WorldWideScience

Sample records for annual particle flux

  1. Annual particle flux observations over a heterogeneous urban area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Järvi, L.; Rannik, Ü.; Mammarella, I.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term eddy covariance particle number flux measurements for the diameter range 6 nm to 5 μm were performed at the SMEAR III station over an urban area in Helsinki, Finland. The heterogeneity of the urban measurement location allowed us to study the effect of different land-use classes in diff...... stationary combustion sources are also highest. Particle number fluxes were compared with the simultaneously measured CO2 fluxes and similarity in their sources was distinguishable. For CO2, the median emission factor of vehicles was estimated to be 370 g km−1........ The measurement footprint was estimated by the use of both numerical and analytical models. Using the crosswind integrated form of the footprint function, we estimated the emission factor for the mixed vehicle fleet, yielding a median particle number emission factor per vehicle of 3.0×1014 # km−1. Particle fluxes...

  2. Process of dosimetry of a particle flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francois, H; Heilmann, C; Jacquot, C

    1976-06-25

    The main feature of this dosimetry process is that a nuclear emulsion plate with an emulsion of gelatine and silver bromide microcrystals is subjected to the flux of particles to be measured, that the plate is developed in a standard manner and that the amount of silver thus reduced to the metal state is then analysed by activation. The plate containing the nuclear emulsion irradiated in this way is then developed by the conventional temperature method, the effect of which is to cause traces to appear formed of metal silver particles at those places where ionising particles have penetrated into the emulsion and have given up therein all or part of their energy. Once the plates have been developed, like an ordinary photographic plate, they are then subjected to a neutron flux (nuclear reactor, accelerator, etc.) that activates the silver particles in the emulsion which then become emitters of ..gamma.. radiations which may then be detected to find out the amount of silver present in the plate, which finally is specific of the radiation flux dose received by this plate. A Geiger type gamma ray detector gives a global indication on the mass of silver contained in the emulsion. A more refined method consists in using a multi-channel gamma spectrometer and this makes it possible to have an energy selective dosimetry. The juxtaposition of several separate plates each having its own sensitivity in a given energy band enable a veritable 'sandwhich' of several plates to be made.

  3. Coordinates for Representing Radiation Belt Particle Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roederer, Juan G.; Lejosne, Solène

    2018-02-01

    Fifty years have passed since the parameter "L-star" was introduced in geomagnetically trapped particle dynamics. It is thus timely to review the use of adiabatic theory in present-day studies of the radiation belts, with the intention of helping to prevent common misinterpretations and the frequent confusion between concepts like "distance to the equatorial point of a field line," McIlwain's L-value, and the trapped particle's adiabatic L* parameter. And too often do we miss in the recent literature a proper discussion of the extent to which some observed time and space signatures of particle flux could simply be due to changes in magnetospheric field, especially insofar as off-equatorial particles are concerned. We present a brief review on the history of radiation belt parameterization, some "recipes" on how to compute adiabatic parameters, and we illustrate our points with a real event in which magnetospheric disturbance is shown to adiabatically affect the particle fluxes measured onboard the Van Allen Probes.

  4. Charged particle flux near the Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vernov, S.N.; Tverskoj, B.A.; Yakovlev, V.A.

    1974-01-01

    The data on cosmic ray fluxes, obtained for the first time in the areocentric orbit by means of the 'Mars-2' satellite are given and discussed. The measurements were carried out on the variable solar cosmic ray flux background from December 14, 1971, to June 1, 1972. For this reason it is difficult to strictly separate local increases in the soft particle fluxes near the planet (electrons with Esub(e)>0.1 and 0.3MeV and protons with Esub(p)>1 and 5MeV) from the variation of corresponding particles of a solar origin. The detected intensities exceed the background which is caused by detection of particles of a galactic origin even at the complete overlap of the counter aperture by the planet. The possible causes of the detected irregularities in an intensity are discussed. It has been established definitely that neither Mars nor Venus have radiation belts at an election energy of Esub(e)>100KeV and proton energy of Esup(p)>1

  5. Annual report of the Particle Physics Committee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Annual Report for the period 1 August 1975 to 31 July 1976 of the Particle Physics Committee of the Nuclear Physics Board, under the (United Kingdom) Science Research Council, is presented. Details are given of particle physics grants and laboratory agreements. (U.K.)

  6. Particle fluxes in atomic collision cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sckerl, B.W.; Sigmund, P.; Vicanek, M.

    1996-01-01

    The flux of recoil atoms in atomic collision cascades induced by an ion beam or another source of energetic particles in a material is known to approach isotropy at kinetic energies far below the beam energy. A variety of irradiation effects can be explained satisfactorily on the basis of an isotropic particle flux, but significant deviations from this simple behavior are known to exist. While numerous examples have been studied by numerical simulation of cascade processes, the systematics is, by and large, unknown. The present study aims at general scaling properties and estimates of the magnitude of moderate deviations from isotropy and their spatial dependence for a wide range of beam and material parameters. Anisotropies introduced by crystal structure are ignored. Although it is well established that cascade anisotropy is related to the momentum of beam particles, previous attempts to quantify this relation have failed. We have found that there are two leading correction terms to the isotropic particle flux, a well-known term centered around the beam direction as a symmetry axis and a new term proportional to the gradient of the deposited-energy density. As a general rule the two contributions are either both significant or both negligible. Specific situations in which the gradient term dominates are, however, of considerable interest in applications. The parameters which characterize the anisotropy of collision cascades also determine the deposition of momentum, but the connection is less straightforward than asserted hitherto. General principles are first illustrated on the specific case of elastic-collision cascades under self-bombardment which contains the essentials. Thereafter several generalizations are made, including atomic binding forces and inelasticity as well as allowance for multicomponent materials. Application areas in mixing and sputtering are outlined. (au) 58 refs

  7. Nares Abyssal Plain Sediment Flux Studies, FY 1985 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymond, J.; Collier, R.

    1987-01-01

    The sediment trap NAP-1 was successfully recovered and the materials have been analyzed for a set of bio- and geochemical components. The trap mooring NAP-2 was deployed and recovered but no analyses have been completed. The bulk fluxes are relatively low at this site and are approximately 50% biogenic and 50% terrigenous. The flux of terrigenous material is very high due to primary atmospheric inputs and horizontal transport of resuspended sediments. The buoyant particle fluxes are also extremely low. The accumulation of material in the sediments reflects the crustal nature of the vertical flux and also shows the normal loss of labile biogenic phases

  8. Particle fluxes above forests: Observations, methodological considerations and method comparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryor, S.C.; Larsen, S.E.; Sorensen, L.L.; Barthelmie, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports a study designed to test, evaluate and compare micro-meteorological methods for determining the particle number flux above forest canopies. Half-hour average particle number fluxes above a representative broad-leaved forest in Denmark derived using eddy covariance range from -7 x 10 7 m -2 s -1 (1st percentile) to 5 x 10 7 m -2 s -1 (99th percentile), and have a median value of -1.6 x 10 6 m -2 s -1 . The statistical uncertainties associated with the particle number flux estimates are larger than those for momentum fluxes and imply that in this data set approximately half of the particle number fluxes are not statistically different to zero. Particle number fluxes from relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) and eddy covariance are highly correlated and of almost identical magnitude. Flux estimates from the co-spectral and dissipation methods are also correlated with those from eddy covariance but exhibit higher absolute magnitude of fluxes. - Number fluxes of ultra-fine particles over a forest computed using four micro-meteorological techniques are highly correlated but vary in magnitude

  9. Annual, semi-annual and ter-annual variations of gravity wave momentum flux in 13 years of SABER data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dan; Preusse, Peter; Ern, Manfred; Strube, Cornelia

    2017-04-01

    In this study, the variations at different time scales such as the annual cycle, the semiannual oscillation (SAO), the ter-annual cycle (about four monthly) and the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in zonal mean GW amplitudes and GW momentum flux (GWMF) have been investigated using satellite observations from 2002-2014 and combining ECMWF high resolution data with the GORGRAT model. The global distribution (patterns) of spectral amplitudes of GW momentum flux in stratosphere and mesosphere (from 30 km to 90 km) show that the annual cycle is the most predominant variation, and then are SAO, ter-annual cycle and QBO. For annual components, two relatively isolated amplitude maxima appear in each hemisphere: a subtropical maximum is associated with convective sources in summer, a mid and high latitude maximum is associated with the polar vortex in winter. In the subtropics, GWs propagate upward obliquely to the higher latitudes. The winter maximum in the southern hemisphere has larger momentum flux than that one in the northern hemisphere. While on the SH the phase (i.e. time corresponding to the maximum GWMF) continuously descends with the maximum in July in the upper mesosphere and in September in the lower stratosphere, on the northern hemisphere, the phase has no visible altitude dependence with a maximum in December. For semiannual variations, in the MLT (70-80 km) region, there is an obvious enhancement of spectral amplitude at equatorial latitudes which relate to the dissipation of convectively forced GWs. The SAO in absolute momentum flux and the annual cycle in zonal momentum flux indicated that the variations at mid-latitudes (about from 30°-40°) are not a SAO signals but rather an annual cycle when the direction of GWMF is considered. The ter-annual cycle may be related to the duration of active convection in subtropical latitudes (from June to Sep. in north hemisphere) Indications for QBO are found latitude extension to mid-latitudes in stratosphere of

  10. Bayesian modeling and prediction of solar particles flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedecius, Kamil; Kalova, Jana

    2010-01-01

    An autoregression model was developed based on the Bayesian approach. Considering the solar wind non-homogeneity, the idea was applied of combining the pure autoregressive properties of the model with expert knowledge based on a similar behaviour of the various phenomena related to the flux properties. Examples of such situations include the hardening of the X-ray spectrum, which is often followed by coronal mass ejection and a significant increase in the particles flux intensity

  11. Neutrino fluxes produced by high energy solar flare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomeets, E.V.; Shmonin, V.L.

    1975-01-01

    In this work the calculated differential energy spectra of neutrinos poduced by high energy protons accelerated during 'small' solar flares are presented. The muon flux produced by neutrino interactions with the matter at large depths under the ground is calculated. The obtained flux of muons for the total number of solar flare accelerated protons of 10 28 - 10 32 is within 10 9 - 10 13 particles/cm 2 X s x ster. (orig.) [de

  12. Particle flux across the mid-European continental margin

    CERN Document Server

    Antia, A N; Peinert, R

    1999-01-01

    Results are presented from particle flux studies using sediment trap and current meter moorings along a transect at the European continental margin at 49 degrees N within the Ocean Margin Exchange (OMEX) project. Two moorings were placed, at the mid- and outer slope in water depths of 1500 and 3660 m, with traps at 600 and 1050 m and at 580, 1440 and 3220 m, respectively. Residual currents at the mid- slope follow the slope contour, whereas seasonal off-slope flow was registered at the outer slope. At 600 m on the slope fluxes are similar to those in the abyssal North Atlantic. The flux of all components (bulk dry weight, particulate organic and inorganic carbon, lithogenic matter and opal) increased with water depth. Highest fluxes were recorded at 1440 m at the outer slope, where off- slope residual currents mediate particle export. The injection of biogenic and lithogenic particles below the depth of winter mixing results in the export of particles from shallower waters. Calculated lateral fluxes of partic...

  13. Plasma-surface interactions under high heat and particle fluxes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Temmerman, G.; Bystrov, K.; Liu, F.; Liu, W.; Morgan, T.; Tanyeli, I.; van den Berg, M.; Xu, H.; Zielinski, J.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface

  14. Muon Flux Limits for Majorana Dark Matter Particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belotsky, Konstantin; Khlopov, Maxim; Kouvaris, Christoforos

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the effects of capture of dark matter (DM) particles, with successive annihilations, predicted in the minimal walking technicolor model (MWT) by the Sun and the Earth. We show that the Super-Kamiokande (SK) upper limit on excessive muon flux disfavors the mass interval between 100-200 Ge...

  15. Increased particle flux to the deep ocean related to monsoons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nair, R.R.; Ittekkot, V.; Manganini, S.J.; Ramaswamy, V.; Haake, B.; Degens, E.T.; Desai, B.N.; Honjo, S.

    . To assess the impact of monsoon-driven processes on the downward particle flux variations in the open ocean we deployed three moored arrays consisting of six time-series sediment traps at selected locations in the western, central and eastern parts...

  16. Plasma–Surface Interactions Under High Heat and Particle Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory De Temmerman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface interactions studies under those very harsh conditions. While the ion energies on the divertor surfaces of a fusion device are comparable to those used in various plasma-assited deposition and etching techniques, the ion (and energy fluxes are up to four orders of magnitude higher. This large upscale in particle flux maintains the surface under highly non-equilibrium conditions and bring new effects to light, some of which will be described in this paper.

  17. The development of Micromegas for high particle-flux environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giomataris, Y.; Mangeot, Ph.; Rebourgeard, Ph.; Robert, J.P.

    1996-01-01

    Detectors able to operate in high rate environments, with particle flux beyond 10 14 particles/mm 2 /s, are needed for future high energy physics projects and medical radiography. A new promising technique called Micromegas has been proposed. It consists of a 2-stage parallel-plate avalanche chamber of small amplification gap (100 μm) combined with a conversion-drift space. In this paper we present results obtained with such a detector and we see that the detector combines most of the qualities required for high-rate position-sensitive particle detection, particularly it shows excellent spatial and energy resolutions. (author)

  18. Local particle flux reversal under strongly sheared flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.; Newman, D.E.; Ware, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    The advection of electron density by turbulent ExB flow with linearly varying mean yields a particle flux that can reverse sign at certain locations along the direction of magnetic shear. The effect, calculated for strong flow shear, resides in the density-potential cross phase. It is produced by the interplay between the inhomogeneities of magnetic shear and flow shear, but subject to a variety of conditions and constraints. The regions of reversed flux tend to wash out if the turbulence consists of closely spaced modes of different helicities, but survive if modes of a single helicity are relatively isolated. The reversed flux becomes negligible if the electron density response is governed by electron scales while the eigenmode is governed by ion scales. The relationship of these results to experimentally observe flux reversals is discussed

  19. Particle physics 2012. Highlights and annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischer, Manfred; Kasemann, Matthias; Medinnis, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Particle physics at DESY, the work of the Helmholtz alliance concerning the LHC and the ILC, bringing particle physics into people's mind, research at HERA, LHC, and the linear accelerators, plasma wakefield acceleration, astroparticle physics, theory of elementary particles, research projects and scientific infrastructure. (HSI)

  20. Characteristics of heat flux and particle flux to the divertor in H-mode of JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itami, K.; Hosogane, N.; Asakura, N.; Kubo, H.; Tsuji, S.; Shimada, M.

    1995-01-01

    Heat flux and particle flux behavior in H-mode is studied in a comparative manner. It was confirmed that the multiple peak structure of heat flux during ELM activity has a role in reducing the average value of a peak heat flux at the divertor. In order to characterize heat and particle flux during ELM activity, the ELM part and the steady state part of heat flux and particle flux were determined and statistically analyzed. A large in-out asymmetry of peak ELM heat flux density was found. The asymmetry is almost unaffected by the ion grad-B drift direction. In-out asymmetry of both ELM and steady-state parts of the particle flux were found to be similar. ((orig.))

  1. A process of dosimetry of a particle flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francois, Henri; Heilmann, Celine; Jacquot, Claude.

    1976-01-01

    The main feature of this dosimetry process is that a nuclear emulsion plate with an emulsion of gelatine and silver bromide microcrystals is subjected to the flux of particles to be measured, that the plate is developed in a standard manner and that the amount of silver thus reduced to the metal state is then analysed by activation. The plate containing the nuclear emulsion irradiated in this way is then developed by the conventional temperature method, the effect of which is to cause traces to appear formed of metal silver particles at those places where ionising particles have penetrated into the emulsion and have given up therein all or part of their energy. Once the plates have been developed, like an ordinary photographic plate, they are then subjected to a neutron flux (nuclear reactor, accelerator, etc.) that activates the silver particles in the emulsion which then become emitters of γ radiations which may then be detected to find out the amount of silver present in the plate, which finally is specific of the radiation flux dose received by this plate. A Geiger type gamma ray detector gives a global indication on the mass of silver contained in the emulsion. A more refined method consists in using a multi-channel gamma spectrometer and this makes it possible to have an energy selective dosimetry. The juxtaposition of several separate plates each having its own sensitivity in a given energy band enable a veritable 'sandwhich' of several plates to be made [fr

  2. Particle acceleration in relativistic magnetic flux-merging events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyutikov, Maxim; Sironi, Lorenzo; Komissarov, Serguei S.; Porth, Oliver

    2017-12-01

    Using analytical and numerical methods (fluid and particle-in-cell simulations) we study a number of model problems involving merger of magnetic flux tubes in relativistic magnetically dominated plasma. Mergers of current-carrying flux tubes (exemplified by the two-dimensional `ABC' structures) and zero-total-current magnetic flux tubes are considered. In all cases regimes of spontaneous and driven evolution are investigated. We identify two stages of particle acceleration during flux mergers: (i) fast explosive prompt X-point collapse and (ii) ensuing island merger. The fastest acceleration occurs during the initial catastrophic X-point collapse, with the reconnection electric field of the order of the magnetic field. During the X-point collapse, particles are accelerated by charge-starved electric fields, which can reach (and even exceed) values of the local magnetic field. The explosive stage of reconnection produces non-thermal power-law tails with slopes that depend on the average magnetization . For plasma magnetization 2$ the spectrum power-law index is 2$ ; in this case the maximal energy depends linearly on the size of the reconnecting islands. For higher magnetization, 2$ , the spectra are hard, , yet the maximal energy \\text{max}$ can still exceed the average magnetic energy per particle, , by orders of magnitude (if is not too close to unity). The X-point collapse stage is followed by magnetic island merger that dissipates a large fraction of the initial magnetic energy in a regime of forced magnetic reconnection, further accelerating the particles, but proceeds at a slower reconnection rate.

  3. Particle flux on the continental shelf in the Amundsen Sea Polynya and Western Antarctic Peninsula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugh W. Ducklow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report results from a yearlong, moored sediment trap in the Amundsen Sea Polynya (ASP, the first such time series in this remote and productive ecosystem. Results are compared to a long-term (1992–2013 time series from the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP. The ASP trap was deployed from December 2010 to December 2011 at 350 m depth. We observed two brief, but high flux events, peaking at 8 and 5 mmol C m−2 d−1 in January and December 2011, respectively, with a total annual capture of 315 mmol C m−2. Both peak fluxes and annual capture exceeded the comparable WAP observations. Like the overlying phytoplankton bloom observed during the cruise in the ASP (December 2010 to January 2011, particle flux was dominated by Phaeocystis antarctica, which produced phytodetrital aggregates. Particles at the start of the bloom were highly depleted in 13C, indicating their origin in the cold, CO2-rich winter waters exposed by retreating sea ice. As the bloom progressed, microscope visualization and stable isotopic composition provided evidence for an increasing contribution by zooplankton fecal material. Incubation experiments and zooplankton observations suggested that fecal pellet production likely contributed 10–40% of the total flux during the first flux event, and could be very high during episodic krill swarms. Independent estimates of export from the surface (100 m were about 5–10 times that captured in the trap at 350 m. Estimated bacterial respiration was sufficient to account for much of the decline in the flux between 50 and 350 m, whereas zooplankton respiration was much lower. The ASP system appears to export only a small fraction of its production deeper than 350 m within the polynya region. The export efficiency was comparable to other polar regions where phytoplankton blooms were not dominated by diatoms.

  4. Particle flux at the outlet of an Ecr plasma source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez T, C.; Gonzalez D, J.

    1999-01-01

    The necessity of processing big material areas this has resulted in the development of plasma sources with the important property to be uniform in these areas. Also the continuous diminution in the size of substrates to be processed have stimulated the study of models which allow to predict the control of energy and the density of the ions and neutral particles toward the substrate. On the other hand, there are other applications of the plasma sources where it is very necessary to understand the effects generated by the energetic fluxes of ions and neutrals. These fluxes as well as another beneficial effects can improve the activation energy for the formation and improvement of the diffusion processes in the different materials. In this work, using the drift kinetic approximation is described a model to calculate the azimuthal and radial fluxes in the zone of materials processing of an Ecr plasma source type. The results obtained are compared with experimental results. (Author)

  5. Low energy neutral particle fluxes in the JET divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reichle, R.; Horton, L.D.; Ingesson, L.C.; Jaeckel, H.J.; McCormick, G.K.; Loarte, A.; Simonini, R.; Stamp, M.F.

    1997-01-01

    First measurements are presented of the total power loss through neutral particles and their average energy in the JET divertor. The method used distinguishes between the heat flux and the electromagnetic radiation on bolometers. This is done by comparing measurements from inside the divertor either with opposite lines of sight or with a tomographic reconstruction of the radiation. The typical value of the total power loss in the divertor through neutrals is about 1 MW. The average energy of the neutral particles at the inner divertor leg is 1.5-3 eV when detachment is in progress, which agrees with EDGE2D/NIMBUS modelling. (orig.)

  6. Dryout heat flux experiments with deep heterogeneous particle bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, I.; Holmstroem, S.; Miettinen, J.; Lestinen, V.; Hyvaerinen, J.; Pankakoski, P.; Sjoevall, H.

    2006-01-01

    A test facility has been constructed at Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) to simulate as accurately as possible the ex-vessel core particle bed in the conditions of Olkiluoto nuclear power plant. The STYX particle bed reproduces the anticipated depth of the bed and the size range of particles having irregular shape. The bed is immersed in water, creating top flooding conditions, and internally heated by an array of electrical resistance heating elements. Dryout tests have been successfully conducted at 0.1-0.7 MPa pressure for both uniformly mixed and stratified bed geometries. In all tests, including the stratified ones, the dry zone first formed near the bottom of the bed. The measured dryout heat fluxes increased with increasing pressure, from 232 kW/m 2 at near atmospheric pressure to 451 kW/m 2 at 0.7 MPa pressure. The data show some scatter even for the uniform bed. The tests with the stratified bed indicate a clear reduction of critical power due to the presence of a layer of small particles on top of the uniform bed. Comparison of data with various critical power (dryout heat flux) correlations for porous media shows that the most important parameter in the models is the effective particle diameter. Adiabatic debris bed flow resistance measurements were conducted to determine the most representative particle diameter. This diameter is close, but not equal, to the particle number-weighted average diameter of the bed material. With it, uniform bed data can be calculated to within an accuracy of 3-28% using Lipinski's 0-D model. In the stratified bed experiments, it appears that the top layer was partially fluidized, hence the measured critical power was significantly higher than calculated. Future experiments are being planned with denser top layer material to eliminate non-prototypic fluidization

  7. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, Richard Howell; Biewer, Theodore M.; Caughman, John B.; Chen, Guangye; Owen, Larry W.; Sparks, Dennis O.

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Gamma(p) > 10(23) M-3 s(-1), and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of similar to 10 MW/m(2). An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength vertical bar B vertical bar in the antenna region up to similar to 0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3 x 10(19) M-3 in He and 2.5 x 10(19) m(-3) in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial vertical bar B vertical bar profile.

  8. Operation of the ORNL High Particle Flux Helicon Plasma Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goulding, R. H.; Biewer, T. M.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Chen, G. C.; Owen, L. W.; Sparks, D. O.

    2011-01-01

    A high power, high particle flux rf-based helicon plasma source has been constructed at ORNL and operated at power levels up to 30 kW. High-density hydrogen and helium plasmas have been produced. The source has been designed as the basis for a linear plasma materials interaction (PMI) test facility that will generate particle fluxes Γ p 10 23 m -3 s -1 , and utilize additional ion and electron cyclotron heating to produce high parallel (to the magnetic field) heat fluxes of ∼10 MW/m 2 . An rf-based source for PMI research is of interest because high plasma densities are generated with no internal electrodes, allowing true steady state operation with minimal impurity generation. The ORNL helicon source has a diameter of 15 cm and to-date has operated at a frequency f = 13.56 MHz, with magnetic field strength |B| in the antenna region up to ∼0.15 T. Maximum densities of 3x10 19 m -3 in He and 2.5x10 19 m -3 in H have been achieved. Radial density profiles have been seen to be dependent on the axial |B| profile.

  9. Manifestation of solar activity in solar wind particle flux density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalenko, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis has been made of the origin of long-term variations in flux density of solar wind particles (nv) for different velocity regimes. The study revealed a relationship of these variations to the area of the polar coronal holes (CH). It is shown that within the framework of the model under development, the main longterm variations of nv are a result of the latitude redistribution of the solar wind mass flux in the heliosphere and are due to changes in the large-scale geometry of the solar plasma flow in the corona. A study has been made of the variations of nv for high speed solar wind streams. It is found that nv in high speed streams which are formed in CH, decreases from minimum to maximum solar activity. The analysis indicates that this decrease is attributable to the magnetic field strength increase in coronal holes. It has been found that periods of rapid global changes of background magnetic fields on the Sun are accompanied by a reconfiguration of coronal magnetic fields, rapid changes in the length of quiescent filaments, and by an increase in the density of the particle flux of a high speed solar wind. It has been established that these periods precede the formation of CH, corresponding to the increase in solar wind velocity near the Earth and to enhancement of the level of geomagnetic disturbance. (author)

  10. Aerosol fluxes and particle growth above managed grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Particle deposition velocities (11–3000 nm diameter measured above grassland by eddy covariance during the EU GRAMINAE experiment in June 2000 averaged 0.24 and 0.03 mm s−1 to long (0.75 m and short (0.07 m grass, respectively. After fertilisation with 108 kg N ha−1 as calcium ammonium nitrate, sustained apparent upward fluxes of particles were observed. Analysis of concentrations and fluxes of potential precursor gases, including NH3, HNO3, HCl and selected VOCs, shows that condensation of HNO3 and NH3 on the surface of existing particles is responsible for this effect. A novel approach is developed to derive particle growth rates at the field scale, from a combination of measurements of vertical fluxes and particle size-distributions. For the first 9 days after fertilization, growth rates of 11 nm particles of 7.04 nm hr−1 and 1.68 nm hr−1 were derived for day and night-time conditions, respectively. This implies total NH4NO3 production rates of 1.11 and 0.44 μg m−3 h−1, respectively. The effect translates into a small error in measured ammonia fluxes (0.06% day, 0.56% night and a large error in NH4+ and NO3 aerosol fluxes of 3.6% and 10%, respectively. By converting rapidly exchanged NH3 and HNO3 into slowly depositing NH4NO3, the reaction modifies the total N budget, though this effect is small (<1% for the 10 days following fertilization, as NH3 emission dominates the net flux. It is estimated that 3.8% of the fertilizer N was volatilised as NH3, of which 0.05% re-condensed to form NH4NO3 particles within the lowest 2 m of the surface layer. This surface induced process would at least scale up to a global NH4NO3 formation of ca. 0.21 kt N yr

  11. Annual review of nuclear and particle science. Vol. 52

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quigg, C.

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 volume of the ''Annual Review of Nuclear and Particle Science'' ranges from the applied to the speculative, from the accomplished to the inchoate, bearing witness to the vitality and diversity of subatomic physics. Milla Baldo Ceolin's prefatory chapter , ''The Discreet Charm of the Nuclear Emulsion Era,'' takes us back to the rebirth of particle physics in Europe after World War II through international emulsion collaborations that revealed wonders unimagined. Gaisser and Honda detail progress toward understanding the flux of atmospheric neutrinos, which is crucial for interpreting evidence for neutrino oscillations and searching for extraterrestrial neutrino sources. Elliott and Vogel's status report on double beta decay explores the sensitivity frontier and the prospects for testing the notion that the neutrino is its own antiparticle. Kado and Tully take stock of searches for electroweak theory's Higgs boson at CERN's Large Electron-Positron collider. Lee and Redwine draw lessons from three decades' exploration of pion-nucleus interactions at meson factories. Bedaque and van Kolck review recent progress in effective field theories that permit systematic treatment of few-nucleon systems. El-Khadra and Luke describe the ways in which Quantum Chromodynamics makes possible a precise determination of the b-quark mass. Harrison, Peggs, and Roser report on Brookhaven National Laboratory's Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, which explores new realms of collisions among heavy nuclei. Gomez-Cadenas and Harris introduce the scientific motivations and technical challenges of neutrino factories based on muon storage rings. The study of biological function through positron-emission tomography is a burgeoning application of antimatter. PET's history, practice, and promise are presented by Phelps. Michael Faraday's words, ''Nothing is too wonderful to be true,'' and ''Experiment is the best test,'' are especially apt for the delicious possibility that spacetime extends

  12. A detector for high frequency modulation in auroral particle fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiger, R. J.; Oehme, D.; Loewenstein, R. F.; Murphree, J.; Anderson, H. R.; Anderson, R.

    1974-01-01

    A high time resolution electron detector has been developed for use in sounding rocket studies of the aurora. The detector is used to look for particle bunching in the range 50 kHz-10 MHz. The design uses an electron multiplier and an onboard frequency spectrum analyzer. By using the onboard analyzer, the data can be transmitted back to ground on a single 93-kHz voltage-controlled oscillator. The detector covers the 50 kHz-10 MHz range six times per second and detects modulation on the order of a new percent of the total electron flux. Spectra are presented for a flight over an auroral arc.

  13. (Medium energy particle physics): Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1985-10-01

    Investigations currently carried out by the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group can be arranged into four programs: Pion-Nucleon Scattering; Tests of Charge Symmetry and Isospin Invariance; Light Nuclei (Strong Form Factors of /sup 3/H, /sup 3/He, /sup 4/He; Detailed Balance in pd /r reversible/ /gamma//sup 3/H; Interaction Dynamics); and Search for the Rare Decay /Mu//sup +/ /yields/ e/sup +/ + /gamma/ (MEGA). The general considerations which led to the choice of physics problems investigated by our group are given in the next section. We also outline the scope of the research being done which includes over a dozen experiments. The main body of this report details the research carried out in the past year, the status of various experiments, and new projects.

  14. The ecosystem baseline for particle flux in the Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.L.C. Giering

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Response management and damage assessment during and after environmental disasters such as the Deepwater Horizon (DWH oil spill require an ecological baseline and a solid understanding of the main drivers of the ecosystem. During the DWH event, a large fraction of the spilled oil was transported to depth via sinking marine snow, a routing of spilled oil unexpected to emergency response planners. Because baseline knowledge of particle export in the Northern Gulf of Mexico and how it varies spatially and temporally was limited, we conducted a detailed assessment of the potential drivers of deep (~1400 m depth particle fluxes during 2012–2016 using sediment traps at three contrasting sites in the Northern Gulf of Mexico: near the DWH site, at an active natural oil seep site, and at a site considered typical for background conditions. The DWH site, located ~70 km from the Mississippi River Delta, showed flux patterns that were strongly linked to the Mississippi nitrogen discharge and an annual subsequent surface bloom. Fluxes carried clear signals of combustion products, which likely originated from pyrogenic sources that were transported offshore via the Mississippi plume. The seep and reference sites were more strongly influenced by the open Gulf of Mexico, did not show a clear seasonal flux pattern, and their overall sedimentation rates were lower than those at the DWH site. At the seep site, based on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon data, we observed indications of three different pathways for “natural” oiled-snow sedimentation: scavenging by sinking particles at depth, weathering at the surface before incorporation into sinking particles, and entry into the food web and subsequent sinking in form of detritus. Overall, sedimentation rates at the three sites were markedly different in quality and quantity owing to varying degrees of riverine and oceanic influences, including natural seepage and contamination by combustion products.

  15. 1975 annual report of the Elementary Particle Physics Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-03-01

    The annual report gives a short summary of experiments in progress and of approved proposals of experiments to be performed at CERN by the Elementary Particle Physics Department of Saclay, and also publication lists and informations about the Department activities during 1975 [fr

  16. Annual and seasonal CO2 fluxes from Russian southern taiga soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurganova, I.; Lopes De Gerenyu, V.; Rozanova, L.; Sapronov, D.; Myakshina, T.; Kudeyarov, V.

    2003-01-01

    Annual and seasonal characteristics of CO 2 emission from five different ecosystems were studied in situ (Russia, Moscow Region) from November 1997 through October 2000. The annual behaviour of the soil respiration rate is influenced by weather conditions during a particular year. Annual CO 2 fluxes from the soils depend on land use of the soils and averaged 684 and 906 g C/m 2 from sandy Albeluvisols (sod-podzolic soils) under forest and grassland, respectively. Annual emission from clay Phaeozems (grey forest soils) was lower and ranged from 422 to 660 g C/m 2 ; the order of precedence was arable 2 fluxes caused by weather conditions ranged from 18% (forest ecosystem on Phaeozems) to 31% (agro-ecosystem). The contribution from the cold period (with snow, November-April) to the annual CO 2 flux was substantial and averaged 21% and 14% for natural and agricultural ecosystems, respectively. The CO 2 fluxes comprised approximately 48-51% in summer, 23-24% in autumn, 18-20% in spring and 7-10% in winter of the total annual carbon dioxide flux

  17. 1982 Annual status report: operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The high flux materials testing reactor has been operated in 1982 within a few percent of the pre-set schedule, attaining 73% overall availability. Its utilization reached another record figure in 20 years: 81% without, 92% with, the low enrichment test elements irradiated during the year

  18. A Particle-In-Cell approach to particle flux shaping with a surface mask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kawamura

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Particle-In-Cell simulation code PICS has been developed to study plasma in front of a surface with two types of masks, step-type and roof-type. Parameter scans with regard to magnetic field angle, electron density, and mask height were carried out to understand their influence on ion particle flux distribution on a surface. A roof-type mask with a small mask height yields short decay length in the flux distribution which is consistent with that estimated experimentally. A roof-type mask with a large height yields very long decay length and the flux value does not depend on a mask height or an electron density, but rather on a mask length and a biasing voltage of the surface. Mask height also changes the flux distribution apart from the mask because of the shading effect of the mask. Electron density changes the distribution near the mask edge according to the Debye length. Dependence of distribution on parameters are complicated especially for a roof-type mask, and simulation study with various parameters are useful to understand the physical reasons of dependence and also is useful as a tool for experiment studies.

  19. Feeding on dispersed vs. aggregated particles: The effect of zooplankton feeding behavior on vertical flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koski, Marja; Boutorh, Julia; De La Rocha, Christina L.

    2017-01-01

    Zooplankton feeding activity is hypothesized to attenuate the downward flux of elements in the ocean. We investigated whether the zooplankton community composition could influence the flux attenuation, due to the differences of feeding modes (feeding on dispersed vs. aggregated particles) and of ......Zooplankton feeding activity is hypothesized to attenuate the downward flux of elements in the ocean. We investigated whether the zooplankton community composition could influence the flux attenuation, due to the differences of feeding modes (feeding on dispersed vs. aggregated particles...

  20. Annual progress report 1988, operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    In 1988 the High Flux Reactor Petten was routinely operated without any unforeseen event. The availability was 99% of scheduled operation. Utilization of the irradiation positions amounted to 80% of the practical occupation limit. The exploitation pattern comprised nuclear energy deployment, fundamental research with neutrons, and radioisotope production. General activities in support of running irradiation programmes progressed in the normal way. Development activities addressed upgrading of irradiation devices, neutron radiography and neutron capture therapy

  1. Comparison of annual dry and wet deposition fluxes of selected pesticides in Strasbourg, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauret, Nathalie; Wortham, Henri; Strekowski, Rafal; Herckes, Pierre; Nieto, Laura Ines

    2009-01-01

    This work summarizes the results of a study of atmospheric wet and dry deposition fluxes of Deisopropyl-atrazine (DEA), Desethyl-atrazine (DET), Atrazine, Terbuthylazine, Alachlor, Metolachlor, Diflufenican, Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, Iprodione, Isoproturon and Cymoxanil pesticides conducted in Strasbourg, France, from August 2000 through August 2001. The primary objective of this work was to calculate the total atmospheric pesticide deposition fluxes induced by atmospheric particles. To do this, a modified one-dimensional cloud water deposition model was used. All precipitation and deposition samples were collected at an urban forested park environment setting away from any direct point pesticide sources. The obtained deposition fluxes induced by atmospheric particles over a forested area showed that the dry deposition flux strongly contributes to the total deposition flux. The dry particle deposition fluxes are shown to contribute from 4% (DET) to 60% (cymoxanil) to the total deposition flux (wet + dry). - A modified one-dimensional cloud water deposition model is used to estimate the deposition fluxes of pesticides in the particle phase and compare the relative importance of dry and wet depositions

  2. Comparison of annual dry and wet deposition fluxes of selected pesticides in Strasbourg, France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sauret, Nathalie [Marseilles University, Laboratoire Chimie Provence - UMR 6264, Campus Saint Charles, Case 29, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseilles Cedex 03 (France); Wortham, Henri [Marseilles University, Laboratoire Chimie Provence - UMR 6264, Campus Saint Charles, Case 29, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseilles Cedex 03 (France)], E-mail: Henri.Wortham@univ-provence.fr; Strekowski, Rafal [Marseilles University, Laboratoire Chimie Provence - UMR 6264, Campus Saint Charles, Case 29, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseilles Cedex 03 (France); Herckes, Pierre [Arizona State University, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Tempe, AZ 85287-1604 (United States); Nieto, Laura Ines [Marseilles University, Laboratoire Chimie Provence - UMR 6264, Campus Saint Charles, Case 29, 3 Place Victor Hugo, 13331 Marseilles Cedex 03 (France)

    2009-01-15

    This work summarizes the results of a study of atmospheric wet and dry deposition fluxes of Deisopropyl-atrazine (DEA), Desethyl-atrazine (DET), Atrazine, Terbuthylazine, Alachlor, Metolachlor, Diflufenican, Fenoxaprop-p-ethyl, Iprodione, Isoproturon and Cymoxanil pesticides conducted in Strasbourg, France, from August 2000 through August 2001. The primary objective of this work was to calculate the total atmospheric pesticide deposition fluxes induced by atmospheric particles. To do this, a modified one-dimensional cloud water deposition model was used. All precipitation and deposition samples were collected at an urban forested park environment setting away from any direct point pesticide sources. The obtained deposition fluxes induced by atmospheric particles over a forested area showed that the dry deposition flux strongly contributes to the total deposition flux. The dry particle deposition fluxes are shown to contribute from 4% (DET) to 60% (cymoxanil) to the total deposition flux (wet + dry). - A modified one-dimensional cloud water deposition model is used to estimate the deposition fluxes of pesticides in the particle phase and compare the relative importance of dry and wet depositions.

  3. 1980 Annual status report: operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    HFR Petten has been operated in 1980 in fulfilment of the 1980/83 JRC Programme Decision. Both reactor operation and utilization data have been met within a few percent of the goals set out in the annual working schedule, in support of a large variety of research programmes. Major improvements to experimental facilities have been introduced during the year and future modernization has been prepared

  4. Annual report 1989 operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.; Gevers, A.

    1989-01-01

    In 1989 the operation of the High Flux Reactor Petten was carried out as planned. The availability was more than 100% of scheduled operating time. The average occupation of the reactor by experimental devices was 72% of the practical occupation limit. The reactor was utilized for research programmes in support of nuclear fission reactors and thermonuclear fusion, for fundamental research with neutrons and for radioisotope production. General activities in support of running irradiation programmes progressed in the normal way. Development activities addressed upgrading of irradiation devices, neutron radiography and neutron capture therapy

  5. Annual report 1990. Operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.; Gevers, A.

    1990-01-01

    In 1990 the operation of the High Flux Reactor was carried out as planned. The availability was 96% of scheduled operating time. The average utilization of the reactor was 71% of the practical limit. The reactor was utilized for research programmes in support of nuclear fission reactors and thermonuclear fusion, for fundamental research with neutrons, for radioisotope production, and for various smaller activities. General activities in support of running irradiation programmes progressed in the normal way. Development activities addressed upgrading of irradiation devices, neutron radiography and neutron capture therapy

  6. Annual Report 1991. Operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlf, J.; Gevers, A.

    1992-01-01

    In 1991 the operation of the High Flux Reactor was carried out as planned. The availability was more than 100% of scheduled operating time. The average utilization of the reactor was 69% of the practical limit. The reactor was utilized for research programmes in support of nuclear fission reactors and thermonuclear fusion, for fundamental research with neutrons, for radioisotope production, and for various smaller activities. Development activities addressed upgrading of irradiation devices, neutron capture therapy, neutron radiography and neutron transmutation doping of silicon. General activities in support of running irradiation programmes progressed in the normal way

  7. Gyrokinetic modelling of the quasilinear particle flux for plasmas with neutral-beam fuelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, E.; Honda, M.; Nakata, M.; Yoshida, M.; Takenaga, H.; Hayashi, N.

    2018-02-01

    A quasilinear particle flux is modelled based on gyrokinetic calculations. The particle flux is estimated by determining factors, namely, coefficients of off-diagonal terms and a particle diffusivity. In this paper, the methodology to estimate the factors is presented using a subset of JT-60U plasmas. First, the coefficients of off-diagonal terms are estimated by linear gyrokinetic calculations. Next, to obtain the particle diffusivity, a semi-empirical approach is taken. Most experimental analyses for particle transport have assumed that turbulent particle fluxes are zero in the core region. On the other hand, even in the stationary state, the plasmas in question have a finite turbulent particle flux due to neutral-beam fuelling. By combining estimates of the experimental turbulent particle flux and the coefficients of off-diagonal terms calculated earlier, the particle diffusivity is obtained. The particle diffusivity should reflect a saturation amplitude of instabilities. The particle diffusivity is investigated in terms of the effects of the linear instability and linear zonal flow response, and it is found that a formula including these effects roughly reproduces the particle diffusivity. The developed framework for prediction of the particle flux is flexible to add terms neglected in the current model. The methodology to estimate the quasilinear particle flux requires so low computational cost that a database consisting of the resultant coefficients of off-diagonal terms and particle diffusivity can be constructed to train a neural network. The development of the methodology is the first step towards a neural-network-based particle transport model for fast prediction of the particle flux.

  8. 10Be/230Th ratios as proxy for particle flux in the equatorial Pacific ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.F.; Fleisher, M.Q.; Kubik, P.W.; Suter, M.

    1997-01-01

    Particulate 10 Be/ 230 Th ratios collected by sediment traps in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean exhibit a positive correlation with particle flux, but little or no correlation with particle composition. (author) 1 fig., 4 refs

  9. Annual sediment flux estimates in a tidal strait using surrogate measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganju, N.K.; Schoellhamer, D.H.

    2006-01-01

    Annual suspended-sediment flux estimates through Carquinez Strait (the seaward boundary of Suisun Bay, California) are provided based on surrogate measurements for advective, dispersive, and Stokes drift flux. The surrogates are landward watershed discharge, suspended-sediment concentration at one location in the Strait, and the longitudinal salinity gradient. The first two surrogates substitute for tidally averaged discharge and velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration in the Strait, thereby providing advective flux estimates, while Stokes drift is estimated with suspended-sediment concentration alone. Dispersive flux is estimated using the product of longitudinal salinity gradient and the root-mean-square value of velocity-weighted suspended-sediment concentration as an added surrogate variable. Cross-sectional measurements validated the use of surrogates during the monitoring period. During high freshwater flow advective and dispersive flux were in the seaward direction, while landward dispersive flux dominated and advective flux approached zero during low freshwater flow. Stokes drift flux was consistently in the landward direction. Wetter than average years led to net export from Suisun Bay, while dry years led to net sediment import. Relatively low watershed sediment fluxes to Suisun Bay contribute to net export during the wet season, while gravitational circulation in Carquinez Strait and higher suspended-sediment concentrations in San Pablo Bay (seaward end of Carquinez Strait) are responsible for the net import of sediment during the dry season. Annual predictions of suspended-sediment fluxes, using these methods, will allow for a sediment budget for Suisun Bay, which has implications for marsh restoration and nutrient/contaminant transport. These methods also provide a general framework for estimating sediment fluxes in estuarine environments, where temporal and spatial variability of transport are large. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  10. Particle concentration and flux dynamics in the atmospheric boundary layer as the indicator of formation mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauros, J.; Sogachev, Andrey; Smolander, S.

    2011-01-01

    the atmospheric boundary layer during nucleation event days shows a highly dynamical picture, where particle formation is coupled with chemistry and turbulent transport. We have demonstrated the suitability of our turbulent mixing scheme in reproducing the most important characteristics of particle dynamics...... within the boundary layer. Deposition and particle flux simulations show that deposition affects noticeably only the smallest particles...

  11. Particle Physics Committee annual report 1976-77, particle physics grants and laboratory agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The Annual Report for the period 1 August 1976 to 31 July 1977 of the Particel Physics Committee of the Nuclear Physics Board, under the (United Kingdom) Science Research Council, is presented. Details are given of particle physics grants and laboratory agreements. (U.K.)

  12. Fresh water influx and particle flux variability in the Bay of Bengal

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Schafer, P.; Ittekkot, V.; Bartsch, M.; Nair, R.R.; Tiemann, J.

    stream_size 22 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Particle_Flux_Ocean_Chapter_15_1996_271.pdf.txt stream_source_info Particle_Flux_Ocean_Chapter_15_1996_271.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  13. Processes determining seasonality and interannual variability of settling particle fluxes to the deep Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Haake, B.; Rixen, T.; Reemtsma, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Ittekkot, V.

    stream_size 20 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Particle_Flux_Ocean_Chapter_14_1996_251.pdf.txt stream_source_info Particle_Flux_Ocean_Chapter_14_1996_251.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  14. Particle fluxes in the Bay of Bengal measurEd. by sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.; Parthiban, G.

    Particle fluxes were measured between October, 1987 and March, 1988 using six automated time series sediment traps at three locations in the northern, central and southern Bay of Bengal. Particle fluxes varied between 16.8 and 345 mg m/2 day/1...

  15. Operation of the High Flux Reactor. Annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    This year was characterized by the end of a major rebuilding of the installation during which the reactor vessel and its peripheral components were replaced by new and redesigned equipment. Both operational safety and experimental use were largely improved by the replacement. The reactor went back to routine operation on February 14, 1985, and has been operating without problem since then. All performance parameters were met. Other upgrading actions started during the year concerned new heat exchangers and improvements to the reactor building complex. The experimental load of the High Flux Reactor reached a satisfactory level with an average of 57%. New developments aimed at future safety related irradiation tests and at novel applications of neutrons from the horizontal beam tubes. A unique remote encapsulation hot cell facility became available adding new possibilities for fast breeder fuel testing and for intermediate specimen examination. The HFR Programme hosted an international meeting on development and use of reduced enrichment fuel for research reactors. All aspects of core physics, manufacture technology, and licensing of novel, proliferation-free, research reactor fuel were debated

  16. Active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes in EAST towards advanced steady state operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, L., E-mail: lwang@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Guo, H.Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); General Atomics, P. O. Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186 (United States); Li, J.; Wan, B.N.; Gong, X.Z.; Zhang, X.D.; Hu, J.S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Liang, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Association EURATOM-FZJ, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Xu, G.S. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Zou, X.L. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Loarte, A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 St Paul Lez Durance (France); Maingi, R.; Menard, J.E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States); Luo, G.N.; Gao, X.; Hu, L.Q.; Gan, K.F.; Liu, S.C.; Wang, H.Q.; Chen, R. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); and others

    2015-08-15

    Significant progress has been made in EAST towards advanced steady state operations by active control of divertor heat and particle fluxes. Many innovative techniques have been developed to mitigate transient ELM and stationary heat fluxes on the divertor target plates. It has been found that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) can lead to edge plasma ergodization, striation of the stationary heat flux and lower ELM transient heat and particle fluxes. With multi-pulse supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) to quantitatively regulate the divertor particle flux, the divertor power footprint pattern can be actively modified. H-modes have been extended over 30 s in EAST with the divertor peak heat flux and the target temperature being controlled well below 2 MW/m{sup 2} and 250 °C, respectively, by integrating these new methods, coupled with advanced lithium wall conditioning and internal divertor pumping, along with an edge coherent mode to provide continuous particle and power exhaust.

  17. The Oceanic Flux Program: A three decade time-series of particle flux in the deep Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J. C.; Conte, M. H.

    2010-12-01

    The Oceanic Flux Program (OFP), 75 km SE of Bermuda, is the longest running time-series of its kind. Initiated in 1978, the OFP has produced an unsurpassed, nearly continuous record of temporal variability in deep ocean fluxes, with a >90% temporal coverage at 3200m depth. The OFP, in conjunction with the co-located Bermuda-Atlantic Time Series (BATS) and the Bermuda Testbed Mooring (BTM) time-series, has provided key observations enabling detailed assessment of how seasonal and non-seasonal variability in the deep ocean is linked with the overlying physical and biogeochemical environment. This talk will focus on the short-term flux variability that overlies the seasonal flux pattern in the Sargasso Sea, emphasizing episodic extreme flux events. Extreme flux events are responsible for much of the year-to-year variability in mean annual flux and are most often observed during early winter and late spring when surface stratification is weak or transient. In addition to biological phenomena (e.g. salp blooms), passage of productive meso-scale features such as eddies, which alter surface water mixing characteristics and surface export fluxes, may initiate some extreme flux events. Yet other productive eddies show a minimal influence on the deep flux, underscoring the importance of upper ocean ecosystem structure and midwater processes on the coupling between the surface ocean environment and deep fluxes. Using key organic and inorganic tracers, causative processes that influence deep flux generation and the strength of the coupling with the surface ocean environment can be identified.

  18. A sampling strategy for estimating plot average annual fluxes of chemical elements from forest soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brus, D.J.; Gruijter, de J.J.; Vries, de W.

    2010-01-01

    A sampling strategy for estimating spatially averaged annual element leaching fluxes from forest soils is presented and tested in three Dutch forest monitoring plots. In this method sampling locations and times (days) are selected by probability sampling. Sampling locations were selected by

  19. Simultaneous coastal measurements of ozone deposition fluxes and iodine-mediated particle emission fluxes with subsequent CCN formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Whitehead

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we present the first observations of simultaneous ozone deposition fluxes and ultrafine particle emission fluxes over an extensive infra-littoral zone. Fluxes were measured by the eddy covariance technique at the Station Biologique de Roscoff, on the coast of Brittany, north-west France. This site overlooks a very wide (3 km littoral zone controlled by very deep tides (9.6 m exposing extensive macroalgae beds available for significant iodine mediated photochemical production of ultrafine particles. The aspect at the Station Biologique de Roscoff provides an extensive and relatively flat, uniform fetch within which micrometeorological techniques may be utilized to study links between ozone deposition to macroalgae (and sea water and ultrafine particle production.

    Ozone deposition to seawater at high tide was significantly slower (vd[O3]=0.302±0.095 mm s−1 than low tidal deposition. A statistically significant difference in the deposition velocities to macroalgae at low tide was observed between night time (vd[O3]=1.00±0.10 mm s−1 and daytime (vd[O3]=2.05±0.16 mm s−1 when ultrafine particle formation results in apparent particle emission. Very high emission fluxes of ultrafine particles were observed during daytime periods at low tides ranging from 50 000 particles cm−2 s−1 to greater than 200 000 particles cm−2 s−1 during some of the lowest tides. These emission fluxes exhibited a significant relationship with particle number concentrations comparable with previous observations at another location. Apparent particle growth rates were estimated to be in the range 17–150 nm h−1 for particles in the size range 3–10 nm. Under certain conditions, particle growth may be inferred to continue to greater than 120 nm over tens

  20. Energy selecting action of limiters on particle fluxes penetrating into the SOL-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hildebrandt, D.

    1986-01-01

    A single model of the penetration of particle effluxes from the core plasma into the SOL-plasma of tokamaks is proposed. The assumptions made are free streaming of particles parallel to the magnetic field and anomalous particle transport perpendicular to the toroidal field with a constant radial velocity. The model has been proved for measured particle fluxes of Li which was injected into the core plasma of the tokamak T-10. The dependence of the Li-particle flux on the minor radius as well as toroidal asymmetries in the SOL-plasma can be explained by the results of the calculations. (author)

  1. Size-resolved fluxes of sub-100-nm particles over forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryor, Sara; Barthelmie, Rebecca Jane; Spaulding, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    Dry deposition of atmospheric particles is critically dependent on particle size and plays a key role in dictating the mass and number distributions of atmospheric particles. However, modeling dry deposition is constrained by a lack of understanding of controlling dependencies and accurate size......-resolved observations. We present size-resolved particle number fluxes for sub-100-nm particle diameters (Dp) over a deciduous forest derived using eddy covariance applied to data from a fast mobility particle sizer. The size-resolved particle number fluxes in 18 diameters between 8 and 100 nm were collected during...... leaf-on and are statistically robust. Particle deposition velocities normalized by friction velocity (v d +) are approximately four times smaller than comparable values for coniferous forests reported elsewhere. Comparison of the data with output from a new one-dimensional mechanistic particle...

  2. On the origin of particle fluxes from thunderclouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Chilingaryan, S.; Karapetyan, T.; Khanikyants, Y.; Pokhsraryan, D.; Soghomonyan, S.

    2017-01-01

    We present the observational data on registration of atmospheric discharges simultaneously with the detection of elementary particles performed during thunderstorms at 3200m altitudes above sea level on Mt. Aragats in Armenia. Throughout the 2016 summer campaign on Aragats we monitored lightning occurrences and signals from NaI spectrometers, plastic scintillators, and Neutron Monitor proportional counters, and analyzed the shape of registered pulses. Particle detector signals were synchronized with lightning occurrences on microsecond time scale. Our measurements prove that all signals registered by particle detectors simultaneously with lightning were Electromagnetic interferences (EMI) and not typical responses of particle detectors on the passage of neutral or charged elementary particles. (author)

  3. Heated submicron particle fluxes using an optical particle counter in urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, M.; Johansson, C.; Mårtensson, M.; Struthers, H.; Ahlm, L.; Nilsson, D.

    2013-03-01

    From May 2008 to March 2009 aerosol emissions were measured using the eddy covariance method covering the size range 0.25 to 2.5 μm diameter (Dp) from a 105 m tower, in central Stockholm, Sweden. Supporting chemical aerosol data were collected at roof and street level. Results show that the inorganic fraction of sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and sea salt accounts for approximately 15% of the total aerosol mass removed at 0.6 μm Dp. Further heating to 300 °C caused very little additional losses road traffic (as inferred from the ratio of the incremental concentrations of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and BC measured on a densely trafficked street) and the fluxes of non-volatile material at tower level are in close agreement, suggesting a traffic source of BC. We have estimated the emission factors (EFs) for non-volatile particles <0.6 μm Dp to be 2.4 ± 1.4 mg veh-1 km-1 based on either CO2 fluxes or traffic activity data. Light (LDV) and heavy duty vehicle (HDV) EFs were estimated using multiple linear regression and reveal that for non-volatile particulate matter in the 0.25 to 0.6 μm Dp range, the EFHDV is approximately twice as high as the EFLDV, the difference not being statistically significant.

  4. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.

    1995-01-01

    This is the annual progress report of the University of Florida's elementary particle physics group. The theoretical high energy physics group's research covers a broad range of topics, including both theory and phenomenology. Present work of the experimental high energy physics group is directed toward the CLEO detector, with some effort going to B physics at Fermilab. The Axion Search project is participating in the operation of a large-scale axion detector at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with the University of Florida taking responsibility for this experiment's high-resolution spectrometer's assembly, programming, and installation, and planning to take shifts during operation of the detector in FY96. The report also includes a continuation of the University's three-year proposal to the United States Department of Energy to upgrade the University's high-energy physics computing equipment and to continue student support, system manager/programmer support, and maintenance. Report includes lists of presentations and publications by members of the group

  5. Particles and energy fluxes from a conformal field theory perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, A.; Navarro-Salas, J.; Olmo, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze the creation of particles in two dimensions under the action of conformal transformations. We focus our attention on Mobius transformations and compare the usual approach, based on the Bogoliubov coefficients, with an alternative but equivalent viewpoint based on correlation functions. In the latter approach the absence of particle production under full Mobius transformations is manifest. Moreover, we give examples, using the moving-mirror analogy, to illustrate the close relation between the production of quanta and energy

  6. Limits for the fluxes of non-conventional particles in muon showers underground

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dardo, M.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Mannocchi, G.; Picchi, P.; Visentin, R.; Sitte, K.

    1975-01-01

    A search for non-conventional massive particles was carried out with the Mt. Cappuccini spark chamber array, by a study of the interactions initiated in the chamber absorbers. Neither an excess of large electro-magnetic cascades, nor an excess of large-angle scattering events was found. Likewise no difference was seen between the interaction features of prompt and of delayed shower particles. The estimated upper limits of the underground fluxes are not or barely consistent with the assumptions of the mandela or passive X-particle hypotheses; zero fluxes appear most likely. (orig./BJ) [de

  7. Signatures of energy flux in particle production: a black hole birth cry and death gasp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, Michael R.R. [Department of Physics, Nazarbayev University,53 Kabanbay Batyr Ave., Astana, Republic of (Kazakhstan); Ong, Yen Chin [Nordic Institute for Theoretical Physics, KTH Royal Institute of Technology Stockholm University,Roslagstullsbacken 23, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-27

    It is recently argued that if the Hawking radiation process is unitary, then a black hole’s mass cannot be monotonically decreasing. We examine the time dependent particle count and negative energy flux in the non-trivial conformal vacuum via the moving mirror approach. A new, exactly unitary solution is presented which emits a characteristic above-thermal positive energy burst, a thermal plateau, and negative energy flux. It is found that the characteristic positive energy flare and thermal plateau is observed in the particle outflow. However, the results of time dependent particle production show no overt indication of negative energy flux. Therefore, a black hole’s birth cry is detectable by asymptotic observers via particle count, whereas its death gasp is not.

  8. The causal relation between turbulent particle flux and density gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milligen, B. Ph. van; Martín de Aguilera, A.; Hidalgo, C. [CIEMAT - Laboratorio Nacional de Fusión, Avda. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Carreras, B. A. [BACV Solutions, 110 Mohawk Road, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 (United States); García, L.; Nicolau, J. H. [Universidad Carlos III, 28911 Leganés, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-07-15

    A technique for detecting the causal relationship between fluctuating signals is used to investigate the relation between flux and gradient in fusion plasmas. Both a resistive pressure gradient driven turbulence model and experimental Langmuir probe data from the TJ-II stellarator are studied. It is found that the maximum influence occurs at a finite time lag (non-instantaneous response) and that quasi-periodicities exist. Furthermore, the model results show very long range radial influences, extending over most of the investigated regions, possibly related to coupling effects associated with plasma self-organization. These results clearly show that transport in fusion plasmas is not local and instantaneous, as is sometimes assumed.

  9. Characteristics of flux variations of energetic particles associated with storm sudden commencement at synchronous orbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomomura, Kiyoshi; Kato, Yoshio; Sakurai, Tohru

    1982-01-01

    Characteristics of flux variations of energetic particles associated with Storm Sudden Commencement (SSC) are examined on the basis of the particle's data observed by solid state detecter onboard the synchronous satellite, GMS ''Himawari'', during the period from Febuary 1978 to August 1979. The energy of the particles are covered from 1.2 to 4.0 MeV for proton and greater than 2 MeV for electron, respectively. The flux variations for protons generally increase in association with SSC. However, for electrons, they show the increase except 7 events (the decrease event) among 40 events studied. It is evident that the values of the flux attained immediately after SSC (J) clearly depend on those just before SSC(J 0 ). They follow a Power law (J proportional J 0 sup( n)). The variation of the proton flux ( + ΔJ + = + J - J 0+ ) increases with the value of the flux just before SSC. In both increase and decrease events for electrons, the variation of the flux tends to increase until the flux just before SSC attains the value of 10 4 , then to decrease as its value exceeds 10 4 . (author)

  10. Enhancement of low energy particle flux around plasmapause under quiet geomagnetic condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J.

    2016-12-01

    Plasmapause is the boundary of the plasmaspheric region where cold plasma is dominant. In this boundary, the plasma density shows depletion to 1 10 on direction from the plasmasphere to magnetosphere and changes composition of energy distribution of particle. Some previous study provides that the location of the plasmapause expand beyond geosynchronous orbit under the quiet geomagnetic conditions. In this work, we study the changed characteristic of particle flux around the plasmapause using measurement from Van Allen Probes. On 23 April 2013, the satellites observed simultaneously proton and electron fluxes enhancement with E > 100 eV. During 12 hours prior to this event, the geomagnetic conditions were very quiet, Kp < 1, and geomagnetic storm did not occur. This event maintain for 15 minutes and only proton flux decrease rapidly in the magnetosphere. In this period SYM-H index enhanced abruptly in response to the impact of the dynamic pressure enhancement and AE index increased gradually up to about 200 nT. Electric field started to perturb in coincidence with enhancement of particle flux from the plasmapause. To explain the variation of low energy particle flux we will compare kinetic property of low energy particle by using velocity space distribution function at region of inner and outer boundary of the plasmapause.

  11. Inter-annual and spatial variability in hillslope runoff and mercury flux during spring snowmelt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Kristine M; Mitchell, Carl P J

    2012-08-01

    Spring snowmelt is an important period of mercury (Hg) export from watersheds. Limited research has investigated the potential effects of climate variability on hydrologic and Hg fluxes during spring snowmelt. The purpose of this research was to assess the potential impacts of inter-annual climate variability on Hg mobility in forested uplands, as well as spatial variability in hillslope hydrology and Hg fluxes. We compared hydrological flows, Hg and solute mobility from three adjacent hillslopes in the S7 watershed of the Marcell Experimental Forest, Minnesota during two very different spring snowmelt periods: one following a winter (2009-2010) with severely diminished snow accumulation (snow water equivalent (SWE) = 48 mm) with an early melt, and a second (2010-2011) with significantly greater winter snow accumulation (SWE = 98 mm) with average to late melt timing. Observed inter-annual differences in total Hg (THg) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) yields were predominantly flow-driven, as the proportion by which solute yields increased was the same as the increase in runoff. Accounting for inter-annual differences in flow, there was no significant difference in THg and DOC export between the two snowmelt periods. The spring 2010 snowmelt highlighted the important contribution of melting soil frost in the timing of a considerable portion of THg exported from the hillslope, accounting for nearly 30% of the THg mobilized. Differences in slope morphology and soil depths to the confining till layer were important in controlling the large observed spatial variability in hydrological flowpaths, transmissivity feedback responses, and Hg flux trends across the adjacent hillslopes.

  12. Particle export fluxes to the oxygen minimum zone of the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Anja; Wagner, Hannes; Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Wilson, Samuel T.

    2017-04-01

    In the ocean, sinking of particulate organic matter (POM) drives carbon export from the euphotic zone and supplies nutrition to mesopelagic communities, the feeding and degradation activities of which in turn lead to export flux attenuation. Oxygen (O2) minimum zones (OMZs) with suboxic water layers ( 100 µmol O2 kg-1), supposedly due to reduced heterotrophic activity. This study focuses on sinking particle fluxes through hypoxic mesopelagic waters (warming, acidification and enhanced stratification.

  13. Behavior of TPC`s in a high particle flux environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etkin, A.; Eiseman, S.E.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Lindenbaum, S.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K.H.; Zhu, Y. [City College of New York, New York (United States); Hallman, T.J.; Madansky, L. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Ahmad, S.; Bonner, B.E.; Buchanan, J.A.; Chiou, C.N.; Clement, J.M.; Mutchler, G.S.; Roberts, J.B. [Bonner Nuclear Lab., Houston, TX (United States)

    1991-12-31

    TPC`s (Time Projection Chamber) used in E-810 at the TAGS (Alternating Gradient Synchrotron) were exposed to fluxes equivalent to more than 10 minimum ionizing particles per second to find if such high fluxes cause gain changes or distortions of the electric field. Initial results of these and other tests are presented and the consequences for the RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) TPC-based experiments are discussed.

  14. HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES FLUX ORIGIN IN THE CLOUDS, DARK LIGHTNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsov, V.V.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Problem of high-energy particles flux origin in clouds is discussed. Conditions in which dark lightning preceding the ordinary one and creating additional ionization, fluxes of fast electrons with MeV energy prior to the earthquake detected among lightning initiating ball-lightning, glow, sprites are considered. All above phenomena appear to be of general nature founded on quantum entanglement of hydrogen bonds protons in water clasters inside clouds.

  15. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzi, Luxherta, E-mail: l.buzi@fz-juelich.de [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Université de Lorraine, Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS UMR 7198, Bvd. des Aiguillettes, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France); Temmerman, Greg De [FOM Institute DIFFER-Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Edisonbaan 14, 3439 MN, PO Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Oost, Guido Van [Ghent University, Department of Applied Physics, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Möller, Sören [Institut für Energie und Klimaforschung – Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Leo-Brandt-Straße, 52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-12-15

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10{sup 23} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s and low: 9 · 10{sup 21} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10{sup 26} D{sup +}/m{sup 2} and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion.

  16. Influence of particle flux density and temperature on surface modifications of tungsten and deuterium retention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzi, Luxherta; Temmerman, Greg De; Unterberg, Bernhard; Reinhart, Michael; Litnovsky, Andrey; Philipps, Volker; Oost, Guido Van; Möller, Sören

    2014-01-01

    Systematic study of deuterium irradiation effects on tungsten was done under ITER – relevant high particle flux density, scanning a broad surface temperature range. Polycrystalline ITER – like grade tungsten samples were exposed in linear plasma devices to two different ranges of deuterium ion flux densities (high: 3.5–7 · 10 23 D + /m 2 s and low: 9 · 10 21 D + /m 2 s). Particle fluence and ion energy, respectively 10 26 D + /m 2 and ∼38 eV were kept constant in all cases. The experiments were performed at three different surface temperatures 530 K, 630 K and 870 K. Experimental results concerning the deuterium retention and surface modifications of low flux exposure confirmed previous investigations. At temperatures 530 K and 630 K, deuterium retention was higher at lower flux density due to the longer exposure time (steady state plasma operation) and a consequently deeper diffusion range. At 870 K, deuterium retention was found to be higher at high flux density according to the thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) measurements. While blisters were completely absent at low flux density, small blisters of about 40–50 nm were formed at high flux density exposure. At the given conditions, a relation between deuterium retention and blister formation has been found which has to be considered in addition to deuterium trapping in defects populated by diffusion

  17. A review of dryout heat fluxes and coolability of particle beds. APRI 4, Stage 2 Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindholm, Ilona

    2002-04-01

    Dryout heat flux experiments on particle beds have been reviewed. The observed dryout heat flux varies from some tens of kW/m 2 to well over 1 MW/m 2 . The variation can be qualitatively and to some extent also quantitatively explained. The effect of particle diameter has been clearly demonstrated. For particles having diameter less than about 1 mm, the dryout heat flux on the order of 100-200 kW/m 2 , and increases on square of the particle diameter. For larger than 1 mm particles the dryout heat flux increases on square root of the particle diameter. Typical values for ∼ 5 mm particles is 500 kW/m 2 to 1 MW/m 2 . An effect of bed thickness can be seen for small particles and medium range (50-500 mm) beds. For thick beds, > 500 mm, the dryout heat flux does not any more change as the bed height increases. The dryout heat flux increases with increasing coolant pressure. This can be explained by the increasing vapour density, which can remove more latent heat from the bed. Debris bed stratification, with small particles on top, clearly decreases the dryout heat flux. The dryout heat flux in a stratified bed can even be smaller than a heat flux of an equivalent debris bed consisting of the smaller particles alone. This is due to the capillary force, which draws liquid towards the smaller particles and causes the dryout to occur at the interface of the particle layers. A model has been developed by Lipinski to estimate dryout heat fluxes in a particle bed. The model has been derived based on solution of momentum, energy and mass conservation equations for two phases. The 1-D model can take into account variable particle sizes (stratification) along the bed and different coolant entry positions. It has been shown that the model can quite well predict the observed dryout characteristics in most experiments. The simpler 0-D model can give reasonable estimates for non-stratified beds. Results and observations of several tests on melt jet fragmentation in a water pool

  18. Particle flux and temperature dependence of carbon impurity production from an inertially-cooled limiter in tore supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMichelis, C.; Monier-Garbet, P.; Guilhem, D.

    1998-01-01

    A visible endoscope system and an infrared camera system have been used to study the flux of carbon from an inertially-cooled graphite limiter in Tore Supra. From the variation in the carbon flux with plasma parameters new data have been obtained describing the dependence of radiation enhanced sublimation (RES) and chemical sputtering on incident ion flux. Other characteristics of RES under plasma operation conditions have also been studied. The dependence of RES on incident deuterium particle flux density is found to be in reasonable agreement with the expected particle flux scaling over a range of particle fluxes varying by a factor ∼ 25, extending the present scaling to higher flux density values. Chemical sputtering has been observed, but only in regions of the limiter with low incident deuterium fluxes. Values inferred for the chemical sputtering yield are similar to those measured with a temperature controlled test limiter in Textor. (author)

  19. {sup 10}Be/{sup 230}Th ratios as proxy for particle flux in the equatorial Pacific ocean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.F.; Fleisher, M.Q. [LDEO of Columbia Univ. (United States); Kubik, P.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Suter, M. [Eidgenoessische Technische Hochschule, Zurich (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Particulate {sup 10}Be/{sup 230}Th ratios collected by sediment traps in the central equatorial Pacific Ocean exhibit a positive correlation with particle flux, but little or no correlation with particle composition. (author) 1 fig., 4 refs.

  20. Annual and latitudinal variations of surface fluxes and meteorological variables at Arctic terrestrial sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grachev, Andrey; Uttal, Taneil; Persson, Ola; Konopleva-Akish, Elena; Crepinsek, Sara; Cox, Christopher; Fairall, Christopher; Makshtas, Alexander; Repina, Irina

    2016-04-01

    This study analyzes and discusses seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface fluxes (turbulent, radiative, and soil ground heat) and other ancillary surface/snow/permafrost data based on in-situ measurements made at two long-term research observatories near the coast of the Arctic Ocean located in Canada and Russia. The hourly averaged data collected at Eureka (Canadian territory of Nunavut) and Tiksi (East Siberia) located at two quite different latitudes (80.0 N and 71.6 N respectively) are analyzed in details to describe the seasons in the Arctic. Although Eureka and Tiksi are located at the different continents and at the different latitudes, the annual course of the surface meteorology and the surface fluxes are qualitatively very similar. The air and soil temperatures display the familiar strong seasonal trend with maximum of measured temperatures in mid-summer and minimum during winter. According to our data, variation in incoming short-wave solar radiation led the seasonal pattern of the air and soil temperatures, and the turbulent fluxes. During the dark Polar nights, air and ground temperatures are strongly controlled by long-wave radiation associated generally with cloud cover. Due to the fact that in average the higher latitudes receive less solar radiation than lower latitudes, a length of the convective atmospheric boundary layer (warm season) is shorter and middle-summer amplitude of the turbulent fluxes is generally less in Eureka than in Tiksi. However, since solar elevation angle at local midnight in the middle of Arctic summer is higher for Eureka as compared to Tiksi, stable stratification and upward turbulent flux for carbon dioxide is generally did not observed at Eureka site during summer seasons. It was found a high correlation between the turbulent fluxes of sensible and latent heat, carbon dioxide and the net solar radiation. A comprehensive evaluation of energy balance closure problem is performed based on the multi-year data sets

  1. Kinetic Simulations of Plasma Energization and Particle Acceleration in Interacting Magnetic Flux Ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, S.; Guo, F.; Zank, G. P.; Li, X.; Stanier, A.

    2017-12-01

    The interaction between magnetic flux ropes has been suggested as a process that leads to efficient plasma energization and particle acceleration (e.g., Drake et al. 2013; Zank et al. 2014). However, the underlying plasma dynamics and acceleration mechanisms are subject to examination of numerical simulations. As a first step of this effort, we carry out 2D fully kinetic simulations using the VPIC code to study the plasma energization and particle acceleration during coalescence of two magnetic flux ropes. Our analysis shows that the reconnection electric field and compression effect are important in plasma energization. The results may help understand the energization process associated with magnetic flux ropes frequently observed in the solar wind near the heliospheric current sheet.

  2. Slowing down tail enhanced, neoclassical and classical alpha particle fluxes in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, P.J.; Tessarotto, M.

    1988-01-01

    The classical and neoclassical particle and energy fluxes associated with a slowing down tail, alpha particle distribution function are evaluated for arbitrary aspect ratio ε -1 , cross section, and poloidal magnetic field. The retention of both electron and ion drag and pitch angle scattering by the background ions results in a large diffusive neoclassical heat flux in the plasma core. This flux remains substantial at larger radii only if the characteristic speed associated with pitch angle scattering, v/sub b/, is close enough to the alpha birth speed v 0 so that ε(v 0 /v/sub b/) 3 remains less than some order unity critical value which is not determined by the methods herein. The enhanced neoclassical losses would only have a serious impact on ignition if the critical value of ε(v 0 /v/sub b/) 3 is found to be somewhat larger than unity

  3. Multi-annual fluxes of carbon dioxide from an intensively cultivated temperate peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cumming, Alex; Balzter, Heiko; Evans, Chris; Kaduk, Joerg; Morrison, Ross; Page, Susan

    2016-04-01

    East Anglia contains the largest continuous area of lowland fen peatlands in the United Kingdom (UK) which store vast quantities of terrestrial carbon (C) that have accrued over millennia. These long term C stores have largely been drained and converted for agricultural land use over the last 400 years due to their high agricultural production potential. Initial drainage of these peatlands leads to surface lowering and peat wastage. Prolonged exposure of carbon dense peat soils to oxygen through continued agricultural management results in sustained losses of carbon dioxide (CO₂) to the atmosphere. An increasing population in the UK has the potential to put further stress on these productive but rapidly diminishing Grade 1 agricultural land. Improving our understanding of land management impacts on CO₂ emissions from these soils is crucial to improving their longevity as an important store of C and as an economic resource. Our measurements at an intensively cultivated lowland peatland in Norfolk, UK, are the first multi-annual record using the micrometeorological eddy covariance (EC) technique to measure CO₂ fluxes associated with the production of horticultural salad crops. Three full years of flux measurements over leek (2013), lettuce (2014) and celery (2015) cropping systems found that the site was a net annual source of CO₂ with a net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of 6.59, 7.84 and 7.71 t C-CO₂ ha-1 a-1 respectively. The leek crop, with its longer growing period, had a lower annual NEE due to its long growth period from early spring through to late autumn, whereas the shorter growing periods of lettuce and celery meant their peak growth (CO₂ uptake, Gross Primary Productivity, GPP) took place during early/mid-summer with post-harvest weeds exploiting the later growing season but exhibited lower CO₂ assimilation than the leek crop. Periods of high CO₂ emissions from the soil to the atmosphere were measured during mechanical disruptions to the soils

  4. BOREAS RSS-8 BIOME-BGC SSA Simulation of Annual Water and Carbon Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); Kimball, John

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-8 team performed research to evaluate the effect of seasonal weather and landcover heterogeneity on boreal forest regional water and carbon fluxes using a process-level ecosystem model, BIOME-BGC, coupled with remote sensing-derived parameter maps of key state variables. This data set contains derived maps of landcover type and crown and stem biomass as model inputs to determine annual evapotranspiration, gross primary production, autotrophic respiration, and net primary productivity within the BOREAS SSA-MSA, at a 30-m spatial resolution. Model runs were conducted over a 3-year period from 1994-1996; images are provided for each of those years. The data are stored in binary image format. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  5. Long-term nitrous oxide fluxes in annual and perennial agricultural and unmanaged ecosystems in the upper Midwest USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Ilya; Shcherbak, Iurii; Millar, Neville; Kravchenko, Alexandra N; Robertson, G Philip

    2016-11-01

    Differences in soil nitrous oxide (N 2 O) fluxes among ecosystems are often difficult to evaluate and predict due to high spatial and temporal variabilities and few direct experimental comparisons. For 20 years, we measured N 2 O fluxes in 11 ecosystems in southwest Michigan USA: four annual grain crops (corn-soybean-wheat rotations) managed with conventional, no-till, reduced input, or biologically based/organic inputs; three perennial crops (alfalfa, poplar, and conifers); and four unmanaged ecosystems of different successional age including mature forest. Average N 2 O emissions were higher from annual grain and N-fixing cropping systems than from nonleguminous perennial cropping systems and were low across unmanaged ecosystems. Among annual cropping systems full-rotation fluxes were indistinguishable from one another but rotation phase mattered. For example, those systems with cover crops and reduced fertilizer N emitted more N 2 O during the corn and soybean phases, but during the wheat phase fluxes were ~40% lower. Likewise, no-till did not differ from conventional tillage over the entire rotation but reduced emissions ~20% in the wheat phase and increased emissions 30-80% in the corn and soybean phases. Greenhouse gas intensity for the annual crops (flux per unit yield) was lowest for soybeans produced under conventional management, while for the 11 other crop × management combinations intensities were similar to one another. Among the fertilized systems, emissions ranged from 0.30 to 1.33 kg N 2 O-N ha -1  yr -1 and were best predicted by IPCC Tier 1 and ΔEF emission factor approaches. Annual cumulative fluxes from perennial systems were best explained by soil NO3- pools (r 2  = 0.72) but not so for annual crops, where management differences overrode simple correlations. Daily soil N 2 O emissions were poorly predicted by any measured variables. Overall, long-term measurements reveal lower fluxes in nonlegume perennial vegetation and, for

  6. Annual balances of CH4 and N2O from a managed fen meadow using eddy covariance flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrier-Uijl, A.P.; Veenendaal, E.M.; Kroon, P.S.; Hensen, A.; Jonker, H.J.J.

    2010-10-01

    Annual terrestrial balances of methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) are presented for a managed fen meadow in the Netherlands for 2006, 2007 and 2008, using eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements. Annual emissions derived from different methods are compared. The most accurate annual CH4 flux is achieved by gap filling EC fluxes with an empirical multivariate regression model, with soil temperature and mean wind velocity as driving variables. This model explains about 60% of the variability in observed daily CH4 fluxes. Annual N2O emissions can be separated into background emissions and event emissions due to fertilization. The background emission is estimated using a multivariate regression model also based on EC flux data, with soil temperature and mean wind velocity as driving variables. The event emissions are estimated using emission factors. The minimum direct emission factor is derived for six fertilization events by subtracting the background emission, and the IPCC default emission factor of 1% is used for the other events. In addition, the maximum direct emission factors are determined for the six events without subtracting the background emission. The average direct emission factor ranges from 1.2 to 2.8%, which is larger than the IPCC default value. Finally, the total terrestrial greenhouse gas balance is estimated at 16 Mg ha -1 year -1 in CO2-equivalents with contributions of 30, 25 and 45% by CO2, CH4 and N2O, respectively.

  7. sup(234) Th scavenging and particle export fluxes from the upper 100 m of the Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarin, M.M.; Rengarajan, R.; Ramaswamy, V.

    of column primary productivity. Using the sup(234) Th export fluxes and the measured specific activity of sup(234) Th in the sediment traps, we have computed th eparticle and carbon fluxes at 100 m. These results reveal that the particle fluxes determined...

  8. A Decade of Carbon Flux Measurements with Annual and Perennial Crop Rotations on the Canadian Prairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiro, B. D.; Tenuta, M.; Gao, X.; Gervais, M.

    2016-12-01

    The Fluxnet database has over 100 cropland sites, some of which have long-term (over a decade) measurements. Carbon neutrality is one goal of sustainable agriculture, although measurements over many annual cropping systems have indicated that soil carbon is often lost. Croplands are complex systems because the CO2 exchange depends on the type of crop, soil, weather, and management decisions such as planting date, nutrient fertilization and pest management strategy. Crop rotations are often used to decrease pest pressure, and can range from a simple 2-crop system, to have 4 or more crops in series. Carbon dioxide exchange has been measured using the flux-gradient technique since 2006 in agricultural systems in Manitoba, Canada. Two cropping systems are being followed: one that is a rotation of annual crops (corn, faba bean, spring wheat, rapeseed, barley, spring wheat, corn, soybean, spring wheat, soybean); and the other with a perennial phase of alfalfa/grass in years 3 to 6. Net ecosystem production ranged from a gain of 330 g C m-2 y-1 in corn to a loss of 75 g C m-2 y-1 in a poor spring-wheat crop. Over a decade, net ecosystem production for the annual cropping system was not significantly different from zero (carbon neutral), but the addition of the perennial phase increased the sink to 130 g C m-2 y-1. Once harvest removals were included, there was a net loss of carbon ranging from 77 g C m-2 y-1 in the annual system to 52 g C m-2 y-1 in the annual-perennial system; but neither of these were significantly different from zero. Termination of the perennial phase of the rotation only caused short-term increases in respiration. We conclude that both these systems were close to carbon-neutral over a decade even though they were tilled with a short growing season (90 to 130 days). We discuss the need for more datasets on agricultural systems to inform management options to increase the soil carbon sink.

  9. Model for GCR-particle fluxes in stony meteorites and production rates of cosmogenic nuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    A model is presented for the differential fluxes of galactic-cosmic-ray (GCR) particles with energies above 1 MeV inside any spherical stony meteorite as a function of the meteorite's radius and the sample's depth. This model is based on the Reedy-Arnold equations for the energy-dependent fluxes of GCR particles in the moon and is an extension of flux parameters that were derived for several meteorites of various sizes. This flux is used to calculate the production rates of many cosmogenic nuclides as a function of radius and depth. The peak production rates for most nuclides made by the reactions of energetic GCR particles occur near the centers of meteorites with radii of 40 to 70 g cm -2 . Although the model has some limitations, it reproduces well the basic trends for the depth-dependent production of cosmogenic nuclides in stony meteorites of various radii. These production profiles agree fairly well with measurements of cosmogenic nuclides in meteorites. Some of these production profiles are different than those calculated by others. The chemical dependence of the production rates for several nuclides varies with size and depth. 25 references, 8 figures

  10. Statistical study of plasma sheet dynamics using ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle flux data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandouras, J.; Reme, H.; Saint-Marc, A.; Sauvaud, J.A.; Parks, G.K.; Anderson, K.A.; Lin, R.P.

    1986-01-01

    During magnetospheric substorms, satellites embedded in the plasma sheet often detect transient dropouts of plasma and energetic particle fluxes, a phenomemon generally interpreted as indicating the exit of the satellite into the magnetospheric lobe due to a plasma sheet thinning. In order to determine the large-scale dynamics of the near-earth plasma sheet during substorms, three satellite years of ISEE 1 and 2 energetic particle flux data (1.5 and 6 keV), corresponding to 461 particle flux dropouts, have been analyzed. The principal results show that flux dropouts can be observed anywhere in the nightside plasma sheet, independent of the satellite's geocentric distance (for R>12R/sub E/), magnetic local time (except near the magnetospheric flanks) and estimated distance to the neutral sheet. Furthermore, flux dropouts can be observed for any combination of the AE index value and the satellite's distance to the neutral sheet, which shows that the plasma sheet is dynamic even during weak magnetospheric disturbances. Substorms during which the satellites, though situated in the plasma sheet, did not detect any flux dropout, have also been examined, and it is found that the plasma sheet thickness can locally remain unaffected by substorm development for AE index values up to at least 1000 nT. The predictions of the two major plasma sheet thinning models, i.e., the near-tail X-type magnetic neutral line formation model and the MHD rarefaction wave propagation model, are compared to the experimental results, and it is concluded that neither model can account for all of the observations; plasma sheet dynamics are more complex. Phenomenologically, this study suggests that multiple pinching of the plasma sheet and/or large-amplitude three-dimensional plasma sheet oscillations are important in plasma sheet dynamics

  11. Revised methane emissions factors and spatially distributed annual carbon fluxes for global livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Julie; Asrar, Ghassem R; West, Tristram O

    2017-09-29

    Livestock play an important role in carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Recent research suggests that existing bottom-up inventories of livestock methane emissions in the US, such as those made using 2006 IPCC Tier 1 livestock emissions factors, are too low. This may be due to outdated information used to develop these emissions factors. In this study, we update information for cattle and swine by region, based on reported recent changes in animal body mass, feed quality and quantity, milk productivity, and management of animals and manure. We then use this updated information to calculate new livestock methane emissions factors for enteric fermentation in cattle, and for manure management in cattle and swine. Using the new emissions factors, we estimate global livestock emissions of 119.1 ± 18.2 Tg methane in 2011; this quantity is 11% greater than that obtained using the IPCC 2006 emissions factors, encompassing an 8.4% increase in enteric fermentation methane, a 36.7% increase in manure management methane, and notable variability among regions and sources. For example, revised manure management methane emissions for 2011 in the US increased by 71.8%. For years through 2013, we present (a) annual livestock methane emissions, (b) complete annual livestock carbon budgets, including carbon dioxide emissions, and (c) spatial distributions of livestock methane and other carbon fluxes, downscaled to 0.05 × 0.05 degree resolution. Our revised bottom-up estimates of global livestock methane emissions are comparable to recently reported top-down global estimates for recent years, and account for a significant part of the increase in annual methane emissions since 2007. Our results suggest that livestock methane emissions, while not the dominant overall source of global methane emissions, may be a major contributor to the observed annual emissions increases over the 2000s to 2010s. Differences at regional and local scales may help

  12. Optimizing critical heat flux enhancement through nano-particle-based surface modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truong, B.; Hu, L. W.; Buongiorno, J.

    2008-01-01

    Colloidal dispersions of nano-particles, also known as nano-fluids, have shown to yield significant Critical Heat Flux (CHF) enhancement. The CHF enhancement mechanism in nano-fluids is due to the buildup of a porous layer of nano-particles upon boiling. Unlike microporous coatings that had been studied extensively, nano-particles have the advantages of forming a thin layer on the substrate with surface roughness ranges from the sub-micron to several microns. By tuning the chemical properties it is possible to coat the nano-particles in colloidal dispersions onto the desired surface, as has been demonstrated in engineering thin film industry. Building on recent work conducted at MIT, this paper illustrates the maximum CHF enhancement that can be achieved based on existing correlations. Optimization of the CHF enhancement by incorporation of key factors, such as the surface wettability and roughness, will also be discussed. (authors)

  13. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1981-08-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. A synopsis of research carried out last year is given. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research

  14. Sputtering yields of carbon based materials under high particle flux with low energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, K.; Nagase, A.; Dairaku, M.; Akiba, M.; Araki, M.; Okumura, Y.

    1995-04-01

    A new ion source which can produce high particle flux beams at low energies has been developed. This paper presents preliminary results on the sputtering yield of the carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFCs) measured with the new ion source. The sputtering yields of 1D and 2D CFCs, which are candidate materials for the divertor armour tiles, have been measured by the weight loss method under the hydrogen and deuterium particle fluxes of 2 ˜ 7 × 10 20/m 2 s at 50 ˜ 150 eV. Preferential sputtering of the matrix was observed on CFCs which included the matrix of 40 ˜ 60 w%. The energy dependence of the sputtering yields was weak. The sputtering yields of CFCs normally irradiated with deuterium beam were from 0.073 to 0.095, and were around three times larger than those with hydrogen beam.

  15. Sputtering yields of carbon based materials under high particle flux with low energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, K.; Nagase, A.; Dairaku, M.; Akiba, M.; Araki, M.; Okumura, Y.

    1995-01-01

    A new ion source which can produce high particle flux beams at low energies has been developed. This paper presents preliminary results on the sputtering yield of the carbon fiber reinforced composites (CFCs) measured with the new ion source. The sputtering yields of 1D and 2D CFCs, which are candidate materials for the divertor armour tiles, have been measured by the weight loss method under the hydrogen and deuterium particle fluxes of 2 similar 7x10 20 /m 2 s at 50 similar 150 eV. Preferential sputtering of the matrix was observed on CFCs which included the matrix of 40 similar 60 w%. The energy dependence of the sputtering yields was weak. The sputtering yields of CFCs normally irradiated with deuterium beam were from 0.073 to 0.095, and were around three times larger than those with hydrogen beam. ((orig.))

  16. High flux Particle Bed Reactor systems for rapid transmutation of actinides and long lived fission products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, J.; Ludewig, H.; Maise, G.; Steinberg, M.; Todosow, M.

    1993-01-01

    An initial assessment of several actinide/LLFP burner concepts based on the Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) is described. The high power density/flux level achievable with the PBR make it an attractive candidate for this application. The PBR based actinide burner concept also possesses a number of safety and economic benefits relative to other reactor based transmutation approaches including a low inventory of radionuclides, and high integrity, coated fuel particles which can withstand extremely high in temperatures while retaining virtually all fission products. In addition the reactor also posesses a number of ''engineered safety features,'' which, along with the use of high temperature capable materials further enhance its safety characteristics

  17. Measurement of current density fluctuations and ambipolar particle flux due to magnetic fluctuations in MST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Weimin.

    1992-08-01

    Studies of magnetic fluctuation induced particle transport on Reversed Field Pinch plasmas were done on the Madison Symmetric Torus. Plasma current density and current density fluctuations were measured using a multi-coil magnetic probes. The low frequency (f parallel B r >. The result of zero net charged particle loss was obtained, meaning the flux is ambipolar. The ambipolarity of low frequency global tearing modes is satisfied through the phase relations determined by tearing instabilities. The ambipolarity of high frequency localized modes could be partially explained by the simple model of Waltz based on the radial average of small scale turbulence

  18. Particle fluxes in the deep Eastern Mediterranean basins: the role of ocean vertical velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Patara

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the relationship between deep sedimentary fluxes and ocean current vertical velocities in an offshore area of the Ionian Sea, the deepest basin of the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Sediment trap data are collected at 500 m and 2800 m depth in two successive moorings covering the period September 1999–May 2001. A tight coupling is observed between the upper and deep traps and the estimated particle sinking rates are more than 200 m day−1. The current vertical velocity field is computed from a 1/16°×1/16° Ocean General Circulation Model simulation and from the wind stress curl. Current vertical velocities are larger and more variable than Ekman vertical velocities, yet the general patterns are alike. Current vertical velocities are generally smaller than 1 m day−1: we therefore exclude a direct effect of downward velocities in determining high sedimentation rates. However we find that upward velocities in the subsurface layers of the water column are positively correlated with deep particle fluxes. We thus hypothesize that upwelling would produce an increase in upper ocean nutrient levels – thus stimulating primary production and grazing – a few weeks before an enhanced vertical flux is found in the sediment traps. High particle sedimentation rates may be attained by means of rapidly sinking fecal pellets produced by gelatinous macro-zooplankton. Other sedimentation mechanisms, such as dust deposition, are also considered in explaining large pulses of deep particle fluxes. The fast sinking rates estimated in this study might be an evidence of the efficiency of the biological pump in sequestering organic carbon from the surface layers of the deep Eastern Mediterranean basins.

  19. Simulation of Particle Fluxes at the DESY-II Test Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuetz, Anne

    2015-05-01

    In the course of this Master's thesis ''Simulation of Particle Fluxes at the DESY-II Test Beam Facility'' the test beam generation for the DESY test beam line was studied in detail and simulated with the simulation software SLIC. SLIC uses the Geant4 toolkit for realistic Monte Carlo simulations of particles passing through detector material.After discussing the physics processes relevant for the test beam generation and the principles of the beam generation itself, the software used is introduced together with a description of the functionality of the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation of the test beam line follows the sequence of the test beam generation. Therefore, it starts with the simulation of the beam bunch of the synchrotron accelerator DESY-II, and proceeds step by step with the single test beam line components. An additional benefit of this thesis is the provision of particle flux and trajectory maps, which make fluxes directly visible by following the particle tracks through the simulated beam line. These maps allow us to see each of the test beam line components, because flux rates and directions change rapidly at these points. They will also guide the decision for placements of future test beam line components and measurement equipment.In the end, the beam energy and its spread, and the beam rate of the final test beam in the test beam area were studied in the simulation, so that the results can be compared to the measured beam parameters. The test beam simulation of this Master's thesis will serve as a key input for future test beam line improvements.

  20. Radionuclide fluxes in the Arabian Sea: The role of particle composition

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Scholten, J.C.; Fietzke, J.; Mangini, A.; Stoffers, P.; Rixen, T.; Gaye-Haake, B.; Blanz, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Sirocko, F.; Schulz, H.; Ittekkot, V.

    scavenging. 2. Methods Sediment trap samples were obtained from loca- tions WAST, CAST and EAST. Details on the locations, sampling intervals and average composition of the sediment trap material are given in Table 1. investigated Collection interruptions Ca... as they sink through the water column [11]. One of the basic methods when applying radio- high ratios are expected at continental margins (high particle flux), and such a boundary scavenging was observed in the surface sediments of the Pacific Ocean [13...

  1. Control of three dimensional particle flux to divertor using rotating RMP in the EAST tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, M.; Sun, Y.; Liang, Y.; Wang, L.; Xu, J.; Gu, S.; Lyu, B.; Wang, H. H.; Yang, X.; Zhong, F.; Chu, N.; Feng, W.; He, K.; Liu, Y. Q.; Qian, J.; Shi, T.; Shen, B.

    2018-04-01

    Controlling the steady state particle and heat flux impinging on the plasma facing components, as one of the main concerns of future fusion reactors, is still necessary when the transient power loads induced by edge localized modes (ELMs) have been eliminated by resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in high confinement tokamak experiments. This is especially true for long pulse operation. One promising solution is to use the rotating perturbed field. Recently rotating and differential phase scans of n  =  1 and 2 RMP fields have been operated for the first time in EAST discharges. The particle flux patterns on the divertor targets change synchronously with both rotating and phasing RMP fields as predicted by the modeled magnetic footprint patterns. The modeling with plasma response, which is calculated by MARS-F, is also carried out. The plasma response shows amplifying or screening effect to n  =  2 perturbations with different spectra. This changes the field line penetration depth rather than the general footprint shape. This has been verified by experimental observations on EAST. These experiments motivate further study of reducing both transient and steady state local power load and particle flux with the help of rotating RMPs in long pulse operation.

  2. Modulation of energetic particle fluxes by a mixed mode of transverse and compressional waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, C.S.; Parks, G.K.

    1982-01-01

    Modulation characteristics of particle fluxes in the presence of a mixed mode of compressional and transverse magnetic waves at hydromagnetic frequencies have been studied by means of kinetic perturbation of the distribution function. The magnetospheric medium in which the particles are modulated contains both the magnetic and pressure gradients. It is found that the modulation features are strongly dependent on the energy and pitch angle of the particles. Drifting particles can resonate with waves whose phase velocities are near their drift velocities. When this happens, the amplitude of the modulations become significantly large and large phase shifts will occur. Resonance is important for particles with mid pitch angles (40 0 --70 0 ). The phase shift between the particle modulations and the magnetic field oscillations are strongly controlled by combined effects of transverse and compressional wave components and/or the occurrence of drift resonance. We have performed numerical calculations by using the dispersion relation of drift mirror Alfven waves as an example of waves with both compressional and transverse components. The results derived in this study may be of importance in studying the relationship of particles and Pc 4--5 waves that are observed during magnetically disturbed times

  3. UCLA Particle Physics Research Group annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nefkens, B.M.K.

    1983-11-01

    The objectives, basic research programs, recent results, and continuing activities of the UCLA Particle Physics Research Group are presented. The objectives of the research are to discover, to formulate, and to elucidate the physics laws that govern the elementary constituents of matter and to determine basic properties of particles. The research carried out by the Group last year may be divided into three separate programs: (1) baryon spectroscopy, (2) investigations of charge symmetry and isospin invariance, and (3) tests of time reversal invariance. The main body of this report is the account of the techniques used in our investigations, the results obtained, and the plans for continuing and new research. An update of the group bibliography is given at the end

  4. Concentration of aqueous extracts of defatted soy flour by ultrafiltration; Effect of suspended particles on the filtration flux

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordman, T.R.; Kooiker, K.; Bel, W.; Dekker, M.; Wesselingh, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Suspended particles can have a positive effect on the flux and concentration curve of soy flour extracts during ultrafiltration. This is described by a simple empirical model. The suspended particles in this study were insoluble milled bean material (mean particle size 25 m). It is shown that it is

  5. Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules: First annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1988-01-01

    Our first goal was to investigate the phenomenon of aerodynamic focusing in supersonic free jets, in order to assess its potential technological uses in /open quotes/direct writing/close quotes/ and other energy-related applications. Our research program divides itself naturally into two chapters: on focusing microscopic particles, and on focusing individual molecules of heavy vapors carried in jets of He and H 2 . In both lines we combine diverse experimental and theoretical methods of attack. 3 refs., 4 figs

  6. Suspended particle dynamics and fluxes in an Arctic fjord (Kongsfjorden, Svalbard)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meslard, Florian; Bourrin, François; Many, Gaël; Kerhervé, Philippe

    2018-05-01

    An experiment was carried out during summer 2015 in the inner part of the Kongsfjorden to study the inputs of meltwater and behaviour of associated suspended particles. We used a wide range of oceanographic instruments to assess the hydrological and hydrodynamic characteristics of coastal waters. The transfer of suspended particles occurs from a large surface plume fed by two main sources: the most important one is the upwelling of fresh and turbid water coming from a tide-water glacier: the Kronebreen, and the second one from a continental glacier: the Kongsvegen. We estimated that these two sources discharged about 2.48 ± 0.37 × 106 t of suspended sediments during the two months of melting. The major part of these sediments is deposited within the first kilometre due to flocculation phenomena. Flocculation is initiated below the surface turbid plume and is mainly caused by the salinity gradient and high suspended particle concentration. Finally, our estimates of suspended particle fluxes by a typical Arctic coastal glacier showed the need to consider suspended sediment fluxes from high-latitude areas into global budgets in the context of climate change.

  7. Spatiotemporal variation of vertical particle fluxes and modelled chlorophyll a standing stocks in the Benguela Upwelling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorrath, Maria-Elena; Lahajnar, Niko; Fischer, Gerhard; Libuku, Viktor Miti; Schmidt, Martin; Emeis, Kay-Christian

    2018-04-01

    Marine particle fluxes from high productive coastal upwelling systems return upwelled CO2 and nutrients to the deep ocean and sediments and have a substantial impact on the global carbon cycle. This study examines relations between production regimes on the shelf and over the continental margin of the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS) in the SE Atlantic Ocean. Data of composition and timing of vertical particle flux come from sediment trap time series (deployed intermittently between 1988 and 2014) in the regions Walvis Ridge, Walvis Bay, Luederitz and Orange River. We compare their seasonal variability to modelled patterns of chlorophyll concentrations in a 3-D ecosystem model. Both modelled seasonal chlorophyll a standing stocks and sampled particle flux patterns are highly correspondent with a bimodal seasonal cycle offshore the BUS. The material in the particle flux in offshore traps is dominantly carbonate (40-70%), and flux peaks in offshore particle flux originate from two independent events: in austral autumn thermocline shoaling and vertical mixing are decoupled from coastal upwelling, while fluxes in spring coincide with the upwelling season, indicated by slightly elevated biogenic opal values at some locations. Coastal particle fluxes are characterized by a trimodal pattern and are dominated by biogenic opal (22-35%) and organic matter (30-60%). The distinct seasonality in observed fluxes on the shelf is caused by high variability in production, sinking behaviour, wind stress, and hydrodynamic processes. We speculate that global warming will increase ocean stratification and alter coastal upwelling, so that consequences for primary production and particle flux in the BUS are inevitable.

  8. HIGH TEMPERATURE EROSION WEAR OF CERMET PARTICLES REINFORCED SELF-FLUXING ALLOY MATRIX HVOF SPRAYED COATINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Surzhenkov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, the resistance of high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF sprayed TiC-NiMo and Cr3C2-Ni cermet particles reinforced NiCrSiB self-fluxing alloy matrix coatings to high temperature erosion wear is studied. Microstructure of the coatings was examined by SEM, phase composition was determined by XRD. A four-channel centrifugal particle accelerator was applied to study the high temperature erosion wear of the coatings. The impact angles were 30 and 90 degrees, initial particle velocity was 50 m/s, temperature of the test - 650 degrees. Volume wear of the coatings was calculated and compared to the respective values of the reference materials. Wear mechanisms were studied by SEM.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.21.3.7617

  9. Comparisons of a Quantum Annealing and Classical Computer Neural Net Approach for Inferring Global Annual CO2 Fluxes over Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halem, M.; Radov, A.; Singh, D.

    2017-12-01

    Investigations of mid to high latitude atmospheric CO2 show growing amplitudes in seasonal variations over the past several decades. Recent high-resolution satellite measurements of CO2 concentration are now available for three years from the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2. The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program of DOE has been making long-term CO2-flux measurements (in addition to CO2 concentration and an array of other meteorological quantities) at several towers and mobile sites located around the globe at half-hour frequencies. Recent papers have shown CO2 fluxes inferred by assimilating CO2 observations into ecosystem models are largely inconsistent with station observations. An investigation of how the biosphere has reacted to changes in atmospheric CO2 is essential to our understanding of potential climate-vegetation feedbacks. Thus, new approaches for calculating CO2-flux for assimilation into land surface models are necessary for improving the prediction of annual carbon uptake. In this study, we calculate and compare the predicted CO2 fluxes results employing a Feed Forward Backward Propagation Neural Network model on two architectures, (i) an IBM Minsky Computer node and (ii) a hybrid version of the ARC D-Wave quantum annealing computer. We compare the neural net results of predictions of CO2 flux from ARM station data for three different DOE ecosystem sites; an arid plains near Oklahoma City, a northern arctic site at Barrows AL, and a tropical rainforest site in the Amazon. Training times and predictive results for the calculating annual CO2 flux for the two architectures for each of the three sites are presented. Comparative results of predictions as measured by RMSE and MAE are discussed. Plots and correlations of observed vs predicted CO2 flux are also presented for all three sites. We show the estimated training times for quantum and classical calculations when extended to calculating global annual Carbon Uptake over land. We also

  10. CHARGE-2/C, Flux and Dose Behind Shield from Electron, Proton, Heavy Particle Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ucker, W.R.; Lilley, J.R.

    1994-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: The CHARGE code computes flux spectra, dose and other response rates behind a multilayered spherical or infinite planar shield exposed to isotopic fluxes of electrons, protons and heavy charged particles. The doses, or other responses, to electron, primary proton, heavy particle, electron Bremsstrahlung, secondary proton, and secondary neutron radiations are calculated as a function of penetration into the shield; the materials of each layer may be mixtures of elements contained in the accompanying data library, or supplied by the user. The calculation may optionally be halted before the entire shield is traversed by specifying a minimum total dose rate; the computation stops when the dose drops below this value. The ambient electron, proton and heavy particle spectra may be specified in tabular or functional form. These incident charged particle spectra are divided into energy bands or groups, the number or spacing of which are controlled by input data. The variation of the group boundary energies and group spectra as a function of shield penetration uniquely determines charged particle dose rates and secondary particle production rates. The charged particle shielding calculation is essentially the integration of the range- energy equation which expresses the variation of particle energy wit distance travelled. 2 - Method of solution: The 'straight-ahead' approximation is used throughout, that is the changes in particle direction of motion due to elastic scattering are ignored. This approximation is corrected, in the case of electrons, by applying transmission factors obtained from Monte Carlo calculations. Inelastic scattering between protons and the shielding material is assumed to produce two classes of secondaries 1) Cascade protons and neutrons, emitted in the same direction as the primaries 2) Evaporation neutrons, emitted isotropically. The transmission of secondary protons is analyzed in exactly the same way as the

  11. Modelling the pelagic nitrogen cycle and vertical particle flux in the Norwegian sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haupt, Olaf J.; Wolf, Uli; v. Bodungen, Bodo

    1999-02-01

    A 1D Eulerian ecosystem model (BIological Ocean Model) for the Norwegian Sea was developed to investigate the dynamics of pelagic ecosystems. The BIOM combines six biochemical compartments and simulates the annual nitrogen cycle with specific focus on production, modification and sedimentation of particles in the water column. The external forcing and physical framework is based on a simulated annual cycle of global radiation and an annual mixed-layer cycle derived from field data. The vertical resolution of the model is given by an exponential grid with 200 depth layers, allowing specific parameterization of various sinking velocities, breakdown of particles and the remineralization processes. The aim of the numerical experiments is the simulation of ecosystem dynamics considering the specific biogeochemical properties of the Norwegian Sea, for example the life cycle of the dominant copepod Calanus finmarchicus. The results of the simulations were validated with field data. Model results are in good agreement with field data for the lower trophic levels of the food web. With increasing complexity of the organisms the differences increase between simulated processes and field data. Results of the numerical simulations suggest that BIOM is well adapted to investigate a physically controlled ecosystem. The simulation of grazing controlled pelagic ecosystems, like the Norwegian Sea, requires adaptations of parameterization to the specific ecosystem features. By using seasonally adaptation of the most sensible processes like utilization of light by phytoplankton and grazing by zooplankton results were greatly improved.

  12. Ecosystem-scale fluxes in seminatural Pyrenean grasslands: role of annual dynamics of plant functional types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altimir, Nuria; Ibañez, Mercedes; Elbers, Jan; Rota, Cristina; Arias, Claudia; Carrara, Arnaud; Nogues, Salvador; Sebastia, Maria-Teresa

    2013-04-01

    The net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and the annual C balance of a site are in general modulated by light, temperature and availability of water and other resources to the plants. In grasslands, NEE is expected to depend strongly on the vegetation with a relationship that can be summarized by the above-ground biomass, its amount and dynamics. Any factor controlling the amount of green biomass is expected to have a strong impact on the short-term NEE, such as amount of solar radiation, water availability and grazing pressure. These controls are modulated differently depending on the plant functional type enduring them. Furthermore, as different guilds follow different functional strategies for optimization of the resources, they also present different patterns of change in their capacities such as photosynthetic fixation, belowground C allocation, and C loss via respiration. We examined these relationships at several semi-natural pastures to determine how the seasonal distribution of plant functional types is detected in the short-term ecosystem exchange and what role it plays. We have looked into these patterns to determine the general variation of key processes and whether different temporal patterns arise between different guilds. The study sites are in the Pyrenees, on the mountain pastures of La Bertolina, Alinyà, and Castellar at 1300, 1700, 1900 m a.s.l. respectively. We performed ecosystem-scale flux measurements by means of micrometeorologial stations combined with a thorough description of the vegetation including below- and above-ground biomass and leaf area as well as monitoring of natural abundance of C isotopes, discriminated by plant functional types. We present here the results of the study.

  13. Flux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Ib

    . FLUX betegner en flyden eller strømmen, dvs. dynamik. Forstår man livet som proces og udvikling i stedet for som ting og mekanik, får man et andet billede af det gode liv end det, som den velkendte vestlige mekanicisme lægger op til. Dynamisk forstået indebærer det gode liv den bedst mulige...... kanalisering af den flux eller energi, der strømmer igennem os og giver sig til kende i vore daglige aktiviteter. Skal vores tanker, handlinger, arbejde, samvær og politiske liv organiseres efter stramme og faste regelsæt, uden slinger i valsen? Eller skal de tværtimod forløbe ganske uhindret af regler og bånd...

  14. Erzion interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhutov, Yu. N.

    2001-08-01

    It is discussed the interpretation of negative penetrating cosmic ray particles excess flux observed in bubble chamber "SKAT" for the momentum range P > P0 = 30 GeV/c by Erzions, hypothetical heavy stable penetrating hadrons, proposed to explain the anomalous vertical muons energy spectrum at small depth underground. Here it is shown that negative charge of p articles observed in "SKAT" is the same as predicted by theoretical Erzion model. The excess particles flux ( J ˜ 10-5 cm-2 s-1 sr-1 ) corresponds to the Erzion intensity observed by scintillation telescope in our previous experiment. The threshold momentum ( P0 ) and the track length threshold ( L0 = 50 cm of liquid BrF3C) are in good accordance with Erzion stop path as for the single charged particle with mass M ≅ 200 GeV/c2 . But to don't contradict with all previous charge ratio results for cosmic ray muons in 30 - 100 GeV/c momentum range it is necessary to propose for such particles the Solar sporadic origin taking to account that both Erzion observations were in the active Sun years (April 23,1979 & July, 1999). INTRODUCTION. 20 years ago to explain anomalous energy spectrum of vertical cosmic ray muons, observed at sea level and small depth underground (particles were started [4,5,6]. Later the theoretical model U(1)xSUl(2)xSU r(2)xSU(3) of such particles (Erzions) has been created in framework of "mirror" models [7,8], which without contradictions to elementary particles Standard Model has explained large kind of another anomalous results in cosmic rays and nuclear physics [9-19]. At last after almost 20 years Erzions search they have been observed due to small vertical original scintillation telescope "Doch-4" [20,21,22]. The observed Erz ions mass was ME = (175+/-25) GeV/c2 and intensity at sea level - JE = (1.8+/-0.4)ṡ10-6 cm-2 sr-1 s-1 (at EE ≤ 6 GeV, PE ≤ 50 GeV/c2 ). To confirm such Erzion discovery it was undertook the attempt of Erzions search on one of the largest bubble chamber (BC

  15. Magnetic trapping of energetic particles on open dayside boundary layer flux tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowley, S.W.H.; Lewis, Z.V.

    1990-01-01

    Both simple as well as detailed empirical magnetic models of the Earth's dayside magnetosphere suggest that field lines near the magnetopause boundary in the noon quadrant (∼ 09:00 to ∼ 15:00 M.L.T.) possess an unusual property due to the compressive effect of the impinging solar wind flow, namely that the equatorial region represents a local maximum in the magnetic field strength, and not a minimum as elsewhere in the magnetosphere. In this region the field lines can therefore support two distinct particle populations, those which bounce across the equator between mirror points on either side, and those which are trapped about the off-equatorial field strength minima and are confined to one side of the equator. When these field lines become magnetically open due to the occurrence of magnetic reconnection at the equatorial magnetopause, the former particles will rapidly escape into the magnetosheath by field-aligned flow, while the latter population may be sustained within the boundary layer over many bounce periods, as the flux tubes contract and move tailward. Consequently, trapped distributions of energetic particles may commonly occur on open field lines in the dayside boundary layer in the noon quadrant, particularly at high latitudes. The existence of such particles is thus not an infallible indicator of the presence of closed magnetic field lines in this region. At earlier and later local times, however, the boundary layer field lines revert to possessing a minimum in the field strength at the equator. (author)

  16. Fixed-target particle fluxes and radiation levels at SSC energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dukes, E.C.

    1993-01-01

    The author calculates the charged particle fluxes and radiation doses from minimum ionizing particles (MIP), electromagnetic showers, and hadronic showers, in a fixed-target experiment at the SSC. This work follows the work of Groom, essentially boosting his results into the laboratory frame. The radiation in dense matter, such as a calorimeter, is produced by several sources: electromagnetic showers, hadronic showers, and minimum ionizing particles. The author does not consider other sources of radiation such as beam halo, a dependent effects, and low energy neutrons from secondary sources. Nor does he consider the effects of magnetic fields. Low energy neutrons have been shown to be an important source of radiation for collider experiments at the SSC. In fixed-target experiments, where the spectrometer is more open and where most detector elements are far away from secondary particle dumps, these sources are not as important. They are also very much detector and experimental hall dependent. Hence the results presented here are only a lower limit of the estimated radiation dose

  17. Particle propagation, wave growth and energy dissipation in a flaring flux tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S. M.; Melrose, D. B.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    Wave amplification by downgoing particles in a common flare model is investigated. The flare is assumed to occur at the top of a coronal magnetic flux loop, and results in the heating of plasma in the flaring region. The hot electrons propagate down the legs of the flux tube towards increasing magnetic field. It is simple to demonstrate that the velocity distributions which result in this model are unstable to both beam instabilities and cyclotron maser action. An explanation is presented for the propagation effects on the distribution, and the properties of the resulting amplified waves are explored, concentrating on cyclotron maser action, which has properties (emission in the z mode below the local gyrofrequency) quite different from maser action by other distributions considered in the context of solar flares. The z mode waves will be damped in the coronal plasma surrounding the flaring flux tube and lead to heating there. This process may be important in the overall energy budget of the flare. The downgoing maser is compared with the loss cone maser, which is more likely to produce observable bursts.

  18. Divertor power and particle fluxes between and during type-I ELMs in the ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallenbach, A.; Dux, R.; Eich, T.; Fischer, R.; Giannone, L.; Harhausen, J.; Herrmann, A.; Müller, H. W.; Pautasso, G.; Wischmeier, M.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2008-08-01

    Particle, electric charge and power fluxes for type-I ELMy H-modes are measured in the divertor of the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak by triple Langmuir probes, shunts, infrared (IR) thermography and spectroscopy. The discharges are in the medium to high density range, resulting in predominantly convective edge localized modes (ELMs) with moderate fractional stored energy losses of 2% or below. Time resolved data over ELM cycles are obtained by coherent averaging of typically one hundred similar ELMs, spatial profiles from the flush-mounted Langmuir probes are obtained by strike point sweeps. The application of simple physics models is used to compare different diagnostics and to make consistency checks, e.g. the standard sheath model applied to the Langmuir probes yields power fluxes which are compared with the thermographic measurements. In between ELMs, Langmuir probe and thermography power loads appear consistent in the outer divertor, taking into account additional load due to radiation and charge exchange neutrals measured by thermography. The inner divertor is completely detached and no significant power flow by charged particles is measured. During ELMs, quite similar power flux profiles are found in the outer divertor by thermography and probes, albeit larger uncertainties in Langmuir probe evaluation during ELMs have to be taken into account. In the inner divertor, ELM power fluxes from thermography are a factor 10 larger than those derived from probes using the standard sheath model. This deviation is too large to be caused by deficiencies of probe analysis. The total ELM energy deposition from IR is about a factor 2 higher in the inner divertor compared with the outer divertor. Spectroscopic measurements suggest a quite moderate contribution of radiation to the target power load. Shunt measurements reveal a significant positive charge flow into the inner target during ELMs. The net number of elementary charges correlates well with the total core particle loss

  19. Membrane flux dynamics in the submerged ultrafiltration hybrid treatment process during particle and natural organic matter removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Xiaojian Zhang; Yonghong Li; Jun Wang; Chao Chen

    2011-01-01

    Particles and natural organic matter (NOM) are two major concerns in surface water,which greatly influence the membrane filtration process.The objective of this article is to investigate the effect of particles,NOM and their interaction on the submerged ultrafiltration (UF) membrane flux under conditions of solo UF and coagulation and PAC adsorption as the pretreatment of UF.Particles,NOM and their mixture were spiked in tap water to simulate raw water.Exponential relationship,(JP/JP0 =axexp{-k[t-(n- 1)T]}),was developed to quantify the normalized membrane flux dynamics during the filtration period and fitted the results well.In this equation,coefficient a was determined by the value of Jp/Jp0 at the beginning of a filtration cycle,reflecting the flux recovery after backwashing,that is,the irreversible fouling.The coefficient k reflected the trend of flux dynamics.Integrated total permeability (ΣJp) in one filtration period could be used as a quantified indicator for comparison of different hybrid membrane processes or under different scenarios.According to the results,there was an additive effect on membrane flux by NOM and particles during solo UF process.This additive fouling could be alleviated by coagulation pretreatment since particles helped the formation of flocs with coagulant,which further delayed the decrease of membrane flux and benefited flux recovery by backwashing.The addition of PAC also increased membrane flux by adsorbing NOM and improved flux recovery through backwashing.

  20. CrossRef Antiproton Flux, Antiproton-to-Proton Flux Ratio, and Properties of Elementary Particle Fluxes in Primary Cosmic Rays Measured with the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer on the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Aguilar, M; Alpat, B; Ambrosi, G; Arruda, L; Attig, N; Aupetit, S; Azzarello, P; Bachlechner, A; Barao, F; Barrau, A; Barrin, L; Bartoloni, A; Basara, L; Başeǧmez-du Pree, S; Battarbee, M; Battiston, R; Bazo, J; Becker, U; Behlmann, M; Beischer, B; Berdugo, J; Bertucci, B; Bindi, V; Boella, G; de Boer, W; Bollweg, K; Bonnivard, V; Borgia, B; Boschini, M  J; Bourquin, M; Bueno, E  F; Burger, J; Cadoux, F; Cai, X  D; Capell, M; Caroff, S; Casaus, J; Castellini, G; Cernuda, I; Cervelli, F; Chae, M  J; Chang, Y  H; Chen, A  I; Chen, G  M; Chen, H  S; Cheng, L; Chou, H  Y; Choumilov, E; Choutko, V; Chung, C  H; Clark, C; Clavero, R; Coignet, G; Consolandi, C; Contin, A; Corti, C; Coste, B; Creus, W; Crispoltoni, M; Cui, Z; Dai, Y  M; Delgado, C; Della Torre, S; Demirköz, M  B; Derome, L; Di Falco, S; Dimiccoli, F; Díaz, C; von Doetinchem, P; Dong, F; Donnini, F; Duranti, M; D'Urso, D; Egorov, A; Eline, A; Eronen, T; Feng, J; Fiandrini, E; Finch, E; Fisher, P; Formato, V; Galaktionov, Y; Gallucci, G; García, B; García-López, R  J; Gargiulo, C; Gast, H; Gebauer, I; Gervasi, M; Ghelfi, A; Giovacchini, F; Goglov, P; Gómez-Coral, D  M; Gong, J; Goy, C; Grabski, V; Grandi, D; Graziani, M; Guerri, I; Guo, K  H; Habiby, M; Haino, S; Han, K  C; He, Z  H; Heil, M; Hoffman, J; Hsieh, T  H; Huang, H; Huang, Z  C; Huh, C; Incagli, M; Ionica, M; Jang, W  Y; Jinchi, H; Kang, S  C; Kanishev, K; Kim, G  N; Kim, K  S; Kirn, Th; Konak, C; Kounina, O; Kounine, A; Koutsenko, V; Krafczyk, M  S; La Vacca, G; Laudi, E; Laurenti, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lebedev, A; Lee, H  T; Lee, S  C; Leluc, C; Li, H  S; Li, J  Q; Li, Q; Li, T  X; Li, W; Li, Z  H; Li, Z  Y; Lim, S; Lin, C  H; Lipari, P; Lippert, T; Liu, D; Liu, Hu; Lu, S  Q; Lu, Y  S; Luebelsmeyer, K; Luo, F; Luo, J  Z; Lv, S  S; Majka, R; Mañá, C; Marín, J; Martin, T; Martínez, G; Masi, N; Maurin, D; Menchaca-Rocha, A; Meng, Q; Mo, D  C; Morescalchi, L; Mott, P; Nelson, T; Ni, J  Q; Nikonov, N; Nozzoli, F; Nunes, P; Oliva, A; Orcinha, M; Palmonari, F; Palomares, C; Paniccia, M; Pauluzzi, M; Pensotti, S; Pereira, R; Picot-Clemente, N; Pilo, F; Pizzolotto, C; Plyaskin, V; Pohl, M; Poireau, V; Putze, A; Quadrani, L; Qi, X  M; Qin, X; Qu, Z  Y; Räihä, T; Rancoita, P  G; Rapin, D; Ricol, J  S; Rodríguez, I; Rosier-Lees, S; Rozhkov, A; Rozza, D; Sagdeev, R; Sandweiss, J; Saouter, P; Schael, S; Schmidt, S  M; Schulz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Seo, E  S; Shan, B  S; Shi, J  Y; Siedenburg, T; Son, D; Song, J  W; Sun, W  H; Tacconi, M; Tang, X  W; Tang, Z  C; Tao, L; Tescaro, D; Ting, Samuel C  C; Ting, S  M; Tomassetti, N; Torsti, J; Türkoğlu, C; Urban, T; Vagelli, V; Valente, E; Vannini, C; Valtonen, E; Vázquez Acosta, M; Vecchi, M; Velasco, M; Vialle, J  P; Vitale, V; Vitillo, S; Wang, L  Q; Wang, N  H; Wang, Q  L; Wang, X; Wang, X  Q; Wang, Z  X; Wei, C  C; Weng, Z  L; Whitman, K; Wienkenhöver, J; Willenbrock, M; Wu, H; Wu, X; Xia, X; Xiong, R  Q; Xu, W; Yan, Q; Yang, J; Yang, M; Yang, Y; Yi, H; Yu, Y  J; Yu, Z  Q; Zeissler, S; Zhang, C; Zhang, J; Zhang, J  H; Zhang, S  D; Zhang, S  W; Zhang, Z; Zheng, Z  M; Zhu, Z  Q; Zhuang, H  L; Zhukov, V; Zichichi, A; Zimmermann, N; Zuccon, P

    2016-01-01

    A precision measurement by AMS of the antiproton flux and the antiproton-to-proton flux ratio in primary cosmic rays in the absolute rigidity range from 1 to 450 GV is presented based on 3.49×105 antiproton events and 2.42×109 proton events. The fluxes and flux ratios of charged elementary particles in cosmic rays are also presented. In the absolute rigidity range ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the antiproton p¯, proton p, and positron e+ fluxes are found to have nearly identical rigidity dependence and the electron e− flux exhibits a different rigidity dependence. Below 60 GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios each reaches a maximum. From ∼60 to ∼500  GV, the (p¯/p), (p¯/e+), and (p/e+) flux ratios show no rigidity dependence. These are new observations of the properties of elementary particles in the cosmos.

  1. Annual and seasonal mean buoyancy fluxes for the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, T.G.

    . The fluxes of heat and freshwater across the air-sea interface, and hence the surface buoyancy flux, show strong spatial and temporal variability. The Bay of Bengal and eastern equatorial Indian Ocean are characterized by a net freshwater gain due to heavy...

  2. L-mode and inter-ELM divertor particle and heat flux width scaling on MAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, J.R., E-mail: james.harrison@ccfe.ac.uk [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Fishpool, G.M.; Kirk, A. [EURATOM/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    The distribution of particles and power to plasma-facing components is of key importance in the design of next-generation fusion devices. Power and particle decay lengths have been measured in a number of MAST L-mode and H-mode discharges in order to determine their parametric dependencies, by fitting power and particle flux profiles measured by divertor Langmuir probes, to a convolution of an exponential decay and a Gaussian function. In all discharges analysed, it is found that exponential decay lengths mapped to the midplane are mostly dependent on separatrix electron density (n{sub e,sep}{sup 0.65±0.15}) L-mode, (n{sub e,sep}{sup 0.76±0.19}) H-mode) and plasma current (I{sub p}{sup -0.36±0.11}) L-mode, I{sub p}{sup -1.05±0.18} H-mode) (or parallel connection length). The widths of the convolved Gaussian functions have been used to derive an approximate diffusion coefficient, which is found to vary from 1 m{sup 2}/s to 7 m{sup 2}/s, and is systematically lower in H-mode compared with L-mode.

  3. VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean): A study of particle sources and flux attenuation in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buesseler, K. O.; Trull, T. W.; Steinberg, D. K.; Silver, M. W.; Siegel, D. A.; Saitoh, S.-I.; Lamborg, C. H.; Lam, P. J.; Karl, D. M.; Jiao, N. Z.; Honda, M. C.; Elskens, M.; Dehairs, F.; Brown, S. L.; Boyd, P. W.; Bishop, J. K. B.; Bidigare, R. R.

    2008-07-01

    The VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) study examined particle sources and fluxes through the ocean's "twilight zone" (defined here as depths below the euphotic zone to 1000 m). Interdisciplinary process studies were conducted at contrasting sites off Hawaii (ALOHA) and in the NW Pacific (K2) during 3-week occupations in 2004 and 2005, respectively. We examine in this overview paper the contrasting physical, chemical and biological settings and how these conditions impact the source characteristics of the sinking material and the transport efficiency through the twilight zone. A major finding in VERTIGO is the considerably lower transfer efficiency ( Teff) of particulate organic carbon (POC), POC flux 500/150 m, at ALOHA (20%) vs. K2 (50%). This efficiency is higher in the diatom-dominated setting at K2 where silica-rich particles dominate the flux at the end of a diatom bloom, and where zooplankton and their pellets are larger. At K2, the drawdown of macronutrients is used to assess export and suggests that shallow remineralization above our 150-m trap is significant, especially for N relative to Si. We explore here also surface export ratios (POC flux/primary production) and possible reasons why this ratio is higher at K2, especially during the first trap deployment. When we compare the 500-m fluxes to deep moored traps, both sites lose about half of the sinking POC by >4000 m, but this comparison is limited in that fluxes at depth may have both a local and distant component. Certainly, the greatest difference in particle flux attenuation is in the mesopelagic, and we highlight other VERTIGO papers that provide a more detailed examination of the particle sources, flux and processes that attenuate the flux of sinking particles. Ultimately, we contend that at least three types of processes need to be considered: heterotrophic degradation of sinking particles, zooplankton migration and surface feeding, and lateral sources of suspended and sinking

  4. VERTIGO (VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean): A study of particle sources and flux attenuation in the North Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buesseler, K.O.; Trull, T.W.; Steinberg, D.K.; Silver, M.W.; Siegel, D.A.; Saitoh, S.-I.; Lamborg, C.H.; Lam, P.J.; Karl, D.M.; Jiao, N.Z.; Honda, M.C.; Elskens, M.; Dehairs, F.; Brown, S.L.; Boyd, P.W.; Bishop, J.K.B.; Bidigare, R.R.

    2008-06-10

    The VERtical Transport In the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) study examined particle sources and fluxes through the ocean's 'twilight zone' (defined here as depths below the euphotic zone to 1000 m). Interdisciplinary process studies were conducted at contrasting sites off Hawaii (ALOHA) and in the NW Pacific (K2) during 3 week occupations in 2004 and 2005, respectively. We examine in this overview paper the contrasting physical, chemical and biological settings and how these conditions impact the source characteristics of the sinking material and the transport efficiency through the twilight zone. A major finding in VERTIGO is the considerably lower transfer efficiency (T{sub eff}) of particulate organic carbon (POC), POC flux 500/150 m, at ALOHA (20%) vs. K2 (50%). This efficiency is higher in the diatom-dominated setting at K2 where silica-rich particles dominate the flux at the end of a diatom bloom, and where zooplankton and their pellets are larger. At K2, the drawdown of macronutrients is used to assess export and suggests that shallow remineralization above our 150 m trap is significant, especially for N relative to Si. We explore here also surface export ratios (POC flux/primary production) and possible reasons why this ratio is higher at K2, especially during the first trap deployment. When we compare the 500 m fluxes to deep moored traps, both sites lose about half of the sinking POC by >4000 m, but this comparison is limited in that fluxes at depth may have both a local and distant component. Certainly, the greatest difference in particle flux attenuation is in the mesopelagic, and we highlight other VERTIGO papers that provide a more detailed examination of the particle sources, flux and processes that attenuate the flux of sinking particles. Ultimately, we contend that at least three types of processes need to be considered: heterotrophic degradation of sinking particles, zooplankton migration and surface feeding, and lateral sources of

  5. Annual mean statistics of the surface fluxes of the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Rao, L.V.G.

    MEAN STATISTICS OF THE SURFACE FLUXES OF THE TROPICAL INDIAN OCEAN (Research Note) M. R. RAMESH KUMAR and L. V. GANGADHARA RAO Physical Oceanography Division, National Institute of Oceanography, Dona Paula, 403004, Goa, India (Received in final...

  6. Seasonal and Intra-annual Controls on CO2 Flux in Arctic Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, Walter [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States); Kalhori, Aram [San Diego State Univ., CA (United States)

    2015-12-01

    In order to advance the understanding of the patterns and controls on the carbon budget in the Arctic region, San Diego State University has maintained eddy covariance flux towers at three sites in Arctic Alaska, starting in 1997.

  7. Massive production of heavy metals in the Ganga (Hooghly) River estuary, India: Global importance of solute-particle interaction and enhanced metal fluxes to the oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Saumik; Dalai, Tarun K.

    2018-05-01

    The Ganga River System is a major contributor to the global sediment and water discharge to the oceans. The estuary of Ganga (Hooghly) River in India is under increasing influence of anthropogenic contributions via discharge of the industrial and urban effluents. Here we document, based on the investigation of water and suspended sediment samples collected during six periods over two years, that there is extensive production of heavy metals (Co, Ni and Cu) in the estuary such that the annual dissolved fluxes of metals from the Hooghly River are enhanced by up to 230-1770%. Furthermore, the estuarine dissolved metal fluxes, when normalized with water fluxes, are the highest among estuaries of the major rivers in the world. Our simultaneous data on the dissolved, suspended particulate and exchangeable phases allow us to identify the ion-exchange process (coupled adsorption and desorption) as the dominant contributor to the generation of heavy metals in the middle and lower estuary where the estimated anthropogenic contribution is negligible. The estimated contributions from the groundwater are also insufficient to explain the measured metal concentrations in the estuary. A strong positive correlation that is observed between the dissolved heavy metal fluxes and the suspended particulate matter (SPM) fluxes, after normalizing them with the water fluxes, for estuaries of the major global rivers imply that the solute-particle interaction is a globally significant process in the estuarine production of metals. Based on this correlation that is observed for major estuaries around the world, we demonstrate that the South Asian Rivers which supply only ∼9% of the global river water discharge but carry elevated SPM load, contribute a far more significant proportion (∼40 ± 2% Ni and 15 ± 1% Cu) to the global supply of the dissolved metals from the rivers.

  8. Flux of low-energy particles in the solar system: the record in St. Severin meteorite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lal, D [Physical Research Lab., Ahmedabad (India); Marti, K

    1977-06-01

    Some data are presented for the St. Severin meteorite which indicate appreciable contributions due to nuclear reactions of low-energy particles of energy < 200 MeV. Some or most of these may be of solar origin; a part of the low-energy flux may in fact be galactic in origin, if modulation effects are less severe at 2 to 4 A.U. distances compared to that near the Earth or the Moon. These conclusions are based on a study of the concentrations of spallogenic gases and cosmic-ray tracks in seven samples to depths down to about 2.5 cm along a core taken from a fragment of the meteorite.

  9. Density profiles and particle fluxes of heavy impurities in the limiter shadow region of a tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claassen, H.A.; Repp, H.

    1980-01-01

    For the case of low impurity concentration, transport calculations have been performed for heavy impurities, in the scrape-off layer plasma of a tokamak with a poloidal ring limiter. The theory is based on the drift-kinetic equations for the various ionization states of the impurity ions taking due consideration of the convection and collision processes. The background plasma and the impurity sources from the torus wall and the limiter surface enter the theory as input parameters. The theory is developed for the first two orders of the drift approximation. Numerical results are given to zero order drift approximation for the radial profiles of density and particle fluxes parallel to the magnetic field. (orig.)

  10. Characterization of FeCo particles synthesized via co-precipitation, particle growth using flux treatment and reduction in hydrogen gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishimoto, Mikio, E-mail: kishimoto.mikio.gb@u.tsukuba.ac.jp; Latiff, Hawa; Kita, Eiji; Yanagihara, Hideto

    2017-06-15

    The possibility of high coercive force in FeCo particles was examined focusing on distortion introduced in the particles. The particles were synthesized via co-precipitation of Fe and Co ions, heat-treatment in potassium bromide flux for particle growth, and reduction using hydrogen gas. The particle shape was spherical or a slightly elongated with the size of approximately 30–200 nm, and the composition with approximately Fe{sub 60}Co{sub 40} was determined from the D-spacing of (110) peak. The coercive force of approximately 90 kA/m was obtained in particles with the saturation magnetization of approximately 150 Am{sup 2}/kg. The coercive force was higher than those in reported FeCo particles with same level of saturation magnetization. As one of the reason of high coercive force, we expected the possibility of occurrence of magnetic anisotropy based on the anisotropic distortion generated between FeCo alloy and surface oxides in a slightly elongated particles. - Highlights: • FeCo particles synthesized via Fe/Co:1/1, flux treated, and reduction. • Spherical or slightly elongated shape with size of approximately 30–200 nm. • Composition with Fe{sub 60}Co{sub 40} determined from D-spacing of (110) peak. • Coercive force of 90 kA/m and saturation magnetization of 150 Am{sup 2}/kg.

  11. Dryout heat flux and flooding phenomena in debris beds consisting of homogeneous diameter particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yu; Abe, Yutaka; Yamano, Norihiro; Soda, Kunihisa

    1988-08-01

    Since the TMI-2 accident, which occurred in 1979, necessity of understanding phenomena associated with a severe accident have been recognized and researches have been conducted in many countries. During a severe accident of a light water reactor, a debris bed consisting of the degraded core materials would be formed. Because the debris bed continues to release decay heat, the debris bed would remelt when the coolable geometry is not maintained. Thus the degraded core coolability experiments to investigate the influence of the debris particle diameter and coolant flow conditions on the coolability of the debris bed and the flooding experiments to investigate the dependence of flooding phenomena on the configuration of the debris bed have been conducted in JAERI. From the degraded core coolability experiments, the following conclusions were derived; the coolability of debris beds would be improved by coolant supply into the beds, Lipinski's 1-dimensional model shows good agreement with the measured dryout heat flux for the beds under stagnant and forced flow conditions from the bottom of the beds, and the analytical model used for the case that coolant is fed by natural circulation through the downcomer reproduces the experimental results. And the following conclusions were given from the flooding experiments ; no dependence between bed height and the flooding constant exists for the beds lower than the critical bed height, flooding phenomena of the stratified beds would be dominated by the layer consisting of smaller particles, and the predicted dryout heat flux by the analytical model based on the flooding theory gives underestimation under stagnant condition. (author)

  12. Study of dryout heat fluxes in beds of inductively heated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhir, V.K.; Catton, I.

    1977-02-01

    Experimental observations of the dryout heat fluxes for inductively heated particulate beds have been made. The data were obtained when steel and lead particles in the size distribution 295-787 microns were placed in a 4.7 cm diameter pyrex glass jar and inductively heated by passing radio frequency current through a 13.3 cm diameter multi-turn work coil encircling the jar. Distilled water, methanol and acetone were used as coolants in the experiments, while the bed height was varied from 1.0 to 8.9 cm. Different mechanisms for the dryout in deep and shallow beds have been identified. Dryout in shallow beds is believed to occur when the vapor velocity in the gas jets exceeds a certain critical velocity at which choking of the vapor occurs, leading to obstruction in the flow of the liquid toward the bed. However, deep beds dry out when gravitational force can no longer maintain a downward coolant flow rate necessary to dissipate the heat generated in the bed. The heat flux data of the investigation and that from two previous investigations made at Argonne Laboratory and at UCLA have been correlated with semi-theoretical correlations based on the proposed hydrodynamic models. The deep and shallow bed correlations are used to predict the bed height at which transition from deep to shallow bed would occur. An application of the study has been made to determine the maximum coolable depths of the core debris as a function of the particle size, bed porosity and decay heat

  13. Neutral particle and radiation effects on Pfirsch - Schlueter fluxes near the edge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catto, P.J.; Helander, P.; Connor, J.W.; Hazeltine, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The edge plasma of a tokamak is affected by atomic physics processes and can have density and temperature variations along the magnetic field that strongly modify edge transport. A closed system of equations in the Pfirsch - Schlueter regime is presented that can be solved for the radial and poloidal variation of the plasma density, electron and ion temperatures, and the electrostatic potential in the presence of neutrals and a poloidally asymmetric energy radiation sink due to inelastic electron collisions. Neutrals have a large diffusivity so their viscosity and heat flux can become important even when their density is not high, in which case the neutral viscosity alters the electrostatic potential at the edge by introducing strong radial variation. The strong parallel gradient in the electron temperature that can arise in the presence of a localized radiation sink drives a convective flow of particles and heat across the field. This plasma transport mechanism can balance the neutral influx and is particularly strong if multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge (MARFE) occurs, since the electron temperature then varies substantially over the flux surface. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  14. Measurements on rotating ion cyclotron range of frequencies induced particle fluxes in axisymmetric mirror plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, R.; Hershkowitz, N.; Majeski, R.; Wen, Y.J.; Brouchous, D.B.; Proberts, P.; Breun, R.A.; Roberts, D.; Vukovic, M.; Tanaka, T.

    1997-01-01

    A comparison of phenomenological features of plasmas is made with a special emphasis on radio-frequency induced transport, which are maintained when a set of two closely spaced dual half-turn antennas in a central cell of the Phaedrus-B axisymmetric tandem mirror [J. J. Browning et al., Phys. Fluids B 1, 1692 (1989)] is phased to excite electromagnetic fields in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) with m=-1 (rotating with ions) and m=+1 (rotating with electrons) azimuthal modes. Positive and negative electric currents are measured to flow axially to the end walls in the cases of m=-1 and m=+1 excitations, respectively. These parallel nonambipolar ion and electron fluxes are observed to be accompanied by azimuthal ion flows in the same directions as the antenna-excitation modes m. The phenomena are argued in terms of radial particle fluxes due to a nonambipolar transport mechanism [Hojo and Hatori, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 2510 (1991); Hatakeyama et al., J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 60, 2815 (1991), and Phys. Rev. E 52, 6664 (1995)], which are induced when azimuthally traveling ICRF waves are absorbed in the magnetized plasma column. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  15. Variations of iron flux and organic carbon remineralization in a subterranean estuary caused by inter-annual variations in recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Moutusi; Martin, Jonathan B.; Cable, Jaye E.; Smith, Christopher G.

    2013-02-01

    We determine the inter-annual variations in diagenetic reaction rates of sedimentary iron (Fe) in an east Florida subterranean estuary and evaluate the connection between metal fluxes and recharge to the coastal aquifer. Over the three years study period (from 2004 to 2007), the amount of Fe-oxides reduced at the study site decreased from 192 to 153 g/yr and associated organic carbon (OC) remineralization decreased from 48 to 38 g/yr. These reductions occurred although the Fe-oxide reduction rates remained constant around 1 mg/cm2/yr. These results suggest that changes in flow rates of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) related to changes in precipitation may be important to fluxes of the diagenetic reaction products. Rainfall at a weather station approximately 5 km from the field area decreased from 12.6 to 8.4 cm/month from 2004 to 2007. Monthly potential evapotranspiration (PET) calculated from Thornthwaite's method indicated potential evapotranspiration cycled from about 3 cm/month in the winter to about 15 cm/month in the summer so that net annual recharge to the aquifer decreased from 40 cm in 2004 to -10 cm in 2007. Simultaneously with the decrease in recharge of groundwater, freshwater SGD decreased by around 20% and caused the originally 25 m wide freshwater seepage face to decrease in width by about 5 m. The smaller seepage face reduced the area under which Fe-oxides were undergoing reductive dissolution. Consequently, the observed decrease in Fe flux is controlled by hydrology of the subterranean estuary. These results point out the need to better understand linkages between temporal variations in diagenetic reactions and changes in flow within subterranean estuaries in order to accurately constrain their contribution to oceanic fluxes of solutes from subterranean estuaries.

  16. Spectroscopic imaging of limiter heat and particle fluxes and the resulting impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephey, L; Wurden, G A; Schmitz, O; Frerichs, H; Effenberg, F; Biedermann, C; Harris, J; König, R; Kornejew, P; Krychowiak, M; Unterberg, E A

    2016-11-01

    A combined IR and visible camera system [G. A. Wurden et al., "A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] and a filterscope system [R. J. Colchin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2068 (2003)] were implemented together to obtain spectroscopic data of limiter and first wall recycling and impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas. Both systems together provided excellent temporal and spatial spectroscopic resolution of limiter 3. Narrowband interference filters in front of the camera yielded C-III and H α photon flux, and the filterscope system provided H α , H β , He-I, He-II, C-II, and visible bremsstrahlung data. The filterscopes made additional measurements of several points on the W7-X vacuum vessel to yield wall recycling fluxes. The resulting photon flux from both the visible camera and filterscopes can then be compared to an EMC3-EIRENE synthetic diagnostic [H. Frerichs et al., "Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X," Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] to infer both a limiter particle flux and wall particle flux, both of which will ultimately be used to infer the complete particle balance and particle confinement time τ P .

  17. Spectroscopic imaging of limiter heat and particle fluxes and the resulting impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephey, L., E-mail: stephey@wisc.edu; Schmitz, O.; Frerichs, H.; Effenberg, F. [University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Wurden, G. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Biedermann, C.; König, R.; Kornejew, P.; Krychowiak, M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasma Physik, Wendelsteinstrasse 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany); Harris, J.; Unterberg, E. A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    A combined IR and visible camera system [G. A. Wurden et al., “A high resolution IR/visible imaging system for the W7-X limiter,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] and a filterscope system [R. J. Colchin et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2068 (2003)] were implemented together to obtain spectroscopic data of limiter and first wall recycling and impurity sources during Wendelstein 7-X startup plasmas. Both systems together provided excellent temporal and spatial spectroscopic resolution of limiter 3. Narrowband interference filters in front of the camera yielded C-III and H{sub α} photon flux, and the filterscope system provided H{sub α}, H{sub β}, He-I, He-II, C-II, and visible bremsstrahlung data. The filterscopes made additional measurements of several points on the W7-X vacuum vessel to yield wall recycling fluxes. The resulting photon flux from both the visible camera and filterscopes can then be compared to an EMC3-EIRENE synthetic diagnostic [H. Frerichs et al., “Synthetic plasma edge diagnostics for EMC3-EIRENE, highlighted for Wendelstein 7-X,” Rev. Sci. Instrum. (these proceedings)] to infer both a limiter particle flux and wall particle flux, both of which will ultimately be used to infer the complete particle balance and particle confinement time τ{sub P}.

  18. High-latitude electromagnetic and particle energy flux during an event with sustained strongly northward IMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korth

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available We present a case study of a prolonged interval of strongly northward orientation of the interplanetary magnetic field on 16 July 2000, 16:00-19:00 UT to characterize the energy exchange between the magnetosphere and ionosphere for conditions associated with minimum solar wind-magnetosphere coupling. With reconnection occurring tailward of the cusp under northward IMF conditions, the reconnection dynamo should be separated from the viscous dynamo, presumably driven by the Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH instability. Thus, these conditions are also ideal for evaluating the contribution of a viscous interaction to the coupling process. We derive the two-dimensional distribution of the Poynting vector radial component in the northern sunlit polar ionosphere from magnetic field observations by the constellation of Iridium satellites together with drift meter and magnetometer observations from the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP F13 and F15 satellites. The electromagnetic energy flux is then compared with the particle energy flux obtained from auroral images taken by the far-ultraviolet (FUV instrument on the Imager for Magnetopause to Aurora Global Exploration (IMAGE spacecraft. The electromagnetic energy input to the ionosphere of 51 GW calculated from the Iridium/DMSP observations is eight times larger than the 6 GW due to particle precipitation all poleward of 78° MLAT. This result indicates that the energy transport is significant, particularly as it is concentrated in a small region near the magnetic pole, even under conditions traditionally considered to be quiet and is dominated by the electromagnetic flux. We estimate the contributions of the high and mid-latitude dynamos to both the Birkeland currents and electric potentials finding that high-latitude reconnection accounts for 0.8 MA and 45kV while we attribute <0.2MA and ~5kV to an interaction at lower latitudes having the sense of a viscous interaction. Given that these

  19. Extreme fluxes in solar energetic particle events: Methodological and physical limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miroshnichenko, L.I.; Nymmik, R.A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, all available data on the largest solar proton events (SPEs), or extreme solar energetic particle (SEP) events, for the period from 1561 up to now are analyzed. Under consideration are the observational, methodological and physical problems of energy-spectrum presentation for SEP fluxes (fluences) near the Earth's orbit. Special attention is paid to the study of the distribution function for extreme fluences of SEPs by their sizes. The authors present advances in at least three aspects: 1) a form of the distribution function that was previously obtained from the data for three cycles of solar activity has been completely confirmed by the data for 41 solar cycles; 2) early estimates of extremely large fluences in the past have been critically revised, and their values were found to be overestimated; and 3) extremely large SEP fluxes are shown to obey a probabilistic distribution, so the concept of an “upper limit flux” does not carry any strict physical sense although it serves as an important empirical restriction. SEP fluxes may only be characterized by the relative probabilities of their appearance, and there is a sharp break in the spectrum in the range of large fluences (or low probabilities). It is emphasized that modern observational data and methods of investigation do not allow, for the present, the precise resolution of the problem of the spectrum break or the estimation of the maximum potentialities of solar accelerator(s). This limitation considerably restricts the extrapolation of the obtained results to the past and future for application to the epochs with different levels of solar activity. - Highlights: • All available data on the largest solar proton events (SPEs) are analyzed. • Distribution function obtained for 3 last cycles is confirmed for 41 solar cycles. • Estimates of extremely large fluences in the past are found to be overestimated. • Extremely large SEP fluxes are shown to obey a probabilistic distribution.

  20. Probabilistic model for fluences and peak fluxes of solar energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nymmik, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The model is intended for calculating the probability for solar energetic particles (SEP), i.e., protons and Z=2-28 ions, to have an effect on hardware and on biological and other objects in the space. The model describes the probability for the ≥10 MeV/nucleon SEP fluences and peak fluxes to occur in the near-Earth space beyond the Earth magnetosphere under varying solar activity. The physical prerequisites of the model are as follows. The occurrence of SEP is a probabilistic process. The mean SEP occurrence frequency is a power-law function of solar activity (sunspot number). The SEP size (taken to be the ≥30 MeV proton fluence size) distribution is a power-law function within a 10 5 -10 11 proton/cm 2 range. The SEP event particle energy spectra are described by a common function whose parameters are distributed log-normally. The SEP mean composition is energy-dependent and suffers fluctuations described by log-normal functions in separate events

  1. Impurity identifications, concentrations and particle fluxes from spectral measurements of the EXTRAP T2R plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menmuir, S.; Kuldkepp, M.; Rachlew, E.

    2006-10-01

    An absolute intensity calibrated 0.5 m spectrometer with optical multi-channel analyser detector was used to observe the visible-UV radiation from the plasma in the EXTRAP T2R reversed field pinch experiment. Spectral lines were identified indicating the presence of oxygen, chromium, iron and molybdenum impurities in the hydrogen plasma. Certain regions of interest were examined in more detail and at different times in the plasma discharge. Impurity concentration calculations were made using the absolute intensities of lines of OIV and OV measured at 1-2 ms into the discharge generating estimates of the order of 0.2% of ne in the central region rising to 0.7% of ne at greater radii for OIV and 0.3% rising to 0.6% for OV. Edge electron temperatures of 0.5-5 eV at electron densities of 5-10×1011 cm-3 were calculated from the measured relative intensities of hydrogen Balmer lines. The absolute intensities of hydrogen lines and of multiplets of neutral chromium and molybdenum were used to determine particle fluxes (at 4-5 ms into the plasma) of the order 1×1016, 7×1013 and 3×1013 particles cm-2 s-1, respectively.

  2. Charged particle motion in a time-dependent flux-driven ring: an exactly solvable model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, P-G; Tang, C-S

    2007-01-01

    We consider a charged particle driven by a time-dependent flux threading a quantum ring. The dynamics of the charged particle is investigated using a classical treatment, a Fourier expansion technique, a time-evolution method, and the Lewis-Riesenfeld approach. We have shown that, by properly managing the boundary conditions, a time-dependent wavefunction can be obtained using a general non-Hermitian time-dependent invariant, which is a specific linear combination of initial angular-momentum and azimuthal-angle operators. It is shown that the linear invariant eigenfunction can be realized as a Gaussian-type wavepacket with a peak moving along the classical angular trajectory, while the distribution of the wavepacket is determined by the ratio of the coefficient of the initial angle to that of the initial canonical angular momentum. From the topologically nontrivial nature as well as the classical trajectory and angular momentum, one can determine the dynamical motion of the wavepacket. It should be noted that the peak position is no longer an expectation value of the angle operator, and hence the Ehrenfest theorem is not directly applicable in such a topologically nontrivial system

  3. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brændholt, Andreas; Larsen, Klaus Steenberg; Ibrom, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic...... day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when...

  4. Seasonality and interannual variability of particle-fluxes to the deep Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Haake, B.; Ittekkot, V.; Rixen, T.; Ramaswamy, V.; Nair, R.R.; Curry, W.B.

    at the western location due to the prolonged influence of the monsoonal upwelling as indicatEd. by increased biogenic carbonate and opal fluxes. However, the opal fluxes peak a month later than the carbonate fluxes. The delayed onset of opal flux peak appears...

  5. Risk estimation and annual fluxes of emerging contaminants from a Scottish priority catchment to the estuary and North Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zulin; Lebleu, Melanie; Osprey, Mark; Kerr, Christine; Courtot, Estelle

    2017-06-28

    Emerging contaminants (ECs) such as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) and pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) attracted global concern during the last decades due to their potential adverse effects on humans and ecosystems. This work is the first study to assess the spatiotemporal changes, annual fluxes and ecological risk of ECs (4 EDCs and 6 PPCPs) by different monitoring strategies (spot and passive sampling) over 12 months in a Scottish priority catchment (River Ugie, Scotland, 335 km 2 ). Overall, the total concentration in water ranged from contaminants in the River Ugie. The total annual fluxes of 4 EDCs transported to the Ugie estuary and North Sea were estimated to be 409 and 294 g based on the spot and passive sampling data, respectively, while they were 4636 and 4517 g for 6 PPCPs by spot and passive sampling, respectively. The spatiotemporal trend suggested that human activities and medication usages were the primary source of the contaminants. The overall comparison of the two sampling strategies supported the hypothesis that passive sampling tends to integrate the contaminants over a period of exposure and allows quantification of contamination at low concentration. The ecological risk assessment showed that bisphenol A posed the highest risks with 21.5% of the spot samples, resulting in a risk quotient >1. This suggests that mitigation measures might need to be taken to reduce the input of emerging contaminants into the river and its adjacent estuary and sea.

  6. Particle acceleration in regions of magnetic flux emergence: a statistical approach using test-particle- and MHD-simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahos, Loukas; Archontis, Vasilis; Isliker, Heinz

    We consider 3D nonlinear MHD simulations of an emerging flux tube, from the convection zone into the corona, focusing on the coronal part of the simulations. We first analyze the statistical nature and spatial structure of the electric field, calculating histograms and making use of iso-contour visualizations. Then test-particle simulations are performed for electrons, in order to study heating and acceleration phenomena, as well as to determine HXR emission. This study is done by comparatively exploring quiet, turbulent explosive, and mildly explosive phases of the MHD simulations. Also, the importance of collisional and relativistic effects is assessed, and the role of the integration time is investigated. Particular aim of this project is to verify the quasi- linear assumptions made in standard transport models, and to identify possible transport effects that cannot be captured with the latter. In order to determine the relation of our results to Fermi acceleration and Fokker-Planck modeling, we determine the standard transport coefficients. After all, we find that the electric field of the MHD simulations must be downscaled in order to prevent an un-physically high degree of acceleration, and the value chosen for the scale factor strongly affects the results. In different MHD time-instances we find heating to take place, and acceleration that depends on the level of MHD turbulence. Also, acceleration appears to be a transient phenomenon, there is a kind of saturation effect, and the parallel dynamics clearly dominate the energetics. The HXR spectra are not yet really compatible with observations, we have though to further explore the scaling of the electric field and the integration times used.

  7. Annual suspended sediment and trace element fluxes in the Mississippi, Columbia, Colorado, and Rio Grande drainage basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, A.J.; Elrick, K.A.; Smith, J.J.

    2001-01-01

    Suspended sediment, sediment-associated, total trace element, phosphorus (P), and total organic carbon (TOC) fluxes were determined for the Mississippi, Columbia, Rio Grande, and Colorado Basins for the study period (the 1996, 1997, and 1998 water years) as part of the US Geological Survey's redesigned National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) programme. The majority (??? 70%) of Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Ba, P, As, Fe, Mn, and Al are transported in association with suspended sediment; Sr transport seems dominated by the dissolved phase, whereas the transport of Li and TOC seems to be divided equally between both phases. Average dissolved trace element levels are markedly lower than reported during the original NASQAN programme; this seems due to the use of 'clean' sampling, processing, and analytical techniques rather than to improvements in water quality. Partitioning between sediment and water for Ag, Pb, Cd, Cr, Co, V, Be, As, Sb, Hg, and Ti could not be estimated due to a lack of detectable dissolved concentrations in most samples. Elevated suspended sediment-associated Zn levels were detected in the Ohio River Basin and elevated Hg levels were detected in the Tennessee River, the former may affect the mainstem Mississippi River, whereas the latter probably do not. Sediment-associated concentrations of Ag, Cu, Pb, Zn, Cd, Cr, Co, Ba, Mo, Sb, Hg, and Fe are markedly elevated in the upper Columbia Basin, and appear to be detectable (Zn, Cd) as far downstream as the middle of the basin. These elevated concentrations seem to result from mining and/or mining-related activities. Consistently detectable concentrations of dissolved Se were found only in the Colorado River Basin. Calculated average annual suspended sediment fluxes at the mouths of the Mississippi and Rio Grande Basins were below, whereas those for the Columbia and Colorado Basins were above previously published annual values. Downstream suspended sediment-associated and total trace element fluxes

  8. Iron fertilization enhanced net community production but not downward particle flux during the Southern Ocean iron fertilization experiment LOHAFEX

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Martin, P.; Loeff, M.M.R. van der.; Cassar, N.; Vandromme, P.; d'Ovidio, F.; Stemmann, L.; Rengarajan, R.; Soares, M.A.; Gonzalez, H.E.; Ebersbach, F.; Lampitt, R.S.; Sanders, R.; Barnett, B.A.; Smetacek, V.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    A closed eddy core in the Subantarctic Atlantic Ocean was fertilized twice with two tons of iron (as FeSO4), and the 300 km2 fertilized patch was studied for 39 days to test whether fertilization enhances downward particle flux...

  9. 234Th-based measurements of particle flux in surface water of the Bransfield Strait, western Antarctica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulin, S.B.; National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Sevastopol, Autonomous Republic of Crimea

    2014-01-01

    Measurements of particulate and dissolved 234 Th were carried out in March 2002 in the Bransfield Strait located between the Antarctic Peninsula and the South Shetland Islands. The 234 Th/ 238 U disequilibrium found in the upper water column has allowed evaluation of downward particle fluxes across a frontal zone, which divides water masses coming from the Bellingshausen Sea and the Weddell Sea. The highest particle flux has been found in this mixing zone, where it was 3-5 times greater than in the adjacent waters. Total mass fluxes in the upper 150-m water column were estimated as about 2.2 g m -2 day -1 in the eastern part of the Strait and 3.1 g m -2 day -1 in the western area. (author)

  10. Moss and soil contributions to the annual net carbon flux of a maturing boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; O'Neill, K. P.; Trumbore, S.E.; Veldhuis, H.; Stocks, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    We used input and decomposition data from 14C studies of soils to determine rates of vertical accumulation of moss combined with carbon storage inventories on a sequence of burns to model how carbon accumulates in soils and moss after a stand-killing fire. We used soil drainage - moss associations and soil drainage maps of the old black spruce (OBS) site at the BOREAS northern study area (NSA) to areally weight the contributions of each moderately well drained, feathermoss areas; poorly drained sphagnum - feathermoss areas; and very poorly drained brown moss areas to the carbon storage and flux at the OBS NSA site. On this very old (117 years) complex of black spruce, sphagnum bog veneer, and fen systems we conclude that these systems are likely sequestering 0.01-0.03 kg C m-2 yr-' at OBS-NSA today. Soil drainage in boreal forests near Thompson, Manitoba, controls carbon storage and flux by controlling moss input and decomposition rates and by controlling through fire the amount and quality of carbon left after burning. On poorly drained soils rich in sphagnum moss, net accumulation and long-term storage of carbon is higher than on better drained soils colonized by feathermosses. The carbon flux of these contrasting ecosystems is best characterized by soil drainage class and stand age, where stands recently burned are net sources of CO2, and maturing stands become increasingly stronger sinks of atmospheric CO2. This approach to measuring carbon storage and flux presents a method of scaling to larger areas using soil drainage, moss cover, and stand age information.

  11. Formation of field-twisting flux tubes on the magnetopause and solar wind particle entry into the magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, T.; Shimada, T.; Tanaka, M.; Hayashi, T.; Watanabe, K.

    1986-01-01

    A global interaction between the solar wind with a southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the magnetosphere is studied using a semi-global simulation model. A magnetic flux tube in which field lines are twisted is created as a result of repeated reconnection between the IMF and the outermost earth-rooted magnetic field near the equatorial plane and propagates to higher latitudes. When crossing the polar cusp, the flux tube penetrates into the magnetosphere reiterating reconnection with the earth-rooted higher latitude magnetic field, whereby solar wind particles are freely brought inside the magnetosphere. The flux tube structure has similarities in many aspects to the flux transfer events (FTEs) observed near the dayside magnetopause

  12. Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Task A. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1994-01-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DOE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie), one Associate Professor (Woodard), and two Assistant Professors (Qiu, Kennedy). In addition, we have four postdoctoral research associates and seven graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics including both theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years, an outline of our current research program

  13. Dependence of the Peak Fluxes of Solar Energetic Particles on CME 3D Parameters from STEREO and SOHO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinhye; Moon, Y.-J.; Lee, Harim

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the relationships between the peak fluxes of 18 solar energetic particle (SEP) events and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) 3D parameters (speed, angular width, and separation angle) obtained from SOHO , and STEREO-A / B for the period from 2010 August to 2013 June. We apply the STEREO CME Analysis Tool (StereoCAT) to the SEP-associated CMEs to obtain 3D speeds and 3D angular widths. The separation angles are determined as the longitudinal angles between flaring regions and magnetic footpoints of the spacecraft, which are calculated by the assumption of a Parker spiral field. The main results are as follows. (1) We find that the dependence of the SEP peak fluxes on CME 3D speed from multiple spacecraft is similar to that on CME 2D speed. (2) There is a positive correlation between SEP peak flux and 3D angular width from multiple spacecraft, which is much more evident than the relationship between SEP peak flux and 2D angular width. (3) There is a noticeable anti-correlation ( r = −0.62) between SEP peak flux and separation angle. (4) The multiple-regression method between SEP peak fluxes and CME 3D parameters shows that the longitudinal separation angle is the most important parameter, and the CME 3D speed is secondary on SEP peak flux.

  14. Dependence of the Peak Fluxes of Solar Energetic Particles on CME 3D Parameters from STEREO and SOHO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jinhye; Moon, Y.-J. [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Harim, E-mail: jinhye@khu.ac.kr [School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 17104 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-07-20

    We investigate the relationships between the peak fluxes of 18 solar energetic particle (SEP) events and associated coronal mass ejection (CME) 3D parameters (speed, angular width, and separation angle) obtained from SOHO , and STEREO-A / B for the period from 2010 August to 2013 June. We apply the STEREO CME Analysis Tool (StereoCAT) to the SEP-associated CMEs to obtain 3D speeds and 3D angular widths. The separation angles are determined as the longitudinal angles between flaring regions and magnetic footpoints of the spacecraft, which are calculated by the assumption of a Parker spiral field. The main results are as follows. (1) We find that the dependence of the SEP peak fluxes on CME 3D speed from multiple spacecraft is similar to that on CME 2D speed. (2) There is a positive correlation between SEP peak flux and 3D angular width from multiple spacecraft, which is much more evident than the relationship between SEP peak flux and 2D angular width. (3) There is a noticeable anti-correlation ( r = −0.62) between SEP peak flux and separation angle. (4) The multiple-regression method between SEP peak fluxes and CME 3D parameters shows that the longitudinal separation angle is the most important parameter, and the CME 3D speed is secondary on SEP peak flux.

  15. Task A: Research in theoretical elementary particle physics at the University of Florida; Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, R.D.; Ramond, P.M.; Sikivie, P.; Thorn, C.B.

    1993-11-01

    This is the Annual Progress Report of the theoretical particle theory group at the University of Florida under DoE Grant DE-FG05-86ER40272. At present our group consists of four Full Professors (Field, Ramond, Thorn, Sikivie) and three Assistant Professors (Qiu, Woodard, Kennedy). Dallas Kennedy recently joined our group increasing the Particle Theory faculty to seven. In addition, we have three postdoctoral research associates, an SSC fellow, and eight graduate students. The research of our group covers a broad range of topics in theoretical high energy physics with balance between theory and phenomenology. Included in this report is a summary of the last several years of operation of the group and an outline of our current research program.

  16. Radiation phenomena and particle fluxes in the X-event in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeckel, H J; Bartlett, D V; Falter, H; Lingertat, J; Reichle, R [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking

    1994-07-01

    The radiation build-up and the particle fluxes in the phase, immediately preceding the X-event, has been studied bolometrically and using spectroscopy. The results show that the H-mode phase in high performance discharges tends to collapse irreversibly. The (calculated) target temperature just before the X-event amounts to about 1400 C. Any deterioration of confinement at this temperature leads to run-away conditions of the target temperature and a final fall-back into L-mode. Possible causes of the confinement deterioration are: MHD activities can cause a fast plasma loss and, hence, a power flash, dumped on the divertor target, leading to a temperature jump of up to 1000 C; enhanced recycling, due to thermal release of trapped deuterium from the graphite target plates causes an effective plasma edge cooling; loose graphite on the target tiles with virtually no thermal coupling to the target bulk can be sublimated and ejected into the main plasma with even small power levels. An active cooling, keeping the bulk target at ambient temperature could make the discharge more resilient against even medium MHD instabilities, as e.g. giant ELMs. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  17. MIB Probes for measurements of particle and energy fluxes in plasma of Wendelstein 7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidov, V. I.; Koepke, M. E.; Kurlyandskaya, I. P.; Raitses, Y.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetically insulated baffled (MIB) probes and probe arrays that share the simplicity of simple Langmuir probes but supersede them in their ability to make real-time measurements of plasma potential, temperature and energy/particle fluxes in W7-X stellarator plasma are being developed. The probes offer the advantages of direct measurements of the plasma fluid observables, while being non-emitting and electrically floating. The principle of operation of the probe is based on the dependence of the voltage drop in the plasma-probe sheath on the direction of the local magnetic field. The core technology for these probes rests with the use of a special baffling configuration such that electron current to the probe is fully controllable in the closed, open or partially open orientation, by a simple rotation of the baffle with respect to the magnetic field alignment in the plasma. The baffled-probe designs proposed for edge diagnostics will increase the capability to characterize separately plasma properties in real-time for understanding of underlying physics in the edge plasma.

  18. Direct measurements of particle flux along gap sides in castellated plasma facing component in COMPASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dejarnac, Renaud; Dimitrova, Miglena; Komm, Michael; Schweer, Bernd; Terra, Alexis; Martin, Aurelien; Boizante, Gontran; Gunn, James P.; Panek, Radomir

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •We designed a probe to measure plasma deposition into gaps during tokamak discharges. •Isat profiles are measured on both side of the gap for different gap orientations. •Ion current is measured at the bottom of the gap in the toroidal orientation. •Kinetic simulations reproduce well experimental profiles qualitatively. -- Abstract: In this paper, we report results of a dedicated experiment that gives the plasma penetration profiles inside a gap of a tokamak castellated plasma-facing component. A specially designed probe that recreates a gap between two tiles has been built for the purpose of this study. It allows to measure ion saturation profiles along the 2 sides and at the bottom of the gap for both poloidal and toroidal orientations. The novelty of such experiment is the real time measurement of the plasma flux inside the gap during a tokamak D-shaped discharge compared to previous experimental studies which were mainly post-mortem. This experiment was performed in the COMPASS tokamak and results are compared with particle-in-cell simulations. The plasma deposition is found to be asymmetric in both orientations with a stronger effect in poloidal gaps. The Larmor radius of the incoming ions plays a role in the plasma penetration only in poloidal gaps but seems to have little impact in toroidal gaps. Profiles are qualitatively well reproduced by simulations. Ion current is recorded at the bottom of a toroidal gap under certain conditions

  19. Particle swarm optimization-based least squares support vector regression for critical heat flux prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, B.T.; Zhao, F.Y.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► CHF data are collected from the published literature. ► Less training data are used to train the LSSVR model. ► PSO is adopted to optimize the key parameters to improve the model precision. ► The reliability of LSSVR is proved through parametric trends analysis. - Abstract: In view of practical importance of critical heat flux (CHF) for design and safety of nuclear reactors, accurate prediction of CHF is of utmost significance. This paper presents a novel approach using least squares support vector regression (LSSVR) and particle swarm optimization (PSO) to predict CHF. Two available published datasets are used to train and test the proposed algorithm, in which PSO is employed to search for the best parameters involved in LSSVR model. The CHF values obtained by the LSSVR model are compared with the corresponding experimental values and those of a previous method, adaptive neuro fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). This comparison is also carried out in the investigation of parametric trends of CHF. It is found that the proposed method can achieve the desired performance and yields a more satisfactory fit with experimental results than ANFIS. Therefore, LSSVR method is likely to be suitable for other parameters processing such as CHF

  20. Control of particles flux in a tokamak with an events structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsitrone, E.

    1995-01-01

    Two key problems in the development of a controlled fusion reactor are: -the control of the ashes resulting from the fusion reaction (helium) and of the impurities coming from the wall erosion, which affect the central plasma performances by diluting the fuel and dissipating a part of the produced energy by radiation. - the removal of the heat carried to the walls by charged particles, which is highly concentrated (peak values of several tens of MW per m 2 ). Two types of systems are generally used for the plasma-wall interface: throat limiter and axisymmetric divertor. Neither is an ideal candidate to control simultaneously the heat and particle fluxes. This thesis investigates an alternative configuration, the vented limiter, tested for the first time on the Tore Supra tokamak. The vented limiter principle lies on the recycling neutrals collection by slots, in such a way that local thermal overload is avoided. It is shown experimentally that the surface temperature of the prototype installed in Tore Supra remains uniform. As far as the particle collection is concerned, even though the pressure in the vented limiter is lower than the pressure in the throat limiter by a factor 3 for deuterium and 4 helium, it is sufficient to control the plasma density. Moreover, as with a throat limiter, the pressure exhibits a quadratic evolution with the plasma density. To interpret these results, a model describing the plasma recycling on the limiter and the pumping by the slots has been developed. The model has been validated by a comparison with the experimental data. It was then used to propose an optimized version of the prototype with reshaped slots. This should improve the pumping efficiency by a factor 2, in deuterium as well as in helium, but without removing the discrepancy between both pumping efficiencies. As a consequence, even if the thermal behaviour of the vented limiter is satisfactory, its suitability for a future strongly depends on whether it is possible or

  1. The contribution of various types of settling particles to the flux of organic carbon in the Gulf of St. Lawrence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Ibarra, Nancy; Silverberg, Norman

    2011-10-01

    The contents of 31 samples from free-drifting sediment traps deployed in the Gulf of St. Lawrence (GSL) were analyzed for the individual contribution of the different types of particles encountered to the total particulate organic carbon (POC) flux. Two trap models were used in 1993-1994: small traps at 50 m depth and large traps at 50 and 150 m. Total POC fluxes averaged 42 mg C m -2 d -1 for the more reliable large trap and 149 mg C m -2 d -1 for the small trap. The POC fluxes were attributed to different classes of particles based upon microscopically determined particle dimensions and carbon/volume algorithms available in the literature. Fecal pellets, followed by phytoplankton, were the major attributable components, with important contributions by microzooplankton, particularly during the summer of 1994. The mean fluxes for pellets (6 and 60 mg C m -2 d -1, for the large and small traps, respectively) and phytoplankton (3.2 and 42.9 mg C m -2 d -1) were in the range of those encountered in other areas of moderate primary productivity. Mean zooplankton carbon fluxes (1.8 and 8.5 mg C m -2 d -1, respectively), however, reflect higher than average zooplankton abundances in the GSL. The C fluxes of specific algal groups confirmed the existence of three trophic regimes previously identified from water column studies and numeric cell fluxes: (1) a period when diatoms were dominant during the spring, (2) a longer interval, which was dominated by dinoflagellates at most others times of the year, and (3) a period of transition during summer. Carbon of animal origin dominated the attributable flux, including an important fraction associated with heterotrophic dinoflagellates. The contribution of marine snow to the total flux (estimated as the difference between the total POC flux and the sum of the attributed components) frequently amounted to more than 60%. The true importance of marine snow remains uncertain, however, because the errors associated with each of the

  2. A comprehensive biogeochemical record and annual flux estimates for the Sabaki River (Kenya)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwick, Trent R.; Tamooh, Fredrick; Ogwoka, Bernard; Borges, Alberto V.; Darchambeau, François; Bouillon, Steven

    2018-03-01

    Inland waters impart considerable influence on nutrient cycling and budget estimates across local, regional and global scales, whilst anthropogenic pressures, such as rising populations and the appropriation of land and water resources, are undoubtedly modulating the flux of carbon (C), nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) between terrestrial biomes to inland waters, and the subsequent flux of these nutrients to the marine and atmospheric domains. Here, we present a 2-year biogeochemical record (October 2011-December 2013) at biweekly sampling resolution for the lower Sabaki River, Kenya, and provide estimates for suspended sediment and nutrient export fluxes from the lower Sabaki River under pre-dam conditions, and in light of the approved construction of the Thwake Multipurpose Dam on its upper reaches (Athi River). Erratic seasonal variation was typical for most parameters, with generally poor correlation between discharge and material concentrations, and stable isotope values of C (δ13C) and N (δ15N). Although high total suspended matter (TSM) concentrations are reported here (up to ˜ 3.8 g L-1), peak concentrations of TSM rarely coincided with peak discharge. The contribution of particulate organic C (POC) to the TSM pool indicates a wide biannual variation in suspended sediment load from OC poor (0.3 %) to OC rich (14.9 %), with the highest %POC occurring when discharge is Wet season flows (October-December and March-May) carried > 80 % of the total load for TSM (˜ 86 %), POC (˜ 89 %), dissolved organic carbon (DOC; ˜ 81 %), PN (˜ 89 %) and particulate phosphorus (TPP; ˜ 82 %), with > 50 % of each fraction exported during the long wet season (March-May). Our estimated sediment yield (85 Mg km-2 yr-1) is relatively low on the global scale and is considerably less than the recently reported average sediment yield of ˜ 630 Mg km-2 yr-1 for African river basins. Regardless, sediment and OC yields were all at least equivalent or greater than reported yields

  3. Coupling between SW monsoon-related surface and deep ocean processes as discerned from continuous particle flux measurements and correlated satellite data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rixen, T.; Haake, B.; Ittekkot, V.; Guptha, M.V.S.; Nair, R.R.; Schlussel, P.

    . The particle flux in the eastern Arabian Sea is as high as in the central Arabian Sea but is influenced by a weaker upwelling system along the Indian Coast. The observed interannual variability in the pattern of particle fluxes during the SW monsoons is most...

  4. Annual benthic metabolism and organic carbon fluxes in a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay dominated by the macroalgae Caulerpa prolifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas play an important role on carbon cycling. Elucidating the dynamics on the production, transport and fate of organic carbon is relevant to gain a better understanding of the role coastal areas play in the global carbon budget. Here, we assess the metabolic status and associated organic carbon fluxes of a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay supporting a meadow of Caulerpa prolifera. We test whether the EDOC pool is a significant component of the organic carbon pool and associated fluxes in this ecosystem. The Bay of Portocolom was in net metabolic balance on a yearly basis, but heterotrophic during the summer months. Community respiration (CR was positively correlated to C. prolifera biomass, while net community production (NCP had a negative correlation. The benthic compartment represented, on average, 72.6 ± 5.2 % of CR and 86.8 ± 4.5 % of gross primary production (GPP. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC production peaked in summer and was always positive, with the incubations performed in the dark almost doubling the flux of those performed in the light. Exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, however, oscillated between production and uptake, being completely recycled within the system and representing around 14% of the DOC flux. The pools of bottom and surface DOC were high for an oligotrophic environment, and were positively correlated to the pool of EDOC. Thus, despite being in metabolic balance, this ecosystem acted as a conduit for organic carbon (OC, as it is able to export OC to adjacent areas derived from allochtonous inputs during heterotrophic conditions. These inputs likely come from groundwater discharge, human activity in the watershed, delivered to the sediments through the high capacity of C. prolifera to remove particles from the water column, and from the air-water exchange of EDOC, demonstrating that these communities are a major contributor to the cycling of OC in coastal embayments.

  5. Bathypelagic particle flux signatures from a suboxic eddy in the oligotrophic tropical North Atlantic: production, sedimentation and preservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Karstensen, J.; Romero, O.; Baumann, K.-H.; Donner, B.; Hefter, J.; Mollenhauer, G.; Iversen, M.; Fiedler, B.; Monteiro, I.; Körtzinger, A.

    2015-11-01

    Particle fluxes at the Cape Verde Ocean Observatory (CVOO) in the eastern tropical North Atlantic for the period December 2009 until May 2011 are discussed based on bathypelagic sediment trap time series data collected at 1290 and 3439 m water depth. The typically oligotrophic particle flux pattern with weak seasonality is modified by the appearance of a highly productive and low oxygen anticyclonic modewater eddy (ACME) in winter 2010. The eddy passage was accompanied by unusually high mass fluxes, lasting from December 2009 to May 2010. Distinct biogenic silica (BSi) and organic carbon flux peaks were observed in February-March 2010 when the eddy approached CVOO. The flux of the lithogenic component, mostly mineral dust, was well correlated to that of organic carbon in particular in the deep trap samples, suggesting a close coupling. The lithogenic ballasting obviously resulted in high particle settling rates and, thus, a fast transfer of epi-/mesopelagic signatures to the bathypelagic traps. Molar C : N ratios of organic matter during the ACME passage were around 18 and 25 for the upper and lower trap samples, respectively. This suggests that some production under nutrient (nitrate) limitation in the upper few tens of meters above the zone of suboxia might have occurred in the beginning of 2010. The δ15N record showed a decrease from January to March 2010 while the organic carbon and N fluxes increased. The causes of enhanced sedimentation from the eddy in February/March 2010 remain elusive but nutrient depletion and/or a high availability of dust as ballast mineral for organic-rich aggregates might have contributed to the elevated fluxes during the eddy passage. Remineralization of sinking organic-rich particles could have contributed to the formation of a suboxic zone at shallow depth. Although the eddy has been formed in the African coastal area in summer 2009, no indication of coastal flux signatures were found in the sediment traps, suggesting an

  6. A comprehensive biogeochemical record and annual flux estimates for the Sabaki River (Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. Marwick

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Inland waters impart considerable influence on nutrient cycling and budget estimates across local, regional and global scales, whilst anthropogenic pressures, such as rising populations and the appropriation of land and water resources, are undoubtedly modulating the flux of carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P between terrestrial biomes to inland waters, and the subsequent flux of these nutrients to the marine and atmospheric domains. Here, we present a 2-year biogeochemical record (October 2011–December 2013 at biweekly sampling resolution for the lower Sabaki River, Kenya, and provide estimates for suspended sediment and nutrient export fluxes from the lower Sabaki River under pre-dam conditions, and in light of the approved construction of the Thwake Multipurpose Dam on its upper reaches (Athi River. Erratic seasonal variation was typical for most parameters, with generally poor correlation between discharge and material concentrations, and stable isotope values of C (δ13C and N (δ15N. Although high total suspended matter (TSM concentrations are reported here (up to ∼ 3.8 g L−1, peak concentrations of TSM rarely coincided with peak discharge. The contribution of particulate organic C (POC to the TSM pool indicates a wide biannual variation in suspended sediment load from OC poor (0.3 % to OC rich (14.9 %, with the highest %POC occurring when discharge is < 100 m3 s−1 and at lower TSM concentrations. The consistent 15N enrichment of the particulate nitrogen (PN pool compared to other river systems indicates anthropogenic N loading is a year-round driver of N export from the Sabaki Basin. The lower Sabaki River was consistently oversaturated in dissolved methane (CH4; from 499 to 135 111 % and nitrous oxide (N2O; 100 to 463 % relative to atmospheric concentrations. Wet season flows (October–December and March–May carried > 80 % of the total load for TSM (∼ 86 %, POC (∼ 89 %, dissolved

  7. Vertical and lateral particle and element fluxes across soil catenas in southern Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonejans, Jerome; Vanacker, Veerle; Opfergelt, Sophie

    2016-04-01

    At the Earth's surface, mechanical disaggregation and chemical weathering transform bedrock into mobile regolith and soil. Downslope translocation of weathering products by lateral transport of soil particles and elements are determinant for the development of soil catenas. To grasp the rates of soil formation and development along catenas, we need better constraints on the vertical and lateral fluxes of particles and nutrients along hillslopes. Our study aims to analyze soil catena development in a spatio-temporal framework. The data are collected in the central part of the Rio Grande do Sul State in southern Brazil. The sampling area is located on the Serra Geral plateau composed by rhyodacite rocks (˜700 m.a.s.l). The climate is humid subtropical (Cfa), and the natural vegetation is characterized by deciduous tropical forest and native Araucaria angustifolia forests. Two soil catenas with different slope morphology were selected: a steep slope of 190m long with maximum slope angle of 24° , and a gentle one of 140m long with a maximum slope angle of 11° . In total, eight soil profiles were sampled and 67 soil and 8 saprock or bedrock samples have been analysed for total element composition. Bulk densities were determined on undisturbed soil samples. The soil thickness varies along catenas with soil depths of about 90 cm on the ridge top, 30 cm on the convex nose of the steep slope and >2 m on the foot slope. Chemical mass balance techniques are used to constrain chemical weathering intensities (CDF) and absolute chemical mass losses or gains (δj,w). In each one of the eight soil profiles, we notice important absolute chemical mass losses for the most mobile elements (Na, K and Ca). The mass transfer coefficients of Al and Fe do not show a clear pattern, and largely depend on soil depth and position along the soil catena. The weathering intensity of the soil and the absolute chemical mass transfer are correlated with the residence time of the soil. Our data

  8. Types of Lightning Discharges that Abruptly Terminate Enhanced Fluxes of Energetic Radiation and Particles Observed at Ground Level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilingarian, A.; Khanikyants, Y.; Pokhsraryan, D.; Soghomonyan, S.; Mareev, E.; Rakov, V.

    2017-01-01

    We present ground-based measurements of thunderstorm-related enhancements of fluxes of energetic radiation and particles that are abruptly terminated by lightning discharges. All measurements were performed at an altitude of 3200 m above sea level on Mt. Aragats (Armenia). Lightning signatures were recorded using a network of five electric field mills, three of which were placed at the Aragats station, one at the Nor Amberd station (12.8 km from Aragats), and one at the Yerevan station (39 km from Aragats), and a wideband electric field measuring system with a useful frequency bandwidth of 50 Hz to 12 MHZ. It appears that the flux-enhancement termination is associated with close (within 10 km or so of the particle detector) -CGs and normal polarity ICs; that is, with lightning types which reduce the upward-directed electric field below the cloud and, hence, suppress the acceleration of electrons toward the ground. (author)

  9. Simulations of particle and heat fluxes in an ELMy H-mode discharge on EAST using BOUT++ code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y. B.; Xia, T. Y.; Zhong, F. C.; Zheng, Z.; Liu, J. B.; team3, EAST

    2018-05-01

    In order to study the distribution and evolution of the transient particle and heat fluxes during edge-localized mode (ELM) bursts on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), the BOUT++ six-field two-fluid model is used to simulate the pedestal collapse. The profiles from the EAST H-mode discharge #56129 are used as the initial conditions. Linear analysis shows that the resistive ballooning mode and drift-Alfven wave are two dominant instabilities for the equilibrium, and play important roles in driving ELMs. The evolution of the density profile and the growing process of the heat flux at divertor targets during the burst of ELMs are reproduced. The time evolution of the poloidal structures of T e is well simulated, and the dominant mode in each stage of the ELM crash process is found. The studies show that during the nonlinear phase, the dominant mode is 5, and it changes to 0 when the nonlinear phase goes to saturation after the ELM crash. The time evolution of the radial electron heat flux, ion heat flux, and particle density flux at the outer midplane (OMP) are obtained, and the corresponding transport coefficients D r, χ ir, and χ er reach maximum around 0.3 ∼ 0.5 m2 s‑1 at ΨN = 0.9. The heat fluxes at outer target plates are several times larger than that at inner target plates, which is consistent with the experimental observations. The simulated profiles of ion saturation current density (j s) at the lower outboard (LO) divertor target are compared to those of experiments by Langmuir probes. The profiles near the strike point are similar, and the peak values of j s from simulation are very close to the measurements.

  10. Simulation of electron density disturbances of the ionospheric D region produced by high-energy particle fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martynenko, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    Using the large-scale tim expansion analytical solutions of electron concentration balance equation in D-region of the ionosphere for pulsed and periodic changes in the rate of ion formatin under the effect of fluxes of precipitating high-energy particles are obtained. Possible effect of disturbances of temperature of nutrals is taken into account. On the basis of model representations the space-time structure of emerging ionospheric disturbances is discussed

  11. Framework to model neutral particle flux in convex high aspect ratio structures using one-dimensional radiosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manstetten, Paul; Filipovic, Lado; Hössinger, Andreas; Weinbub, Josef; Selberherr, Siegfried

    2017-02-01

    We present a computationally efficient framework to compute the neutral flux in high aspect ratio structures during three-dimensional plasma etching simulations. The framework is based on a one-dimensional radiosity approach and is applicable to simulations of convex rotationally symmetric holes and convex symmetric trenches with a constant cross-section. The framework is intended to replace the full three-dimensional simulation step required to calculate the neutral flux during plasma etching simulations. Especially for high aspect ratio structures, the computational effort, required to perform the full three-dimensional simulation of the neutral flux at the desired spatial resolution, conflicts with practical simulation time constraints. Our results are in agreement with those obtained by three-dimensional Monte Carlo based ray tracing simulations for various aspect ratios and convex geometries. With this framework we present a comprehensive analysis of the influence of the geometrical properties of high aspect ratio structures as well as of the particle sticking probability on the neutral particle flux.

  12. Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology

  13. Stair-Step Particle Flux Spectra on the Lunar Surface: Evidence for Nonmonotonic Potentials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Newheart, Anastasia; Poppe, Andrew R.; Hills, H. Kent; Farrell, William M.

    2016-01-01

    We present examples of unusual "stair-step" differential flux spectra observed by the Apollo 14 Suprathermal Ion Detector Experiment on the lunar dayside surface in Earth's magnetotail. These spectra exhibit a relatively constant differential flux below some cutoff energy and then drop off precipitously, by about an order of magnitude or more, at higher energies. We propose that these spectra result from photoions accelerated on the lunar dayside by nonmonotonic potentials (i.e.,potentials that do not decay to zero monotonically) and present a model for the expected differential flux. The energy of the cutoff and the magnitude of the differential flux are related to the properties of the local space environment and are consistent with the observed flux spectra. If this interpretation is correct, these surface-based ion observations provide a unique perspective that both complements and enhances the conclusions obtained by remote-sensing orbiter observations on the Moon's exospheric and electrostatic properties.

  14. Continuous Flow Hygroscopicity-Resolved Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (Hy-Res REA) Method of Measuring Size-Resolved Sea-Salt Particle Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meskhidze, N.; Royalty, T. M.; Phillips, B.; Dawson, K. W.; Petters, M. D.; Reed, R.; Weinstein, J.; Hook, D.; Wiener, R.

    2017-12-01

    The accurate representation of aerosols in climate models requires direct ambient measurement of the size- and composition-dependent particle production fluxes. Here we present the design, testing, and analysis of data collected through the first instrument capable of measuring hygroscopicity-based, size-resolved particle fluxes using a continuous-flow Hygroscopicity-Resolved Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (Hy-Res REA) technique. The different components of the instrument were extensively tested inside the US Environmental Protection Agency's Aerosol Test Facility for sea-salt and ammoniums sulfate particle fluxes. The new REA system design does not require particle accumulation, therefore avoids the diffusional wall losses associated with long residence times of particles inside the air collectors of the traditional REA devices. The Hy-Res REA system used in this study includes a 3-D sonic anemometer, two fast-response solenoid valves, two Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs), a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS), and a Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA). A linear relationship was found between the sea-salt particle fluxes measured by eddy covariance and REA techniques, with comparable theoretical (0.34) and measured (0.39) proportionality constants. The sea-salt particle detection limit of the Hy-Res REA flux system is estimated to be 6x105 m-2s-1. For the conditions of ammonium sulfate and sea-salt particles of comparable source strength and location, the continuous-flow Hy-Res REA instrument was able to achieve better than 90% accuracy of measuring the sea-salt particle fluxes. In principle, the instrument can be applied to measure fluxes of particles of variable size and distinct hygroscopic properties (i.e., mineral dust, black carbon, etc.).

  15. Effects of dairy manure management in annual and perennial cropping systems on soil microbial communities associated with in situ N2O fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunfield, Kari; Thompson, Karen; Bent, Elizabeth; Abalos, Diego; Wagner-Riddle, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    Liquid dairy manure (LDM) application and ploughing events may affect soil microbial community functioning differently between perennial and annual cropping systems due to plant-specific characteristics stimulating changes in microbial community structure. Understanding how these microbial communities change in response to varied management, and how these changes relate to in situ N2O fluxes may allow the creation of predictive models for use in the development of best management practices (BMPs) to decrease nitrogen (N) losses through choice of crop, plough, and LDM practices. Our objectives were to contrast changes in the population sizes and community structures of genes associated with nitrifier (amoA, crenamoA) and denitrifier (nirK, nirS, nosZ) communities in differently managed annual and perennial fields demonstrating variation in N2O flux, and to determine if differences in these microbial communities were linked to the observed variation in N2O fluxes. Soil was sampled in 2012 and in 2014 in a 4-ha spring-applied LDM grass-legume (perennial) plot and two 4-ha corn (annual) treatments under fall or spring LDM application. Soil DNA was extracted and used to target N-cycling genes via qPCR (n=6) and for next-generation sequencing (Illumina Miseq) (n=3). Significantly higher field-scale N2O fluxes were observed in the annual plots compared to the perennial system; however N2O fluxes increased after plough down of the perennial plot. Nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) indicated differences in N-cycling communities between annual and perennial cropping systems, and some communities became similar between annual and perennial plots after ploughing. Shifts in these communities demonstrated relationships with agricultural management, which were associated with differences in N2O flux. Indicator species analysis was used to identify operational taxonomic units (OTUs) most responsible for community shifts related to management. Nitrifying and denitrifying soil

  16. Particle flux during the southwest monsoon on the western margin of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaswamy, V.

    of the collected particulate matter is reported here The result suggests that present-day sedimentation on the outer shelf is dominated by larger particle or particle aggregates, composed mainly of biogenic carbonates Clay minerals in the samples collected...

  17. Angular dependence of energy and particle fluxes in a magnetized plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, B.; Bohmeyer, W.; Fussmann, G.

    2005-01-01

    A flat probe allowing simultaneous measurements of energy flux and current density as functions of a bias voltage was rotated in a spatially homogeneous plasma. The experiments were conducted at the PSI-2 facility, a linear divertor simulator with moderate magnetic field strength. Sheath parameters (ion current density j i , floating potential U f , energy flux density q, ion energy reflection coefficient R E and sheath energy transmission coefficient γ) were determined as functions of the angle α between the probe surface normal and the magnetic field. A geometric model has been developed to explain the ion flux density at grazing incidence

  18. Estimating surface turbulent heat fluxes from land surface temperature and soil moisture using the particle batch smoother

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Dong, Jianzhi; Steele-Dunne, Susan; van de Giesen, Nick

    2016-04-01

    This study is focused on estimating surface sensible and latent heat fluxes from land surface temperature (LST) time series and soil moisture observations. Surface turbulent heat fluxes interact with the overlying atmosphere and play a crucial role in meteorology, hydrology and other climate-related fields, but in-situ measurements are costly and difficult. It has been demonstrated that the time series of LST contains information of energy partitioning and that surface turbulent heat fluxes can be determined from assimilation of LST. These studies are mainly based on two assumptions: (1) a monthly value of bulk heat transfer coefficient under neutral conditions (CHN) which scales the sum of the fluxes, and (2) an evaporation fraction (EF) which stays constant during the near-peak hours of the day. Previous studies have applied variational and ensemble approaches to this problem. Here the newly developed particle batch smoother (PBS) algorithm is adopted to test its capability in this application. The PBS can be seen as an extension of the standard particle filter (PF) in which the states and parameters within a fix window are updated in a batch using all observations in the window. The aim of this study is two-fold. First, the PBS is used to assimilate only LST time series into the force-restore model to estimate fluxes. Second, a simple soil water transfer scheme is introduced to evaluate the benefit of assimilating soil moisture observations simultaneously. The experiments are implemented using the First ISLSCP (International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project) (FIFE) data. It is shown that the restored LST time series using PBS agrees very well with observations, and that assimilating LST significantly improved the flux estimation at both daily and half-hourly time scales. When soil moisture is introduced to further constrain EF, the accuracy of estimated EF is greatly improved. Furthermore, the RMSEs of retrieved fluxes are effectively reduced at both

  19. Seasonal and interannual variability in deep ocean particle fluxes at the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP)/Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) site in the western Sargasso Sea near Bermuda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Maureen H.; Ralph, Nate; Ross, Edith H.

    Since 1978, the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) time-series sediment traps have measured particle fluxes in the deep Sargasso Sea near Bermuda. There is currently a 20+yr flux record at 3200-m depth, a 12+yr flux at 1500-m depth, and a 9+yr record at 500-m depth. Strong seasonality is observed in mass flux at all depths, with a flux maximum in February-March and a smaller maximum in December-January. There is also significant interannual variability in the flux, especially with respect to the presence/absence of the December-January flux maximum and in the duration of the high flux period in the spring. The flux records at the three depths are surprisingly coherent, with no statistically significant temporal lag between 500 and 3200-m fluxes at our biweekly sample resolution. Bulk compositional data indicate an extremely rapid decrease in the flux of organic constituents with depth between 500 and 1500-m, and a smaller decrease with depth between 1500 and 3200-m depth. In contrast, carbonate flux is uniform or increases slightly between 500 and 1500-m, possibly reflecting deep secondary calcification by foraminifera. The lithogenic flux increases by over 50% between 500 and 3200-m depth, indicating strong deep water scavenging/repackaging of suspended lithogenic material. Concurrent with the rapid changes in flux composition, there is a marked reduction in the heterogeneity of the sinking particle pool with depth, especially within the mesopelagic zone. By 3200-m depth, the bulk composition of the sinking particle pool is strikingly uniform, both seasonally and over variations in mass flux of more than an order of magnitude. These OFP results provide strong indirect evidence for the intensity of reprocessing of the particle pool by resident zooplankton within mesopelagic and bathypelagic waters. The rapid loss of organic components, the marked reduction in the heterogeneity of the bulk composition of the flux, and the increase in terrigenous fluxes with depth are most

  20. An instrument for measuring the momentum flux from atomic and charged particle jets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.A.; Zonca, F.; Timberlake, J.; Bennett, T.; Cuthbertson, J.; Langer, W.; Motley, R.

    1990-07-01

    We have developed an instrument to measure the momentum flux from an intense plasma stream for which the standard techniques used for low pressure gases ( -5 - 10 -3 Newtons with a response time of 10 12 cm -3 ). Such forces are transmitted predominantly by ionic and neutral species, with 10's of eV's of kinetic energy, are accompanied by high heat fluxes, and are pulsed. The momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer, a capacitance-type pressure gauge. This protects the transducer from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering. An absolute force calibration of the PMM to 1% accuracy has been made is described. A flat carbon target has been used in measurements of the momentum flux of He, Ne, Ar, and Kr, plasmas produced in a magnetized linear plasma device. 7 refs., 7 figs

  1. Monitoring solar energetic particles with an armada of European spacecraft and the new automated SEPF (Solar Energetic Proton Fluxes) Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, I.; Daglis, I. A.; Anastasiadis, A.; Balasis, G.; Georgoulis, M.; Nieminen, P.; Evans, H.; Daly, E.

    2012-01-01

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) observed in interplanetary medium consist of electrons, protons, alpha particles and heavier ions (up to Fe), with energies from dozens of keVs to a few GeVs. SEP events, or SEPEs, are particle flux enhancements from background level ( 30 MeV. The main part of SEPEs results from the acceleration of particles either by solar flares and/or by interplanetary shocks driven by Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs); these accelerated particles propagate through the heliosphere, traveling along the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF). SEPEs show significant variability from one event to another and are an important part of space weather, because they pose a serious health risk to humans in space and a serious radiation hazard for the spacecraft hardware which may lead to severe damages. As a consequence, engineering models, observations and theoretical investigations related to the high energy particle environment is a priority issue for both robotic and manned space missions. The European Space Agency operates the Standard Radiation Environment Monitor (SREM) on-board six spacecraft: Proba-1, INTEGRAL, Rosetta, Giove-B, Herschel and Planck, which measures high-energy protons and electrons with a fair angular and spectral resolution. The fact that several SREM units operate in different orbits provides a unique chance for comparative studies of the radiation environment based on multiple data gathered by identical detectors. Furthermore, the radiation environment monitoring by the SREM unit onboard Rosetta may reveal unknown characteristics of SEPEs properties given the fact that the majority of the available radiation data and models only refer to 1AU solar distances. The Institute for Space Applications and Remote Sensing of the National Observatory of Athens (ISARS/NOA) has developed and validated a novel method to obtain flux spectra from SREM count rates. Using this method and by conducting detailed scientific studies we have showed in

  2. Estimation of annual suspended-sediment fluxes, 1931-95, and evaluation of geomorphic changes, 1950-2010, in the Arkansas River near Tulsa, Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jason M.; Smith, S. Jerrod; Buck, Stephanie D.; Strong, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    An understanding of fluvial sediment transport and changing channel morphology can assist planners in making responsible decisions with future riverine development or restoration projects. Sediment rating curves can serve as simple models and can provide predictive tools to estimate annual sediment fluxes. Sediment flux models can aid in the design of river projects by providing insight to past and potential future sediment fluxes. Historical U.S. Geological Survey suspended-sediment and discharge data were evaluated to estimate annual suspended-sediment fluxes for two stations on the Arkansas River located downstream from Keystone Dam in Tulsa County. Annual suspended-sediment fluxes were estimated from 1931-95 for the Arkansas River at Tulsa streamflow-gaging station (07164500) and from 1973-82 for the Arkansas River near Haskell streamflow-gaging station (07165570). The annual flow-weighted suspended-sediment concentration decreased from 1,970 milligrams per liter to 350 milligrams per liter after the completion of Keystone Dam at the Tulsa station. The streambed elevation at the Arkansas River at Tulsa station has changed less than 1 foot from 1970 to 2005, but the thalweg has shifted from a location near the right bank to a position near the left bank. There was little change in the position of most of the banks of the Arkansas River channel from 1950 to 2009. The most substantial change evident from visual inspection of aerial photographs was an apparent decrease in sediment storage in the form of mid-channel and meander bars. The Arkansas River channel between Keystone Dam and the Tulsa-Wagoner County line showed a narrowing and lengthening (increase in sinuosity) over the transition period 1950-77 followed by a steady widening and shortening of the river channel (decrease in sinuosity) during the post-dam (Keystone) periods 1977-85, 1985-2003, and 2003-10.

  3. Control of particles flux in a tokamak with an events structure; Controle des flux de particules dans un Tokamak au moyen d`une structure a events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsitrone, E

    1995-12-01

    Two key problems in the development of a controlled fusion reactor are: -the control of the ashes resulting from the fusion reaction (helium) and of the impurities coming from the wall erosion, which affect the central plasma performances by diluting the fuel and dissipating a part of the produced energy by radiation. - the removal of the heat carried to the walls by charged particles, which is highly concentrated (peak values of several tens of MW per m{sup 2}). Two types of systems are generally used for the plasma-wall interface: throat limiter and axisymmetric divertor. Neither is an ideal candidate to control simultaneously the heat and particle fluxes. This thesis investigates an alternative configuration, the vented limiter, tested for the first time on the Tore Supra tokamak. The vented limiter principle lies on the recycling neutrals collection by slots, in such a way that local thermal overload is avoided. It is shown experimentally that the surface temperature of the prototype installed in Tore Supra remains uniform. As far as the particle collection is concerned, even though the pressure in the vented limiter is lower than the pressure in the throat limiter by a factor 3 for deuterium and 4 helium, it is sufficient to control the plasma density. Moreover, as with a throat limiter, the pressure exhibits a quadratic evolution with the plasma density. To interpret these results, a model describing the plasma recycling on the limiter and the pumping by the slots has been developed. The model has been validated by a comparison with the experimental data. It was then used to propose an optimized version of the prototype with reshaped slots. This should improve the pumping efficiency by a factor 2, in deuterium as well as in helium, but without removing the discrepancy between both pumping efficiencies. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Effect of nano-carbon particle doping on the flux pinning properties of MgB2 superconductor

    OpenAIRE

    Soltanian, S.; Horvat, J.; Wang, X. L.; Munroe, P.; Dou, S. X.

    2003-01-01

    Polycrystalline MgB2-xCx samples with x=0.05, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4 nano-particle carbon powder were prepared using an in-situ reaction method under well controlled conditions to limit the extent of C substitution. The phases, lattice parameters, microstructures, superconductivity and flux pinning were characterized by XRD, TEM, and magnetic measurements. It was found that both the a-axis lattice parameter and the Tc decreased monotonically with increasing doping level. For the sample doped with...

  5. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca II K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Brown, Alexander; Mason, James P.; Schneider, P. Christian; Tilley, Matt A.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Buccino, Andrea; Froning, Cynthia S.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Linsky, Jeffrey; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Redfield, Seth; Kowalski, Adam; Miguel, Yamila; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rugheimer, Sarah; Segura, Antígona; Roberge, Aki; Vieytes, Mariela

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca II K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H I Lyα. In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si IV and He II) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10-3 W m-2 and possible proton fluxes ˜102-103 pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  6. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca ii K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Mason, James P. [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 600 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Brown, Alexander [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 389 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Schneider, P. Christian [European Space Research and Technology Centre (ESA/ESTEC), Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Tilley, Matt A. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, University of Washington, Box 351310, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Kowalski, Adam [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 2000 Colorado Ave., Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo J. D. [Dpto. de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales (FCEN), Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA), Buenos Aires (Argentina); Froning, Cynthia S. [Department of Astronomy/McDonald Observatory, C1400, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hawley, Suzanne L. [Astronomy Department, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Linsky, Jeffrey [JILA, University of Colorado and NIST, 440 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Redfield, Seth [Astronomy Department and Van Vleck Observatory, Wesleyan University, Middletown, CT 06459 (United States); Miguel, Yamila [Observatoire de la Cote d’Azur, Boulevard de l’Observatoire, CS 34229 F-06304 NICE Cedex 4 (France); Newton, Elisabeth R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rugheimer, Sarah, E-mail: allison.youngblood@colorado.edu [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of St. Andrews, Irvine Building, North Street, St. Andrews, KY16 9AL (United Kingdom); and others

    2017-07-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca ii K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H i Ly α . In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si iv and He ii) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10{sup −3} W m{sup −2} and possible proton fluxes ∼10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  7. The MUSCLES Treasury Survey. IV. Scaling Relations for Ultraviolet, Ca ii K, and Energetic Particle Fluxes from M Dwarfs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Youngblood, Allison; France, Kevin; Loyd, R. O. Parke; Mason, James P.; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. Christian; Tilley, Matt A.; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Kowalski, Adam; Buccino, Andrea; Mauas, Pablo J. D.; Froning, Cynthia S.; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Linsky, Jeffrey; Redfield, Seth; Miguel, Yamila; Newton, Elisabeth R.; Rugheimer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Characterizing the UV spectral energy distribution (SED) of an exoplanet host star is critically important for assessing its planet’s potential habitability, particularly for M dwarfs, as they are prime targets for current and near-term exoplanet characterization efforts and atmospheric models predict that their UV radiation can produce photochemistry on habitable zone planets different from that on Earth. To derive ground-based proxies for UV emission for use when Hubble Space Telescope ( HST ) observations are unavailable, we have assembled a sample of 15 early to mid-M dwarfs observed by HST and compared their nonsimultaneous UV and optical spectra. We find that the equivalent width of the chromospheric Ca ii K line at 3933 Å, when corrected for spectral type, can be used to estimate the stellar surface flux in ultraviolet emission lines, including H i Ly α . In addition, we address another potential driver of habitability: energetic particle fluxes associated with flares. We present a new technique for estimating soft X-ray and >10 MeV proton flux during far-UV emission line flares (Si iv and He ii) by assuming solar-like energy partitions. We analyze several flares from the M4 dwarf GJ 876 observed with HST and Chandra as part of the MUSCLES Treasury Survey and find that habitable zone planets orbiting GJ 876 are impacted by large Carrington-like flares with peak soft X-ray fluxes ≥10 −3 W m −2 and possible proton fluxes ∼10 2 –10 3 pfu, approximately four orders of magnitude more frequently than modern-day Earth.

  8. Storm-time electron flux precipitation in the inner radiation belt caused by wave-particle interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Tadokoro

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available It has been believed that electrons in the inner belt do not show the dynamical variation during magnetic storms except for great magnetic storms. However, Tadokoro et al. (2007 recently disclosed that low-altitude electrons in the inner belt frequently show flux variations during storms (Storm Time inner belt Electron Enhancement at the Low altitude (STEEL. This paper investigates a possible mechanism explaining STEEL during small and moderate storms, and shows that it is caused not by radial transport processes but by pitch angle scattering through wave-particle interactions. The waves related to wave-particle interactions are attributed to be banded whistler mode waves around 30 kHz observed in the inner magnetosphere by the Akebono satellite. The estimated pitch angle distribution based on a numerical calculation is roughly consistent with the observed results.

  9. Initial study of divertor particle and heat flux width scaling in lower-single-null configuration on EAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Liang; Xu Guosheng; Guo Houyang; Gan Kaifu; Gong Xianzu; Hu Liqun

    2013-01-01

    The dependence of divertor particle and power deposition widths on plasma current (I_p) for lower hybrid current driven (LHCD) L- and H-mode plasmas was initially studied in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) under a lower single null (LSN) divertor configuration. And the profile widths were obtained from the divertor triple Langmuir probe array and an infra-red (IR) camera. It is shown that the deposition widths of divertor particle and heat flux profiles both display a strong negative dependence on increasing plasma current, in L-mode, ELM-free H-mode and ELMy H-mode scenarios. The experimental results show good agreement with the heuristic SOL width model proposed by Goldston. (author)

  10. Excitation of an instability by neutral particle ionization induced fluxes in the tokamak edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, P.; Sunder, D.

    1991-01-01

    Strong density and potential fluctuations in the edge plasma of toroidal nuclear fusion devices can lead to anomalously fast particle and energy transport. There are some reasons to assume the level of these fluctuations to be connected with neutral particles which enter the plasma by gas puffing or recycling processes. The influence of neutral particles on the behaviour of electrostatic drift modes was investigated. Using the ballooning transformation the excitation of dissipative drift waves in tokamak was studied taking ionization and charge exchange into consideration. Ionization driven drift wave turbulence was analyzed. The higher the neutral particle density is the more important the plasma-wall interaction and the less important the action of the limiter becomes. Instabilities localized in the edge plasma and far from the limiter can be one of the reasons of such a phenomenon. In the present paper we show that such an instability may exist. Usually the neutral particle density is large in the vicinity of the limiter and decreases rapidly with the distance from it. Plasma particles generated by ionization of these neutrals outside the limiter shadow, move along the magnetic field lines into a region without neutrals and diffuse slowly across the magnetic field. We solve the stability problem for modes with a perpendicular wave length that is much larger than the ion Larmor radius with electron temperature, and much smaller than the minor plasma radius. The excitation of such modes localized far from the limiter is investigated. A one-dimensional differential equation is derived in the cold ion approximation without taking shear and toroidal effects into consideration. In the case of low flow velocities a nearly aperiodic instability is found analytically. Its growth rate is proportional to the equilibrium plasma velocity at the boundary of the neutral particle's free region and to the inverse of the extension of this zone. This mode is localized in the edge

  11. Direct determination of highly size-resolved turbulent particle fluxes with the disjunct eddy covariance method and a 12 – stage electrical low pressure impactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schmidt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available During summer 2007, turbulent vertical particle mass and number fluxes were measured for a period of 98 days near the city centre of Münster in north-west Germany. For this purpose, a valve controlled disjunct eddy covariance system was mounted at 65 m a.g.l. on a military radio tower. The concentration values for 11 size bins with aerodynamic diameters (D50 from 0.03 to 10 μm were measured with an electrical low pressure impactor. After comparison with other fluxes obtained from 10 Hz measurements with the classical eddy covariance method, the loss of information concerning high frequent parts of the flux could be stated as negligible. The results offer an extended insight in the turbulent atmospheric exchange of aerosol particles by highly size-resolved particle fluxes covering 11 size bins and show that the city of Münster acts as a relevant source for aerosol particles.

    Significant differences occur between the fluxes of the various particle size classes. While the total particle number flux shows a pattern which is strictly correlated to the diurnal course of the turbulence regime and the traffic intensity, the total mass flux exhibits a single minimum in the evening hours when coarse particles start to deposit.

    As a result, a mean mass deposition of about 10 mg m−2 per day was found above the urban test site, covering the aerosol size range from 40 nm to 2.0 μm. By contrast, the half-hourly total number fluxes accumulated over the lower ELPI stages range from −4.29×107 to +1.44×108 particles m−2 s−1 and are clearly dominated by the sub-micron particle fraction of the impactor stages with diameters between 40 nm and 320 nm. The averaged number fluxes of particles with diameters between 2.0 and 6.4 μm show lower turbulent dynamics during daytime and partially remarkably high negative fluxes with mean deposition velocities of 2×10−3 m

  12. Simulation of electron beam in a MET as charged particles flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez-Valle, Alberto; Valverde-Noguera, Vanessa; Lopez-Gomez, Ignacio; Chine-Polito, Bruno; Esquivel-Isern, Ricardo; Chaves-Noguera, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The behavior of an electron beam is simulated in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The simulation is performed according to the acceleration voltage, the excitation current of the lenses and the relative permeability of the pole pieces, through the software COMSOL Multiphysics version 4.2a. The dispersed electrons filtered by diaphragms have showed a low vertical speed as result. Graphics have exposed an increase in the magnetic flux density, intensifying the magnetic permeability of the polar pieces, the angle of the divergent electrons and vertical velocity reduction. Observations have showed that the number of electrons in the system remains unaffected in the general behavior of the beam and the magnitude of the magnetic flux density. (Author) [es

  13. Seasonal and vertical variations of sinking particle fluxes in the West Caroline Basin

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahata, H; Yamamuro, M; Ohta, H

    1998-01-01

    Des pièges à sédiments ont été déployés dans le bassin des Carolines Occidentales (ouest du Pacifique équatorial), entre la zone d'influence de la mousson d'Asie et l'océan ouvert. À la station 1, le flux annuel au piège le moins profond est 57, 10 g m-2 an-1. Les flux élevés de matière organique sont généralement associés au développement des communautés planctoniques à test silicieux et carbonaté. De plus, le rapport carbone organique/carbone minéral tend à augmenter avec la teneur en matiè...

  14. Direct comparison of {sup 210}Po, {sup 234}Th and POC particle-size distributions and export fluxes at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, Gillian, E-mail: gstewart@qc.cuny.ed [Queens College, CUNY Flushing, NY 11367 (United States); Moran, S. Bradley, E-mail: moran@gso.uri.ed [Graduate School of Oceanography, URI Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States); Lomas, Michael W., E-mail: Michael.Lomas@bios.ed [Bermuda Institute for Ocean Sciences, St. George' s, GE01 (Bermuda); Kelly, Roger P., E-mail: rokelly@gso.uri.ed [Graduate School of Oceanography, URI Narragansett, RI 02882 (United States)

    2011-05-15

    Particle-reactive, naturally occurring radionuclides are useful tracers of the sinking flux of organic matter from the surface to the deep ocean. Since the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS) began in 1987, the disequilibrium between {sup 234}Th and its parent {sup 238}U has become widely used as a technique to measure particle export fluxes from surface ocean waters. Another radionuclide pair, {sup 210}Po and {sup 210}Pb, can be used for the same purpose but has not been as widely adopted due to difficulty with accurately constraining the {sup 210}Po/{sup 210}Pb radiochemical balance in the ocean and because of the more time-consuming radiochemical procedures. Direct comparison of particle flux estimated in different ocean regions using these short-lived radionuclides is important in evaluating their utility and accuracy as tracers of particle flux. In this paper, we present paired {sup 234}Th/{sup 238}U and {sup 210}Po/{sup 210}Pb data from oligotrophic surface waters of the subtropical Northwest Atlantic and discuss their advantages and limitations. Vertical profiles of total and particle size-fractionated {sup 210}Po and {sup 234}Th activities, together with particulate organic carbon (POC) concentrations, were measured during three seasons at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site. Both {sup 210}Po and {sup 234}Th reasonably predict sinking POC flux caught in sediment traps, and each tracer provides unique information about the magnitude and efficiency of the ocean's biological pump.

  15. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-01

    This report discusses research in the following areas: theoretical elementary particle physics; experimental elementary particle physics; axion project; SSC detector development; and computer acquisition. (LSP).

  16. Modeling of Particle Transport on Channels and Gaps Exposed to Plasma Fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieto-Perez, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Many problems in particle transport in fusion devices involve the transport of plasma or eroded particles through channels or gaps, such as in the case of trying to assess damage to delicate optical diagnostics collecting light through a slit or determining the deposition and codeposition on the gaps between tiles of plasma-facing components. A dynamic-composition Monte Carlo code in the spirit of TRIDYN, previously developed to study composition changes on optical mirrors subject to ion bombardment, has been upgraded to include motion of particles through a volume defined by sets of plane surfaces. Particles sputtered or reflected from the walls of the channel/gap can be tracked as well, allowing the calculation of wall impurity transport, either back to the plasma (for the case of a gap) or to components separated from the plasma by a channel/slit (for the case of optical diagnostics). Two examples of the code application to particle transport in fusion devices will be presented in this work: one will evaluate the erosion/impurity deposition rate on a mirror separated from a plasma source by a slit; the other case will look at the enhanced emission of tile material in the region of the gap between two tiles

  17. Seasonal calcareous nannoplankton and other biogenic particle fluxes for 1990-2009: twenty-year long records from the central subarctic Pacific Ocean and the Bering Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kozo; Tsutsui, Hideto

    2017-04-01

    Time-series sediment traps were deployed for nearly 20 years (1990-2009) at two long-term locations: Station SA (49°N, 174°W, trap depth 4,800 m, water depth 5,400 m) in the central subarctic Pacific, and Station AB (53.5°N, 177°W, trap depth 3,200 m, water depth 3,800 m) in the southern Bering Sea. Among many biogenic particles, calcareous nannoplankton represented nearly half or more of the entire calcium carbonate fluxes of the regions. Dominant taxa include Coccolithus pelagicus and Emiliania huxleyi. The flux maxima of the former taxon occurred twice a year during June and October-November, whereas that of the latter taxon only occurred primarily once a year in November at both stations, indicating environmental preferences of the taxa. Among many environmental conditions, the fluxes of Emiliania huxleyi showed strong correlations with both water temperatures above 45 m depth and air temperatures (these parameters taken with one-month lag [earlier values] considering sinking time of ca. a month to the respective trap depths). Coccolithus pelagicus, on the other hand, showed lower values in the correlation with temperatures (Tsutsui et al., 2016), indicating that this taxon is somewhat more dependent on other factors such as nutrients compared to those of E. huxleyi. The timings of the seasonal flux maxima of calcareous nannoplankton are quite different from and later than those of other taxonomic groups such as diatoms and silicoflagellates. The primary seasonal flux maxima of diatoms and silicoflagellates, for example, occurred in May, a month earlier than the June maximum of C. pelagicus, and secondary seasonal flux maxima occurred in August, 2-3 months earlier than those of calcareous nannoplankton at both stations, based on 8 year flux records for diatoms (Onodera and Takahashi, 2009) and 4 year records for silicoflagellates (Onodera and Takahashi, 2012). By examining seasonal changes of nitrate and phosphate concentrations above 50 m depth from ERDDAP

  18. Physics of compact radio sources. I. Particle acceleration and flux variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacholczyk, A.G.; Scott, J.S.

    1976-01-01

    The observed patterns of variability of compact radio sources may be explained by assuming that the radio components are plasmons containing relativistic particles, and by applying a model with the following features: (1) the plasmons are ejected at high speed into the interstellar medium in the nuclei of active galaxies: (2) ram pressure confinement of the plasmons leads to Rayleigh-Taylor and Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities therein; (3) turbulence is thereby introduced into the plasmons; (4) the turbulence amplifies the plasmon magnetic field (for a short period) and this leads to betatron aceleration of the relativistic particles; (5) the turbulence vortices continue to accelerate the particles by the second-order Fermi acceleration mechanism. The emission patterns are the result of the combination of these accelerations and adiabatic losses

  19. Study on subcooled-forced flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux of solid particle-water two-phase mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Yasuo; Mochizuki, Manabu; Ohtake, Hiroyasu

    1999-01-01

    The effect of solid particle introduction on forced flow boiling and the critical heat flux was examined for the mixture of subcooled-water and 0.6 mm glass beads. When the particles were introduced, the growth on of a superheated layer near a wall seemed to be suppressed and the onset of nucleate boiling was delayed. The particles tempted for bubbles to condense at nucleation sites, and then the initiation of net vapor generation was also delayed and sifted to a high wall-superheat region. The nucleate boiling heat transfer was augmented by the particles, which considered to be caused by the combination of the suppression of the superheated layer growth and the promotion of the condensation and dissipation of the bubbles. The wall superheat at the critical heat flux condition was sifted to a high wall superheat region and the critical heat flux itself was also elevated a little. (author)

  20. A hierarchical Bayesian spatio-temporal model to forecast trapped particle fluxes over the SAA region

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suparta, W.; Gusrizal, G.; Kudela, Karel; Isa, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 3 (2017), s. 357-370 ISSN 1017-0839 R&D Projects: GA MŠk EF15_003/0000481 Institutional support: RVO:61389005 Keywords : trapped particle * spatio-temporal * hierarchical Bayesian * forecasting Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology OBOR OECD: Meteorology and atmospheric sciences Impact factor: 0.752, year: 2016

  1. Flare particle acceleration in the interaction of twisted coronal flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threlfall, J.; Hood, A. W.; Browning, P. K.

    2018-03-01

    Aim. The aim of this work is to investigate and characterise non-thermal particle behaviour in a three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) model of unstable multi-threaded flaring coronal loops. Methods: We have used a numerical scheme which solves the relativistic guiding centre approximation to study the motion of electrons and protons. The scheme uses snapshots from high resolution numerical MHD simulations of coronal loops containing two threads, where a single thread becomes unstable and (in one case) destabilises and merges with an additional thread. Results: The particle responses to the reconnection and fragmentation in MHD simulations of two loop threads are examined in detail. We illustrate the role played by uniform background resistivity and distinguish this from the role of anomalous resistivity using orbits in an MHD simulation where only one thread becomes unstable without destabilising further loop threads. We examine the (scalable) orbit energy gains and final positions recovered at different stages of a second MHD simulation wherein a secondary loop thread is destabilised by (and merges with) the first thread. We compare these results with other theoretical particle acceleration models in the context of observed energetic particle populations during solar flares.

  2. CHARGE-EXCHANGE LIMITS ON LOW-ENERGY {alpha}-PARTICLE FLUXES IN SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, H. S. [SSL, UC Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Fletcher, L.; MacKinnon, A. L. [School of Physics and Astronomy, SUPA, University of Glasgow, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Woods, T. N., E-mail: hhudson@ssl.berkeley.edu [Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics, University of Colorado, 1234 Innovation Dr., Boulder, CO 80303 (United States)

    2012-06-20

    This paper reports on a search for flare emission via charge-exchange radiation in the wings of the Ly{alpha} line of He II at 304 A, as originally suggested for hydrogen by Orrall and Zirker. Via this mechanism a primary {alpha} particle that penetrates into the neutral chromosphere can pick up an atomic electron and emit in the He II bound-bound spectrum before it stops. The Extreme-ultraviolet Variability Experiment on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory gives us our first chance to search for this effect systematically. The Orrall-Zirker mechanism has great importance for flare physics because of the essential roles that particle acceleration plays; this mechanism is one of the few proposed that would allow remote sensing of primary accelerated particles below a few MeV nucleon{sup -1}. We study 10 events in total, including the {gamma}-ray events SOL2010-06-12 (M2.0) and SOL2011-02-24 (M3.5) (the latter a limb flare), seven X-class flares, and one prominent M-class event that produced solar energetic particles. The absence of charge-exchange line wings may point to a need for more complete theoretical work. Some of the events do have broadband signatures, which could correspond to continua from other origins, but these do not have the spectral signatures expected from the Orrall-Zirker mechanism.

  3. COLLISIONLESS SHOCKS IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED MEDIUM. I. NEUTRAL RETURN FLUX AND ITS EFFECTS ON ACCELERATION OF TEST PARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blasi, P.; Morlino, G.; Bandiera, R.; Amato, E. [INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, Largo E. Fermi, 5, I-50125 Firenze (Italy); Caprioli, D. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States)

    2012-08-20

    A collisionless shock may be strongly modified by the presence of neutral atoms through the processes of charge exchange between ions and neutrals and ionization of the latter. These two processes lead to exchange of energy and momentum between charged and neutral particles both upstream and downstream of the shock. In particular, neutrals that suffer a charge exchange downstream with shock-heated ions generate high-velocity neutrals that have a finite probability of returning upstream. These neutrals might then deposit heat in the upstream plasma through ionization and charge exchange, thereby reducing the fluid Mach number. A consequence of this phenomenon, which we refer to as the neutral return flux, is a reduction of the shock compression factor and the formation of a shock precursor upstream. The scale length of the precursor is determined by the ionization and charge-exchange interaction lengths of fast neutrals moving toward upstream infinity. In the case of a shock propagating in the interstellar medium, the effects of ion-neutral interactions are especially important for shock velocities <3000 km s{sup -1}. Such propagation velocities are common among shocks associated with supernova remnants, the primary candidate sources for the acceleration of Galactic cosmic rays. We then investigate the effects of the return flux of neutrals on the spectrum of test particles accelerated at the shock. We find that, for shocks slower than {approx}3000 km s{sup -1}, the particle energy spectrum steepens appreciably with respect to the naive expectation for a strong shock, namely, {proportional_to}E{sup -2}.

  4. Neutron flux density and secondary-particle energy spectra at the 184-inch synchrocyclotron medical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.R.; Schimmerling, W.; Henson, A.M.; Kanstein, L.L.; McCaslin, J.B.; Stephens, L.D.; Thomas, R.H.; Ozawa, J.; Yeater, F.W.

    1978-07-01

    Helium ions, with an energy of 920 MeV, produced by the 184-inch synchrocyclotron of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory are now being used in a pilot series to determine their efficacy in the treatment of tumors of large volume. The techniques for production of the large uniform radiation fields required for these treatments involve the use of beam-limiting collimators and energy degraders. Interaction of the primary beam with these beam components produces secondary charged particles and neutrons. The sources of neutron production in the beam transport system of the alpha-particle beam have been identified and their magnitudes have been determined. Measurements with activation detectors and pulse counters of differing energy responses have been used to determine secondary particle spectra at various locations on the patient table. These spectra are compared to a calculation of neutron production based on best estimates derived from published cross sections. Agreement between the calculated spectra and those derived from experimental measurements is obtained (at the 10 to 20% level) when the presence of charged particles is taken into account. The adsorbed dose in soft tissue is not very sensitive to the shape of the incident neutron energy spectrum, and the values obtained from unfolding the experimental measurements agree with the values obtained from the calculated spectra within the estimated uncertainty of +-25%. These values are about 3 x 10 -3 rad on the beam axis and about 1 x 10 -3 rad at 20 cm or more from the beam axis, per rad deposited by the incident alpha-particle beam. Estimates of upper limit dose to the lens of the eye and red bone marrow are approximately 10 rad and approximately 1 rad, respectively, for a typical treatment plan. The absorbed dose to the lens of the eye is thus well below the threshold value for cataractogenesis estimated for fission neutrons. An upper limit for the risk of leukemia is estimated to be approximately 0.04%

  5. Revised estimates of the annual net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from changes in land use and land management 1850-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent analyses of land-use change in the US and China, together with the latest estimates of tropical deforestation and afforestation from the FAO, were used to calculate a portion of the annual flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The calculated flux includes only that portion of the flux resulting from direct human activity. In most regions, activities included the conversion of natural ecosystems to cultivated lands and pastures, including shifting cultivation, harvest of wood (for timber and fuel) and the establishment of tree plantations. In the US, woody encroachment and woodland thickening as a result of fire suppression were also included. The calculated flux of carbon does not include increases or decreases in carbon storage as a result of environmental changes (e.g.; increasing concentrations of CO 2 , N deposition, climatic change or pollution). Globally, the long-term (1850-2000) flux of carbon from changes in land use and management released 156 PgC to the atmosphere, about 60% of it from the tropics. Average annual fluxes during the 1980s and 1990s were 2.0 and 2.2 PgC/yr, respectively, dominated by releases of carbon from the tropics. Outside the tropics, the average net flux of carbon attributable to land-use change and management decreased from a source of 0.06 PgC/yr during the 1980s to a sink of 0.02 PgC/yr during the 1990s. According to the analyses summarized here, changes in land use were responsible for sinks in North America and Europe and for small sources in other non-tropical regions. The revisions were as large as 0.3 PgC/yr in individual regions but were largely offsetting, so that the global estimate for the 1980s was changed little from an earlier estimate. Uncertainties and recent improvements in the data used to calculate the flux of carbon from land-use change are reviewed, and the results are compared to other estimates of flux to evaluate the extent to which processes other than land-use change and

  6. Seasonal variations of the particle flux in the Peru-Chile current at 30°S under `normal' and El Niño conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebbeln, Dierk; Marchant, Margarita; Wefer, Gerold

    Time-series sediment traps were deployed 180 km off the Chilean coast at 30°S in the Peru-Chile Current during the El Niño period 1991/1992 (6 months) and during the 'normal' period 1993/1994 (12 months). Under normal conditions in 1993/1994 the particle fluxes display a pronounced seasonal cycle marked by a settling phytoplankton bloom in September, intermediate fluxes until January, and low fluxes between January and July. This seasonal pattern is also reflected in stable isotope data, measured on the planktic foraminifera species Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (dex.) and Globigerina bulloides, which indicate persistent upwelling conditions between August and February followed by a stratified water column between March and July. The total flux under normal conditions amounts to 65.1 g m -2 a-1, with the main flux constituents contributing 47.6% (carbonate), 26.4% (lithogenic matter), 17.4% (biogenic opal), and 8.6% (organic matter), respectively. Based on these particle flux data the export production has been estimated to be 42 gC m -2 a-1. Although the main flux event in September was not sampled in the El Niño period 1991/1992, the available record from November 1991 to April 1992 allows an interesting comparison with the fluxes of the normal year. The total amount of fluxes and the timing of minor flux events are very similar under normal and under El Niño conditions. However, increased proportions of organic carbon and lithogenic matter under El Niño conditions are interpreted to reflect faster sedimentation and preferred scavenging of organic matter by elevated lithogenic fluxes rather than increased productivity. The higher lithogenic fluxes under El Niño conditions are probably due to increased precipitation and terrestial runoff in the arid to semiarid northern part of Chile.

  7. Effects of nano-particles strengthening activating flux on the microstructures and mechanical properties of TIG welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Xiong; Shen, Jun; Cheng, Liang; Li, Yang; Pu, Yayun

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Increased nano-particles strengthening activating flux degraded TIGed seams. • The reaction between SiC particles and Mg alloy produced Al 4 C 3 and Mg 2 Si phases. • Al 4 C 3 and SiC particles promoted the nucleation and suppressed the growth of α-Mg. • Refined α-Mg grains, precipitated phase and SiC particles enhanced TIGed joints. - Abstract: In this paper, AZ31 magnesium alloy joints were processed by nano-particles strengthening activating flux tungsten inert gas (NSA-TIG) welding, which was achieved by the mixed TiO 2 and nano-SiC particles coated on the samples before welding tests. The macro/micro structural observation and mechanical properties evaluation of the welding joints were conducted by using optical microscope, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and tension and microhardness tests. The results showed that nano-particles strengthening activating flux effective improved the microstructure, microhardness in fusion zone, ultimate tensile strength of the TIG welding joints. In addition, the chemical reaction between part of SiC particles and AZ31 magnesium alloy produced Al 4 C 3 and Mg 2 Si in the joints. The Al 4 C 3 performed as nucleating agents for α-Mg and the dispersed Mg 2 Si and SiC particles enhanced the mechanical properties of the NSA-TIG welding joints. However, large heat input induced by the increase of the surface coating density of the nano-particles strengthening activating flux, increased the α-Mg grain sizes and weakened the mechanical properties of the welded joints. Therefore, the grain size of α-Mg, distribution of β-Mg 17 Al 12 , Mg 2 Si and SiC particles together influenced the evolution of the mechanical properties of the NSA-TIG welded AZ31 magnesium alloy joints

  8. Effect of charged particle flux on Bacillus mesentericus and Pseudomonas fluorescens cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostapenkov, A.M.; Kaptereva, Yu.V.; Merinov, N.S.; Lavrova, V.L.

    1979-01-01

    Studied was the effect of a strong electric field and charged particle (aerions) flow on Bac. mesentericus and Ps. fluorescens cultures causing the spoiling of foodstuffs and food raw materials. It has been found, that under the effects of the electric field and positive or negative ions reduced is the Bac. mesentericus and Ps. fluorescens viability, cultivated on a solid nutrient medium; the effect of the electric field only does not affect the Bac. mesentericus viability

  9. Activity, size, and flux of resuspended particles from Rocky Flats soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langer, G.

    1982-01-01

    Wind erosion processes that resuspend soil from Rocky Flats (rf) sites known as the pad field and the east field were studied. The soil in these sites contains above background amounts of Pu and Am. The following five major areas of concern were studied: Pu levels in source area soil; total Pu activity and activity-particle size relationship in the wind resuspended dust; culpability of suspected source areas for Pu activity reported by the RF surveillance samplers; Pu activity in the respirable and coarse fraction of wind resuspended dust; Pu activity in resuspended dust from wind tunnel simulations of wind erosion. Results indicate that Pu attached to wind blown dust from the pad field and the east field at rf does not present a health hazard. The Pu carrying dust particles are too large (> 3 μm) to be respirable and most are above the inhalable size (> 10 μm). For the July 1981 to March 1982 period, 90% of the Pu collected by the surveillance samplers east of the pad field originated from this field. For those months 90% of the winds over 14 m/s originated from the two western quadrants. Winds over 14 m/s resuspend most of the dust. From April to June 1982 there were no winds over 14 m/s and Pu originated about equally from the pad and east field. Wind tunnel resuspension of dust varied as the 2.8 to 4.2 power of wind speed for a soil moisture range of 14 to 1% respectively. Above 14% moisture little dust was resuspended. No measurable respirable particles (< 3 μm) were resuspended

  10. A Coupled Epipelagic-Meso/Bathypelagic Particle Flux Model for the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Station (BATS)/Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, D. M.; Conte, M.

    2002-12-01

    Of considerable scientific interest is the role remineralization plays in the global carbon cycle. It is the ``biological pump'' that fixes carbon in the upper water column and exports it for long time periods to the deep ocean. From a global carbon cycle point-of-view, it is the processes that govern remineralization in the mid- to deep-ocean waters that provide the feedback to the biogeochemical carbon cycle. In this study we construct an ecosystem model that serves as a mechanistic link between euphotic processes and mesopelagic and bathypelagic processes. We then use this prognostic model to further our understanding of the unparalleled time-series of deep-water sediment traps (21+ years) at the Oceanic Flux Program (OFP) and the euphotic zone measurements (10+ years) at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Site (BATS). At the core of this mechanistic ecosystem model of the mesopelagic zone is a model that consists of an active feeding habit zooplankton, a passive feeding habit zooplankton, large detritus (sinks), small detritus (non-sinking), and a nutrient pool. As the detritus, the primary source of food, moves through the water column it is fed upon by the active/passive zooplankton pair and undergoes bacterially mediated remineralization into nutrients. The large detritus pool at depth gains material from the formation of fecal pellets from the passive and active zooplankton. Sloppy feeding habits of the active zooplankton contribute to the small detrital pool. Zooplankton mortality (both classes) also contribute directly to the large detritus pool. Aggregation and disaggregation transform detrital particles from one pool to the other and back again. The nutrients at each depth will gain from detrital remineralization and zooplankton excretion. The equations that model the active zooplankton, passive zooplankton, large detritus, small detritus, and nutrients will be reviewed, results shown and future model modifications discussed.

  11. Design and characterization of a 64 channels ASIC front-end electronics for high-flux particle beam detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fausti, F.; Mazza, G.; Attili, A.; Mazinani, M. Fadavi; Giordanengo, S.; Lavagno, M.; Manganaro, L.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Sacchi, R.; Vignati, A.; Cirio, R.

    2017-09-01

    A new wide-input range 64-channels current-to-frequency converter ASIC has been developed and characterized for applications in beam monitoring of therapeutic particle beams. This chip, named TERA09, has been designed to extend the input current range, compared to the previous versions of the chip, for dealing with high-flux pulsed beams. A particular care was devoted in achieving a good conversion linearity over a wide bipolar input current range. Using a charge quantum of 200 fC, a linearity within ±2% for an input current range between 3 nA and 12 μA is obtained for individual channels, with a gain spread among the channels of about 3%. By connecting all the 64 channels of the chip to a common input, the current range can be increased 64 times preserving a linearity within ±3% in the range between and 20 μA and 750 μA.

  12. Self-similarity of fluctuation particle fluxes in the plasma edge of the stellarator L-2M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenko, V.V. [Ulyanovsk State University, Leo Tolstoy str., 42, Ulyanovsk (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15

    Results are presented of statistical studies of probability density of fluctuations of plasma density, floating potential, and turbulent particle fluxes measured by a Langmuir probe in the edge plasma of the L-2M stellarator. Empirical probability densities differ from Gaussian distributions. The empirical probability density distributions have heavy tails decreasing as x{sup -{alpha}}{sup -1} and are leptokurtic. Fractional stable distributions were successfully applied to describing such distributions. It is shown that fractional stable distributions give good fit to the distri-butions of increments of fluctuation amplitudes of physical variables under study. The distribution parameters are statistically estimated from measured time sequences (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Self-similarity of fluctuation particle fluxes in the plasma edge of the stellarator L-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saenko, V.V.

    2010-01-01

    Results are presented of statistical studies of probability density of fluctuations of plasma density, floating potential, and turbulent particle fluxes measured by a Langmuir probe in the edge plasma of the L-2M stellarator. Empirical probability densities differ from Gaussian distributions. The empirical probability density distributions have heavy tails decreasing as x -α-1 and are leptokurtic. Fractional stable distributions were successfully applied to describing such distributions. It is shown that fractional stable distributions give good fit to the distri-butions of increments of fluctuation amplitudes of physical variables under study. The distribution parameters are statistically estimated from measured time sequences (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Concentration and vertical flux of Fukushima-derived radiocesium in sinking particles from two sites in the Northwestern Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Honda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At two stations in the western North Pacific, K2 in the subarctic gyre and S1 in the subtropical gyre, time-series sediment traps were collecting sinking particles when the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FNPP1 accident occurred on 11 March 2011. Radiocesium (134Cs and 137Cs derived from the FNPP1 accident was detected in sinking particles collected at 500 m in late March 2011 and at 4810 m in early April 2011 at both stations. The sinking velocity of 134Cs and 137Cs was estimated to be 22 to 71 m day−1 between the surface and 500 m and >180 m day−1 between 500 m and 4810 m. 137Cs concentrations varied from 0.14 to 0.25 Bq g−1 dry weight. These values are higher than those of surface seawater, suspended particles, and zooplankton collected in April 2011. Although the radiocesium may have been adsorbed onto or incorporated into clay minerals, correlations between 134Cs and lithogenic material were not always significant; therefore, the form of the cesium associated with the sinking particles is still an open question. The total 137Cs inventory by late June at K2 and by late July at S1 was 0.5 to 1.7 Bq m−2 at both depths. Compared with 137Cs input from both stations by April 2011, estimated from the surface 137Cs concentration and mixed-layer depth and by assuming that the observed 137Cs flux was constant throughout the year, the estimated removal rate of 137Cs from the upper layer (residence time in the upper layer was 0.3 to 1.5% yr−1 (68 to 312 yr. The estimated removal rates and residence times are comparable to previously reported values after the Chernobyl accident (removal rate: 0.2–1%, residence time: 130–390 yr.

  15. Global observations of electromagnetic and particle energy flux for an event during northern winter with southward interplanetary magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korth

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of the polar ionosphere–thermosphere (I-T system to electromagnetic (EM energy input is fundamentally different to that from particle precipitation. To understand the I-T response to polar energy input one must know the intensities and spatial distributions of both EM and precipitation energy deposition. Moreover, since individual events typically display behavior different from statistical models, it is important to observe the global system state for specific events. We present an analysis of an event in Northern Hemisphere winter for sustained southward interplanetary magnetic field (IMF, 10 January 2002, 10:00–12:00 UT, for which excellent observations are available from the constellation of Iridium satellites, the SuperDARN radar network, and the Far-Ultraviolet (FUV instrument on the IMAGE satellite. Using data from these assets we determine the EM and particle precipitation energy fluxes to the Northern Hemisphere poleward of 60° MLAT and examine their spatial distributions and intensities. The accuracy of the global estimates are assessed quantitatively using comparisons with in-situ observations by DMSP along two orbit planes. While the location of EM power input evaluated from Iridium and SuperDARN data is in good agreement with DMSP, the magnitude estimated from DMSP observations is approximately four times larger. Corrected for this underestimate, the total EM power input to the Northern Hemisphere is 188 GW. Comparison of IMAGE FUV-derived distributions of the particle energy flux with DMSP plasma data indicates that the IMAGE FUV results similarly locate the precipitation accurately while underestimating the precipitation input somewhat. The total particle input is estimated to be 20 GW, nearly a factor of ten lower than the EM input. We therefore expect the thermosphere response to be determined primarily by the EM input even under winter conditions, and accurate assessment of the EM energy input is therefore key

  16. A simple method to extract information on anisotropy of particle fluxes from spin-modulated counting rates of cosmic ray telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, K.C.; Lin, Y.C.; Sullivan, J.D.

    1975-01-01

    A simple method to extract information on anisotropy of particle fluxes from data collected by cosmic ray telescopes on spinning spacecraft but without sectored accumulators is presented. Application of this method to specific satellite data demonstrates that it requires no prior assumption on the form of angular distribution of the fluxes; furthermore, self-consistency ensures the validity of the results thus obtained. The examples show perfect agreement with the corresponding magnetic field directions

  17. A novel robust and efficient algorithm for charge particle tracking in high background flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fanelli, C; Cisbani, E; Dotto, A Del

    2015-01-01

    The high luminosity that will be reached in the new generation of High Energy Particle and Nuclear physics experiments implies large high background rate and large tracker occupancy, representing therefore a new challenge for particle tracking algorithms. For instance, at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) (VA,USA), one of the most demanding experiment in this respect, performed with a 12 GeV electron beam, is characterized by a luminosity up to 10 39 cm -2 s -1 . To this scope, Gaseous Electron Multiplier (GEM) based trackers are under development for a new spectrometer that will operate at these high rates in the Hall A of JLab. Within this context, we developed a new tracking algorithm, based on a multistep approach: (i) all hardware - time and charge - information are exploited to minimize the number of hits to associate; (ii) a dedicated Neural Network (NN) has been designed for a fast and efficient association of the hits measured by the GEM detector; (iii) the measurements of the associated hits are further improved in resolution through the application of Kalman filter and Rauch- Tung-Striebel smoother. The algorithm is shortly presented along with a discussion of the promising first results. (paper)

  18. Annual variation in neustonic micro- and meso-plastic particles and zooplankton in the Bay of Calvi (Mediterranean-Corsica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collignon, Amandine; Hecq, Jean-Henri; Galgani, François; Collard, France; Goffart, Anne

    2014-02-15

    The annual variation in neustonic plastic particles and zooplankton was studied in the Bay of Calvi (Corsica) between 30 August 2011 and 7 August 2012. Plastic particles were classified into three size classes, small microplastics (0.2-2mm), large microplastics (2-5mm) and mesoplastics (5-10mm). 74% of the 38 samples contained plastic particles of varying composition: e.g. filaments, polystyrene, thin plastic films. An average concentration of 6.2 particles/100 m(2) was observed. The highest abundance values (69 particles/100 m(2)) observed occurred during periods of low offshore wind conditions. These values rose in the same order of magnitude as in previous studies in the North Western Mediterranean. The relationships between the abundance values of the size classes between zooplankton and plastic particles were then examined. The ratio for the intermediate size class (2-5mm) reached 2.73. This would suggest a potential confusion for predators regarding planktonic prey of this size class. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effects of flux additives on the characteristics of Y2.95Al5O12:0.05Ce3+ phosphor: Particle growth mechanism and luminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiang, Chung-Hao; Liu, Te-Hsing; Lin, Han-Yu; Kuo, Hung-Yi; Chu, Sheng-Yuan

    2013-01-01

    The dependence of the amount of the BaF 2 flux additive on the luminescence of Y 2.95 Al 5 O 12 :0.05Ce 3+ phosphors was investigated. The integrated emission intensity of Y 2.95 Al 5 O 12 :0.05Ce 3+ prepared without the flux was enhanced by 29% with the addition of BaF 2 flux at the optimum amount of 6 wt. %. Such an enhancement can be attributed to the purer phase of Y 3 Al 5 O 12 and the morphology change from the irregular shape to spherical shape with the smoother surface due to the flux. The morphology and luminescence of Y 2.95 Al 5 O 12 :0.05Ce 3+ prepared with the 6 wt. % BaF 2 flux additive (Sample II) were further compared with those of Y 2.95 Al 5 O 12 :0.05Ce 3+ prepared with the 7 wt. % H 3 BO 3 flux additive (Sample I). The particle size, particle shape, and integrated emission intensity (λ ex  = 450 nm) of the former were found to be larger, more regular, and 6% higher than those of the latter. The difference in the morphology of Samples I and II, which led to the difference in the emission intensity and the external quantum efficiency, were well explained by the particle growth mechanism

  20. The particle fluxes in the edge plasma during discharges with improved ohmic confinement in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbeek, H.; Poschenrieder, W.; Fu, J.K.; Soeldner, F.X.

    1989-01-01

    In the recent experimental period of ASDEX a new regime of improved ohmic confinement (IOC) was discovered. So far the energy confinement time τ E increased linearly with increasing line averaged density n e up to n e = 3·10 13 cm -3 saturated, however, at higher densities. In the new IOC regime τ E increases further with increasing n e up to ∼5·10 13 cm -3 . The IOC regime is achieved for D 2 discharges only since the last modification of the ASDEX divertor which substantially increased the recycling from the divertor through the divertor slits. It also led to a reduction in gas consumption for a discharge by a factor of about 2. As it appears, the high fuelling rate required during a fast ramp-up of the plasma density leads to a transition into the Saturated Ohmic Confinememt (SOC) regime. Vice versa, the strong reduction in the external gas feed when the preprogrammed density plateau is reached seems to be essential for establishing the IOC. It is characterized by a pronounced peaking of the density profile. During the transition from the SOC to the IOC regime large variations in the signals of all edge and divertor related diagnostics are observed. In this paper we concentrate on the results of the Low Energy Neutral Particle Analyser (LENA), the sniffer probe, on the mass spectrometers measuring the divertor exhaust pressure. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs

  1. Effect of realistic astrophysical inputs on the phase and shape of the weakly interacting massive particles annual modulation signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Anne M.

    2003-01-01

    The orbit of the Earth about the Sun produces an annual modulation in the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP) direct detection rate. If the local WIMP velocity distribution is isotropic then the modulation is roughly sinusoidal with maximum in June; however, if the velocity distribution is anisotropic the phase and shape of the signal can change. Motivated by conflicting claims about the effect of uncertainties in the local velocity distribution on the interpretation of the DAMA annual modulation signal (and the possibility that the form of the modulation could be used to probe the structure of the Milky Way halo), we study the dependence of the annual modulation on various astrophysical inputs. We first examine the approximations used for the Earth's motion about the Sun and the Sun's velocity with respect to the Galactic rest frame. We find that overly simplistic assumptions lead to errors of up to ten days in the phase and up to tens of percent in the shape of the signal, even if the velocity distribution is isotropic. Crucially, if the components of the Earth's velocity perpendicular to the motion of the Sun are neglected, then the change in the phase which occurs for anisotropic velocity distributions is missed. We then examine how the annual modulation signal varies for physically and observationally well-motivated velocity distributions. We find that the phase of the signal changes by up to 20 days and the mean value and amplitude change by up to tens of percent

  2. Application of two-component phase doppler interferometry to the measurement of particle size, mass flux, and velocities in two-phase flows

    OpenAIRE

    McDonell, VG; Samuelsen, GS

    1989-01-01

    The application of two-component interferometry is described for the spatially-resolved measurement of particle size, velocity and mass flux as well as continuous phase velocity. Such a capability is important to develop an understanding of the physical processes attendant to two-phase flow systems, especially those involving liquid atomization typical of a wide class of combustion systems. Adapted from laser anemometry, the technique (phase Doppler interferometry) measures single particle ev...

  3. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] neutral beam injectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E parallel B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Elementary particle physics at the University of Florida. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the following topics: Task A: theoretical elementary particle physics; Task B: experimental elementary particle physics; Task C: axion project; Task G: experimental research in collider physics; and Task S: computer acquisition. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database

  5. Research in elementary particle physics at the University of Florida: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This is a progress report on the Elementary Particle Physics program at the University of Florida. The program has five tasks covering a broad range of topics in theoretical and experimental high energy physics: Theoretical Elementary Particle Physics, Experimental High Energy Physics, Axion Search, Detector Development, and Computer Requisition

  6. Laser scattering off of alpha particle cyclotron harmonic resonances: Annual performance report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aamodt, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    The active probing of burning plasmas to quantitatively determine high energy alpha particle characteristics is the main purpose of the laser and gyroton scattering program. Progress to date includes a systematic evaluation of homogeneous results, analytical study of alpha particle harmonic resonances, and investigations of finite size detection systems

  7. Design optimization of radial flux permanent magnetwind generator for highest annual energy input and lower magnet volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faiz, J.; Rajabi-Sebdani, M.; Ebrahimi, B. M. (Univ. of Tehran, Tehran (Iran)); Khan, M. A. (Univ. of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa))

    2008-07-01

    This paper presents a multi-objective optimization method to maximize annual energy input (AEI) and minimize permanent magnet (PM) volume in use. For this purpose, the analytical model of the machine is utilized. Effects of generator specifications on the annual energy input and PM volume are then investigated. Permanent magnet synchronous generator (PMSG) parameters and dimensions are then optimized using genetic algorithm incorporated with an appropriate objective function. The results show an enhancement in PMSG performance. Finally 2D time stepping finite element method (2D TSFE) is used to verify the analytical results. Comparison of the results validates the optimization method

  8. The annual ammonia budget of fertilised cut grassland – Part 1: Micrometeorological flux measurements and emissions after slurry application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Spirig

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Two commercial ammonia (NH3 analysers were customised to allow continuous measurements of vertical concentration gradients. The gradients were used to derive ammonia exchange fluxes above a managed grassland site at Oensingen (Switzerland by application of the aerodynamic gradient method. The measurements from July 2006 to October 2007 covered five complete growth-cut cycles and included six applications of liquid cattle slurry. The average accuracy of the flux measurements during unstable and near-neutral conditions was 20% and the detection limit was 10 ng NH3 m−2 s−1. Hence the flux measurements are considered sufficiently accurate for studying typical NH3 deposition rates over growing vegetation. Quantifying the overall emissions after slurry applications required the application of elaborate interpolations because of difficulties capturing the initial emissions during broadspreading of liquid manure. The emissions were also calculated with a mass balance method yielding similar fluxes. NH3 losses after slurry application expressed as percentage of emitted nitrogen versus applied total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN varied between 4 and 19%, which is roughly a factor of three lower than the values for broadspreading of liquid manure in emission inventories. The comparatively low emission factors appear to be a consequence of the low dry matter content of the applied slurry and soil properties favouring ammonium adsorption.

  9. PREFACE: 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference: Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    The 14th Annual International Astrophysics Conference was held at the Sheraton Tampa Riverwalk Hotel, Tampa, Florida, USA, during the week of 19-24 April 2015. The meeting drew some 75 participants from all over the world, representing a wide range of interests and expertise in the energization of particles from the perspectives of theory, modelling and simulations, and observations. The theme of the meeting was "Linear and Nonlinear Particle Energization throughout the Heliosphere and Beyond." Energetic particles are ubiquitous to plasma environments, whether collisionless such as the supersonic solar wind, the magnetospheres of planets, the exospheres of nonmagnetized planets and comets, the heliospheric-local interstellar boundary regions, interstellar space and supernova remnant shocks, and stellar wind boundaries. Energetic particles are found too in more collisional regions such as in the solar corona, dense regions of the interstellar medium, accretion flows around stellar objects, to name a few. Particle acceleration occurs wherever plasma boundaries, magnetic and electric fields, and turbulence are present. The meeting addressed the linear and nonlinear physical processes underlying the variety of particle acceleration mechanisms, the role of particle acceleration in shaping different environments, and acceleration processes common to different regions. Both theory and observations were addressed with a view to encouraging crossdisciplinary fertilization of ideas, concepts, and techniques. The meeting addressed all aspects of particle acceleration in regions ranging from the Sun to the interplanetary medium to magnetospheres, exospheres, and comets, the boundaries of the heliosphere, and beyond to supernova remnant shocks, galactic jets, stellar winds, accretion flows, and more. The format of the meeting included 25-minute presentations punctuated by two 40-minute talks, one by Len Fisk that provided an historical overview of particle acceleration in the

  10. [Fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in small particles]: Annual report, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chew, H.; McNulty, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is given of the model formulated for fluorescent and Raman scattering by molecules embedded in or in the vicinity of small particles. The model takes into account the size, shape, refractive index, and morphology of the host particles. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for spherical (one and more layers, including magnetic dipole transitions), cylindrical, and spheroidal particles. Particular attention has been given to the spherical case with fluorescent/Raman scatterers uniformly distributed in the particles radiating both coherently and incoherently. Depolarization effects have been studied with suitable averaging process, and good agreement with experiment has been obtained. Analytic and numerical results have been obtained for the elastic scattering of evanescent waves; these results are useful for the study of fluorescence under excitation by evanescent waves

  11. [Field theoretic investigations on particle physics and cosmology]. Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pi, S.Y.

    1985-01-01

    Topics covered include topics bridging particle physics and cosmology, superconducting universe, inflationary universe, density fluctuations in the new inflationary universe, a realistic inflationary model, and the quantum mechanics of the scalar field in the new inflationary universe

  12. Quantitative evaluation of high-energy O− ion particle flux in a DC magnetron sputter plasma with an indium-tin-oxide target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suyama, Taku; Bae, Hansin; Setaka, Kenta; Ogawa, Hayato; Fukuoka, Yushi; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2017-01-01

    O − ion flux from the indium tin oxide (ITO) sputter target under Ar ion bombardment is quantitatively evaluated using a calorimetry method. Using a mass spectrometer with an energy analyzer, O − energy distribution is measured with spatial dependence. Directional high-energy O − ion ejected from the target surface is observed. Using a calorimetry method, localized heat flux originated from high-energy O − ion is measured. From absolute evaluation of the heat flux from O − ion, O − particle flux in order of 10 18 m −2 s −1 is evaluated at a distance of 10 cm from the target. Production yield of O − ion on the ITO target by one Ar + ion impingement at a kinetic energy of 244 eV is estimated to be 3.3  ×  10 −3 as the minimum value. (paper)

  13. Quantitative evaluation of high-energy O- ion particle flux in a DC magnetron sputter plasma with an indium-tin-oxide target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyama, Taku; Bae, Hansin; Setaka, Kenta; Ogawa, Hayato; Fukuoka, Yushi; Suzuki, Haruka; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2017-11-01

    O- ion flux from the indium tin oxide (ITO) sputter target under Ar ion bombardment is quantitatively evaluated using a calorimetry method. Using a mass spectrometer with an energy analyzer, O- energy distribution is measured with spatial dependence. Directional high-energy O- ion ejected from the target surface is observed. Using a calorimetry method, localized heat flux originated from high-energy O- ion is measured. From absolute evaluation of the heat flux from O- ion, O- particle flux in order of 1018 m-2 s-1 is evaluated at a distance of 10 cm from the target. Production yield of O- ion on the ITO target by one Ar+ ion impingement at a kinetic energy of 244 eV is estimated to be 3.3  ×  10-3 as the minimum value.

  14. Influence of the Particle Length of Carbon Nanotube for Pool Boiling Critical Heat Flux Enhancement of Nanofluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Sung Seek; Kim, Yong Hwan; Kim, Nam Jin

    2013-01-01

    The results of this experiment were that the CHF of the two nanofluids increased along with the volumetric fraction until 0.001 vol%, and the two types of nanofluids are the highest CHF at 0.001 vol%. Also, the results show clearly that the rate of CHF increase of the CM-100 MWCNT nanofluid with longer-length nanoparticles is higher than that of the CM-95 MWNCT nanofluid. These results indicate that the length of carbon nanotube influences the pool boiling CHF of carbon nanotube nanofluid and that long-length MWCNT, as above-noted, offers a superior effect in this regard. Boiling heat transfer is used in a variety of industrial processes and applications, such as refrigeration, power generation, heat exchangers, cooling of high-power electronics components and cooling of nuclear reactors. The critical heat flux (CHF) phenomenon is the thermal limit during a boiling heat transfer phase change; at the CHF point the heat transfer is maximised, followed by a drastic degradation after the CHF point. The consequence is a substantial increase in wall temperature which may result in physical failure phenomenon of heat transfer systems. Therefore, the CHF is important being considered in the cooling device design, such as nuclear reactor and nuclear fuels, steam generators, high-density electronic component, etc. And, CHF enhancement is essential for safety of heat transfer system. Recently, CHF reported increased when applied to the nanofluids, with its high (higher-than-base-fluid) thermal characteristic in the nuclear power plant system. Therefore, in this study, carried out the pool boiling CHF experiments by the particle length using carbon nanotube nanofluids, and the results are compared and analyzed for the CHF enhancement. The pool boiling CHF of experiments of carbon nanotube nanofluids carried out by the length of particles and the various concentrations

  15. Experimental investigations on friction laws and dryout heat flux of particulate beds packed with multi-size spheres and irregular particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Liangxing; Ma, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with reducing uncertainty in quantification of debris bed coolability in a hypothetical severe accident of light water reactors (LWRs). A test facility named POMECO-FL is constructed to investigate the friction laws of adiabatic single and two-phase flow in a particulate bed packed with multi-size spheres or irregular particles. The same types of particles were then loaded in the test section of the POMECO-HT facility to obtain the dryout heat flux of the volumetrically heated particulate bed. The POMECO-HT facility features a high power capacity (up to 2.1 MW/m 2 ) which enables coolability study on particulate bed with broad variations in porosity and particle diameters under both top-flooding and bottom-injection conditions. The results show that given the effective particle diameter obtained from single-phase flow through the packed bed with multi-size spheres or irregular particles, both the pressure drop and the dryout heat flux of two-phase flow through the bed can be predicted by the Reed model. The bottom injection of coolant increases the dryout heat flux significantly. Meanwhile, the elevation of the dryout position is moving upwards with increasing bottom-injection flowrate. The experimental data provides insights for interpretation of debris bed coolability, as well as high-quality data for validation of the coolability analysis models and codes. (author)

  16. Introduction of Nickel Coated Silicon Carbide Particles in Aluminum Metal Matrix Hardfaced by MIG/TIG Processes on Precoated Flux Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kamburov

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate an aluminium metal matrix surface layer hardfaced by shielded gas metal arc welding processes applying either metal inert gas (MIG or tungsten inert gas (TIG, with standard wire filler onto the precoated flux layer - a baked resistant film containing electroless nickel coated micro/nano SiC particles. During baking, the components of the flux (MgCl2, NaCl, KCl and Na3AlF6 form a low melting eutectic, which: protects the hardfaced surface from oxidation, provides electrical conductance and keeps the particles on the surface during welding, as well as facilitates particles wettability and their interfacial bonding with the molten metal into the weld puddle.

  17. Multiobjective Design of Turbo Injection Mode for Axial Flux Motor in Plastic Injection Molding Machine by Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Long Kuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a turbo injection mode (TIM for an axial flux motor to apply onto injection molding machine. Since the injection molding machine requires different speed and force parameters setting when finishing a complete injection process. The interleaved winding structure in the motor provides two different injection levels to provide enough injection forces. Two wye-wye windings are designed to switch two control modes conveniently. Wye-wye configuration is used to switch two force levels for the motor. When only one set of wye-winding is energized, field weakening function is achieved. Both of the torque and speed increase under field weakening operation. To achieve two control objectives for torque and speed of the motor, fuzzy based multiple performance characteristics index (MPCI with particle swarm optimization (PSO is used to find out the multiobjective optimal design solution. Both of the torque and speed are expected to be maximal at the same time. Three control factors are selected as studied factors: winding diameter, winding type, and air-gap. Experimental results show that both of the torque and speed increase under the optimal condition. This will provide enough large torque and speed to perform the turbo injection mode in injection process for the injection molding machine.

  18. Sinking rates and ballast composition of particles in the Atlantic Ocean: implications for the organic carbon fluxes to the deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Karakaş, G.

    2009-01-01

    The flux of materials to the deep sea is dominated by larger, organic-rich particles with sinking rates varying between a few meters and several hundred meters per day. Mineral ballast may regulate the transfer of organic matter and other components by determining the sinking rates, e.g. via particle density. We calculated particle sinking rates from mass flux patterns and alkenone measurements applying the results of sediment trap experiments from the Atlantic Ocean. We have indication for higher particle sinking rates in carbonate-dominated production systems when considering both regional and seasonal data. During a summer coccolithophorid bloom in the Cape Blanc coastal upwelling off Mauritania, particle sinking rates reached almost 570 m per day, most probably due the fast sedimentation of densely packed zooplankton fecal pellets, which transport high amounts of organic carbon associated with coccoliths to the deep ocean despite rather low production. During the recurring winter-spring blooms off NW Africa and in opal-rich production systems of the Southern Ocean, sinking rates of larger particles, most probably diatom aggregates, showed a tendency to lower values. However, there is no straightforward relationship between carbonate content and particle sinking rates. This could be due to the unknown composition of carbonate and/or the influence of particle size and shape on sinking rates. It also remains noticeable that the highest sinking rates occurred in dust-rich ocean regions off NW Africa, but this issue deserves further detailed field and laboratory investigations. We obtained increasing sinking rates with depth. By using a seven-compartment biogeochemical model, it was shown that the deep ocean organic carbon flux at a mesotrophic sediment trap site off Cape Blanc can be captured fairly well using seasonal variable particle sinking rates. Our model provides a total organic carbon flux of 0.29 Tg per year down to 3000 m off the NW African upwelling

  19. Water-saving ground cover rice production system reduces net greenhouse gas fluxes in an annual rice-based cropping system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Z.; Du, Y.; Tao, Y.; Zheng, X.; Liu, C.; Lin, S.; Butterbach-Bahl, K.

    2014-11-01

    To safeguard food security and preserve precious water resources, the technology of water-saving ground cover rice production system (GCRPS) is being increasingly adopted for rice cultivation. However, changes in soil water status and temperature under GCRPS may affect soil biogeochemical processes that control the biosphere-atmosphere exchanges of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and carbon dioxide (CO2). The overall goal of this study is to better understand how net ecosystem greenhouse gas exchanges (NEGE) and grain yields are affected by GCRPS in an annual rice-based cropping system. Our evaluation was based on measurements of the CH4 and N2O fluxes and soil heterotrophic respiration (CO2 emissions) over a complete year, and the estimated soil carbon sequestration intensity for six different fertilizer treatments for conventional paddy and GCRPS. The fertilizer treatments included urea application and no N fertilization for both conventional paddy (CUN and CNN) and GCRPS (GUN and GNN), and solely chicken manure (GCM) and combined urea and chicken manure applications (GUM) for GCRPS. Averaging across all the fertilizer treatments, GCRPS increased annual N2O emission and grain yield by 40 and 9%, respectively, and decreased annual CH4 emission by 69%, while GCRPS did not affect soil CO2 emissions relative to the conventional paddy. The annual direct emission factors of N2O were 4.01, 0.09 and 0.50% for GUN, GCM and GUM, respectively, and 1.52% for the conventional paddy (CUN). The annual soil carbon sequestration intensity under GCRPS was estimated to be an average of -1.33 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, which is approximately 44% higher than the conventional paddy. The annual NEGE were 10.80-11.02 Mg CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1 for the conventional paddy and 3.05-9.37 Mg CO2-eq ha-1 yr-1 for the GCRPS, suggesting the potential feasibility of GCRPS in reducing net greenhouse effects from rice cultivation. Using organic fertilizers for GCRPS considerably reduced annual emissions of CH4

  20. Comparing interaction rate detectors for weakly interacting massive particles with annual modulation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copi, Craig J.; Krauss, Lawrence M.

    2003-01-01

    We compare the sensitivity of WIMP detection via direct separation of possible signal versus background to WIMP detection via detection of an annual modulation, in which signal and background cannot be separated on an event-by-event basis. In order to determine how the constraints from the two different types of experiments might be combined an adequate incorporation of uncertainties due to galactic halo models must be made. This issue is particularly timely in light of recent direct detection limits from Edelweiss and CDMS, which we now demonstrate cannot be made consistent with the most recent claimed DAMA annual modulation observation by including halo uncertainties for spin independent interactions. On the other hand, we demonstrate that a combination of these two techniques, in the event of any positive direct detection signal, could ultimately allow significant constraints on anisotropic halo models even without directional sensitivity in these detectors

  1. Estimation of annual heat flux balance at the sea surface from sst (NOAA-satellite and ships drift data off southeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimine Ikeda

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work is to study the possibility of estimating the heat flux balance at the sea surface from GOSSTCOMP (Global Ocean Sea Surface Temperature Computation developed by NOAA/NESS, USA, and sea surface current data based from ships drift information obtained from Pilot Charts, published by the Diretoria de Hidrografia e Navegação (DHN, Brazilian Navy. The annual mean value of the heat flux balance at the sea surface off southeast Brazil for 1977, is estimated from data on the balance between the heat transported by the currents and that transported by eddy diffusion for each volume defined as 2º x 2º (Lat. x Long. square with a constant depth equivalent to an oceanic mixed layer, 100 m thick. Results show several oceanic areas where there are net flows of heat from atmosphere towards the sea surface. In front of Rio de Janeiro the heat flow was downward and up to 70 ly day-1 and is probably related to the upwellirug phenomenon normally occurring in that area. Another coastal area between Lat. 25ºS to 28ºS indicated an downward flow up to 50 ly day-1; and for an area south of Lat. 27ºS, Long. 040ºW - 048ºW an downward flow up to 200 ly day-1, where the transfer was probably due to the cold water of a nortward flux from the Falkland (Malvinas Current. Results also show several oceanic areas where net flows of heat (of about -100 ly day-1 were toward the atmosphere. In the oceanic areas Lat. 19ºS - 23ºS and Lat. 24ºS - 30ºS, the flows were probably due to the warm water of a southward flux of the Brazil Current. The resulting fluxes from the warm waters of the Brazil Current when compared with those from warm waters of the Gulf Stream and Kuroshio, indicate that the Gulf Stream carries about 3.3 times and the Kuroshio 1.7 times more heat than the Brazil Current. These values agree with those of data available on the heat fluxes of the above mentioned Currents calculated by different methods (Budyko, 1974.

  2. Research in elementary particle physics. Annual report, January 1--October 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    Experimental and theoretical work on high energy physics is reviewed. Included are preparations to study high-energy electron-proton interactions at HERA, light-cone QCD, decays of charm and beauty particles, neutrino oscillation, electron-positron interactions at CLEO II, detector development, and astrophysics and cosmology.

  3. ORCHIDEE-PEAT (revision 4596, a model for northern peatland CO2, water, and energy fluxes on daily to annual scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Qiu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands store substantial amounts of carbon and are vulnerable to climate change. We present a modified version of the Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems (ORCHIDEE land surface model for simulating the hydrology, surface energy, and CO2 fluxes of peatlands on daily to annual timescales. The model includes a separate soil tile in each 0.5° grid cell, defined from a global peatland map and identified with peat-specific soil hydraulic properties. Runoff from non-peat vegetation within a grid cell containing a fraction of peat is routed to this peat soil tile, which maintains shallow water tables. The water table position separates oxic from anoxic decomposition. The model was evaluated against eddy-covariance (EC observations from 30 northern peatland sites, with the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax being optimized at each site. Regarding short-term day-to-day variations, the model performance was good for gross primary production (GPP (r2 =  0.76; Nash–Sutcliffe modeling efficiency, MEF  =  0.76 and ecosystem respiration (ER, r2 =  0.78, MEF  =  0.75, with lesser accuracy for latent heat fluxes (LE, r2 =  0.42, MEF  =  0.14 and and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE, r2 =  0.38, MEF  =  0.26. Seasonal variations in GPP, ER, NEE, and energy fluxes on monthly scales showed moderate to high r2 values (0.57–0.86. For spatial across-site gradients of annual mean GPP, ER, NEE, and LE, r2 values of 0.93, 0.89, 0.27, and 0.71 were achieved, respectively. Water table (WT variation was not well predicted (r2 < 0.1, likely due to the uncertain water input to the peat from surrounding areas. However, the poor performance of WT simulation did not greatly affect predictions of ER and NEE. We found a significant relationship between optimized Vcmax and latitude (temperature, which better reflects the spatial gradients of annual NEE than using an average Vcmax value.

  4. ORCHIDEE-PEAT (revision 4596), a model for northern peatland CO2, water, and energy fluxes on daily to annual scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Chunjing; Zhu, Dan; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Krinner, Gerhard; Peng, Shushi; Aurela, Mika; Bernhofer, Christian; Brümmer, Christian; Bret-Harte, Syndonia; Chu, Housen; Chen, Jiquan; Desai, Ankur R.; Dušek, Jiří; Euskirchen, Eugénie S.; Fortuniak, Krzysztof; Flanagan, Lawrence B.; Friborg, Thomas; Grygoruk, Mateusz; Gogo, Sébastien; Grünwald, Thomas; Hansen, Birger U.; Holl, David; Humphreys, Elyn; Hurkuck, Miriam; Kiely, Gerard; Klatt, Janina; Kutzbach, Lars; Largeron, Chloé; Laggoun-Défarge, Fatima; Lund, Magnus; Lafleur, Peter M.; Li, Xuefei; Mammarella, Ivan; Merbold, Lutz; Nilsson, Mats B.; Olejnik, Janusz; Ottosson-Löfvenius, Mikaell; Oechel, Walter; Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Peichl, Matthias; Pirk, Norbert; Peltola, Olli; Pawlak, Włodzimierz; Rasse, Daniel; Rinne, Janne; Shaver, Gaius; Schmid, Hans Peter; Sottocornola, Matteo; Steinbrecher, Rainer; Sachs, Torsten; Urbaniak, Marek; Zona, Donatella; Ziemblinska, Klaudia

    2018-02-01

    Peatlands store substantial amounts of carbon and are vulnerable to climate change. We present a modified version of the Organising Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic Ecosystems (ORCHIDEE) land surface model for simulating the hydrology, surface energy, and CO2 fluxes of peatlands on daily to annual timescales. The model includes a separate soil tile in each 0.5° grid cell, defined from a global peatland map and identified with peat-specific soil hydraulic properties. Runoff from non-peat vegetation within a grid cell containing a fraction of peat is routed to this peat soil tile, which maintains shallow water tables. The water table position separates oxic from anoxic decomposition. The model was evaluated against eddy-covariance (EC) observations from 30 northern peatland sites, with the maximum rate of carboxylation (Vcmax) being optimized at each site. Regarding short-term day-to-day variations, the model performance was good for gross primary production (GPP) (r2 = 0.76; Nash-Sutcliffe modeling efficiency, MEF = 0.76) and ecosystem respiration (ER, r2 = 0.78, MEF = 0.75), with lesser accuracy for latent heat fluxes (LE, r2 = 0.42, MEF = 0.14) and and net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE, r2 = 0.38, MEF = 0.26). Seasonal variations in GPP, ER, NEE, and energy fluxes on monthly scales showed moderate to high r2 values (0.57-0.86). For spatial across-site gradients of annual mean GPP, ER, NEE, and LE, r2 values of 0.93, 0.89, 0.27, and 0.71 were achieved, respectively. Water table (WT) variation was not well predicted (r2 < 0.1), likely due to the uncertain water input to the peat from surrounding areas. However, the poor performance of WT simulation did not greatly affect predictions of ER and NEE. We found a significant relationship between optimized Vcmax and latitude (temperature), which better reflects the spatial gradients of annual NEE than using an average Vcmax value.

  5. Annual report 1977, Particle physics, Institute of Physics, University of Stockholm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The research in the field of elementary particle physics concerns hadronic processes at high energies, using the facilities offered by CERN and Fermilab, USA. The teams carrying out experiments with bubble chambers are mainly working at the institute, whereas the tems utilizing counter techniques spend long periods at CERN. Experiments at CERN SPS and Fermilab are in progress. The equipment for bubble chamber physics at the institute consists of five scanning tables, one manual measuring machine and the Spiral Reader measuring machine. A computer CD 6400 is available at the institute. The research program comprises study of 100 GeV/c antiproton-deuterium reactions, 12 GeV/c antiproton-deuterium reactions, 9 and 12 GeV/c antiproton-proton reactions studying all annihilation and non-annihilation processes, a detailed study of amplitudes in 4 GeV/c π - p reactions with strange particles, strange particle production in 19 GeV/c pp and study of 19 GeV/c pd. The main emphasis in the future will be on experiments with the European Hybrid Spectrometer system and the Big European Bubble Chamber at SPS. The group participates in the design work and planning for the physics experiments. Research physicists from the group participate in counter experiments at SPS studying elastic scattering at high transverse momenta, elastic scattering of π, K and p sup(+-) at PS energies and study of line reversal invariance in πp and Kp reactions. (author)

  6. Influence of gas-particle partitioning on ammonia and nitric acid fluxes above a deciduous forest in the Midwestern USA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristina; Sørensen, Lise Lotte; Hornsby, Karen E.

    to bi-directionality of the flux, and the dynamics of the chemical gas/aerosol equilibrium of NH3 and HNO3 (or other atmospheric acids) with aerosol-phase ammonium (NH4+) and nitrate (NO3-). NH3 and HNO3 are both very reactive and typically exhibit higher deposition velocities than aerosol NH4...... diffusion denuders with detection by florescence and half-hourly flux measurements are calculated. HNO3 REA system is based on gas capture on sodium chloride (NaCl) coated denuders with subsequent analysis by ion-chromatography, and the resulting fluxes have a resolution of 3-4 hours. CO2 fluxes...

  7. Particle flux at the outlet of an Ecr plasma source; Flujos de particulas a la salida de una fuente de plasma ECR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez T, C.; Gonzalez D, J. [ININ, Departamento de Fisica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2000-07-01

    The necessity of processing big material areas this has resulted in the development of plasma sources with the important property to be uniform in these areas. Also the continuous diminution in the size of substrates to be processed have stimulated the study of models which allow to predict the control of energy and the density of the ions and neutral particles toward the substrate. On the other hand, there are other applications of the plasma sources where it is very necessary to understand the effects generated by the energetic fluxes of ions and neutrals. These fluxes as well as another beneficial effects can improve the activation energy for the formation and improvement of the diffusion processes in the different materials. In this work, using the drift kinetic approximation is described a model to calculate the azimuthal and radial fluxes in the zone of materials processing of an Ecr plasma source type. The results obtained are compared with experimental results. (Author)

  8. Numerical model for swirl flow cooling in high-heat-flux particle beam targets and the design of a swirl-flow-based plasma limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milora, S.L.; Combs, S.K.; Foster, C.A.

    1984-11-01

    An unsteady, two-dimensional heat conduction code has been used to study the performance of swirl-flow-based neutral particle beam targets. The model includes the effects of two-phase heat transfer and asymmetric heating of tubular elements. The calorimeter installed in the Medium Energy Test Facility, which has been subjected to 30-s neutral beam pulses with incident heat flux intensities of greater than or equal to 5 kW/cm 2 , has been modeled. The numerical results indicate that local heat fluxes in excess of 7 kW/cm 2 occur at the water-cooled surface on the side exposed to the beam. This exceeds critical heat flux limits for uniformly heated tubes wih straight flow by approximately a factor of 5. The design of a plasma limiter based on swirl flow heat transfer is presented

  9. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  10. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2009-03-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2008 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Scoping experiments with various manufacturing methods for forming the LEU alloy profile are presented.

  11. Ecosystem function and particle flux dynamics across the Mackenzie Shelf (Beaufort Sea, Arctic Ocean: an integrative analysis of spatial variability and biophysical forcings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Forest

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of how environmental changes affect organic matter fluxes in Arctic marine ecosystems is sorely needed. Here we combine mooring times series, ship-based measurements and remote sensing to assess the variability and forcing factors of vertical fluxes of particulate organic carbon (POC across the Mackenzie Shelf in 2009. We developed a geospatial model of these fluxes to proceed to an integrative analysis of their determinants in summer. Flux data were obtained with sediment traps moored around 125 m and via a regional empirical algorithm applied to particle size distributions (17 classes from 0.08–4.2 mm measured by an Underwater Vision Profiler 5. The low fractal dimension (i.e., porous, fluffy particles derived from the algorithm (1.26 ± 0.34 and the dominance (~ 77% of rapidly sinking small aggregates (p r2 cum. = 0.37. Bacteria were correlated with small aggregates, while northeasterly wind was associated with large size classes (> 1 mm ESD, but these two factors were weakly related with each other. Copepod biomass was overall negatively correlated (p < 0.05 with vertical POC fluxes, implying that metazoans acted as regulators of export fluxes, even if their role was minor given that our study spanned the onset of diapause. Our results demonstrate that on interior Arctic shelves where productivity is low in mid-summer, localized upwelling zones (nutrient enrichment may result in the formation of large filamentous phytoaggregates that are not substantially retained by copepod and bacterial communities.

  12. Rising Mean Annual Temperature Increases Carbon Flux and Alters Partitioning, but Does Not Change Ecosystem Carbon Storage in Hawaiian Tropical Montane Wet Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.; Selmants, P.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem carbon (C) storage exceeds that in the atmosphere by a factor of four, and represents a dynamic balance among C input, allocation, and loss. This balance is likely being altered by climate change, but the response of terrestrial C cycling to warming remains poorly quantified, particularly in tropical forests which play a disproportionately large role in the global C cycle. Over the past five years, we have quantified above- and belowground C pools and fluxes in nine permanent plots spanning a 5.2°C mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient (13-18.2°C) in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forest. This elevation gradient is unique in that substrate type and age, soil type, soil water balance, canopy vegetation, and disturbance history are constant, allowing us to isolate the impact of long-term, whole ecosystem warming on C input, allocation, loss and storage. Across the gradient, soil respiration, litterfall, litter decomposition, total belowground C flux, aboveground net primary productivity, and estimates of gross primary production (GPP) all increase linearly and positively with MAT. Carbon partitioning is dynamic, shifting from below- to aboveground with warming, likely in response to a warming-induced increase in the cycling and availability of soil nutrients. In contrast to observed patterns in C flux, live biomass C, soil C, and total ecosystem C pools remained remarkably constant with MAT. There was also no difference in soil bacterial taxon richness, phylogenetic diversity, or community composition with MAT. Taken together these results indicate that in tropical montane wet forests, increased temperatures in the absence of water limitation or disturbance will accelerate C cycling, will not alter ecosystem C storage, and will shift the products of photosynthesis from below- to aboveground. These results agree with an increasing number of studies, and collectively provide a unique insight into anticipated warming-induced changes in tropical

  13. Hazardous gas production by alpha particles in solid organic transuranic waste matrices. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LaVerne, J.A.

    1998-01-01

    'This project uses fundamental radiation chemical techniques to elucidate the basic processes occurring in the heavy-ion radiolysis of solid hydrocarbon matrices such as polymers and organic resins that are associated with many of the transuranic waste deposits or the transportation of these radionuclides. The environmental management of mixed waste containing transuranic radionuclides is difficult because these nuclides are alpha particle emitters and the energy deposited by the alpha particles causes chemical transformations in the matrices accompanying the waste. Most radiolysis programs focus on conventional radiation such as gamma rays, but the chemical changes induced by alpha particles and other heavy ions are typically very different and product yields can vary by more than an order of magnitude. The objective of this research is to measure the production of gases, especially molecular hydrogen, produced in the proton, helium ion, and carbon ion radiolysis of selected solid organic matrices in order to obtain fundamental mechanistic information on the radiolytic decomposition of these materials. This knowledge can also be used to directly give reasonable estimates of explosive or flammability hazards in the storage or transport of transuranic wastes in order to enhance the safety of DOE sites. This report summarizes the work after eight months of a three-year project on determining the production of hazardous gases in transuranic waste. The first stage of the project was to design and build an assembly to irradiate solid organic matrices using accelerated ion beams. It is necessary to measure absolute radiolytic yields, and simulate some of the conditions found in the field. A window assembly was constructed allowing the beam to pass consecutively through a collimator, a vacuum exit window and into the solid sample. The beam is stopped in the sample and the entire end of the assembly is a Faraday cup. Integration of the collected current, in conjunction

  14. Particle deposition in human and canine tracheobronchial casts: Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.S.

    1987-01-01

    This work measures deposition patterns and efficiencies of aerosols within realistic, physical models of the tracheobronchial airways of humans and experimental animals over a range of particle sizes from 0.01 to 1.0 μm, for a variety of respiratory modes and rates. Full morphometric and flow distribution measurements were completed on casts of human and canine tracheobronchial airways, which extend from just below the larynx to airways 1 mm in diameter. They show basic similarities in the distribution of airflow, but also species differences which must be considered. The distribution of airflow was measured for minute volumes equivalent to 6, 11, 17 and 22 L min -1 for the human and 3, 6, 8 and 11 L min -1 for the canine for both constant and pulsatile inspiratory flow. Inertance was found to carry more of the flow to airways of the lower lobes at higher flow rates. Basic differences in airway branching pattern result in a more distinct change in airflow distribution as flow rate changes for the canine cast as compared with the human cast. These differences will contribute to differing patterns of mass transfer of inhaled particles in central airways of the two species. 8 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  15. Collisional dynamics of perturbed particle disks in the solar system. Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, W.W.; Stewart, G.R.

    1987-03-01

    Investigations of the collisional evolution of particulate disks subject to the gravitational perturbation of a more massive particle orbiting within the disk are underway. Both numerical N-body simulations using a novel collision algorithm and analytical kinetic theory are being employed to extend our understanding of perturbed disks in planetary rings and during the formation of the solar system. Particular problems proposed for investigation are: (1) The development and testing of general criteria for a small moonlet to clear a gap and produce observable morphological features in planetary rings; (2) The development of detailed models of collisional damping of the wavy edges observed on the Encke division of Saturn's A ring; and (3) The determination of the extent of runaway growth of the few largest planetesimals during the early stages of planetary accretion

  16. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  17. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renfro, David G.; Cook, David Howard; Freels, James D.; Griffin, Frederick P.; Ilas, Germina; Sease, John D.; Chandler, David

    2012-01-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  18. Beyond annual budgets: carbon flux at different temporal scales in fire-prone Siberian Scots pine forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wirth, C.; Czimczik, C.I.; Schulze, E.D.

    2002-01-01

    Along four chronosequences of fire-prone Siberian Scots pine forests we compared net primary production (NPP) and two different mass-based estimates of net ecosystem productivity (NEP C and NEP S ). NEP C quantifies changes in carbon pools along the chronosequences, whereas NEP S estimates the short-term stand-level carbon balance in intervals between fires. The chronosequences differed in the mean return interval of surface fires (unburned or moderately burned, 40 yr; heavily burned, 25 yr) and site quality (lichen versus Vaccinium type). Of the Vaccinium type (higher site quality) only a moderately burned chronosequence was studied. NEP C was derived from the rate of changes of two major carbon pools along the chronosequence time axes: (1) decomposition of old coarse woody debris (CWD) left from the previous generation after stand-replacing fire, and (2) accumulation of new carbon in biomass, CWD and soil organic layer by the regenerating stand. Young stands of all chronosequences were losing carbon at rates of -4 to -19 mol C/m 2 /yr (-48 to -228 g C/m 2 /yr). Depending on initial CWD pools and site-specific accumulation rates the stands became net carbon sinks after 12 yr (Vaccinium type) to 24 yr (lichen type) following the stand-replacing fire and offset initial carbon losses after 27 and 70 yr, respectively. Highest NEP C was reached in the unburned chronosequence (10.8 mol C/m 2 /yr or 130 g C/m 2 /yr). Maximum NEP C in the burned chronosequences ranged from 1.8 to 5.1 mol C/m 2 /yr (22 to 61 g C/m 2 /yr) depending on site quality and fire regime. Around a stand age of 200 yr NEP C was 1.6 ± 0.6 mol C/m 2 /yr (19 ± 7 g C/m 2 /yr) across all chronosequences. NEP S represents the current stand-level carbon accumulation in intervals between recurring surface fires and can be viewed as a mass-based analogue of net ecosystem exchange measured with flux towers. It was estimated based on measurements of current woody NPP, modelled decomposition of measured CWD

  19. Studies of particle interactions in bubble chamber, spark chambers and counter experiments. Annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holloway, L.E.; O'Halloran, T.A. Jr.; Simmons, R.O.

    1983-07-01

    During the past six years we have carried out and planned experiments which predominantly studied the production and decay of particles containing charmed quarks. A series of photoproduction and neutron production experiments started with the very early observation of the production of J/psi by neutrons and by photons at Fermilab. From subsequent experiments using these neutral beams and the basic detecting system, we have reported results on the photoproduction of the Λ/sub c/ charmed baryon and the D and D* charmed mesons. More recent runs are studying the high energy photoproduction of vector mesons including the psi'. The present experiment in this sequence is using neutrons to produce a large number of D mesons. Another series of experiments at Fermilab set out to study the hadronic production of charmed mesons. The Chicago Cyclotron facility was modified with a detector sensitive to various possible production mechanisms. The experiments were a success; clean signals of D mesons were observed to be produced by pions, and also the production of chi/sub c/ with the subsequent decay via a γ-ray to psi was observed. The charmonium experiments run this year have better photon resolution for measuring the decays of chi/sub c/ to psi. We are part of a collaboration which is working on the Collider Detector Facility for Fermilab. The CDF at Fermilab is a possible source of (weak) intermediate vector bosons from the collisions of protons and anti-protons. Our responsibilities in the CDF include both the construction of the muon detector and the designing, planning, and testing of the FASTBUS electronics. The second part of our weak interaction program is the Neutrino Oscillation experiment which is now under construction at Brookhaven

  20. Phase of the annual modulation as a tool for determining the mass of the weakly interacting massive particle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewis, Matthew J.; Freese, Katherine

    2004-01-01

    The count rate of weakly interacting massive particle (WIMP) dark matter candidates in direct detection experiments experiences an annual modulation due to the Earth's motion around the Sun. In the standard isothermal halo model, the signal peaks near June 2nd at high recoil energies; however, the signal experiences a phase reversal and peaks in December at low energy recoils. We show that this phase reversal may be used to determine the WIMP mass. If an annual modulation were observed with the usual phase (i.e., peaking on June 2nd) in the lowest accessible energy recoil bins of the DAMA, CDMS-II, CRESST-II, EDELWEISS-II, GENIUS-TF, ZEPLIN-II, XENON, or ZEPLIN-IV detectors, one could immediately place upper bounds on the WIMP mass of 103, 48, 6, 97, 10, 52, 29, and 29 GeV, respectively. In addition, detectors with adequate energy resolution and sufficiently low recoil energy thresholds may determine the crossover recoil energy at which the phase reverses, thereby obtaining an independent measurement of the WIMP mass. We study the capabilities of various detectors, and find that CRESST-II, ZEPLIN-II, and GENIUS-TF should be able to observe the phase reversal in a few years of runtime, and can thus determine the mass of the WIMP if it is O(100 GeV). Xenon based detectors with 1000 kg (XENON and ZEPLIN-IV) and with energy recoil thresholds of a few keV require 25 kg yr exposure, which will be readily attained in upcoming experiments

  1. Modern and historical fluxes of halogenated organic contaminants to a lake in the Canadian arctic, as determined from annually laminated sediment cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, G.A.; Braekevelt, E.; Helm, P.A.; Bidleman, T.F.; Outridge, P.M.; Lockhart, W.L.; McNeeley, R.; Rosenberg, B.; Ikonomou, M.G.; Hamilton, P.; Tomy, G.T.; Wilkinson, P.

    2005-01-01

    Two annually laminated cores collected from Lake DV09 on Devon Island in May 1999 were dated using 210 Pb and 137 Cs, and analyzed for a variety of halogenated organic contaminants (HOCs), including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides, short-chain polychlorinated n-alkanes (sPCAs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Dry weight HOC concentrations in Lake DV09 sediments were generally similar to other remote Arctic lakes. Maximum HOC fluxes often agreed well with production maxima, although many compound groups exhibited maxima at or near the sediment surface, much later than peak production. The lower than expected HOC concentrations in older sediment slices may be due to anaerobic degradation and possibly to dilution resulting from a temporary increase in sedimentation rate observed between the mid-1960s and 1970s. Indeed, temporal trends were more readily apparent for those compound classes when anaerobic metabolites were also analyzed, such as for DDT and toxaphene. However, it is postulated here for the first time that the maximum or increasing HOC surface fluxes observed for many of the major compound classes in DV09 sediments may be influenced by climate variation and the resulting increase in algal primary productivity which could drive an increasing rate of HOC scavenging from the water column. Both the fraction (F TC ) and enantiomer fraction (EF) of trans-chlordane (TC) decreased significantly between 1957 and 1997, suggesting that recent inputs to the lake are from weathered chlordane sources. PCDD/Fs showed a change in sources from pentachlorophenol (PeCP) in the 1950s and 1960s to combustion sources into the 1990s. Improvements in combustion technology may be responsible for the reducing the proportion of TCDF relative to OCDD in the most recent slice

  2. Fundamental radiation effects in αAg-Zn alloys: Zener relaxation, study of the mobility of point defects and the evolution of their populations in a particle flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbwachs, Michel.

    1977-01-01

    After a recall on the physical effects of radiations, a model used to describe the defect populations produced in a fast particle flux is presented. The experimental devices used and the measurements carried out on a solid solution of αAg-Zn are described. The results obtained in an electron flux are compared with the forecastings of the theoretical models. The mobility and the apparent recombination radius of vacancies and autointerstitials, the absorption efficiency of dislocations in regard to point defects and the participation of autointerstitials to short-range order are studied. A similar study carried out under neutron irradiation is reported. The influence of neutron doses and temperature on atomic mobility is investigated. An experiment carried out under gamma photon irradiation enables a comparison to be made between the creation of defects by gamma photons and electrons [fr

  3. The concentration, source and deposition flux of ammonium and nitrate in atmospheric particles during dust events at a coastal site in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jianhua; Liu, Xiaohuan; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhang, Ruifeng; Chen, Xiaojing; Lin, Xuehui; Gao, Huiwang; Liu, Ruhai

    2018-01-01

    Asian dust has been reported to carry anthropogenic reactive nitrogen during transport from source areas to the oceans. In this study, we attempted to characterize NH4+ and NO3- in atmospheric particles collected at a coastal site in northern China during spring dust events from 2008 to 2011. Based on the mass concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- in each total suspended particle (TSP) sample, the samples can be classified into increasing or decreasing types. In Category 1, the concentrations of NH4+ and NO3- were 20-440 % higher in dust day samples relative to samples collected immediately before or after a dust event. These concentrations decreased by 10-75 % in the dust day samples in Categories 2 and 3. Back trajectory analysis suggested that multiple factors, such as the transport distance prior to the reception site, the mixing layer depth on the transport route and the residence time across highly polluted regions, might affect the concentrations of NH4+ and NO3-. NH4+ in the dust day samples was likely either in the form of ammonium salts existing separately to dust aerosols or as the residual of incomplete reactions between ammonium salts and carbonate salts. NO3- in the dust day samples was attributed to various formation processes during the long-range transport. The positive matrix factorization (PMF) receptor model results showed that the contribution of soil dust increased from 23 to 36 % on dust days, with decreasing contributions from local anthropogenic inputs and associated secondary aerosols. The estimated deposition flux of NNH4++NO3- varied greatly from event to event; e.g., the dry deposition flux of NNH4++NO3- increased by 9-285 % in Category 1 but decreased by 46-73 % in Category 2. In Category 3, the average dry deposition fluxes of particulate nitrate and ammonium decreased by 46 % and increased by 10 %, respectively, leading to 11-48 % decrease in the fluxes of NNH4++NO3-.

  4. Optimal design of permanent magnet flux switching generator for wind applications via artificial neural network and multi-objective particle swarm optimization hybrid approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meo, Santolo; Zohoori, Alireza; Vahedi, Abolfazl

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new optimal design of flux switching permanent magnet generator is developed. • A prototype is employed to validate numerical data used for optimization. • A novel hybrid multi-objective particle swarm optimization approach is proposed. • Optimization targets are weight, cost, voltage and its total harmonic distortion. • The hybrid approach preference is proved compared with other optimization methods. - Abstract: In this paper a new hybrid approach obtained combining a multi-objective particle swarm optimization and artificial neural network is proposed for the design optimization of a direct-drive permanent magnet flux switching generators for low power wind applications. The targets of the proposed multi-objective optimization are to reduce the costs and weight of the machine while maximizing the amplitude of the induced voltage as well as minimizing its total harmonic distortion. The permanent magnet width, the stator and rotor tooth width, the rotor teeth number and stator pole number of the machine define the search space for the optimization problem. Four supervised artificial neural networks are designed for modeling the complex relationships among the weight, the cost, the amplitude and the total harmonic distortion of the output voltage respect to the quantities of the search space. Finite element analysis is adopted to generate training dataset for the artificial neural networks. Finite element analysis based model is verified by experimental results with a 1.5 kW permanent magnet flux switching generator prototype suitable for renewable energy applications, having 6/19 stator poles/rotor teeth. Finally the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid procedure is compared with the results given by conventional multi-objective optimization algorithms. The obtained results show the soundness of the proposed multi objective optimization technique and its feasibility to be adopted as suitable methodology for optimal design of permanent

  5. Measurement of a neutral particle flux by a thermal method using the junction temperature effect; Mesure d'un flux de particules neutres par une methode thermique mettant a contribution l'effet de temperature des jonctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caron, Anthime [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires. Services Scientifiques

    1966-07-01

    Among all the methods suitable for measuring neutral particle fluxes obtained by proton charge exchange in an organic gas, the thermal method has been chosen. The energy imparted by the neutral particles to the target in the form of heat leads to the latter temperature increasing; this temperature is usually followed with a thermocouple. In order to increase the sensitivity and the elegance of the apparatus the thermocouple has been replaced by a junction whose characteristics are known to vary with temperature. A calibration is carried out using a beam of charged particles. The response obtained is linear. Measurements have been made with a power of up to 1 mW; the accuracy increases with the energy provided; for 4 joules an accuracy of 10 per cent is obtained. The apparatus may be improved in particular by extending the measurement range towards low power values, and by increasing the accuracy. (author) [French] Parmi toutes les methodes utilisees pour la mesure d'un flux de particules neutres, obtenues par echange de charge de protons dans un gaz organique, nous avons choisi la methode thermique. L'energie cedee par les particules neutres a la cible sous forme de chaleur provoque une elevation de temperature de celle-ci; cette temperature est habituellement reperee par thermocouple. Pour accroitre la sensibilite et la finesse de l'appareillage, nous avons substitue au thermocouple une jonction dont on sait que les caracteristiques varient avec la temperature. Un etalonnage est realise par un faisceau de particules chargees. La reponse obtenue est lineaire. Des puissances de l'ordre du mW ont ete mesurees; la precision croit avec l'energie apportee; elle est de 10 pour cent quand celle-ci est de 4 joules. L'appareillage peut etre notablement perfectionne, pour reculer la gamme des mesures vers les basses puissances et accroitre la precision. (auteur)

  6. A punctual flux estimator and reactions rates optimization in neutral particles transport calculus by the Monte Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Authier, N.

    1998-12-01

    One of the questions asked in radiation shielding problems is the estimation of the radiation level in particular to determine accessibility of working persons in controlled area (nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants) or to study the dose gradients encountered in material (iron nuclear vessel, medical therapy, electronics in satellite). The flux and reaction rate estimators used in Monte Carlo codes give average values in volumes or on surfaces of the geometrical description of the system. But in certain configurations, the knowledge of punctual deposited energy and dose estimates are necessary. The Monte Carlo estimate of the flux at a point of interest is a calculus which presents an unbounded variance. The central limit theorem cannot be applied thus no easy confidence level may be calculated. The convergence rate is then very poor. We propose in this study a new solution for the photon flux at a point estimator. The method is based on the 'once more collided flux estimator' developed earlier for neutron calculations. It solves the problem of the unbounded variance and do not add any bias to the estimation. We show however that our new sampling schemes specially developed to treat the anisotropy of the photon coherent scattering is necessary for a good and regular behavior of the estimator. This developments integrated in the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code add the possibility of an unbiased punctual estimate on media interfaces. (author)

  7. Comparison of flux motion in type-II superconductors including pinning centers with the shapes of nano-rods and nano-particles by using 3D-TDGL simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Shintaro; Ichino, Yusuke; Yoshida, Yutaka

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We constructed the 3D-TDGL simulator to calculate the flux motion. • We assumed two superconductors including only nano-rods and only nano-particles. • We succeeded to simulate the flux motion for various magnetic field angles. • If anyone introduce nano-rod, controlling the “single-kink” motion is very important. • The introduction of nano-particles is effective to pin the “single-kink” motion. - Abstract: Time-dependent Ginzburg–Landau (TDGL) equations are very useful method for simulation of the motion of flux quanta in type-II superconductors. We constructed the 3D-TDGL simulator and succeeded to simulate the motion of flux quanta in 3-dimension. We carried out the 3D-TDGL simulation to compare two superconductors which included only pinning centers with the shape of nano-rods and only nano-particle-like pinning centers in the viewpoint of the flux motion. As a result, a motion of “single-kink” caused the whole motion of a flux quantum in the superconductor including only the nano-rods. On the other hand, in the superconductor including the nano-particles, the flux quanta were pinned by the nano-particles in the various magnetic field applied angles. As the result, no “single-kink” occurred in the superconductor including the nano-particles. Therefore, the nano-particle-like pinning centers are effective shape to trap flux quanta for various magnetic field applied angles.

  8. Characterization of a detector chain using a FPGA-based time-to-digital converter to reconstruct the three-dimensional coordinates of single particles at high flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogrette, F.; Heurteau, D.; Chang, R.; Bouton, Q.; Westbrook, C. I.; Sellem, R.; Clément, D.

    2015-11-01

    We report on the development of a novel FPGA-based time-to-digital converter and its implementation in a detection chain that records the coordinates of single particles along three dimensions. The detector is composed of micro-channel plates mounted on top of a cross delay line and connected to fast electronics. We demonstrate continuous recording of the timing signals from the cross delay line at rates up to 4.1 × 106 s-1 and three-dimensional reconstruction of the coordinates up to 3.2 × 106 particles per second. From the imaging of a calibrated structure we measure the in-plane resolution of the detector to be 140(20) μm at a flux of 3 × 105 particles per second. In addition, we analyze a method to estimate the resolution without placing any structure under vacuum, a significant practical improvement. While we use UV photons here, the results of this work apply to the detection of other kinds of particles.

  9. Flux Growth of Highly Crystalline Photocatalytic BaTiO3 Particle Layers on Porous Titanium Sponge Substrate and Insights into the Formation Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Li, B.

    2017-09-01

    A unique architecture of idiomorphic and highly crystalline BaTiO3 particle layers directly grown on a porous titanium sponge substrate was successfully achieved for the first time using a facile molten salt method at a relatively low temperature of 700 °C. Specifically, the low-melting KCl-NaCl eutectic salts and barium hydroxide octahydrate were employed as the reaction medium and barium source, respectively. Powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectrophotometry were used to characterize the structure, morphology and optical property of the obtained samples. The results revealed that the flux-grown tetragonal BaTiO3 products had well-defined and uniform morphology with an average size of 300 nm and a band gap of ∼3.16 eV. Based on XRD, EDS, SEM, and TEM, the possible formation mechanism responsible for the well-developed architecture of BaTiO3 particle layers was proposed and discussed. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the flux-grown BaTiO3 products for organic pollutant degradation under simulated sunlight irradiation was also investigated.

  10. Testing the FOODBANCS hypothesis: Seasonal variations in near-bottom particle flux, bioturbation intensity, and deposit feeding based on 234Th measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClintic, Mark A.; DeMaster, David J.; Thomas, Carrie J.; Smith, Craig R.

    2008-11-01

    Naturally occurring 234Th (24-d half-life) was used on the West Antarctic continental shelf to evaluate temporal variations in the flux of particulate material reaching the seabed, bioturbation intensity, the seasonal continuity of feeding by benthic fauna, and trends in particle selection during ingestion for six common detritivores (four surface deposit feeders and two subsurface deposit feeders). These measurements were made at three stations during the five FOODBANCS cruises (December 1999, March, June, and October 2000, and March 2001) to assess the nature of pelagic-benthic coupling on the shelf and to evaluate the seabed as a potential food bank for deposit feeders when surface primary production is minimal. Two summer regimes were sampled (March 2000 and March 2001) with the latter exhibiting a distinct 1-2-cm-thick phytodetritus layer in nearly all sediment core samples. At site B, the 234Th fluxes into the near-bottom (150/170 mab) sediment traps were indistinguishable for the December-March 2000, March-June 2000, and June-October 2000 sampling intervals (fluxes ranging from 170 to 280 dpm m -2 d -1). However, the sediment-trap 234Th flux measured for the October 2000-March 2001 interval (1000 dpm m -2 d -1) was ˜5-fold greater than during the other three sampling periods, consistent with the deposition of a phytodetritus layer. The steady-state 234Th fluxes derived from seabed inventories at site B were 2.4-2.7 times greater than the sediment-trap 234Th fluxes, indicating substantial scavenging of this particle-reactive radiotracer in the bottom 150 m of the water column and/or lateral transport near the seabed. The seabed 234Th inventories at the three stations showed no variation during the first four cruises, but were significantly greater during cruise FB-V (March 2001), when the phytodetritus layer occurred. Based on 234Th distributions in the seabed, bioturbation intensities (quantified using the diffusive mixing coefficient, Db) varied from 0

  11. Estimating chemical composition of atmospheric deposition fluxes from mineral insoluble particles deposition collected in the western Mediterranean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Fu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to measure the mass flux of atmospheric insoluble deposition and to constrain regional models of dust simulation, a network of automatic deposition collectors (CARAGA has been installed throughout the western Mediterranean Basin. Weekly samples of the insoluble fraction of total atmospheric deposition were collected concurrently on filters at five sites including four on western Mediterranean islands (Frioul and Corsica, France; Mallorca, Spain; and Lampedusa, Italy and one in the southern French Alps (Le Casset, and a weighing and ignition protocol was applied in order to quantify their mineral fraction. Atmospheric deposition is both a strong source of nutrients and metals for marine ecosystems in this area. However, there are few data on trace-metal deposition in the literature, since their deposition measurement is difficult to perform. In order to obtain more information from CARAGA atmospheric deposition samples, this study aimed to test their relevance in estimating elemental fluxes in addition to total mass fluxes. The elemental chemical analysis of ashed CARAGA filter samples was based on an acid digestion and an elemental analysis by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES and mass spectrometry (MS in a clean room. The sampling and analytical protocols were tested to determine the elemental composition for mineral dust tracers (Al, Ca, K, Mg and Ti, nutrients (P and Fe and trace metals (Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Mn, Ni, V and Zn from simulated wet deposition of dust analogues and traffic soot. The relative mass loss by dissolution in wet deposition was lower than 1 % for Al and Fe, and reached 13 % for P due to its larger solubility in water. For trace metals, this loss represented less than 3 % of the total mass concentration, except for Zn, Cu and Mn for which it could reach 10 %, especially in traffic soot. The chemical contamination during analysis was negligible for all the elements except for Cd

  12. Gas-particle interactions above a Dutch heathland: I. Surface exchange fluxes of NH3, SO2, HNO3 and HCl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nemitz

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A field measurement campaign was carried out over a Dutch heathland to investigate the effect of gas-to-particle conversion and ammonium aerosol evaporation on surface/atmosphere fluxes of ammonia and related species. Continuous micrometeorological measurements of the surface exchange of NH3, SO2, HNO3 and HCl were made and are analyzed here with regard to average fluxes, deposition velocities (Vd, canopy resistances (Rc and canopy compensation point for NH3. Gradients of SO2, HNO3 and HCl were measured with a novel wet-denuder system with online anion chromatography. Measurements of HNO3 and HCl indicate an Rc of 100 to 200 s m-1 during warm daytime periods, probably at least partly due to non-zero acid partial pressures above NH4NO3 and NH4Cl on the leaf surfaces. Although it is likely that this observation is exacerbated by the effect of the evaporation of airborne NH4+ on the gradient measurements, the findings nevertheless add to the growing evidence that HNO3 and HCl are not always deposited at the maximum rate. Ammonia (NH3 fluxes show mainly deposition, with some periods of significant daytime emission. The net exchange could be reproduced both with an Rc model (deposition fluxes only using resistance parameterizations from former measurements, as well as with the canopy compensation point model, using parameterizations derived from the measurements. The apoplastic ratio of ammonium and hydrogen concentration (Γs=[NH4+]/[H+] of 1200 estimated from the measurements is large for semi-natural vegetation, but smaller than indicated by previous measurements at this site.

  13. Gas-particle interactions above a Dutch heathland: I. Surface exchange fluxes of NH3, SO2, HNO3 and HCl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemitz, E.; Sutton, M. A.; Wyers, G. P.; Jongejan, P. A. C.

    2004-07-01

    A field measurement campaign was carried out over a Dutch heathland to investigate the effect of gas-to-particle conversion and ammonium aerosol evaporation on surface/atmosphere fluxes of ammonia and related species. Continuous micrometeorological measurements of the surface exchange of NH3, SO2, HNO3 and HCl were made and are analyzed here with regard to average fluxes, deposition velocities (Vd), canopy resistances (Rc) and canopy compensation point for NH3. Gradients of SO2, HNO3 and HCl were measured with a novel wet-denuder system with online anion chromatography. Measurements of HNO3 and HCl indicate an Rc of 100 to 200 s m-1 during warm daytime periods, probably at least partly due to non-zero acid partial pressures above NH4NO3 and NH4Cl on the leaf surfaces. Although it is likely that this observation is exacerbated by the effect of the evaporation of airborne NH4+ on the gradient measurements, the findings nevertheless add to the growing evidence that HNO3 and HCl are not always deposited at the maximum rate. Ammonia (NH3) fluxes show mainly deposition, with some periods of significant daytime emission. The net exchange could be reproduced both with an Rc model (deposition fluxes only) using resistance parameterizations from former measurements, as well as with the canopy compensation point model, using parameterizations derived from the measurements. The apoplastic ratio of ammonium and hydrogen concentration (Γs=[NH4+]/[H+]) of 1200 estimated from the measurements is large for semi-natural vegetation, but smaller than indicated by previous measurements at this site.

  14. Poloidal inhomogeneity of the particle fluctuation induced fluxes near of the LCFS at lower hybrid heating and improved confinement transition at the FT-2 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashkul, S.I.; Altukhov, A.B.; Gurchenko, A.D.; Gusakov, E.Z.; Dyachenko, V.V.; Esipov, L.A.; Kantor, M.Y.; Kouprienko, D.V.; Stepanov, A.Y.; Sharpeonok, A.P.; Shatalin, S.V.; Vekshina, E.O.

    2004-01-01

    This paper present our observations and conclusions about development of the transport process at the plasma periphery of the small tokamak FT-2 during additional Lower Hybrid Heating (LHH), when external (ETB) transport barrier followed by Internal (ITB) transport barrier is observed. The peculiarities of the variations of the fluctuation fluxes near periphery are measured by three moveable multi-electrode Langmuir probes (L-probe) located in the same poloidal cross-section of the chamber. So the observed L-H transition and ETB formation after LHH and the associated negative E r rise result mainly from the decrease of the electron temperature (T e ) near inner region of the LCFS (last close flux surface) by greater extent than in SOL (scrape-off layer). This effect is stimulated by decrease of the input power and decrease of the radial correlation coefficient (for r equals 74-77 mm) (and radial particle fluctuation-induced Γ(t)) resulted from ITB formation mechanism during LHH. T e variation in the SOL after LH heating pulse takes place to a lesser extent. Observed non-monotonic radial profile of T e near LCFS with positive δT e /δr rise is kept constant obviously by large longitudinal conductivity and poloidal fluxes from the hotter limiter shadow regions because of the poloidal inhomogeneity of the T e (SOL) and n e (SOL). Such induced negative E r after RF pulse gives fast rise to a quasi-steady-state Γ 0 (t) drift fluxes with reversed direction structure, like 'zonal flows', which may inhibit transport across the flow. Large rise of grad(n e ) after LHH near LCFS with L-H transition is observed after the end of LH pulse for a long time - about 10-15 ms

  15. Impact of open-ocean convection on particle fluxes and sediment dynamics in the deep margin of the Gulf of Lions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Stabholz

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The deep outer margin of the Gulf of Lions and the adjacent basin, in the western Mediterranean Sea, are regularly impacted by open-ocean convection, a major hydrodynamic event responsible for the ventilation of the deep water in the western Mediterranean Basin. However, the impact of open-ocean convection on the flux and transport of particulate matter remains poorly understood. The variability of water mass properties (i.e., temperature and salinity, currents, and particle fluxes were monitored between September 2007 and April 2009 at five instrumented mooring lines deployed between 2050 and 2350-m depth in the deepest continental margin and adjacent basin. Four of the lines followed a NW–SE transect, while the fifth one was located on a sediment wave field to the west. The results of the main, central line SC2350 ("LION" located at 42°02.5′ N, 4°41′ E, at 2350-m depth, show that open-ocean convection reached mid-water depth (≈ 1000-m depth during winter 2007–2008, and reached the seabed (≈ 2350-m depth during winter 2008–2009. Horizontal currents were unusually strong with speeds up to 39 cm s−1 during winter 2008–2009. The measurements at all 5 different locations indicate that mid-depth and near-bottom currents and particle fluxes gave relatively consistent values of similar magnitude across the study area except during winter 2008–2009, when near-bottom fluxes abruptly increased by one to two orders of magnitude. Particulate organic carbon contents, which generally vary between 3 and 5%, were abnormally low (≤ 1% during winter 2008–2009 and approached those observed in surface sediments (≈ 0.6%. Turbidity profiles made in the region demonstrated the existence of a bottom nepheloid layer, several hundred meters thick, and related to the resuspension of bottom sediments. These observations support the view that open-ocean deep convection events in the Gulf of Lions can cause significant remobilization

  16. Solar energetic particle flux enhancement as a predictor of geomagnetic activity in a neural network-based model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valach, F.; Revallo, M.; Bochníček, Josef; Hejda, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 7, April (2009), S04004/1-S04004/7 ISSN 1542-7390 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA300120608; GA AV ČR 1QS300120506 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30120515 Keywords : neural networks * coronal mass ejections * energetic particles * flares * radio emissions * magnetic storms Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography Impact factor: 1.845, year: 2009

  17. Effect of asymmetric plasma potential in the SOL on the particle radial transport and heat flux broadening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Junichiro; Uesugi, Yoshihiko; Miura, Yukitoshi; Kawashima, Hisato.

    1997-01-01

    The effective divertor heat-load relaxation using ExB induced convective cells in the SOL is studied. The ExB convective cells in the SOL are generated by the toroidally asymmetric divertor biasing, which can control the local plasma potential in the SOL. The preliminary experiment has been done in the JFT-2M tokamak with poloidal divertor. The helical SOL current flows along the magnetic field between the locally biased inboard plate and grounded outer plates, thereby modifying plasma potential in the vicinity of the local divertor current flow. The generation of the poloidal electric field reaching up to 1.5kV/m locally in the SOL and the modification of the heat flux profile on the divertor plate is observed. (author)

  18. Characterization of injection instabilities in electrohydrodynamics by numerical modelling: comparison of particle in cell and flux corrected transport methods for electroconvection between two plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, P A; Georghiou, G E; Castellanos, A

    2006-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out for the characterization of injection instabilities in electrohydrodynamics and, in particular, the development of electroconvection between two parallel plates. The particle-in-cell and the finite element-flux corrected transport methods are used for the simulation of the test case, as they have proved very powerful and accurate in the solution of complex transport problems. Results are presented for unipolar injection (both strong and weak injections) between two plane electrodes immersed in a dielectric liquid, and the good agreement obtained by the two methods demonstrates not only their theoretical validity but also their practical ability to deal with transport problems in the presence of steep gradients. Some differences appear mainly in the prediction of small oscillations of the velocity and consequently of the electric current. These differences are highlighted and an explanation of their source is given

  19. Enhanced particle fluxes and heterotrophic bacterial activities in Gulf of Mexico bottom waters following storm-induced sediment resuspension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziervogel, K.; Dike, C.; Asper, V.; Montoya, J.; Battles, J.; D`souza, N.; Passow, U.; Diercks, A.; Esch, M.; Joye, S.; Dewald, C.; Arnosti, C.

    2016-07-01

    Bottom nepheloid layers (BNLs) in the deep sea transport and remobilize considerable amounts of particulate matter, enhancing microbial cycling of organic matter in cold, deep water environments. We measured bacterial abundance, bacterial protein production, and activities of hydrolytic enzymes within and above a BNL that formed in the deep Mississippi Canyon, northern Gulf of Mexico, shortly after Hurricane Isaac had passed over the study area in late August 2012. The BNL was detected via beam attenuation in CTD casts over an area of at least 3.5 km2, extending up to 200 m above the seafloor at a water depth of 1500 m. A large fraction of the suspended matter in the BNL consisted of resuspended sediments, as indicated by high levels of lithogenic material collected in near-bottom sediment traps shortly before the start of our sampling campaign. Observations of suspended particle abundance and sizes throughout the water column, using a combined camera-CTD system (marine snow camera, MSC), revealed the presence of macroaggregates (>1 mm in diameter) within the BNL, indicating resuspension of canyon sediments. A distinct bacterial response to enhanced particle concentrations within the BNL was evident from the observation that the highest enzymatic activities (peptidase, β-glucosidase) and protein production (3H-leucine incorporation) were found within the most particle rich sections of the BNL. To investigate the effects of enhanced particle concentrations on bacterial activities in deep BNLs more directly, we conducted laboratory experiments with roller bottles filled with bottom water and amended with experimentally resuspended sediments from the study area. Macroaggregates formed within 1 day from resuspended sediments; by day 4 of the incubation bacterial cell numbers in treatments with resuspended sediments were more than twice as high as in those lacking sediment suspensions. Cell-specific enzymatic activities were also generally higher in the sediment

  20. Particle Fluxes and Bulk Geochemical Characterization of the Cabo Frio Upwelling System in Southeastern Brazil: Sediment Trap Experiments between Spring 2010 and Summer 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA LUIZA S. ALBUQUERQUE

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical and biogeochemical processes in continental shelves act synergistically in both transporting and transforming suspended material, and ocean dynamics control the dispersion of particles by the coastal zone and their subsequent mixing and dilution within the shelf area constrained by oceanic boundary currents, followed by their gradual settling in a complex sedimentary scenario. One of these regions is the Cabo Frio Upwelling System located in a significantly productive area of Southeastern Brazil, under the control of the nutrient-poor western boundary Brazil Current but also with a wind-driven coastal upwelling zone, inducing cold-water intrusions of South Atlantic Central Water on the shelf. To understand these synergic interactions among physical and biogeochemical processes in the Cabo Frio shelf, a series of four experiments with a total of 98 discrete samples using sediment traps was performed from November 2010 to March 2012, located on the 145 m isobath on the edge of the continental shelf. The results showed that lateral transport might be relevant in some cases, especially in deep layers, although no clear seasonal cycle was detected. Two main physical-geochemical coupling scenarios were identified: singular downwelling events that can enhance particles fluxes and are potentially related to the Brazil Current oscillations; and events of significant fluxes related to the intrusion of the 18°C isotherm in the euphotic zone. The particulate matter settling in the Cabo Frio shelf area seems to belong to multiple marine and terrestrial sources, in which both Paraiba do Sul River and Guanabara Bay could be potential land-sources, although the particulate material might subject intense transformation (diagenesis during its trajectory to the shelf edge.

  1. Particle Fluxes and Bulk Geochemical Characterization of the Cabo Frio Upwelling System in Southeastern Brazil: Sediment Trap Experiments between Spring 2010 and Summer 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Ana Luiza S; Belém, André L; Zuluaga, Francisco J B; Cordeiro, Livia G M; Mendoza, Ursula; Knoppers, Bastiaan A; Gurgel, Marcio H C; Meyers, Philip A; Capilla, Ramsés

    2014-05-14

    Physical and biogeochemical processes in continental shelves act synergistically in both transporting and transforming suspended material, and ocean dynamics control the dispersion of particles by the coastal zone and their subsequent mixing and dilution within the shelf area constrained by oceanic boundary currents, followed by their gradual settling in a complex sedimentary scenario. One of these regions is the Cabo Frio Upwelling System located in a significantly productive area of Southeastern Brazil, under the control of the nutrient-poor western boundary Brazil Current but also with a wind-driven coastal upwelling zone, inducing cold-water intrusions of South Atlantic Central Water on the shelf. To understand these synergic interactions among physical and biogeochemical processes in the Cabo Frio shelf, a series of four experiments with a total of 98 discrete samples using sediment traps was performed from November 2010 to March 2012, located on the 145 m isobath on the edge of the continental shelf. The results showed that lateral transport might be relevant in some cases, especially in deep layers, although no clear seasonal cycle was detected. Two main physical-geochemical coupling scenarios were identified: singular downwelling events that can enhance particles fluxes and are potentially related to the Brazil Current oscillations; and events of significant fluxes related to the intrusion of the 18°C isotherm in the euphotic zone. The particulate matter settling in the Cabo Frio shelf area seems to belong to multiple marine and terrestrial sources, in which both Paraiba do Sul River and Guanabara Bay could be potential land-sources, although the particulate material might subject intense transformation (diagenesis) during its trajectory to the shelf edge.

  2. Analysis of the Variation of Energetic Electron Flux with Respect to Longitude and Distance Normal to the Magnetic Equatorial Plane for Galileo Energetic Particle Detector Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swimm, R.; Garrett, H. B.; Jun, I.; Evans, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    In this study we examine ten-minute omni-directional averages of energetic electron data measured by the Galileo spacecraft Energetic Particle Detector (EPD). Count rates from electron channels B1, DC2, and DC3 are evaluated using a power law model to yield estimates of the differential electron fluxes from 1 MeV to 11 MeV at distances from the planet Jupiter from 8 to 28 Jupiter radii. Whereas the orbit of the Galileo spacecraft remained close to the rotational equatorial plane of Jupiter, the approximately 11 degree tilt of the magnetic axis of Jupiter relative to its rotational axis allowed the EPD instrument to sample high energy electrons at limited distances normal to the magnetic equatorial plane. We present a Fourier analysis of the semi-diurnal variation of electron radiation with longitude. We also develop a model of the electron flux with respect to distance normal to the magnetic equatorial plane as a function of the distance from Jupiter.

  3. Effects of particle size and dry matter content of a total mixed ration on intraruminal equilibration and net portal flux of volatile fatty acids in lactating dairy cows

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Adam Christian; Kristensen, Niels Bastian

    2010-01-01

    Effects of physical changes in consistency of ruminal contents on intraruminal equilibration and net portal fluxes of volatile fatty acids (VFA) in dairy cows were studied. Four Danish Holstein cows (121 ± 17 d in milk, 591 ± 24 kg of body weight, mean ± SD) surgically fitted with a ruminal cannula...... and permanent indwelling catheters in the major splanchnic blood vessels were used. The experimental design was a 4 × 4 Latin square with a 2 × 2 factorial design of treatments. Treatments differed in forage (grass hay) particle size (FPS; 3.0 and 30 mm) and feed dry matter (DM) content of the total mixed...... ration (44.3 and 53.8%). The feed DM did not affect chewing time, ruminal variables, or net portal flux of VFA. However, decreasing the FPS decreased the overall chewing and rumination times by 151 ± 55 and 135 ± 29 min/d, respectively. No effect of the reduced chewing time was observed on ruminal p...

  4. Active particle control experiments and critical particle flux discriminating between the wall pumping and fuelling in the compact plasma wall interaction device CPD spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zushi, H.; Sakamoto, M.; Yoshinaga, T.; Higashizono, Y.; Hanada, K.; Yoshida, N.; Tokunaga, K.; Kawasaki, S.; Sato, K. N.; Nakamura, K.; Idei, H.; Hirooka, Y.; Bhattacharyay, R.; Okamoto, K.; Miyazaki, T.; Honma, H.; Nakashima, Y.; Nishino, N.; Kado, S.; Shikama, T.

    2009-01-01

    Two approaches associated with wall recycling have been performed in a small spherical tokamak device CPD (compact plasma wall interaction experimental device), that is, (1) demonstration of active particle recycling control, namely, 'active wall pumping' using a rotating poloidal limiter whose surface is continuously gettered by lithium and (2) a basic study of the key parameters which discriminates between 'wall pumping and fuelling'. For the former, active control of 'wall pumping' has been demonstrated during 50 kW RF current drive discharges whose pulse length is typically ∼300 ms. Although the rotating limiter is located at the outer board, as soon as the rotating drum is gettered with lithium, hydrogen recycling measured with H α spectroscopy decreases by about a factor of 3 not only near the limiter but also in the centre stack region. Also, the oxygen impurity level measured with O II spectroscopy is reduced by about a factor of 3. As a consequence of the reduced recycling and impurity level, RF driven current has nearly doubled at the same vertical magnetic field. For the latter, global plasma wall interaction with plasma facing components in the vessel is studied in a simple torus produced by electron cyclotron waves with I p -4 to ∼0.1 x 10 -4 Torr during the experimental campaign (∼3000 shots). In the wall pumping pressure range the wall pumping fraction is reduced with increasing surface temperature up to 150 deg. C.

  5. The Real-Time Data Analysis and Decision System for Particle Flux Detection in the LHC Accelerator at CERN.

    CERN Document Server

    Zamantzas, C; Dehning, B

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) under construction at the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN) is an accelerator unprecedented in terms of beam energy, particle production rate and also in the potential of self-destruction. Its operation requires a large variety of instrumentation, not only for the control of the beams, but also for the protection of the complex hardware systems. The Beam Loss Monitoring (BLM) system has to prevent the superconducting magnets from becoming normal conducting and protect the machine components against damages making it one of the most critical elements for the protection of the LHC. For its operation, the system requires 3600 detectors to be placed at various locations around the 27 km ring. The measurement system is sub-divided to the tunnel electronics, which are responsible for acquiring, digitising and transmitting the data, and the surface electronics, which receive the data via 2 km optical data links, process, analyze, store and issue warning...

  6. Magnetized retarding field energy analyzer measuring the particle flux and ion energy distribution of both positive and negative ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rafalskyi, Dmytro; Aanesland, Ane; Dudin, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the development of a magnetized retarding field energy analyzer (MRFEA) used for positive and negative ion analysis. The two-stage analyzer combines a magnetic electron barrier and an electrostatic ion energy barrier allowing both positive and negative ions to be analyzed without the influence of electrons (co-extracted or created downstream). An optimal design of the MRFEA for ion-ion beams has been achieved by a comparative study of three different MRFEA configurations, and from this, scaling laws of an optimal magnetic field strength and topology have been deduced. The optimal design consists of a uniform magnetic field barrier created in a rectangular channel and an electrostatic barrier consisting of a single grid and a collector placed behind the magnetic field. The magnetic barrier alone provides an electron suppression ratio inside the analyzer of up to 6000, while keeping the ion energy resolution below 5 eV. The effective ion transparency combining the magnetic and electrostatic sections of the MRFEA is measured as a function of the ion energy. It is found that the ion transparency of the magnetic barrier increases almost linearly with increasing ion energy in the low-energy range (below 200 eV) and saturates at high ion energies. The ion transparency of the electrostatic section is almost constant and close to the optical transparency of the entrance grid. We show here that the MRFEA can provide both accurate ion flux and ion energy distribution measurements in various experimental setups with ion beams or plasmas run at low pressure and with ion energies above 10 eV

  7. DNA-based molecular fingerprinting of eukaryotic protists and cyanobacteria contributing to sinking particle flux at the Bermuda Atlantic time-series study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amacher, Jessica; Neuer, Susanne; Lomas, Michael

    2013-09-01

    We used denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) to examine the protist and cyanobacterial communities in the euphotic zone (0-120 m) and in corresponding 150 m particle interceptor traps at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) in a two-year monthly time-series from May 2008 to April 2010. Dinoflagellates were the most commonly detected taxa in both water column and trap samples throughout the time series. Diatom sequences were found only eight times in the water column, and only four times in trap material. Small-sized eukaryotic taxa, including the prasinophyte genera Ostreococcus, Micromonas, and Bathycoccus, were present in trap samples, as were the cyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. Synechococcus was usually overrepresented in trap material, whereas Prochlorococcus was underrepresented compared to the water column. Both seasonal and temporal variability affected patterns of ribosomal DNA found in sediment traps. The two years of this study were quite different hydrographically, with higher storm activity and the passing of a cyclonic eddy causing unusually deep mixing in winter 2010. This was reflected in the DGGE fingerprints of the water column, which showed greater phylotype richness of eukaryotes and a lesser richness of cyanobacteria in winter of 2010 compared with the winter of 2009. Increases in eukaryotic richness could be traced to increased diversity of prasinophytes and prymnesiophytes. The decrease in cyanobacterial richness was in turn reflected in the trap composition, but the increase in eukaryotes was not, indicating a disproportionate contribution of certain taxa to sinking particle flux.

  8. Electrostatic fluctuation and fluctuation-induced particle flux during formation of the edge transport barrier in the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, T.; Hamada, Y.; Nagashima, Y.; Nishizawa, A.; Kawasumi, Y.; Miura, Y.; Hoshino, K.; Ogawa, H.; Shinohara, K.; Kamiya, K.; Kusama, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The electrostatic fluctuation with Geodesic-Acoustic-Mode (GAM) frequency is observed in L-mode plasmas. The fluctuation has the poloidal wave number (k θ ) of (-2 ± 24) x 10 -3 (cm -1 ), that corresponds to the poloidal mode number of 1.5 or less, and the radial wave number (k r ) of 0.94 ± 0.05 (cm -1 ), that is corresponds to k r ρ i = 0.26 < 1. The amplitude of the fluctuation changes in the radial direction; it is small near the separatrix and it has maximum at 3 cm inside the separatrix. The relation between the amplitude of potential fluctuation and that of density fluctuation is the same as that of the predicted GAM. The fluctuation is probably GAM. The envelope of ambient density fluctuation and the potential fluctuation have a significant coherence at the GAM frequency. Thus, it is clearly verified that the fluctuation with the GAM frequency correlates with the ambient density fluctuation. The fluctuation with the GAM frequency affects the particle transport through the modulation of the ambient fluctuation. But the effect is not large, and it is not a sufficient condition to form the edge transport barrier and to drive the intermittent particle flux. (author)

  9. Electrostatic fluctuation and fluctuation-induced particle flux during formation of the edge transport barrier in the JFT-2M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ido, T.; Miura, K.; Hoshino, K.

    2005-01-01

    The electrostatic fluctuation with Geodesic-Acoustic-Mode (GAM) frequency is observed in L-mode plasmas. The fluctuation has the poloidal wave number (k θ ) of (-2 ± 24) x 10 -3 (cm -1 ), that corresponds to the poloidal mode number of 1.5 or less, and the radial wave number (k γ ) of 0.94±0.05 (cm -1 ), that is corresponds to k γ ρ i =0.26 < 1. The amplitude of the fluctuation changes in the radial direction; it is small near the separatrix and it has maximum at 3 cm inside the separatrix. The relation between the amplitude of potential fluctuation and that of density fluctuation is the same as that of the predicted GAM. The fluctuation is probably GAM. The envelope of ambient density fluctuation and the potential fluctuation have a significant coherence at the GAM frequency. Thus, it is clearly verified that the fluctuation with the GAM frequency correlates with the ambient density fluctuation. The fluctuation with the GAM frequency affects the particle transport through the modulation of the ambient fluctuation. But the effect is not large, and it is not a sufficient condition to form the edge transport barrier and to drive the intermittent particle flux. (author)

  10. ESCAPING PARTICLE FLUXES IN THE ATMOSPHERES OF CLOSE-IN EXOPLANETS. II. REDUCED MASS-LOSS RATES AND ANISOTROPIC WINDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    In Paper I, we presented a one-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the winds of close-in exoplanets. However, close-in exoplanets are tidally locked and irradiated only on the day sides by their host stars. This requires two-dimensional hydrodynamic models with self-consistent radiative transfer calculations. In this paper, for the tidal-locking (two-dimensional radiative transfer) and non-tidal-locking cases (one-dimensional radiative transfer), we constructed a multi-fluid two-dimensional hydrodynamic model with detailed radiative transfer to depict the escape of particles. We found that the tidal forces (the sum of tidal gravity of the star and centrifugal force due to the planetary rotation) supply significant accelerations and result in anisotropic winds. An important effect of the tidal forces is that it severely depresses the outflow of particles near the polar regions where the density and the radial velocity are a factor of a few (ten) smaller than those of the low-latitude regions. As a consequence, most particles escape the surface of the planet from the regions of low latitude. Comparing the tidal-locking and non-tidal-locking cases, we found that their optical depths are very different so that the flows also emerge with a different pattern. In the case of non-tidal locking, the radial velocities at the base of the wind are higher than the meridional velocities. However, in the case of tidal locking, the meridional velocities dominate the flow at the base of the wind, and they can effectively transfer mass and energy from the day sides to the night sides. Further, we also found that the differences of the winds show a middle extent at large radii. This means that the structure of the wind at the base can be changed by the two-dimensional radiative transfer due to large optical depths, but the extent is reduced with an increase in radius. Because the escape is depressed in the polar regions, the mass-loss rate predicted by the non-tidal-locking model, in

  11. In situ measurement of mesopelagic particle sinking rates and the control of carbon transfer to the ocean interior during the Vertical Flux in the Global Ocean (VERTIGO) voyages in the North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trull, T. W.; Bray, S. G.; Buesseler, K. O.; Lamborg, C. H.; Manganini, S.; Moy, C.; Valdes, J.

    2008-07-01

    Among the parameters affecting carbon transfer to the ocean interior, particle sinking rates vary three orders of magnitude and thus more than primary production, f-ratios, or particle carbon contents [e.g., Boyd, P.W., Trull, T.W., 2006. Understanding the export of marine biogenic particles: is there consensus? Progress in Oceanography 4, 276-312, doi:10.1016/j.pocean.2006.10.007]. Very few data have been obtained from the mesopelagic zone where the majority of carbon remineralization occurs and the attenuation of the sinking flux is determined. Here, we report sinking rates from ˜300 m depth for the subtropical (station ALOHA, June 2004) and subarctic (station K2, July 2005) North Pacific Ocean, obtained from short (6.5 day) deployments of an indented rotating sphere (IRS) sediment trap operating as an in situ settling column [Peterson, M.L., Wakeham, S.G., Lee, C., Askea, M.A., Miquel, J.C., 2005. Novel techniques for collection of sinking particles in the ocean and determining their settling rates. Limnology and Oceanography Methods 3, 520-532] to separate the flux into 11 sinking-rate fractions ranging from >820 to >2 m d -1 that are collected by a carousel for further analysis. Functioning of the IRS trap was tested using a novel programming sequence to check that all particles have cleared the settling column prior to the next delivery of particles by the 6-hourly rotation cycle of the IRS. There was some evidence (from the flux distribution among the cups and photomicroscopy of the collected particles) that very slow-sinking particles may have been under-collected because they were unable to penetrate the brine-filled collection cups, but good evidence for appropriate collection of fast-settling fractions. Approximately 50% of the particulate organic carbon (POC) flux was sinking at greater than 100 m d -1 at both stations. At ALOHA, more than 15% of the POC flux sank at >820 m d -1, but low fluxes make this uncertain, and precluded resolution of particles

  12. Primary cosmic ray flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanev, Todor

    2001-05-01

    We discuss the primary cosmic ray flux from the point of view of particle interactions and production of atmospheric neutrinos. The overall normalization of the cosmic ray flux and its time variations and site dependence are major ingredients of the atmospheric neutrino predictions and the basis for the derivation of the neutrino oscillation parameters.

  13. [Theory of elementary particle studies in weak iteration and grand unification and studies in accelerator design]: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, N.G.

    1987-01-01

    This paper discusses the work done in high energy physics at the University of Oregon over the post year. Some of the topics briefly discussed are: string phenomenology, horizontal symmetry, heavy quark decays, neutrino counting and new quarks and leptons, treatment of heavy particles and w-bosons as constituents of hadrons, higher twist corrections to heavy particle production, factorization in the Drell-Yan process, jets and compositeness at the SSC, minimum-bias physics in hadronic collisions, and quark-gluon plasma

  14. A hybrid self-adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization–Genetic Algorithm–Radial Basis Function model for annual electricity demand prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shiwei; Wang, Ke; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid self-adaptive PSO–GA-RBF model is proposed for electricity demand prediction. • Each mixed-coding particle is composed by two coding parts of binary and real. • Five independent variables have been selected to predict future electricity consumption in Wuhan. • The proposed model has a simpler structure or higher estimating precision than other ANN models. • No matter what the scenario, the electricity consumption of Wuhan will grow rapidly. - Abstract: The present study proposes a hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization and Genetic Algorithm optimized Radial Basis Function (PSO–GA-RBF) neural network for prediction of annual electricity demand. In the model, each mixed-coding particle (or chromosome) is composed of two coding parts, binary and real, which optimizes the structure of the RBF by GA operation and the parameters of the basis and weights by a PSO–GA implementation. Five independent variables have been selected to predict future electricity consumption in Wuhan by using optimized networks. The results shows that (1) the proposed PSO–GA-RBF model has a simpler network structure (fewer hidden neurons) or higher estimation precision than other selected ANN models; and (2) no matter what the scenario, the electricity consumption of Wuhan will grow rapidly at average annual growth rates of about 9.7–11.5%. By 2020, the electricity demand in the planning scenario, the highest among the scenarios, will be 95.85 billion kW h. The lowest demand is estimated for the business-as-usual scenario, and will be 88.45 billion kW h

  15. Particle detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Charpak, G.

    2000-01-01

    In this article G.Charpak presents the principles on which particle detection is based. Particle accelerators are becoming more and more powerful and require new detectors able to track the right particle in a huge flux of particles. The gigantic size of detectors in high energy physics is often due to the necessity of getting a long enough trajectory in a magnetic field in order to deduce from the curvature an accurate account of impulses in the reaction. (A.C.)

  16. Development of Improved Models and Designs for Coated-Particle Gas Reactor Fuels (I-NERI Annual Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petti, David Andrew; Maki, John Thomas; Languille, Alain; Martin, Philippe; Ballinger, Ronald

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this INERI project is to develop improved fuel behavior models for gas reactor coated particle fuels and to develop improved coated-particle fuel designs that can be used reliably at very high burnups and potentially in fast gas-cooled reactors. Thermomechanical, thermophysical, and physiochemical material properties data were compiled by both the US and the French and preliminary assessments conducted. Comparison between U.S. and European data revealed many similarities and a few important differences. In all cases, the data needed for accurate fuel performance modeling of coated particle fuel at high burnup were lacking. The development of the INEEL fuel performance model, PARFUME, continued from earlier efforts. The statistical model being used to simulate the detailed finite element calculations is being upgraded and improved to allow for changes in fuel design attributes (e.g. thickness of layers, dimensions of kernel) as well as changes in important material properties to increase the flexibility of the code. In addition, modeling of other potentially important failure modes such as debonding and asphericity was started. A paper on the status of the model was presented at the HTR-2002 meeting in Petten, Netherlands in April 2002, and a paper on the statistical method was submitted to the Journal of Nuclear Material in September 2002. Benchmarking of the model against Japanese and an older DRAGON irradiation are planned. Preliminary calculations of the stresses in a coated particle have been calculated by the CEA using the ATLAS finite element model. This model and the material properties and constitutive relationships will be incorporated into a more general software platform termed Pleiades. Pleiades will be able to analyze different fuel forms at different scales (from particle to fuel body) and also handle the statistical variability in coated particle fuel. Diffusion couple experiments to study Ag and Pd transport through SiC were

  17. Seasonal and annual variation in planktonic foraminiferal fluxes including warm period related El Niño in the northwestern North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroyanagi, A.; Kawahata, H.; Nishi, H.; Honda, M. C.

    2007-12-01

    Planktonic foraminifera provide a record of the upper ocean environment through their species assemblage and individual tests. To investigate the relationship between foraminifera and oceanographic conditions and the impact of El Niño on foraminifera, we analyzed foraminiferal fluxes and relative abundances by using sediment trap samples collected biweekly at three sites in the northwestern North Pacific: Site 40N (39 °60'N, 165 °00'E), Site KNOT (43 °58'N, 155 °03'E), and Site 50N (50 °01'N, 165 °02'E) from 1998- 2001, a period that included an El Niño effect. Based on foraminiferal production and assemblage composition, we divided the sampling duration into several periods during which certain characteristic oceanographic properties were observed. These sampling periods were classified into five types (I-V) based upon four factors: 1) the predominant foraminiferal group, 2) total foraminiferal fluxes (TFFs), 3) organic matter (OM) fluxes, and 4) hydrographic conditions, which included sea surface temperature (SST) and thermal structure. Our results suggest that seasonal changes in foraminifera were closely related to water mass properties in addition to SST. If species compositions were the same, then water mass properties were the most important factors affecting the seasonal variation of foraminiferal abundance in the northwestern North Pacific. Although one of the major controlling factors for foraminiferal fluxes is food availability, the controlling factors for each type (types I-V) are different because of specific oceanographic situations, such as phytoplankton blooms, which result in an excess food supply for foraminifera. At Site KNOT in 1998, SST was remarkably high because of El Niño, and high surface temperatures and weak winds would have lowered nutrient supply and intensified water column stratification, resulting in the relatively low fluxes of total foraminifera, N. pachyderma, and G. bulloides, and the high fluxes of N. dutertrei that

  18. Annual variability in light absorption by particles and colored dissolved organic matter in the Crimean coastal waters (the Black Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churilova, T.; Moiseeva, N.; Efimova, T.; Suslin, V.; Krivenko, O.; Zemlianskaia, E.

    2017-11-01

    Bio-optical studies were carried out in coastal waters around the Crimea peninsula in different seasons 2016. It was shown that variability of chlorophyll a concentration (Chl-a), light absorption by suspended particles (ap(λ)), phytoplankton pigments (aph(λ)), non-algal particles (aNAP(λ)) and by colored dissolved organic matter (aCDOM(λ)) in the Crimea coastal water was high ( order of magnitudes) in all seasons 2016. Relationships between ap(440), aph(440) and Chl-a were obtained and their seasonal differences were analyzed. Spectral distribution of aNAP(λ) and aCDOM(λ) were parameterized. Seasonality in aCDOM(λ) parameterization was revealed, but - in aNAP(λ) parameterization was not revealed. The budget of light absorption by aph(λ), aNAP(λ) i aCDOM(λ) at 440 nm was assessed and its seasonal dynamics was analyzed.

  19. Particle dynamics in a wave with variable amplitude: Annual progress report, August 1, 1987-April 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cary, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of accelerator systems via newly developed techniques of nonlinear dynamics has been carried out. The study of transport through phase psace over the last year has clarified the effects of correlations on the dynamics of systems with slow chaos. An analytic alculation of the relation between the phases between separatrix crossings allows more accurate calculation of the rate of diffusion for particle throughout phase space. Numerical calculations show nevertheless that predictions obtained by the neglect of correlations are qualitatively correct. A new method for obtaining the dynamic apeture in accelerators has also been developed. The results from analyzing one-dimensional systems are encouraging. 11 refs., 3 figs

  20. Turbulence and wave particle interactions in solar-terrestrial plasmas. Annual Status Report, 1 July 1983-30 June 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dulk, G.A.; Goldman, M.V.; Toomre, J.

    1985-01-01

    Activities in the following study areas are reported: (1) particle and wave processes in solar flares; (2) solar convection zone turbulence; and (3) solar radiation emission. To investigate the amplification of cyclotron maser radiation in solar flares, a radio frequency. (RF) heating model was developed for the corona surrounding the energy release site. Then nonlinear simulations of compressible convection display prominent penetration by plumes into regions of stable stratification at the base of the solar convection zone, leading to the excitation of internal gravity waves there. Lastly, linear saturation of electron-beam-driven Langmuir waves by ambient density fluctuations, nonlinear saturation by strong turbulence processes, and radiation emission mechanisms are examined. An additional section discusses solar magnetic fields and hydromagnetic waves in inhomogeneous media, and the effect of magnetic fields on stellar oscillation

  1. Development of methodics for the characterization of the composition of the ion-collision-induced secondary-particle flux by comparison of the yield contributions of photoinduced ion formation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vering, Guido

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to distinguish between different ion formation processes and to determine the influence of these processes on the total number of detected monatomic ions of a certain element. A vector/matrix-formalism was developed, which describes the physical processes of sputtering, ion formation, mass separation and detection in laser-SNMS. In the framework of the method developed, based on this theoretic formalism, changes in the secondary flux contribution of the respective element were observed by comparing the detected monatomic ion yield obtained in specifically aligned (SIMS and) laser-SNMS experiments. The yields resulting from these experiments were used to calculate characteristic numbers to compare the flux composition from different surfaces. The potential of the method was demonstrated for the elements boron, iron and gadolinium by investigating the changes in the flux composition of secondary particles sputtered from metallic surfaces, as a function of the oxygen concentration at the surface. Finally, combined laser-SNMS depth profiles and images, obtained with both laser systems, were presented to demonstrate how the parallel detection of the three differently originated ion signals of the same element can be used to get additional information about the composition of the flux of secondary particles synchronously during the analysis of elemental distributions. In this respect the presented method can be a very helpful tool to prevent misleading interpretations of SIMS or laser-SNMS data. (orig.)

  2. Insignificant enhancement of export flux in the highly productive subtropical front, east of New Zealand: a high resolution study of particle export fluxes based on 234Th: 238U disequilibria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Hall

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the export fluxes of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC in the Subtropical Frontal zone (STF of the SW Pacific sector of the Southern Ocean. The site is characterized by enhanced primary productivity, which has been suggested to be stimulated through so-called natural iron fertilization processes where iron-depleted subantarctic water (SAW mixes with mesotrophic, iron-replete subtropical water (STW. We adopted the small-volume 234Th method to achieve the highest possible spatial sampling resolution in austral late autumn-early winter, May–June, 2008. Inventories of chlorophyll-a, particulate 234Th and POC observed in the upper 100 m were all elevated in the mid-salinity water type (34.5 34.8 salinity waters which were of STW origin with low macronutrients. However, Steady-State 234Th fluxes were similar across the salinity gradient being, 25 ± 0.78 ((1.5 ± 0.047 × 103 in the mid-salinity, and 29 ± 0.53 ((1.8 ± 0.032 × 103 and 22 ± 1.1 Bq m−2 d−1 ((1.3 ± 0.066 × 103 dpm m−2 d–1 in the high and low salinity waters respectively. Bottle POC/Th ratios at the depth of 100 m were used to convert 234Th fluxes into POC export fluxes. The derived POC flux did not appear to be enhanced in mid-salinity waters where the primary productivity was inferred to be the highest at the time of sampling, with a flux of 11 ± 0.45 mmol C m−2 d−1, compared to 14 ± 0.39 mmol C m−2 d−1 in high salinity waters and 8.5 ± 0.66 mmol C m−2 d−1 in low salinity waters. This study thus implied that natural iron fertilization does not necessarily lead to an enhancement of POC export in STF regions.

  3. Lithogenic and biogenic particle deposition in an Antarctic coastal environment (Marian Cove, King George Island): Seasonal patterns from a sediment trap study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khim, B. K.; Shim, J.; Yoon, H. I.; Kang, Y. C.; Jang, Y. H.

    2007-06-01

    Particulate suspended material was recovered over a 23-month period using two sediment traps deployed in shallow water (˜30 m deep) off the King Sejong Station located in Marian Cove of King George Island, West Antarctica. Variability in seasonal flux and geochemical characteristics of the sediment particles highlights seasonal patterns of sedimentation of both lithogenic (terrigenous) and biogenic particles in the coastal glaciomarine environment. All components including total mass flux, lithogenic particle flux and biogenic particle flux show distinct seasonal variation, with high recovery rates during the summer and low rates under winter fast ice. The major contributor to total mass flux is the lithogenic component, comprising from 88% during the summer months (about 21 g m -2 d -1) up to 97% during the winter season (about 2 g m -2 d -1). The lithogenic particle flux depends mainly on the amount of snow-melt (snow accumulation) delivered into the coastal region as well as on the resuspension of sedimentary materials. These fine-grained lithogenic particles are silt-to-clay sized, composed mostly of clay minerals weathered on King George Island. Biogenic particle flux is also seasonal. Winter flux is ˜0.2 g m -2 d -1, whereas the summer contribution increases more than tenfold, up to 2.6 g m -2 d -1. Different biogenic flux between the two summers indicates inter-annual variability to the spring-summer phytoplankton bloom. The maximum of lithogenic particle flux occurs over a short period of time, and follows the peak of biogenic particle flux, which lasts longer. The seasonal warming and sea-ice retreat result in change in seawater nutrient status and subsequent ice-edge phytoplankton production. Meanwhile, the meltwater input to Marian Cove from the coastal drainage in January to February plays a major role in transporting lithogenic particles into the shallow water environment, although the tidal currents may be the main agents of resuspension in this

  4. A program of data synthesis from the ALSEP/CPLEE ALSEP/SIDE, and Explorer 35 magnetometer to investigate lunar terminator and nightside particle fluxes and surface interactions. Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reasoner, D.L.

    1976-01-01

    Lunar nightside electron fluxes were studied with the aid of the ALSEP/CPLEE and other instruments. The flux events were shown to be due to (a) electrons propagating upstream from the earth's bow shock, (b) electrons thermalized and scattered to the lunar surface by disturbances along the boundary of the lunar solarwind cavity, and (c) solar wind electrons scattered to the lunar surface by lunar limb shocks and/or compressional disturbances. These electrons were identified as a cause of the high night surface negative potentials observed in tha ALSEP/SIDE ion data. A study was also made of the shadowing of magnetotail plasma sheet electrons by interactions between the lunar body and the ambient magnetic field and by interactions between charged particles and lunar remnant magnetic fields. These shadowing effects were shown to modify lunar surface and near-lunar potential distributions. (Author)

  5. Multi-year Estimates of Methane Fluxes in Alaska from an Atmospheric Inverse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, S. M.; Commane, R.; Chang, R. Y. W.; Miller, C. E.; Michalak, A. M.; Dinardo, S. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Hartery, S.; Karion, A.; Lindaas, J.; Sweeney, C.; Wofsy, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    We estimate methane fluxes across Alaska over a multi-year period using observations from a three-year aircraft campaign, the Carbon Arctic Reservoirs Vulnerability Experiment (CARVE). Existing estimates of methane from Alaska and other Arctic regions disagree in both magnitude and distribution, and before the CARVE campaign, atmospheric observations in the region were sparse. We combine these observations with an atmospheric particle trajectory model and a geostatistical inversion to estimate surface fluxes at the model grid scale. We first use this framework to estimate the spatial distribution of methane fluxes across the state. We find the largest fluxes in the south-east and North Slope regions of Alaska. This distribution is consistent with several estimates of wetland extent but contrasts with the distribution in most existing flux models. These flux models concentrate methane in warmer or more southerly regions of Alaska compared to the estimate presented here. This result suggests a discrepancy in how existing bottom-up models translate wetland area into methane fluxes across the state. We next use the inversion framework to explore inter-annual variability in regional-scale methane fluxes for 2012-2014. We examine the extent to which this variability correlates with weather or other environmental conditions. These results indicate the possible sensitivity of wetland fluxes to near-term variability in climate.

  6. [Elementary particle physics. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izen, J.M.; Lou, X.

    1998-01-01

    The BABAR construction phase is ending and first data is expected during May, 1999. During construction, UTD has developed analysis framework software, contributed to the BABAR Physics Book, assembled a first rate computing facility, and pioneered Internet-based video techniques for the collaboration. The authors are now defining the physics goals, and are participating in the formation physics analysis groups. They are starting to use their computing facility for BABAR production jobs

  7. Correlation of variations of charged particle fluxes in the flare on 3 November, 1973 with change of parameters of interplanetary medium according to the data of the ''Mars-7'' automatic interplanetary station and ''Prognoz-3'' artificial Earth's satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuzhevskij, B.M.; Mineev, Yu.V.; Savenko, I.A.; Spir'kova, E.S.; Surova, G.M.; ShestopaloV, I.P.

    1979-01-01

    The experimental data on the charged particle fluxes in the flare on the 3d of November, 1973 are analyzed. The experiments were carried out at the ''Prognoz-3'' artificial Earth satellite and ''Mars-7'' automatic interplanetary station with the help of devices recorded Esub(e) >= 30 keV energy electrons, 1 <= Esub(p) <= 5 MeV energy protons and 1-150 MeV energy protons. Presented are the data on variations of the intensity of cosmic ray particles which are compared with the data on interplanetary magnetic fields. The character of proton and electron intensity variations is explained by the change of interplanetary medium parameters. It is supposed that the electron splashes and proton intensity variations recorded at the satellites are conditioned by the sign change of the interplanetary magnetic field

  8. Australian methane fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, D.J.

    1990-01-01

    Estimates are provided for the amount of methane emitted annually into the atmosphere in Australia for a variety of sources. The sources considered are coal mining, landfill, motor vehicles, natural gas suply system, rice paddies, bushfires, termites, wetland and animals. This assessment indicates that the major sources of methane are natural or agricultural in nature and therefore offer little scope for reduction. Nevertheless the remainder are not trival and reduction of these fluxes could play a significant part in any Australian action on the greenhouse problem. 19 refs., 7 tabs., 1 fig

  9. How Choice of Depth Horizon Influences the Estimated Spatial Patterns and Global Magnitude of Ocean Carbon Export Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palevsky, Hilary I.; Doney, Scott C.

    2018-05-01

    Estimated rates and efficiency of ocean carbon export flux are sensitive to differences in the depth horizons used to define export, which often vary across methodological approaches. We evaluate sinking particulate organic carbon (POC) flux rates and efficiency (e-ratios) in a global earth system model, using a range of commonly used depth horizons: the seasonal mixed layer depth, the particle compensation depth, the base of the euphotic zone, a fixed depth horizon of 100 m, and the maximum annual mixed layer depth. Within this single dynamically consistent model framework, global POC flux rates vary by 30% and global e-ratios by 21% across different depth horizon choices. Zonal variability in POC flux and e-ratio also depends on the export depth horizon due to pronounced influence of deep winter mixing in subpolar regions. Efforts to reconcile conflicting estimates of export need to account for these systematic discrepancies created by differing depth horizon choices.

  10. Monte Carlo surface flux tallies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2010-01-01

    Particle fluxes on surfaces are difficult to calculate with Monte Carlo codes because the score requires a division by the surface-crossing angle cosine, and grazing angles lead to inaccuracies. We revisit the standard practice of dividing by half of a cosine 'cutoff' for particles whose surface-crossing cosines are below the cutoff. The theory behind this approximation is sound, but the application of the theory to all possible situations does not account for two implicit assumptions: (1) the grazing band must be symmetric about 0, and (2) a single linear expansion for the angular flux must be applied in the entire grazing band. These assumptions are violated in common circumstances; for example, for separate in-going and out-going flux tallies on internal surfaces, and for out-going flux tallies on external surfaces. In some situations, dividing by two-thirds of the cosine cutoff is more appropriate. If users were able to control both the cosine cutoff and the substitute value, they could use these parameters to make accurate surface flux tallies. The procedure is demonstrated in a test problem in which Monte Carlo surface fluxes in cosine bins are converted to angular fluxes and compared with the results of a discrete ordinates calculation.

  11. Atmospheric and oceanic dust fluxes in the northeastern tropical Atlantic Ocean: how close a coupling?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bory

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric inputs to the ocean of dust originating from Africa are compared with downward dust flux in the oceanic water column. Atmospheric fluxes were estimated using remote-sensing-derived dust optical thickness and parameters from a transport/deposition model (TM2z. Oceanic fluxes were measured directly over/in two regions of contrasting primary productivity of the northeastern tropical Atlantic (one mesotrophic and one oligotrophic, located at about 500 and 1500 km off Mauritania underlying the offshore dust plume. In both regions, estimates of annual atmospheric dust inputs to the ocean surface are lower than, but of the same order of magnitude as, oceanic fluxes (49.5 and 8.8 mg.m-2 .d-1 in the mesotrophic and oligotrophic regions. Part of this mismatch may reflect both a general flaw in the dust grain size distribution used in transport models, which likely underestimates large particles, and/or lateral advection to each region of dustier surface waters from upstream, where dust deposition is higher. Higher-frequency temporal coupling between atmospheric and oceanic fluxes seems to be primary-productivity dependent, as hypothesized in previously reported studies.Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (aerosols and particles; geochemical cycles Oceanography: biological and chemical (geochemistry

  12. Annual variation of CH{sub 4} emissions from the middle taiga in West Siberian Lowland (2005-2009): a case of high CH{sub 4} flux and precipitation rate in the summer of 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasakawa, M.; Ito, A.; Machida, T. (Center for Global Environmental Research, National Inst. for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba (Japan)), Email: sasakawa.motoki@nies.go.jp; Tsuda, N. (Global Environmental Forum, Bunkyo-ku Tokyo (Japan)); Niwa, Y. (Meteorological Research Inst., Tsukuba (Japan)); Davydov, D.; Fofonov, A.; Arshinov, M. (V.E. Zuev Inst. of Atmospheric Optics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Tomsk (Russian Federation))

    2012-03-15

    We described continuous measurements of CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} concentration obtained at two sites placed in the middle taiga, Karasevoe (KRS) and Demyanskoe (DEM), in West Siberian Lowland (WSL) from 2005 to 2009. Although both CH{sub 4} and CO{sub 2} accumulation (DELTACH{sub 4} and DELTACO{sub 2}) during night-time at KRS in June and July 2007 showed an anomalously high concentration, higher ratios of DELTACH{sub 4}/DELTACO{sub 2} compared with those in other years indicated that a considerably higher CH{sub 4} flux occurred relative to the CO{sub 2} flux. The daily CH{sub 4} flux calculated with the ratio of DELTACH{sub 4}/DELTACO{sub 2} and terrestrial biosphere CO{sub 2} flux from an ecosystem model showed a maximum in July at the both sites. Although anomalously high flux was observed in June and July 2007 at KRS, only a small flux variation was observed at DEM. The high regional CH{sub 4} flux in June and July 2007 at KRS was reproduced using a process-based ecosystem model, Vegetation Integrative Simulator for Trace gases (VISIT), in response to high water table depth caused by the anomalously high precipitation during the summer of 2007

  13. Annual variation of CH4 emissions from the middle taiga in West Siberian Lowland (2005–2009: a case of high CH4 flux and precipitation rate in the summer of 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sasakawa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We described continuous measurements of CH4 and CO2 concentration obtained at two sites placed in the middle taiga, Karasevoe (KRS and Demyanskoe (DEM, in West Siberian Lowland (WSL from 2005 to 2009. Although both CH4 and CO2 accumulation (ΔCH4 and ▵CO2 during night-time at KRS in June and July 2007 showed an anomalously high concentration, higher ratios of ΔCH4/ΔCO2 compared with those in other years indicated that a considerably higher CH4 flux occurred relative to the CO2 flux. The daily CH4 flux calculated with the ratio of ΔCH4/ΔCO2 and terrestrial biosphere CO2 flux from an ecosystem model showed a maximum in July at the both sites. Although anomalously high flux was observed in June and July 2007 at KRS, only a small flux variation was observed at DEM. The high regional CH4 flux in June and July 2007 at KRS was reproduced using a process-based ecosystem model, Vegetation Integrative Simulator for Trace gases (VISIT, in response to high water table depth caused by the anomalously high precipitation during the summer of 2007.

  14. Annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In this annual report the work done at the named Institute is described. This concerns particle and fields in the solar system, infrared astronomy, X-ray astronomy, γ-astronomy, and molecule spectroscopy. A list of publications is added. (HSI)

  15. U- and Th-series nuclides in settling particles: implications to sediment transport through surface waters and interior ocean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarin, M.M.

    2012-01-01

    The Bay of Bengal is a unique ocean basin receiving large quantities of fresh water and sediment supply from several rivers draining the Indian subcontinent. The annual flux of suspended sediments discharged into the Bay of Bengal is one billion tons, about one-tenth of the global sediment discharge into the ocean. The water and sediment discharge to the Bay, show significant seasonal variation, with maximum transport coinciding with the SW-monsoon (July-September). Earlier studies on the distribution of clay minerals in sediments have led to the suggestion that the sediments of the western Bengal Fan are mainly derived from the Peninsular rivers, whereas rest of the Fan sediments is influenced by the Himalayan rivers. Settling fluxes of particulate matter through the water column of the Bay of Bengal show seasonal trends resulting from monsoon enhanced sediment supply via rivers and biological processes in the water column. It is, thus, important to understand the influence of the seasonally varying particle fluxes on the solute-particle interactions and chemical scavenging processes in the surface and deep waters of the Bay of Bengal. In this context, measurements of U- and Th-series nuclides in the settling particles are most relevant. The radionuclide fluxes ( 230 Th, 228 Th and 210 Pb) in the settling particles provide insight into the role of their removal by vertical particle flux and/or lateral transport (removal at the ocean boundaries). A study carried out in the Northern Bay of Bengal documents that the authigenic flux of 230 Th, as measured in sediment trap samples from deep waters, is balanced by its production in the overhead water column. The sediment mass flux, Al and 228 Th fluxes are similar in the settling particles through shallow and deep waters, suggesting predominant removal by vertical particle flux in the North Bay of Bengal. In the Central Bay, particulate mass, Al and 228 Th fluxes are higher in the trap material from deep waters relative

  16. [Theory of elementary particle studies in weak interaction and grand unification and studies in accelerator design]: Annual report, Part 1, Task A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This paper briefly discusses research being done on the following topics. Particle decay of Z bosons and B mesons; multiparticle production; relativistic heavy-ion collisions; determination of electromagnetic form factors; factorization in the Drell-Yan process; and Jet cross sections

  17. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex I. PSI-F1-Newsletter 1996 nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlach, D.; Kettle, P.R.; Buechli, C. [eds.] [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-02-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, -applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1996, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1996. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  18. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex I: PSI-F1-Newsletter 1995. Nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herlach, D; Kettle, P R [eds.

    1996-09-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, - applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1995, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1995. (author) figs., tabs., refs.

  19. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1996. Annex I. PSI-F1-Newsletter 1996 nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlach, D.; Kettle, P.R.; Buechli, C.

    1997-02-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, -applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1996, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1996. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  20. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex I: PSI-F1-Newsletter 1995. Nuclear and particle physics. Muons in solid-state physics and chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herlach, D.; Kettle, P.R.

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter contains reports from the F1-Department and its Divisions. The contributions are categorized as follows: - activities of the F1-Department of PSI, - nuclear and particle physics supported by the Department, - applications of muons in solid-state physics and chemistry. Groups were asked to present new, preliminary or final results obtained in 1995, as well as a publication list, related to F1-supported work which had appeared in scientific journals during 1995. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  1. DESY. Scientific annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    In the following the main progresses at DESY in the fields accelerator development, elementary-particle physics, research with photons and particle astrophysics, as well as the accelerator development are briefly presented. More detailed descriptions of the events and important developments of the year 2003 are found in the following chapters of the present annual report [de

  2. Critical flux determination by flux-stepping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2010-01-01

    In membrane filtration related scientific literature, often step-by-step determined critical fluxes are reported. Using a dynamic microfiltration device, it is shown that critical fluxes determined from two different flux-stepping methods are dependent upon operational parameters such as step...... length, step height, and.flux start level. Filtrating 8 kg/m(3) yeast cell suspensions by a vibrating 0.45 x 10(-6) m pore size microfiltration hollow fiber module, critical fluxes from 5.6 x 10(-6) to 1.2 x 10(-5) m/s have been measured using various step lengths from 300 to 1200 seconds. Thus......, such values are more or less useless in itself as critical flux predictors, and constant flux verification experiments have to be conducted to check if the determined critical fluxes call predict sustainable flux regimes. However, it is shown that using the step-by-step predicted critical fluxes as start...

  3. 48{sup th} Annual meeting on nuclear technology (AMNT 2017). Key topic / Outstanding know-how and sustainable innovations. Technical session: Reactor physics, thermo and fluid dynamics. Neutron flux oscillations phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herb, Joachim [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Garching (Germany). Abt. Kuehlkreislauf

    2018-01-15

    The Technical Session about Neutron Flux Oscillation Phenomena was chaired by Joachim Herb (Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) GmbH) and well attended by approx. 50 listeners. It comprised of three keynotes and two technical presentations. The main topics were the significant changes of the neutron flux noise levels in different German and foreign pressurized water reactors (PWRs). For about ten years an increase in neutron noise levels has been observed in German PWRs. During the following five years the noise levels have been decreasing again. In principle, a correlation of the neutron noise levels to the use of certain fuel element types was observed and the phenomenon of neutron flux oscillations had been known since decades. Nevertheless, no self-consistent physical theory exists so far, which can explain the observed changes and the absolute levels of the observed neutron flux noise levels. Therefore, safety authorities, technical support organizations (TSO), utilities as well as research organizations showed increased interest in this topic during the last years. The results of the corresponding work as well as an outlook into soon-starting research projects were given in this session.

  4. Nanolipoprotein Particles (NLPs) as Versatile Vaccine Platforms for Co-delivery of Multiple Adjuvants with Subunit Antigens from Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis - Annual Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, N. O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-04-16

    The goal of this proposal is to demonstrate that co-localization of protein subunit antigens and adjuvants on nanolipoprotein particles (NLPs) can increase the protective efficacy of recombinant subunit antigens from Burkholderia spp. and Francisella tularensis against an aerosol challenge. NLPs are are biocompatible, high-density lipoprotein mimetics that are amenable to the incorporation of multiple, chemically-disparate adjuvant and antigen molecules. We hypothesize that the ability to co-localize optimized adjuvant formulations with subunit antigens within a single particle will enhance the stimulation and activation of key immune effector cells, increasing the protective efficacy of subunit antigen-based vaccines. While Burkholderia spp. and F. tularensis subunit antigens are the focus of this proposal, we anticipate that this approach is applicable to a wide range of DOD-relevant biothreat agents. The F344 rat aerosol challenge model for F. tularensis has been successfully established at Battelle under this contract, and Year 3 efficacy studies performed at Battelle demonstrated that an NLP vaccine formulation was able to enhance survival of female F344 rats relative to naïve animals. In addition, Year 3 focused on the incorporation of multiple Burkholderia antigens (both polysaccharides and proteins) onto adjuvanted NLPs, with immunological analysis poised to begin in the next quarter.

  5. Low energy particle composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gloeckler, G.

    1975-01-01

    More than 50 papers presented at this Conference dealt with the composition of low energy particles. The topics can be divided roughly into two broad categories. The first is the study of the energy spectra and composition of the steady or 'quiet-time' particle flux, whose origin is at this time unknown. The second category includes the study of particles and photons which are associated with solar flares or active regions on the sun. (orig.) [de

  6. Coupling of Coastal Zone Color Scanner data to a physical-biological model of the southeastern U.S. continental shelf ecosystem. I - CZCS data description and Lagrangian particle tracing experiments. II - An Eulerian model. III - Nutrient and phytoplankton fluxes and CZCS data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishizaka, Joji

    1990-01-01

    Surface phytoplankton biomass of the southeastern U.S. continental shelf area is discussed based on coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) images obtained in April 1980. Data of chlorophyll distributions are analyzed in conjunction with concurrent flow and temperature fields. Lagrangian particle tracing experiments show that the particles move consistently with the evolution of the chlorophyll patterns. A four-component physical-biological model for a horizontal plane at a nominal depth of 17 m is presented. Model simulations using various physical-biological dynamics and boundary conditions show that the variability of chlorophyll distributions is controlled by horizontal advection. Phytoplankton and nutrient fluxes, calculated using the model, show considerable variability with time. The chlorophyll distributions obtained from the CZCS images are assimilated into the model to improve the phytoplankton flux estimates.

  7. IKF - annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Steuer, E.

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the work performed in the named institute during 1982 together with a list of publications. The work concerns nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, high-energetic heavy ion physics, heavy ion-atom collisions, nuclear solidstate physics, solid-state particle detectors, the application of nuclear methods and mass spectroscopy, ion source development, instrumental development and data processing, interdisciplinary cooperation, as well as the Van de Graaf accelerator facilities. (HSI) [de

  8. Development of methodics for the characterization of the composition of the ion-collision-induced secondary-particle flux by comparison of the yield contributions of photoinduced ion formation processes; Entwicklung einer Methodik zur Charakterisierung der Zusammensetzung des ionenbeschussinduzierten Sekundaerteilchenflusses durch Vergleich der Ausbeuteanteile photoinduzierter Ionenbildungsprozesse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vering, Guido

    2008-10-13

    The aim of this work was to develop a method to distinguish between different ion formation processes and to determine the influence of these processes on the total number of detected monatomic ions of a certain element. A vector/matrix-formalism was developed, which describes the physical processes of sputtering, ion formation, mass separation and detection in laser-SNMS. In the framework of the method developed, based on this theoretic formalism, changes in the secondary flux contribution of the respective element were observed by comparing the detected monatomic ion yield obtained in specifically aligned (SIMS and) laser-SNMS experiments. The yields resulting from these experiments were used to calculate characteristic numbers to compare the flux composition from different surfaces. The potential of the method was demonstrated for the elements boron, iron and gadolinium by investigating the changes in the flux composition of secondary particles sputtered from metallic surfaces, as a function of the oxygen concentration at the surface. Finally, combined laser-SNMS depth profiles and images, obtained with both laser systems, were presented to demonstrate how the parallel detection of the three differently originated ion signals of the same element can be used to get additional information about the composition of the flux of secondary particles synchronously during the analysis of elemental distributions. In this respect the presented method can be a very helpful tool to prevent misleading interpretations of SIMS or laser-SNMS data. (orig.)

  9. Annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-06-01

    This annual report gives a survey of the activities of ECN at The Hague and Petten, Netherlands, in 1982. These activities are concerned with energy generation and development and with scientific and technical applications of thermal neutrons, which are available from the High Flux Reactor and the Low Flux Reactor at Petten. The Energy Study Centre (ESC), a special department of ECN, is engaged with social-economic studies on energy generation and utilization. ESC also investigates the consequences of energy scenarios. The Bureau Energy Research Projects (BEOP) coordinates and administers all national research projects, especially on flywheels, solar energy, wind power and coal combustion. After a survey of staffing and finances the report ends with a list of ECN publications

  10. FSFE: Fake Spectra Flux Extractor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Simeon

    2017-10-01

    The fake spectra flux extractor generates simulated quasar absorption spectra from a particle or adaptive mesh-based hydrodynamic simulation. It is implemented as a python module. It can produce both hydrogen and metal line spectra, if the simulation includes metals. The cloudy table for metal ionization fractions is included. Unlike earlier spectral generation codes, it produces absorption from each particle close to the sight-line individually, rather than first producing an average density in each spectral pixel, thus substantially preserving more of the small-scale velocity structure of the gas. The code supports both Gadget (ascl:0003.001) and AREPO.

  11. Annual balances and extended seasonal modelling of carbon fluxes from a temperate fen cropped to festulolium and tall fescue under two-cut and three-cut harvesting regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kandel, Tanka; Elsgaard, Lars; Lærke, Poul Erik

    2017-01-01

    to environmental factors (light and temperature) and canopy reflectance (ratio vegetation index, RVI). Methodological assessments were made of (i) GPP models with or without temperature functions (Ft) to adjust GPP constraints imposed by low temperature (... as biomass proxies. The sensitivity of the models was also tested on partial datasets including only alternate measurement campaigns and on datasets only from the crop growing period. Use of Ft in GPP models effectively corrected GPP overestimation in cold periods, and this approach was used throughout...... fuel replacement, yield-scaled carbon fluxes are suggested to be given additional considerations for comparison of management options in terms of atmospheric impact....

  12. High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR), Petten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-09-01

    After conversion to burnable poison fuel elements, the High Flux Materials Testing Reactor (HFR) Petten (Netherlands), operated through 1974 for 280 days at 45 MW. Equipment for irradiation experiments has been replaced and extended. The average annual occupation by experiments was 55% as compared to 38% in 1973. Work continued on thirty irradiation projects and ten development activities

  13. AmeriFlux Measurement Network: Science Team Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, B E

    2012-12-12

    Research involves analysis and field direction of AmeriFlux operations, and the PI provides scientific leadership of the AmeriFlux network. Activities include the coordination and quality assurance of measurements across AmeriFlux network sites, synthesis of results across the network, organizing and supporting the annual Science Team Meeting, and communicating AmeriFlux results to the scientific community and other users. Objectives of measurement research include (i) coordination of flux and biometric measurement protocols (ii) timely data delivery to the Carbon Dioxide Information and Analysis Center (CDIAC); and (iii) assurance of data quality of flux and ecosystem measurements contributed by AmeriFlux sites. Objectives of integration and synthesis activities include (i) integration of site data into network-wide synthesis products; and (ii) participation in the analysis, modeling and interpretation of network data products. Communications objectives include (i) organizing an annual meeting of AmeriFlux investigators for reporting annual flux measurements and exchanging scientific information on ecosystem carbon budgets; (ii) developing focused topics for analysis and publication; and (iii) developing data reporting protocols in support of AmeriFlux network goals.

  14. Magnetic-flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A magnetic flux pump is described for increasing the intensity of a magnetic field by transferring flux from one location to the magnetic field. The device includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, and a piston for displacing the trapped magnetic flux into the secondary cavity producing a field having an intense flux density.

  15. Radon flux measurement methodologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C.

    1984-01-01

    Five methods for measuring radon fluxes are evaluated: the accumulator can, a small charcoal sampler, a large-area charcoal sampler, the ''Big Louie'' charcoal sampler, and the charcoal tent sampler. An experimental comparison of the five flux measurement techniques was also conducted. Excellent agreement was obtained between the measured radon fluxes and fluxes predicted from radium and emanation measurements

  16. Transport and fluxes of terrestrial polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in a small mountain river and submarine canyon system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing-Sian; Lee, Chon-Lin; Brimblecombe, Peter; Liu, James T

    2016-08-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in the Gaoping River were investigated in the wet and dry seasons. PAH characteristics allowed us to trace the particulate matter transported in a river-sea system containing a small mountain river, continental shelf, and submarine canyon. PAH signatures of the Gaoping River showed that particles were rapidly transported from the high mountain to the Gaoping coastal areas in the wet season, even arriving at the deep ocean via the Gaoping Submarine Canyon. By contrast, in the dry season, the particles were delivered quite slowly and included mostly pyrogenic contaminants. The annual riverine flux estimates for PAHs were 2241 kg in the Gaoping river-sea system. Only 18.0 kg were associated with the dissolved phase; the rest was bound onto particles. The fluxes caused by typhoons and their effects accounted for 20.2% of the dissolved and 68.4% of the particulate PAH fluxes from the river. Normalized partition coefficients for organic carbon suggested that PAHs were rigid on the particles. Distinct source characteristics were evident for PAHs on riverine suspended particles and coastal surface sediments: the particles in the wet season (as background signals) were similar to petrogenic sources, whereas the particles in the dry season had characteristics of coal burning and vehicular emissions. The sediments in the northwestern shelf were similar to pyrogenic sources (including vehicular emissions and coal and biomass burning), whereas the sediments in the canyon and southeastern shelf arose from mixed sources, although some diesel signature was also evident. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. High heat flux cooling for accelerator targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silverman, I.; Nagler, A.

    2002-01-01

    Accelerator targets, both for radioisotope production and for high neutron flux sources generate very high thermal power in the target material which absorbs the particles beam. Generally, the geometric size of the targets is very small and the power density is high. The design of these targets requires dealing with very high heat fluxes and very efficient heat removal techniques in order to preserve the integrity of the target. Normal heat fluxes from these targets are in the order of 1 kw/cm 2 and may reach levels of an order of magnitude higher

  18. Alongshore wind stress and heat flux divergence off Visakhapatnam, east coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sadhuram, Y.; Rao, B.P.; Rao, D.P.

    Annual variation of heat flux divergence (Qv) was computed for the coastal waters of Visakhapatnam. The mean values of net heat exchange (Qn) and heat flux divergence (Qv) were found to be 114 and 115 W.m/2 respectively on annual scale. The net heat...

  19. Towards direction dependent fluxes with AMS-02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeissler, Stefan; Andeen, Karen; Boer, Wim de; Gebauer, Iris; Merx, Carmen; Nikonov, Nikolay; Vagelli, Valerio [Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie KIT (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is a state-of-the-art particle physics detector designed to operate as an external module on the International Space Station (ISS). In the unique space environment cosmic particles can be measured with high precision over an energy range from GeV up to TeV. In 2014 electron and positron flux measurements where published which indicate an additional source of positrons among the various cosmic particles. The arrival directions of energetic positrons and electrons convey fundamental information on their origin. We evaluate the AMS-02 detector acceptance for each incoming particle direction and show preliminary results of a direction dependent measurement of the AMS-02 lepton flux.

  20. Particle Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Your Health Particle Pollution Public Health Issues Particle Pollution Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Particle pollution — ... see them in the air. Where does particle pollution come from? Particle pollution can come from two ...

  1. NIRE annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The National Institute for Resources and Environment (NIRE) has a R & D concept of `ecotechnology` that aims to protect the environment from degradation whilst promoting sustainable development. This annual report presents summaries of 32 recent research efforts on such topics as: emission control of sulfur and nitrogen oxides from advanced coal combustors; catalysts for diesel NO{sub x} removal; measuring dust from stationary sources; software for life cycle assessment; marine disposal of CO{sub 2}; emissions of greenhouse gases from coal mines in Japan; structural changes in coal particles during gasification; solubilization and desulfurization of high sulfur coal with trifluoromethane sulfuroic acid; and oxidation mechanisms of H{sub 2}S.

  2. Annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the research done at the named institute. These abstracts concern the development of accelerators and ion sources, the construction of the magnetic spectrograph and radiation detectors, the investigation of solids and microstructures by nuclear methods, the development of electronic circuits, the advances in data processing, the study of heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure, and reaction mechanisms, the research on atomic physics and the interaction of charged particles with matter, the studies in medium and high energy physics, the theoretical studies of nuclear structure, and the research in cosmochemistry. Furthermore a list of publications is added. (orig./HSI) [de

  3. 1997 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This 1997 issue of the annual report of the French Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) gives a general overview of the CEA organization, activities, human resources, international relations and communication with some budgetary information. The main activities described concern the national defence, the fuel cycle, the nuclear reactors, the nuclear protection and safety, the advanced technologies, the quasi-particles, the effects of ionizing radiations on humans, the medical imagery, the transfer of technology, the protection and valorization of knowledge, the radioactive wastes and spent fuels management, the training and teaching, the scientific prizes, the committees, councils and commissions. (O.M.)

  4. Annual report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    In this annual report, the Institut fuer Kernphysik of the university of Frankfurt/Main gives a survey on its scientific activities in the year 1974. Research activities in this period comprised the following fields: nuclear reactions and nuclear structure, heavy ion physics, atomic collision processes, neutron diffractometry and spectroscopy, solid state particle trace detectors, methods of nuclear analysis and mass spectroscopy, ion source development, electronics and data processing, and radiation protection. Furthermore, some application-oriented interdisciplinary research projects were started. (orig./AK) [de

  5. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the research done at the named institute. These abstracts concern the development of accelerators and ion sources, the construction of the magnetic spectrograph and radiation detectors, the investigation of solids and microstructures by nuclear methods, the development of electronic circuits, the advances in data processing, the study of heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure, and reaction mechanisms, the research on atomic physics and the interaction of charged particles with matter, the studies in medium and high energy physics, the theoretical studies of nuclear structure, and the research in cosmochemistry. Furthermore a list of publications is added. (orig./HSI) [de

  6. 1992 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Annual report of the Institut de Physique Nucleaire at Orsay (France). The main themes are presented. Concerning experimental research: nuclear structure, ground states and low energy excited states, high excitation energy nuclear states, nuclear matter and nucleus-nucleus collision, intermediate energy nuclear physics, radiochemistry, inter-disciplinary research, scientific information and communication; concerning theoretical physics: particles and fields (formal aspects and hadronic physics), chaotic systems and semi-classical methods, few body problems, nucleus-nucleus scattering, nucleus spectroscopy and clusters, statistical physics and condensed matter; concerning general activities and technological research: accelerators, detectors, applications in cryogenics, data processing, Isolde and Orion equipment

  7. Annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the research done at the named institute. These abstracts concern the development of accelerators and ion sources, the construction of the magnetic spectrograph and radiation detectors, the investigation of solids and microstructures by nuclear methods, the development of electronic circuits, the advances in data processing, the study of heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure, and reaction mechanisms, the research on atomic physics and the interaction of charged particles with matter, the studies of in medium and high energy physics, the theoretical studies of nuclear structure and the research in cosmophysics. Furthermore a list of publications is added. (orig./HSI) [de

  8. Distribution and dynamics of radionuclides and stable elements in the coastal waters off Rokkasho Village, Japan, prior to the opening of a nuclear reprocessing facility. Part 1. Sedimentation flux of suspended particles and elimination of radionuclides and stable elements from seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.; Kawabata, H.; Ueda, S.; Hasegawa, H.; Inaba, J.; Ohmomo, Y.; Mitamura, O.; Seike, Y.

    2004-01-01

    A nuclear fuel reprocessing facility is currently under construction in Rokkasho Village, Aomori, Japan. After completion and start-up, this facility will discharge radionuclides into the Pacific Ocean through an outlet pipe set on the seafloor offshore. For future assessments of the stability of these radionuclides in the environment, a sufficient understanding of the behavior of radionuclides in this ocean ecosystem before the start-up of the facility is necessary. To understand the processes by which radionuclides and various other types of elements are eliminated from seawater, we measured the sedimentation flux of suspended particles in the coastal waters off Rokkasho Village where the sea emissions pipes will be placed. (author)

  9. Spatial variation in the flux of atmospheric deposition and its ecological effects in arid Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Linlin; Wang, Xunming; Li, Danfeng

    2018-06-01

    Atmospheric deposition is one of the key land surface processes, and plays important roles in regional ecosystems and global climate change. Previous studies have focused on the magnitude of and the temporal and spatial variations in the flux of atmospheric deposition, and the composition of atmospheric deposition on a local scale. However, there have been no comprehensive studies of atmospheric deposition on a regional scale and its ecological effects in arid Asia. The temporal and spatial patterns, composition of atmospheric deposition, and its potential effects on regional ecosystems in arid Asia are investigated in this study. The results show that the annual deposition flux is high on the Turan Plain, Aral Sea Desert, and Tarim Basin. The seasonal deposition flux also varies remarkably among different regions. The Tarim Basin shows higher deposition flux in both spring and summer, southern Mongolian Plateau has a higher deposition flux in spring, and the deposition flux of Iran Plateau is higher in summer. Multiple sources of elements in deposited particles are identified. Calcium, iron, aluminum, and magnesium are mainly derived from remote regions, while zinc, copper and lead have predominantly anthropogenic sources. Atmospheric deposition can provide abundant nutrients to vegetation and consequently play a role in the succession of regional ecosystems by affecting the structure, function, diversity, and primary production of the vegetation, especially the exotic or short-lived opportunistic species in arid Asia. Nevertheless, there is not much evidence of the ecological effects of atmospheric deposition on the regional and local scale. The present results may help in further understanding the mechanism of atmospheric deposition as well as providing a motivation for the protection of the ecological environment in arid Asia.

  10. THE TOPOLOGY OF CANONICAL FLUX TUBES IN FLARED JET GEOMETRY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavine, Eric Sander; You, Setthivoine, E-mail: Slavine2@uw.edu, E-mail: syou@aa.washington.edu [University of Washington, 4000 15th Street, NE Aeronautics and Astronautics 211 Guggenheim Hall, Box 352400, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2017-01-20

    Magnetized plasma jets are generally modeled as magnetic flux tubes filled with flowing plasma governed by magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). We outline here a more fundamental approach based on flux tubes of canonical vorticity, where canonical vorticity is defined as the circulation of the species’ canonical momentum. This approach extends the concept of magnetic flux tube evolution to include the effects of finite particle momentum and enables visualization of the topology of plasma jets in regimes beyond MHD. A flared, current-carrying magnetic flux tube in an ion-electron plasma with finite ion momentum is thus equivalent to either a pair of electron and ion flow flux tubes, a pair of electron and ion canonical momentum flux tubes, or a pair of electron and ion canonical vorticity flux tubes. We examine the morphology of all these flux tubes for increasing electrical currents, different radial current profiles, different electron Mach numbers, and a fixed, flared, axisymmetric magnetic geometry. Calculations of gauge-invariant relative canonical helicities track the evolution of magnetic, cross, and kinetic helicities in the system, and show that ion flow fields can unwind to compensate for an increasing magnetic twist. The results demonstrate that including a species’ finite momentum can result in a very long collimated canonical vorticity flux tube even if the magnetic flux tube is flared. With finite momentum, particle density gradients must be normal to canonical vorticities, not to magnetic fields, so observations of collimated astrophysical jets could be images of canonical vorticity flux tubes instead of magnetic flux tubes.

  11. Clustering of Emerging Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzmaikin, A.

    1997-01-01

    Observations show that newly emerging flux tends to appear on the Solar surface at sites where there is flux already. This results in clustering of solar activity. Standard dynamo theories do not predict this effect.

  12. Turbulent transport across invariant canonical flux surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollenberg, J.B.; Callen, J.D.

    1994-07-01

    Net transport due to a combination of Coulomb collisions and turbulence effects in a plasma is investigated using a fluid moment description that allows for kinetic and nonlinear effects via closure relations. The model considered allows for ''ideal'' turbulent fluctuations that distort but preserve the topology of species-dependent canonical flux surfaces ψ number-sign,s triple-bond ∫ dF · B number-sign,s triple-bond ∇ x [A + (m s /q s )u s ] in which u s is the flow velocity of the fluid species. Equations for the net transport relative to these surfaces due to ''nonideal'' dissipative processes are found for the total number of particles and total entropy enclosed by a moving canonical flux surface. The corresponding particle transport flux is calculated using a toroidal axisymmetry approximation of the ideal surfaces. The resulting Lagrangian transport flux includes classical, neoclassical-like, and anomalous contributions and shows for the first time how these various contributions should be summed to obtain the total particle transport flux

  13. Bulk and export production fluxes from sediment traps in the Gulf of Aqaba, north Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfstein, A.; Kienast, S.; Shaked, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Real time observations of the dynamics between dust input, primary production, and export production in deep oligotrophic waters are extremely rare. This is especially true in the context of the direct response and lag time between nutrient supply (e.g., dust), the oceanic biogeochemical response and the signal transfer from the water to sedimentary record. Here, we present the first direct measurments of bulk and export production fluxes in the deep oligotrophic Gulf of Aqaba (GOA), northern Red Sea, located between the hyper-arid Sahara and Arabia Deserts. This study is based on a coupled sediment trap array that provides daily- and monthly- resolution since January 2014. This coupled configuration allows for a unique collection of marine particulates, whereby the annual and seasonal patterns can be evaluated in the context of discrete (daily-timescale) events such as abrupt dust storms, floods and biological blooms. The marine organic C and N fluxes range annually between 0.02-0.25 and 0.001-0.1 g d-1 m-2, respectively. Both show a sharp decay with depth, corresponding to the "Martin curve" (Martin et al., 1987, Deep-Sea Research, 34, 267-285). Importantly, the daily-resolution sampling provides insights to the seasonal increase in export production during the winter and early spring. Rather than a smooth seasonal cycle, this increase is driven by only very few short events, lasting no more than a few days, during which export production increases by an order of magnitude above the baseline. Yet, the nature of these export production "spikes" is non-unique because they reflect different "trigger" events such as dust storms or water column mixing. Accordingly, we present a quantitative evaluation of the observations in the context of coeval dust flux records and the physical and chemical configuration of the GOA over the time of sampling period, and present and quantitative mass balance of particle fluxes in this deep yet land-locked marine setting.

  14. A punctual flux estimator and reactions rates optimization in neutral particles transport calculus by the Monte Carlo method; Mise au point d'un estimateur ponctuel du flux et des taux de reactions dans les calculs de transport de particules neutres par la methode de monte carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authier, N

    1998-12-01

    One of the questions asked in radiation shielding problems is the estimation of the radiation level in particular to determine accessibility of working persons in controlled area (nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants) or to study the dose gradients encountered in material (iron nuclear vessel, medical therapy, electronics in satellite). The flux and reaction rate estimators used in Monte Carlo codes give average values in volumes or on surfaces of the geometrical description of the system. But in certain configurations, the knowledge of punctual deposited energy and dose estimates are necessary. The Monte Carlo estimate of the flux at a point of interest is a calculus which presents an unbounded variance. The central limit theorem cannot be applied thus no easy confidencelevel may be calculated. The convergence rate is then very poor. We propose in this study a new solution for the photon flux at a point estimator. The method is based on the 'once more collided flux estimator' developed earlier for neutron calculations. It solves the problem of the unbounded variance and do not add any bias to the estimation. We show however that our new sampling schemes specially developed to treat the anisotropy of the photon coherent scattering is necessary for a good and regular behavior of the estimator. This developments integrated in the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code add the possibility of an unbiased punctual estimate on media interfaces. (author)

  15. A punctual flux estimator and reactions rates optimization in neutral particles transport calculus by the Monte Carlo method; Mise au point d'un estimateur ponctuel du flux et des taux de reactions dans les calculs de transport de particules neutres par la methode de monte carlo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Authier, N

    1998-12-01

    One of the questions asked in radiation shielding problems is the estimation of the radiation level in particular to determine accessibility of working persons in controlled area (nuclear power plants, nuclear fuel reprocessing plants) or to study the dose gradients encountered in material (iron nuclear vessel, medical therapy, electronics in satellite). The flux and reaction rate estimators used in Monte Carlo codes give average values in volumes or on surfaces of the geometrical description of the system. But in certain configurations, the knowledge of punctual deposited energy and dose estimates are necessary. The Monte Carlo estimate of the flux at a point of interest is a calculus which presents an unbounded variance. The central limit theorem cannot be applied thus no easy confidencelevel may be calculated. The convergence rate is then very poor. We propose in this study a new solution for the photon flux at a point estimator. The method is based on the 'once more collided flux estimator' developed earlier for neutron calculations. It solves the problem of the unbounded variance and do not add any bias to the estimation. We show however that our new sampling schemes specially developed to treat the anisotropy of the photon coherent scattering is necessary for a good and regular behavior of the estimator. This developments integrated in the TRIPOLI-4 Monte Carlo code add the possibility of an unbiased punctual estimate on media interfaces. (author)

  16. The FLUKA atmospheric neutrino flux calculation

    CERN Document Server

    Battistoni, G.; Montaruli, T.; Sala, P.R.

    2003-01-01

    The 3-dimensional (3-D) calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux by means of the FLUKA Monte Carlo model is here described in all details, starting from the latest data on primary cosmic ray spectra. The importance of a 3-D calculation and of its consequences have been already debated in a previous paper. Here instead the focus is on the absolute flux. We stress the relevant aspects of the hadronic interaction model of FLUKA in the atmospheric neutrino flux calculation. This model is constructed and maintained so to provide a high degree of accuracy in the description of particle production. The accuracy achieved in the comparison with data from accelerators and cross checked with data on particle production in atmosphere certifies the reliability of shower calculation in atmosphere. The results presented here can be already used for analysis by current experiments on atmospheric neutrinos. However they represent an intermediate step towards a final release, since this calculation does not yet include the...

  17. NERSC 2001 Annual Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hules, John

    2001-01-01

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005

  18. Generalized flux states of the t-J model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nori, F.; Abrahams, E.; Zimanyi, G.T.

    1990-01-01

    We investigate certain generalized flux phases arising in a mean-field approach to the t-J model. First, we establish that the energy of noninteracting electrons moving in a uniform magnetic field has an absolute minimum as a function of the flux at exactly one flux quantum per particle. Using this result, we show that if the hard-core nature of the hole bosons is taken into account, then the slave-boson mean-field approximation for the t-J Hamiltonian allows for a solution where both the spinons and the holons experience an average flux of one flux quantum per particle. This enables them to achieve the lowest possible energy within the manifold of spatially uniform flux states. In the case of the continuum model, this is possible only for certain fractional fillings and we speculate that the system may react to this frustration effect by phase separation

  19. Characterization of ion fluxes and heat fluxes for PMI relevant conditions on Proto-MPEX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beers, Clyde; Shaw, Guinevere; Biewer, Theodore; Rapp, Juergen

    2016-10-01

    Plasma characterization, in particular, particle flux and electron and ion temperature distributions nearest to an exposed target, are critical to quantifying Plasma Surface Interaction (PSI). In the Proto-Material Plasma Exposure eXperiment (Proto-MPEX), the ion fluxes and heat fluxes are derived from double Langmuir Probes (DLP) and Thomson Scattering in front of the target assuming Bohm conditions at the sheath entrance. Power fluxes derived from ne and Te measurements are compared to heat fluxes measured with IR thermography. The comparison will allow conclusions on the sheath heat transmission coefficient to be made experimentally. Different experimental conditions (low and high density plasmas (0.5 - 6 x 1019 m-3) with different magnetic configuration are compared. This work was supported by the U.S. D.O.E. contract DE-AC05-00OR22725.

  20. Source, flux and balance of atmospheric deposition of metals at Ile-de-France; Source, flux et bilan des retombees atmospheriques de metaux en Ile de France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azimi, S

    2004-07-15

    evidenced. At the Seine River catchment scale, the atmospheric deposition levels were of the same order of magnitude as Seine River particle contents measured at the catchment estuary (Poses). The flux ratio between atmospheric inputs and Seine particles ranged between 0.8 and 4.8 for Al, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb and Zn. The importance of atmospheric deposition of metals was estimated on agricultural and urban areas. In the first case, the atmospheric fallout appears as the main input way of Cu, Ni and Pb to agro-systems while Cd is mainly introduced by fertilizers. These two input ways induced an increase of Cd, Ni and Pb in the cultivated horizon with an annual balance reaching 0.33, 0.014 and 0.014 %, respectively, of actual stocks while the Cu showed a decrease with an annual balance reaching 0.024 %. In the second case, atmospheric deposition was compared to roof and street runoff. The atmospheric deposition is the main introducing way of most of considered elements, compared to roof runoff excepting Cu, Pb, Ti and Zn which are mainly emitted by the latter. Nevertheless, compared to street runoff, atmospheric deposition levels are 1.5 to 27 times lower than street cleaning ones showing that atmospheric introducing way is not the main introducing way of metals in urban areas. The source investigation on atmospheric deposition was performed using several tools developed during this study. The results allow the characterisation of the anthropogenic sources considered using specific elements or ratios. These tools were applied to the atmospheric deposition data but they did not allowed the determination of anthropogenic activities because of the atmospheric mixture. (author)

  1. Compact neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhavi, V.; Phatak, P.R.; Bahadur, C.; Bayala, A.K.; Jakati, R.K.; Sathian, V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A compact size neutron flux monitor has been developed incorporating standard boards developed for smart radiation monitors. The sensitivity of the monitors is 0.4cps/nV. It has been tested up to 2075 nV flux with standard neutron sources. It shows convincing results even in high flux areas like 6m away from the accelerator in RMC (Parel) for 106/107 nV. These monitors have a focal and remote display, alarm function with potential free contacts for centralized control and additional provision of connectivity via RS485/Ethernet. This paper describes the construction, working and results of the above flux monitor

  2. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This is the thirty-ninth annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The period covered by this report is the year ending March 31, 1986. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) was established in 1946, by the Atomic Energy Control Act (AEC Act), (Revised Statues of Canada (R.S.C.) 1970 cA19). It is a departmental corporation (Schedule B) within the meaning and purpose of the Financial Administration Act. The AECB controls the development, application and use of atomic energy in Canada, and participates on behalf of Canada in international measures of control. The AECB is also repsonsible for the administration of the Nuclear Liability Act, (R.S.C. 1970 c29 1st Supp) as amended, including the designation of nuclear installations and the prescription of basic insurance to be carried by the operators of such nuclear installations. The AECB reports to Parliament through a designated Minister, currently the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources

  3. Higher order Cambell techniques for neutron flux measurement. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lux, I.; Baranyai, A.

    1982-01-01

    An exact mathematical description of arbitrary high order Campbell techniques for measuring particle fluxes is given. The nth order Campbell technique assumes the measurement of the moments of the outcoming voltage up to the nth one. A simple relation is derived among the various moments of the total measured voltage and of the detector signal caused by one incident particle. It is proven that in the monoparticle case combination of the measured moments up to the order n provides an expression proportional to the particle flux and to the nth moment of the detector signal. Generalization to several different particles is given and it is shown that if the flux of the particle causing the largest detector signal is measured with a relative error epsilon in the dc method and the error is due to the signals of other particles, then in the nth order campbelling the error will be of order epsilonsup(n). The effect of a random background on the measured voltage is also investigated and it is established that the nth order campbelling supresses the noise according to the nth power of the relative amplitude of the noise to the signal. The results concerning constant fluxes are generalized to time dependent particle fluxes and a method assuming a Fourier transform of the measured quantities is proposed for their determination. (orig.)

  4. La/Yb and Th/Sc in settling particles: vertical and horizontal transport of lithogenic material in the western North Pacific

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otosaka, Shigeyoshi; Noriki, Shinichiro; Honda, Makio C.

    2004-01-01

    In order to understand the origins and transport processes of lithogenic aluminosilicate in the western North Pacific, time-series traps were deployed at Stn. KNOT at 44degN 155degE (water depth: 5320 m). Annual mean content of aluminum (Al) which is a proxy of lithogenic material in settling particles was 0.38% at 1 km depth, 0.78% at 3 km depth and 1.14% at 5 km depth, respectively. Mass fluxes were corrected by 230 Th and 231 Pa activities in particles and seawater. Annual mean corrected Al fluxes at 1, 3 and 5 km depths were calculated to 0.45, 0.46 and 0.33 g/m 2 /year, respectively. Lanthanum/ytterbium (La/Yb) and thorium/scandium (Th/Sc) ratios were used as proxies for estimating the origin of lithogenic aluminosilicate in settling particles. Both La/Yb and Th/Sc ratios in settling particles increased with depth, and the seasonal variation was the smallest at 5 km depth. It was considered that variations of La/Yb and Th/Sc ratios in settling particles reflected the change of source material of lithogenic aluminosilicates. Origins of lithogenic materials in the settling particles were summarized using two end-members, loess from central Asian continent (AL) and basalts from the Kurile-Kamchatka Islands (KEK). Contributions of end-members in settling particles were estimated from the La/Yb and Th/Sc ratios. The contribution of KK particles in lithogenic materials was calculated to be 84% at 1 km depth, and 61% at 3 and 5 km depths, respectively. Although the KK material was the dominant constituent of the terrigenous component in settling particles at Stn. KNOT, the KK flux decreased with depth. On the other hand, the AL flux increased with depth and the significant increase of the AL flux was presumably due to the lateral import of AL particles to the deep layer at Stn. KNOT. From these results we conclude that the distribution of lithogenic materials recorded in sediments in the western North Pacific are influenced by the northward transport of AL within the

  5. Proceedings of the 43. annual conference of metallurgists of CIM and the 5. UBC-McGill biennial international symposium on fundamentals of mineral processing : particle size enlargement in mineral processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laskowski, J.S. [British Columbia Univ., Vancouver, BC (Canada)] (ed.)

    2004-07-01

    This conference focused on the technological, economic and environmental challenges of increased quantities of fine particles that result from mineral processing operations such as crushing and grinding. The fine particles create problems in both concentration unit operations and solid/liquid separation unit operations. In addition to introductory lectures on fine particle aggregation, the conference included sessions dealing with hydrophobic aggregation in fine particle beneficiation/flotation, flocculation, pelletization and briquetting. The conference featured 32 presentations of which 6 have been indexed separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  6. Flux cutting in superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, A M

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes experiments and theories of flux cutting in superconductors. The use of the flux line picture in free space is discussed. In superconductors cutting can either be by means of flux at an angle to other layers of flux, as in longitudinal current experiments, or due to shearing of the vortex lattice as in grain boundaries in YBCO. Experiments on longitudinal currents can be interpreted in terms of flux rings penetrating axial lines. More physical models of flux cutting are discussed but all predict much larger flux cutting forces than are observed. Also, cutting is occurring at angles between vortices of about one millidegree which is hard to explain. The double critical state model and its developments are discussed in relation to experiments on crossed and rotating fields. A new experiment suggested by Clem gives more direct information. It shows that an elliptical yield surface of the critical state works well, but none of the theoretical proposals for determining the direction of E are universally applicable. It appears that, as soon as any flux flow takes place, cutting also occurs. The conclusion is that new theories are required. (perspective)

  7. DESY scientific annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-05-01

    This annual report contains a short description of the organization of DESY, extended abstracts concerning the experimental studies at the PETRA and DORIS storage rings, the development of the ZEUS detector, synchrotron-radiation experiments, theory of elementary particles, development of counting electronics, technical developments of the HERA, DORIS II and PETRA II storage rings and the DESY II respectively DESY I/III synchrotron, radiation protection, as well as data processing, and a list of speeches, publications, and theses. (HSI)

  8. Heat flux microsensor measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, J. P.; Hager, J. M.; Onishi, S.; Diller, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    A thin-film heat flux sensor has been fabricated on a stainless steel substrate. The thermocouple elements of the heat flux sensor were nickel and nichrome, and the temperature resistance sensor was platinum. The completed heat flux microsensor was calibrated at the AEDC radiation facility. The gage output was linear with heat flux with no apparent temperature effect on sensitivity. The gage was used for heat flux measurements at the NASA Langley Vitiated Air Test Facility. Vitiated air was expanded to Mach 3.0 and hydrogen fuel was injected. Measurements were made on the wall of a diverging duct downstream of the injector during all stages of the hydrogen combustion tests. Because the wall and the gage were not actively cooled, the wall temperature reached over 1000 C (1900 F) during the most severe test.

  9. Annual report for 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts of the work done in the named Laboratory together with a list of publications and reports. The abstracts concern deep-inelastic and transfer reactions, compound-nucleus reactions including fusion and fission, reactions with light and with polarized particles, gamma-ray spectroscopy, and coulomb excitation, atomic physics, the irradiation of biological systems, nuclear structure, nuclear reaction theory, dissipative reactions, accelerator developments, the superconducting sector-cyclotron SuSe, the synchrotron-radiation source Little Erna, detectors, technology, the on-line computer system, the online-offline programming system GOOPSY, the megachannel analyzer for the acquisition of multidimensional events MADAME, and the central monitoring and control system ZUeSS. (HSI) [de

  10. Annual modulation of the muon flux in the GERDA experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falkenstein, Raphael; Freund, Kai; Grabmayr, Peter; Hegai, Alexander; Jochum, Josef; Schmitt, Christopher; Schuetz, Ann-Kathrin [Eberhard Karls Univeritaet Tuebingen (Germany); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Gerda collaboration aims to determine the half life of the neutrinoless double beta decay (0νββ) of {sup 76}Ge. In Phase I, the experimental background was reduced to 10{sup -2} cts/(keV.kg.yr) in the region around Q{sub ββ}. For Phase II we want to reduce the background contribution by one order of magnitude. Cosmic muons induce part of this dangerous background and must be vetoed. The muon veto consists of a water Cherenkov detector with 66 PMTs in the water tank surrounding the Gerda cryostat which contains the germanium crystals. The muon veto operated stably for 806 days where only 2 PMTs were lost. The rate however is modulated by the Cngs neutrino beam and the atmospheric temperature effect, both will be presented in this talk.

  11. Nares Abyssal Plain sediment flux studies, FY 1986 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dymond, J.; Collier, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    On 21 September, 1984, a mooring (NAP-2) was deployed at 23 0 14.5'N, 64 0 02.1'W with an approximate bottom depth of 5835 meters. This mooring contained 6 upward looking traps (at 720, 1420, 2870, 3785, 4770, 5780 meters) and two inverted traps (at 2900 and 4800 meters). This mooring was successfully recovered on 21 November, 1985. The details of this recovery and the samples are presented. On 22 November, 1985, another shorter trap mooring (NAP-3) was deployed. The mooring was similar in design to NAP-1 and has two normal traps at 750 and 4800 meters and an inverted trap at 4830 meters

  12. Incoming Shortwave Fluxes at the Surface--A Comparison of GCM Results with Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garratt, J. R.

    1994-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the exam surface net radiation calculated in general circulation models at continental surfaces is mostly due to excess incoming shortwave fluxes. Based on long-term observations from 22 worldwide inland stations and results from four general circulation models the overestimate in models of 20% (11 W m2) in net radiation on an annual basis compares with 6% (9 W m2) for shortwave fluxes for the same 22 locations, or 9% (18 W m2) for a larger set of 93 stations (71 having shortwave fluxes only). For annual fluxes, these differences appear to be significant.

  13. Quarterly, Bi-annual and Annual Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Quarterly, Bi-annual and Annual Reports are periodic reports issued for public release. For the deep set fishery these reports are issued quarterly and anually....

  14. Comparisons between POC and zooplankton swimmer flux from sediment traps in the subarctic and subtropical North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Naoya; Abe, Yoshiyuki; Kitamura, Minoru; Honda, Makio C.; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2018-03-01

    Seasonal changes in zooplankton swimmer (ZS) abundance, biomass and community structure were evaluated based on samples collected by moored sediment traps at a depth of 200 m in the subarctic (SA) and subtropical (ST) western North Pacific. Based on these samples, we made comparisons on two topics: 1) latitudinal (subarctic vs. subtropical) changes in ZS abundance, biomass and community and 2) quantitative differences between the ZS and particle organic carbon (POC) fluxes based on data from moored or drifting sediment traps. The results showed that the ZS flux was greater in the SA (annual mean: 311 ind. m-2 day-1 or 258 mg C m-2 day-1) than in the ST (135 ind. m-2 day-1 or 38 mg C m-2 day-1). The peak ZS flux was observed from July-August in the SA and from April-May in the ST. The dominant taxa were Copepoda and Chaetognatha in the SA and Ostracoda and Mollusca in the ST. These latitudinal differences are likely related to the dominance of large-sized Copepoda in the SA, regional differences in the timing of the spring phytoplankton bloom, and the magnitude and size structure of primary producers. The percent composition of ZS to the total C flux (= ZS+POC flux) varied by region: 85-95% in the SA and 47-75% in the ST. These differences between the ZS composition and the total C flux are most likely caused by the dominance of large-sized Copepoda (Neocalanus spp. and Eucalanus bungii) in the SA.

  15. Modern Estimates of Global Water Cycle Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodell, M.; Beaudoing, H. K.; L'Ecuyer, T. S.; Olson, W. S.

    2014-12-01

    The goal of the first phase of the NASA Energy and Water Cycle Study (NEWS) Water and Energy Cycle Climatology project was to develop "state of the global water cycle" and "state of the global energy cycle" assessments based on data from modern ground and space based observing systems and data integrating models. Here we describe results of the water cycle assessment, including mean annual and monthly fluxes over continents and ocean basins during the first decade of the millennium. To the extent possible, the water flux estimates are based on (1) satellite measurements and (2) data-integrating models. A careful accounting of uncertainty in each flux was applied within a routine that enforced multiple water and energy budget constraints simultaneously in a variational framework, in order to produce objectively-determined, optimized estimates. Simultaneous closure of the water and energy budgets caused the ocean evaporation and precipitation terms to increase by about 10% and 5% relative to the original estimates, mainly because the energy budget required turbulent heat fluxes to be substantially larger in order to balance net radiation. In the majority of cases, the observed annual, surface and atmospheric water budgets over the continents and oceans close with much less than 10% residual. Observed residuals and optimized uncertainty estimates are considerably larger for monthly surface and atmospheric water budget closure, often nearing or exceeding 20% in North America, Eurasia, Australia and neighboring islands, and the Arctic and South Atlantic Oceans. The residuals in South America and Africa tend to be smaller, possibly because cold land processes are a non-issue. Fluxes are poorly observed over the Arctic Ocean, certain seas, Antarctica, and the Australasian and Indonesian Islands, leading to reliance on atmospheric analysis estimates. Other details of the study and future directions will be discussed.

  16. Total hydrogen and oxygen fluxes in the edge plasma of tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kastelewicz, H.

    1988-01-01

    A relativistic model of the edge plasma of tokamaks is described considering the primary neutral fluxes emitted from limiter and wall. The primary neutrals, which determine essentially the particle flux balance in the plasma edge, the scrape-off layer plasma and the particles adsorbed at limiter and wall are treated as separate subsystems which are iteratively coupled through the mutual particle sinks and sources. The model is used for the calculation of total hydrogen and oxygen fluxes in edge plasma of tokamaks. The results for different fractions of and contributions to the total fluxes are illustrated and discussed

  17. GOES Space Environment Monitor, Energetic Particles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Solid state detectors with pulse height discrimination measure proton, alpha-particle, and electron fluxes. E1 and I1 channels are responding primarily to trapped...

  18. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kerry; Pinsky, Lawrence; Andersen, Vic; Zeitlin, Cary; Cleghorn, Tim; Cucinotta, Frank; Saganti, Premkumar; Atwell, William; Turner, Ron

    2006-01-01

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range

  19. Helium cosmic ray flux measurements at Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kerry [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States)]. E-mail: ktlee@ems.jsc.nasa.gov; Pinsky, Lawrence [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Andersen, Vic [University of Houston, 4800 Calhoun Rd. Houston, TX 77204 (United States); Zeitlin, Cary [National Space Biomedical Research Institute, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Cleghorn, Tim [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Cucinotta, Frank [NASA Johnson Space Center, 2101 NASA Road 1, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Saganti, Premkumar [Prairie View A and M University, P.O. Box 519, Prairie View, TX 77446-0519 (United States); Atwell, William [The Boeing Company, Houston, TX (United States); Turner, Ron [Advancing National Strategies and Enabling Results (ANSER), Arlington, Virginia (United States)

    2006-10-15

    The helium energy spectrum in Martian orbit has been observed by the MARIE charged particle spectrometer aboard the 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft. The orbital data were taken from March 13, 2002 to October 28, 2003, at which time a very intense Solar Particle Event caused a loss of communication between the instrument and the spacecraft. The silicon detector stack in MARIE is optimized for the detection of protons and helium in the energy range below 100MeV/n, which typically includes almost all of the flux during SPEs. This also makes MARIE an efficient detector for GCR helium in the energy range of 50-150MeV/n. We will present the first fully normalized flux results from MARIE, using helium ions in this energy range.

  20. Multi-spectra Cosmic Ray Flux Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaochun; Dayananda, Mathes

    2010-02-01

    The Earth's upper atmosphere is constantly bombarded by rain of charged particles known as primary cosmic rays. These primary cosmic rays will collide with the atmospheric molecules and create extensive secondary particles which shower downward to the surface of the Earth. In recent years, a few studies have been done regarding to the applications of the cosmic ray measurements and the correlations between the Earth's climate conditions and the cosmic ray fluxes [1,2,3]. Most of the particles, which reach to the surface of the Earth, are muons together with a small percentage of electrons, gammas, neutrons, etc. At Georgia State University, multiple cosmic ray particle detectors have been constructed to measure the fluxes and energy distributions of the secondary cosmic ray particles. In this presentation, we will briefly describe these prototype detectors and show the preliminary test results. Reference: [1] K.Borozdin, G.Hogan, C.Morris, W.Priedhorsky, A.Saunders, L.Shultz, M.Teasdale, Nature, Vol.422, 277 (2003). [2] L.V. Egorova, V. Ya Vovk, O.A. Troshichev, Journal of Atmospheric and Terrestrial Physics 62, 955-966 (2000). [3] Henrik Svensmark, Phy. Rev. Lett. 81, 5027 (1998). )

  1. Continuous magnetic flux pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, A. F.; Elleman, D. D.; Whitmore, F. C. (Inventor)

    1966-01-01

    A method and means for altering the intensity of a magnetic field by transposing flux from one location to the location desired fro the magnetic field are examined. The device described includes a pair of communicating cavities formed in a block of superconducting material, is dimensioned to be insertable into one of the cavities and to substantially fill the cavity. Magnetic flux is first trapped in the cavities by establishing a magnetic field while the superconducting material is above the critical temperature at which it goes superconducting. Thereafter, the temperature of the material is reduced below the critical value, and then the exciting magnetic field may be removed. By varying the ratios of the areas of the two cavities, it is possible to produce a field having much greater flux density in the second, smaller cavity, into which the flux transposed.

  2. Flux in Tallinn

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2004-01-01

    Rahvusvahelise elektroonilise kunsti sümpoosioni ISEA2004 klubiõhtu "Flux in Tallinn" klubis Bon Bon. Eestit esindasid Ropotator, Ars Intel Inc., Urmas Puhkan, Joel Tammik, Taavi Tulev (pseud. Wochtzchee). Klubiõhtu koordinaator Andres Lõo

  3. Flux shunts for undulators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, E.; Chin, J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1993-05-01

    Undulators for high-performance applications in synchrotron-radiation sources and periodic magnetic structures for free-electron lasers have stringent requirements on the curvature of the electron's average trajectory. Undulators using the permanent magnet hybrid configuration often have fields in their central region that produce a curved trajectory caused by local, ambient magnetic fields such as those of the earth. The 4.6 m long Advanced Light Source (ALS) undulators use flux shunts to reduce this effect. These flux shunts are magnetic linkages of very high permeability material connecting the two steel beams that support the magnetic structures. The shunts reduce the scalar potential difference between the supporting beams and carry substantial flux that would normally appear in the undulator gap. Magnetic design, mechanical configuration of the flux shunts and magnetic measurements of their effect on the ALS undulators are described

  4. Greenhouse gas flux dynamics in wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvola, J.; Alm, J.; Saarnio, S. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Martikainen, P.J. [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology

    1996-12-31

    Two important greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, are closely connected to the carbon cycling of wetlands. Although virgin wetlands are mostly carbon accumulating ecosystems, major proportion of the CO{sub 2} bound annually in photosynthesis is released back to the atmosphere. Main portion of the carbon cycling in wetlands is quite fast while a small proportion of carbon diffusing from soil is released from organic matter, which may be ten thousand years old. Methane is formed in the anaerobic layers of wetlands, from where it is released gradually to the atmosphere. The decomposition in anaerobic conditions is very slow, which means that usually only a few percent of the annual carbon cycling takes place as methane. Research on CO{sub 2} fluxes of different virgin and managed peatlands was the main topic of this project during the first phase of SILMU. The measurements were made during two seasons in varying conditions in c. 30 study sites. In the second phase of SILMU the research topics were the spatial and temporal variation of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes, the relationships between vegetation and gas fluxes as well as carbon balance studies in wetlands at some intensive sites

  5. Greenhouse gas flux dynamics in wetlands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvola, J; Alm, J; Saarnio, S [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Martikainen, P J [National Public Health Inst., Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology

    1997-12-31

    Two important greenhouse gases, CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, are closely connected to the carbon cycling of wetlands. Although virgin wetlands are mostly carbon accumulating ecosystems, major proportion of the CO{sub 2} bound annually in photosynthesis is released back to the atmosphere. Main portion of the carbon cycling in wetlands is quite fast while a small proportion of carbon diffusing from soil is released from organic matter, which may be ten thousand years old. Methane is formed in the anaerobic layers of wetlands, from where it is released gradually to the atmosphere. The decomposition in anaerobic conditions is very slow, which means that usually only a few percent of the annual carbon cycling takes place as methane. Research on CO{sub 2} fluxes of different virgin and managed peatlands was the main topic of this project during the first phase of SILMU. The measurements were made during two seasons in varying conditions in c. 30 study sites. In the second phase of SILMU the research topics were the spatial and temporal variation of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes, the relationships between vegetation and gas fluxes as well as carbon balance studies in wetlands at some intensive sites

  6. Carbon and energy fluxes from China's largest freshwater lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, G.; LIU, Y.

    2017-12-01

    Carbon and energy fluxes between lakes and the atmosphere are important aspects of hydrology, limnology, and ecology studies. China's largest freshwater lake, the Poyang lake experiences tremendous water-land transitions periodically throughout the year, which provides natural experimental settings for the study of carbon and energy fluxes. In this study, we use the eddy covariance technique to explore the seasonal and diurnal variation patterns of sensible and latent heat fluxes of Poyang lake during its high-water and low-water periods, when the lake is covered by water and mudflat, respectively. We also determine the annual NEE of Poyang lake and the variations of NEE's components: Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (Re). Controlling factors of seasonal and diurnal variations of carbon and energy fluxes are analyzed, and land cover impacts on the variation patterns are also studied. Finally, the coupling between the carbon and energy fluxes are analyzed under different atmospheric, boundary stability and land cover conditions.

  7. Seasonal variability in 7Be depositional fluxes at Granada, Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez-Gomez, C.; Azahra, M.; Lopez-Penalver, J.J.; Camacho-Garcia, A.; Bardouni, T.El.; Boukhal, H.

    2006-01-01

    Measurement of 7 Be depositional fluxes at Granada, Spain (37 o 10'50''N-3 o 35'44''W, altitude 670 m) in the period 1995 through 1998 indicates substantial variations between the four seasons and also between corresponding seasons in different years, ranging from 23.6 to 242 Bq m -2 per season. A strongly positive correlation with precipitation is shown, which explains about 70% of the variations in the 7 Be depositional fluxes over the 16 seasons studied. The depositional 7 Be flux is on the average highest in the fall and lowest in the summer. The study shows that precipitation primarily controls the 7 Be depositional flux and plays a dominant role in the removal of 7 Be from the troposphere. The average annual 7 Be depositional flux at Granada amounts to 469+145 Bq m -2

  8. Human footprints on greenhouse gas fluxes in cryogenic ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelin, D. V.; Goryachkin, S. V.; Zamolodchikov, D. G.; Dolgikh, A. V.; Zazovskaya, E. P.; Shishkov, V. A.; Kraev, G. N.

    2017-12-01

    Various human footprints on the flux of biogenic greenhouse gases from permafrost-affected soils in Arctic and boreal domains in Russia are considered. Tendencies of significant growth or suppression of soil CO2 fluxes change across types of human impact. Overall, the human impacts increase the mean value and variance of local soil CO2 flux. Human footprint on methane exchange between soil and atmosphere is mediated by drainage. However, all the types of human impact suppress the sources and increase sinks of methane to the land ecosystems. N2O flux grew under the considered types of human impact. Based on the results, we suggest that human footprint on soil greenhouse gases fluxes is comparable to the effect of climate change at an annual to decadal timescales.

  9. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oda, Naotaka.

    1993-01-01

    The device of the present invention greatly saves an analog processing section such as an analog filter and an analog processing circuit. That is, the device of the present invention comprises (1) a neutron flux detection means for detecting neutron fluxed in the reactor, (2) a digital filter means for dividing signals corresponding to the detected neutron fluxes into predetermined frequency band regions, (3) a calculation processing means for applying a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band regions to the neutron flux detection signals divided by the digital filter means. With such a constitution, since the neutron detection signals are processed by the digital filter means, the accuracy is improved and the change for the property of the filter is facilitated. Further, when a neutron flux level is obtained, a calculation processing corresponding to the frequency band region can be conducted without the analog processing circuit. Accordingly, maintenance and accuracy are improved by greatly decreasing the number of parts. Further, since problems inherent to the analog circuit are solved, neutron fluxes are monitored at high reliability. (I.S.)

  10. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimazu, Yoichiro.

    1995-01-01

    In a neutron flux monitoring device, there are disposed a neutron flux measuring means for outputting signals in accordance with the intensity of neutron fluxes, a calculation means for calculating a self power density spectrum at a frequency band suitable to an object to be measured based on the output of the neutron flux measuring means, an alarm set value generation means for outputting an alarm set value as a comparative reference, and an alarm judging means for comparing the alarm set value with the outputted value of the calculation means to judge requirement of generating an alarm and generate an alarm in accordance with the result of the judgement. Namely, the time-series of neutron flux signals is put to fourier transformation for a predetermined period of time by the calculation means, and from each of square sums for real number component and imaginary number component for each of the frequencies, a self power density spectrum in the frequency band suitable to the object to be measured is calculated. Then, when the set reference value is exceeded, an alarm is generated. This can reliably prevent generation of erroneous alarm due to neutron flux noises and can accurately generate an alarm at an appropriate time. (N.H.)

  11. SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect CO2, Water Vapor, and Heat Flux, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: Short-term measurements of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes were collected at four locations along a mean annual precipitation gradient in southern...

  12. SAFARI 2000 Kalahari Transect CO2, Water Vapor, and Heat Flux, Wet Season 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Short-term measurements of carbon dioxide, water, and energy fluxes were collected at four locations along a mean annual precipitation gradient in southern Africa...

  13. LBA-ECO LC-39 Modeled Carbon Flux from Deforestation, Mato Grosso, Brazil: 2000-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains modeled estimates of carbon flux, biomass, and annual burning emissions across the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso from 2000-2006. The model,...

  14. LBA-ECO LC-39 Modeled Carbon Flux from Deforestation, Mato Grosso, Brazil: 2000-2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains modeled estimates of carbon flux, biomass, and annual burning emissions across the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso from 2000-2006....

  15. The Mini-SPT (Space Particle Telescope) for dual use: Precision flux measurement of low energy proton electron and heavy ion with tracking capability and A compact, low-cost realtime local radiation hazard/alarm detector to be used on board a satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpat, Behcet; Ergin, Tulun; Kalemci, Emrah

    2016-07-01

    The Mini-SPT project is the first, and most important, step towards the ambitious goal of creating a low-cost, compact, radiation hardened and high performance space particle telescope that can be mounted, in the near future, as standard particle detector on any satellite. Mini-SPT will be capable of providing high quality physics data on local space environment. In particular high precision flux measurement and tracking of low energy protons and electrons on different orbits with same instrumentation is of paramount importance for studies as geomagnetically trapped fluxes and space weather dynamics, dark matter search, low energy proton anisotropy and its effects on ICs as well as the solar protons studies. In addition, it will provide real-time "differentiable warnings" about the local space radiation hazard to other electronics systems on board the hosting satellite, including different criticality levels and alarm signals to activate mitigation techniques whenever this is strictly necessary to protect them from temporary/permanent failures. A real-time warning system will help satellite subsystems to save significant amount of power and memory with respect to other conventional techniques where the "mitigation" solutions are required to be active during entire mission life. The Mini-SPT will combine the use of technologies developed in cutting-edge high energy physics experiments (including technology from CMS experiments at CERN) and the development of new charged particle detecting systems for their use for the first time in space. The Mini-SPT essential objective is, by using for the first time in space SIPMs (Silicon Photomultipliers) technology for TOF and energy measurements, the production of high quality data with a good time, position and energy resolutions. The mini-SPT will consists of three main sub-units: a- A tracking and dE/dX measuring sub-detector which will be based on silicon pixel detectors (SPD) coupled to the rad-hard chip ROC-DIG (Read

  16. Turbulent fluxes by "Conditional Eddy Sampling"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2015-04-01

    for the field (one to two orders of magnitude lower compared to current closed-path laser based eddy covariance systems). Potential applications include fluxes of CO2, CH4, N2O, VOCs and other tracers. Finally we assess the flux accuracy of the Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) approach as in our real implementation relative to alternative techniques including eddy covariance (EC) and relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). We further quantify various sources of instrument and method specific measurement errors. This comparison uses real measurements of 20 Hz turbulent time series of 3D wind velocity, sonic temperature and CO2 mixing ratio over a mixed decidious forest at the 'ICOS' flux tower site 'Hainich', Germany. Results from a simulation using real wind and CO2 timeseries from the Hainich site from 30 April to 3 November 2014 and real instrument performance suggest that the maximum flux estimates error (50% and 75% error quantiles) from Conditional Eddy Sampling (CES) relative to the true flux is 1.3% and 10%, respectively for monthly net fluxes, 1.6% and 7%, respectively for daily net fluxes and 8% and 35%, respectively for 30-minute CO2 flux estimates. Those results from CES are promising and outperform our REA estimates by about a factor of 50 assuming REA with constant b value. Results include flux time series from the EC, CES and REA approaches from 30-min to annual resolution.

  17. Rare particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of 14 C from 223 Ra. 35 references

  18. Charged particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, T.I.; Nolde, G.V.

    1974-01-01

    A charged particle accelerator is described. It is made of an enclosure arranged for channeling a stream of charged particles along a predetermined path, and propelling means juxtaposed to said enclosure for generating therein a magnetic field moving in a predetermined direction with respect to each point of said path, the magnetic flux vector of that field being transverse to that path at every point, which gives the particles, along said path, a velocity connected to that of the mobile field by a predetermined relation. This can be applied to the fast production of chemical compounds, to the emission of neutrons and of thermal energy, and to the production of mechanical energy for propelling space ships [fr

  19. Charged particle accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ress, T I; Nolde, G V

    1974-11-25

    A charged particle accelerator is described. It is made of an enclosure arranged for channeling a stream of charged particles along a predetermined path, and propelling means juxtaposed to the enclosure for generating a magnetic field moving in a predetermined direction with respect to each point of the path, the magnetic flux vector of that field being transverse to that path at every point, which gives the particles, along said path, a velocity connected to that of the mobile field by a predetermined relation. This can be applied to the fast production of chemical compounds, to the emission of neutrons and of thermal energy, and to the production of mechanical energy for propelling space ships.

  20. The Open Flux Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R.; Henney, C. J.; Arge, C. N.; Liu, Y.; Derosa, M. L.; Yeates, A.; Owens, M. J.

    2017-10-01

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  1. The Open Flux Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linker, J. A.; Caplan, R. M.; Downs, C.; Riley, P.; Mikic, Z.; Lionello, R. [Predictive Science Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Road, Suite 170, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Henney, C. J. [Air Force Research Lab/Space Vehicles Directorate, 3550 Aberdeen Avenue SE, Kirtland AFB, NM (United States); Arge, C. N. [Science and Exploration Directorate, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Liu, Y. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Derosa, M. L. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, 3251 Hanover Street B/252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Yeates, A. [Department of Mathematical Sciences, Durham University, Durham, DH1 3LE (United Kingdom); Owens, M. J., E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com [Space and Atmospheric Electricity Group, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Earley Gate, P.O. Box 243, Reading RG6 6BB (United Kingdom)

    2017-10-10

    The heliospheric magnetic field is of pivotal importance in solar and space physics. The field is rooted in the Sun’s photosphere, where it has been observed for many years. Global maps of the solar magnetic field based on full-disk magnetograms are commonly used as boundary conditions for coronal and solar wind models. Two primary observational constraints on the models are (1) the open field regions in the model should approximately correspond to coronal holes (CHs) observed in emission and (2) the magnitude of the open magnetic flux in the model should match that inferred from in situ spacecraft measurements. In this study, we calculate both magnetohydrodynamic and potential field source surface solutions using 14 different magnetic maps produced from five different types of observatory magnetograms, for the time period surrounding 2010 July. We have found that for all of the model/map combinations, models that have CH areas close to observations underestimate the interplanetary magnetic flux, or, conversely, for models to match the interplanetary flux, the modeled open field regions are larger than CHs observed in EUV emission. In an alternative approach, we estimate the open magnetic flux entirely from solar observations by combining automatically detected CHs for Carrington rotation 2098 with observatory synoptic magnetic maps. This approach also underestimates the interplanetary magnetic flux. Our results imply that either typical observatory maps underestimate the Sun’s magnetic flux, or a significant portion of the open magnetic flux is not rooted in regions that are obviously dark in EUV and X-ray emission.

  2. MAGNETIC FLUX EXPULSION IN STAR FORMATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Bo; Li Zhiyun; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Krasnopolsky, Ruben; Shang, Hsien

    2011-01-01

    Stars form in dense cores of magnetized molecular clouds. If the magnetic flux threading the cores is dragged into the stars, the stellar field would be orders of magnitude stronger than observed. This well-known 'magnetic flux problem' demands that most of the core magnetic flux be decoupled from the matter that enters the star. We carry out the first exploration of what happens to the decoupled magnetic flux in three dimensions, using a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) version of the ENZO adaptive mesh refinement code. The field-matter decoupling is achieved through a sink particle treatment, which is needed to follow the protostellar accretion phase of star formation. We find that the accumulation of the decoupled flux near the accreting protostar leads to a magnetic pressure buildup. The high pressure is released anisotropically along the path of least resistance. It drives a low-density expanding region in which the decoupled magnetic flux is expelled. This decoupling-enabled magnetic structure has never been seen before in three-dimensional MHD simulations of star formation. It generates a strong asymmetry in the protostellar accretion flow, potentially giving a kick to the star. In the presence of an initial core rotation, the structure presents an obstacle to the formation of a rotationally supported disk, in addition to magnetic braking, by acting as a rigid magnetic wall that prevents the rotating gas from completing a full orbit around the central object. We conclude that the decoupled magnetic flux from the stellar matter can strongly affect the protostellar collapse dynamics.

  3. Apparatus and method for handling magnetic particles in a fluid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for handling magnetic particles suspended in a fluid, relying upon the known features of a magnetic flux conductor that is permeable thereby permitting the magnetic particles and fluid to flow therethrough; and a controllable magnetic field for the handling. The present invention is an improvement wherein the magnetic flux conductor is a monolithic porous foam.

  4. Proceedings of International Symposium TEPA 2016: Thunderstorms and Elementary Particle Acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilingarian, A.

    2017-03-01

    The problem of the thundercloud electrification and how particle fluxes and lightning flashes are initiated inside thunderclouds are among the biggest unsolved problems in atmospheric sciences. The relationship between thundercloud electrification, lightning initiation, and particle fluxes from the clouds has not been yet unambiguously established. Cosmic Ray Division of Yerevan Physics Institute (YerPhI), Armenia and Skobeltsyn Institute of Nuclear Physics of Moscow State University (SINP), Russia already 6th year are organizing Thunderstorms and Elementary Particle Acceleration (TEPA) annual meeting, creating environment for leading scientists and students to meet each other and discuss last discoveries in these fields (see reports of previous TEPA symposia in Fishman and Chilingarian, 2010, Chilingarian, 2013, 2014, 2016). The CRD have an impressing profile of the investigations in the emerging field of high- energy physics in the atmosphere. New designed particle detector networks and unique geographical location of Aragats station allows observation in last 8 years near 500 intensive particle fluxes from the thunderclouds, which were called TGEs – Thunderstorm ground enhancements. Aragats physicists enlarge the TGE research by coherent detection of the electrical and geomagnetic fields, temperature, relative humidity and other meteorological parameters, as well as by detection of the lightning flashes. An adopted multivariate approach allows interrelate particle fluxes, electric fields, and lightning occurrences and finally come to a comprehensive model of the TGE. One of most intriguing opportunities opening by observation of the high-energy processes in the atmosphere is their relation to lightning initiation. C.T.R. Wilson postulated acceleration of electrons in the strong electric fields inside thunderclouds in 1924. In 1992 Gurevich et al. developed the theory of the runaway breakdown (RB), now mostly referred to as relativistic runaway electron

  5. Meromorphic flux compactification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damian, Cesar [Departamento de Ingeniería Mecánica, Universidad de Guanajuato,Carretera Salamanca-Valle de Santiago Km 3.5+1.8 Comunidad de Palo Blanco,Salamanca (Mexico); Loaiza-Brito, Oscar [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Guanajuato,Loma del Bosque No. 103 Col. Lomas del Campestre C.P 37150 León, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2017-04-26

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  6. Meromorphic flux compactification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damian, Cesar; Loaiza-Brito, Oscar

    2017-01-01

    We present exact solutions of four-dimensional Einstein’s equations related to Minkoswki vacuum constructed from Type IIB string theory with non-trivial fluxes. Following https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)187; https://www.doi.org/10.1007/JHEP02(2015)188 we study a non-trivial flux compactification on a fibered product by a four-dimensional torus and a two-dimensional sphere punctured by 5- and 7-branes. By considering only 3-form fluxes and the dilaton, as functions on the internal sphere coordinates, we show that these solutions correspond to a family of supersymmetric solutions constructed by the use of G-theory. Meromorphicity on functions constructed in terms of fluxes and warping factors guarantees that flux and 5-brane contributions to the scalar curvature vanish while fulfilling stringent constraints as tadpole cancelation and Bianchi identities. Different Einstein’s solutions are shown to be related by U-dualities. We present three supersymmetric non-trivial Minkowski vacuum solutions and compute the corresponding soft terms. We also construct a non-supersymmetric solution and study its stability.

  7. Flux Pinning in Superconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Teruo

    2007-01-01

    The book covers the flux pinning mechanisms and properties and the electromagnetic phenomena caused by the flux pinning common for metallic, high-Tc and MgB2 superconductors. The condensation energy interaction known for normal precipitates or grain boundaries and the kinetic energy interaction proposed for artificial Nb pins in Nb-Ti, etc., are introduced for the pinning mechanism. Summation theories to derive the critical current density are discussed in detail. Irreversible magnetization and AC loss caused by the flux pinning are also discussed. The loss originally stems from the ohmic dissipation of normal electrons in the normal core driven by the electric field induced by the flux motion. The readers will learn why the resultant loss is of hysteresis type in spite of such mechanism. The influence of the flux pinning on the vortex phase diagram in high Tc superconductors is discussed, and the dependencies of the irreversibility field are also described on other quantities such as anisotropy of supercondu...

  8. Can Runoff Responses be Used to Predict Aquatic Biogeochemical Fluxes from Boreal Forest Ecosystems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestegaard, K. L.; Ziegler, S. E.; Billings, S. A.; Edwards, K. A.

    2017-12-01

    Climate change has direct effects on precipitation and temperature, which contribute to indirect changes in ecosystem productivity, runoff, biogeochemical processes, and species composition. In this research, we examine water balances in boreal forest watersheds to determine spatial and inter-annual variations in their responses to changes in precipitation. Our research indicates that Central and Western N. American boreal watersheds with mean annual precipitation (MAP) of less than 1000 mm exhibit positive relationships between annual precipitation and annual evapotranspiration, suggesting an increase in forest productivity during wet years often without increased runoff. In Maritime boreal watersheds in Eastern N. America and N. Europe, runoff is a significantly larger portion of the water balance and runoff increases with precipitation This regionalism in the water balance may have significant consequences for biogeochemical fluxes; for example, where MAP >1000 mm, a future wetter climate may result in increases in the terrestrial-to-aquatic transport of solutes. To test this idea, we examined inter-annual variations in hydrologic and dissolved organic carbon fluxes in watersheds in Newfoundland and Labrador along a longitudinal transect. Mean annual temperature varies from 0-5.2oC along the transect, and MAP varies from 1050 to 1500 mm. Data indicate an increase in evapotranspiration, runoff, and soil DOC fluxes with the increasing mean annual precipitation among watersheds along the transect. During the 2011-2015 period of study there was significant overlap in annual precipitation among the sites. Although wet water years also produced higher amounts of runoff from most watersheds, the annual soil DOC flux within each region was not significantly affected by these inter-annual changes in precipitation. Stream and groundwater monitoring data from the catchments reveal seasonal variations in evapotranspiration and runoff and their role in solute fluxes, and

  9. Neutron flux monitoring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Yasushi; Mitsubori, Minehisa; Ohashi, Kazunori.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention provides a neutron flux monitoring device for preventing occurrence of erroneous reactor scram caused by the elevation of the indication of a start region monitor (SRM) due to a factor different from actual increase of neutron fluxes. Namely, judgement based on measured values obtained by a pulse counting method and a judgment based on measured values obtained by a Cambel method are combined. A logic of switching neutron flux measuring method to be used for monitoring, namely, switching to an intermediate region when both of the judgements are valid is adopted. Then, even if the indication value is elevated based on the Cambel method with no increase of the counter rate in a neutron source region, the switching to the intermediate region is not conducted. As a result, erroneous reactor scram such as 'shorter reactor period' can be avoided. (I.S.)

  10. Magnetic and electric dipole constraints on extra dimensions and magnetic fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Aaron J.; Bander, Myron

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of charged particles and gauge fields in a compact extra dimension contributes to g-2 of the charged particles. In addition, a magnetic flux threading this extra dimension generates an electric dipole moment for these particles. We present constraints on the compactification size and on the possible magnetic flux imposed by the comparison of data and theory of the magnetic moment of the muon and from limits on the electric dipole moments of the muon, neutron and electron

  11. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Honda, M.; Kasahara, K.; Hidaka, K.; Midorikawa, S.

    1990-02-01

    A detailed Monte Carlo simulation of neutrino fluxes of atmospheric origin is made taking into account the muon polarization effect on neutrinos from muon decay. We calculate the fluxes with energies above 3 MeV for future experiments. There still remains a significant discrepancy between the calculated (ν e +antiν e )/(ν μ +antiν μ ) ratio and that observed by the Kamiokande group. However, the ratio evaluated at the Frejus site shows a good agreement with the data. (author)

  12. Experimental evidence of off-diagonal transport term and the discrepancy between energy/particle balance and perturbation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagashima, Keisuke; Fukuda, Takeshi

    1991-12-01

    Evidence of temperature gradient driven particle flux was observed from the sawtooth induced density propagation phenomenon in JT-60. This off-diagonal particle flux was confirmed using the numerical calculation of measured chord integrated electron density. It was shown that the discrepancies between thermal and particle diffusivities estimated from the perturbation method and energy/particle balance analysis can be explained by considering the flux equations with off-diagonal transport terms. These flux equations were compared with the E x B convective fluxes in an electro-static drift wave instability and it was found that the E x B fluxes are consistent with several experimental observations. (author)

  13. Determination of lead 210 atmospheric fluxes in Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Masri, M. S.; Shaik Khalil, H.

    2001-01-01

    Lead 210 atmospheric fluxes were determined by collecting 51 profiles from Syrian soil during 1998. Lead 210 fluxes in Syria calculated from lead 210 inventory in soil ranged from 15 Bq.m -2 .y -1 and 407 Bq.m -2 .y -1 with an average value of 128 Bq.m -2 .y -1 . the highest fluxes were found to be in Hama area due to the Gaab fault, which is considered as a radon source in the area. In addition, fluxes were also high in most sites, which are located in Syria valleys and around the lakes. Moreover, the study has indicated that there is no linear relation between lead 210 flux values and other parameters such as annual rainfall and bulk density of the soil. On the other hand, an effect, of those two factors on lead 210 distribution with depth has been observed. In addition, the results of variable lead 210 fluxes from site to another have proved that it is necessary, in order to obtain a representative mean value of lead 210 flux obtained in this study is within the worldwide range for lead 210 flux. (Author)

  14. Observations of magnetic flux ropes during magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Borg

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available We present an investigation of magnetic flux ropes observed by the four Cluster spacecraft during periods of magnetic reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail. Using a list of 21 Cluster encounters with the reconnection process in the period 2001–2006 identified in Borg et al. (2012, we present the distribution and characteristics of the flux ropes. We find 27 flux ropes embedded in the reconnection outflows of only 11 of the 21 reconnection encounters. Reconnection processes associated with no flux rope observations were not distinguishable from those where flux ropes were observed. Only 7 of the 27 flux ropes show evidence of enhanced energetic electron flux above 50 keV, and there was no clear signature of the flux rope in the thermal particle measurements. We found no clear correlation between the flux rope core field and the prevailing IMF By direction.

  15. Annual Report, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buettner, Herma G.; Leadbetter, Alan J.

    1999-01-01

    In this Annual Report a selection of about 30 scientific achievements are highlighted. These are intended to represent the huge range of high quality research carried out at ILL. In 1998 about 750 experiments were performed in the 225 days of reactor operation. The fields of magnetism and strongly correlated electron systems continue to be fertile and to throw up strong new growth. Remarkable new advances are coming from the applications of both existing and new neutron techniques and the development of new materials. These highlights concern superconductors, nano-magnetic particles, colossal magneto-resistance, magnetic-nuclear correlations, quantum spin systems and more. Novel magnetic measurements are also reported for a quasicrystal and on thin films of both normal and superconducting materials. Thanks to special abilities of neutrons to penetrate matter new results were obtained: following the production of novel intermetallic compounds, pressure dependence of phonon frequencies, the structure of glasses, solutions (in both bulk and thin films) and adsorbed phases; dynamics and relaxation in liquids; the confirmation of reptant motion in linear polymers, self-assembly and shear phenomena in liquid crystals. Three important results from nuclear physics are also included. These involve: fission-produced neutron-rich nuclei, weighing gamma photons in connection with the determination of fundamental constants and the determination of interatomic potentials from the slowing down process of atoms recoiling from gamma-ray emission - a direct link between nuclear and solid-state physics. The neutron experiments of importance for particle physics and biology will be reported next year

  16. Annual Report, 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buettner, Herma G; Leadbetter, Alan J [eds.; Institut Max von Laue - Paul Langevin (ILL), 38 - Grenoble (France)

    1999-11-01

    In this Annual Report a selection of about 30 scientific achievements are highlighted. These are intended to represent the huge range of high quality research carried out at ILL. In 1998 about 750 experiments were performed in the 225 days of reactor operation. The fields of magnetism and strongly correlated electron systems continue to be fertile and to throw up strong new growth. Remarkable new advances are coming from the applications of both existing and new neutron techniques and the development of new materials. These highlights concern superconductors, nano-magnetic particles, colossal magneto-resistance, magnetic-nuclear correlations, quantum spin systems and more. Novel magnetic measurements are also reported for a quasicrystal and on thin films of both normal and superconducting materials. Thanks to special abilities of neutrons to penetrate matter new results were obtained: following the production of novel intermetallic compounds, pressure dependence of phonon frequencies, the structure of glasses, solutions (in both bulk and thin films) and adsorbed phases; dynamics and relaxation in liquids; the confirmation of reptant motion in linear polymers, self-assembly and shear phenomena in liquid crystals. Three important results from nuclear physics are also included. These involve: fission-produced neutron-rich nuclei, weighing gamma photons in connection with the determination of fundamental constants and the determination of interatomic potentials from the slowing down process of atoms recoiling from gamma-ray emission - a direct link between nuclear and solid-state physics. The neutron experiments of importance for particle physics and biology will be reported next year

  17. Synthesizing greenhouse gas fluxes across nine European peatlands and shrublands - responses to climatic and environmental changes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carter, M.S.; Larsen, K.S.; Emmett, B.; Estiarte, M.; Field, C.; Leith, I.D.; Lund, M.; Meijide, A.; Mills, R.T.E.; Niinemets, Ü.; Peñuelas, J.; Portillo-Estrada, M.; Schmidt, I.K.; Selsted, M.B.; Sheppard, L.J.; Sowerby, A.; Tietema, A.; Beier, B.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we compare annual fluxes of methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and soil respiratory carbon dioxide (CO2) measured at nine European peatlands (n = 4) and shrublands (n = 5). The sites range from northern Sweden to Spain, covering a span in mean annual air temperature from 0 to 16C, and

  18. Role of recycling flux in gas fuelling in the Large Helical Device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyazawa, J.; Masuzaki, S.; Yamada, H.

    2004-01-01

    The 'effective' fuelling efficiency of hydrogen gas puffing ranges from 10% to 50% in the Large Helical Device. A local increase in neutral particle pressure at the gas puff port was measured in the experiment. The pressure increase rate corresponds to ∼ 10% of the gas puff flux. The other 90% of the gas puff flux increases the density and/or the plasma outflow. A particle balance model reveals that the recycling flux estimated from the particle flux on the divertor plates increases during the gas puffing. It is shown that the high effective fuelling efficiency is possibly due to the large recycling flux. At the limit of small recycling flux, the effective fuelling efficiency decreases to ∼10%. In the helium gas puff discharge, the effective fuelling efficiency is larger than the hydrogen gas puffing and approaches 100%. This can be related to the large recycling coefficient of more than 0.95. (author)

  19. Turbulence and particle acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    A model for the production of high energy particles in the supernova remnant Cas A is considered. The ordered expansion of the fast moving knots produce turbulent cells in the ambient interstellar medium. The turbulent cells act as magnetic scattering centers and charged particles are accelerated to large energies by the second order Fermi mechanism. Model predictions are shown to be consistent with the observed shape and time dependence of the radio spectrum, and with the scale size of magnetic field irregularities. Assuming a galactic supernova rate at 1/50 yr -1 , this mechanism is capable of producing the observed galactic cosmic ray flux and spectrum below 10 16 eV/nucleon. Several observed features of galactic cosmic rays are shown to be consistent with model predictions. A model for the objects known as radio tall galaxies is also presented. Independent blobs of magnetized plasma emerging from an active radio galaxy into an intracluster medium become turbulent due to Rayleigh--Taylor and Kelvin--Helmholz instabilities. The turbulence produces both in situ betatron and 2nd order Fermi accelerations. Predictions of the dependence of spectral index and flux on distance along the tail match observations well. Fitting provides values of physical parameters in the blobs. The relevance of this method of particle acceleration for the problem of the origin of x-ray emission in clusters of galaxies is discussed

  20. Strange particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinowsky, W.

    1989-01-01

    Work done in the mid 1950s at Brookhaven National Laboratory on strange particles is described. Experiments were done on the Cosmotron. The author describes his own and others' work on neutral kaons, lambda and theta particles and points out the theoretical gap between predictions and experimental findings. By the end of the decade, the theory of strange particles was better understood. (UK)

  1. Nuclear Physics Laboratory. Annual report no.21

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-11-01

    The annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory covers the following subjects: 1) the accelerators; 2) work in experimental nuclear physics; 3) research in particle physics: experiments at TRIUMF and CERN; 4) work in applied nuclear physics; and 5) work in theoretical physics

  2. Nuclear Physics Laboratory. Annual report no.22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-11-01

    The annual report of the Nuclear Physics Laboratory covers the following subjects: 1) the accelerators; 2) work in experimental nuclear physics; 3) research in particle physics: experiments at TRIUMF and CERN; 4) work in applied nuclear physics; and 5) work in theoretical physics

  3. Radiation flux measuring device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corte, E.; Maitra, P.

    1977-01-01

    A radiation flux measuring device is described which employs a differential pair of transistors, the output of which is maintained constant, connected to a radiation detector. Means connected to the differential pair produce a signal representing the log of the a-c component of the radiation detector, thereby providing a signal representing the true root mean square logarithmic output. 3 claims, 2 figures

  4. Soluble organic nutrient fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert G. Qualls; Bruce L. Haines; Wayne Swank

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives in this study were (i) compare fluxes of the dissolved organic nutrients dissolved organic carbon (DOC), DON, and dissolved organic phosphorus (DOP) in a clearcut area and an adjacent mature reference area. (ii) determine whether concentrations of dissolved organic nutrients or inorganic nutrients were greater in clearcut areas than in reference areas,...

  5. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio [CERN, Theory Unit, CH-1211 Geneva, 23 (Switzerland); Marescotti, Matteo [Dipartimento di Fisica Teorica, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, I-10125, Turin (Italy)

    2007-01-15

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds.

  6. Flux vacua and supermanifolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grassi, Pietro Antonio; Marescotti, Matteo

    2007-01-01

    As been recently pointed out, physically relevant models derived from string theory require the presence of non-vanishing form fluxes besides the usual geometrical constraints. In the case of NS-NS fluxes, the Generalized Complex Geometry encodes these informations in a beautiful geometrical structure. On the other hand, the R-R fluxes call for supergeometry as the underlying mathematical framework. In this context, we analyze the possibility of constructing interesting supermanifolds recasting the geometrical data and RR fluxes. To characterize these supermanifolds we have been guided by the fact topological strings on supermanifolds require the super-Ricci flatness of the target space. This can be achieved by adding to a given bosonic manifold enough anticommuting coordinates and new constraints on the bosonic sub-manifold. We study these constraints at the linear and non-linear level for a pure geometrical setting and in the presence of p-form field strengths. We find that certain spaces admit several super-extensions and we give a parameterization in a simple case of d bosonic coordinates and two fermionic coordinates. In addition, we comment on the role of the RR field in the construction of the super-metric. We give several examples based on supergroup manifolds and coset supermanifolds

  7. Atmospheric neutrino fluxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric neutrino fluxes, which are responsible for the main background in proton decay experiments, have been calculated by two independent methods. There are discrepancies between the two sets of results regarding latitude effects and up-down asymmetries, especially for neutrino energies Esub(ν) < 1 GeV. (author)

  8. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. Flux scaling: Ultimate regime. With the Nusselt number and the mixing length scales, we get the Nusselt number and Reynolds number (w'd/ν) scalings: and or. and. scaling expected to occur at extremely high Ra Rayleigh-Benard convection. Get the ultimate regime ...

  9. Charged-particle coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, W.L.; Crane, J.K.; Hendricks, C.D.

    1980-01-01

    Advanced target designs require thicker (approx. 300 μm) coatings and better surface finishes that can be produced with current coating techniques. An advanced coating technique is proposed to provide maximum control of the coating flux and optimum manipulation of the shell during processing. In this scheme a small beam of ions or particles of known incident energy are collided with a levitated spherical mandrel. Precise control of the incident energy and angle of the deposition flux optimizes the control of the coating morphology while controlled rotation and noncontact support of the shell minimizes the possibility of particulate or damage generated defects. Almost infinite variability of the incident energy and material in this process provides increased flexibility of the target designs which can be physically realized

  10. Annual report 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The paper presents the Scottish Universities Research and Reactor Centre Annual Report 1986-7. The contents contain the Director's Report, Reactor and Associated activities, and research activities. The reactor studies are described with respect to the reactor operations, isotope production and computing. The research work includes: environmental radioactivity, neutron activation analysis, particle track analysis, body composition studies, isotope traces in biology, nuclear physics, thermoluminescence dosimetry, gamma-ray irradiation processing, radiation effects on electrical insulation, isotopic geology, and NERC Radiocarbon Laboratory. (U.K.)

  11. Evidence for flux ropes in the earth's magnetotail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sibeck, D.G.

    1990-01-01

    Magnetic field reconnection is a fundamental process that occurs in the magnetotail during geomagnetic substorms. Some 2D reconnection models predict the formation of a plasmoid, or closed loop of magnetic field lines, in the noon-midnight meridional plane at those times. When the 3D magnetotail magnetic field is considered, it becomes clear that reconnection produces a flux rope with an axis transverse to the earth-sun line. Three signatures mark both 2D plasmoids and 3D flux ropes: (1) a bipolar magnetic field signature, (2) tailward flow of a hot plasma, and (3) convecting isotropic energetic particle distributions. Plasmoids and flux ropes may be distinguished by (4) the axial magnetic field that only flux ropes possess. All four signatures have been identified in near-earth, middle, and distant magnetotail observations, but their interpretation is disputed. Thus, the existence of magnetotail flux ropes remains a controversial subject. 59 refs

  12. Cosmology and particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salati, P.

    1986-01-01

    If the hot Big Bang model is correct, the very early universe provides us with a good laboratory to test our ideas on particle physics. The temperature and the density at that time are so high that each known particle must exist in chemical and in thermal equilibrium with the others. When the universe cools, the particles freeze out, leaving us today with a cosmic background. Such a kind of relic is of great interest because we can probe the Big Bang Model by studying the fossilized gas of a known particle. Conversely we can use that model to derive information about a hypothetical particle. Basically the freezing of a gas occurs a temperature T o and may be thermal or chemical. Studying the decoupling of a stable neutrino brings information on its mass: if the mass M ν lies in the forbidden range, the neutrino has to be unstable and its lifetime is constrained by cosmology. As for the G.U.T. Monopole, cosmology tells us that its present mass density is either to big or to small (1 monopole/observable universe) owing to a predicted flux far from the Parker Limit. Finally, the super red-giant star life time constrains the axion or the Higgs to be more massive than .2 MeV [fr

  13. GCR flux 9-day variations with LISA Pathfinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grimani, C; Benella, S; Fabi, M; Finetti, N; Telloni, D

    2017-01-01

    Galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) energy spectra in the heliosphere vary on the basis of the level of solar activity, the status of solar polarity and interplanetary transient magnetic structures of solar origin. A high counting rate particle detector (PD) aboard LISA Pathfinder (LPF) allows for the measurement of galactic cosmic-ray and solar energetic particle (SEP) integral fluxes at energies > 70 MeV n −1 up to 6500 counts s −1 . Data are gathered with a sampling time of 15 s. A study of GCR flux depressions associated with the third harmonic of the Sun rotation period (∼ 9 days) is presented here. (paper)

  14. Proceedings of the 45. annual conference of metallurgists of CIM : interfacial phenomena in fine particle technology : the 6. UBC-McGill-UA international symposium on fundamentals of mineral processing in honor of Professor Janusz S. Laskowski

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Z.; Liu, Q. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Chemical and Materials Engineering] (eds.)

    2006-07-01

    This conference, organized by the Mineral Sciences and Engineering Section of the Metallurgical Society of CIM acknowledged that strong economic growth is the driving force behind record high productivity in the mining industry. The industry must strive to meet the higher demand for raw materials while facing the challenge of stringent environmental constraints. The continuing success of the mining industry will depend on efficient and environmentally sound mineral processing, particularly since the industry has been forced to exploit more complex forms of minerals given the gradual depletion of high-grade mineral resources. In addition to shortages in qualified personnel in mineral processing, the industry is currently facing a general reduction in basic research and training programs, resulting in deficiencies in technologies needed to process complex ores. World experts in mineral processing participated at this conference to share their novel research in fine particle processing, applications of atomic force microscopy, flotation research, particle interactions in mineral processing, flotation froths, grinding, rheology and sulphide flotation chemistry. The sessions of the conference were entitled: atomic force microscopy in flotation research particulate interactions; flotation froths, flocculation and dewatering; grinding and rheology surfactants; flotation froths, particle-bubble interactions; sulphide flotation; and, general flotation froths. The conference featured 37 presentations, of which 6 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  15. Anomalous particle pinch for collisionless plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    The particle transport arising from the convection of nonadiabatic electron density by ion temperature gradient driven turbulence is examined when trapped electrons collide less often than a bounce period. In the lower temperature end of this regime, trapped electrons are collisional and the particle flux is outward (in the direction of the gradients). When the trapped electrons are collisionless, there is a temperature threshold above which the electron temperature gradient driven particle flux changes sign and becomes inward. The magnitude of the nonadiabatic electron contribution to the growth rate is found to be potentially of the same order as the ion contribution. 11 refs

  16. Wet deposition flux of trace elements to the Adirondack region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, X.; Keskin, S.S.; Gullu, G.; Olmez, I.

    2001-01-01

    Wet deposition samples from two locations in the Adirondack region of New York were analyzed for trace elemental composition by instrumental neutron activation analysis. Annual fluxes of the measured species were determined by precipitation-weighted and linear-regression methods. Despite several episodes of high deposition fluxes, the cumulative areal wet deposition of trace elements increased fairly linearly (r 2 > 0.9) over the two year sampling period at both sites. This implies that short duration sampling programs may be used to estimate long-term fluxes and cumulative wet deposition impacts. Based on the magnitude of their fluxes, the measured species have been divided into four groups: acidic anions, electroneutral balancing cations, and minor and trace elements of anthropogenic origin. (author)

  17. Fluxes and budget of organic matter in the benthic boundary layer over the northwestern Mediterranean margin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscail, R.; Pocklington, R.; Daumas, R.; Guidi, L.

    1990-09-01

    Sediment traps were deployed at depths of 26 and 645 m at two stations on the continental margin of the Gulf of Lions (northwestern Mediterranean). During the same period, surficial sediments were sampled by box corer. The material collected by bottom sediment traps and in corresponding surface sediments was analysed for total organic carbon, hydrolysable organic carbon, nitrogen, sugars, amino acids and lignin-derived compounds. Seasonal variations in organic inputs and the difference between particles from bottom layers and sediment were compared. For the continental shelf station, the annual averages of organic compound fluxes were found to be: 552 mg m -2 d -1 (orgC), 183 mg m -2 d -1 (N), 283 mg m -2 d -1 (hydrolysable orgC), 181 mg m -2 d -1 (Ceq. glucose) and 478 mg m -2 d -1 (amino acids). These values would have to be reduced by half if the large fluxes of autumn, due to resuspension during storm events, were excluded. For the slope, the average annual fluxes were evaluated as: 92.7 mg m -2 d -1 (orgC); 9.4 mg m -2 d -1 (N); 74.1 mg m -2 d -1 (hydrolysable orgC); 11.8 mg m -2 d -1 (Ceq.glucose); and 68.2 mg m -2 d -1 (amino acids). The values obtained for material trapped over the shelf are 4-7 times (orgC and amino acids) and 15-19 times (sugars and nitrogen) higher than for the slope. In contrast, the content in organic compounds of surficial sediments on the slope is 2-3 times higher than that of the shelf deposits. Budgets of orgC transformation at the sediment-water interface were based on calculations which include bottom orgC fluxes, sedimentation rates and orgC content for the first centimetre of deposits. For the continental shelf area, 5.3 g m -2 y -1 have accumulated and 16.7 g m -2 y -1 are mineralized. For the canyon and adjacent slope, the figures are 0.4 and 0.6 g m -2 y -1, respectively. Over the upper adjacent slope, the major part of organic matter is transported by advective processes, which contribute to the sediment interface

  18. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambiotte, R.; Salazar, J.M.; Brenig, L.

    2005-01-01

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic behavior. We also propose an empirical system of ODEs representing the proportion of each type of particles and the segregation flux of particles. These equations reproduce the major features observed by the simulations

  19. From particle segregation to the granular clock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambiotte, R. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: rlambiot@ulb.ac.be; Salazar, J.M. [Universite De Bougogne-LRRS UMR-5613 CNRS, Faculte des Sciences Mirande, 9 Av. Alain Savary, 21078 Dijon Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jmarcos@u-bourgogne.fr; Brenig, L. [Physique Statistique, Plasmas et Optique Non-lineaire, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Campus Plaine, Boulevard du Triomphe, Code Postal 231, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)]. E-mail: lbrenig@ulb.ac.be

    2005-08-01

    Recently several authors studied the segregation of particles for a system composed of mono-dispersed inelastic spheres contained in a box divided by a wall in the middle. The system exhibited a symmetry breaking leading to an overpopulation of particles in one side of the box. Here we study the segregation of a mixture of particles composed of inelastic hard spheres and fluidized by a vibrating wall. Our numerical simulations show a rich phenomenology: horizontal segregation and periodic behavior. We also propose an empirical system of ODEs representing the proportion of each type of particles and the segregation flux of particles. These equations reproduce the major features observed by the simulations.

  20. Research and development of a gaseous detector PIM (parallel ionization multiplier) dedicated to particle tracking under high hadron rates; Recherche et developpement d'un detecteur gazeux PIM (Parallel Ionization Multiplier) pour la trajectographie de particules sous un haut flux de hadrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beucher, J

    2007-10-15

    PIM (Parallel Ionization Multiplier) is a multi-stage micro-pattern gaseous detector using micro-meshes technology. This new device, based on Micromegas (micro-mesh gaseous structure) detector principle of operation, offers good characteristics for minimum ionizing particles track detection. However, this kind of detectors placed in hadron environment suffers discharges which degrade sensibly the detection efficiency and account for hazard to the front-end electronics. In order to minimize these strong events, it is convenient to perform charges multiplication by several successive steps. Within the framework of a European hadron physics project we have investigated the multi-stage PIM detector for high hadrons flux application. For this part of research and development, a systematic study for many geometrical configurations of a two amplification stages separated with a transfer space operated with the gaseous mixture Ne + 10% CO{sub 2} has been performed. Beam tests realised with high energy hadrons at CERN facility have given that discharges probability could be strongly reduced with a suitable PIM device. A discharges rate lower to 10{sup 9} by incident hadron and a spatial resolution of 51 {mu}m have been measured at the beginning efficiency plateau (>96 %) operating point. (author)

  1. Design of a flux buffer based on the flux shuttle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenson, M.

    1991-01-01

    This paper discusses the design considerations for a flux buffer based on the flux-shuttle concept. Particular attention is given to the issues of flux popping, stability of operation and saturation levels for a large input. Modulation techniques used in order to minimize 1/f noise, in addition to offsets are also analyzed. Advantages over conventional approaches using a SQUID for a flux buffer are discussed. Results of computer simulations are presented

  2. Lobotomy of flux compactifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dibitetto, Giuseppe [Institutionen för fysik och astronomi, University of Uppsala,Box 803, SE-751 08 Uppsala (Sweden); Guarino, Adolfo [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Institute for Theoretical Physics,Bern University, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Roest, Diederik [Centre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen,Nijenborgh 4 9747 AG Groningen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    We provide the dictionary between four-dimensional gauged supergravity and type II compactifications on T{sup 6} with metric and gauge fluxes in the absence of supersymmetry breaking sources, such as branes and orientifold planes. Secondly, we prove that there is a unique isotropic compactification allowing for critical points. It corresponds to a type IIA background given by a product of two 3-tori with SO(3) twists and results in a unique theory (gauging) with a non-semisimple gauge algebra. Besides the known four AdS solutions surviving the orientifold projection to N=4 induced by O6-planes, this theory contains a novel AdS solution that requires non-trivial orientifold-odd fluxes, hence being a genuine critical point of the N=8 theory.

  3. Particle therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  4. Particle therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics

  5. Dusty-Plasma Particle Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, John E.

    2005-01-01

    A dusty-plasma apparatus is being investigated as means of accelerating nanometer- and micrometer-sized particles. Applications for the dusty-plasma particle accelerators fall into two classes: Simulation of a variety of rapidly moving dust particles and micrometeoroids in outer-space environments that include micrometeoroid streams, comet tails, planetary rings, and nebulae and Deposition or implantation of nanoparticles on substrates for diverse industrial purposes that could include hardening, increasing thermal insulation, altering optical properties, and/or increasing permittivities of substrate materials. Relative to prior apparatuses used for similar applications, dusty-plasma particle accelerators offer such potential advantages as smaller size, lower cost, less complexity, and increased particle flux densities. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator exploits the fact that an isolated particle immersed in plasma acquires a net electric charge that depends on the relative mobilities of electrons and ions. Typically, a particle that is immersed in a low-temperature, partially ionized gas, wherein the average kinetic energy of electrons exceeds that of ions, causes the particle to become negatively charged. The particle can then be accelerated by applying an appropriate electric field. A dusty-plasma particle accelerator (see figure) includes a plasma source such as a radio-frequency induction discharge apparatus containing (1) a shallow cup with a biasable electrode to hold the particles to be accelerated and (2) a holder for the substrate on which the particles are to impinge. Depending on the specific design, a pair of electrostatic-acceleration grids between the substrate and discharge plasma can be used to both collimate and further accelerate particles exiting the particle holder. Once exposed to the discharge plasma, the particles in the cup quickly acquire a negative charge. Application of a negative voltage pulse to the biasable electrode results in the

  6. Physics of magnetic flux ropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, C. T.; Priest, E. R.; Lee, L. C.

    The present work encompasses papers on the structure, waves, and instabilities of magnetic flux ropes (MFRs), photospheric flux tubes (PFTs), the structure and heating of coronal loops, solar prominences, coronal mass ejections and magnetic clouds, flux ropes in planetary ionospheres, the magnetopause, magnetospheric field-aligned currents and flux tubes, and the magnetotail. Attention is given to the equilibrium of MFRs, resistive instability, magnetic reconnection and turbulence in current sheets, dynamical effects and energy transport in intense flux tubes, waves in solar PFTs, twisted flux ropes in the solar corona, an electrodynamical model of solar flares, filament cooling and condensation in a sheared magnetic field, the magnetopause, the generation of twisted MFRs during magnetic reconnection, ionospheric flux ropes above the South Pole, substorms and MFR structures, evidence for flux ropes in the earth magnetotail, and MFRs in 3D MHD simulations.

  7. Particle cosmology

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the Universe at the largest and smallest scales traditionally has been the subject of cosmology and particle physics, respectively. Studying the evolution of the Universe connects today's large scales with the tiny scales in the very early Universe and provides the link between the physics of particles and of the cosmos. This series of five lectures aims at a modern and critical presentation of the basic ideas, methods, models and observations in today's particle cosmology.

  8. Measuring oxidation processes: Atomic oxygen flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    Of the existing 95 high-energy accelerators in the world, the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) is the only one of the linear-collider type, where electrons and positrons are smashed together at energies of 50 GeV using linear beams instead of beam rings for achieving interactions. Use of a collider eliminates energy losses in the form of x-rays due to the curved trajectory of the rings, a phenomena known as bremsstrauhlung. Because these losses are eliminated, higher interaction energies are reached. Consequently the SLC produced the first Z particle in quantities large enough to allow measurement of its physical properties with some accuracy. SLAC intends to probe still deeper into the structure of matter by next polarizing the electrons in the beam. The surface of the source for these polarized particles, typically gallium arsenide, must be kept clean of contaminants. One method for accomplishing this task requires the oxidation of the surface, from which the oxidized contaminants are later boiled off. The technique requires careful measurement of the oxidation process. SLAC researchers have developed a technique for measuring the atomic oxygen flux in this process. The method uses a silver film on a quartz-crystal, deposition-rate monitor. Measuring the initial oxidation rate of the silver, which is proportional to the atomic oxygen flux, determines a lower limit on that flux in the range of 10 13 to 10 17 atoms per square centimeter per second. Furthermore, the deposition is reversible by exposing the sensor to atomic hydrogen. This technique has wider applications to processes in solid-state and surface physics as well as surface chemistry. In semiconductor manufacturing where a precise thickness of oxide must be deposited, this technique could be used to monitor the critical flux of atomic oxygen in the process

  9. Carbon dioxide fluxes from an urban area in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tao; Wang, Yuesi

    2012-03-01

    A better understanding of urban carbon dioxide (CO 2) emissions is important for quantifying urban contributions to the global carbon budget. From January to December 2008, CO 2 fluxes were measured, by eddy covariance at 47 m above ground on a meteorological tower in a high-density residential area in Beijing. The results showed that the urban surface was a net source of CO 2 in the atmosphere. Diurnal flux patterns were similar to those previously observed in other cities and were largely influenced by traffic volume. Carbon uptake by both urban vegetation during the growing season and the reduction of fuel consumption for domestic heating resulted in less-positive daily fluxes in the summer. The average daily flux measured in the summer was 0.48 mg m - 2 s - 1 , which was 82%, 35% and 36% lower than those in the winter, spring and autumn, respectively. The reduction of vehicles on the road during the 29th Olympic and Paralympic Games had a significant impact on CO 2 flux. The flux of 0.40 mg m - 2 s - 1 for September 2008 was approximately 0.17 mg m - 2 s - 1 lower than the flux for September 2007. Annual CO 2 emissions from the study site were estimated at 20.6 kg CO 2 m - 2 y - 1 , considerably higher than yearly emissions obtained from other urban and suburban landscapes.

  10. FY 1998 annual report on the researches on creation of inorganic thin films and fine particles of new functions; 1998 nendo shinkino muki usumaku biryushi no sosei kenkyu chosa hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Creation of inorganic thin films and fine particles under a microgravity atmosphere is studied, for which Japan Microgravity Center's drop test facilities are used. The Cu anodic dissolution tests are conducted using a quasi-two-dimensional electrolytic cell, as part of the basic researches on micromachining for controlling high aspect ratio and shape anisotropy. It is difficult to control natural convection on the ground, even when the electrode thickness is decreased to 100 {mu}m or less. Concentration of the electrolytic solution over the anode surface is more supersaturated under a microgravity than on the ground. For production of fine glass particles, the liquid phase is involved between evaporation and solidification of glass. The Pb-X and Pb-Zn-X systems are molten, and dropped and, at the same time, solidified by quenching. The X component (including Zn) is uniformly dispersed under a microgravity in spheres of several to 20 {mu}m in diameter, although it is separated on the ground. The spherical droplets of GaSb can grow into a single crystal even in the absence of the seed, when supercooled and directed at high speed onto silica glass. A SiGe film with fine voids can be prepared and fast adhered to the base by flash lamp annealing, when it is deposited on the base with a SiN film as the buffer and then made into the film. (NEDO)

  11. Particle physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamal, Anwar

    2014-01-01

    Provides step-by-step derivations. Contains numerous tables and diagrams. Supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Sketches also the historical development of the subject. This textbook teaches particle physics very didactically. It supports learning and teaching with numerous worked examples, questions and problems with answers. Numerous tables and diagrams lead to a better understanding of the explanations. The content of the book covers all important topics of particle physics: Elementary particles are classified from the point of view of the four fundamental interactions. The nomenclature used in particle physics is explained. The discoveries and properties of known elementary particles and resonances are given. The particles considered are positrons, muon, pions, anti-protons, strange particles, neutrino and hadrons. The conservation laws governing the interactions of elementary particles are given. The concepts of parity, spin, charge conjugation, time reversal and gauge invariance are explained. The quark theory is introduced to explain the hadron structure and strong interactions. The solar neutrino problem is considered. Weak interactions are classified into various types, and the selection rules are stated. Non-conservation of parity and the universality of the weak interactions are discussed. Neutral and charged currents, discovery of W and Z bosons and the early universe form important topics of the electroweak interactions. The principles of high energy accelerators including colliders are elaborately explained. Additionally, in the book detectors used in nuclear and particle physics are described. This book is on the upper undergraduate level.

  12. Magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  13. Proton flux under radiation belts: near-equatorial zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grigoryan, O.R.; Panasyuk, M.I.; Petrov, A.N.; Kudela, K.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the features of low-energy proton flux increases in near-equatorial region (McIlvein parameter L th the proton flux (with energy from tens keV up to several MeV) increases are registering regularly. However modern proton flux models (for example AP8 model) works at L>1.15 only and does not take into account near-equatorial protons. These fluxes are not too big, but the investigation of this phenomenon is important in scope of atmosphere-ionosphere connections and mechanisms of particles transport in magnetosphere. In according to double charge-exchange model the proton flux in near-equatorial region does not depend on geomagnetic local time (MLT) and longitude. However the Azur satellite data and Kosmos-484, MIR station and Active satellite data revealed the proton flux dependence on longitude. The other feature of near-equatorial proton flux is the dependence on geomagnetic local time revealed in the Sampex satellite experiment and other experiments listed above. In this work the dependences on MLT and longitude are investigated using the Active satellite (30-500 keV) and Sampex satellite (>800 keV). This data confirms that main sources of near-equatorial protons are radiation belts and ring current. The other result is that near-equatorial protons are quasi-trapped. The empirical proton flux dependences on L, B at near-equatorial longitudes are presented. (author)

  14. Airborne particulate concentrations and fluxes at an active uranium mill tailings site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sehmel, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particulate concentrations and fluxes of transported mill tailing materials were measured at an active mill tailings site. Experimental measurement equipment consisted of meteorological instrumentation to automatically activate total particulate air samplers as a function of wind speed increments and direction, as well as particle cascade impactors to measure airborne respirable concentrations as a function of particle size. In addition, an inertial impaction device measured nonrespirable fluxes of airborne particles. Caclulated results are presented in terms of the airborne solid concentration in g/m 3 , the horizontal airborne mass flux in g/(m 2 -day) for total collected nonrespirable particles and the radionuclide concentrations in dpm/g as a function of particle diameter for respirable and nonrespirable particles

  15. Plasma particle drifts due to traveling waves with cyclotron frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatakeyama, Rikizo; Sato, Naoyuki; Sato, Noriyoshi

    1991-01-01

    A particle orbit theory yields that traveling waves with cyclotron frequencies give rise to charged particle drifts perpendicular both to the wave propagation and external magnetic field lines. The result is applicable to particle-flux control of magnetized plasmas. (author)

  16. Foreword. Annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sujkowski, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: My Foreword to the 2002 Annual Report ended with a handful of best wishes for the year 2003. One of them, rather highly pitched, was addressed to our funding authorities: may their preaching about a ''Knowledge Based Society in Poland'' come true ! There is, unfortunately, little evidence that this preaching is taken seriously by the preachers, even though the time for that in a unifying Europe is high. I hope that this Annual Report bears witness that at least we are doing our bit in this direction. Thus: We have published 203 papers in international journals. Several of them quickly gain international recognition. There was hard competition for our internal awards. The four emerging winners are behind the contributions: on the creation of circular vortices in Bose-Einstein condensates (contribution 8.23), on our share in the NA49 experiment at CERN (contribution 6.4), on our use of solid state nuclear track detectors, SSNTD, in the hostile environment of hot plasma experiments (contribution 5.5) and on some special detectors for positron emission tomography to be applied in hadron therapy (contribution 3.7). We have also contributed to the general education by, e.g., having over 7000 young guests at our Training Department (see Chapter 11 ), taking part in the Science Festival in Warsaw and Lodz, or starting the ''Roland Maze project'' in that city. The project aims at involving a large number of high school pupils in active research concerning extensive air showers at highest energies (contribution 7.6). Very importantly, it has gained approval and financial support of the local authorities in Lodz. Two international meetings were organized by our Institute: the 28 Mazurian Lakes Conference, ''The Atomic Nucleus as a Laboratory for Fundamental Processes'', EPS sponsored, see e.g. CERN Courier 44 (2004), and the ''Conference on Plasma Research and Applications, PLASMA 2003'', biannual gathering of plasma physics its. Our attempts at obtaining EU

  17. Particle accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ress, R.I.

    1976-01-01

    Charged particles are entrained in a predetermined direction, independent of their polarity, in a circular orbit by a magnetic field rotating at high speed about an axis in a closed cylindrical or toroidal vessel. The field may be generated by a cylindrical laser structure, whose beam is polygonally reflected from the walls of an excited cavity centered on the axis, or by high-frequency energization of a set of electromagnets perpendicular to the axis. In the latter case, a separate magnetostatic axial field limits the orbital radius of the particles. These rotating and stationary magnetic fields may be generated centrally or by individual magnets peripherally spaced along its circular orbit. Chemical or nuclear reactions can be induced by collisions between the orbiting particles and an injected reactant, or by diverting high-speed particles from one doughnut into the path of counterrotating particles in an adjoining doughnut

  18. On standard forms for transport equations and fluxes: Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ross, D.W.

    1990-03-01

    Quasilinear expressions for anomalous particle and energy fluxes arising from electrostatic plasma turbulence in a tokamak are reviewed yet again. Further clarifications are made, and the position taken in a previous report is modified. There, the total energy flux, Q j , and the conductive heat flux, q j , were correctly defined, and the anomalous Q j was correctly calculated. It was shown that the anomalous energy transport can be correctly described by ∇·Q* j , where Q* j = 3/5 Q j , with all remaining source terms such as left-angle p j ∇·Vj} cancelling. Here, a revised discussion is given of the identification of the anomalous conductive flux, q j , in which the distinction between Q j and Q* j is reconsidered. It is shown that there is more than one consistent way to define q j . Transport calculations involving only theoretical electrostatic turbulent fluxes are unaffected by these distinctions since Q j or Q* j , rather than q j , is the quantity naturally calculated in the theory. However, an ambiguity remains in experimental transport analysis if the measured particle flux Γ j = n j V j is to be used in the energy equation. This is because we cannot be sure how properly to treat the source terms p j ∇·V j or { p j ∇·V j }. 17 refs

  19. Annual Report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This annual report presents research programmes and basic investigations of the Institute for Transuranium Elements. In Basic Safety Research on Nuclear Fuels, studies of the fracture and evaporation behaviour of UO 2 , simulating different degrees of burn-up, were continued. The Study of Safety Aspects of Fuel Operation and Handling dealt with an investigation of the operational limits of advanced fuels and with the transport and dispersion of radioactive aerosol particles in nuclear facilities. Actinide Determination and Recycling activities were mainly concerned with an evaluation of the technical possibilities to transmute long-lived nuclear waste constituents into shorter-lived fission products. The results of an earlier irradiation test were evaluated, and minor-actinide containing oxide fuel pins which had been irradiated in the PHENIX reactor were analysed. Progress was made in the Characterization of Waste Forms and of High Burn-Up Fuel. In the context of efforts to model the consequences of water intrusion into an underground fuel deposit (Project COCAIN), existing models (FUTURE, MITRA, CHEMIF) were adapted and used to characterize the initial state of an LWR fuel which had been subject to several irradiation cycles. In Actinide Research the accent was on the preparation and on structural and physical studies of actinide compounds with heavy fermion properties and with a particular magnetic behaviour. Experimental investigations on the attenuation of sound waves by aerosols and theoretical studies concerning the optimization of acoustic cavities for aerosol conditioning were carried out during the reporting period under the heading Exploratory Research. Support to the Directorate General XVII (Energy) on safeguarding fissile materials concentrated on the preparation of work in on-site analytical laboratories in Sellafield and La Hague. In this context, a portable compact K-edge absorption spectrometer was constructed and an expert system for the

  20. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadilin, V. V.; Kaplun, A. A.; Taraskin, A. A.

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results.

  1. Plastic scintillator detector for pulsed flux measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadilin, V V; Kaplun, A A; Taraskin, A A

    2017-01-01

    A neutron detector, providing charged particle detection capability, has been designed. The main purpose of the detector is to measure pulsed fluxes of both charged particles and neutrons during scientific experiments. The detector consists of commonly used neutron-sensitive ZnS(Ag) / 6 LiF scintillator screens wrapping a layer of polystyrene based scintillator (BC-454, EJ-254 or equivalent boron loaded plastic). This type of detector design is able to log a spatial distribution of events and may be scaled to any size. Different variations of the design were considered and modelled in specialized toolkits. The article presents a review of the detector design features as well as simulation results. (paper)

  2. Multidecadal increases in the Yukon River Basin of chemical fluxes as indicators of changing flowpaths, groundwater, and permafrost

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toohey, Ryan C; Herman-Mercer, Nicole M.; Schuster, Paul F.; Mutter, Edda A.; Koch, Joshua C.

    2016-01-01

    The Yukon River Basin, underlain by discontinuous permafrost, has experienced a warming climate over the last century that has altered air temperature, precipitation, and permafrost. We investigated a water chemistry database from 1982 to 2014 for the Yukon River and its major tributary, the Tanana River. Significant increases of Ca, Mg, and Na annual flux were found in both rivers. Additionally, SO4 and P annual flux increased in the Yukon River. No annual trends were observed for dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from 2001 to 2014. In the Yukon River, Mg and SO4 flux increased throughout the year, while some of the most positive trends for Ca, Mg, Na, SO4, and P flux occurred during the fall and winter months. Both rivers exhibited positive monthly DOC flux trends for summer (Yukon River) and winter (Tanana River). These trends suggest increased active layer expansion, weathering, and sulfide oxidation due to permafrost degradation throughout the Yukon River Basin.

  3. Regional nitrous oxide flux in Amazon basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felippe, Monica Tais Siqueira D'Amelio

    2010-01-01

    Nitrous oxide (N 2 O) is the third most important anthropogenic greenhouse gas. Globally, the main sources of N 2 O are nitrification and denitrification in soils. About two thirds of the soil emissions occur in the tropics and approximately 20% originate in wet rain forest ecosystems, like the Amazon forest. The work presented here involves aircraft vertical profiles of N 2 O from the surface to 4 km over two sites in the Eastern and Central Amazon: Tapajos National Forest (2000-2009) and Cuieiras Biologic Reserve (2004-2007), and the estimation of N 2 O fluxes for regions upwind of these sites using two methods: Column Integration Technique and Inversion Model - FLEXPART. To our knowledge, these regional scale N 2 O measurements in Amazonia are unique and represent a new approach to looking regional scale emissions. For the both methods, the fluxes upwind of Cuieiras Biologic Reserve exhibited little seasonality, and the annual mean was 1.9 ±1.6 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 for the Column Integration Technique and 2.3±0.9 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 for Inversion Model - FLEXPART. For fluxes upwind of Tapajos Nacional Forest, the Inversion Model - FLEXPART presented about half (0.9±1.7 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 ) of the Column Integration Technique (2.0±1.1 mgN 2 Om -2 day -1 ) for the same period (2004-2008). One reason could be because the inversion model does not consider anthropic activities, once it had a good representation for less impacted area. Both regions presented similar emission during wet season. By Column Integration Technique, fluxes upwind Tapajos Nacional Forest were similar for dry and wet seasons. The dry season N 2 O fluxes exhibit significant correlations with CO fluxes, indicating a larger than expected source of N 2 O from biomass burning. The average CO:N 2 O ratio for all 38 profiles sampled during the dry season was 82±69 mol CO:molN 2 O and suggests a larger biomass burning contribution to the global N 2 O budget than previously reported. (author)

  4. Critical heat flux evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banner, D.

    1995-01-01

    Critical heat flux (CHF) is of importance for nuclear safety and represents the major limiting factors for reactor cores. Critical heat flux is caused by a sharp reduction in the heat transfer coefficient located at the outer surface of fuel rods. Safety requires that this phenomenon also called the boiling crisis should be precluded under nominal or incidental conditions (Class I and II events). CHF evaluation in reactor cores is basically a two-step approach. Fuel assemblies are first tested in experimental loops in order to determine CHF limits under various flow conditions. Then, core thermal-hydraulic calculations are performed for safety evaluation. The paper will go into more details about the boiling crisis in order to pinpoint complexity and lack of fundamental understanding in many areas. Experimental test sections needed to collect data over wide thermal-hydraulic and geometric ranges are described CHF safety margin evaluation in reactors cores is discussed by presenting how uncertainties are mentioned. From basic considerations to current concerns, the following topics are discussed; knowledge of the boiling crisis, CHF predictors, and advances thermal-hydraulic codes. (authors). 15 refs., 4 figs

  5. Neutron flux monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seki, Eiji; Tai, Ichiro.

    1984-01-01

    Purpose: To maintain the measuring accuracy and the reponse time within an allowable range in accordance with the change of neutron fluxes in a nuclear reactor pressure vessel. Constitution: Neutron fluxes within a nuclear reactor pressure vessel are detected by detectors, converted into pulse signals and amplified in a range switching amplifier. The amplified signals are further converted through an A/D converter and digital signals from the converter are subjected to a square operation in an square operation circuit. The output from the circuit is inputted into an integration circuit to selectively accumulate the constant of 1/2n, 1 - 1/2n (n is a positive integer) respectively for two continuing signals to perform weighing. Then, the addition is carried out to calculate the integrated value and the addition number is changed by the chane in the number n to vary the integrating time. The integrated value is inputted into a control circuit to control the value of n so that the fluctuation and the calculation time for the integrated value are within a predetermined range and, at the same time, the gain of the range switching amplifier is controlled. (Seki, T.)

  6. Salp contributions to vertical carbon flux in the Sargasso Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Joshua P.; Steinberg, Deborah K.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a one-dimensional model to estimate salp contributions to vertical carbon flux at the Bermuda Atlantic Time-series Study (BATS) site in the North Atlantic subtropical gyre for a 17-yr period (April 1994 to December 2011). We based the model parameters on published rates of salp physiology and experimentally determined sinking and decomposition rates of salp carcasses. Salp grazing was low during non-bloom conditions, but routinely exceeded 100% of chlorophyll standing stock and primary production during blooms. Fecal pellet production was the largest source of salp carbon flux (78% of total), followed by respiration below 200 m (19%), sinking of carcasses (3%), and DOC excretion below 200 m (salp-mediated carbon flux. Seasonally, salp flux was higher during spring-summer than fall-winter, due to seasonal changes in species composition and abundance. Salp carbon export to 200 m was on average 2.3 mg C m-2 d-1 across the entire time series. This is equivalent to 11% of the mean 200 m POC flux measured by sediment traps in the region. During years with significant salp blooms, however, annually-averaged salp carbon export was the equivalent of up to 60% of trap POC flux at 200 m. Salp carbon flux attenuated slowly, and at 3200 m the average modeled carbon from salps was 109% of the POC flux measured in sediment traps at that depth. Migratory and carcass carbon export pathways should also be considered (alongside fecal pellet flux) as facilitating carbon export to sequestration depths in future studies.

  7. Annual report 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The GKSS scientific annual report summarizes the problems and results of the research and development projects of 1973. In contrast to earlier annual reports, a comprehensive description of the research facilities is not included. The annual report was extended by the paragraph 'Financial Report 1973' in the chapter 'Development of Geesthacht Research Centre'. The financial report gives a survey of the financial transactions and the major operations of the year under review. (orig./AK) [de

  8. D branes in background fluxes and Nielsen-Olesen instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, Jorge G.

    2016-01-01

    In quantum field theory, charged particles with spin ≥1 may become tachyonic in the present of magnetic fluxes above some critical field, signaling an instability of the vacuum. The phenomenon is generic, in particular, similar instabilities are known to exist in open and closed string theory, where a spinning string state can become tachyonic above a critical field. In compactifications involving RR fluxes F_p_+_2, the quantum states which could become tachyonic by the same Nielsen-Olesen mechanism are Dp branes. By constructing an appropriate background with RR magnetic flux that takes into account back-reaction, we identify the possible tachyonic Dp brane states and compute the formula for the energy spectrum in a sector. More generally, we argue that in any background RR magnetic flux, there are high spin Dp quantum states which become very light at critical fields.

  9. D branes in background fluxes and Nielsen-Olesen instabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, Jorge G. [Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA),Pg. Lluis Companys, 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain); Department de Fisica Cuantica i Astrofisica and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos,Universitat de Barcelona, Martí Franquès, 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-06-06

    In quantum field theory, charged particles with spin ≥1 may become tachyonic in the present of magnetic fluxes above some critical field, signaling an instability of the vacuum. The phenomenon is generic, in particular, similar instabilities are known to exist in open and closed string theory, where a spinning string state can become tachyonic above a critical field. In compactifications involving RR fluxes F{sub p+2}, the quantum states which could become tachyonic by the same Nielsen-Olesen mechanism are Dp branes. By constructing an appropriate background with RR magnetic flux that takes into account back-reaction, we identify the possible tachyonic Dp brane states and compute the formula for the energy spectrum in a sector. More generally, we argue that in any background RR magnetic flux, there are high spin Dp quantum states which become very light at critical fields.

  10. Variable Eddington factors and flux-limiting diffusion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whalen, P.P.

    1982-01-01

    Variable Eddington factors and flux limiting diffusion coefficients arise in two common techniques of closing the moment equations of transport. The first two moment equations of the full transport equation are still frequently used to solve many problems of radiative or particle transport. An approximate analysis, developed by Levermore, exhibits the relation between the coefficients of the two different techniques. This analysis is described and then used to test the validity of several commonly used flux limiters and Eddington factors. All of the ad-hoc flux limiters have limited validity. All of the variable Eddington factors derived from some underlying description of the angular distribution function are generally valid. The use of coefficients from Minerbo's elegant maximum entropy Eddington factor analysis is suggested for use in either flux limited diffusion or variable Eddington factor equations

  11. Inverse Flux versus Pressure of Muons from Cosmic Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buitrago, D.; Armendariz, R.

    2017-12-01

    When an incoming cosmic ray proton or atom collides with particles in earth's atmosphere a shower of secondary muons is created. Cosmic ray muon flux was measured at the Queensborough Community College using a QuarkNet detector consisting of three stacked scintillator muon counters and a three-fold coincidence trigger. Data was recorded during a three-day period during a severe weather storm that occurred from March 13-17, 2017. A computer program was created in Python to read the muon flux rate and atmospheric pressure sensor readings from the detector's data acquisition board. The program converts the data from hexadecimal to decimal, re-bins the data in a more suitable format, creates and overlays plots of muon flux with atmospheric pressure. Results thus far show a strong correlation between muon flux and atmospheric pressure. More data analysis will be done to verify the above conclusion.

  12. NUKEM annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of this important undertaking in the German nuclear industry informs about its structure, holdings and activities in 1981. The report of the management is followed by remarks on the annual statement of accounts (annual balance, profit-loss accounting) and the report of the Supervisory Board. In the annex the annual balance of NUKEM GmbH/HOBEG mbH as per December 31, 1981, and the profit-loss accounting of NUKEM GmbH/HOBEG mbH for the business year 1981 are presented. (UA) [de

  13. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  14. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  15. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  16. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  17. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  18. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  19. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  20. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  1. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  2. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  3. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  4. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  5. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  6. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  7. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  8. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  9. Gap filling strategies and error in estimating annual soil respiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soil respiration (Rsoil) is one of the largest CO2 fluxes in the global carbon (C) cycle. Estimation of annual Rsoil requires extrapolation of survey measurements or gap-filling of automated records to produce a complete time series. While many gap-filling methodologies have been employed, there is ...

  10. Particle acceleration in binaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinitsyna V.G.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cygnus X-3 massive binary system is one of the powerful sources of radio and X-ray emission consisting of an accreting compact object, probably a black hole, with a Wolf-Rayet star companion. Based on the detections of ultra high energy gamma-rays by Kiel and Havera Park, Cygnus X-3 has been proposed to be one of the most powerful sources of charged cosmic ray particles in the Galaxy. The results of long-term observations of the Cyg X-3 binary at energies 800 GeV–85 TeV detected by SHALON in 1995 are presented with images, integral spectra and spectral energy distribution. The identification of source with Cygnus X-3 detected by SHALON was secured by the detection of its 4.8 hour orbital period in TeV gamma-rays. During the whole observation period of Cyg X-3 with SHALON significant flux increases were detected at energies above 0.8 TeV. These TeV flux increases are correlated with flaring activity at a lower energy range of X-ray and/or at observations of Fermi LAT as well as with radio emission from the relativistic jets of Cygnus X-3. The variability of very high-energy gamma-radiation and correlation of radiation activity in the wide energy range can provide essential information on particle mechanism production up to very high energies. Whereas, modulation of very high energy emission connected to the orbital motion of the binary system, provides an understanding of the emission processes, nature and location of particle acceleration.

  11. Calculation of conventional and prompt lepton fluxes at very high energy

    CERN Document Server

    Fedynitch, Anatoli; Gaisser, Thomas K; Riehn, Felix; Stanev, Todor

    2015-01-01

    An efficient method for calculating inclusive conventional and prompt atmospheric leptons fluxes is presented. The coupled cascade equations are solved numerically by formulating them as matrix equation. The presented approach is very flexible and allows the use of different hadronic interaction models, realistic parametrizations of the primary cosmic-ray flux and the Earth's atmosphere, and a detailed treatment of particle interactions and decays. The power of the developed method is illustrated by calculating lepton flux predictions for a number of different scenarios.

  12. Flux measurements with a sniffer probe near the wall in ASDEX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poschenrieder, W.; Venus, G.; Wang, Y.G.; Mueller, E.R.; Bartiromo, R.; Becker, G.; Bosch, H.S.; Brocken, H.; Eberhagen, A.; Fussmann, G.; Gehre, O.; Gernhardt, J.; Gierke, G. v.; Glock, E.; Gruber, O.; Haas, G.; Janeschitz, G.; Karger, F.; Kotze, P.B.; Keilhacker, M.; Klueber, O.; Kornherr, M.; Lackner, K.; Lenoci, M.; Lisitano, G.; Mayer, H.M.; McCormick, K.; Meisel, D.; Mertens, V.; Murmann, H.; Niedermeyer, H.; Rapp, H.; Roehr, H.; Ryter, F.; Schneider, F.; Siller, G.; Smeulders, P.; Soeldner, F.; Speth, E.; Steuer, K.H.; Vollmer, O.; Wagner, F.

    1985-01-01

    For a detailed assessment of particle recycling in a tokamak it is necessary to know quality and quantity of the particle fluxes directed to the elements of the wall. In a divertor machine like ASDEX we have to differentiate between at least four distinct elements: main chamber wall, protective limiters, collector plates, and divertor walls. Relevant data about the divertor region are obtained from pressure and flux measurements. (orig./GG)

  13. Turbulent flux and the diffusion of passive tracers in electrostatic turbulence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basu, R.; Jessen, T.; Naulin, V.

    2003-01-01

    The connection between the diffusion of passive tracer particles and the anomalous turbulent flux in electrostatic drift-wave turbulence is investigated by direct numerical solutions of the 2D Hasegawa-Wakatani equations. The probability density functions for the point-wise and flux surface...

  14. Seasonality of Overstory and Understory Fluxes in a Semi-Arid Oak Savanna: What can be Learned from Comparing Measured and Modeled Fluxes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raz-Yaseef, N.; Sonnentag, O.; Kobayashi, H.; Chen, J. M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Ma, S.; Baldocchi, D. D.

    2011-12-01

    Semi-arid climates experience large seasonal and inter-annual variability in radiation and precipitation, creating natural conditions adequate to study how year-to-year changes affect atmosphere-biosphere fluxes. Especially, savanna ecosystems, that combine tree and below-canopy components, create a unique environment in which phenology dramatically changes between seasons. We used a 10-year flux database in order to define seasonal and interannual variability of climatic inputs and fluxes, and evaluate model capability to reproduce observed variability. This is based on the perception that model capability to construct the deviation, and not the average, is important in order to correctly predict ecosystem sensitivity to climate change. Our research site is a low density and low LAI (0.8) semi-arid savanna, located at Tonzi Ranch, Northern California. In this system, trees are active during the warm season (Mar - Oct), and grasses are active during the wet season (Dec - May). Measurements of carbon and water fluxes above and below the tree canopy using eddy covariance and supplementary measurements have been made since 2001. Fluxes were simulated using bio-meteorological process-oriented ecosystem models: BEPS and 3D-CAONAK. Models were partly capable of reproducing fluxes on daily scales (R2=0.66). We then compared model outputs for different ecosystem components and seasons, and found distinct seasons with high correlations while other seasons were purely represented. Comparison was much higher for ET than for GPP. The understory was better simulated than the overstory. CANOAK overestimated spring understory fluxes, probably due to the capability to directly calculated 3D radiative transfer. BEPS underestimated spring understory fluxes, following the pre-description of grass die-off. Both models underestimated peak spring overstory fluxes. During winter tree dormant, modeled fluxes were null, but occasional high fluxes of both ET and GPP were measured following

  15. Does historical wildfire activity alter metal fluxes to northern lakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, N.; Chetelat, J.; Vermaire, J. C.; Palmer, M.; Black, J.; Pellisey, J.; Tracz, B.; van der Wielen, S.

    2017-12-01

    Current drought conditions in northwestern Canada are conducive to more frequent and severe wildfires that may mobilize mercury and other metals accumulated in soil and biomass. There is evidence that wildfires can remobilize and transport mercury within and outside catchments by atmospheric volatilization, particulate emissions and catchment soil erosion. However, the effect of fires on mercury fluxes to nearby lake sediments remains unclear. In this study, we use a combination of 10 dated lake sediment cores and four nearby ombrotrophic peatland cores to investigate the effects of wildfires on mercury fluxes to lake sediments. Lakes varying in catchment size and distance from recent fire events were sampled. Mercury concentrations in the environmental archives were measured, and macroscopic charcoal particles (>100 um) were counted at high resolution in the sediments to observe the co-variation of the local fire history and mercury fluxes. Mercury flux recorded in ombrotrophic peat cores provided an estimate of the historical atmospheric mercury flux from local and regional atmospheric deposition. The mercury flux recorded in lake sediments corresponds to the sum of direct atmospheric deposition and catchment transport. In combination, these archives will allow for the partitioning of mercury loading attributable to catchment transport from direct atmospheric deposition. After correcting the fluxes for particle focusing and terragenic elements input, flux from different lakes will be compared based on their catchment size and their temporal and spatial proximity known fire events. Altogether, our preliminary results using these paleolimnological methods will provide new insights on mercury transport processes that are predicted to become more important under a changing climate.

  16. Soil respiration at mean annual temperature predicts annual total across vegetation types and biomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Bahn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Soil respiration (SR constitutes the largest flux of CO2 from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. However, there still exist considerable uncertainties as to its actual magnitude, as well as its spatial and interannual variability. Based on a reanalysis and synthesis of 80 site-years for 57 forests, plantations, savannas, shrublands and grasslands from boreal to tropical climates we present evidence that total annual SR is closely related to SR at mean annual soil temperature (SRMAT, irrespective of the type of ecosystem and biome. This is theoretically expected for non water-limited ecosystems within most of the globally occurring range of annual temperature variability and sensitivity (Q10. We further show that for seasonally dry sites where annual precipitation (P is lower than potential evapotranspiration (PET, annual SR can be predicted from wet season SRMAT corrected for a factor related to P/PET. Our finding indicates that it can be sufficient to measure SRMAT for obtaining a well constrained estimate of its annual total. This should substantially increase our capacity for assessing the spatial distribution of soil CO2 emissions across ecosystems, landscapes and regions, and thereby contribute to improving the spatial resolution of a major component of the global carbon cycle.

  17. Particle detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hilke, Hans Jürgen

    1992-01-01

    We shall discuss the principles of the main techniques applied to particle detection (including front-end electronics), the construction and performance of some of the devices presently in operation and a few ideas on future developments.

  18. GEO Debris and Interplanetary Dust: Fluxes and Charging Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graps, A. L.; Green, S. F.; McBride, N. M.; McDonnell, J. A. M.; Drolshagen, G.; Svedhem, H.; Bunte, K. D.

    2005-08-01

    A population of cosmic dust mixed with a population of man-made debris exists within the Earth's magnetosphere. Measurements of these provide the data samples for studies of the interplanetary dust particles that travel through our magnetosphere from the outside and for studies of the local byproducts of our space endeavours. Even though instruments to detect natural meteoroids and space debris particles have been flown in Low Earth Orbits (LEO) and on interplanetary missions, very little information on the particle environment for Earth orbits above about 600 km altitude have been available. In particular, knowledge about particles smaller than 1 m in the geostationary (GEO) region was largely unknown before GORID. In September 1996, a dust/debris detector: GORID was launched into GEO as a piggyback instrument on the Russian Express-2 telecommunications spacecraft. The instrument began its normal operation in April 1997 and ended its mission in July 2002. The goal of this work was to use GORID's particle data to identify and separate the space debris from the interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) in GEO, to more finely determine the instrument's measurement characteristics and to derive impact fluxes. Here we present some results of that study. We give GORID flux distributions for debris and IDPs and then present intriguing debris clustering features that might be the result of electrostatic fragmentation of the rocket slag particles.

  19. Divertor heat flux mitigation in the National Spherical Torus Experimenta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukhanovskii, V. A.; Maingi, R.; Gates, D. A.; Menard, J. E.; Paul, S. F.; Raman, R.; Roquemore, A. L.; Bell, M. G.; Bell, R. E.; Boedo, J. A.; Bush, C. E.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H. W.; Leblanc, B. P.; Mueller, D.; NSTX Team

    2009-02-01

    Steady-state handling of divertor heat flux is a critical issue for both ITER and spherical torus-based devices with compact high power density divertors. Significant reduction of heat flux to the divertor plate has been achieved simultaneously with favorable core and pedestal confinement and stability properties in a highly shaped lower single null configuration in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 2000] using high magnetic flux expansion at the divertor strike point and the radiative divertor technique. A partial detachment of the outer strike point was achieved with divertor deuterium injection leading to peak flux reduction from 4-6MWm-2to0.5-2MWm-2 in small-ELM 0.8-1.0MA, 4-6MW neutral beam injection-heated H-mode discharges. A self-consistent picture of the outer strike point partial detachment was evident from divertor heat flux profiles and recombination, particle flux and neutral pressure measurements. Analytic scrape-off layer parallel transport models were used for interpretation of NSTX detachment experiments. The modeling showed that the observed peak heat flux reduction and detachment are possible with high radiated power and momentum loss fractions, achievable with divertor gas injection, and nearly impossible to achieve with main electron density, divertor neutral density or recombination increases alone.

  20. Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munn, W.I.

    1981-01-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Hanford site a few miles north of Richland, Washington, is a major link in the chain of development required to sustain and advance Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) technology in the United States. This 400 MWt sodium cooled reactor is a three loop design, is operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy, and is the largest research reactor of its kind in the world. The purpose of the facility is three-fold: (1) to provide a test bed for components, materials, and breeder reactor fuels which can significantly extend resource reserves; (2) to produce a complete body of base data for the use of liquid sodium in heat transfer systens; and (3) to demonstrate inherent safety characteristics of LMFBR designs