

  17. Feasibility study on nuclear core design for soluble boron free small modular reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabir, Mohamad Hairie, E-mail: m-hairie@nuclearmalaysia.gov.my; Hah, Chang Joo; Ju, Cho Sung [Department of NPP Engineering, KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-04-29

    A feasibility study on nuclear core design of soluble boron free (SBF) core for small size (150MWth) small modular reactor (SMR) was investigated. The purpose of this study was to design a once through cycle SMR core, where it can be used to supply electricity to a remote isolated area. PWR fuel assembly design with 17×17 arrangement, with 264 fuel rods per assembly was adopted as the basis design. The computer code CASMO-3/MASTER was used for the search of SBF core and fuel assembly analysis for SMR design. A low critical boron concentration (CBC) below 200 ppm core with 4.7 years once through cycle length was achieved using 57 fuel assemblies having 170 cm of active height. Core reactivity controlled using mainly 512 number of 4 wt% and 960 12 wt% Gd rods.

  18. Optimization of hydride fueled pressurized water reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuffler, Carter A.; Trant, Jarrod M.; Todreas, Neil E.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: This paper reports the results of the thermal-hydraulic and economic analyses performed for hydride fueled PWR cores as part of a collaborative project on hydride fuels undertaken by MIT and UC Berkeley. The use of hydride fuels allows increased fuel to coolant ratios in a given core volume, and the achievement of higher burnups and thermal power from a core loading. A parametric study was developed to determine the optimum combination of lattice pitch, rod diameter, and channel shape - further referred to as geometry - for minimizing the cost of electricity associated with the use of UZrH 1.6 fuel in PWRs. Results of the steady-state and transient thermal hydraulic analyses are presented here. These are integrated with the results from fuel performance and neutronics studies into an economic model to reveal the desired optimal geometries. The thermal hydraulic analysis determines the maximum power that can be achieved for a given geometry, subject to steady-state and transient design constraints. Steady-state constraints include MDNBR, pressure drop, fuel temperature, and fuel rod vibrations. Transient constraints include the consideration of LOCA, LOFA, and over-power events. The fuel performance and neutronics analyses determine the maximum achievable burnup for a given geometry, subject to constraints on fuel internal pressure and fission gas release, clad oxidation, clad strain, and reactivity. All results are included in the economic model, which calculates the front and back end fuel cycle, operations and maintenance, and capital costs. Optimal designs include geometries where hydride fuel offers cost savings over oxide fuel, as well as geometries offering the lowest overall cost of electricity. All studies are performed for both UZrH 1.6 and UO 2 fuels, and the methodology is successfully validated by comparison of the predicted power, burnup, and cost of electricity for UO-2 fueled cores with corresponding data from

  19. ORPHEE research reactor: 3D core depletion calculation using Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4®

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, F.; Brun, E.

    2014-06-01

    ORPHEE is a research reactor located at CEA Saclay. It aims at producing neutron beams for experiments. This is a pool-type reactor (heavy water), and the core is cooled by light water. Its thermal power is 14 MW. ORPHEE core is 90 cm height and has a cross section of 27x27 cm2. It is loaded with eight fuel assemblies characterized by a various number of fuel plates. The fuel plate is composed of aluminium and High Enriched Uranium (HEU). It is a once through core with a fuel cycle length of approximately 100 Equivalent Full Power Days (EFPD) and with a maximum burnup of 40%. Various analyses under progress at CEA concern the determination of the core neutronic parameters during irradiation. Taking into consideration the geometrical complexity of the core and the quasi absence of thermal feedback for nominal operation, the 3D core depletion calculations are performed using the Monte-Carlo code TRIPOLI-4® [1,2,3]. A preliminary validation of the depletion calculation was performed on a 2D core configuration by comparison with the deterministic transport code APOLLO2 [4]. The analysis showed the reliability of TRIPOLI-4® to calculate a complex core configuration using a large number of depleting regions with a high level of confidence.

  20. A Burst Mode, Ultrahigh Temperature UF4 Vapor Core Reactor Rankine Cycle Space Power System Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, E. T.; Kahook, S. D.; Diaz, N. J.

    1996-01-01

    Static and dynamic neutronic analyses have been performed on an innovative burst mode (100's of MW output for a few thousand seconds) Ulvahigh Temperature Vapor Core Reactor (UTVR) space nuclear power system. The NVTR employs multiple, neutronically-coupled fissioning cores and operates on a direct, closed Rankine cycle using a disk Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generater for energy conversion. The UTVR includes two types of fissioning core regions: (1) the central Ultrahigh Temperature Vapor Core (UTVC) which contains a vapor mixture of highly enriched UF4 fuel and a metal fluoride working fluid and (2) the UF4 boiler column cores located in the BeO moderator/reflector region. The gaseous nature of the fuel the fact that the fuel is circulating, the multiple coupled fissioning cores, and the use of a two phase fissioning fuel lead to unique static and dynamic neutronic characteristics. Static neutronic analysis was conducted using two-dimensional S sub n, transport theory calculations and three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport theory calculations. Circulating-fuel, coupled-core point reactor kinetics equations were used for analyzing the dynamic behavior of the UTVR. In addition to including reactivity feedback phenomena associated with the individual fissioning cores, the effects of core-to-core neutronic and mass flow coupling between the UTVC and the surrounding boiler cores were also included in the dynamic model The dynamic analysis of the UTVR reveals the existence of some very effectlve inherent reactivity feedback effects that are capable of quickly stabilizing this system, within a few seconds, even when large positive reactivity insertions are imposed. If the UTVC vapor fuel density feedback is suppressed, the UTVR is still inherently stable because of the boiler core liquid-fuel volume feedback; in contrast, suppression of the vapor fuel density feedback in 'conventional" gas core cavity reactors causes them to become inherently unstable. Due to the

  1. Three core concepts for producing uranium-233 in commercial pressurized light water reactors for possible use in water-cooled breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conley, G.H.; Cowell, G.K.; Detrick, C.A.; Kusenko, J.; Johnson, E.G.; Dunyak, J.; Flanery, B.K.; Shinko, M.S.; Giffen, R.H.; Rampolla, D.S.

    1979-12-01

    Selected prebreeder core concepts are described which could be backfit into a reference light water reactor similar to current commercial reactors, and produce uranium-233 for use in water-cooled breeder reactors. The prebreeder concepts were selected on the basis of minimizing fuel system development and reactor changes required to permit a backfit. The fuel assemblies for the prebreeder core concepts discussed would occupy the same space envelope as those in the reference core but contain a 19 by 19 array of fuel rods instead of the reference 17 by 17 array. An instrument well and 28 guide tubes for control rods have been allocated to each prebreeder fuel assembly in a pattern similar to that for the reference fuel assemblies. Backfit of these prebreeder concepts into the reference reactor would require changes only to the upper core support structure while providing flexibility for alternatives in the type of fuel used

  2. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II): Instrumentation for core surveillance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    EBR-II has operated for 25 years in support of several major programs. During this time period, several of the original, non-replaceable, flow sensors, RDT sensors and thermocouples have failed in the primary system. This has led to the development of new sensors and the use of calculated values using computer models of the plant. It is important for the next generation of LMR reactors to minimize or eliminate the use of non-replaceable sensors. EBR-II is perhaps the best modeled reactor in the world, thanks to a dedicated T-H analysis program. The success of this program relied on excellent measurements of temperature and flow in subassemblies in the core. The instrumented subassemblies of the XX series provided that measurement capability. From this test series, EBR-II calculations showed that the core could withstand a loss-of-flow without scram accident and a loss-of-heat sink without scram accident from full reactor power without core damage. From this, reactor designers can now design with confidence, inherently safe reactors. 11 refs., 8 figs

  3. A new reactor core monitoring system. First experience gained at the Dukovany NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecka, M.; Svarny, J.; Kment, J.

    2001-01-01

    The article deals with methods of interpretation of in-core measurements that are based on the determination of the three-dimensional (3D) power distribution within the reactor core, discusses on-line mode calculations, and describes the results obtained during the trial operation of the new SCORPIO-VVER reactor core monitoring system. The principles of the method of determination of the fuel assembly subchannel parameters are outlined. Alternative methods of self-powered detector signal conversion to local power are given, and some results of their testing are presented. Emphasis is put on self-powered detectors supplied by the US firm IST, which were first deployed at the Dukovany NPP in 1998. The predictive function of the SCORPIO-VVER system, whose implementation was inspired by favourable experience gained on some PWR reactors (such as the products of the Halden reactor project at Ringhals and Sizewell B) were adapted to the specific needs of WWER-440 reactors. The main results of validation of the functions are described and presented in detail. (author)

  4. Experiment calculated ascertainment of factors affecting the energy release in IGR reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurpesheva, A.M.; Zhotabayev, Zh.R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: At present energy supply resources problem is important. Nuclear reactors can, of course, solve this problem, but at the same time there is another issue, concerning safety exploitation of nuclear reactors. That is why, for the last seven years, such experiments as 'Investigation of the processes, conducting severe accidents with core melting' are being carried out at our IGR (impulse graphite reactor) reactor. Leaving out other difficulties of such experiments, it is necessary to notice, that such experiments require more accurate IGR core energy release calculations. The final aim of the present research is verification and correction of the existing method or creation of new method of IGR core energy release calculation. IGR reactor is unique and there is no the same reactor in the world. Therefore, application of the other research reactor methods here is quite useful. This work is based on evaluation of factors affecting core energy release (physical weight of experimental device, different configuration of reactor core, i.e. location of absorbers, initial temperature of core, etc), as well as interference of absorbers group. As it is known, energy release is a value of integral reactor power. During experiments with rays, Reactor power depends on currents of ion production chambers (IPC), located round the core. It is worth to notice that each ion production chamber (IPC) in the same start-up has its own ratio coefficient between IPC current and reactor present power. This task is complicated due to 'IPC current - reactor power' ratio coefficients, that change continuously, probably, because of new loading of experimental facility and different position of control rods. That is why, in order to try about reactor power, before every start-up, we have to re-determine the 'IPC current - reactor power' ratio coefficients for each ion production chamber (IPC). Therefore, the present work will investigate the behavior of ratio coefficient within the

  5. Testing of an Integrated Reactor Core Simulator and Power Conversion System with Simulated Reactivity Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Hervol, David S.; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    A Direct Drive Gas-Cooled (DDG) reactor core simulator has been coupled to a Brayton Power Conversion Unit (BPCU) for integrated system testing at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in Cleveland, Ohio. This is a closed-cycle system that incorporates an electrically heated reactor core module, turboalternator, recuperator, and gas cooler. Nuclear fuel elements in the gas-cooled reactor design are replaced with electric resistance heaters to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel in the corresponding fast spectrum nuclear reactor. The thermodynamic transient behavior of the integrated system was the focus of this test series. In order to better mimic the integrated response of the nuclear-fueled system, a simulated reactivity feedback control loop was implemented. Core power was controlled by a point kinetics model in which the reactivity feedback was based on core temperature measurements; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. These dynamic system response tests demonstrate the overall capability of a non-nuclear test facility in assessing system integration issues and characterizing integrated system response times and response characteristics.

  6. Optimized core design and fuel management of a pebble-bed type nuclear reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, B.

    2009-01-01

    The core design of a pebble-bed type Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is optimized, aiming for an increase of the coolant outlet temperature to 1000 C, while retaining its inherent safety features. The VHTR has been selected by the international Generation IV research initiative as one of the

  7. Design of the zero power reactor core of Instituto de Energia Atomica, SP, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Antonio Carlos de Almeida

    1974-01-01

    The main characteristics of a graphite moderated core of a critical assembly to be installed in the zero power reactor of the Instituto de Energia Atomica have been defined. Several simple geometric configurations have been selected and criticality studies have been made. The necessary quantity of fissile uranium has been calculated. (author)

  8. Consequence analysis of core meltdown accidents in liquid metal fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suk, S.D.; Hahn, D.

    2001-01-01

    Core disruptive accidents have been investigated at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute(KAERI) as part of work to demonstrate the inherent and ultimate safety of the conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor(KALIMER), a 150 Mw pool-type sodium cooled prototype fast reactor that uses U-Pu-Zr metallic fuel. In this study, a simple method was developed using a modified Bethe-Tait method to simulate the kinetics and hydraulic behavior of a homogeneous spherical core over the period of the super-prompt critical power excursion induced by the ramp reactivity insertion. Calculations of energy release during excursions in the sodium-voided core of the KALIMER were subsequently performed using the method for various reactivity insertion rates up to 100 $/s, which has been widely considered to be the upper limit of ramp rates due to fuel compaction. Benchmark calculations were made to compare with the results of more detailed analysis for core meltdown energetics of the oxide fuelled fast reactor. A set of parametric studies was also performed to investigate the sensitivity of the results on the various thermodynamics and reactor parameters. (author)

  9. Determination of short circuit stresses in an air core reactor using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR OKE

    Corresponding Author: e-mail: ghchitaliya@gmail.com, Tel +91-265-2637209. Abstract. This paper shows the use and effectiveness of finite element method while designing an air core reactor for determining the short circuit forces and stress ...

  10. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jung Kil; Hah, Chang Joo; Cho, Sung Ju; Seong, Ki Bong

    2016-01-01

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4˜5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO2 fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  11. Core characteristics on a hybrid type fast reactor system combined with proton accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowata, Yasuki; Otsubo, Akira [Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1997-06-01

    In our study on a hybrid fast reactor system, we have investigated it from the view point of transmutation ability of trans-uranium (TRU) nuclide making the most effective use of special features (controllability, hard neutron spectrum) of the system. It is proved that a proton beam is superior in generation of neutrons compared with an electron beam. Therefore a proton accelerator using spallation reaction with a target nucleus has an advantage to transmutation of TRU than an electron one. A fast reactor is expected to primarily have a merit that the reactor can be operated for a long term without employment of highly enriched plutonium fuel by using external neutron source such as the proton accelerator. Namely, the system has a desirable characteristic of being possible to self-sustained fissile plutonium. Consequently in the present report, core characteristics of the system were roughly studied by analyses using 2D-BURN code. The possibility of self-sustained fuel was investigated from the burnup and neutronic calculation in a cylindrical core with 300w/cc of power density without considering a target material region for the accelerator. For a reference core of which the height and the radius are both 100 cm, there is a fair prospect that a long term reactor operation is possible with subsequent refueling of natural uranium, if the medium enriched (around 10wt%) uranium or plutonium fuels are fully loaded in the initial core. More precise analyses will be planed in a later fiscal year. (author)

  12. Self powered neutron detectors as in-core detectors for Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, V.; Barbot, L.; Filliatre, P.; Hellesen, C.; Jammes, C.; Svärd, S. Jacobsson

    2017-07-01

    Neutron flux monitoring system forms an integral part of the design of a Generation IV sodium cooled fast reactor. Diverse possibilities of detector system installation must be studied for various locations in the reactor vessel in order to detect any perturbations in the core. Results from a previous paper indicated that it is possible to detect changes in neutron source distribution initiated by an inadvertent withdrawal of outer control rod with in-vessel fission chambers located azimuthally around the core. It is, however, not possible to follow inner control rod withdrawal and precisely know the location of the perturbation in the core. Hence the use of complimentary in-core detectors coupled with the peripheral fission chambers is proposed to enable robust core monitoring across the radial direction. In this paper, we assess the feasibility of using self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) as in-core detectors in fast reactors for detecting local changes in the power distribution when the reactor is operated at nominal power. We study the neutron and gamma contributions to the total output current of the detector modelled with Platinum as the emitter material. It is shown that this SPND placed in an SFR-like environment would give a sufficiently measurable prompt neutron induced current of the order of 600 nA/m. The corresponding induced current in the connecting cable is two orders of magnitude lower and can be neglected. This means that the SPND can follow in-core power fluctuations. This validates the operability of an SPND in an SFR-like environment.

  13. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Approvals § 50.46 Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide...

  14. Analysis of ringing effects due to magnetic core materials in pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhu Gaunkar, N., E-mail: neelampg@iastate.edu; Bouda, N. R. Y.; Nlebedim, I. C.; Hadimani, R. L.; Mina, M.; Jiles, D. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Bulu, I.; Ganesan, K.; Song, Y. Q. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    This work presents investigations and detailed analysis of ringing in a non-resonant pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) circuit. Ringing is a commonly observed phenomenon in high power switching circuits. The oscillations described as ringing impede measurements in pulsed NMR systems. It is therefore desirable that those oscillations decay fast. It is often assumed that one of the causes behind ringing is the role of the magnetic core used in the antenna (acting as an inductive load). We will demonstrate that an LRC subcircuit is also set-up due to the inductive load and needs to be considered due to its parasitic effects. It is observed that the parasitics associated with the inductive load become important at certain frequencies. The output response can be related to the response of an under-damped circuit and to the magnetic core material. This research work demonstrates and discusses ways of controlling ringing by considering interrelationships between different contributing factors.

  15. Impact of core design on the fuel cycle of fast neutron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cabrillat, J.C.; Clauzon, P.; Dufour, P.

    1981-11-01

    The value of the annual flow of fissile mixed oxide passing through the plants of the fabrication-reprocessing cycle has a preponderant effect on the cost of the fuel cycle of fast reactors. This annual flow can be reduced either by increasing the performance of the fuel elements or by using new core concepts. It is this latter possibility that is examined in this paper using a steel atom displacement criterion as criterion for the end of life of fuel assemblies. The facts provided should make it possible to guide the choice of core concept of the reactors built after Super Phenix in order to improve on the cost of the fuel cycle of fast reactors [fr

  16. Errors in determination of irregularity factor for distributed parameters in a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlasov, V.A.; Zajtsev, M.P.; Il'ina, L.I.; Postnikov, V.V.

    1988-01-01

    Two types errors (measurement error and error of regulation of reactor core distributed parameters), offen met during high-power density reactor operation, are analyzed. Consideration is given to errors in determination of irregularity factor for radial power distribution for a hot channel under conditions of its minimization and for the conditions when the regulation of relative power distribution is absent. The first regime is investigated by the method of statistic experiment using the program of neutron-physical calculation optimization taking as an example a large channel water cooled graphite moderated reactor. It is concluded that it is necessary, to take into account the complex interaction of measurement error with the error of parameter profiling over the core both for conditions of continuous manual or automatic parameter regulation (optimization) and for the conditions without regulation namely at a priore equalized distribution. When evaluating the error of distributed parameter control

  17. Reactor core protection system using a 4-channel microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mertens, U.

    1982-12-01

    A four channel microcomputer system was fitted in Grafenrheinfeld NPP for local core protection. This system performs continuous on-line monitoring of peak power density, departure from nucleate boiling ratio and fuel duty. The system implements limitation functions with more sophisticated criteria and improved accuracy. The Grafenrheinfeld system points the way to the employment of computer based limitation system, particularly in the field of programming language, demarkation of tasks, commissioning and documentation aids, streamlining of qualification and structuring of the system. (orig.) [de

  18. Fabrication of Sintered Annular Fuel Pellet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Young Woo; Kim, Dong Joo; Kim, Jong Hun; Yang, Jae Ho; Kim, Keon Sik; Kang, Ki Won; Song, Kun Woo

    2010-01-01

    A dual cooled annular fuel has been seriously considered as a favorable option for uprating the power density of a Pressurized Water Reactor fuel assembly. An annular fuel has a geometrically inherent advantage such as an increased heat transfer area and a thin pellet thickness. It results in a lot of advantages from the point of a fuel safety and its economy. In order to actualize the dual cooled fuel, an essential element is the annular pellet with precisely controlled diametric tolerance. However, the unique shape of annular fuel pellet causes challenging difficulties to satisfy a diametric tolerance specification. Because of an inhomogeneous green density distribution along the compact height, an hour-glassing usually occurred in a sintered cylindrical PWR fuel pellet fabricated by a conventional doubleacting press. Thus, a sintered pellet usually undergoes a centerless grinding process in order to secure a pellet's specifications. In the case of an annular pellet fabrication using a conventional double-acting press, the same hour-glass shape would probably occur. The outer diameter tolerance of an annular pellet can be controlled easily similar to that of a conventional cylindrical PWR pellet through a centerless grinding. However, it appears not to be simple in the case of an inner surface grinding. It would be the best way to satisfy the specifications for the inner diameter in an as-fabricated pellet. In the present study, we are trying to find a way to minimize the diametric tolerance of the sintered annular pellet without inner surface grinding. This paper deals with a new approach that we have tried to reduce the diametric tolerance of the sintered annular pellet

  19. Implications for accident management of adding water to a degrading reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J.; Pafford, D.J.; Quick, K.S.; Witt, R.J.

    1994-02-01

    This report evaluates both the positive and negative consequences of adding water to a degraded reactor core during a severe accident. The evaluation discusses the earliest possible stage at which an accident can be terminated and how plant personnel can best respond to undesired results. Specifically discussed are (a) the potential for plant personnel to add water for a range of severe accidents, (b) the time available for plant personnel to act, (c) possible plant responses to water added during the various stages of core degradation, (d) plant instrumentation available to understand the core condition and (e) the expected response of the instrumentation during the various stages of severe accidents

  20. Specialists' meeting on design features affecting a dynamic behaviour of fast reactor cores. Summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the effects induced by changes in some design characteristics on overall performances and transient behaviour of fast reactor cores. The main topics discussed in the four technical sessions were: National Review Presentations. Identification of the key issues to be considered in the following sessions; Effects of design changes on performance characteristics. Kinetics models and codes; Evaluation and interpretation of reactivity coefficients. Kinetics calculations for restrained and free-standing cores; Comparison of the dynamic behaviour of homogeneous and heterogeneous cores

  1. Investigation of Abnormal Heat Transfer and Flow in a VHTR Reactor Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawaji, Masahiro [City College of New York, NY (United States); Valentin, Francisco I. [City College of New York, NY (United States); Artoun, Narbeh [City College of New York, NY (United States); Banerjee, Sanjoy [City College of New York, NY (United States); Sohal, Manohar [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schultz, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McEligot, Donald M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-12-21

    The main objective of this project was to identify and characterize the conditions under which abnormal heat transfer phenomena would occur in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a prismatic core. High pressure/high temperature experiments have been conducted to obtain data that could be used for validation of VHTR design and safety analysis codes. The focus of these experiments was on the generation of benchmark data for design and off-design heat transfer for forced, mixed and natural circulation in a VHTR core. In particular, a flow laminarization phenomenon was intensely investigated since it could give rise to hot spots in the VHTR core.

  2. Implications for accident management of adding water to a degrading reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuan, P.; Hanson, D.J.; Pafford, D.J.; Quick, K.S.; Witt, R.J. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-02-01

    This report evaluates both the positive and negative consequences of adding water to a degraded reactor core during a severe accident. The evaluation discusses the earliest possible stage at which an accident can be terminated and how plant personnel can best respond to undesired results. Specifically discussed are (a) the potential for plant personnel to add water for a range of severe accidents, (b) the time available for plant personnel to act, (c) possible plant responses to water added during the various stages of core degradation, (d) plant instrumentation available to understand the core condition and (e) the expected response of the instrumentation during the various stages of severe accidents.

  3. Responses of the biogas process to pulses of oleate in reactors treating mixtures of cattle and pig manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2006-01-01

    of oleate. Following pulses of 0.5 and 1.0 g oleate/L, the most distinct increase in volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentrations were observed in the reactor with the lowest TS/VS content. This suggests a higher adsorption of oleate on the surfaces of biofibers in the reactor with the highest TS/VS and a less...

  4. Radiation Characterization Summary: ACRR Polyethylene-Lead-Graphite (PLG) Bucket Located in the Central Cavity on the 32-Inch Pedestal at the Core Centerline (ACRR-PLG-CC-32-cl).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parma, Edward J.,; Vehar, David W.; Lippert, Lance L.; Griffin, Patrick J.; Naranjo, Gerald E.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2015-06-01

    This document presents the facility-recommended characterization of the neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray radiation fields in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the polyethylene-lead-graphite (PLG) bucket in the central cavity on the 32-inch pedestal at the core centerline. The designation for this environment is ACRR-PLG-CC-32-cl. The neutron, prompt gamma-ray, and delayed gamma-ray energy spectra, uncertainties, and covariance matrices are presented as well as radial and axial neutron and gamma-ray fluence profiles within the experiment area of the bucket. Recommended constants are given to facilitate the conversion of various dosimetry readings into radiation metrics desired by experimenters. Representative pulse operations are presented with conversion examples. Acknowledgements The authors wish to thank the Annular Core Research Reactor staff and the Radiation Metrology Laboratory staff for their support of this work. Also thanks to David Ames for his assistance in running MCNP on the Sandia parallel machines.

  5. The core design of ALFRED, a demonstrator for the European lead-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grasso, G.; Petrovich, C.; Mattioli, D.; Artioli, C.; Sciora, P.; Gugiu, D.; Bandini, G.; Bubelis, E.; Mikityuk, K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The design for the lead fast reactor is conceived in a comprehensive approach. • Neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient analyses show promising results. • The system is designed to withstand even design extension conditions accidents. • Activation products in lead, including polonium, are evaluated. - Abstract: The European Union has recently co-funded the LEADER (Lead-cooled European Advanced DEmonstration Reactor) project, in the frame of which the preliminary designs of an industrial size lead-cooled reactor (1500 MW th ) and of its demonstrator reactor (300 MW th ) were developed. The latter is called ALFRED (Advanced Lead-cooled Fast Reactor European Demonstrator) and its core, as designed and characterized in the project, is presented here. The core parameters have been fixed in a comprehensive approach taking into account the main technological constraints and goals of the system from the very beginning: the limiting temperature of the clad and of the fuel, the Pu enrichment, the achievement of a burn-up of 100 GWd/t, the respect of the integrity of the system even in design extension conditions (DEC). After the general core design has been fixed, it has been characterized from the neutronic point of view by two independent codes (MCNPX and ERANOS), whose results are compared. The power deposition and the reactivity coefficient calculations have been used respectively as input for the thermal-hydraulic analysis (TRACE, CFD and ANTEO codes) and for some preliminary transient calculations (RELAP, CATHARE and SIM-LFR codes). The results of the lead activation analysis are also presented (FISPACT code). Some issues of the core design are to be reviewed and improved, uncertainties are still to be evaluated, but the verifications performed so far confirm the promising safety features of the lead-cooled fast reactors

  6. The core design of ALFRED, a demonstrator for the European lead-cooled reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, G., E-mail: giacomo.grasso@enea.it [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development), via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Petrovich, C., E-mail: carlo.petrovich@enea.it [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development), via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Mattioli, D., E-mail: davide.mattioli@enea.it [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development), via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Artioli, C., E-mail: carlo.artioli@enea.it [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development), via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Sciora, P., E-mail: pierre.sciora@cea.fr [CEA (Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission), DEN, DER, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Gugiu, D., E-mail: daniela.gugiu@nuclear.ro [RATEN-ICN (Institute for Nuclear Research), Cod 115400 Mioveni, Str. Campului, 1, Jud. Arges (Romania); Bandini, G., E-mail: giacomino.bandini@enea.it [ENEA (Italian National Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Sustainable Economic Development), via Martiri di Monte Sole, 4, 40129 Bologna (Italy); Bubelis, E., E-mail: evaldas.bubelis@kit.edu [KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Mikityuk, K., E-mail: konstantin.mikityuk@psi.ch [PSI (Paul Scherrer Institute), OHSA/D11, 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The design for the lead fast reactor is conceived in a comprehensive approach. • Neutronic, thermal-hydraulic, and transient analyses show promising results. • The system is designed to withstand even design extension conditions accidents. • Activation products in lead, including polonium, are evaluated. - Abstract: The European Union has recently co-funded the LEADER (Lead-cooled European Advanced DEmonstration Reactor) project, in the frame of which the preliminary designs of an industrial size lead-cooled reactor (1500 MW{sub th}) and of its demonstrator reactor (300 MW{sub th}) were developed. The latter is called ALFRED (Advanced Lead-cooled Fast Reactor European Demonstrator) and its core, as designed and characterized in the project, is presented here. The core parameters have been fixed in a comprehensive approach taking into account the main technological constraints and goals of the system from the very beginning: the limiting temperature of the clad and of the fuel, the Pu enrichment, the achievement of a burn-up of 100 GWd/t, the respect of the integrity of the system even in design extension conditions (DEC). After the general core design has been fixed, it has been characterized from the neutronic point of view by two independent codes (MCNPX and ERANOS), whose results are compared. The power deposition and the reactivity coefficient calculations have been used respectively as input for the thermal-hydraulic analysis (TRACE, CFD and ANTEO codes) and for some preliminary transient calculations (RELAP, CATHARE and SIM-LFR codes). The results of the lead activation analysis are also presented (FISPACT code). Some issues of the core design are to be reviewed and improved, uncertainties are still to be evaluated, but the verifications performed so far confirm the promising safety features of the lead-cooled fast reactors.

  7. Core Design and Deployment Strategy of Heavy Water Cooled Sustainable Thorium Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Takaki

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Our previous studies on water cooled thorium breeder reactor based on matured pressurized water reactor (PWR plant technology concluded that reduced moderated core by arranging fuel pins in a triangular tight lattice array and using heavy water as coolant is appropriate for achieving better breeding performance and higher burn-up simultaneously [1–6]. One optimum core that produces 3.5 GW thermal energy using Th-233U oxide fuel shows a breeding ratio of 1.07 and averaged burn-up of about 80 GWd/t with long cycle length of 1300 days. The moderator to fuel volume ratio is 0.6 and required enrichment of 233U for the fresh fuel is about 7%. The coolant reactivity coefficient is negative during all cycles despite it being a large scale breeder reactor. In order to introduce this sustainable thorium reactor, three-step deployment scenario, with intermediate transition phase between current light water reactor (LWR phase and future sustainer phase, is proposed. Both in transition phase and sustainer phase, almost the same core design can be applicable only by changing fissile materials mixed with thorium from plutonium to 233U with slight modification in the fuel assembly design. Assuming total capacity of 60 GWe in current LWR phase and reprocessing capacity of 800 ton/y with further extensions to 1600 ton/y, all LWRs will be replaced by heavy water cooled thorium reactors within about one century then thorium reactors will be kept operational owing to its potential to sustain fissile fuels while reprocessing all spent fuels until exhaustion of massive thorium resource.

  8. Documented Safety Analysis Addendum for the Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility Core Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd D. Christensen

    2009-05-01

    The Neutron Radiography Reactor Facility (NRAD) is a Training, Research, Isotope Production, General Atomics (TRIGA) reactor which was installed in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) in the mid 1970s. The facility provides researchers the capability to examine both irradiated and non-irradiated materials in support of reactor fuel and components programs through non-destructive neutron radiography examination. The facility has been used in the past as one facet of a suite of reactor fuels and component examination facilities available to researchers at the INL and throughout the DOE complex. The facility has also served various commercial research activities in addition to the DOE research and development support. The reactor was initially constructed using Fuel Lifetime Improvement Program (FLIP)- type highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel obtained from the dismantled Puerto Rico Nuclear Center (PRNC) reactor. In accordance with international non-proliferation agreements, the NRAD core will be converted to a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and will continue to utilize the PRNC control rods, control rod drives, startup source, and instrument console as was previously used with the HEU core. The existing NRAD Safety Analysis Report (SAR) was created and maintained in the preferred format of the day, combining sections of both DOE-STD-3009 and Nuclear Regulatory Commission Regulatory Guide 1.70. An addendum was developed to cover the refueling and reactor operation with the LEU core. This addendum follows the existing SAR format combining required formats from both the DOE and NRC. This paper discusses the project to successfully write a compliant and approved addendum to the existing safety basis documents.

  9. Unavailability Analysis of the Reactor Core Protection System using Reliability Block Diagram

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Hyun Kook; Kim, Sung Ho; Choi, Woong Suk; Kim, Jae Hack

    2006-01-01

    The reactor core of nuclear power plants needs to be monitored for the early detection of core abnormal conditions to protect plants from a severe accident. The core protection calculator system (CPCS) has been provided to calculate the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR) and the local power density (LPD) based on measured parameters of reactor and coolant system. The original CPCS for OPR 1000 has been designed and implemented based on the concurrent 3205 computer system whose components are obsolete. The CPCS based on Westinghouse Common-Q system has recently been implemented for the Shin-Kori Nuclear Power Plant, Units 1 and 2(SKN 1 and 2). An R and D project has been launched to develop new core protection system called as RCOPS (Reactor Core Protection System) with the partnership of KOPEC and Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction Co. RCOPS is implemented on the HFC-6000 safety class programmable logic controller (PLC). In this paper, the reliability of RCOPS is analyzed using the reliability block diagram (RBD) method. The calculated results are compared with that of the CPCS for SKN 1 and 2

  10. Research reactor core conversion guidebook. V. 3: Analytical verification (Appendices G and H)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-04-01

    Volume 3 consists of Appendix G which contains detailed results of a safety-related benchmark problem for an idealized reactor and Appendix H which contains detailed comparisons of calculated and measured data for actual cores with moderately enriched uranium and low enriched uranium fuels. The results of the benchmark calculations in Appendix G are summarized in Chapter 7 of Volume 1 and the results of the comparisons between calculations and measurements are summarized in Chapter 8 of Volume 1. Both the approaches described in these appendices are very useful in ensuring that the calculational methods employed in the preparation of a Safety Report are accurate. As a first step, it is recommended that reactor operators/physicists use their own methods and codes to first calculate the benchmark problem, and then compare the results of calculations with measurements in their own reactor or in one of the reactors for which measured data is available in Appendix H. (author). Refs, figs and tabs

  11. Radiation transport out from the reactor core: to decouple or not to decouple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burn Kenneth W.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the extension of the lifetime of currently operating reactors as well as of issues connected to decommissioning, accurate calculations of neutron and gamma responses outside the reactor core are increasingly being sought. Recently Monte Carlo calculations have been extended to provide a deep penetration capability incorporated within the eigenvalue calculation. This allows, in principle, neutron and gamma ray responses quite far outside the fissile region to be calculated within the same source-iteration scheme employed to define the neutronic responses in the fissile zone. In this paper, the new algorithm is compared to the classic decoupled approach - an eigenvalue calculation followed by a fixed source one - with the point of decoupling chosen as the fission sites. Two contrasting sample problems are discussed: a small fast research reactor and a large GEN-III Pressurized Water Reactor. The latter problem highlights the role of superhistories in maintaining the fundamental mode.

  12. Research and development studies on plant and core seismic behaviour for a fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martelli, A.; Forni, M.; Castoldi, A.; Muzzi, F.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents the main features and results of the numerical and experimental studies that were carried out by ENEA in co-operation with ANSALDO and ISMES for the seismic verification of the Italian PEC fast reactor test facility. More precisely, the paper focuses on the wide-ranging research and development programme that has been performed (and recently completed) on the reactor building, the reactor-block, the main vessel, the core and the shutdown system. The needs of these detailed studies are stressed and the feed-backs on the design, necessary to satisfy the seismic safety requirements, are recalled. The general validity of the analyses in the framework of the research and development activities for nuclear reactors is also pointed out. (orig.)

  13. Identification of the physical parameters of a nuclear reactor core by a dynamic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervoni, C.

    1981-10-01

    The aim of this thesis was to qualify an identification and measuring method of the physical parameters of a nuclear reactor core, that is to say the integral antireactivity of control rods, as also the temperature coefficients and the thermal exchange coefficient. This method can be applied to PWR type reactors. The method used for the present study is the power track measuring method. It is applied (1) to measure the anti-reactivity of the (N-1) control assemblies of a PWR reactor, (2) to measure the antireactivity of the control rods in the rod drop case on the experimental reactor ''ORPHEE'', (3) to the identification of the thermal feedback coefficients in the rod drop case. One shows how the detectors have to be used to solve the spatial effect problem for these different experiments [fr

  14. Sicral F1 graphite-core fuel element behavior in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendu, M.

    1987-02-01

    Over 500 000 Sicral F1 graphite-core fuel elements have been manufactured by COGEMA to date and irradiated in GCR power reactors. Since 1963, this type of fuel element has been thoroughly investigated in design studies, in-core and out-of-core tests and post-mortem examinations. This report reviews the current state of knowledge on the irradiation behavior of the components under normal operating conditions and in incident situations (e.g. clad failure). It discusses how this work has led to optimization of the thermal, mechanical metallurgical and neutronic performance in order to obtain a can failure probability of less than 1.6 x 10 -5 , and defines general operating procedures for reactor implementation of this type of fuel element [fr

  15. Fission product release from the molten research reactor core, FRM-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, H.-J.

    1995-01-01

    Background for the investigations is concerned with minimizing of nuclear risks, political and social acceptance of FRM II reactor, safety report and independent expert's reports, and accident analyses. Radiological design basis accident was analyzed estimating that 15 (out of 113) plates of the core were melting under water; defect on one plate, influence to the neighbouring plates, beyond design accident on request of the licensing body: melting of the whole core underwater. Activity inventory in the fuel element was calculated. Development of the accident was analyzed by taking into account the barriers for fission products release (fuel, water, reactor hall, environment). Radiation exposure in the environment was the main goal of this calculation. Results obtained show that protection measures against emergencies are not necessary in this cases, if it can be achieved, that the core stays in the pool under water under all circumstances

  16. Shippingport operations with the Light Water Breeder Reactor core. (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budd, W.A.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the operation of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station during the LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) Core lifetime. It also summarizes the plant-oriented operations during the period preceding LWBR startup, which include the defueling of The Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 (PWR-2) and the installation of the LWBR Core, and the operations associated with the defueling of LWBR. The intent of this report is to examine LWBR experience in retrospect and present pertinent and significant aspects of LWBR operations that relate primarily to the nuclear portion of the Station. The nonnuclear portion of the Station is discussed only as it relates to overall plant operation or to unusual problems which result from the use of conventional equipment in radioactive environments. 30 refs., 69 figs., 27 tabs

  17. Critical evaluation of molybdenum and its alloys for use in space reactor core heat pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundberg, L.B.

    1981-01-01

    The choice of pure molybdenum as the prime candidate material for space reactor core heat pipes is examined, and the advantages and disadvantages of this material are brought into focus. Even though pure molybdenum heat pipes have been built and tested, this metal's high ductile-brittle transition temperature and modest creep strength place significant design restrictions on a core heat pipe made from it. Molybdenum alloys are examined with regard to their promise as potential replacements for pure molybdenum. The properties of TZM and molybdenum-rhenium alloys are examined, and it appears that Mo-Re alloys with 10 to 15 wt % rhenium offer the most advantage as an alternative to pure molybdenum in space reactor core heat pipes

  18. Corrosion of cermet cores of fuel plates for nuclear research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Durazzo, M.; Ramanathan, L.V.

    1984-01-01

    Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) type fuel plates containing U 3 O 8 -Al cores and clad with Al are used in various research reactor. Preliminary investigations, where in the cladding of samples was drilled to simulate conditions of rupture due to pitting attack, revealed that considerable quantities of H 2 was evolved upon exposure of the core to water. The corrosion of cermets cores of different densities was characterized as a function of H 2 evolution that revealed 3 stages. A first stage consisting of an incubation period followed by initiation of H 2 evolution, a second stage with a constant rate of H 2 evolution and a third stage with a low rate of H 2 evolution. All 3 stages were found to vary as a function of cermet density and water temperature. (Author) [pt

  19. Nonperturbative measurement of the local magnetic field using pulsed polarimetry for fusion reactor conditions (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Roger J.

    2008-01-01

    A novel diagnostic technique for the remote and nonperturbative sensing of the local magnetic field in reactor relevant plasmas is presented. Pulsed polarimetry [Patent No. 12/150,169 (pending)] combines optical scattering with the Faraday effect. The polarimetric light detection and ranging (LIDAR)-like diagnostic has the potential to be a local B pol diagnostic on ITER and can achieve spatial resolutions of millimeters on high energy density (HED) plasmas using existing lasers. The pulsed polarimetry method is based on nonlocal measurements and subtle effects are introduced that are not present in either cw polarimetry or Thomson scattering LIDAR. Important features include the capability of simultaneously measuring local T e , n e , and B || along the line of sight, a resiliency to refractive effects, a short measurement duration providing near instantaneous data in time, and location for real-time feedback and control of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities and the realization of a widely applicable internal magnetic field diagnostic for the magnetic fusion energy program. The technique improves for higher n e B || product and higher n e and is well suited for diagnosing the transient plasmas in the HED program. Larger devices such as ITER and DEMO are also better suited to the technique, allowing longer pulse lengths and thereby relaxing key technology constraints making pulsed polarimetry a valuable asset for next step devices. The pulsed polarimetry technique is clarified by way of illustration on the ITER tokamak and plasmas within the magnetized target fusion program within present technological means.

  20. Comparison of Core Performance with Various Oxide fuels on Sodium Cooled Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jin Ha; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2016-01-01

    The system is called Prototype GenIV Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (PGSFR). Ultimate goal of PGSFR is test for capability of TRU transmutation. Purpose of this study is test for evaluation of in-core performance and TRU transmutation performance by applying various oxide fuel loaded TRU. Fuel type of reference core is changed to uranium-based oxide fuel. Oxide fuel has a lot of experience through fuel fabrication and reactor operation. This study performed by compared and analyzed a core performance of various oxide fuels. (U,Pu)O 2 and (U,TRU)O 2 which various oxide fuel types are selected as extreme case for comparison with core performance and transmutation capability of TRU isotopes. Thorium-based fuel is known that it has good performance for burner reactor due to low proliferation characteristic. To check the performance of TRU incineration for comparison with uranium-based fuel on prototype SFR, Thorium-based fuel, (Th,U)O 2 , (Th,Pu)O 2 and (Th,TRU)O 2 , is selected. Calculations of core performance for various oxide fuel are performed using the fast calculation tool, TRANSX / DANTSTS / REBUS-3. In this study, comparison of core performance and transmutation performance is conducted with various fuel types in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Mixed oxide fuel with TRU can produce the energy with small amount of fissile material. However, the TRU fuel is confirmed to bring a potential decline of the safety parameters. In case of (Th,U)O2 fuel, the flux level in thermal neutron region becomes lower because of higher capture cross-section of Th-232 than U-238. However, Th-232 has difficulty in converting to TRU isotopes. Therefore, the TRU consumption mass is relatively high in mixed oxide fuel with thorium and TRU.