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Sample records for annual influenza vaccination

  1. Modeling the effects of annual influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.J.; Ackley, D.H.; Forrest, S. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Computer Science; Perelson, A.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.

    1998-12-31

    Although influenza vaccine efficacy is 70--90% in young healthy first-time vaccinees, the efficacy in repeat vaccinees has varied considerably. In some studies, vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccinees was higher than in first-time vaccinees, whereas in other studies vaccine efficacy in repeat vaccinees was significantly lower than in first-time vaccinees and sometimes no higher than in unvaccinated controls. It is known that the closeness of the antigenic match between the vaccine strain and the epidemic virus is important for vaccine effectiveness. In this study the authors show that the antigenic differences between a first vaccine strain and a second vaccine strain, and between the first vaccine strain and the epidemic strain, might account for the observed variation in attack rate among two-time vaccinees.

  2. Annually repeated influenza vaccination improves humoral responses to several influenza virus strains in healthy elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.A. de Bruijn (Iris); E.J. Remarque (Edmond); W.E.Ph. Beyer (Walter); S. le Cessie (Saskia); N. Masurel (Nic); G.L. Ligthart (Gerard)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractThe benefit of annually repeated influenza vaccination on antibody formation is still under debate. In this study the effect of annually repeated influenza vaccination on haemagglutination inhibiting (HI) antibody formation in the elderly is investigated. Between 1990 and 1993 healthy

  3. Repeated annual influenza vaccination and vaccine effectiveness: review of evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belongia, Edward A; Skowronski, Danuta M; McLean, Huong Q; Chambers, Catharine; Sundaram, Maria E; De Serres, Gaston

    2017-07-01

    Studies in the 1970s and 1980s signaled concern that repeated influenza vaccination could affect vaccine protection. The antigenic distance hypothesis provided a theoretical framework to explain variability in repeat vaccination effects based on antigenic similarity between successive vaccine components and the epidemic strain. Areas covered: A meta-analysis of vaccine effectiveness studies from 2010-11 through 2014-15 shows substantial heterogeneity in repeat vaccination effects within and between seasons and subtypes. When negative effects were observed, they were most pronounced for H3N2, especially in 2014-15 when vaccine components were unchanged and antigenically distinct from the epidemic strain. Studies of repeated vaccination across multiple seasons suggest that vaccine effectiveness may be influenced by more than one prior season. In immunogenicity studies, repeated vaccination blunts the hemagglutinin antibody response, particularly for H3N2. Expert commentary: Substantial heterogeneity in repeated vaccination effects is not surprising given the variation in study populations and seasons, and the variable effects of antigenic distance and immunological landscape in different age groups and populations. Caution is required in the interpretation of pooled results across multiple seasons, since this can mask important variation in repeat vaccination effects between seasons. Multi-season clinical studies are needed to understand repeat vaccination effects and guide recommendations.

  4. Influenza vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerhus, Sven Frederick

    2015-01-01

    The Cochrane Library was systematically searched for meta-analyses regarding influenza vaccination of various populations, both healthy and sick. An effect in reducing the number of cases of influenza, influenza-like illness or complications to influenza was found in some studies, but, generally......, the quality of the studies was low, and several studies lacked hard clinical endpoints. Data on adverse effects were scarce. More randomised controlled trials investigating the effects of influenza vaccination are warranted....

  5. Effectiveness of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, G.; Tacken, M.A.; Bos, J.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Korevaar, J.C.; Stolk, R.P.; Wolters, B.; Bijl, M. van der; Postma, M.J.; Wilschut, J.; Nichol, K.L.; Hak, E.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we conducted a study in the adults belonging to the risk groups to assess the A(H1N1)pdm09 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine effectiveness. METHODS: VE against influenza and/or pneumonia was

  6. Effectiveness of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, G.; Tacken, M.; Bos, J.; Stirbu-Wagner, I.; Korevaar, J.C.; Stolk, R.P.; Wolters, B.; Bijl, M.; Postma, M.J.; Wilschut, J.; Nichol, K.L.; Hak, E.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we conducted a study in the adults belonging to the risk groups to assess the A(H1N1)pdm09 MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine effectiveness. Methods: VE against influenza and/or pneumonia was

  7. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.D. de Vries (Rory); A.F. Altenburg (Arwen); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractCurrently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically

  8. Flublok Seasonal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Vaccine Safety and Pregnant Women Febrile Seizures Following Vaccination Flu Vaccine and People with Egg Allergies Guillain- ... Flu Vaccines Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Intradermal Influenza (Flu) Vaccination Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Cell-Based ...

  9. Successive annual influenza vaccination induces a recurrent oligoclonotypic memory response in circulating T follicular helper cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Muselman, Alexander; Vella, Laura; Bengsch, Bertram; Parkhouse, Kaela; Del Alcazar, Daniel; Kotzin, Jonathan; Doyle, Susan A.; Tebas, Pablo; Hensley, Scott E.; Su, Laura F.; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Wherry, E. John

    2017-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) CD4 cells are crucial providers of B cell help during adaptive immune responses. A circulating population of CD4 T cells, termed cTfh, have similarity to lymphoid Tfh, can provide B cell help, and responded to influenza vaccination. However, it is unclear whether human vaccination-induced cTfh respond in an antigen-specific manner and whether they form long-lasting memory. Here, we identified a cTfh population that expressed multiple T cell activation markers and could be readily identified by coexpression of ICOS and CD38. This subset expressed more Bcl-6, c-Maf, and IL-21 than other blood CD4 subsets. Influenza vaccination induced a strong response in the ICOS+CD38+ cTfh at day 7, and this population included hemagglutinin-specific cells by tetramer staining and antigen-stimulated Activation Induced Marker (AIM) expression. Moreover, TCRB sequencing identified a clonal response in ICOS+CD38+ cTfh that correlated strongly with the increased circulating ICOS+CD38+ cTfh frequency and the circulating plasmablast response. In subjects who received successive annual vaccinations, a recurrent oligoclonal response was identified in the ICOS+CD38+ cTfh subset at 7 days after every vaccination. These oligoclonal responses in ICOS+CD38+ cTfh after vaccination persisted in the ICOS−CD38− cTfh repertoire in subsequent years, suggesting clonal maintenance in a memory reservoir in the more-stable ICOS−CD38− cTfh subset. These data highlight the antigen-specificity, lineage relationships and memory properties of human cTfh responses to vaccination, providing new avenues for tracking and monitoring cTfh responses during infection and vaccination in humans. PMID:28620653

  10. Nephrologists need to play a key role in improving annual influenza vaccination rates in children with kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuerman, Oded; Zilber, Eyal; Davidovits, Miriam; Chodick, Gabriel; Levy, Itzhak

    2017-05-01

    This study investigated the under-researched area of annual influenza vaccination rates in children with chronic kidney disease and identified reasons for nonimmunisation. A prospective cross-sectional study was conducted in the nephrology clinic and dialysis unit of a tertiary paediatric medical centre from August to October 2011 and September to October 2012. Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire on their child's immunisation against influenza. Of the 217 children studied, 45.6% were vaccinated against influenza. The major reason for nonimmunisation was because the parents had not received the necessary information from the primary physician or treating nephrologist. The nonvaccinated children were significantly more likely to be less than two years old and female and to have parents who did not believe in the benefits of vaccination (p vaccinate their child, 38% claimed they would have done so if the vaccine had been offered in the nephrology clinic. Children with kidney disease had a higher annual influenza vaccination rate than the general population, but it was still suboptimal. Nephrologists should be alerted to the need to provide parents with information on influenza vaccinations and they should be available in nephrology clinics. ©2017 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Influenza Vaccination Strategies: Comparing Inactivated and Live Attenuated Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Saranya; Brokstad, Karl A.; Cox, Rebecca J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is a major respiratory pathogen causing annual outbreaks and occasional pandemics. Influenza vaccination is the major method of prophylaxis. Currently annual influenza vaccination is recommended for groups at high risk of complications from influenza infection such as pregnant women, young children, people with underlying disease and the elderly, along with occupational groups such a healthcare workers and farm workers. There are two main types of vaccines available: the parenteral inactivated influenza vaccine and the intranasal live attenuated influenza vaccine. The inactivated vaccines are licensed from 6 months of age and have been used for more than 50 years with a good safety profile. Inactivated vaccines are standardized according to the presence of the viral major surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and protection is mediated by the induction of vaccine strain specific antibody responses. In contrast, the live attenuated vaccines are licensed in Europe for children from 2–17 years of age and provide a multifaceted immune response with local and systemic antibody and T cell responses but with no clear correlate of protection. Here we discuss the immunological immune responses elicited by the two vaccines and discuss future work to better define correlates of protection. PMID:26343192

  12. Public health and economic impact of vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7 in the context of the annual influenza epidemic and a severe influenza pandemic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strutton David R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza pandemic outbreaks occurred in the US in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Historical evidence suggests that the majority of influenza-related deaths during the 1918 US pandemic were attributable to bacterial pneumococcal infections. The 2009 novel influenza A (H1N1 outbreak highlights the importance of interventions that may mitigate the impact of a pandemic. Methods A decision-analytic model was constructed to evaluate the impact of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7 on pneumococcal disease incidence and mortality during a typical influenza season (13/100 and a severe influenza pandemic (30/100. Outcomes were compared for current PCV7 vaccination practices vs. no vaccination. The model was estimated using published sources and includes indirect (herd protection of non-vaccinated persons. Results The model predicts that PCV7 vaccination in the US is cost saving for a normal influenza season, reducing pneumococcal-related costs by $1.6 billion. In a severe influenza pandemic, vaccination would save $7.3 billion in costs and prevent 512,000 cases of IPD, 719,000 cases of pneumonia, 62,000 IPD deaths, and 47,000 pneumonia deaths; 84% of deaths are prevented due to indirect (herd protection in the unvaccinated. Conclusions PCV7 vaccination is highly effective and cost saving in both normal and severe pandemic influenza seasons. Current infant vaccination practices may prevent >1 million pneumococcal-related deaths in a severe influenza pandemic, primarily due to herd protection.

  13. Public health and economic impact of vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7) in the context of the annual influenza epidemic and a severe influenza pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Jaime L; McGarry, Lisa J; Klugman, Keith P; Strutton, David R; Gilmore, Kristen E; Weinstein, Milton C

    2010-01-21

    Influenza pandemic outbreaks occurred in the US in 1918, 1957, and 1968. Historical evidence suggests that the majority of influenza-related deaths during the 1918 US pandemic were attributable to bacterial pneumococcal infections. The 2009 novel influenza A (H1N1) outbreak highlights the importance of interventions that may mitigate the impact of a pandemic. A decision-analytic model was constructed to evaluate the impact of 7-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV7) on pneumococcal disease incidence and mortality during a typical influenza season (13/100) and a severe influenza pandemic (30/100). Outcomes were compared for current PCV7 vaccination practices vs. no vaccination. The model was estimated using published sources and includes indirect (herd) protection of non-vaccinated persons. The model predicts that PCV7 vaccination in the US is cost saving for a normal influenza season, reducing pneumococcal-related costs by $1.6 billion. In a severe influenza pandemic, vaccination would save $7.3 billion in costs and prevent 512,000 cases of IPD, 719,000 cases of pneumonia, 62,000 IPD deaths, and 47,000 pneumonia deaths; 84% of deaths are prevented due to indirect (herd) protection in the unvaccinated. PCV7 vaccination is highly effective and cost saving in both normal and severe pandemic influenza seasons. Current infant vaccination practices may prevent >1 million pneumococcal-related deaths in a severe influenza pandemic, primarily due to herd protection.

  14. Effectiveness of the influenza A(H1N1)PDM09 vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination: A matched case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Tacken, Margot; Bos, Jens; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Korevaar, Joke C.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Wolters, Bert; Bijl, Marc; Postma, Maarten J.; Wilschut, Jan; Nichol, Kristin L.; Hak, Eelko

    2012-01-01

    Background and objectives Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we aimed to assess the effectiveness of MF59-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in a matched case-control study. Patients/methods This study was conducted during the pandemic influenza

  15. Using combinatorial bioinformatics methods to analyze annual perspective changes of influenza viruses and to accelerate development of effective vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Jen Hu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The standard World Health Organization procedure for vaccine development has provided a guideline for influenza viruses, but no systematic operational model. We recently designed a systemic analysis method to evaluate annual perspective sequence changes of influenza virus strains. We applied dnaml of PHYLIP 3.69, developed by Joseph Felsenstein of Washington University, and ClustalX2, developed by Larkin et al, for calculating, comparing, and localizing the most plausible vaccine epitopes. This study identified the changes in biological sequences and associated alignment alterations, which would ultimately affect epitope structures, as well as the plausible hidden features to search for the most conserved and effective epitopes for vaccine development. Addition our newly designed systemic analysis method to supplement the WHO guidelines could accelerate the development of urgently needed vaccines that might concurrently combat several strains of viruses within a shorter period.

  16. Universal influenza vaccines, science fiction or soon reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D; Altenburg, Arwen F; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2015-01-01

    Currently used influenza vaccines are only effective when the vaccine strains match the epidemic strains antigenically. To this end, seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated almost annually. Furthermore, seasonal influenza vaccines fail to afford protection against antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. Because of an ever-present threat of the next influenza pandemic and the continuous emergence of drift variants of seasonal influenza A viruses, there is a need for an universal influenza vaccine that induces protective immunity against all influenza A viruses. Here, we summarize some of the efforts that are ongoing to develop universal influenza vaccines.

  17. ADULT INFLUENZA VACCINATION GUIDELINE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    immunisation, and successful influenza vaccines are available each year for the predominant serotypes of the virus. 2. THE VIRUS2.6-9. The influenza viruses are enveloped viruses with a segmented. RNA genome. There are three types, influenza A, B and C based on antigenic differences. Both influenza A and B viruses.

  18. Virus-Vectored Influenza Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, Ralph A.; Tompkins, S. Mark

    2014-01-01

    Despite the availability of an inactivated vaccine that has been licensed for >50 years, the influenza virus continues to cause morbidity and mortality worldwide. Constant evolution of circulating influenza virus strains and the emergence of new strains diminishes the effectiveness of annual vaccines that rely on a match with circulating influenza strains. Thus, there is a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection to avoid the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Recombinant virus-vectored vaccines are an appealing alternative to classical inactivated vaccines because virus vectors enable native expression of influenza antigens, even from virulent influenza viruses, while expressed in the context of the vector that can improve immunogenicity. In addition, a vectored vaccine often enables delivery of the vaccine to sites of inductive immunity such as the respiratory tract enabling protection from influenza virus infection. Moreover, the ability to readily manipulate virus vectors to produce novel influenza vaccines may provide the quickest path toward a universal vaccine protecting against all influenza viruses. This review will discuss experimental virus-vectored vaccines for use in humans, comparing them to licensed vaccines and the hurdles faced for licensure of these next-generation influenza virus vaccines. PMID:25105278

  19. Universal influenza vaccines: Shifting to better vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlanda Scorza, Francesco; Tsvetnitsky, Vadim; Donnelly, John J

    2016-06-03

    Influenza virus causes acute upper and lower respiratory infections and is the most likely, among known pathogens, to cause a large epidemic in humans. Influenza virus mutates rapidly, enabling it to evade natural and vaccine-induced immunity. Furthermore, influenza viruses can cross from animals to humans, generating novel, potentially pandemic strains. Currently available influenza vaccines induce a strain specific response and may be ineffective against new influenza viruses. The difficulty in predicting circulating strains has frequently resulted in mismatch between the annual vaccine and circulating viruses. Low-resource countries remain mostly unprotected against seasonal influenza and are particularly vulnerable to future pandemics, in part, because investments in vaccine manufacturing and stockpiling are concentrated in high-resource countries. Antibodies that target conserved sites in the hemagglutinin stalk have been isolated from humans and shown to confer protection in animal models, suggesting that broadly protective immunity may be possible. Several innovative influenza vaccine candidates are currently in preclinical or early clinical development. New technologies include adjuvants, synthetic peptides, virus-like particles (VLPs), DNA vectors, messenger RNA, viral vectors, and attenuated or inactivated influenza viruses. Other approaches target the conserved exposed epitope of the surface exposed membrane matrix protein M2e. Well-conserved influenza proteins, such as nucleoprotein and matrix protein, are mainly targeted for developing strong cross-protective T cell responses. With multiple vaccine candidates moving along the testing and development pipeline, the field is steadily moving toward a product that is more potent, durable, and broadly protective than previously licensed vaccines. Copyright © 2016 World Health Organization. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. New vaccines against influenza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Ko, Eun-Ju; Lee, Yu-Na; Kim, Min-Chul; Kwon, Young-Man; Tang, Yinghua; Cho, Min-Kyoung; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most effective and cost-benefit interventions that prevent the mortality and reduce morbidity from infectious pathogens. However, the licensed influenza vaccine induces strain-specific immunity and must be updated annually based on predicted strains that will circulate in the upcoming season. Influenza virus still causes significant health problems worldwide due to the low vaccine efficacy from unexpected outbreaks of next epidemic strains or the emergence of pandemic viruses. Current influenza vaccines are based on immunity to the hemagglutinin antigen that is highly variable among different influenza viruses circulating in humans and animals. Several scientific advances have been endeavored to develop universal vaccines that will induce broad protection. Universal vaccines have been focused on regions of viral proteins that are highly conserved across different virus subtypes. The strategies of universal vaccines include the matrix 2 protein, the hemagglutinin HA2 stalk domain, and T cell-based multivalent antigens. Supplemented and/or adjuvanted vaccination in combination with universal target antigenic vaccines would have much promise. This review summarizes encouraging scientific advances in the field with a focus on novel vaccine designs. PMID:24427759

  1. Seasonal Inactivated Influenza Virus Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Couch, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    Inactivated influenza virus vaccines are the primary modality used for prevention of influenza. A system of annual identification of new strains causing illnesses, selections for vaccines, chick embryo growth, inactivation, processing, packaging, distribution and usage has been in place for decades. Current vaccines contain 15 µg of the HA of an A/H1N1, A/H3N2 and B strain and are given parenterally to induce serum anti-HA antibody for prevention of subsequent infection and illness from natur...

  2. The health and economic impact of vaccination with 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7) during an annual influenza epidemic and influenza pandemic in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Ronald; Roberts, Craig S; An, Zhijie; Chen, Chieh-I; Wang, Bruce

    2015-07-24

    China has experienced several severe outbreaks of influenza over the past century: 1918, 1957, 1968, and 2009. Influenza itself can be deadly; however, the increase in mortality during an influenza outbreak is also attributable to secondary bacterial infections, specifically pneumococcal disease. Given the history of pandemic outbreaks and the associated morbidity and mortality, we investigated the cost-effectiveness of a PCV7 vaccination program in China from the context of typical and pandemic influenza seasons. A decision-analytic model was employed to evaluate the impact of a 7-valent pneumococcal vaccine (PCV7) infant vaccination program on the incidence, mortality, and cost associated with pneumococcal disease during a typical influenza season (15% flu incidence) and influenza pandemic (30% flu incidence) in China. The model incorporated Chinese data where available and included both direct and indirect (herd) effects on the unvaccinated population, assuming a point in time following the initial introduction of the vaccine where the impact of the indirect effects has reached a steady state, approximately seven years following the implementation of the vaccine program. Pneumococcal disease incidence, mortality, and costs were evaluated over a one year time horizon. Healthcare costs were calculated using a payer perspective and included vaccination program costs and direct medical expenditures from pneumococcal disease. The model predicted that routine PCV7 vaccination of infants in China would prevent 5,053,453 cases of pneumococcal disease and 76,714 deaths in a single year during a normal influenza season.The estimated incremental-cost-effectiveness ratios were ¥12,281 (US$1,900) per life-year saved and ¥13,737 (US$2,125) per quality-adjusted-life-year gained. During an influenza pandemic, the model estimated that routine vaccination with PCV7 would prevent 8,469,506 cases of pneumococcal disease and 707,526 deaths, and would be cost-saving. Routine

  3. Universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, R; Krammer, F

    2017-04-01

    Current influenza virus vaccines are effective when well matched to the circulating strains. Unfortunately, antigenic drift and the high diversity of potential emerging zoonotic and pandemic viruses make it difficult to select the right strains for vaccine production. This problem causes vaccine mismatches, which lead to sharp drops in vaccine effectiveness and long response times to manufacture matched vaccines in case of novel pandemic viruses. To provide an overview of universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies in preclinical and clinical development. PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov were used as sources for this review. Universal influenza virus vaccines that target conserved regions of the influenza virus including the haemagglutinin stalk domain, the ectodomain of the M2 ion channel or the internal matrix and nucleoproteins are in late preclinical and clinical development. These vaccines could confer broad protection against all influenza A and B viruses including drift variants and thereby abolish the need for annual re-formulation and re-administration of influenza virus vaccines. In addition, these novel vaccines would enhance preparedness against emerging influenza virus pandemics. Finally, novel therapeutic antibodies against the same conserved targets are in clinical development and could become valuable tools in the fight against influenza virus infection. Both universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies are potential future options for the control of human influenza infections. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effectiveness of the influenza a(H1N1)PDM09 vaccine in adults recommended for annual influenza vaccination : A case-control study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Tacken, Margot; Bos, Jens; Stirbu-Wagner, Irina; Korevaar, Joke C.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Wolters, Bert; Bijl, Marc; Postma, Maarten J.; Wilschut, Jan; Nichol, Kristin L.; Hak, Eelko

    Background: Because of variability in published A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates, we aimed to assess the effectiveness of MF59-adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine in a matched case-control study. Objectives: We aimed to assess the effectiveness of MF59- adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09

  5. Towards universal influenza vaccines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractVaccination is the most cost-effective way to reduce the considerable disease burden of seasonal influenza. Although seasonal influenza vaccines are effective, their performance in the elderly and immunocompromised individuals would benefit from improvement. Major problems related to the

  6. Underutilization of Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall K. Cheney

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Yearly influenza vaccination continues to be underutilized by those who would most benefit from it. The Health Belief Model was used to explain differences in beliefs about influenza vaccination among at-risk individuals resistant to influenza vaccination. Survey data were collected from 74 members of at-risk groups who were not vaccinated for influenza during the previous flu season. Accepting individuals were more likely to perceive flu as a threat to health and perceive access barriers, and cues to action were the most important influence on whether they plan to get vaccinated. In comparison, resistant individuals did not feel threatened by the flu, access barriers were not a problem, and they did not respond favorably to cues to action. Perceived threat, perceived access barriers, and cues to action were significantly associated with plans to be vaccinated for influenza in the next flu season. Participants who saw influenza as a threat to their health had 5.4 times the odds of planning to be vaccinated than those who did not. Participants reporting barriers to accessing influenza vaccination had 7.5 times the odds of reporting plans to be vaccinated. Those responding positively to cues to action had 12.2 times the odds of planning to be vaccinated in the next flu season than those who did not. Accepting and resistant individuals have significant differences in their beliefs, which require different intervention strategies to increase vaccination rates. These findings provide important information to researchers and practitioners working to increase influenza vaccination rates.

  7. Influenza epidemiology and influenza vaccine effectiveness during the 2014–2015 season: annual report from the Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Puig-Barberà

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Global Influenza Hospital Surveillance Network (GIHSN has established a prospective, active surveillance, hospital-based epidemiological study to collect epidemiological and virological data for the Northern and Southern Hemispheres over several consecutive seasons. It focuses exclusively on severe cases of influenza requiring hospitalization. A standard protocol is shared between sites allowing comparison and pooling of results. During the 2014–2015 influenza season, the GIHSN included seven coordinating sites from six countries (St. Petersburg and Moscow, Russian Federation; Prague, Czech Republic; Istanbul, Turkey; Beijing, China; Valencia, Spain; and Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Here, we present the detailed epidemiological and influenza vaccine effectiveness findings for the Northern Hemisphere 2014–2015 influenza season.

  8. How influenza vaccination policy may affect vaccine logistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Tina-Marie; Rookkapan, Korngamon; Rajgopal, Jayant; Sornsrivichai, Vorasith; Brown, Shawn T; Welling, Joel S; Norman, Bryan A; Connor, Diana L; Chen, Sheng-I; Slayton, Rachel B; Laosiritaworn, Yongjua; Wateska, Angela R; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Lee, Bruce Y

    2012-06-22

    When policymakers make decision about the target populations and timing of influenza vaccination, they may not consider the impact on the vaccine supply chains, which may in turn affect vaccine availability. Our goal is to explore the effects on the Thailand vaccine supply chain of introducing influenza vaccines and varying the target populations and immunization time-frames. We Utilized our custom-designed software HERMES (Highly Extensible Resource for Modeling Supply Chains), we developed a detailed, computational discrete-event simulation model of the Thailand's National Immunization Program (NIP) supply chain in Trang Province, Thailand. A suite of experiments simulated introducing influenza vaccines for different target populations and over different time-frames prior to and during the annual influenza season. Introducing influenza vaccines creates bottlenecks that reduce the availability of both influenza vaccines as well as the other NIP vaccines, with provincial to district transport capacity being the primary constraint. Even covering only 25% of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practice-recommended population while administering the vaccine over six months hinders overall vaccine availability so that only 62% of arriving patients can receive vaccines. Increasing the target population from 25% to 100% progressively worsens these bottlenecks, while increasing influenza vaccination time-frame from 1 to 6 months decreases these bottlenecks. Since the choice of target populations for influenza vaccination and the time-frame to deliver this vaccine can substantially affect the flow of all vaccines, policy-makers may want to consider supply chain effects when choosing target populations for a vaccine. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not pr...

  10. Does influenza vaccination improve pediatric asthma outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Bruce A; Forester, Joseph; Fallot, Andre

    2009-06-01

    vaccination is associated with fewer asthma exacerbations. After controlling for several potential confounding variables, administration of influenza vaccine was associated with a protective effect against indicators of asthma exacerbations. Our results indicate that children with asthma in the military beneficiary population may benefit from annual influenza vaccination.

  11. Influenza B vaccine lineage selection-An optimized trivalent vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mosterín Höpping (Ana); J.M. Fonville (Judith); C.A. Russell (Colin); S.L. James (Sarah ); D.J. Smith (Derek James)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractEpidemics of seasonal influenza viruses cause considerable morbidity and mortality each year. Various types and subtypes of influenza circulate in humans and evolve continuously such that individuals at risk of serious complications need to be vaccinated annually to keep protection up to

  12. [Influenza vaccine and adjuvant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2011-01-01

    Adjuvant is originated from the Latin word "adjuvare" which means "help" in English to enhance the immunological responses when given together with antigens. The beginning of adjuvant was mineral oil which enhanced the immune response when it was given with inactivated Salmonella typhimurium. Aluminium salt was used to precipitate diphtheria toxoid and increased level of antibody response was demonstrated when administered with alum-precipitated antigens. Since 1930, aluminium salt has been used as DTaP (diphtheria-tetanus-acellular pertussis vaccine) adjuvant. Many candidates were tested for adjuvant activity but only aluminum salt is allowed to use for human vaccines. New adjuvant MF59, oil-in-water emulsion type, was developed for influenza vaccine for elderly (Fluad) and series of AS adjuvant are used for hepatitis B, pandemic flue, and human papiloma virus vaccines. Oil-adjuvanted influenza pandemic vaccines induced higher antibody response than alum-adjuvanted vaccine with higher incidence of adverse events, especially for local reactions. Alum-adjuvanted whole virion inactivated H5N1 vaccine was developed in Japan, and it induced relatively well immune responses in adults. When it applied for children, febrile reaction was noted in approximately 60% of the subjects, with higher antibodies. Recent investigation on innate immunity demonstrates that adjuvant activity is initiated from the stimulation on innate immunity and/or inflammasome, resulting in cytokine induction and antigen uptake by monocytes and macrophages. The probable reason for high incidence of febrile reaction should be investigated to develop a safe and effective influenza vaccine.

  13. Repeated seasonal influenza vaccination among elderly in Europe: Effects on laboratory confirmed hospitalised influenza.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rondy, Marc; Launay, Odile; Castilla, Jesus; Costanzo, Simona; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Gefenaite, Giedre; Larrauri, Amparo; Rizzo, Caterina; Pitigoi, Daniela; Syrjänen, Ritva K; Machado, Ausenda; Kurečić Filipović, Sanja; Krisztina Horváth, Judit; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Marbus, Sierk; Moren, Alain

    2017-01-01

    In Europe, annual influenza vaccination is recommended to elderly. From 2011 to 2014 and in 2015-16, we conducted a multicentre test negative case control study in hospitals of 11 European countries to measure influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against laboratory confirmed hospitalised influenza

  14. Dried influenza vaccines : Over the counter vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.

    2010-01-01

    Since last year influenza pandemic has struck again after 40 years, this is the right moment to discuss the different available formulation options for influenza vaccine. Looking back to the last 4 decades, most vaccines are still formulated as liquid solution. These vaccines have shown a poor

  15. Novel vaccines against influenza viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Compans, Richard W.

    2011-01-01

    Killed and live attenuated influenza virus vaccines are effective in preventing and curbing the spread of influenza epidemics when the strains present in the vaccines are closely matched with the predicted epidemic strains. These vaccines are primarily targeted to induce immunity to the variable major target antigen, hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus. However, current vaccines are not effective in preventing the emergence of new pandemic or highly virulent viruses. New approaches are bein...

  16. [Influenza vaccination. Effectiveness of current vaccines and future challenges].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de Lejarazu, Raúl; Tamames, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is an annual challenge for health-care systems, due to factors such as co-circulation of 2 influenza A subtypes jointly with 2 influenza B lineages; the antigenic drift of these virus, which eludes natural immunity, as well as immunity conferred by vaccination; together with influenza impact in terms of morbidity and mortality. Influenza vaccines have been available for more than 70 years and they have progressed in formulation, production and delivery route. Recommendations on vaccination are focused on those with a higher probability of severe disease, and have a progressively wider coverage, and classically based on inactivated vaccines, but with an increasing importance of attenuated live vaccines. More inactivated vaccines are becoming available, from adyuvanted and virosomal vaccines to intradermal delivery, cell-culture or quadrivalent. Overall vaccine effectiveness is about 65%, but varies depending on characteristics of vaccines, virus, population and the outcomes to be prevented, and ranges from less than 10% to almost 90%. Future challenges are formulations that confer more extensive and lasting protection, as well as increased vaccination coverage, especially in groups such as pregnant women and health-care professionals, as well as being extended to paediatrics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  17. Antibody Responses to Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine in Health Care Personnel Previously Vaccinated and Vaccinated for The First Time

    OpenAIRE

    Kuan-Ying A. Huang; Shih-Cheng Chang; Yhu-Chering Huang; Cheng-Hsun Chiu; Tzou-Yien Lin

    2017-01-01

    Inactivated influenza vaccination induces a hemagglutinin-specific antibody response to the strain used for immunization. Annual vaccination is strongly recommended for health care personnel. However, it is debatable if repeated vaccination would affect the antibody response to inactivated influenza vaccine through the time. We enrolled health care personnel who had repeated and first trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in 2005?2008. Serological antibody responses were measured by hem...

  18. Novel vaccines against influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, S M; Song, J M; Compans, R W

    2011-12-01

    Killed and live attenuated influenza virus vaccines are effective in preventing and curbing the spread of influenza epidemics when the strains present in the vaccines are closely matched with the predicted epidemic strains. These vaccines are primarily targeted to induce immunity to the variable major target antigen, hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus. However, current vaccines are not effective in preventing the emergence of new pandemic or highly virulent viruses. New approaches are being investigated to develop universal influenza virus vaccines as well as to apply more effective vaccine delivery methods. Conserved vaccine targets including the influenza M2 ion channel protein and HA stalk domains are being developed using recombinant technologies to improve the level of cross protection. In addition, recent studies provide evidence that vaccine supplements can provide avenues to further improve current vaccies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Multimedia

    SC Unit

    2009-01-01

    As every year, the Medical Service is taking part in the campaign to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal influenza is especially recommended for people suffering from chronic lung, cardio-vascular or kidney conditions or diabetes, for those recovering from a serious illness or surgical operation and for everyone over the age of 65. The influenza virus is transmitted by air and contact with contaminated surfaces, hence the importance of washing hands regularly with soap and / or disinfection using a hydro-alcoholic solution. From the onset of symptoms (fever> 38°, chills, cough, muscle aches and / or joint pain, fatigue) you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. In the present context of the influenza A (H1N1) pandemic, it is important to dissociate these two illnesses and emphasise that the two viruses and the vaccines used to combat them are quite different and that protection against one will not provide protection against the...

  20. Reverse Genetics Approaches for the Development of Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, Aitor; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics of human respiratory disease. Influenza virus infections represent a serious public health and economic problem, which are most effectively prevented through vaccination. However, influenza viruses undergo continual antigenic variation, which requires either the annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines or the rapid generation of vaccines against potential pandemic virus strains. The segmented nature of influenza virus allows for the reassortment between two or more viruses within a co-infected cell, and this characteristic has also been harnessed in the laboratory to generate reassortant viruses for their use as either inactivated or live-attenuated influenza vaccines. With the implementation of plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques, it is now possible to engineer recombinant influenza viruses entirely from full-length complementary DNA copies of the viral genome by transfection of susceptible cells. These reverse genetics systems have provided investigators with novel and powerful approaches to answer important questions about the biology of influenza viruses, including the function of viral proteins, their interaction with cellular host factors and the mechanisms of influenza virus transmission and pathogenesis. In addition, reverse genetics techniques have allowed the generation of recombinant influenza viruses, providing a powerful technology to develop both inactivated and live-attenuated influenza vaccines. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge of state-of-the-art, plasmid-based, influenza reverse genetics approaches and their implementation to provide rapid, convenient, safe and more effective influenza inactivated or live-attenuated vaccines. PMID:28025504

  1. Influenza Vaccines: Unmet Needs and Recent Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Ji Yun

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a worldwide public health concern. Since the introduction of trivalent influenza vaccine in 1978, vaccination has been the primary means of prevention and control of influenza. Current influenza vaccines have moderate efficacy, good safety, and acceptable tolerability; however, they have unsatisfactory efficacy in older adults, are dependent on egg supply for production, and are time-consuming to manufacture. This review outlines the unmet medical needs of current influenza vaccines. Recent developments in influenza vaccines are also described. PMID:24475351

  2. Psychological determinants of influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens-Oliver; Hajek, André; König, Hans-Helmut

    2017-08-29

    Previous studies investigated the determinants of individuals' decision to vaccinate against influenza primarily focusing on social as well as certain proximal determinants, for example, behavioral beliefs. Thus, so far, the analysis of psychological factors as determinants of influenza vaccination was mainly limited to beliefs, attitudes or perceptions that were directly related to influenza vaccination and its perceived impact. However, considering general psychological factors, like general self-efficacy, optimism or subjective well-being, might further enhance the understanding of why certain people vaccinate while others do not. The aim was to investigate the relationship between various general psychological factors and older people's decision to vaccinate against seasonal flu. The data of individuals aged 60 or older (n = 5037; in 2014) were used from the Germany Ageing Survey. The data were collected in face-to-face interviews and in self-administered questionnaires. They include questions on the use of influenza vaccination and the psychological factors of optimism, self-efficacy, self-esteem, perceived stress, self-regulation, life satisfaction, and negative affect as well as positive affect. The psychological determinants of regular influenza vaccination were investigated using multiple logistic regressions. 53.2% of all participants were regular users of influenza vaccination. There were significant bivariate correlations of all cited psychological factor with influenza vaccination except for life satisfaction and negative affect. After controlling for numerous potential socio-demographic, morbidity- and lifestyle-related confounders, regular influenza vaccination was still positively associated with lower levels of self-esteem and a higher level of perceived stress. There are significant associations of general individual psychological constructs with the decision to vaccinate against influenza. Future research might determine the impact of

  3. Progress toward the development of universal influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoft, Daniel F; Belshe, Robert B

    2014-01-01

    Influenza remains a major problem causing significant morbidity and mortality annually and periodic pandemics with the potential for 10-100 fold increased mortality. Conventional vaccines can be highly effective if generated each year to match currently circulating viruses. Ongoing research focuses on producing cross-protective vaccines that induce T cell and/ or antibody responses specific for highly conserved viral epitopes. The Saint Louis University Center for Vaccine Development (SLUCVD) is highly engaged in multiple efforts to generate universally relevant influenza vaccines.

  4. School-based influenza vaccination: parents' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Candace; Russell, Margaret L; MacDonald, Judy; Collins, Ramona; Frank, Christine J; Davis, Amy E

    2014-01-01

    School-age children are important drivers of annual influenza epidemics yet influenza vaccination coverage of this population is low despite universal publicly funded influenza vaccination in Alberta, Canada. Immunizing children at school may potentially increase vaccine uptake. As parents are a key stakeholder group for such a program, it is important to consider their concerns. We explored parents' perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools, and obtained suggestions for structuring such a program. Forty-eight parents of children aged 5-18 years participated in 9 focus groups. Participants lived in urban areas of the Alberta Health Services Calgary Zone. Three major themes emerged: Advantages of school-based influenza vaccination (SBIV), Disadvantages of SBIV, and Implications for program design & delivery. Advantages were perceived to occur for different populations: children (e.g. emotional support), families (e.g. convenience), the community (e.g. benefits for school and multicultural communities), the health sector (e.g. reductions in costs due to burden of illness) and to society at large (e.g. indirect conduit of information about health services, building structure for pandemic preparedness, building healthy lifestyles). Disadvantages, however, might also occur for children (e.g. older children less likely to be immunized), families (e.g. communication challenges, perceived loss of parental control over information, choices and decisions) and the education sector (loss of instructional time). Nine second-level themes emerged within the major theme of Implications for program design & delivery: program goals/objectives, consent process, stakeholder consultation, age-appropriate program, education, communication, logistics, immunizing agent, and clinic process. Parents perceived advantages and disadvantages to delivering annual seasonal influenza

  5. Now and future influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruben, F L

    1990-03-01

    Influenza is a modern day plague. In the young, the clinical picture is classical, but in the elderly, the disease may go unsuspected until complications such as pneumonia develop. Influenza A and B viruses are responsible, and these viruses mutate with great regularity. Antibodies to the HA and NA surface antigens of influenza viruses, both naturally and vaccine induced, are protective. The earliest influenza vaccines were crude, toxic, and ineffective. With modern purification techniques, the egg-grown viruses have been turned into safe, immunogenic, and effective killed-virus vaccines--whole virus and split virus. Surveillance permits the correct virus strains to be incorporated into each new vaccine. Those who have been experiencing the worst effects of influenza have been identified. These individuals need to be immunized each year. In the future, live influenza virus vaccines may offer the benefits of ease of administration and longer-lasting protection. Synthetic peptides, genetically engineered antigens, and even nonantigen (anti-idiotype) vaccines are possible, but such vaccines will require adjuvant enhancement. For the present, greater efforts must be made to use existing influenza vaccines.

  6. Vaccination against seasonal influenza

    CERN Document Server

    GS Department

    2010-01-01

    This year, as usual, the Medical Service is helping to promote vaccination against seasonal influenza. Vaccination against seasonal flu is especially recommended for anyone who suffers from chronic pulmonary, cardio-vascular or kidney disease or diabetes, is recovering from a serious illness or major surgery, or is over 65 years of age. The flu virus is transmitted through the air and through contact with contaminated surfaces, so frequent hand-washing with soap and/or an antiseptic hand wash is of great importance. As soon as the first symptoms appear (fever above 38°, shivering, coughing, muscle and/or joint pains, generalised weakness), you are strongly recommended to stay at home to avoid spreading the virus. Anyone working on the CERN site who wishes to be vaccinated against seasonal flu should go to the Infirmary (Building 57, ground floor), with their dose of vaccine. The Medical Service will issue a prescription on the day of the vaccination for the purposes of reimbursement through UNIQA...

  7. Influenza vaccination for children with asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, Bat-Chen; Goldman, Ran D.

    2010-01-01

    QUESTION Parents of children with asthma are encouraged by many health organizations to vaccinate their children against seasonal influenza viruses. Is the influenza vaccine efficient in preventing asthma exacerbation? Are current vaccinations safe to administer to children with asthma?

  8. Universal Influenza Vaccines, a Dream to Be Realized Soon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Zhang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Due to frequent viral antigenic change, current influenza vaccines need to be re-formulated annually to match the circulating strains for battling seasonal influenza epidemics. These vaccines are also ineffective in preventing occasional outbreaks of new influenza pandemic viruses. All these challenges call for the development of universal influenza vaccines capable of conferring broad cross-protection against multiple subtypes of influenza A viruses. Facilitated by the advancement in modern molecular biology, delicate antigen design becomes one of the most effective factors for fulfilling such goals. Conserved epitopes residing in virus surface proteins including influenza matrix protein 2 and the stalk domain of the hemagglutinin draw general interest for improved antigen design. The present review summarizes the recent progress in such endeavors and also covers the encouraging progress in integrated antigen/adjuvant delivery and controlled release technology that facilitate the development of an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  9. Predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination among older adults in Thailand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabda Praphasiri

    Full Text Available In advance of a large influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE cohort study among older adults in Thailand, we conducted a population-based, cross-sectional survey to measure vaccine coverage and identify factors associated with influenza vaccination among older Thai adults that could bias measures of vaccine effectiveness.We selected adults ≥65 years using a two-stage, stratified, cluster sampling design. Functional status was assessed using the 10-point Vulnerable Elders Survey (VES; scores ≥3 indicated vulnerability. Questions about attitudes towards vaccination were based on the Health Belief Model. The distance between participants' households and the nearest vaccination clinic was calculated. Vaccination status was determined using national influenza vaccination registry. Prevalence ratios (PR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using log-binomial multivariable models accounting for the sampling design.We enrolled 581 participants, of whom 60% were female, median age was 72 years, 41% had at least one chronic underlying illness, 24% met the criteria for vulnerable, and 23% did not leave the house on a daily basis. Influenza vaccination rate was 34%. In multivariable models, no variable related to functional status was associated with vaccination. The strongest predictors of vaccination were distance to the nearest vaccination center (PR 3.0, 95% CI 1.7-5.1 for participants in the closest quartile compared to the furthest, and high levels of a perception of benefits of influenza vaccination (PR 2.8, 95% CI 1.4-5.6 and cues to action (PR 2.7, 95% CI 1.5-5.1.Distance to vaccination clinics should be considered in analyses of influenza VE studies in Thailand. Strategies that emphasize benefits of vaccination and encourage physicians to recommend annual influenza vaccination could improve influenza vaccine uptake among older Thai adults. Outreach to more distant and less mobile older adults may also be required to improve influenza

  10. Intranasally administered Endocine™ formulated 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine induces broad specific antibody responses and confers protection in ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.-K. Maltais (Anna-Karin); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); E.J.B. Veldhuis Kroeze (Edwin); G. van Amerongen (Geert); M.L. Dijkshoorn (Marcel); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); J. Hinkula (Jorma); H. Arwidsson (Hans); A. Lindberg (Alf); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza is a contagious respiratory disease caused by an influenza virus. Due to continuous antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses, influenza vaccines need to be adjusted before every influenza season. This allows annual vaccination with multivalent seasonal influenza vaccines,

  11. Novel viral vectored vaccines for the prevention of influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambe, Teresa

    2012-10-24

    Influenza represents a substantial global healthcare burden, with annual epidemics resulting in 3-5 million cases of severe illness with a significant associated mortality. In addition, the risk of a virulent and lethal influenza pandemic has generated widespread and warranted concern. Currently licensed influenza vaccines are limited in their ability to induce efficacious and long-lasting herd immunity. In addition, and as evidenced by the H1N1 pandemic in 2009, there can be a significant delay between the emergence of a pandemic influenza and an effective, antibody-inducing vaccine. There is, therefore, a continued need for new, efficacious vaccines conferring cross-clade protection-obviating the need for biannual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines. Development of such a vaccine would yield enormous health benefits to society and also greatly reduce the associated global healthcare burden. There are a number of alternative influenza vaccine technologies being assessed both preclinically and clinically. In this review we discuss viral vectored vaccines, either recombinant live-attenuated or replication-deficient viruses, which are current lead candidates for inducing efficacious and long-lasting immunity toward influenza viruses. These alternate influenza vaccines offer real promise to deliver viable alternatives to currently deployed vaccines and more importantly may confer long-lasting and universal protection against influenza viral infection.

  12. Influenza Vaccination During Pregnancy: Influenza Seasons 2002-2012, Vaccine Safety Datalink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groom, Holly C; Henninger, Michelle L; Smith, Ning; Koppolu, Padma; Cheetham, T Craig; Glanz, Jason M; Hambidge, Simon J; Jackson, Lisa A; Kharbanda, Elyse O; Klein, Nicola P; McCarthy, Natalie L; Nordin, James D; Weintraub, Eric S; Naleway, Allison L

    2016-04-01

    Pregnant women are at risk for influenza-related complications and have been recommended for vaccination by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) since 1990. Annual rates of influenza coverage of pregnant women have been consistently low. The Vaccine Safety Datalink was used to assess influenza vaccine coverage over 10 consecutive years (2002-2012); assess patterns related to changes in ACIP recommendations; identify predictors of vaccination; and compare the results with those published by national U.S. surveys. Retrospective cohort study of 721,898 pregnancies conducted in 2014. Coverage rates were assessed for all pregnancies and for live births only. Multivariate regression analysis identified predictors associated with vaccination. Coverage increased from 8.8% to 50.9% in 2002-2012. Seasonal coverage rates increased slowly following the 2004 ACIP influenza vaccine recommendation (to remove the first trimester restriction), but spiked significantly during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic. Significant predictors of vaccination during pregnancy included older age; vaccination in a previous season; high-risk conditions in addition to pregnancy; pregnancy during either the 2004-2005 or 2009-2010 seasons; entering the influenza season after the first trimester of pregnancy; and a pregnancy with longer overlap with the influenza season (pvaccination coverage among pregnant women increased between the 2002-2003 and 2011-2012 seasons, although it was still below the developmental Healthy People 2020 goal of 80%. The 2004 ACIP language change positively impacted first-trimester vaccination uptake. Vaccine Safety Datalink data estimates were consistent with U.S. estimates. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  13. Influenza Vaccination in Patients with Common Variable Immunodeficiency (CVID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mieves, Jan F; Wittke, Kirsten; Freitag, Helma; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen; Hanitsch, Leif G

    2017-10-05

    Vaccination against influenza in patients with primary antibody deficiency is recommended. Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is the most frequent and clinically relevant antibody deficiency disease and is by definition characterized by an impaired vaccination response. The purpose of this review is to present the current knowledge of humoral and cellular vaccine response to influenza in CVID patients. Studies conducted in CVID patients demonstrated an impaired humoral response upon influenza vaccination. Data on cellular immune response are in part conflicting, with two out of three studies showing responses similar to healthy controls. Available data suggest a benefit from influenza vaccination in CVID patients. Therefore, annual influenza vaccination in patients and their close household contacts is recommended.

  14. Influenza vaccination in children with neurologic or neurodevelopmental disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael; Peacock, Georgina; Uyeki, Timothy M; Moore, Cynthia

    2015-05-11

    providers about influenza and the benefit of annual influenza vaccination is needed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adenoviral vectors as novel vaccines for influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda; Mullarkey, Caitlin; Gilbert, Sarah

    2015-03-01

    Influenza is a viral respiratory disease causing seasonal epidemics, with significant annual illness and mortality. Emerging viruses can pose a major pandemic threat if they acquire the capacity for sustained human-to-human transmission. Vaccination reduces influenza-associated mortality and is critical in minimising the burden on the healthcare system. However, current vaccines are not always effective in at-risk populations and fail to induce long-lasting protective immunity against a range of viruses. The development of 'universal' influenza vaccines, which induce heterosubtypic immunity capable of reducing disease severity, limiting viral shedding or protecting against influenza subtypes with pandemic potential, has gained interest in the research community. To date, approaches have focused on inducing immune responses to conserved epitopes within the stem of haemagglutinin, targeting the ectodomain of influenza M2e or by stimulating cellular immunity to conserved internal antigens, nucleoprotein or matrix protein 1. Adenoviral vectors are potent inducers of T-cell and antibody responses and have demonstrated safety in clinical applications, making them an excellent choice of vector for delivery of vaccine antigens. In order to circumvent pre-existing immunity in humans, serotypes from non-human primates have recently been investigated. We will discuss the pre-clinical development of these novel vectors and their advancement to clinical trials. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  16. Epitope-based approaches to a universal influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Tanya; Ben-Yedidia, Tamar

    2014-11-01

    The development of vaccines has been one of the most important contributions of immunology to public health to date. Although several infectious diseases have all but vanished thanks to effective vaccines, the most common infectious disease, influenza, still represents a major threat to public health. This is more concerning than ever before in light of potentially virulent avian pandemic strains which have emerged in the last decade and infected human hosts, causing high morbidity and mortality. Despite considerable efforts to improve production of influenza vaccines and vaccinate large portions of the population annually, the currently available influenza vaccines are strain-specific and not effective enough. Considering the vulnerability of infants and elderly to seasonal influenza-related complications and the ever present public health threat of a deadly influenza pandemic, there is urgent need for a new kind of influenza vaccine. Ideally, such a vaccine should provide enhanced long term, multi-strain protection without compromising safety and in this way, dramatically improve global protection against seasonal and pandemic influenza viruses. This review highlights one approach to developing a universal influenza vaccine, which is based on highly conserved viral sequences, 'epitopes', that specifically activate humoral and/or cellular immune responses. This approach to vaccinology was pioneered by Prof Arnon, who initiated development of an epitope-based universal vaccine called Multimeric-001 (M-001), which has already been validated in clinical trials to induce broad immunity against A and B-Type, seasonal and pandemic strains. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Traditional and New Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sook-San

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The challenges in successful vaccination against influenza using conventional approaches lie in their variable efficacy in different age populations, the antigenic variability of the circulating virus, and the production and manufacturing limitations to ensure safe, timely, and adequate supply of vaccine. The conventional influenza vaccine platform is based on stimulating immunity against the major neutralizing antibody target, hemagglutinin (HA), by virus attenuation or inactivation. Improvements to this conventional system have focused primarily on improving production and immunogenicity. Cell culture, reverse genetics, and baculovirus expression technology allow for safe and scalable production, while adjuvants, dose variation, and alternate routes of delivery aim to improve vaccine immunogenicity. Fundamentally different approaches that are currently under development hope to signal new generations of influenza vaccines. Such approaches target nonvariable regions of antigenic proteins, with the idea of stimulating cross-protective antibodies and thus creating a “universal” influenza vaccine. While such approaches have obvious benefits, there are many hurdles yet to clear. Here, we discuss the process and challenges of the current influenza vaccine platform as well as new approaches that are being investigated based on the same antigenic target and newer technologies based on different antigenic targets. PMID:23824369

  18. Targeted vaccination in healthy school children - Can primary school vaccination alone control influenza?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorrington, Dominic; Jit, Mark; Eames, Ken

    2015-10-05

    The UK commenced an extension to the seasonal influenza vaccination policy in autumn 2014 that will eventually see all healthy children between the ages of 2-16 years offered annual influenza vaccination. Models suggest that the new policy will be both highly effective at reducing the burden of influenza as well as cost-effective. We explore whether targeting vaccination at either primary or secondary schools would be more effective and/or cost-effective than the current strategy. An age-structured deterministic transmission dynamic SEIR-type mathematical model was used to simulate a national influenza outbreak in England. Costs including GP consultations, hospitalisations due to influenza and vaccinations were compared to potential gains in quality-adjusted life years achieved through vaccinating healthy children. Costs and benefits of the new JCVI vaccination policy were estimated over a single season, and compared to the hypothesised new policies of targeted and heterogeneous vaccination. All potential vaccination policies were highly cost-effective. Influenza transmission can be eliminated for a particular season by vaccinating both primary and secondary school children, but not by vaccinating only one group. The most cost-effective policy overall is heterogeneous vaccination coverage with 48% uptake in primary schools and 34% in secondary schools. The Joint Committee on Vaccination and Immunisation can consider a modification to their policy of offering seasonal influenza vaccinations to all healthy children of ages 2-16 years. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effective influenza vaccines for children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banzhoff, Angelika; Stoddard, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Seasonal influenza causes clinical illness and hospitalization in all age groups; however, conventional inactivated vaccines have only limited efficacy in young children. MF59®, an oil-in-water emulsion adjuvant, has been used since the 1990s to enhance the immunogenicity of influenza vaccines in the elderly, a population with waning immune function due to immunosenescence.   Clinical trials now provide information to support a favorable immunogenicity and safety profile of MF59-adjuvanted influenza vaccine in young children. Published data indicate that Fluad®, a trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine with MF59, was immunogenic and well tolerated in young children, with a benefit/risk ratio that supports routine clinical use. A recent clinical trial also shows that Fluad provides high efficacy against PCR-confirmed influenza. Based on the results of clinical studies in children, the use of MF59-adjuvanted vaccine offers the potential to enhance efficacy and make vaccination a viable prevention and control strategy in this population. PMID:22327501

  20. Influenza vaccinations : who needs them and when?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, Eelko; Hoes, Arno W; Verheij, Theo J M

    2002-01-01

    Influenza vaccination programmes should aim at reducing the burden from influenza among those who need it most. The primary aim of this literature review is to identify who should receive priority in influenza vaccination programmes. Risk factors for severe post-influenza complications include

  1. The effect of age and recent influenza vaccination history on the immunogenicity and efficacy of 2009-10 seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccination in children.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Ng

    Full Text Available There is some evidence that annual vaccination of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV may lead to reduced vaccine immunogenicity but evidence is lacking on whether vaccine efficacy is affected by prior vaccination history. The efficacy of one dose of TIV in children 6-8 y of age against influenza B is uncertain. We examined whether immunogenicity and efficacy of influenza vaccination in school-age children varied by age and past vaccination history.We conducted a randomized controlled trial of 2009-10 TIV. Influenza vaccination history in the two preceding years was recorded. Immunogenicity was assessed by comparison of HI titers before and one month after receipt of TIV/placebo. Subjects were followed up for 11 months with symptom diaries, and respiratory specimens were collected during acute respiratory illnesses to permit confirmation of influenza virus infections. We found that previous vaccination was associated with reduced antibody responses to TIV against seasonal A(H1N1 and A(H3N2 particularly in children 9-17 y of age, but increased antibody responses to the same lineage of influenza B virus in children 6-8 y of age. Serological responses to the influenza A vaccine viruses were high regardless of vaccination history. One dose of TIV appeared to be efficacious against confirmed influenza B in children 6-8 y of age regardless of vaccination history.Prior vaccination was associated with lower antibody titer rises following vaccination against seasonal influenza A vaccine viruses, but higher responses to influenza B among individuals primed with viruses from the same lineage in preceding years. In a year in which influenza B virus predominated, no impact of prior vaccination history was observed on vaccine efficacy against influenza B. The strains that circulated in the year of study did not allow us to study the effect of prior vaccination on vaccine efficacy against influenza A.

  2. Effectiveness of 2010/2011 seasonal influenza vaccine in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barret, A S

    2012-02-01

    We conducted a case-control study to estimate the 2010\\/2011 trivalent influenza vaccine effectiveness (TIVE) using the Irish general practitioners\\' influenza sentinel surveillance scheme. Cases were influenza-like illness (ILI) patients with laboratory-confirmed influenza. Controls were ILI patients who tested negative for influenza. Participating sentinel general practitioners (GP) collected swabs from patients presenting with ILI along with their vaccination history and other individual characteristics. The TIVE was computed as (1 - odds ratiofor vaccination) x100%. Of 60 sentinel GP practices, 22 expressed interest in participating in the study and 17 (28%) recruited at least one ILI patient. In the analysis, we included 106 cases and 85 controls. Seven controls (8.2%) and one influenza case (0.9%) had been vaccinated in 2010\\/2011. The estimated TIVE against any influenza subtype was 89.4% [95% CI: 13.8; 99.8%], suggesting a protective effect against GP-attended laboratory confirmed influenza. This study design could be used to monitor influenza vaccine effectiveness annually but sample size and vaccination coverage should be increased to obtain precise and adjusted estimates.

  3. Impact of quadrivalent influenza vaccine on public health and influenza-related costs in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélien Jamotte

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annual trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV containing three influenza strains (A/H1N1, A/H3N2, and one B have been recommended for the prevention of influenza. However, worldwide co-circulation of two distinct B lineages (Victoria and Yamagata and difficulties in predicting which lineage will predominate each season have led to the development of quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIV, which include both B lineages. Our analysis evaluates the public health benefit and associated influenza-related costs avoided which would have been obtained by using QIV rather than TIV in Australia over the period 2002–2012. Methods A static model stratified by age group was used, focusing on people at increased risk of influenza as defined by the Australian vaccination recommendations. B-lineage cross-protection was accounted for. We calculated the potential impact of QIV compared with TIV over the seasons 2002–2012 (2009 pandemic year excluded using Australian data on influenza circulation, vaccine coverage, hospitalisation and mortality rates as well as unit costs, and international data on vaccine effectiveness, influenza attack rate, GP consultation rate and working days lost. Third-party payer and societal influenza-related costs were estimated in 2014 Australian dollars. Sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results Using QIV instead of TIV over the period 2002–2012 would have prevented an estimated 68,271 additional influenza cases, 47,537 GP consultations, 3,522 hospitalisations and 683 deaths in the population at risk of influenza. These results translate into influenza-related societal costs avoided of $46.5 million. The estimated impact of QIV was higher for young children and the elderly. The overall impact of QIV depended mainly on vaccine effectiveness and the influenza attack rate attributable to the mismatched B lineage. Conclusion The broader protection offered by QIV would have reduced the number of influenza infections

  4. Can influenza epidemics be prevented by voluntary vaccination?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaele Vardavas

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous modeling studies have identified the vaccination coverage level necessary for preventing influenza epidemics, but have not shown whether this critical coverage can be reached. Here we use computational modeling to determine, for the first time, whether the critical coverage for influenza can be achieved by voluntary vaccination. We construct a novel individual-level model of human cognition and behavior; individuals are characterized by two biological attributes (memory and adaptability that they use when making vaccination decisions. We couple this model with a population-level model of influenza that includes vaccination dynamics. The coupled models allow individual-level decisions to influence influenza epidemiology and, conversely, influenza epidemiology to influence individual-level decisions. By including the effects of adaptive decision-making within an epidemic model, we can reproduce two essential characteristics of influenza epidemiology: annual variation in epidemic severity and sporadic occurrence of severe epidemics. We suggest that individual-level adaptive decision-making may be an important (previously overlooked causal factor in driving influenza epidemiology. We find that severe epidemics cannot be prevented unless vaccination programs offer incentives. Frequency of severe epidemics could be reduced if programs provide, as an incentive to be vaccinated, several years of free vaccines to individuals who pay for one year of vaccination. Magnitude of epidemic amelioration will be determined by the number of years of free vaccination, an individuals' adaptability in decision-making, and their memory. This type of incentive program could control epidemics if individuals are very adaptable and have long-term memories. However, incentive-based programs that provide free vaccination for families could increase the frequency of severe epidemics. We conclude that incentive-based vaccination programs are necessary to control

  5. Developing Universal Influenza Vaccines: Hitting the Nail, Not Just on the Head

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.C.M. Wiersma (Lidewij); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); R.D. de Vries (Rory)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza viruses have a huge impact on public health. Current influenza vaccines need to be updated annually and protect poorly against antigenic drift variants or novel emerging subtypes. Vaccination against influenza can be improved in two important ways, either by inducing more

  6. Universal Vaccines and Vaccine Platforms to Protect against Influenza Viruses in Humans and Agriculture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajão, Daniela S.; Pérez, Daniel R.

    2018-01-01

    Influenza virus infections pose a significant threat to public health due to annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Influenza is also associated with significant economic losses in animal production. The most effective way to prevent influenza infections is through vaccination. Current vaccine programs rely heavily on the vaccine's ability to stimulate neutralizing antibody responses to the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. One of the biggest challenges to an effective vaccination program lies on the fact that influenza viruses are ever-changing, leading to antigenic drift that results in escape from earlier immune responses. Efforts toward overcoming these challenges aim at improving the strength and/or breadth of the immune response. Novel vaccine technologies, the so-called universal vaccines, focus on stimulating better cross-protection against many or all influenza strains. However, vaccine platforms or manufacturing technologies being tested to improve vaccine efficacy are heterogeneous between different species and/or either tailored for epidemic or pandemic influenza. Here, we discuss current vaccines to protect humans and animals against influenza, highlighting challenges faced to effective and uniform novel vaccination strategies and approaches. PMID:29467737

  7. Universal Vaccines and Vaccine Platforms to Protect against Influenza Viruses in Humans and Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajão, Daniela S; Pérez, Daniel R

    2018-01-01

    Influenza virus infections pose a significant threat to public health due to annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Influenza is also associated with significant economic losses in animal production. The most effective way to prevent influenza infections is through vaccination. Current vaccine programs rely heavily on the vaccine's ability to stimulate neutralizing antibody responses to the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. One of the biggest challenges to an effective vaccination program lies on the fact that influenza viruses are ever-changing, leading to antigenic drift that results in escape from earlier immune responses. Efforts toward overcoming these challenges aim at improving the strength and/or breadth of the immune response. Novel vaccine technologies, the so-called universal vaccines, focus on stimulating better cross-protection against many or all influenza strains. However, vaccine platforms or manufacturing technologies being tested to improve vaccine efficacy are heterogeneous between different species and/or either tailored for epidemic or pandemic influenza. Here, we discuss current vaccines to protect humans and animals against influenza, highlighting challenges faced to effective and uniform novel vaccination strategies and approaches.

  8. Universal Vaccines and Vaccine Platforms to Protect against Influenza Viruses in Humans and Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela S. Rajão

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus infections pose a significant threat to public health due to annual seasonal epidemics and occasional pandemics. Influenza is also associated with significant economic losses in animal production. The most effective way to prevent influenza infections is through vaccination. Current vaccine programs rely heavily on the vaccine's ability to stimulate neutralizing antibody responses to the hemagglutinin (HA protein. One of the biggest challenges to an effective vaccination program lies on the fact that influenza viruses are ever-changing, leading to antigenic drift that results in escape from earlier immune responses. Efforts toward overcoming these challenges aim at improving the strength and/or breadth of the immune response. Novel vaccine technologies, the so-called universal vaccines, focus on stimulating better cross-protection against many or all influenza strains. However, vaccine platforms or manufacturing technologies being tested to improve vaccine efficacy are heterogeneous between different species and/or either tailored for epidemic or pandemic influenza. Here, we discuss current vaccines to protect humans and animals against influenza, highlighting challenges faced to effective and uniform novel vaccination strategies and approaches.

  9. Influenza Vaccine Research funded by the European Commission FP7-Health-2013-Innovation-1 project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Heng; Frijlink, Henderik W; Huckriede, Anke; van Doorn, Eva; Schmidt, Ed; Leroy, Odile; Rimmelzwaan, Guus; McCullough, Keneth; Whelan, Mike; Hak, Eelko

    2016-11-21

    Due to influenza viruses continuously displaying antigenic variation, current seasonal influenza vaccines must be updated annually to include the latest predicted strains. Despite all the efforts put into vaccine strain selection, vaccine production, testing, and administration, the protective efficacy of seasonal influenza vaccines is greatly reduced when predicted vaccine strains antigenically mismatch with the actual circulating strains. Moreover, preparing for a pandemic outbreak is a challenge, because it is unpredictable which strain will cause the next pandemic. The European Commission has funded five consortia on influenza vaccine development under the Seventh Framework Programme for Research and Technological Development (FP7) in 2013. The call of the EU aimed at developing broadly protective influenza vaccines. Here we review the scientific strategies used by the different consortia with respect to antigen selection, vaccine delivery system, and formulation. The issues related to the development of novel influenza vaccines are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Stabilization of influenza vaccine enhances protection by microneedle delivery in the mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu-Shi Quan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Simple and effective vaccine administration is particularly important for annually recommended influenza vaccination. We hypothesized that vaccine delivery to the skin using a patch containing vaccine-coated microneedles could be an attractive approach to improve influenza vaccination compliance and efficacy.Solid microneedle arrays coated with inactivated influenza vaccine were prepared for simple vaccine delivery to the skin. However, the stability of the influenza vaccine, as measured by hemagglutination activity, was found to be significantly damaged during microneedle coating. The addition of trehalose to the microneedle coating formulation retained hemagglutination activity, indicating stabilization of the coated influenza vaccine. For both intramuscular and microneedle skin immunization, delivery of un-stabilized vaccine yielded weaker protective immune responses including viral neutralizing antibodies, protective efficacies, and recall immune responses to influenza virus. Immunization using un-stabilized vaccine also shifted the pattern of antibody isotypes compared to the stabilized vaccine. Importantly, a single microneedle-based vaccination using stabilized influenza vaccine was found to be superior to intramuscular immunization in controlling virus replication as well as in inducing rapid recall immune responses post challenge.The functional integrity of hemagglutinin is associated with inducing improved protective immunity against influenza. Simple microneedle influenza vaccination in the skin produced superior protection compared to conventional intramuscular immunization. This approach is likely to be applicable to other vaccines too.

  11. Influenza vaccination and humoral alloimmunity in solid organ transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeiren, Pieter; Aubert, Vincent; Sugamele, Rocco; Aubert, John-David; Venetz, Jean-Pierre; Meylan, Pascal; Pascual, Manuel; Manuel, Oriol

    2014-09-01

    Annual influenza vaccination is recommended in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. However, concerns have been raised about the impact of vaccination on antigraft alloimmunity. We evaluated the humoral alloimmune responses to influenza vaccination in a cohort of SOT recipients between October 2008 and December 2011. Anti-HLA antibodies were measured before and 4-8 weeks after influenza vaccination using a solid-phase assay. Overall, 169 SOT recipients were included (kidney = 136, lung = 26, liver = 3, and combined = 4). Five (2.9%) of 169 patients developed de novo anti-HLA antibodies after vaccination, including one patient who developed donor-specific antibodies (DSA) 8 months after vaccination. In patients with pre-existing anti-HLA antibodies, median MFI was not significantly different before and after vaccination (P = 0.73 for class I and P = 0.20 for class II anti-HLA antibodies) and no development of de novo DSA was observed. Five episodes of rejection (2.9%) were observed within 12 months after vaccination, and only one patient had de novo anti-HLA antibodies. The incidence of development of anti-HLA antibodies after influenza vaccination in our cohort of SOT recipients was very low. Our findings indicate that influenza vaccination is safe and does not trigger humoral alloimmune responses in SOT recipients. © 2014 Steunstichting ESOT.

  12. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Health Care Personnel - United States, 2016-17 Influenza Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Carla L; Yue, Xin; Ball, Sarah W; Fink, Rebecca; de Perio, Marie A; Laney, A Scott; Williams, Walter W; Lindley, Megan C; Graitcer, Samuel B; Lu, Peng-Jun; Devlin, Rebecca; Greby, Stacie M

    2017-09-29

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all health care personnel (HCP) receive an annual influenza vaccination to reduce influenza-related morbidity and mortality among HCP and their patients and to reduce absenteeism among HCP (1-4). To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among HCP in the United States during the 2016-17 influenza season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 2,438 HCP. Overall, 78.6% of survey respondents reported receiving vaccination during the 2016-17 season, similar to reported coverage in the previous three influenza seasons (5). Vaccination coverage continued to be higher among HCP working in hospitals (92.3%) and lower among HCP working in ambulatory (76.1%) and long-term care (LTC) (68.0%) settings. As in previous seasons, coverage was highest among HCP who were required by their employer to be vaccinated (96.7%) and lowest among HCP working in settings where vaccination was not required, promoted, or offered on-site (45.8%). Implementing workplace strategies found to improve vaccination coverage among HCP, including vaccination requirements or active promotion of on-site vaccinations at no cost, can help ensure that HCP and patients are protected against influenza (6).

  13. Repeated influenza vaccination for preventing severe and fatal influenza infection in older adults: a multicentre case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Itziar; Domínguez, Ángela; Toledo, Diana; Chamorro, Judith; Astray, Jenaro; Egurrola, Mikel; Fernández-Sierra, María Amelia; Martín, Vicente; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; Godoy, Pere; Castilla, Jesús

    2018-01-08

    The effectiveness of repeated vaccination for influenza to prevent severe cases remains unclear. We evaluated the effectiveness of influenza vaccination on preventing admissions to hospital for influenza and reducing disease severity. We conducted a case-control study in 20 hospitals in Spain during the 2013/14 and 2014/15 influenza seasons. Community-dwelling adults aged 65 years or older who were admitted to hospital for laboratory-confirmed influenza were matched with inpatient controls by sex, age, hospital and admission date. The effectiveness of vaccination in the current and 3 previous seasons in preventing influenza was estimated for inpatients with nonsevere influenza and for those with severe influenza who were admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) or who died. We enrolled 130 inpatients with severe and 598 with nonsevere influenza who were matched to 333 and 1493 controls, respectively. Compared with patients who were unvaccinated in the current and 3 previous seasons, adjusted effectiveness of influenza vaccination in the current and any previous season was 31% (95% confidence interval [CI] 13%-46%) in preventing admission to hospital for nonsevere influenza, 74% (95% CI 42%-88%) in preventing admissions to ICU and 70% (95% CI 34%-87%) in preventing death. Vaccination in the current season only had no significant effect on cases of severe influenza. Among inpatients with influenza, vaccination in the current and any previous season reduced the risk of severe outcomes (adjusted odds ratio 0.45, 95% CI 0.26-0.76). Among older adults, repeated vaccination for influenza was twice as effective in preventing severe influenza compared with nonsevere influenza in patients who were admitted to hospital, which is attributable to the combination of the number of admissions to hospital for influenza that were prevented and reduced disease severity. These results reinforce recommendations for annual vaccination for influenza in older adults. © 2018 Joule Inc. or

  14. Updates on Influenza Vaccination in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Angela J P; Grohskopf, Lisa A

    2018-03-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for all children 6 months of age and older who do not have contraindications. This article provides an overview of information concerning burden of influenza among children in the United States; US-licensed influenza vaccines; vaccine immunogenicity, effectiveness, and safety; and recent updates relevant to use of these vaccines in pediatric populations. Influenza antiviral medications are discussed. Details concerning vaccine-related topics may be found in the current US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommendations for use of influenza vaccines (https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/vacc-specific/flu.html). Additional information on influenza antivirals is located at https://www.cdc.gov/flu/professionals/antivirals/index.htm. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Meningoencephalitis syndrome following influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, W L; Ravens, K G; Hansen, H W

    1978-02-14

    Immunological reactions to non-virus substances of vaccines may be of considerable significance to the pathogenesis of neurological complications after anti-influenza vaccination. A 60 year old female patient with a known allergic diathesis developed a meningoencephalitis syndrome a few hours after vaccination. The case history as well as the clinical course suggested an immunopathogenetic mechanism. We therefore analyzed the immune profile. Intracutaneous testing with chicken meat and chicken egg protein lead to a striking local anaphylactic reaction which is discussed in causal relation to the postvaccination complication.

  16. Low uptake of influenza vaccine among university students: evaluating predictors beyond cost and safety concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarczyk, Robert A; Chu, Samantha L; Sickler, Heather; Shaw, Jana; Nadeau, Jessica A; McNutt, Louise-Anne

    2015-03-30

    Annual influenza vaccine coverage for young adults (including college students) remains low, despite a 2011 US recommendation for annual immunization of all people 6 months and older. College students are at high risk for influenza morbidity given close living and social spaces and extended travel during semester breaks when influenza circulation typically increases. We evaluated influenza vaccine uptake following an on-campus vaccine campaign at a large, public New York State university. Consecutive students visiting the University Health Center were recruited for a self-administered, anonymous, written survey. Students were asked about recent influenza vaccination, barriers to influenza vaccination, and willingness to get vaccinated to protect other vulnerable individuals they may encounter. Frequencies and proportions were evaluated. Of 653 students approached, 600 completed surveys (92% response proportion); respondents were primarily female (61%) and non-Hispanic white (59%). Influenza vaccine coverage was low (28%). Compared to coverage among non-Hispanic white students (30%), coverage was similar among Hispanic (30%) and other race/ethnicity students (28%) and lowest among non-Hispanic black students (17%). Among the unvaccinated, the most commonly selected vaccination barriers were "Too lazy to get the vaccine" (32%) and "Don't need the vaccine because I'm healthy" (29%); 6% of unvaccinated students cited cost as a barrier. After being informed that influenza vaccination of young, healthy people can protect other vulnerable individuals (e.g., infants, elderly), 71% of unvaccinated students indicated this would increase their willingness to get vaccinated. Influenza vaccine uptake among college students is very low. While making vaccine easily obtained may increase vaccine uptake, college students need to be motivated to get vaccinated. Typically healthy students may not perceive a need for influenza vaccine. Education about vaccinating healthy individuals

  17. Influenza vaccine induces intracellular immune memory of human NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Yaling; Fu, Binqing; Sun, Rui; Li, Wenting; Hu, Wanfu; Tian, Zhigang; Wei, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccines elicit antigen-specific antibodies and immune memory to protect humans from infection with drift variants. However, what supports or limits vaccine efficacy and duration is unclear. Here, we vaccinated healthy volunteers with annual vaccine formulations and investigated the dynamics of T cell, natural killer (NK) cell and antibody responses upon restimulation with heterologous or homologous influenza virus strains. Influenza vaccines induced potential memory NK cells with increased antigen-specific recall IFN-γ responses during the first 6 months. In the absence of significant changes in other NK cell markers (CD45RO, NKp44, CXCR6, CD57, NKG2C, CCR7, CD62L and CD27), influenza vaccines induced memory NK cells with the distinct feature of intracellular NKp46 expression. Indeed, surface NKp46 was internalized, and the dynamic increase in NKp46(intracellular)+CD56dim NK cells positively correlated with increased IFN-γ production to influenza virus restimulation after vaccination. In addition, anti-NKp46 antibodies blocked IFN-γ responses. These findings provide insights into a novel mechanism underlying vaccine-induced immunity and NK-related diseases, which may help to design persisting and universal vaccines in the future.

  18. Influenza vaccination among Saudi Hajj pilgrims: Revealing the uptake and vaccination barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfelali, Mohammad; Barasheed, Osamah; Badahdah, Al-Mamoon; Bokhary, Hamid; Azeem, Mohammed I; Habeebullah, Turki; Bakarman, Marwan; Asghar, Atif; Booy, Robert; Rashid, Harunor

    2018-04-12

    Hajj is the world's largest annual mass gathering that attracts two to three million Muslims from around the globe to a religious assemblage in Makkah, Saudi Arabia. The risk of acquisition and transmission of influenza among Hajj pilgrims is high. Therefore, influenza vaccination is recommended, and was monitored frequently among pilgrims from different countries. However, the vaccination uptake among Saudi pilgrims has not been assessed in recent years. This analysis aims to evaluate influenza vaccine uptake among Saudi Hajj pilgrims, and identify the key barriers to vaccination. Data on influenza vaccination were obtained from Saudi pilgrims who took part in a large trial during the Hajj of 2013, 2014 and 2015. Pilgrims were met and recruited in Mina, Makkah during the peak period of Hajj and were asked to complete a baseline questionnaire that recorded their influenza vaccination history, including reason(s) for non-receipt of vaccine. A total of 6974 Saudi pilgrims aged between 18 and 95 (median 34) years were recruited; male to female ratio was 1:1.2. Of the total, 90.8% declared their influenza vaccination history, 51.3% of them reported receiving influenza vaccine before travel to Hajj. The vaccination rates for the years 2013, 2014 and 2015 were 21.4%, 48.2% and 58.1%, respectively (P natural immunity (15.8%) and being busy (15.5%) were the main reasons for non-receipt. These data from a convenience sample indicate that influenza vaccine uptake among Saudi Hajj pilgrims is increasing over years but still needs further improvement. Lack of awareness and misperceptions are the main barriers. Education of Saudi pilgrims and health professionals is required to raise awareness about influenza vaccination. Further studies are needed to understand pilgrims' misperceptions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Replicon particle vaccine protects swine against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, B; Erdman, M M; Stine, D L; Harris, I; Irwin, C; Jens, M; Loynachan, A; Kamrud, K; Harris, D L

    2010-12-01

    An alphavirus derived replicon particle (RP) vaccine expressing the cluster IV H3N2 swine influenza virus (SIV) hemagglutinin (HA) gene induced protective immunity against homologous influenza virus challenge. However, pigs with maternal antibody had no protective immunity against challenge after vaccination with RP vaccines expressing HA gene alone or in combination with nucleoprotein gene. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Influenza virus vaccine live intranasal--MedImmune vaccines: CAIV-T, influenza vaccine live intranasal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    that it should be able to provide these data without conducting further clinical trials. In January 2002, Aviron submitted additional clinical and manufacturing data on FluMist to the US FDA. MedImmune received a second Complete Response Letter from the US FDA on 10 July 2002, requesting clarification and additional data relating to previously submitted information. One of the most significant issues raised by the US FDA was the exacerbated rate of asthma and wheezing in 18-35-month-old patients using FluMist. MedImmune is considering two options to address this issue; to either exclude patients with asthma and wheezing from the label, or to exclude 18- to 30-month-old patients from the proposed indication. On 26 August 2002, MedImmune reported that it had completed the submission of information requested by the US FDA for FluMist. On 17 December 2002, the US FDA's Vaccination and Related Biologicals Products Advisory Committee (VRBPAC) recommended that the FDA approve FluMist to prevent influenza in healthy children, adolescents and adults (ages 5-49 years). Even though the VRBPAC voted in favour of the product's safety in the 50- to 64-year age group, they believed that the data set on efficacy for this age group was insufficient. The committee has also recommended that head-to-head studies should be conducted comparing FluMist to the marketed trivalent inactivated vaccine. Additional clinical trials suggested by the VRBPAC were shedding studies to more clearly define the probability of transmitting the influenza vaccine virus to a high-risk patient and annual revaccination studies. On 30 January 2003, MedImmune announced that it had received a Complete Response Letter from the US FDA requesting clarification and additional information relating to data previously submitted. No additional clinical trials were requested. The company responded to the five questions contained in the letter on 7 February 2003. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

  1. An innovative influenza vaccination policy: targeting last season's patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamin, Dan; Gavious, Arieh; Solnik, Eyal; Davidovitch, Nadav; Balicer, Ran D; Galvani, Alison P; Pliskin, Joseph S

    2014-05-01

    Influenza vaccination is the primary approach to prevent influenza annually. WHO/CDC recommendations prioritize vaccinations mainly on the basis of age and co-morbidities, but have never considered influenza infection history of individuals for vaccination targeting. We evaluated such influenza vaccination policies through small-world contact networks simulations. Further, to verify our findings we analyzed, independently, large-scale empirical data of influenza diagnosis from the two largest Health Maintenance Organizations in Israel, together covering more than 74% of the Israeli population. These longitudinal individual-level data include about nine million cases of influenza diagnosed over a decade. Through contact network epidemiology simulations, we found that individuals previously infected with influenza have a disproportionate probability of being highly connected within networks and transmitting to others. Therefore, we showed that prioritizing those previously infected for vaccination would be more effective than a random vaccination policy in reducing infection. The effectiveness of such a policy is robust over a range of epidemiological assumptions, including cross-reactivity between influenza strains conferring partial protection as high as 55%. Empirically, our analysis of the medical records confirms that in every age group, case definition for influenza, clinical diagnosis, and year tested, patients infected in the year prior had a substantially higher risk of becoming infected in the subsequent year. Accordingly, considering individual infection history in targeting and promoting influenza vaccination is predicted to be a highly effective supplement to the current policy. Our approach can also be generalized for other infectious disease, computer viruses, or ecological networks.

  2. An innovative influenza vaccination policy: targeting last season's patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yamin

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza vaccination is the primary approach to prevent influenza annually. WHO/CDC recommendations prioritize vaccinations mainly on the basis of age and co-morbidities, but have never considered influenza infection history of individuals for vaccination targeting. We evaluated such influenza vaccination policies through small-world contact networks simulations. Further, to verify our findings we analyzed, independently, large-scale empirical data of influenza diagnosis from the two largest Health Maintenance Organizations in Israel, together covering more than 74% of the Israeli population. These longitudinal individual-level data include about nine million cases of influenza diagnosed over a decade. Through contact network epidemiology simulations, we found that individuals previously infected with influenza have a disproportionate probability of being highly connected within networks and transmitting to others. Therefore, we showed that prioritizing those previously infected for vaccination would be more effective than a random vaccination policy in reducing infection. The effectiveness of such a policy is robust over a range of epidemiological assumptions, including cross-reactivity between influenza strains conferring partial protection as high as 55%. Empirically, our analysis of the medical records confirms that in every age group, case definition for influenza, clinical diagnosis, and year tested, patients infected in the year prior had a substantially higher risk of becoming infected in the subsequent year. Accordingly, considering individual infection history in targeting and promoting influenza vaccination is predicted to be a highly effective supplement to the current policy. Our approach can also be generalized for other infectious disease, computer viruses, or ecological networks.

  3. Developing Universal Influenza Vaccines: Hitting the Nail, Not Just on the Head

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidewij C. M. Wiersma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Influenza viruses have a huge impact on public health. Current influenza vaccines need to be updated annually and protect poorly against antigenic drift variants or novel emerging subtypes. Vaccination against influenza can be improved in two important ways, either by inducing more broadly protective immune responses or by decreasing the time of vaccine production, which is relevant especially during a pandemic outbreak. In this review, we outline the current efforts to develop so-called “universal influenza vaccines”, describing antigens that may induce broadly protective immunity and novel vaccine production platforms that facilitate timely availability of vaccines.

  4. Developing Universal Influenza Vaccines: Hitting the Nail, Not Just on the Head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiersma, Lidewij C. M.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.; de Vries, Rory D.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza viruses have a huge impact on public health. Current influenza vaccines need to be updated annually and protect poorly against antigenic drift variants or novel emerging subtypes. Vaccination against influenza can be improved in two important ways, either by inducing more broadly protective immune responses or by decreasing the time of vaccine production, which is relevant especially during a pandemic outbreak. In this review, we outline the current efforts to develop so-called “universal influenza vaccines”, describing antigens that may induce broadly protective immunity and novel vaccine production platforms that facilitate timely availability of vaccines. PMID:26343187

  5. Emerging influenza viruses and the prospect of a universal influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian

    2015-05-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual seasonal epidemics and pandemics at irregular intervals. Several cases of human infections with avian and swine influenza viruses have been detected recently, warranting enhanced surveillance and the development of more effective countermeasures to address the pandemic potential of these viruses. The most effective countermeasure against influenza virus infection is the use of prophylactic vaccines. However, vaccines that are currently in use for seasonal influenza viruses have to be re-formulated and re-administered in a cumbersome process every year due to the antigenic drift of the virus. Furthermore, current seasonal vaccines are ineffective against novel pandemic strains. This paper reviews zoonotic influenza viruses with pandemic potential and technological advances towards better vaccines that induce broad and long lasting protection from influenza virus infection. Recent efforts have focused on the development of broadly protective/universal influenza virus vaccines that can provide immunity against drifted seasonal influenza virus strains but also against potential pandemic viruses. Copyright © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Adolescent Attitudes toward Influenza Vaccination and Vaccine Uptake in a School-Based Influenza Vaccination Intervention: A Mediation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Pazol, Karen; Wingood, Gina M.; Windle, Michael; Orenstein, Walter A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: School-based vaccination programs may provide an effective strategy to immunize adolescents against influenza. This study examined whether adolescent attitudes toward influenza vaccination mediated the relationship between receipt of a school-based influenza vaccination intervention and vaccine uptake. Methods: Participants were…

  7. Seasonal Influenza Vaccine Uptake in a Respiratory Outpatients Clinic

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rossiter, A

    2017-02-01

    Influenza is an acute viral respiratory illness that continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality in Ireland. Despite well-established national and international guidelines1 and increased public awareness campaigns, vaccine uptake rates are well below target worldwide2. We performed an audit of influenza vaccine uptake at a Respiratory outpatient clinic in a tertiary referral centre. 54% (n=41) of patients received the annual vaccine, well below the target of 75% set by the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC).

  8. Humoral antibody response after receipt of inactivated seasonal influenza vaccinations one year apart in children

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, VJ; Ip, DKM; Ng, S; Chiu, SS; Cowling, BJ; Leung, GM; Peiris, JSM

    2012-01-01

    Background: Annual vaccination against seasonal influenza viruses is recommended for school-age children in some countries. There are limited data on the immunogenicity and efficacy of repeated influenza vaccinations. Methods: In a randomized controlled trial, we administered seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) or placebo to 64 children 6-15 years of age in two consecutive years and explored their humoral antibody responses. Results: Receipt of TIV in the first year was ass...

  9. [Immune response to influenza vaccination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, I; Corral, J; Arranz, A; Foruria, A; Landa, V; Lejarza, J R; Marijuán, L; Martínez, J M

    1989-01-01

    The present study investigated the level of immunity of the population against three strains of the influenza virus (A Chile/1/83 -A Philippines/2/82 and B URSS/100/83) before and three months after vaccination, and the immune response to whole virus vaccine as compared with fragmented virus vaccine. A high percentage of the population had titers greater than or equal to 1/10 before vaccination for the Chile (54%) and Philippines (65.7%) strains, while titers against the URSS strain were lower (25.4%). There was a definitive increase in antibody titer in the vaccinated population, although it was lower than expected. The overall response to both vaccines, with protecting titers greater than or equal to 1/40 after vaccination was 65.2% for the Chile strain, 74.6% for the Philippines strain, and 15% for the URSS strain. No differences in the overall immune response were found between the groups vaccinated with whole and fragmented virus.

  10. Vaccine-mismatched influenza B/Yamagata lineage viruses in Cuba, 2012-2013 season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arencibia, Amely; Piñón, Alexander; Acosta, Belsy; Fernandez, Leandro; Muné, Mayra; Valdés, Odalys; Savón, Clara; Oropesa, Suset; Gonzalez, Grehete; Roque, Rosmery; Gonzalez, Guelsys; Hernández, Bárbara; Alfonso, Javier Martínez

    2018-03-01

    Annual trivalent influenza vaccines contain one of influenza B lineages; influenza B/Victoria-lineage or influenza B/Yamagata viruses. Theoretically, these vaccines should protect against viruses expected to circulate in the next influenza season. The National Influenza Centers, based on surveillance data from National Reference Laboratories, selects the strains composing each annual trivalent or tetravalent vaccine. Nevertheless, in some epidemics, vaccine strains do not match genetically with circulating strains. The aim of the present study is to compare the HA1-domain of 42 influenza B viruses circulating in Cuba during the 2012-2013 season with the vaccine strain B/Wisconsin/01/2010-like virus from the B/Yamagata lineage, included in the 2012-2013 Northern-Hemisphere Influenza vaccine. The efficacy of the influenza vaccine was also estimated. The analysis of the present study indicates that the B/Victoria and B/Yamagata lineages co-circulated in Cuba in the 2012-2013 season. In 2012-2013 season, according to the sequences analysis, trivalent vaccine did not match with the circulating strains. The present study also detected amino acid substitutions which could have altered the antigenic properties of HA gene. The results presented here suggest the need to consider a possible introduction of tetravalent influenza vaccine in Cuba, as has been recommended by the WHO to ensure higher levels of protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Seasonal influenza vaccination rates and reasons for non-vaccination in children with gastrointestinal disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peleg, Noam; Zevit, Noam; Shamir, Raanan; Chodick, Gabriel; Levy, Itzhak

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the treatment and prevention of influenza, it is still considered an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Annual vaccination is the safest and most effective mean of prevention. Our study aims were to explore the uptake of influenza vaccination among children with gastrointestinal disorders, and to characterize non-adherent patients. The present cross-sectional study included parents of pediatric patients attending the Gastroenterology Institute at Schneider Children's Medical Center of Israel between September and October 2011. Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire concerning demographic and clinical parameters, influenza vaccination of the child, and reasons for not vaccinating the child, when appropriate. The study population included 273 patients (50% female), with a median age of 10 years (range, 2-18 years). Overall, the rate of seasonal influenza vaccination was 30.8%. Higher rates were found among immunosuppressed patients (46.1%), and in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (50%). There was no significant effect of patient age, gender, ethnic origin or parental level of education on the vaccination rate. Vaccination rates were significantly associated with parents' information and knowledge of, as well as their personal beliefs regarding the vaccine (Pvaccination rates are relatively low in the pediatric population attending gastroenterology clinics, in both high- and low-risk groups. The importance of parental knowledge in compliance with influenza vaccination of children should prompt general pediatricians and gastroenterologists to discuss and address the common misconceptions regarding the vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Towards Future T Cell-Mediated Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi H. O. Nguyen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAVs infections impact significantly on global health, being particularly problematic in children, the elderly, pregnant women, indigenous populations and people with co-morbidities. Antibody-based vaccines require annual administration to combat rapidly acquired mutations modifying the surface haemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA glycoproteins. Conversely, influenza-specific CD8+ T cell responses directed at peptides derived from the more conserved internal virus proteins are known to be protective, suggesting that T cell-based vaccines may provide long-lasting cross-protection. This review outlines the importance of CD8+ T cell immunity to seasonal influenza and pandemic IAVs and summarises current vaccination strategies for inducing durable CD8+ T cell memory. Aspects of future IAV vaccine design and the use of live virus challenge in humans to establish proof of principle are also discussed.

  13. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination: patient perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, P F; Gibbons, Y M; Primrose, W R; Ellis, G; Downie, G

    2000-04-01

    The efficacy of the influenza vaccine in reducing mortality and hospital admissions is established, particularly in the elderly. However, up to 50% of those at risk do not receive the vaccine. These patients are also at risk from pneumococcal infection and there is considerable overlap between the target group for each vaccine. This study sought to identify at risk individuals from consecutive admissions to an acute geriatric unit and to gain an insight into their perceptions with regard to vaccination. The awareness of each vaccine was recorded, together with the vaccination history. Seventy four per cent of the final cohort had heard of the influenza vaccine, while only 13% had heard of the pneumococcal vaccine. Fifty per cent perceived themselves to be at risk from influenza and its complications and 87% of the cohort believed it to be a serious infection. Influenza vaccine was judged to confer good protection by 72% of the sample and yet up to 50% believed that the vaccine can make the recipient ill. Influenza is perceived as a serious infection by patients and yet many do not believe themselves to be at particular risk. Although influenza vaccination is believed to confer protection, the decision whether, or not, to accept the vaccine is coloured by many factors, including popular myths and anecdotal information from friends and relatives. The uptake of influenza vaccine is suboptimal and the awareness of the pneumococcal vaccine certainly in the elderly is poor. The need for a comprehensive nationwide education campaign promoting both influenza and pneumococcal vaccine is highlighted.

  14. State law and influenza vaccination of health care personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Alexandra M; Cox, Marisa A

    2013-01-21

    Nosocomial influenza outbreaks, attributed to the unvaccinated health care workforce, have contributed to patient complications or death, worker illness and absenteeism, and increased economic costs to the health care system. Since 1981, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended that all HCP receive an annual influenza vaccination. Health care employers (HCE) have adopted various strategies to encourage health care personnel (HCP) to voluntarily receive influenza vaccination, including: sponsoring educational and promotional campaigns, increasing access to seasonal influenza vaccine, permitting the use of declination statements, and combining multiple approaches. However, these measures failed to significantly increase uptake among HCP. As a result, beginning in 2004, health care facilities and local health departments began to require certain HCP to receive influenza vaccination as a condition of employment and annually. Today, hundreds of facilities throughout the country have developed and implemented similar policies. Mandatory vaccination programs have been endorsed by professional and non-profit organizations, state health departments, and public health. These programs have been more effective at increasing coverage rates than any voluntary strategy, with some health systems reporting coverage rates up to 99.3%. Several states have enacted laws requiring HCEs to implement vaccination programs for the workforce. These laws present an example of how states will respond to threats to the public's health and constrain personal choice in order to protect vulnerable populations. This study analyzes laws in twenty states that address influenza vaccination requirements for HCP who practice in acute or long-term care facilities in the United States. The laws vary in the extent to which they incorporate the six elements of a mandatory HCP influenza vaccination program. Four of the

  15. Influenza vaccines: Evaluation of the safety profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombetta, Claudia Maria; Gianchecchi, Elena; Montomoli, Emanuele

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT The safety of vaccines is a critical factor in maintaining public trust in national vaccination programs. Vaccines are recommended for children, adults and elderly subjects and have to meet higher safety standards, since they are administered to healthy subjects, mainly healthy children. Although vaccines are strictly monitored before authorization, the possibility of adverse events and/or rare adverse events cannot be totally eliminated. Two main types of influenza vaccines are currently available: parenteral inactivated influenza vaccines and intranasal live attenuated vaccines. Both display a good safety profile in adults and children. However, they can cause adverse events and/or rare adverse events, some of which are more prevalent in children, while others with a higher prevalence in adults. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of influenza vaccine safety according to target groups, vaccine types and production methods. PMID:29297746

  16. The virosome concept for influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huckriede, A; Bungener, L; Stegmann, T; Daemen, T; Medema, J; Palache, AM; Wilschut, J

    2005-01-01

    There is a need for more efficacious inactivated influenza vaccines, since current formulations show suboptimal immunogenicity in at-risk populations, like the elderly. More effective vaccines are also urgently needed for an improved influenza pandemic preparedness. In this context, there is

  17. Psychosocial Correlates of Intention to Receive an Influenza Vaccination among Rural Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Sales, Jessica M.; Pazol, Karen; Wingood, Gina M.; Windle, Michael; Orenstein, Walter A.; Diclemente, Ralph J.

    2010-01-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recently expanded annual influenza vaccination recommendations to include all children 6 months through 18 years of age. Adolescent attitudes toward influenza vaccination may play a key role in reaching this newly added age group. This study examined the…

  18. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Subramanian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging 'universal' vaccines-targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus-offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in

  19. Development of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara-based Influenza Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. Altenburg (Arwen)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractInfluenza viruses continuously circulate in the human population and are estimated to cause 3-5 million cases of severe respiratory illness annually worldwide of which 250.000-500.000 have a fatal outcome. Vaccination is the most efficient measure to control infectious diseases,

  20. Repeated seasonal influenza vaccination among elderly in Europe: Effects on laboratory confirmed hospitalised influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondy, Marc; Launay, Odile; Castilla, Jesus; Costanzo, Simona; Puig-Barberà, Joan; Gefenaite, Giedre; Larrauri, Amparo; Rizzo, Caterina; Pitigoi, Daniela; Syrjänen, Ritva K; Machado, Ausenda; Kurečić Filipović, Sanja; Krisztina Horváth, Judit; Paradowska-Stankiewicz, Iwona; Marbus, Sierk; Moren, Alain

    2017-08-03

    In Europe, annual influenza vaccination is recommended to elderly. From 2011 to 2014 and in 2015-16, we conducted a multicentre test negative case control study in hospitals of 11 European countries to measure influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against laboratory confirmed hospitalised influenza among people aged ≥65years. We pooled four seasons data to measure IVE by past exposures to influenza vaccination. We swabbed patients admitted for clinical conditions related to influenza with onset of severe acute respiratory infection ≤7days before admission. Cases were patients RT-PCR positive for influenza virus and controls those negative for any influenza virus. We documented seasonal vaccination status for the current season and the two previous seasons. We recruited 5295 patients over the four seasons, including 465A(H1N1)pdm09, 642A(H3N2), 278 B case-patients and 3910 controls. Among patients unvaccinated in both previous two seasons, current seasonal IVE (pooled across seasons) was 30% (95%CI: -35 to 64), 8% (95%CI: -94 to 56) and 33% (95%CI: -43 to 68) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B respectively. Among patients vaccinated in both previous seasons, current seasonal IVE (pooled across seasons) was -1% (95%CI: -80 to 43), 37% (95%CI: 7-57) and 43% (95%CI: 1-68) against influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2) and B respectively. Our results suggest that, regardless of patients' recent vaccination history, current seasonal vaccine conferred some protection to vaccinated patients against hospitalisation with influenza A(H3N2) and B. Vaccination of patients already vaccinated in both the past two seasons did not seem to be effective against A(H1N1)pdm09. To better understand the effect of repeated vaccination, engaging in large cohort studies documenting exposures to vaccine and natural infection is needed. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Direct and indirect effects of influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Martin; Schwehm, Markus; Eichner, Linda; Gerlier, Laetitia

    2017-04-26

    After vaccination, vaccinees acquire some protection against infection and/or disease. Vaccination, therefore, reduces the number of infections in the population. Due to this herd protection, not everybody needs to be vaccinated to prevent infections from spreading. We quantify direct and indirect effects of influenza vaccination examining the standard Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) and Susceptible-Infected-Recovered-Susceptible (SIRS) model as well as simulation results of a sophisticated simulation tool which allows for seasonal transmission of four influenza strains in a population with realistic demography and age-dependent contact patterns. As shown analytically for the simple SIR and SIRS transmission models, indirect vaccination effects are bigger than direct ones if the effective reproduction number of disease transmission is close to the critical value of 1. Simulation results for 20-60% vaccination with live influenza vaccine of 2-17 year old children in Germany, averaged over 10 years (2017-26), confirm this result: four to seven times as many influenza cases are prevented among non-vaccinated individuals as among vaccinees. For complications like death due to influenza which occur much more frequently in the unvaccinated elderly than in the vaccination target group of children, indirect benefits can surpass direct ones by a factor of 20 or even more than 30. The true effect of vaccination can be much bigger than what would be expected by only looking at vaccination coverage and vaccine efficacy.

  2. Microneedle and mucosal delivery of influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sang-Moo; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Yeu-Chun

    2017-01-01

    In recent years with the threat of pandemic influenza and other public health needs, alternative vaccination methods other than intramuscular immunization have received great attention. The skin and mucosal surfaces are attractive sites probably because of both non-invasive access to the vaccine delivery and unique immunological responses. Intradermal vaccines using a microinjection system (BD Soluvia) and intranasal vaccines (FluMist) are licensed. As a new vaccination method, solid microneedles have been developed using a simple device that may be suitable for self-administration. Because coated micorneedle influenza vaccines are administered in the solid state, developing formulations maintaining the stability of influenza vaccines is an important issue to be considered. Marketable microneedle devices and clinical trials remain to be developed. Other alternative mucosal routes such as oral and intranasal delivery systems are also attractive for inducing cross protective mucosal immunity but effective non-live mucosal vaccines remain to be developed. PMID:22697052

  3. Influenza vaccination type, live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) versus inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV), received by children, United States, 2011-12 through 2013-14 influenza seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Katherine E; Santibanez, Tammy A; Zhai, Yusheng; Singleton, James A

    2015-09-22

    Influenza vaccines available for children in the United States include inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) and live, attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV). Objectives of this study were to quantify proportions of IIV and LAIV received by vaccinated children, and examine associations between vaccine type received and demographic characteristics. National Immunization Survey-Flu (NIS-Flu) parental reported data for the 2011-12 through 2013-14 influenza seasons were used to estimate proportions of vaccinated children 2-17 years who received IIV and LAIV. Tests of association between vaccination type and demographic variables were conducted using Wald chi-square tests and pair-wise comparison t-tests. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine variables independently associated with receipt of LAIV versus IIV. In the 2013-14 season, 33.3% of vaccinated children received LAIV, similar to the proportion in the 2011-12 (32.2%) and 2012-13 (32.1%) seasons. Across all seasons studied, the strongest observed association was between vaccination type and child's age, with children 2-8 years (Adjusted Prevalence Ratio (95% confidence interval) [APR(95% CI)] 1.41(1.27-1.56), 1.46(1.34-1.59), and 1.50(1.38-1.63) for 2011-12, 2012-13, and 2013-14) and 9-12 years (APR(95% CI) 1.37(1.23-1.54), 1.38(1.26-1.51), and 1.50(1.38-1.63) for 2011-12, 2012-13, and 2013-14) being more likely to have received LAIV than children 13-17 years. Among those vaccinated, whites were more likely to have received LAIV compared with blacks (APR(95% CI) 1.19(1.05-1.35), 1.24(1.10-1.39), and 1.22(1.11-1.34) for 2011-12, 2012-13, and 2013-14), and children living above poverty (annual income >$75,000) were more likely to have received LAIV than those living at or below poverty (APR(95% CI) 1.43(1.23-1.67), 1.13(1.02-1.26), and 1.16(1.06-1.28) for 2011-12, 2012-13, and 2013-14). This study provides a baseline of the extent and patterns of LAIV uptake that can be used to measure the impact of

  4. Economic analysis of pandemic influenza vaccination strategies in Singapore.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon J Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: All influenza pandemic plans advocate pandemic vaccination. However, few studies have evaluated the cost-effectiveness of different vaccination strategies. This paper compares the economic outcomes of vaccination compared with treatment with antiviral agents alone, in Singapore. METHODOLOGY: We analyzed the economic outcomes of pandemic vaccination (immediate vaccination and vaccine stockpiling compared with treatment-only in Singapore using a decision-based model to perform cost-benefit and cost-effectiveness analyses. We also explored the annual insurance premium (willingness to pay depending on the perceived risk of the next pandemic occurring. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The treatment-only strategy resulted in 690 deaths, 13,950 hospitalization days, and economic cost of USD$497 million. For immediate vaccination, at vaccine effectiveness of >55%, vaccination was cost-beneficial over treatment-only. Vaccine stockpiling is not cost-effective in most scenarios even with 100% vaccine effectiveness. The annual insurance premium was highest with immediate vaccination, and was lower with increased duration to the next pandemic. The premium was also higher with higher vaccine effectiveness, attack rates, and case-fatality rates. Stockpiling with case-fatality rates of 0.4-0.6% would be cost-beneficial if vaccine effectiveness was >80%; while at case-fatality of >5% stockpiling would be cost-beneficial even if vaccine effectiveness was 20%. High-risk sub-groups warrant higher premiums than low-risk sub-groups. CONCLUSIONS: The actual pandemic vaccine effectiveness and lead time is unknown. Vaccine strategy should be based on perception of severity. Immediate vaccination is most cost-effective, but requires vaccines to be available when required. Vaccine stockpiling as insurance against worst-case scenarios is also cost-effective. Research and development is therefore critical to develop and stockpile cheap, readily available effective vaccines.

  5. Nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza vaccination: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sarah; Sim, Jenny; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    To critically analyse the literature describing nurses' knowledge, attitudes and practices regarding influenza vaccination. Influenza is a serious illness that has significant impacts on productivity, health outcomes and healthcare costs. Despite the recommendations for nurses to be vaccinated annually against influenza, the vaccination rates remain suboptimal. Integrative literature review. An integrative review was conducted as described by Whittemore and Knafl (2005). A search of CINAHL, Cochrane Library, ProQuest Central, ClinicalKey, ScienceDirect, Wiley Online Library, and Informit was undertaken to identify relevant papers. Given the heterogeneity of included studies, a narrative approach was used to analyse the data. There was limited research available on this topic area, with only 10 papers identified as meeting the inclusion criteria. Five themes were identified: the relationship between knowledge and influenza vaccination, perception of risk, motivators for influenza vaccination, barriers to influenza vaccination and impact of demographics on vaccination. Despite the evidence for the protective effects of influenza vaccination, rates of vaccination among nurses remain sub-optimal. Nurses' influenza vaccination practices likely relate to their level of knowledge and perception of risk; the greater nurses' knowledge regarding influenza and influenza vaccination the higher their perception of risk and the more likely they are to be vaccinated. This also translates to the advice that they give patients with vaccinated nurses more inclined to recommend vaccination than those unvaccinated. The practices of nurses related to influenza vaccination may translate to the advice that they give their patients. Understanding the knowledge levels, practices and attitudes of nurses can assist in developing strategies to enhance education of nurses. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines

  7. Influenza Vaccines: From Surveillance Through Production to Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Pritish K.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Poland, Gregory A.

    2010-01-01

    Influenza is an important contributor to population and individual morbidity and mortality. The current influenza pandemic with novel H1N1 has highlighted the need for health care professionals to better understand the processes involved in creating influenza vaccines, both for pandemic as well as for seasonal influenza. This review presents an overview of influenza-related topics to help meet this need and includes a discussion of the burden of disease, virology, epidemiology, viral surveillance, and vaccine strain selection. We then present an overview of influenza vaccine—related topics, including vaccine production, vaccine efficacy and effectiveness, influenza vaccine misperceptions, and populations that are recommended to receive vaccination. English-language articles in PubMed published between January 1, 1970, and October 7, 2009, were searched using key words human influenza, influenza vaccines, influenza A, and influenza B. PMID:20118381

  8. Development of a stable liquid formulation of live attenuated influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jessica A; Estrada, Marcus; Flood, E Alexander; Mahmood, Kutub; Dhere, Rajeev; Chen, Dexiang

    2016-07-12

    Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing influenza. However, the cost of producing annual seasonal influenza vaccines puts them out of reach for most developing countries. While live attenuated influenza vaccines are among the most efficacious and can be manufactured at low cost, they may require lyophilization to be stable enough for developing-country use, which adds a significant cost burden. The development of a liquid live attenuated seasonal influenza vaccine that is stable for around a year-the duration of an annual influenza season-would significantly improve not only the production output but also the use and accessibility of influenza vaccines in low-resource settings. In this study, potential stabilizing excipients were screened and optimized using the least stable influenza vaccine strain presently known, H1N1 (A/California/07/2009), as a model. The stability-conferring properties of the lead formulations were also tested with a Type B strain of influenza virus (B/Brisbane/60/2008). Stability was also evaluated with higher titers of influenza virus and exposure to agitation and freeze-thaw stresses to further confirm the stability of the lead formulations. Through this process, we identified a liquid formulation consisting of sucrose phosphate glutamate buffer with 1% arginine and 0.5% recombinant human serum albumin that provided storage stability of one year at 2-8°C for the influenza A and B strains tested. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of stable influenza vaccine powder formulations : Challenges and possibilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, J-P; Huckriede, A; Wilschut, J; Frijlink, H W; Hinrichs, W L J

    2008-01-01

    Influenza vaccination represents the cornerstone of influenza prevention. However, today all influenza vaccines are formulated as liquids that are unstable at ambient temperatures and have to be stored and distributed under refrigeration. In order to stabilize influenza vaccines, they can be brought

  10. How Experience Shapes Health Beliefs: The Case of Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabani, Shosh; Benzion, Uri

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the impact of past experience with influenza and the influenza vaccine on four categories of the Health Belief Model: beliefs about susceptibility to contracting influenza, severity of illness, perceived benefits of the vaccine in preventing influenza, and perceived barriers to getting vaccinated. The study population comprised…

  11. Intranasal Administration of Whole Inactivated Influenza Virus Vaccine as a Promising Influenza Vaccine Candidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainai, Akira; Suzuki, Tadaki; Tamura, Shin-Ichi; Hasegawa, Hideki

    The effect of the current influenza vaccine, an inactivated virus vaccine administered by subcutaneous/intramuscular injection, is limited to reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with seasonal influenza outbreaks. Intranasal vaccination, by contrast, mimics natural infection and induces not only systemic IgG antibodies but also local secretory IgA (S-IgA) antibodies found on the surface of the mucosal epithelium in the upper respiratory tract. S-IgA antibodies are highly effective at preventing virus infection. Although the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) administered intranasally can induce local antibodies, this vaccine is restricted to healthy populations aged 2-49 years because of safety concerns associated with using live viruses in a vaccine. Instead of LAIV, an intranasal vaccine made with inactivated virus could be applied to high-risk populations, including infants and elderly adults. Normally, a mucosal adjuvant would be required to enhance the effect of intranasal vaccination with an inactivated influenza vaccine. However, we found that intranasal administration of a concentrated, whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine without any mucosal adjuvant was enough to induce local neutralizing S-IgA antibodies in the nasal epithelium of healthy individuals with some immunological memory for seasonal influenza viruses. This intranasal vaccine is a novel candidate that could improve on the current injectable vaccine or the LAIV for the prevention of seasonal influenza epidemics.

  12. A Multiyear Model of Influenza Vaccination in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamis, Arnold; Zhang, Yuji; Kamis, Tamara

    2017-07-28

    Vaccinating adults against influenza remains a challenge in the United States. Using data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, we present a model for predicting who receives influenza vaccination in the United States between 2012 and 2014, inclusive. The logistic regression model contains nine predictors: age, pneumococcal vaccination, time since last checkup, highest education level attained, employment, health care coverage, number of personal doctors, smoker status, and annual household income. The model, which classifies correctly 67 percent of the data in 2013, is consistent with models tested on the 2012 and 2014 datasets. Thus, we have a multiyear model to explain and predict influenza vaccination in the United States. The results indicate room for improvement in vaccination rates. We discuss how cognitive biases may underlie reluctance to obtain vaccination. We argue that targeted communications addressing cognitive biases could be useful for effective framing of vaccination messages, thus increasing the vaccination rate. Finally, we discuss limitations of the current study and questions for future research.

  13. Influenza vaccinations of health care personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Nitsch-Osuch

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is one of the most common respiratory diseases affecting people of all age groups all over the world. Seasonal influenza leads to substantial morbidity and mortality on a global scale. Vaccines are undeniably one of the most important health advances of the past century, however, managing influenza in working populations remains a difficult issue. Vaccination of health care workers (HCW is an efficient way to reduce the risk of occupational infection and to prevent nosocomial transmission to vulnerable patients. Despite this, achieving high immunization rates among those professionals is a challenge. Knowledge and attitudes of healthcare providers have significant impact on the frequency with which vaccines are offered and accepted, but many HCWs are poorly equipped to make informed recommendations about vaccine merits and risks. Principal reasons for vaccination are the willing not to be infected and avoiding transmission to patients and the family. The main reasons for refusing is lack of time, a feeling of invulnerability to vaccination, conviction of not being at risk, of being too young or in good health. Misconceptions about influenza vaccine efficacy, like adverse effects, and fear of contracting illness from the vaccine are significantly associated with noncompliance with vaccination. Therefore, strategies to increase awareness of the importance of recommending influenza immunization among health professionals are required. Med Pr 2013;64(1:119–129

  14. 75 FR 48712 - Proposed Vaccine Information Materials for Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... of the benefits of the vaccine, (2) A concise description of the risks associated with the vaccine... each year. However, known benefits and risks for each year's influenza vaccine are generally the same... difficulty breathing, hoarseness or wheezing, hives, paleness, weakness, a fast heart beat or dizziness. What...

  15. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  16. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2016-11-01

    Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors.

  17. Vaccination status and perception of influenza vaccination in the Polish population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak-Kosek, A; Mendrycka, M; Saracen, A; Kosek, J; Hallmann-Szelińska, E; Zielnik-Jurkiewicz, B; Kempińska-Mirosławska, B

    2015-01-01

    Influenza is still considered to be the most dangerous infectious disease of the twenty-first century. Outbreaks of influenza occur worldwide and affect all ages. The disease is severe, often with threatening complications and can lead to death, albeit many people have it in disregard. One of the main ways of preventing the disease is vaccination. The most effective method of prevention against influenza illness and its complications are annual vaccinations. Vaccinations, although recommended by the Ministry of Health in Poland, are not subject to refund. This paper presents the results of research conducted with the use of an anonymous questionnaire containing 18 questions to be completed by parents of school children, students of technical and medical universities, patients, medical staff, and people over 65 years of age. The study was conducted in the season of 2012/2013 in Poland. The survey involved 1,203 people in various age groups with different educational background. The analysis of the study shows that respondents very rarely use this form of prevention. Even if the vaccination were refunded, the percentage of people vaccinated against influenza would not increase significantly. Among the respondents, those who are in favor of influenza vaccination are in the minority.

  18. Effectiveness of the 2013 and 2014 Southern Hemisphere Influenza Vaccines Against Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza in Young Children Using a Test-Negative Design, Bangkok, Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Ditsungnoen, Darunee; Klungthong, Chonticha; Fernandez, Stefan; Yoon, In-Kyu; Lindblade, Kim; Dawood, Fatimah S.; Olsen, Sonja J.; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee

    2016-01-01

    Background The Thai Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends annual influenza vaccination for children six months through two years of age, although older children may be vaccinated on request. We evaluated effectiveness of the 2013 and 2014 inactivated influenza vaccines to reduce medically-attended laboratory-confirmed influenza illness among Thai children aged 7–60 months. Methods From September 2013–May 2015, children with influenza-like illness (ILI) were screened with a rapid influenza diagnostic test. Enrolled children had nasal and throat swabs tested for influenza viruses using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Cases and controls were subjects testing positive and negative, respectively, for influenza viruses by PCR. Vaccination status was ascertained from vaccination cards. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) was calculated as 100%*(1−odds ratio of vaccination among cases versus controls). Results Of 1,377 children enrolled, cases (n=490) and controls (n=887) were similar in demographic characteristics. Cases were less likely to receive influenza vaccine than controls in 2013 (6% vs. 14%; p=0.02), but not in 2014 (6% vs. 7%; p=0.57). Among cases, 126 (26%) were positive for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus, 239 (49%) for influenza A(H3N2) and 124 (25%) for influenza B. One specimen was positive for both influenza A(H3N2) and B viruses. VE for full vaccination against all viruses was 64% (95% confidence interval [CI], 21%, 84%) in 2013 and 26% (95% CI, −47%, 63%) in 2014. Conclusions Influenza vaccination was low among Thai children in our study, and VE varied by year, highlighting the need for annual monitoring of VE to better understand vaccine program effectiveness. PMID:27307102

  19. National seasonal influenza vaccination survey in Europe, 2008.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mereckiene, J

    2008-10-23

    A cross-sectional survey was undertaken with the European Union (EU) Member States and Norway and Iceland to describe seasonal influenza immunisation in the 2006-7 season, in particular to identify country-specific recommendations for risk groups, obtain vaccine uptake information and allow comparison with global recommendations. A standardised questionnaire was completed electronically by each country\\'s project gatekeeper. Of the 29 countries surveyed, 28 recommended seasonal influenza vaccination for older age groups (22 for those aged > 65 years), and in one country vaccine was recommended for all age groups. All countries recommended vaccinating patients with chronic pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases and most countries advised to immunise patients with haematologic or metabolic disorders (n=28), immunologic disorders (n=27) and renal disease (n=27), as well as residents of long-term care facilities (n=24). Most countries recommended vaccination for staff in hospitals (n=25), long-term care facilities (n=25) and outpatient clinics (n=23), and one-third had such recommendations for workers in essential (n=10), military (n=10) and veterinary services (n=10) and poultry industry (n=13). Eight countries recommended vaccine for pregnant women; and five advised to vaccinate children (with age limits ranging from 6 months to 5 years). Twenty countries measured influenza vaccine uptake among those aged > 65 years (range 1.8%-82.1%), seven reported uptake in healthcare workers (range 14%-48%) and seven assessed coverage in persons with underlying medical conditions (range 27.6%-75.2%). The data provided by this study can assist EU states to assess and compare their influenza vaccination programme performance with other countries. The information provides a comprehensive overview of policies and programmes and their outcomes and can be used to inform joint discussions on how the national policies in the EU might be standardised in the future to achieve optimal

  20. DNA-based influenza vaccines as immunoprophylactic agents toward universality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Han; El Zowalaty, Mohamed E

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is an illness of global public health concern. Influenza viruses have been responsible for several pandemics affecting humans. Current influenza vaccines have proved satisfactory safety; however, they have limitations and do not provide protection against unexpected emerging influenza virus strains. Therefore, there is an urgent need for alternative approaches to conventional influenza vaccines. The development of universal influenza vaccines will help alleviate the severity of influenza pandemics. Influenza DNA vaccines have been the subject of many studies over the past decades due to their ability to induce broad-based protective immune responses in various animal models. The present review highlights the recent advances in influenza DNA vaccine research and its potential as an affordable universal influenza vaccine.

  1. Egg-Independent Influenza Vaccines and Vaccine Candidates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Manini

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination remains the principal way to control seasonal infections and is the most effective method of reducing influenza-associated morbidity and mortality. Since the 1940s, the main method of producing influenza vaccines has been an egg-based production process. However, in the event of a pandemic, this method has a significant limitation, as the time lag from strain isolation to final dose formulation and validation is six months. Indeed, production in eggs is a relatively slow process and production yields are both unpredictable and highly variable from strain to strain. In particular, if the next influenza pandemic were to arise from an avian influenza virus, and thus reduce the egg-laying hen population, there would be a shortage of embryonated eggs available for vaccine manufacturing. Although the production of egg-derived vaccines will continue, new technological developments have generated a cell-culture-based influenza vaccine and other more recent platforms, such as synthetic influenza vaccines.

  2. Uptake of the Influenza Vaccination in Pregnancy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Crosby, DA

    2016-09-01

    Influenza is caused by a highly infectious RNA virus, which usually occurs in a seasonal pattern with epidemics in the winter months. The objective of this study was to determine the uptake of the influenza vaccine in a pregnant population and ascertain the reasons why some women did not receive it. A prospective cohort study was conducted over a two-week period in January 2016 in the National Maternity Hospital Dublin, a tertiary referral maternity hospital delivering over 9000 infants per year. There were 504 women studied over the 2-week period. Overall, 197(39.1%) women received the vaccine at a mean gestational age 20.9 weeks (SD 7.0). Given the increased rates of influenza in the community and the associated implications for mother and infant, it is important that pregnant women are educated regarding the risks of influenza in pregnancy and encourage this cohort to be vaccinated.

  3. Epilepsy in Children After Pandemic Influenza Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Håberg, Siri E; Aaberg, Kari M; Surén, Pål; Trogstad, Lill; Ghaderi, Sara; Stoltenberg, Camilla; Magnus, Per; Bakken, Inger Johanne

    2018-02-15

    To determine if pandemic influenza vaccination was associated with an increased risk of epilepsy in children. Information from Norwegian registries from 2006 through 2014 on all children <18 years living in Norway on October 1, 2009 was used in Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios for incident epilepsy after vaccination. A self-controlled case series analysis was used to estimate incidence rate ratios in defined risk periods after pandemic vaccination. In Norway, the main period of the influenza A subtype H1N1 pandemic was from October 2009 to December 2009. On October 1, 2009, 1 154 113 children <18 years of age were registered as residents in Norway. Of these, 572 875 (50.7%) were vaccinated against pandemic influenza. From October 2009 through 2014 there were 3628 new cases of epilepsy (incidence rate 6.09 per 10 000 person-years). The risk of epilepsy was not increased after vaccination: hazard ratio: 1.07; 95% confidence interval: 0.94-1.23. Results from the self-controlled case series analysis supported the finding of no association between vaccination and subsequent epilepsy. Pandemic influenza vaccination was not associated with increased risk of epilepsy. Concerns about pandemic vaccination causing epilepsy in children seem to be unwarranted. Copyright © 2018 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  4. Impact of influenza vaccination on mortality risk among the elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groenwold, R. H. H.; Hoes, A. W.; Hak, E.

    Estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness have mostly been derived from nonrandomised studies and therefore are potentially confounded. The aim of the current study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness in preventing mortality among the elderly, taking both measured and unmeasured

  5. Vaccination coverage among adults, excluding influenza vaccination - United States, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Walter W; Lu, Peng-Jun; O'Halloran, Alissa; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kim, David K; Pilishvili, Tamara; Hales, Craig M; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-02-06

    Vaccinations are recommended throughout life to prevent vaccine-preventable diseases and their sequelae. Adult vaccination coverage, however, remains low for most routinely recommended vaccines and below Healthy People 2020 targets. In October 2014, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved the adult immunization schedule for 2015. With the exception of influenza vaccination, which is recommended for all adults each year, other adult vaccinations are recommended for specific populations based on a person's age, health conditions, behavioral risk factors (e.g., injection drug use), occupation, travel, and other indications. To assess vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥19 years for selected vaccines, CDC analyzed data from the 2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). This report highlights results of that analysis for pneumococcal, tetanus toxoid-containing (tetanus and diphtheria vaccine [Td] or tetanus and diphtheria with acellular pertussis vaccine [Tdap]), hepatitis A, hepatitis B, herpes zoster (shingles), and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines by selected characteristics (age, race/ethnicity,† and vaccination indication). Influenza vaccination coverage estimates for the 2013-14 influenza season have been published separately. Compared with 2012, only modest increases occurred in Tdap vaccination among adults aged ≥19 years (a 2.9 percentage point increase to 17.2%), herpes zoster vaccination among adults aged ≥60 years (a 4.1 percentage point increase to 24.2%), and HPV vaccination among males aged 19-26 years (a 3.6 percentage point increase to 5.9%); coverage among adults in the United States for the other vaccines did not improve. Racial/ethnic disparities in coverage persisted for all six vaccines and widened for Tdap and herpes zoster vaccination. Increases in vaccination coverage are needed to reduce the occurrence of vaccine-preventable diseases among adults. Awareness of the need for vaccines for adults is low

  6. Design of randomized, double-blind, controlled, multi-centre phase IIB trials as part of the eufunded unisec project to assess the safety, immunogenicity and clinical efficacy of cross-seasonal universal influenza vaccines with or without pandemic influenza vaccine in healthy adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, Heng; Robinson, Stuart; Ben-Yedidia, Tamar; Caparros-Wanderley, Wilson; Gottlieb, Tanya; Babecoff, Ron; Schmidt, Ed; Huckriede, Anke; Hak, Eelko

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current influenza vaccines mainly induce immune responses against viral membrane glycoproteins, which undergo continuous mutations through antigenic drift. To prevent immune escape, annual vaccination with the latest predicted viral strains is adopted. Such vaccination strategy is

  7. DIVA vaccination strategies for avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David L

    2012-12-01

    Vaccination for both low pathogenicity avian influenza and highly pathogenic avian influenza is commonly used by countries that have become endemic for avian influenza virus, but stamping-out policies are still common for countries with recently introduced disease. Stamping-out policies of euthanatizing infected and at-risk flocks has been an effective control tool, but it comes at a high social and economic cost. Efforts to identify alternative ways to respond to outbreaks without widespread stamping out has become a goal for organizations like the World Organisation for Animal Health. A major issue with vaccination for avian influenza is trade considerations because countries that vaccinate are often considered to be endemic for the disease and they typically lose their export markets. Primarily as a tool to promote trade, the concept of DIVA (differentiate infected from vaccinated animals) has been considered for avian influenza, but the goal for trade is to differentiate vaccinated and not-infected from vaccinated and infected animals because trading partners are unwilling to accept infected birds. Several different strategies have been investigated for a DIVA strategy, but each has advantages and disadvantages. A review of current knowledge on the research and implementation of the DIVA strategy will be discussed with possible ways to implement this strategy in the field. The increased desire for a workable DIVA strategy may lead to one of these ideas moving from the experimental to the practical.

  8. Vaccination and antigenic drift in influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boni, Maciej F

    2008-07-18

    The relationship between influenza antigenic drift and vaccination lies at the intersection of evolutionary biology and public health, and it must be viewed and analyzed in both contexts simultaneously. In this paper, 1 review what is known about the effects of antigenic drift on vaccination and the effects of vaccination on antigenic drift, and I suggest some simple ways to detect the presence of antigenic drift in seasonal influenza data. If antigenic drift occurs on the time scale of a single influenza season, it may be associated with the presence of herd immunity at the beginning of the season and may indicate a need to monitor for vaccine updates at the end of the season. The relationship between antigenic drift and vaccination must also be viewed in the context of the global circulation of influenza strains and the seeding of local and regional epidemics. In the data sets I consider--from New Zealand, New York, and France--antigenic drift can be statistically detected during some seasons, and seeding of epidemics appears to be endogenous sometimes and exogenous at other times. Improved detection of short-term antigenic drift and epidemic seeding would significantly benefit influenza monitoring efforts and vaccine selection.

  9. Influenza vaccines in immunosuppressed adults with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterman, Roni; Eliakim-Raz, Noa; Vinograd, Inbal; Zalmanovici Trestioreanu, Anca; Leibovici, Leonard; Paul, Mical

    2018-02-01

    This is an update of the Cochrane review published in 2013, Issue 10.Immunosuppressed cancer patients are at increased risk of serious influenza-related complications. Guidelines, therefore, recommend influenza vaccination for these patients. However, data on vaccine effectiveness in this population are lacking, and the value of vaccination in this population remains unclear. To assess the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in immunosuppressed adults with malignancies. The primary review outcome is all-cause mortality, preferably at the end of the influenza season. Influenza-like illness (ILI, a clinical definition), confirmed influenza, pneumonia, any hospitalisations, influenza-related mortality and immunogenicity were defined as secondary outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase and LILACS databases up to May 2017. We searched the following conference proceedings: ICAAC, ECCMID, IDSA (infectious disease conferences), ASH, ASBMT, EBMT (haematological), and ASCO (oncological) between the years 2006 to 2017. In addition, we scanned the references of all identified studies and pertinent reviews. We searched the websites of the manufacturers of influenza vaccine. Finally, we searched for ongoing or unpublished trials in clinical trial registry databases. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs), prospective and retrospective cohort studies and case-control studies were considered, comparing inactivated influenza vaccines versus placebo, no vaccination or a different vaccine, in adults (16 years and over) with cancer. We considered solid malignancies treated with chemotherapy, haematological cancer patients treated or not treated with chemotherapy, cancer patients post-autologous (up to six months after transplantation) or allogeneic (at any time) haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Two review authors independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from included studies adhering to Cochrane

  10. Characterization of influenza vaccine immunogenicity using influenza antigen microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordan V Price

    Full Text Available Existing methods to measure influenza vaccine immunogenicity prohibit detailed analysis of epitope determinants recognized by immunoglobulins. The development of highly multiplex proteomics platforms capable of capturing a high level of antibody binding information will enable researchers and clinicians to generate rapid and meaningful readouts of influenza-specific antibody reactivity.We developed influenza hemagglutinin (HA whole-protein and peptide microarrays and validated that the arrays allow detection of specific antibody reactivity across a broad dynamic range using commercially available antibodies targeted to linear and conformational HA epitopes. We derived serum from blood draws taken from 76 young and elderly subjects immediately before and 28±7 days post-vaccination with the 2008/2009 trivalent influenza vaccine and determined the antibody reactivity of these sera to influenza array antigens.Using linear regression and correcting for multiple hypothesis testing by the Benjamini and Hochberg method of permutations over 1000 resamplings, we identified antibody reactivity to influenza whole-protein and peptide array features that correlated significantly with age, H1N1, and B-strain post-vaccine titer as assessed through a standard microneutralization assay (p<0.05, q <0.2. Notably, we identified several peptide epitopes that were inversely correlated with regard to age and seasonal H1N1 and B-strain neutralization titer (p<0.05, q <0.2, implicating reactivity to these epitopes in age-related defects in response to H1N1 influenza. We also employed multivariate linear regression with cross-validation to build models based on age and pre-vaccine peptide reactivity that predicted vaccine-induced neutralization of seasonal H1N1 and H3N2 influenza strains with a high level of accuracy (84.7% and 74.0%, respectively.Our methods provide powerful tools for rapid and accurate measurement of broad antibody-based immune responses to influenza

  11. Perception and Attitudes of Korean Obstetricians about Maternal Influenza Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Noh, Ji Yun; Seo, Yu Bin; Song, Joon Young; Choi, Won Suk; Lee, Jacob; Jung, Eunju; Kang, Seonghui; Choi, Min Joo; Jun, Jiho; Yoon, Jin Gu; Lee, Saem Na; Hyun, Hakjun; Lee, Jin-Soo; Cheong, Hojin; Cheong, Hee Jin

    2016-01-01

    Pregnant women are prioritized to receive influenza vaccination. However, the maternal influenza vaccination rate has been low in Korea. To identify potential barriers for the vaccination of pregnant women against influenza, a survey using a questionnaire on the perceptions and attitudes about maternal influenza vaccination was applied to Korean obstetricians between May and August of 2014. A total of 473 respondents participated in the survey. Most respondents (94.8%, 442/466) recognized tha...

  12. Heterosybtypic T-cell immunity to influenza in humans: challenges for universal T-cell influenza vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saranya eSridhar

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV remains a significant global health issue causing annual epidemics, pandemics and sporadic human infections with highly pathogenic avian or swine influenza viruses. Current inactivated and live vaccines are the mainstay of the public health response to influenza although vaccine efficacy is lower against antigenically distinct viral strains. The first pandemic of the 21st century underlined the urgent need to develop new vaccines capable of protection against a broad range of influenza strains. Such universal influenza vaccines are based on the idea of heterosubtypic immunity wherein immune responses to epitopes conserved across IAV strains can confer protection against subsequent infection and disease. T-cells recognising conserved antigens are a key contributor to reducing viral load and limiting disease severity during heterosubtypic infection in animal models. Recent studies undertaken during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic provided key insights into the role of cross-reactive T-cells in mediating heterosubtypic protection in humans. This review focuses on human influenza to discuss the epidemiological observations that underpin cross-protective immunity, the role of T-cells as key players in mediating heterosubtypic immunity including recent data from natural history cohort studies and the ongoing clinical development of T-cell inducing universal influenza vaccines. The challenges and knowledge gaps for developing vaccines to generate long-lived protective T-cell responses is discussed.

  13. School-Located Influenza Vaccination and Absenteeism among Elementary School Students in a Hispanic Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Patricia C.; Ynalvez, Marcus Antonius; Gonzalez, Hector F.; Castillo, Keila D.

    2013-01-01

    Seasonal influenza is recognized as a significant health burden to children and is a cause of excess school absenteeism in children. In 2008, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended annual influenza vaccination for all children 6 months to 18 years of age. School nurses influence participation in this recommendation by…

  14. 75 FR 2049 - National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... Part IV The President Proclamation 8472--National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010 #0; #0; #0..., 2010 National Influenza Vaccination Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A... hospitalization or even death. We know that influenza vaccination is the best way to protect ourselves against the...

  15. Influenza vaccination in children being treated with chemotherapy for cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, Ginette M.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; van de Wetering, Marianne D.

    2009-01-01

    Influenza infection is a potential cause of severe morbidity in children with cancer, therefore vaccination against influenza is recommended. However, there are conflicting data concerning the immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer and the value of vaccination remains

  16. Influenza vaccination in children being treated with chemotherapy for cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossen, Ginette M.; Kremer, Leontien C. M.; van de Wetering, Marianne D.

    2013-01-01

    Influenza infection is a potential cause of severe morbidity in children with cancer; therefore vaccination against influenza is recommended. However, data are conflicting regarding the immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer, and the value of vaccination remains unclear. 1.

  17. 77 FR 13329 - Pandemic Influenza Vaccines-Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Pandemic Influenza Vaccines... Secretary issued a declaration for pandemic influenza vaccines, which has been amended a number of times. The original pandemic influenza vaccine declaration was published on January 26, 2007,\\1\\ and was...

  18. Inactivated influenza vaccines: recent progress and implications for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Valentina; de Florentiis, Daniela; Martini, Mariano; Ansaldi, Filippo

    2011-02-01

    The current public health strategy for the containment of influenza is annual vaccination, which is recommended for the elderly and for those in risk factor categories that present the highest morbidity and mortality. However, because the immune response in the elderly is known to be less vigorous than in younger adults, research in the last decade has focused on improving the immune response to vaccination and increasing the protection of aged populations. The decreased efficacy of vaccines in the elderly is due to several factors, such as a decrease in the number of Langerhans cells, the limited capacity of dendritic cells to present antigen, defects in the expression of Toll-like receptors and the reduced expression of MHC class I and II molecules. Also, production of mature naive T cells by the thymus decreases with age. Among several approaches proposed to address the need for more immunogenic vaccines compared with conventional agents, the most well proven is the use of adjuvants. The first licensed adjuvant, aluminium-based mineral salts (alum), introduced in the 1920s, remains the standard worldwide adjuvant for human use and it has been widely used for almost a century. However, the addition of alum adjuvant to a split or subunit influenza vaccine has induced only marginal improvements. Other adjuvants have been developed and approved for human use since 1997; in particular, MF59, an oil-in-water adjuvant emulsion of squalene, which is able to increase immunogenicity of seasonal, pre-pandemic and pandemic subunit vaccines while maintaining acceptable safety and tolerability profiles. More recently, another oil-in-water emulsion, AS03, has been approved as a component of pre-pandemic H5N1 and pandemic H1N1 2009 vaccines. Besides adjuvants, several other strategies have been assessed to enhance antibody response in the elderly and other less responsive subjects, such as high-dose antigen vaccines, carrier systems (liposomes/virosomes) and the intradermal

  19. Influenza Vaccinations, Fall 2009: Model School-Located Vaccination Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herl Jenlink, Carolyn; Kuehnert, Paul; Mazyck, Donna

    2010-01-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus presented a major challenge to health departments, schools, and other community partners to effectively vaccinate large numbers of Americans, primarily children. The use of school-located vaccination (SLV) programs to address this challenge led health departments and schools to become creative in developing models for…

  20. Influenza infection and heart failure-vaccination may change heart failure prognosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoglou, Nikolaos P E; Bracke, Frank; Simmers, Tim; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Parissis, John

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of influenza infection with the pathogenesis of acute heart failure (AHF) and the worsening of chronic heart failure (CHF) is rather complex. The deleterious effects of influenza infection on AHF/CHF can be attenuated by specific immunization. Our review aimed to summarize the efficacy, effectiveness, safety, and dosage of anti-influenza vaccination in HF. In this literature review, we searched MEDLINE and EMBASE from January 1st 1966 to December 31st, 2016, for studies examining the association between AHF/CHF, influenza infections, and anti-influenza immunizations. We used broad criteria to increase the sensitivity of the search. HF was a prerequisite for our search. The search fields used included "heart failure," "vaccination," "influenza," "immunization" along with variants of these terms. No restrictions on the type of study design were applied. The most common clinical scenario is exacerbation of pre-existing CHF by influenza infection. Scarce evidence supports a potential positive association of influenza infection with AHF. Vaccinated patients with pre-existing CHF have reduced all-cause morbidity and mortality, but effects are not consistently documented. Immunization with higher antigen quantity may confer additional protection, but such aggressive approach has not been generally advocated. Further studies are needed to delineate the role of influenza infection on AHF/CHF pathogenesis and maintenance. Annual anti-influenza vaccination appears to be an effective measure for secondary prevention in HF. Better immunization strategies and more efficacious vaccines are urgently necessary.

  1. Cost-effectiveness of alternative strategies for annual influenza vaccination among children aged 6 months to 14 years in four provinces in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To support policy making, we developed an initial model to assess the cost-effectiveness of potential strategies to increase influenza vaccination rates among children in China. METHODS: We studied on children aged 6 months to 14 years in four provinces (Shandong, Henan, Hunan, and Sichuan, with a health care system perspective. We used data from 2005/6 to 2010/11, excluding 2009/10. Costs are reported in 2010 U.S. dollars. RESULTS: In comparison with no vaccination, the mean (range of Medically Attended Cases averted by the current self-payment policy for the two age groups (6 to 59 months and 60 months to 14 years was 1,465 (23 ∼ 11,132 and 792 (36 ∼ 4,247, and the cost effectiveness ratios were $ 0 (-11-51 and $ 37 (6-125 per case adverted, respectively. In comparison with the current policy, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER of alternative strategies, OPTION One-reminder and OPTION Two-comprehensive package, decreased as vaccination rate increased. The ICER for children aged 6 to 59 months was lower than that for children aged 60 months to 14 years. CONCLUSIONS: The model is a useful tool in identifying elements for evaluating vaccination strategies. However, more data are needed to produce more accurate cost-effectiveness estimates of potential vaccination policies.

  2. Cost-Effectiveness of Alternative Strategies for Annual Influenza Vaccination among Children Aged 6 Months to 14 Years in Four Provinces in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Situ, Sujian; Feng, Zijian; Atkins, Charisma Y.; Fung, Isaac Chun-Hai; Xu, Zhen; Huang, Ting; Hu, Shixiong; Wang, Xianjun; Meltzer, Martin I.

    2014-01-01

    Background To support policy making, we developed an initial model to assess the cost-effectiveness of potential strategies to increase influenza vaccination rates among children in China. Methods We studied on children aged 6 months to 14 years in four provinces (Shandong, Henan, Hunan, and Sichuan), with a health care system perspective. We used data from 2005/6 to 2010/11, excluding 2009/10. Costs are reported in 2010 U.S. dollars. Results In comparison with no vaccination, the mean (range) of Medically Attended Cases averted by the current self-payment policy for the two age groups (6 to 59 months and 60 months to 14 years) was 1,465 (23∼11,132) and 792 (36∼4,247), and the cost effectiveness ratios were $ 0 (-11-51) and $ 37 (6-125) per case adverted, respectively. In comparison with the current policy, the incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) of alternative strategies, OPTION One-reminder and OPTION Two-comprehensive package, decreased as vaccination rate increased. The ICER for children aged 6 to 59 months was lower than that for children aged 60 months to 14 years. Conclusions The model is a useful tool in identifying elements for evaluating vaccination strategies. However, more data are needed to produce more accurate cost-effectiveness estimates of potential vaccination policies. PMID:24498145

  3. Novel Platforms for the Development of a Universal Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite advancements in immunotherapeutic approaches, influenza continues to cause severe illness, particularly among immunocompromised individuals, young children, and elderly adults. Vaccination is the most effective way to reduce rates of morbidity and mortality caused by influenza viruses. Frequent genetic shift and drift among influenza-virus strains with the resultant disparity between circulating and vaccine virus strains limits the effectiveness of the available conventional influenza vaccines. One approach to overcome this limitation is to develop a universal influenza vaccine that could provide protection against all subtypes of influenza viruses. Moreover, the development of a novel or improved universal influenza vaccines may be greatly facilitated by new technologies including virus-like particles, T-cell-inducing peptides and recombinant proteins, synthetic viruses, broadly neutralizing antibodies, and nucleic acid-based vaccines. This review discusses recent scientific advances in the development of next-generation universal influenza vaccines.

  4. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  5. Transdermal influenza immunization with vaccine-coated microneedle arrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios G Koutsonanos

    Full Text Available Influenza is a contagious disease caused by a pathogenic virus, with outbreaks all over the world and thousands of hospitalizations and deaths every year. Due to virus antigenic drift and short-lived immune responses, annual vaccination is required. However, vaccine coverage is incomplete, and improvement in immunization is needed. The objective of this study is to investigate a novel method for transdermal delivery using metal microneedle arrays (MN coated with inactivated influenza virus to determine whether this route is a simpler and safer approach than the conventional immunization, capable to induce robust immune responses and confer protection against lethal virus challenge.Inactivated A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2 influenza virus was coated on metal microneedle arrays and applied to mice as a vaccine in the caudal dorsal skin area. Substantial antibody titers with hemagglutination inhibition activity were detected in sera collected two and four weeks after a single vaccine dose. Challenge studies in mice with 5 x LD(50 of mouse adapted Aichi virus demonstrated complete protection. Microneedle vaccination induced a broad spectrum of immune responses including CD4+ and CD8+ responses in the spleen and draining lymph node, a high frequency of antigen-secreting cells in the lung and induction of virus-specific memory B-cells. In addition, the use of MN showed a dose-sparing effect and a strong Th2 bias when compared to an intramuscular (IM reference immunization.The present results show that delivery of inactivated influenza virus through the skin using metal microneedle arrays induced strong humoral and cellular immune responses capable of conferring protection against virus challenge as efficiently as intramuscular immunization, which is the standard vaccination route. In view of the convenience of delivery and the potential for self-administration, vaccine-coated metal microneedles may provide a novel and highly effective immunization method.

  6. Knowledge of influenza vaccination recommendation and early vaccination uptake during the 2015-16 season among adults aged ≥18years - United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-Jun; Srivastav, Anup; Santibanez, Tammy A; Christopher Stringer, M; Bostwick, Michael; Dever, Jill A; Stanley Kurtz, Marshica; Williams, Walter W

    2017-08-03

    Since 2010, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recommended that all persons aged ≥6months receive annual influenza vaccination. We analyzed data from the 2015 National Internet Flu Survey (NIFS), to assess knowledge and awareness of the influenza vaccination recommendation and early influenza vaccination coverage during the 2015-16 season among adults. Predictive marginals from a multivariable logistic regression model were used to identify factors independently associated with adults' knowledge and awareness of the vaccination recommendation and early vaccine uptake during the 2015-16 influenza season. Among the 3301 respondents aged ≥18years, 19.6% indicated knowing that influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged ≥6months. Of respondents, 62.3% indicated awareness that there was a recommendation for influenza vaccination, but did not indicate correct knowledge of the recommended age group. Overall, 39.9% of adults aged ≥18years reported having an influenza vaccination. Age 65years and older, being female, having a college or higher education, not being in work force, having annual household income ≥$75,000, reporting having received an influenza vaccination early in the 2015-16 season, having children aged ≤17years in the household, and having high-risk conditions were independently associated with a higher correct knowledge of the influenza vaccination recommendation. Approximately 1 in 5 had correct knowledge of the recommendation that all persons aged ≥6months should receive an influenza vaccination annually, with some socio-economic groups being even less aware. Clinic based education in combination with strategies known to increase uptake of recommended vaccines, such as patient reminder/recall systems and other healthcare system-based interventions are needed to improve vaccination, which could also improve awareness. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Formulation of influenza T cell peptides: in search of a universal influenza vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Soema, Peter Christiaan

    2015-01-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines rely on the induction of antibodies to neutralize the virus. However, influenza viruses frequently undergo genetic mutations due to antigenic drift and shift, altering the surface proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase to which antibodies usually bind. This could render vaccine-induced antibody responses ineffective, resulting in an ineffective influenza vaccine. Influenza vaccines based on the induction of T cell responses might be cross-reactive, since ...

  8. Towards the knowledge-based design of universal influenza epitope ensemble vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Qamar M; Gatherer, Derek; Reche, Pedro A; Flower, Darren R

    2016-11-01

    Influenza A viral heterogeneity remains a significant threat due to unpredictable antigenic drift in seasonal influenza and antigenic shifts caused by the emergence of novel subtypes. Annual review of multivalent influenza vaccines targets strains of influenza A and B likely to be predominant in future influenza seasons. This does not induce broad, cross protective immunity against emergent subtypes. Better strategies are needed to prevent future pandemics. Cross-protection can be achieved by activating CD8+ and CD4+ T cells against highly conserved regions of the influenza genome. We combine available experimental data with informatics-based immunological predictions to help design vaccines potentially able to induce cross-protective T-cells against multiple influenza subtypes. To exemplify our approach we designed two epitope ensemble vaccines comprising highly conserved and experimentally verified immunogenic influenza A epitopes as putative non-seasonal influenza vaccines; one specifically targets the US population and the other is a universal vaccine. The USA-specific vaccine comprised 6 CD8+ T cell epitopes (GILGFVFTL, FMYSDFHFI, GMDPRMCSL, SVKEKDMTK, FYIQMCTEL, DTVNRTHQY) and 3 CD4+ epitopes (KGILGFVFTLTVPSE, EYIMKGVYINTALLN, ILGFVFTLTVPSERG). The universal vaccine comprised 8 CD8+ epitopes: (FMYSDFHFI, GILGFVFTL, ILRGSVAHK, FYIQMCTEL, ILKGKFQTA, YYLEKANKI, VSDGGPNLY, YSHGTGTGY) and the same 3 CD4+ epitopes. Our USA-specific vaccine has a population protection coverage (portion of the population potentially responsive to one or more component epitopes of the vaccine, PPC) of over 96 and 95% coverage of observed influenza subtypes. The universal vaccine has a PPC value of over 97 and 88% coverage of observed subtypes. http://imed.med.ucm.es/Tools/episopt.html CONTACT: d.r.flower@aston.ac.uk. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  9. Cross-protective immune responses elicited by live attenuated influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yo Han; Seong, Baik Lin

    2013-03-01

    The desired effect of vaccination is to elicit protective immune responses against infection with pathogenic agents. An inactivated influenza vaccine is able to induce the neutralizing antibodies directed primarily against two surface antigens, hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. These two antigens undergo frequent antigenic drift and hence necessitate the annual update of a new vaccine strain. Besides the antigenic drift, the unpredictable emergence of the pandemic influenza strain, as seen in the 2009 pandemic H1N1, underscores the development of a new influenza vaccine that elicits broadly protective immunity against the diverse influenza strains. Cold-adapted live attenuated influenza vaccines (CAIVs) are advocated as a more appropriate strategy for cross-protection than inactivated vaccines and extensive studies have been conducted to address the issues in animal models. Here, we briefly describe experimental and clinical evidence for cross-protection by the CAIVs against antigenically distant strains and discuss possible explanations for cross-protective immune responses afforded by CAIVs. Potential barriers to the achievement of a universal influenza vaccine are also discussed, which will provide useful guidelines for future research on designing an ideal influenza vaccine with broad protection without causing pathogenic effects such as autoimmunity or attrition of protective immunity against homologous infection.

  10. Improving influenza vaccination in dialysis facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Janet R; Frankovich, Edith; Tetrick, Claire A; Howard, Andrew D

    2010-01-01

    The End-Stage Renal Disease Network 5 sought to improve the influenza vaccination rate for the period September 1, 2008, to January 31, 2009, through an awareness campaign, coupled with primary data collection in the form of a tracking tool prepopulated with patient names. The latter served as a reminder to staff to determine the immunization status of patients and offer the influenza vaccination, as appropriate. Targets for the intervention were all facilities and their prevalent hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis patients, with the exclusion of military treatment centers, Veterans Health Administration hospitals, and prisons. The majority of eligible network facilities (86.9%) participated in the project to achieve an overall adult influenza vaccination rate of 82.6% (95% confidence interval = 82.1%, 83.2%), greatly exceeding the project goal of 64.5% and representing substantial progress toward the 2010 goal of 90%. The initiative is reported here using the Standards for Quality Improvement Reporting Excellence (SQUIRE).

  11. Vaccines for preventing influenza in healthy adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demicheli, Vittorio; Jefferson, Tom; Ferroni, Eliana; Rivetti, Alessandro; Di Pietrantonj, Carlo

    2018-02-01

    The consequences of influenza in adults are mainly time off work. Vaccination of pregnant women is recommended internationally. This is an update of a review published in 2014. Future updates of this review will be made only when new trials or vaccines become available. Observational data included in previous versions of the review have been retained for historical reasons but have not been updated due to their lack of influence on the review conclusions. To assess the effects (efficacy, effectiveness, and harm) of vaccines against influenza in healthy adults, including pregnant women. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; 2016, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1966 to 31 December 2016), Embase (1990 to 31 December 2016), the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP; 1 July 2017), and ClinicalTrials.gov (1 July 2017), as well as checking the bibliographies of retrieved articles. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs comparing influenza vaccines with placebo or no intervention in naturally occurring influenza in healthy individuals aged 16 to 65 years. Previous versions of this review included observational comparative studies assessing serious and rare harms cohort and case-control studies. Due to the uncertain quality of observational (i.e. non-randomised) studies and their lack of influence on the review conclusions, we decided to update only randomised evidence. The searches for observational comparative studies are no longer updated. Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We rated certainty of evidence for key outcomes (influenza, influenza-like illness (ILI), hospitalisation, and adverse effects) using GRADE. We included 52 clinical trials of over 80,000 people assessing the safety and effectiveness of influenza vaccines. We have presented findings from 25 studies comparing inactivated parenteral influenza vaccine against placebo or do-nothing control groups as the

  12. Cost Effectiveness of Influenza Vaccine for U.S. Children: Live Attenuated and Inactivated Influenza Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eunha; Brown, Shawn T; DePasse, Jay; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Raviotta, Jonathan M; Smith, Kenneth J; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-09-01

    Prior studies showed that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) is more effective than inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) in children aged 2-8 years, supporting the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations in 2014 for preferential LAIV use in this age group. However, 2014-2015 U.S. effectiveness data indicated relatively poor effectiveness of both vaccines, leading CDC in 2015 to no longer prefer LAIV. An age-structured model of influenza transmission and vaccination was developed, which incorporated both direct and indirect protection induced by vaccination. Based on this model, the cost effectiveness of influenza vaccination strategies in children aged 2-8 years in the U.S. was estimated. The base case assumed a mixed vaccination strategy where 33.3% and 66.7% of vaccinated children aged 2-8 years receive LAIV and IIV, respectively. Analyses were performed in 2014-2015. Using published meta-analysis vaccine effectiveness data (83% LAIV and 64% IIV), exclusive LAIV use would be a cost-effective strategy when vaccinating children aged 2-8 years, whereas IIV would not be preferred. However, when 2014-2015 U.S. effectiveness data (0% LAIV and 15% IIV) were used, IIV was likely to be preferred. The cost effectiveness of influenza vaccination in children aged 2-8 years is highly dependent on vaccine effectiveness; the vaccine type with higher effectiveness is preferred. In general, exclusive IIV use is preferred over LAIV use, as long as vaccine effectiveness is higher for IIV than for LAIV. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Inpatient and personnel vaccination influence on influenza outbreaks in long-term medical and care hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanaoka, Shunji

    2010-01-01

    The influence of the vaccination rate among inpatients and hospital personnel on the risk of influenza outbreaks in long-term medical and care hospital was investigated. Vaccination rates and the annual number of influenza cases were analyzed from 2003/2004 to 2008/ 2009. During the first three influenza seasons, vaccination among inpatients was low-45.4% in 2003/4, 49.7% in 2004/5, and 57.5% in 2005/6. Minor influenza outbreaks accounted for 22 patients in 2003/4, 10 in 2004/5, and 10 in 2005/6. During the next three seasons, vaccination was higher than in the previous years, at follows: 65.8% in 2006/7, 65.6% in 2007/8, and 72.0% in 2008/9. This improvement apparently accounted for the absence of outbreaks during these seasons, with patients numbering 0 in 2006/7 and 2 each in 2007/8 and 2008/9. A strong negative correlation thus exist between inpatient vaccination rates and the number of influenza patients (r = -0.903, p = 0.014). The vaccination rate among hospital personnel was high at 79.3%-91.2% throughout the study, and no correlation was seen between hospital personnel vaccination and the number of influenza patients (r = 0.379, p = 0.459). No correlation was seen, either, between the number of influenza patients and national influenza occurrence (r = - 0.146, p = 0.783). This results thus indicate that a high vaccination rate among hospital personnel is not enough to prevent influenza outbreaks, making it important to raise vaccination rates among both inpatients and hospital personnel if influenza outbreaks are to be controlled and prevented.

  14. Conserved epitope on influenza-virus hemagglutinin head defined by a vaccine-induced antibody

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Donald D.; Bajic, Goran; Ferdman, Jack; Suphaphiphat, Pirada; Settembre, Ethan C.; Moody, M. Anthony; Schmidt, Aaron G.; Harrison, Stephen C. (Duke-MED); (CH-Boston); (Seqirus)

    2017-12-18

    Antigenic variation requires frequent revision of annual influenza vaccines. Next-generation vaccine design strategies aim to elicit a broader immunity by directing the human immune response toward conserved sites on the principal viral surface protein, the hemagglutinin (HA). We describe a group of antibodies that recognize a hitherto unappreciated, conserved site on the HA of H1 subtype influenza viruses. Mutations in that site, which required a change in the H1 component of the 2017 vaccine, had not previously “taken over” among circulating H1 viruses. Our results encourage vaccine design strategies that resurface a protein to focus the immune response on a specific region.

  15. Simplifying influenza vaccination during pandemics : sublingual priming and intramuscular boosting of immune responses with heterologous whole inactivated influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Murugappan, Senthil; Patil, Harshad P; Frijlink, Henderik W; Huckriede, Anke; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2014-01-01

    The best approach to control the spread of influenza virus during a pandemic is vaccination. Yet, an appropriate vaccine is not available early in the pandemic since vaccine production is time consuming. For influenza strains with a high pandemic potential like H5N1, stockpiling of vaccines has been

  16. Immunogenicity and safety of a trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eddy Fadlyana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIV containing antigens of two influenza A strains, A(H1N1 and A(H3N2, and one influenza B strain, are the standard {onnulation for influenza prevention. The vaccines must be updated annually to provide optimal protection against the predicted prevalent strains for the next influenza season. Objective To assess the immunogenidty and safety of the inactivated influenza vaccine (Flubio® in adolescents and adults, 28 days after a single dose. Methods In this experimental, randomized, single-blind, bridging study, we included 60 healthy adolescents and adults. A single, 0.5 mL dose was administered intramuscularly in the deltoid muscle of the left ann. Blood samples were obtained before and 28 days after immunization. Standardized hemagglutination inhibition (HI test was used to assess antibody response to influenza antigens. Results From January to February 2010, a total of 60 adolescents and adults enrolled in the study, but two participants did not provide the required blood samples. One hundred percent of the subjects had an anti-influenza titer ≥ 1:40 HI units to all three strains, A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1, A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2, and B/Brisbane/60/2008 (P=1.000 after immunization. The Geometric Mean Titers (GMT after immunization increased for all strains: A/Brisbane, 76.4 to 992.7, A/Uruguay, 27.6 to 432.1, and B/Brisbane, 19.9 to 312.7. Twenty eight days after immunization, we found a 4 times increase in antibody titers in 75.8% of the subjects for A/Brisbane, 84.5% for A/Uruguay, and 77.6% for B/Brisbane. We also observed that 100% of seronegative subjects converted to seropositive for all 3 strains. All vaccines were well-tolerated. There were no serious adverse events reported during the study. Conclusion In adolescents and adults, the Flubio® vaccine was immunogenic and safe.

  17. Improving Influenza Vaccination Rate among Primary Healthcare Workers in Qatar

    OpenAIRE

    Elawad, Khalid H.; Farag, Elmoubasher A.; Abuelgasim, Dina A.; Smatti, Maria K.; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E.; Al Thani, Mohammed; Al Mujalli, Hanan; Shehata, Zienab; Alex, Merin; Al Thani, Asmaa A.; Yassine, Hadi M.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve influenza vaccination, and determine factors influencing vaccine declination among health care workers (HCW) in Qatar. We launched an influenza vaccination campaign to vaccinate around 4700 HCW in 22 Primary Health Care Corporation (PHCC) centers in Qatar between 1st and 15th of November, 2015. Our target was to vaccinate 60% of all HCW. Vaccine was offered free of charge at all centers, and information about the campaign and the importance of influenz...

  18. Principles underlying rational design of live attenuated influenza vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Jang, Yo Han; Seong, Baik-Lin

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent innovative advances in molecular virology and the developments of vaccines, influenza virus remains a serious burden for human health. Vaccination has been considered a primary countermeasure for prevention of influenza infection. Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) are particularly attracting attention as an effective strategy due to several advantages over inactivated vaccines. Cold-adaptation, as a classical means for attenuating viral virulence, has been successfully...

  19. Intranasal Inactivated Influenza Vaccines: a Reasonable Approach to Improve the Efficacy of Influenza Vaccine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Shin-Ichi; Ainai, Akira; Suzuki, Tadaki; Kurata, Takeshi; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a contagious, acute respiratory disease caused by the influenza virus. The mucosal lining in the host respiratory tract is not only the site of virus infection, but also the site of defense; it is at this site that the host immune response targets the virus and protects against reinfection. One of the most effective methods to prevent influenza is to induce specific antibody (Ab) responses in the respiratory tract by vaccination. Two types of influenza vaccines, intranasal live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV) vaccines and parenteral (injectable) inactivated vaccines, are currently used worldwide. These vaccines are approved by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration. Live attenuated vaccines induce both secretory IgA (S-IgA) and serum IgG antibodies (Abs), whereas parenteral vaccines induce only serum IgG Abs. However, intranasal administration of inactivated vaccines together with an appropriate adjuvant induces both S-IgA and IgG Abs. Several preclinical studies on adjuvant-combined, nasal-inactivated vaccines revealed that nasal S-IgA Abs, a major immune component in the upper respiratory tract, reacted with homologous virus hemagglutinin (HA) and were highly cross-reactive with viral HA variants, resulting in protection and cross-protection against infection by both homologous and variant viruses, respectively. Serum-derived IgG Abs, which are present mainly in the lower respiratory tract, are less cross-reactive and cross-protective. In addition, our own clinical trials have shown that nasal-inactivated whole virus vaccines, including a built-in adjuvant (single-stranded RNA), induced serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) Ab titers that fulfilled the EMA criteria for vaccine efficacy. The nasal-inactivated whole virus vaccines also induced high levels of nasal HI and neutralizing Ab titers, although we have not yet evaluated the nasal HI titers due to the lack of official criteria to establish efficacy based

  20. Conventional influenza vaccines influence the performance of a universal influenza vaccine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowell, Janelle; Lo, Chia-Yun; Price, Graeme E; Misplon, Julia A; Epstein, Suzanne L; Garcia, Mayra

    2018-02-08

    Universal influenza vaccines are designed to protect against diverse strains of influenza virus. Preclinical testing of new vaccine candidates is usually done in naïve animals, despite intended use in the human population with its varied immune history including responses to previous vaccinations. As an approach more relevant to human use, we tested a candidate universal influenza vaccine in mice with a history of conventional vaccination. Female BALB/c mice were given two intramuscular doses of inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) or diphtheria and tetanus toxoids vaccine (DT), one month apart. Another group was given two intranasal doses of live attenuated influenza virus (LAIV). One month after the second dose, mice were given the universal influenza vaccine: recombinant adenoviruses expressing influenza A nucleoprotein (A/NP) and matrix 2 (M2) (A/NP + M2-rAd). Immune responses to universal vaccine antigens A/NP and M2 were assessed by ELISA and interferon-γ ELISPOT. Protection was tested by challenge with mouse-adapted A/FM/1/47 (H1N1) and monitoring for weight loss and survival. Universal vaccine performance was enhanced, inhibited or unaffected by particular prior vaccinations. Mice given Afluria IIV and LAIV had greater antibody and T-cell response to A/NP than mice without prior vaccination, providing examples of enhanced A/NP + M2-rAd performance. Though Fluvirin IIV partially inhibited, the universal vaccine still provided considerable protection unlike conventional vaccination. Fluzone IIV and DT had no effect on A/NP + M2-rAd performance. Thus our results demonstrate that universal vaccine candidate A/NP + M2-rAd was at least partially effective in mice with diverse prior histories. However, the degree of protection and nature of the immune responses may be affected by a history of conventional vaccination and suggests that performance in humans would be influenced by immune history. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Viral vectors for avian influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior to 2003, vaccines against avian influenza (AI) had limited, individual country or regional use in poultry. In late 2003, H5N1 high pathogenicity (HP) AI spread from China to multiple Southeast Asian countries, and to Europe during 2005 and Africa during 2006, challenging governments and all p...

  2. Influenza vaccination in the elderly: seeking new correlates of protection and improved vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    McElhaney, Janet E

    2008-01-01

    Influenza is foremost among all infectious diseases for an age-related increase in risk for serious complications and death. Determining the benefit of current influenza vaccines is largely limited to epidemiologic studies, since placebo-controlled trials of influenza vaccines are no longer considered ethical in the older adult population. Vaccine effectiveness is calculated from the relative reduction in influenza outcomes in individuals who elect to be vaccinated compared with those who do ...

  3. Immune responses after live attenuated influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Kristin G.-I.; Smith, Ingrid; Sjursen, Haakon; Cox, Rebecca Jane

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Since 2003 (US) and 2012 (Europe) the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) has been used as an alternative to the traditional inactivated influenza vaccines (IIV). The immune responses elicted by LAIV mimic natural infection and have been found to provide broader clinical protection in children compared to the IIVs. However, our knowledge of the detailed immunological mechanisims induced by LAIV remain to be fully elucidated, and despite 14 years on the global market, there exists no correlate of protection. Recently, matters are further complicated by differing efficacy data from the US and Europe which are not understood. Better understanding of the immune responses after LAIV may aid in achieving the ultimate goal of a future “universal influenza vaccine”. In this review we aim to cover the current understanding of the immune responses induced after LAIV. PMID:28933664

  4. A comparative analysis of influenza vaccination programs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Bansal

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The threat of avian influenza and the 2004-2005 influenza vaccine supply shortage in the United States have sparked a debate about optimal vaccination strategies to reduce the burden of morbidity and mortality caused by the influenza virus. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We present a comparative analysis of two classes of suggested vaccination strategies: mortality-based strategies that target high-risk populations and morbidity-based strategies that target high-prevalence populations. Applying the methods of contact network epidemiology to a model of disease transmission in a large urban population, we assume that vaccine supplies are limited and then evaluate the efficacy of these strategies across a wide range of viral transmission rates and for two different age-specific mortality distributions. We find that the optimal strategy depends critically on the viral transmission level (reproductive rate of the virus: morbidity-based strategies outperform mortality-based strategies for moderately transmissible strains, while the reverse is true for highly transmissible strains. These results hold for a range of mortality rates reported for prior influenza epidemics and pandemics. Furthermore, we show that vaccination delays and multiple introductions of disease into the community have a more detrimental impact on morbidity-based strategies than mortality-based strategies. CONCLUSIONS: If public health officials have reasonable estimates of the viral transmission rate and the frequency of new introductions into the community prior to an outbreak, then these methods can guide the design of optimal vaccination priorities. When such information is unreliable or not available, as is often the case, this study recommends mortality-based vaccination priorities.

  5. Lessons learned: role of influenza vaccine production, distribution, supply, and demand--what it means for the provider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orenstein, Walter A; Schaffner, William

    2008-07-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has been increasing the size of the population for whom influenza vaccine is recommended to reduce the substantial and persistent annual health burden of influenza. Realization of current and future public health influenza immunization goals requires assuring vaccine supply will be adequate to meet demand. This has posed distinct challenges for the many stakeholders in the influenza vaccine program--government agencies, federal, state, and local policymakers, vaccine manufacturers and distributors, and the medical community--each of whom must make critical decisions in a constantly shifting environment. Factors such as the yearly changes in influenza virus strains, the complicated vaccine production and distribution process, revisions in vaccination recommendations, and changing demographics can all affect the delicate balance between supply and demand. While vaccine shortages and delays have been well-publicized concerns in the recent past, there has been a marked increase in supply in the past several years, with substantial growth in supply expected in the future. The primary issue today is to strengthen the demand for the influenza vaccine, which would in turn help ensure the continued availability of the vaccine to reduce disease burden. A number of strategies are discussed, including increased efforts to publicize and fully implement current CDC recommendations and to offer influenza vaccine beyond the typical vaccination season of October and November, because in the great majority of years, vaccination into January and beyond will still provide health benefits.

  6. Assaying the Potency of Influenza Vaccines

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    Philip D. Minor

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The potency of vaccines must be determined to ensure that the appropriate dose is given. The manufacture and assessment of influenza vaccines are complicated by the continuously changing nature of the pathogen, which makes efficacy estimates difficult but also confounds attempts to produce a well-validated, consistent potency assay. Single radial diffusion has been used for decades and provides a relatively simple way to measure the amount of biologically active materials present in the vaccine. It requires reagents, which are updated on a regular, frequently yearly, basis and alternative methods continue to be sought.

  7. Dry influenza vaccines : towards a stable, effective and convenient alternative to conventional parenteral influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomar, Jasmine; Born, Philip A.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Hinrichs, Wouter L. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cold-chain requirements, limited stockpiling potential and the lack of potent immune responses are major challenges of parenterally formulated influenza vaccines. Decreased cold chain dependence and stockpiling can be achieved if vaccines are formulated in a dry state using suitable excipients and

  8. Circulating CXCR5+PD-1+ response predicts influenza vaccine antibody responses in young adults but not elderly adults

    OpenAIRE

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Reuter, Morgan A.; Dolfi, Douglas V.; Mansfield, Kathleen D.; Aung, Htin; Badwan, Osama Z.; Kurupati, Raj K.; Kannan, Senthil; Ertl, Hildegund; Schmader, Kenneth E.; Betts, Michael R.; Canaday, David H.; Wherry, E. John

    2014-01-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recommended for all adults annually, the incidence of vaccine failure, defined as weak or absent increase in neutralizing antibody titers, is increased in the elderly compared to young adults. The T follicular helper subset of CD4 T cells (Tfh) provides B cell help in germinal centers and is necessary for class-switched antibody responses. Previous studies suggested a role for circulating T follicular helper cells (cTfh) following influenza vaccination in adu...

  9. Qualitative motivators and barriers to pandemic vs. seasonal influenza vaccination among healthcare workers: a content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prematunge, Chatura; Corace, Kimberly; McCarthy, Anne; Nair, Rama C; Roth, Virginia; Suh, Kathryn N; Garber, Gary

    2014-12-12

    Influenza is a major concern across healthcare environments. Annual vaccination of healthcare workers (HCW) remains a key mode of influenza prevention in healthcare settings. Yet influenza vaccine coverage among HCWs continues to be below recommended targets, in pandemic and non-pandemic settings. Thus, the primary objective of this analysis is to identify motivators and barriers to pandemic (panINFLU) and seasonal influenza vaccination (sINFLU) through the qualitative analysis of HCW provided reasons driving HCW's personal vaccination decisions. Data were collected from a multi-professional sample of HCWs via a cross-sectional survey study, conducted at a tertiary-care hospital in Ontario, Canada. HCW provided and ranked qualitative reasons for personal (1) panINFLU (pH1N1) and (2) sINFLU (2008/2009 season) vaccine uptake and avoidance were used to identify key vaccination motivators and barriers through content analysis methodology. Most HCW vaccination motivators and barriers were found to be similar for panINFLU and sINFLU vaccines. Personal motivators had the greatest impact on vaccination (panINFLU 29.9% and sINFLU 33.9%). Other motivators included preventing influenza in loved ones, patients, and community, and awareness of HCW role in influenza transmission. In contrast, concerns of vaccine safety and limited HCW knowledge of influenza vaccines (panINFLU 46.2% and sINFLU 37.3%). HCW vaccination during the pandemic was motivated by panINFLU related fear, epidemiology, and workplace pro-vaccination policies. HCW perceptions of accelerated panINFLU vaccine development and vaccine safety compromises, negative views of external sources (i.e. media, pharmaceutical companies, and regulatory agencies) and pandemic management strategies were barriers specific to panINFLU vaccine. HCW panINFLU and sINFLU vaccine coverage can increase if future vaccination programs (1) highlight personal vaccination benefits (2) emphasize the impact HCW non-vaccination on family

  10. Development of a thermostable microneedle patch for influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mistilis, Matthew; Bommarius, Andreas S; Prausnitz, Mark R.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop thermostable microneedle patch formulations for influenza vaccine that can be partially or completely removed from the cold chain. During vaccine drying associated with microneedle patch manufacturing, ammonium acetate and HEPES buffer salts stabilized influenza vaccine, surfactants had little effect during drying, drying temperature had weak effects on vaccine stability, and drying on polydimethylsiloxane led to increased stability compared to drying on stainless steel. A number of excipients, mostly polysaccharides and some amino acids, further stabilized the influenza vaccine during drying. Over longer time scales of storage, combinations of stabilizers preserved the most vaccine activity. Finally, dissolving microneedle patches formulated with arginine and calcium heptagluconate had no significant activity loss for all three strains of seasonal influenza vaccine during storage at room temperature for six months. We conclude that appropriately formulated microneedle patches can exhibit remarkable thermostability that could enable storage and distribution of influenza vaccine outside the cold chain. PMID:25448542

  11. Influenza Vaccination Coverage During Pregnancy - Selected Sites, United States, 2005-06 Through 2013-14 Influenza Vaccine Seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Stephen; Van Bennekom, Carla M; Mitchell, Allen A

    2016-12-09

    Seasonal influenza vaccine is recommended for all pregnant women because of their increased risk for influenza-associated complications. In addition, receipt of influenza vaccine by women during pregnancy has been shown to protect their infants for several months after birth (1). As part of its case-control surveillance study of medications and birth defects, the Birth Defects Study of the Slone Epidemiology Center at Boston University has recorded data on vaccinations received during pregnancy since the 2005-06 influenza vaccination season. Among the 5,318 mothers of infants without major structural birth defects (control newborns) in this population, seasonal influenza vaccination coverage was approximately 20% in the seasons preceding the 2009-10 pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1) influenza season. During the 2009-10 influenza vaccination season, influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women increased to 33%, and has increased modestly since then, to 41% during the 2013-14 season. Among pregnant women who received influenza vaccine during the 2013-14 season, 80% reported receiving their vaccine in a traditional health care setting, (e.g., the office of their obstetrician or primary care physician or their prenatal clinic) and 20% received it in a work/school, pharmacy/supermarket, or government setting. Incorporating routine administration of seasonal influenza vaccination into the management of pregnant women by their health care providers might increase coverage with this important public health intervention.

  12. Laboratory methods for assessing and licensing influenza vaccines for poultry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza vaccines for poultry are based on hemagglutinin proteins and protection is specific to the vaccine subtype. Over 113 billion doses have been used between 2002 and 2010 for high pathogenicity avian influenza control. No universal vaccines are currently available. The majority of avian...

  13. Effects of influenza vaccination and influenza illness on exacerbations in multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Keyser, J; Zwanikken, C

    1998-01-01

    Despite reports that influenza vaccination appears to be safe in multiple sclerosis there is uncertainty which patients may benefit from it. By using a questionnaire we compared the effects of influenza illness (1995-1996 season) and influenza vaccination (autumn of 1996) on neurologic symptoms in

  14. Review of 10 years of clinical experience with Chinese domestic trivalent influenza vaccine Anflu®.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Wu, Jun-Yu; Wang, Xu; Chen, Jiang-Ting; Xia, Ming; Hu, Wei; Zou, Yong; Yin, Wei-Dong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza viruses cause annual winter epidemics globally and influenza vaccination is most effective way to prevent the disease or severe outcomes from the illness, especially in developing countries. However, the majority of the world's total production capacity of influenza vaccine is concentrated in several large multinational manufacturers. A safe and effective preventive vaccine for the developing countries is urgent. Anflu®, a Chinese domestic preservative-free, split-virus trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV), was introduced by Sinovac Biotech Ltd. in 2006. Until now, 20.6 million doses worldwide of Anflu® were sold. Since 2003, 13 company-sponsored clinical studies investigating the immunogenicity and safety of Anflu® have been completed, in which 6642 subjects participated and were vaccinated by Anflu®. Anflu® was generally well tolerated in all age groups, and highly immunogenic in healthy adults and elderly and exceeded the licensure criteria in Europe. This review presents and discusses the experience with Anflu® during the past decade. A new Chinese domestic, preservative-free, unadjuvanted, inactivated split-virus trivalent influenza vaccine (TIV), Anflu®, was introduced into human clinical trials in 2003 and then licensed in China in 2006. The vaccine contains 15 µg/0.5 ml hemagglutinin from each of the 3 influenza virus strains (including an H1N1 influenza A virus subtype, an H3N2 influenza A virus subtype, and an influenza B virus) that are expected to be circulating in the up-coming influenza season. The clinical data pertaining to Anflu® will be reviewed and compared with other TIVs available at present.

  15. Endocine™, N3OA and N3OASq; three mucosal adjuvants that enhance the immune response to nasal influenza vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Falkeborn

    Full Text Available Annual outbreaks of seasonal influenza are controlled or prevented through vaccination in many countries. The seasonal vaccines used are either inactivated, currently administered parenterally, or live-attenuated given intranasally. In this study three mucosal adjuvants were examined for the influence on the humoral (mucosal and systemic and cellular influenza A-specific immune responses induced by a nasally administered vaccine. We investigated in detail how the anionic Endocine™ and the cationic adjuvants N3OA and N3OASq mixed with a split inactivated influenza vaccine induced influenza A-specific immune responses as compared to the vaccine alone after intranasal immunization. The study showed that nasal administration of a split virus vaccine together with Endocine™ or N3OA induced significantly higher humoral and cell-mediated immune responses than the non-adjuvanted vaccine. N3OASq only significantly increased the cell-mediated immune response. Furthermore, nasal administration of the influenza vaccine in combination with any of the adjuvants; Endocine™, N3OA or N3OASq, significantly enhanced the mucosal immunity against influenza HA protein. Thus the addition of these mucosal adjuvants leads to enhanced immunity in the most relevant tissues, the upper respiratory tract and the systemic circulation. Nasal influenza vaccination with an inactivated split vaccine can therefore provide an important mucosal immune response, which is often low or absent after traditional parenteral vaccination.

  16. Influenza vaccination rates in children decline when the live attenuated influenza vaccine is not recommended.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogel, Benjamin; Hicks, Steven

    2017-09-18

    In 2016 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended against using the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) for the 2016-2017 influenza season. This recommendation is potentially important for vaccination rates because perceived effectiveness and ease of administration are among the primary determinants of families decisions to vaccinate their children. This investigation sought to determine whether rates of pediatric influenza vaccination changed in a season when the LAIV was not recommended. This study used cohort and cross sectional data from an academic primary care pediatric center in central Pennsylvania that serves approximately 12,500 patients. Early season (prior to November 1) and end-of-season (prior to March 1) vaccination rates in the 2015-16 and 2016-17 influenza seasons were recorded for individuals 2-17years old. Repeat vaccination rates (percentage of children receiving influenza vaccination in one season who were also vaccinated in the next season) were recorded for the 2015-16 into 2016-17 seasons. A logistic regression model adjusting for race, ethnicity, age, insurance type and type of vaccination received was employed to identify predictors of repeat vaccination. In the absence of LAIV (2016-17) early vaccination rates were significantly higher (24.7% vs 22.8%, p=0.004), but end-of-season rates were lower (50.4% vs 52.0%, p=0.03) than when LAIV was offered (2015-16). After adjusting for covariates, those who had received IIV in the 2015-16 season had higher odds (OR 1.32, 95% CI, 1.15-1.52) of getting a repeat vaccination in the 2016-17 season, compared with those who had received LAIV in the 2015-16 season. End-of-season vaccination rates were lower in 2016-17 when LAIV was not recommended, particularly among children who received LAIV in the preceding year. Unavailability of LAIV in the 2016-17 season may have impacted influenza vaccination convenience and perceived effectiveness, two factors which could influence

  17. Parental attitudes towards influenza vaccination for children in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Chethan; Zachariah, Rajeev; Steinhoff, Mark; Simon, Anna

    2017-02-01

    The rate of influenza vaccination is low for children in India. The purpose of this study is to assess parental attitudes towards influenza vaccination in South India. Participants were parents who brought their children to the Well Baby Clinic of Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore, India for routine immunization. Participants answered questions by written survey while waiting for their children's vaccination. A total of 456 surveys were completed (403 parents did not opt for trivalent influenza vaccination and 53 opted for influenza vaccination). The majority (53.60%) of those parents who did not accept influenza vaccination identified the lack of a doctor's recommendation as the main reason. When asked separately, many non-acceptors (44.91%) indicated that they did not believe or were not sure that the influenza vaccine was effective. Nearly all non-acceptors (92.56%) stated that they would opt for influenza vaccination if a doctor recommended it. The most common reason that parents not opting for influenza vaccination for their children was the lack of recommendation by a doctor. The results of this study suggest that recommendation by a doctor is a more important factor than belief in efficacy, cost, or convenience in parental decision-making regarding childhood influenza vaccination in India, unlike the United States where parents are less likely to follow recommendations.

  18. Influenza Vaccine Uptake, Hand Hygiene Practices, and Perceived Barriers in Decision Making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedman-Smith, Maggie; Kingsbury, Diana M; Dubois, Cathy L Z; Grey, Scott F

    2017-01-01

    The annual costs of influenza are in the billions of dollars, with employers bearing substantial burdens. Yet, influenza vaccine uptake is sub-optimal. A random survey was administered to employees at a Midwestern public university using mixed quantitative and qualitative methods to identify the rate, characteristics, and barriers of self-reported flu vaccine uptake during March-April of 2012. The lowest uptake was among adults, ages 18 to 49 (29.8%), even though they are included in universal recommendations. Multiple regression analysis adjusted for demographic confounders showed an increase in self-identified protective hand hygiene behavior among those who reported influenza vaccine uptake compared with those who did not. Qualitative thematic analysis revealed contextual accounts of why vaccine uptake was declined including structural, perceptual, and knowledge barriers. Implementation and evaluation of novel multicomponent worksite vaccine interventions tailored to reach young and middle-aged employees including utilization of risk communication is needed to facilitate increased uptake.

  19. Influenza vaccination among healthcare workers in a multidisciplinary University hospital in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marchisio Paola

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for healthcare workers (HCWs in order to reduce the morbidity associated with influenza in healthcare settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the current vaccination status of the HCWs in one of Italy's largest multidisciplinary University Hospitals. Methods Between February 1 and March 31, 2006, we carried out a cross-sectional study of influenza vaccination coverage among HCWs at the University Hospital Fondazione IRCCS "Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Mangiagalli e Regina Elena", Milan, Italy. After receiving a brief description of the aim of the study, 2,143 (95%: 1,064 physicians; 855 nurses; 224 paramedics of 2,240 HCWs self-completed an anonymous questionnaire. Results Influenza vaccination coverage was very low in all specialties, varying from 17.6% in the Emergency Department to 24.3% in the Surgery Department, and knowledge of influenza epidemiology and prevention was poor. The factors positively associated with being vaccinated were an age of ≥ 45 years, considering influenza a potentially severe disease, and being aware of the high-risk categories for which influenza vaccination is strongly recommended; those that negatively associated with being vaccinated were being female, working in the Medicine Department, and being a nurse or paramedic. Conclusion Despite strong recommendations, influenza vaccination coverage seemed to be very low among HCWs of all specialties, with differences between areas and types of employment. Specific continuous educational and vaccination programs for different targets should be urgently organized to reduce morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients, contain nosocomial outbreaks, and ensure an appropriate socioeconomic impact.

  20. Influenza vaccination: a collaborative effort to improve the health of the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Michael F; Grant, Brenda; Iton, Anthony; Parry, Patricia D; Baranowsky, Diane

    2004-11-01

    The need to improve influenza vaccination delivery in our community became painfully clear during the winter of 1997-1998 when high rates of respiratory illness led to congestion in the emergency department and a critical shortage of hospital beds. In response, the local hospital and the Department of Health launched a collaborative program to increase influenza vaccine coverage in the community. The partnership was designed to increase the number of citizens receiving influenza vaccine and to moderate the severity of lower respiratory tract illness during the winter season. A variety of methods were used to increase public awareness, enhance vaccine delivery, and create a relatively seamless service for the community. During three seasons, influenza vaccination rates increased by a relative 150%. This represented immunization of 16% of the entire community and more than 75% of residents older than 65 years. Hospital employee vaccination rates also rose from 34% to 58%. When compared with other hospitals in the county, the campaign reduced the average number of annual visits to the emergency department for all respiratory diagnoses by 34% and exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease by 46%. This influenza vaccination program illustrates the potential for synergy that exists between local departments of health and community hospitals in successfully increasing vaccine delivery to the community. Furthermore, it also suggests that such efforts can be successful in reducing use of the emergency department, resulting in a positive impact on the health of the community.

  1. Progress in Developing Virus-like Particle Influenza Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Fu-Shi; Lee, Young-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hye; Kim, Min-Chul; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recombinant vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) or nanoparticles have been successful in their safety and efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. The technology of expressing enveloped VLP vaccines has combined with molecular engineering of proteins in membrane-anchor and immunogenic forms mimicking the native conformation of surface proteins on the enveloped viruses. This review summarizes recent developments in influenza VLP vaccines against seasonal, pandemic, and avian influenza viruses from the perspective of use in humans. The immunogenicity and efficacies of influenza VLP vaccine in the homologous and cross-protection were reviewed. Discussions include limitations of current influenza vaccination strategies and future directions to confer broadly cross protective new influenza vaccines as well as vaccination. PMID:27058302

  2. Influenza vaccination among workers-21 U.S. states, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Alissa C; Lu, Peng-Jun; Williams, Walter W; Schumacher, Pamela; Sussell, Aaron; Birdsey, Jan; Boal, Winifred L; Sweeney, Marie Haring; Luckhaupt, Sara E; Black, Carla L; Santibanez, Tammy A

    2017-04-01

    Influenza illnesses can result in missed days at work and societal costs, but influenza vaccination can reduce the risk of disease. Knowledge of vaccination coverage by industry and occupation can help guide prevention efforts and be useful during influenza pandemic planning. Data from 21 states using the 2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System industry-occupation module were analyzed. Influenza vaccination coverage was reported by select industry and occupation groups, including health care personnel (HCP) and other occupational groups who may have first priority to receive influenza vaccination during a pandemic (tier 1). The t tests were used to make comparisons between groups. Influenza vaccination coverage varied by industry and occupation, with high coverage among persons in health care industries and occupations. Approximately half of persons classified as tier 1 received influenza vaccination, and vaccination coverage among tier 1 and HCP groups varied widely by state. This report points to the particular industries and occupations where improvement in influenza vaccination coverage is needed. Prior to a pandemic event, more specificity on occupational codes to define exact industries and occupations in each tier group would be beneficial in implementing pandemic influenza vaccination programs and monitoring the success of these programs. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Formulation of influenza T cell peptides : in search of a universal influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soema, Peter Christiaan

    2015-01-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines rely on the induction of antibodies to neutralize the virus. However, influenza viruses frequently undergo genetic mutations due to antigenic drift and shift, altering the surface proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase to which antibodies usually bind. This

  4. Active SMS-based influenza vaccine safety surveillance in Australian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillsbury, Alexis; Quinn, Helen; Cashman, Patrick; Leeb, Alan; Macartney, Kristine

    2017-12-18

    Australia's novel, active surveillance system, AusVaxSafety, monitors the post-market safety of vaccines in near real time. We analysed cumulative surveillance data for children aged 6 months to 4 years who received seasonal influenza vaccine in 2015 and/or 2016 to determine: adverse event following immunisation (AEFI) rates by vaccine brand, age and concomitant vaccine administration. Parent/carer reports of AEFI occurring within 3 days of their child receiving an influenza vaccine in sentinel immunisation clinics were solicited by Short Message Service (SMS) and/or email-based survey. Retrospective data from 2 years were combined to examine specific AEFI rates, particularly fever and medical attendance as a proxy for serious adverse events (SAE), with and without concomitant vaccine administration. As trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) were funded in Australia's National Immunisation Program (NIP) in 2015 and quadrivalent (QIV) in 2016, respectively, we compared their safety profiles. 7402 children were included. Data were reported weekly through each vaccination season; no safety signals or excess of adverse events were detected. More children who received a concomitant vaccine had fever (7.5% versus 2.8%; p vaccine was associated with the highest increase in AEFI rates among children receiving a specified concomitant vaccine: 30.3% reported an AEFI compared with 7.3% who received an influenza vaccine alone (p safety profiles included low and expected AEFI rates (fever: 4.3% for TIV compared with 3.2% for QIV (p = .015); injection site reaction: 1.9% for TIV compared with 3.0% for QIV (p safety profile between brands. Active participant-reported data provided timely vaccine brand-specific safety information. Our surveillance system has particular utility in monitoring the safety of influenza vaccines, given that they may vary in composition annually. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among Pregnant Women - United States, 2016-17 Influenza Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Helen; Black, Carla L; Ball, Sarah; Fink, Rebecca V; Williams, Walter W; Fiebelkorn, Amy Parker; Lu, Peng-Jun; Kahn, Katherine E; D'Angelo, Denise V; Devlin, Rebecca; Greby, Stacie M

    2017-09-29

    Pregnant women and their infants are at increased risk for severe influenza-associated illness (1), and since 2004, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has recommended influenza vaccination for all women who are or might be pregnant during the influenza season, regardless of the trimester of the pregnancy (2). To assess influenza vaccination coverage among pregnant women during the 2016-17 influenza season, CDC analyzed data from an Internet panel survey conducted during March 28-April 7, 2017. Among 1,893 survey respondents pregnant at any time during October 2016-January 2017, 53.6% reported having received influenza vaccination before (16.2%) or during (37.4%) pregnancy, similar to coverage during the preceding four influenza seasons. Also similar to the preceding influenza season, 67.3% of women reported receiving a provider offer for influenza vaccination, 11.9% reported receiving a recommendation but no offer, and 20.7% reported receiving no recommendation; among these women, reported influenza vaccination coverage was 70.5%, 43.7%, and 14.8%, respectively. Among women who received a provider offer for vaccination, vaccination coverage differed by race/ethnicity, education, insurance type, and other sociodemographic factors. Use of evidence-based practices such as provider reminders and standing orders could reduce missed opportunities for vaccination and increase vaccination coverage among pregnant women.

  6. Duration of immunity induced by an equine influenza and tetanus combination vaccine formulation adjuvanted with ISCOM-Matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heldens, J G M; Pouwels, H G W; Derks, C G G; Van de Zande, S M A; Hoeijmakers, M J H

    2010-10-08

    Equine influenza is a contagious disease caused by equine influenza virus which belongs to the orthomyxovirus family. Outbreaks of equine influenza cause severe economic loses to the horse industry and consequently horses in competition are required to be regularly vaccinated against equine influenza. Unlike the existing inactivated vaccines, Equilis Prequenza Te is the only one able to induce protection against clinical disease and virus excretion after a primary vaccination course consisting of two vaccine applications 4-6 weeks apart until the recommended time of the third vaccination. In this paper we describe the duration of immunity profile, tested in an experimental setting according to European legislation, of this inactivated equine influenza and tetanus combination vaccine. In addition to influenza antigen, the formulation contains a second generation ISCOM (the so called ISCOMatrix) as an adjuvant. The vaccine aims at the induction of protection from the primary vaccination course until the time of annual revaccination 12 months later, against challenge with a virulent equine influenza strain. The protection against A/equine/Kentucky/95 (H3N8) at the time of annual revaccination was evidenced by a significant reduction of clinical signs of influenza, a significant reduction of virus excretion and a significant reduction of fever. The effect of the annual revaccination on the duration of immunity against influenza and tetanus was also studied by serology. For tetanus, as a consequence of the 24 months duration of immunity, an alternating annual vaccination schedule consisting of Prequenza and Prequenza Te is proposed after the first three doses of Prequenza Te. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Will routine annual influenza prevention and control systems serve the United States well in a pandemic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringel, Jeanne S; Moore, Melinda; Zambrano, John; Lurie, Nicole

    2009-12-01

    To assess the extent to which the systems in place for prevention and control of routine annual influenza could provide the information and experience needed to manage a pandemic. The authors conducted a qualitative assessment based on key informant interviews and the review of relevant documents. Although there are a number of systems in place that would likely serve the United States well in a pandemic, much of the information and experience needed to manage a pandemic optimally is not available. Systems in place for routine annual influenza prevention and control are necessary but not sufficient for managing a pandemic, nor are they used to their full potential for pandemic preparedness. Pandemic preparedness can be strengthened by building more explicitly upon routine influenza activities and the public health system's response to the unique challenges that arise each influenza season (eg, vaccine supply issues, higher than normal rates of influenza-related deaths).

  8. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Among People With High-Risk Conditions in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Alissa C; Lu, Peng-Jun; Williams, Walter W; Bridges, Carolyn B; Singleton, James A

    2016-01-01

    During annual influenza epidemics, rates of serious illness and death are higher among those who have medical conditions, such as pulmonary disease, diabetes, or heart disease, which place them at increased risk of influenza complications. Annual influenza vaccination was recommended for people with high-risk conditions as early as 1960. Data from the 2012-2013 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System were analyzed in 2014 to estimate national and state-specific influenza vaccination coverage among people aged 18-64 years with high-risk conditions. Prevalence ratios adjusted for demographic and access-to-care characteristics were calculated using logistic regression and predictive marginal models. Unadjusted influenza vaccination coverage was 45.4% among adults aged 18-64 years with at least one high-risk condition, compared with 32.9% among those with no high-risk conditions (pvaccination coverage was 53.2%. Coverage was 43.9% for those with pulmonary diseases, 52.7% for those with diabetes, 48.1% for those with heart disease, and 45.0% for those with cancer. Individuals with high-risk conditions were more likely to receive an influenza vaccine than those with no high-risk conditions, even after controlling for demographic and access-to-care characteristics. Despite ongoing influenza vaccination recommendations for adults with high-risk conditions, coverage was below the Healthy People 2020 target; only about half were vaccinated. Primary care providers and subspecialists should ensure routine assessment of vaccination status every fall and winter and recommend vaccination to people with high-risk conditions. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  9. Influenza vaccination coverage among health-care personnel--United States, 2012-13 influenza season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    Routine influenza vaccination of health-care personnel (HCP) every influenza season can reduce influenza-related illness and its potentially serious consequences among HCP and their patients. To protect HCP and their patients, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends that all HCP be vaccinated against influenza during each influenza season. To estimate influenza vaccination coverage among HCP during the 2012-13 season, CDC conducted an opt-in Internet panel survey of 1,944 self-selected HCP during April 1-16, 2013. This report summarizes the results of that survey, which found that, overall, 72.0% of HCP reported having had an influenza vaccination for the 2012-13 season, an increase from 66.9% vaccination coverage during the 2011-12 season. By occupation type, coverage was 92.3% among physicians, 89.1% among pharmacists, 88.5% among nurse practitioners/physician assistants, and 84.8% among nurses. By occupational setting, vaccination coverage was highest among hospital-based HCP (83.1%) and was lowest among HCP at long-term care facilities (LTCF) (58.9%). Vaccination coverage was higher for HCP in occupational settings offering vaccination on-site at no cost for one (75.7%) or multiple (86.2%) days compared with HCP in occupational settings not offering vaccination on-site at no cost (55.3%). Widespread implementation of comprehensive influenza vaccination strategies that focus on improving access to vaccination services is needed to improve HCP vaccination coverage. Influenza vaccination of HCP in all health-care settings might be increased by providing 1) HCP with information on vaccination benefits and risks for themselves and their patients, 2) vaccinations in the workplace at convenient locations and times, and 3) influenza vaccinations at no cost.

  10. Surveillance of influenza vaccination coverage--United States, 2007-08 through 2011-12 influenza seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng-jun; Santibanez, Tammy A; Williams, Walter W; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Helen; Bryan, Leah; O'Halloran, Alissa; Greby, Stacie M; Bridges, Carolyn B; Graitcer, Samuel B; Kennedy, Erin D; Lindley, Megan C; Ahluwalia, Indu B; LaVail, Katherine; Pabst, Laura J; Harris, LaTreace; Vogt, Tara; Town, Machell; Singleton, James A

    2013-10-25

    Substantial improvement in annual influenza vaccination of recommended groups is needed to reduce the health effects of influenza and reach Healthy People 2020 targets. No single data source provides season-specific estimates of influenza vaccination coverage and related information on place of influenza vaccination and concerns related to influenza and influenza vaccination. 2007-08 through 2011-12 influenza seasons. CDC uses multiple data sources to obtain estimates of vaccination coverage and related data that can guide program and policy decisions to improve coverage. These data sources include the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), the National Flu Survey (NFS), the National Immunization Survey (NIS), the Immunization Information Systems (IIS) eight sentinel sites, Internet panel surveys of health-care personnel and pregnant women, and the Pregnancy Risk Assessment and Monitoring System (PRAMS). National influenza vaccination coverage among children aged 6 months-17 years increased from 31.1% during 2007-08 to 56.7% during the 2011-12 influenza season as measured by NHIS. Vaccination coverage among children aged 6 months-17 years varied by state as measured by NIS. Changes from season to season differed as measured by NIS and NHIS. According to IIS sentinel site data, full vaccination (having either one or two seasonal influenza vaccinations, as recommended by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices for each influenza season, based on the child's influenza vaccination history) with up to two recommended doses for the 2011-12 season was 27.1% among children aged 6 months-8 years and was 44.3% for the youngest children (aged 6-23 months). Influenza vaccination coverage among adults aged ≥18 years increased from 33.0% during 2007-08 to 38.3% during the 2011-12 influenza season as measured by NHIS. Vaccination coverage by age group for the 2011-12 season as measured by BRFSS was Vaccination

  11. Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013-2014 Influenza Season

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-21

    Naval Health Research Center Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2013–2014 Influenza Season Angelia A. Cost...2000–2013 P A G E 1 5 Brief report: mid-season influenza vaccine effectiveness estimates for the 2013–2014 influenza season Angelia A. Cost, PhD...hospitals near the U.S.– Mexico border from 25 November 2013 through 16 January 2014. Infl uenza cases were individ- uals who had positive laboratory

  12. Influenza vaccines for avian species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning in Southeast Asia, in 2003, a multi-national epizootic outbreak of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) was identified in commercial poultry and wild bird species. This lineage, originally identified in Southern China in 1996 and then Hong Kong in 1997, caused severe morbidity an...

  13. [Effectiveness of influenza vaccination in healthy adults--a fourfold decrease in influenza morbidity during one influenza season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chlíbek, R; Beran, J; Splino, M

    2002-04-01

    Despite the existence and availability of effective and safe influenza vaccines, influenza still remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, incl. all economic consequences and the increased number of days of work incapacity. Vaccination against influenza is an effective method of prevention of the disease and its complications. Nevertheless many people still do not trust the effectiveness of anti-influenza vaccination, incl. many physicians, nurses and other health professionals. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effectiveness of vaccination against influenza in healthy adults aged 18-60 years, vaccinated with one of the five commonly available vaccines. The evaluation is based on notifications of influenza and influenza--like diseases. The trial comprised 375 subjects vaccinated against influenza during a given season, as a control group served 340 non-vaccinated subjects. Both groups of volunteers were investigated for six months. During this period the incidence of influenza or influenza--like diseases was recorded, the presence of local and general influenza symptoms, the number of days of work incapacity and the number of visits to the doctor. These data were obtained by the postal correspondence method. In the group of 375 vaccinated subjects 17 (4.5%) became ill. In the group of non-vaccinated subjects 65 (19.1%) became ill. The difference in the incidence of influenza was statistically significant. In subjects vaccinated against influenza a 73-76% effectiveness of vaccination was achieved. Subjects in the non-vaccinated group reported more than a fourfold incidence of influenza as compared with vaccinated subjects. The symptoms of the disease did not differ significantly in the two groups. The most frequent symptom of the disease which was recorded in both groups was fever higher than 38 degrees C, pain in the joints, myalgia and finally cough. More than two thirds of the sick volunteers visited their doctor while

  14. Novel Platforms for the Development of a Universal influenza vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kumar, Arun; Meldgaard, Trine Sundebo; Bertholet, Sylvie

    2018-01-01

    provide protection against all subtypes of influenza viruses. Moreover, the development of a novel or improved universal influenza vaccines may be greatly facilitated by new technologies including virus-like particles, T-cell-inducing peptides and recombinant proteins, synthetic viruses, broadly......Despite advancements in immunotherapeutic approaches, influenza continues to cause severe illness, particularly among immunocompromised individuals, young children, and elderly adults. Vaccination is the most effective way to reduce rates of morbidity and mortality caused by influenza viruses....... Frequent genetic shift and drift among influenzavirus strains with the resultant disparity between circulating and vaccine virus strains limits the effectiveness of the available conventional influenza vaccines. One approach to overcome this limitation is to develop a universal influenza vaccine that could...

  15. Predictors of influenza vaccine. Acceptance among healthy adult workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Carolyn L; Valley, Juanita M

    2002-05-01

    A self administered questionnaire with items derived from the Health Belief Model was mailed to a random sample of workers prior to a worksite influenza vaccine program in this descriptive study of 207 service and clerical workers. The researchers investigated the utility of the Health Belief Model in predicting influenza vaccine acceptance. A second postcard questionnaire was mailed after the program to verify the vaccination status. Workers who received the vaccine had higher scores for susceptibility, seriousness, benefits, cues to action, knowledge, and health motivation and lower scores for barriers than did workers who did not receive a vaccine. Logistic regression analysis revealed the importance of benefits, barriers, and cues to action in predicting influenza vaccine acceptance. Study results suggest education and program efforts directed toward increasing benefits, dispelling myths about influenza and the vaccine, reducing barriers, and developing a campaign to increase program awareness may increase workers' vaccine acceptance.

  16. Seasonal influenza vaccination in China: Landscape of diverse regional reimbursement policy, and budget impact analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Atkins, Katherine E; Feng, Luzhao; Pang, Mingfan; Zheng, Yaming; Liu, Xinxin; Cowling, Benjamin J; Yu, Hongjie

    2016-11-11

    To explore the current landscape of seasonal influenza vaccination across China, and estimate the budget of implementing a national "free-at-the-point-of-care" vaccination program for priority populations recommended by the World Health Organization. In 2014 and 2016, we conducted a survey across provincial Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to collect information on regional reimbursement policies for influenza vaccination, estimated the national uptake using distributed doses of influenza vaccines, and evaluated the budget using population size and vaccine cost obtained from official websites and literatures. Regular reimbursement policies for influenza vaccination are available in 61 mutually exclusive regions, comprising 8 provinces, 45 prefectures, and 8 counties, which were reimbursed by the local Government Financial Department or Basic Social Medical Insurance (BSMI). Finance-reimbursed vaccination was offered mainly for the elderly, and school children for free in Beijing, Dongli district in Tianjin, Karamay, Shenzhen and Xinxiang cities. BSMI-reimbursement policies were limited to specific medical insurance beneficiaries with distinct differences in the reimbursement fractions. The average national vaccination coverage was just 1.5-2.2% between 2004 and 2014. A free national vaccination program for priority populations (n=416million), would cost government US$ 757million (95% CI 726-789) annually (uptake rate=20%). An increasing number of regional governments have begun to pay, partially or fully, for influenza vaccination for selected groups. However, this small-scale policy approach has failed to increase national uptake. A free, nationwide vaccination program would require a substantial annual investment. A cost-effectiveness analysis is needed to identify the most efficient methods to improve coverage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Influenza vaccination in north Indian patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Parvaiz A; Ali, Saima; Mir, Hyder; Ahmad, Syed J; Bhat, Shabir Akram; Bhat, Muneer A

    No data exists regarding the uptake of influenza vaccination in patients with heart failure (HF) in India. The present study was designed to assess the uptake, knowledge, attitude and practices of the Indian HF patients towards influenza vaccination. Five-hundred patients with acute/chronic HF were approached for a personal interview and responses to an interview recorded in a pre-defined questionnaire depicting their knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding influenza vaccination. Of the 500 approached, 320 (64%, 174 male, age 3-90 years) consented to participate in the survey. Only 7.5% (n=24) knew of influenza as an illness with adverse potential consequences for themselves or their family. Seventeen (5.3%) were aware of potentially serious nature of influenza and 40 (12.5%) knew of the availability of a vaccine against it and its local availability. However only 14 (4.4%) had actually received the vaccine 1-2 times in the past 5 years. Only 21 (6.56%) had been prescribed influenza vaccine by their respective physicians. Reasons for declining vaccination included misperceptions about safety and efficacy of the vaccine. Most of the participants, however, had not been prescribed vaccination at all. Poor influenza vaccination rates in HF mandate intense efforts to improve vaccination rates. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Influenza Vaccination Among US Children With Asthma, 2005-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Alan E; Ahrens, Katherine A; Akinbami, Lara J

    2016-01-01

    Children with asthma face higher risk of complications from influenza. Trends in influenza vaccination among children with asthma are unknown. We used 2005-2013 National Health Interview Survey data for children 2 to 17 years of age. We assessed, separately for children with and without asthma, any vaccination (received August through May) during each of the 2005-2006 through 2012-2013 influenza seasons and, for the 2010-2011 through 2012-2013 seasons only, early vaccination (received August through October). We used April-July interviews each year (n = 31,668) to assess vaccination during the previous influenza season. Predictive margins from logistic regression with time as the independent and vaccination status as the dependent variable were used to assess time trends. We also estimated the association between several sociodemographic variables and the likelihood of influenza vaccination. From 2005 to 2013, among children with asthma, influenza vaccination receipt increased about 3 percentage points per year (P children with asthma vaccinated by October (early vaccination) was slightly above 30% in 2012-2013. In 2010-2013, adolescents, the uninsured, children of parents with some college education, and those living in the Midwest, South, and West were less likely to be vaccinated. The percentage of children 2 to 17 years of age with asthma receiving influenza vaccination has increased since 2004-2005, reaching approximately 55% in 2012-2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Influenza Vaccination Among US Children With Asthma, 2005–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Alan E.; Ahrens, Katherine A.; Akinbami, Lara J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Children with asthma face higher risk of complications from influenza. Trends in influenza vaccination among children with asthma are unknown. Methods We used 2005–2013 National Health Interview Survey data for children 2 to 17 years of age. We assessed, separately for children with and without asthma, any vaccination (received August through May) during each of the 2005–2006 through 2012–2013 influenza seasons and, for the 2010–2011 through 2012–2013 seasons only, early vaccination (received August through October). We used April–July interviews each year (n = 31,668) to assess vaccination during the previous influenza season. Predictive margins from logistic regression with time as the independent and vaccination status as the dependent variable were used to assess time trends. We also estimated the association between several sociodemographic variables and the likelihood of influenza vaccination. Results From 2005 to 2013, among children with asthma, influenza vaccination receipt increased about 3 percentage points per year (P children with asthma vaccinated by October (early vaccination) was slightly above 30% in 2012–2013. In 2010–2013, adolescents, the uninsured, children of parents with some college education, and those living in the Midwest, South, and West were less likely to be vaccinated. Conclusions The percentage of children 2 to 17 years of age with asthma receiving influenza vaccination has increased since 2004–2005, reaching approximately 55% in 2012–2013. PMID:26518382

  20. Nurses' attitudes towards enforced measures to increase influenza vaccination: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pless, Anina; Shaw, David; McLennan, Stuart; Elger, Bernice S

    2017-05-01

    Despite studies demonstrating that the annual influenza vaccination of healthcare workers reduces morbidity and mortality among vulnerable patients, vaccination rates remain very low, particularly in nursing staff. Educational programmes have failed to improve rates, which has led to a diverse range of enforced approaches being advocated and implemented. To examine the attitudes of non-vaccinated nursing staff towards various enforced measures aimed at increasing rates of influenza vaccination. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with a purposive sample of 18 non-vaccinated nurses, working in units with high-risk patients at two hospitals in Switzerland. Analysis of interviews was done using conventional content analysis. Nurses were critical of enforced measures. However, measures that include an element of choice were perceived as more acceptable. Declination forms and mandatory vaccinations as part of the employment requirements were found to be the most accepted measures. The perception of choice is crucial to the acceptance of a measure. Respect for choice and autonomy has a positive effect on behavioural change. Mandatory influenza vaccination as a condition of new (and perhaps ongoing) employment could be a feasible, effective and ethical measure to increase vaccination rates among nurses who oppose vaccination. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. School-Based Influenza Vaccination: Health and Economic Impact of Maine's 2009 Influenza Vaccination Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basurto-Dávila, Ricardo; Meltzer, Martin I; Mills, Dora A; Beeler Asay, Garrett R; Cho, Bo-Hyun; Graitcer, Samuel B; Dube, Nancy L; Thompson, Mark G; Patel, Suchita A; Peasah, Samuel K; Ferdinands, Jill M; Gargiullo, Paul; Messonnier, Mark; Shay, David K

    2017-12-01

    To estimate the societal economic and health impacts of Maine's school-based influenza vaccination (SIV) program during the 2009 A(H1N1) influenza pandemic. Primary and secondary data covering the 2008-09 and 2009-10 influenza seasons. We estimated weekly monovalent influenza vaccine uptake in Maine and 15 other states, using difference-in-difference-in-differences analysis to assess the program's impact on immunization among six age groups. We also developed a health and economic Markov microsimulation model and conducted Monte Carlo sensitivity analysis. We used national survey data to estimate the impact of the SIV program on vaccine coverage. We used primary data and published studies to develop the microsimulation model. The program was associated with higher immunization among children and lower immunization among adults aged 18-49 years and 65 and older. The program prevented 4,600 influenza infections and generated $4.9 million in net economic benefits. Cost savings from lower adult vaccination accounted for 54 percent of the economic gain. Economic benefits were positive in 98 percent of Monte Carlo simulations. SIV may be a cost-beneficial approach to increase immunization during pandemics, but programs should be designed to prevent lower immunization among nontargeted groups. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  2. Advances in the development of influenza virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Palese, Peter

    2015-03-01

    Influenza virus infections are a major public health concern and cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Current influenza virus vaccines are an effective countermeasure against infection but need to be reformulated almost every year owing to antigenic drift. Furthermore, these vaccines do not protect against novel pandemic strains, and the timely production of pandemic vaccines remains problematic because of the limitations of current technology. Several improvements have been made recently to enhance immune protection induced by seasonal and pandemic vaccines, and to speed up production in case of a pandemic. Importantly, vaccine constructs that induce broad or even universal influenza virus protection are currently in preclinical and clinical development.

  3. The population impact of a large school-based influenza vaccination campaign.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G Grijalva

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The optimal vaccination strategy to mitigate the impact of influenza epidemics is unclear. In 2005, a countywide school-based influenza vaccination campaign was launched in Knox County, Tennessee (population 385,899. Approximately 41% and 48% of eligible county children aged 5-17 years were immunized with live attenuated influenza vaccine before the 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 influenza seasons, respectively. We sought to determine the population impact of this campaign.Laboratory-confirmed influenza data defined influenza seasons. We calculated the incidence of medically attended acute respiratory illness attributable to influenza in Knox and Knox-surrounding counties (concurrent controls during consecutive seasons (5 precampaign and 2 campaign seasons using negative binomial regression and rate difference methods. Age-stratified analyses compared the incidence of emergency department (ED visits and hospitalizations attributable to influenza.During precampaign seasons, estimated ED visit rates attributable to influenza were 12.39 (95% CI: 10.34-14.44 per 1000 Knox children aged 5-17 years and similar in Knox-surrounding counties. During the campaign seasons, annual Knox influenza-associated ED visit rates declined relative to rates in Knox-surrounding counties: rate ratios 0.55 (95% CI: 0.27-0.83 and 0.70 (95% CI: 0.56-0.84 for the first and second campaign seasons, respectively. Overall, there were about 35% or 4.86 per 1000 fewer influenza-associated ED visits among Knox County children aged 5-17 years attributable to the campaign. No significant declines in Knox compared to surrounding counties were detected for influenza associated ED visits in children aged <5 years, all adults combined or selected adult age subgroups, although power for these analyses was limited. Alternate rate-difference analyses yielded consistent results.Vaccination of approximately 45% of Knox school-aged children with influenza vaccine was associated with a 35% annual

  4. Predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination among older adults in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    Praphasiri, Prabda; Ditsungnoen, Darunee; Sirilak, Supakit; Rattanayot, Jarawee; Areerat, Peera; Dawood, Fatimah S.; Lindblade, Kim A.

    2017-01-01

    Background In advance of a large influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) cohort study among older adults in Thailand, we conducted a population-based, cross-sectional survey to measure vaccine coverage and identify factors associated with influenza vaccination among older Thai adults that could bias measures of vaccine effectiveness. Method We selected adults ≥65 years using a two-stage, stratified, cluster sampling design. Functional status was assessed using the 10-point Vulnerable Elders Surv...

  5. [Implementation of the influenza vaccination recommendation in nursing homes in Germany : results of a survey as part of the national influenza immunization campaign].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bödeker, B; Wichmann, O; Mertens, B; Seefeld, L; Pott, E

    2014-11-01

    Residents and staff of nursing homes are important target groups for influenza vaccination in Germany. The aim of this study was to gain the first insights into whether nursing homes organize activities with respect to vaccination against influenza and whether there is a demand for further information. In the context of the national influenza immunization campaign-which is jointly carried out by the Robert Koch Institute (RKI) and the Federal Centre for Health Education (BZgA) on an annual basis-influenza information kits were sent to the management of 10,700 nursing homes in September 2013. Along with the information material, the institutions also received a questionnaire to which they were able to respond via mail, fax, or online. Data from 988 homes were included in the analysis. The majority of institutions informed both residents (88.9 %) and nursing staff (81.2 %) about influenza vaccination. However, only 64.7 % of nursing homes carried out specific immunization activities for their residents and only half (49.3 %) offered a flu shot to their staff. When asked why the institutions do not provide influenza-specific information and vaccination to their staff, the majority had the opinion that this is the responsibility of each individual's general practitioner. Overall, only 4.9 % of nursing homes assessed influenza vaccination coverage among their staff annually. A third of all surveyed institutions (33.6 %) expressed a demand for additional influenza vaccine-related information. In conclusion, improved health education is needed to raise awareness about the importance of influenza vaccination among residents and employees of nursing homes in Germany so as to prevent influenza-associated morbidity and mortality in this risk group.

  6. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J S; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-20

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six "internal" influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production.

  7. Development of high-yield influenza B virus vaccine viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Jihui; Lopes, Tiago J. S.; Neumann, Gabriele; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2016-01-01

    The burden of human infections with influenza A and B viruses is substantial, and the impact of influenza B virus infections can exceed that of influenza A virus infections in some seasons. Over the past few decades, viruses of two influenza B virus lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) have circulated in humans, and both lineages are now represented in influenza vaccines, as recommended by the World Health Organization. Influenza B virus vaccines for humans have been available for more than half a century, yet no systematic efforts have been undertaken to develop high-yield candidates. Therefore, we screened virus libraries possessing random mutations in the six “internal” influenza B viral RNA segments [i.e., those not encoding the major viral antigens, hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase NA)] for mutants that confer efficient replication. Candidate viruses that supported high yield in cell culture were tested with the HA and NA genes of eight different viruses of the Victoria and Yamagata lineages. We identified combinations of mutations that increased the titers of candidate vaccine viruses in mammalian cells used for human influenza vaccine virus propagation and in embryonated chicken eggs, the most common propagation system for influenza viruses. These influenza B virus vaccine backbones can be used for improved vaccine virus production. PMID:27930325

  8. Risk of venous thromboembolism following influenza vaccination in adults aged 50years and older in the Vaccine Safety Datalink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Elizabeth R; McClure, David L; Naleway, Allison L; Jacobsen, Steven J; Klein, Nicola P; Glanz, Jason M; Weintraub, Eric S; Belongia, Edward A

    2017-10-13

    Influenza-like illness and inflammation are known risk factors for venous thromboembolism (VTE), which includes deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE). However, few studies have characterized the risk of VTE following influenza vaccination. We examined VTE risk after vaccination in adults 50years old and older within the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD). We used the self-controlled case series method to determine the risk of VTE among age-eligible adults who received influenza vaccine (with or without pandemic H1N1) and experienced a VTE during the months of September through December in 2007 through 2012. Presumptive VTE cases were identified among VSD participants using diagnostic codes, diagnostic tests, and oral anticoagulant prescription. Potential cases were validated by medical record review. The VTE incidence rate ratio was calculated among confirmed cases for the risk window 1 to 10days after vaccination relative to all other person-time from September through December. Of the 1,488 presumptive cases identified, 508 were reviewed, of which 492 (97%) were confirmed cases of VTE. The analysis included 396 incident, confirmed cases. Overall, there was no increased risk of VTE in the 1 to 10days after influenza vaccination (IRR=0.89, 95% CI 0.69-1.17) compared to the control period. Results were similar when all person-time was censored before vaccination. A post hoc analysis showed an increased risk among current tobacco smokers (IRR=2.57, 95% CI 1.06-6.23). No clustering of VTE was observed in the 1-42days after vaccination. Overall, there was no evidence that inactivated influenza vaccine was associated with VTE in adults ≥50years old. An increased risk was found among current smokers in a post hoc analysis. These findings are consistent with previous research and support the safety of annual vaccination in this population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of influenza vaccination on the prognosis of hospitalized influenza patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado, Itziar; Domínguez, Angela; Toledo, Diana; Chamorro, Judith; Force, Lluis; Soldevila, Núria; Astray, Jenaro; Egurrola, Mikel; Godoy, Pere; Mayoral, José M; Tamames, Sonia; Sanz, Francisco; Castilla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to assess whether influenza vaccination reduces the risk of severe and fatal outcomes in influenza inpatients aged ≥65 years. During the 2013-2014 influenza season persons aged ≥65 years hospitalized with laboratory-confirmed influenza were selected in 19 Spanish hospitals. A severe influenza case was defined as admission to the intensive care unit, death in hospital or within 30 days after admission. Logistic regression was used to compare the influenza vaccination status between severe and non-severe influenza inpatients. Of 433 influenza confirmed patients, 81 (19%) were severe cases. Vaccination reduced the risk of severe illness (odds ratio: 0.57; 95%CI: 0.33-0.98). The cumulative number of influenza vaccine doses received since the 2010-2011 season was associated with a lower risk of severe influenza (odds ratio: 0.78; 95% CI 0.66-0.91). Adherence to seasonal influenza vaccination in the elderly may reduce the risk of severe influenza outcomes.

  10. Improving Influenza Vaccination Rate among Primary Healthcare Workers in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid H. Elawad

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to improve influenza vaccination, and determine factors influencing vaccine declination among health care workers (HCW in Qatar. We launched an influenza vaccination campaign to vaccinate around 4700 HCW in 22 Primary Health Care Corporation (PHCC centers in Qatar between 1st and 15th of November, 2015. Our target was to vaccinate 60% of all HCW. Vaccine was offered free of charge at all centers, and information about the campaign and the importance of influenza vaccination was provided to employees through direct communication, emails, and social media networks. Staff were reported as vaccinated or non-vaccinated using a declination form that included their occupation, place of work and reasons for declining the vaccine. Survey responses were summarized as proportional outcomes. We exceeded our goal, and vaccinated 77% of the target population. Only 9% declined to take the vaccine, and the remaining 14% were either on leave or had already been vaccinated. Vaccine uptake was highest among aides (98.1%, followed by technicians (95.2%, and was lowest amongst pharmacists (73.2%, preceded by physicians (84%. Of those that declined the vaccine, 34% provided no reason, 18% declined it due to behavioral issues, and 21% declined it due to medical reasons. Uptake of influenza vaccine significantly increased during the 2015 immunization campaign. This is attributed to good planning, preparation, a high level of communication, and providing awareness and training to HCW with proper supervision and monitoring.

  11. Improving Influenza Vaccination Rate among Primary Healthcare Workers in Qatar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elawad, Khalid H; Farag, Elmoubasher A; Abuelgasim, Dina A; Smatti, Maria K; Al-Romaihi, Hamad E; Al Thani, Mohammed; Al Mujalli, Hanan; Shehata, Zienab; Alex, Merin; Al Thani, Asmaa A; Yassine, Hadi M

    2017-10-10

    The purpose of this study was to improve influenza vaccination, and determine factors influencing vaccine declination among health care workers (HCW) in Qatar. We launched an influenza vaccination campaign to vaccinate around 4700 HCW in 22 Primary Health Care Corporation (PHCC) centers in Qatar between 1st and 15th of November, 2015. Our target was to vaccinate 60% of all HCW. Vaccine was offered free of charge at all centers, and information about the campaign and the importance of influenza vaccination was provided to employees through direct communication, emails, and social media networks. Staff were reported as vaccinated or non-vaccinated using a declination form that included their occupation, place of work and reasons for declining the vaccine. Survey responses were summarized as proportional outcomes. We exceeded our goal, and vaccinated 77% of the target population. Only 9% declined to take the vaccine, and the remaining 14% were either on leave or had already been vaccinated. Vaccine uptake was highest among aides (98.1%), followed by technicians (95.2%), and was lowest amongst pharmacists (73.2%), preceded by physicians (84%). Of those that declined the vaccine, 34% provided no reason, 18% declined it due to behavioral issues, and 21% declined it due to medical reasons. Uptake of influenza vaccine significantly increased during the 2015 immunization campaign. This is attributed to good planning, preparation, a high level of communication, and providing awareness and training to HCW with proper supervision and monitoring.

  12. Interim estimates of the effectiveness of influenza vaccination against influenza-associated hospitalization in children in Hong Kong, 2015-16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowling, Benjamin J; Kwan, Mike Y W; Wong, Joshua S C; Feng, Shuo; Leung, Chi-Wai; Chan, Eunice L Y; Chan, Kwok-Hung; Ng, Tak-Keung; To, Wing-Kin; Peiris, Malik J S; Chiu, Susan S

    2017-01-01

    From 1 September 2015 through 31 January 2016, we enrolled 2068 children 6 months to 17 years of age admitted to hospital with a febrile acute respiratory infection in our test-negative study. Information on receipt of 2015-16 northern hemisphere inactivated influenza vaccination was elicited from parents or legal guardians. Using conditional logistic regression adjusting for age and matching on calendar time, we estimated influenza vaccine effectiveness against hospitalization with influenza A or B to be 79.2% (95% confidence interval: 42.0%-92.4%). Annual influenza vaccination should be more widely used in children in Hong Kong. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Urban and Rural Differences in Parental Attitudes About Influenza Vaccination and Vaccine Delivery Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Sean T; Barnard, Juliana; Lockhart, Steven; Kolasa, Maureen; Shmueli, Doron; Dickinson, L Miriam; Kile, Deidre; Dibert, Eva; Kempe, Allison

    2015-01-01

    To assess and compare among parents of healthy children in urban and rural areas: (1) reported influenza vaccination status; (2) attitudes regarding influenza vaccination; and (3) attitudes about collaborative models for influenza vaccination delivery involving practices and public health departments. A mail survey to random samples of parents from 2 urban and 2 rural private practices in Colorado from April 2012 to June 2012. The response rate was 58% (288/500). In the prior season, 63% of urban and 41% of rural parents reported their child received influenza vaccination (P urban and rural parents were found, with 75% of urban and 73% of rural parents agreeing their child should receive an influenza vaccine every year (P = .71). High proportions reported willingness to participate in a collaborative clinic in a community setting (59% urban, 70% rural, P = .05) or at their child's provider (73% urban, 73% rural, P = .99) with public health department assisting. Fewer (36% urban, 53% rural, P health department if referred by their provider. Rural parents were more willing for their child to receive vaccination outside of their provider's office (70% vs. 55%, P = .01). While attitudes regarding influenza vaccination were similar, rural children were much less likely to have received vaccination. Most parents were amenable to collaborative models of influenza vaccination delivery, but rural parents were more comfortable with influenza vaccination outside their provider's office, suggesting that other venues for influenza vaccination in rural settings should be promoted. © 2015 National Rural Health Association.

  14. 21 CFR 610.11a - Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test... Inactivated influenza vaccine, general safety test. For inactivated influenza vaccine, the general safety test... subcutaneous or intraperitoneal injection of 5.0 milliliters of inactivated influenza vaccine into each guinea...

  15. Improving influenza vaccination rates in the workplace: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou J; Toback, Seth L; Rousculp, Matthew D; Eby, Charles; Raymund, Mahlon; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2010-03-01

    To minimize absenteeism resulting from influenza, employers frequently offer on-site influenza vaccination to employees. Yet the level of uptake of vaccine is low among working adults. This study was designed to increase workplace influenza vaccination rates by offering both a choice of intranasal (LAIV) and injectable (TIV) influenza vaccines to eligible employees, and an incentive for being vaccinated, and by increasing awareness of the vaccine clinic. This study used a stratified randomized cluster trial. A total of 12,222 employees in 53 U.S. companies with previous influenza vaccine clinics were examined. Control sites advertised and offered vaccine clinics as previously done. Choice sites offered LAIV or TIV and maintained their previous advertising level but promoted the choice of vaccines. Choice Plus sites increased advertising and promoted and offered a choice of vaccines and a nominal incentive. These included vaccination rates among eligible employees. Hierarchic linear modeling (HLM) was used to determine factors associated with vaccination. The overall vaccination rate increased from 39% in 2007-2008 to 46% in 2008-2009 (pvaccination rates for LAIV was 6.5% for Choice versus Control and 9.9% for Choice Plus versus Control (both p or =50 years (p=0.024). Rates of TIV did not change in workers aged 18-49 years in either intervention arm or in workers aged > or =50 years in the Choice arm. In HLM analyses, factors significantly associated with increased vaccination were older age, female gender, previous company vaccination rate, and the Choice Plus intervention. An incentive for vaccination, an intensified advertising campaign, and offering a choice of influenza vaccines improved vaccination rates in the workplace. Copyright (c) 2010 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Influenza vaccination for healthcare workers in the UK: appraisal of systematic reviews and policy options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kliner, Merav; Keenan, Alex; Sinclair, David; Ghebrehewet, Sam; Garner, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background The UK Department of Health recommends annual influenza vaccination for healthcare workers, but uptake remains low. For staff, there is uncertainty about the rationale for vaccination and evidence underpinning the recommendation. Objectives To clarify the rationale, and evidence base, for influenza vaccination of healthcare workers from the occupational health, employer and patient safety perspectives. Design Systematic appraisal of published systematic reviews. Results The quality of the 11 included reviews was variable; some included exactly the same trials but made conflicting recommendations. 3 reviews assessed vaccine effects in healthcare workers and found 1 trial reporting a vaccine efficacy (VE) of 88%. 6 reviews assessed vaccine effects in healthy adults, and VE was consistent with a median of 62% (95% CI 56 to 67). 2 reviews assessed effects on working days lost in healthcare workers (3 trials), and 3 reported effects in healthy adults (4 trials). The meta-analyses presented by the most recent reviews do not reach standard levels of statistical significance, but may be misleading as individual trials suggest benefit with wide variation in size of effect. The 2013 Cochrane review reported absolute effects close to 0 for laboratory-confirmed influenza, and hospitalisation for patients, but excluded data on clinically suspected influenza and all-cause mortality, which had shown potentially important effects in previous editions. A more recent systematic review reports these effects as a 42% reduction in clinically suspected influenza (95% CI 27 to 54) and a 29% reduction in all-cause mortality (95% CI 15 to 41). Conclusions The evidence for employer and patient safety benefits of influenza vaccination is not straightforward and has been interpreted differently by different systematic review authors. Future uptake of influenza vaccination among healthcare workers may benefit from a fully transparent guideline process by a panel representing all

  17. Effects of Repeated Annual Inactivated Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Personnel on Serum Hemagglutinin Inhibition Antibody Response to A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus during 2010–11

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark G.; Naleway, Allison; Fry, Alicia M.; Ball, Sarah; Spencer, Sarah M.; Reynolds, Sue; Bozeman, Sam; Levine, Min; Katz, Jacqueline M.; Gaglani, Manjusha

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, lower estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against A(H3N2) virus illness among those vaccinated during the previous season or multiple seasons have been reported; however, it is unclear whether these effects are due to differences in immunogenicity. Methods We performed hemagglutination inhibition antibody (HI) assays on serum collected at preseason, ∼30 days post-vaccination, and postseason from a prospective cohort of healthcare personnel (HCP). Eligible participants had medical and vaccination records for at least four years (since July, 2006), including 578 HCP who received 2010–11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine [IIV3, containing A/Perth/16/2009-like A(H3N2)] and 209 HCP who declined vaccination. Estimates of the percentage with high titers (≥40 and > 100) and geometric mean fold change ratios (GMRs) to A/Perth/16/2009-like virus by number of prior vaccinations were adjusted for age, sex, race, education, household size, hospital care responsibilities, and study site. Results Post-vaccination GMRs were inversely associated with the number of prior vaccinations, increasing from 2.3 among those with 4 prior vaccinations to 6.2 among HCP with zero prior vaccinations (F[4,567] = 9.97, p vaccination achieved titers >100 compared to only 11% of HCP with 4 prior vaccinations (adjusted odds ratio = 6.8, 95% CI = 3.1 – 15.3). Conclusion Our findings point to an exposure-response association between repeated IIV3 vaccination and HI for A(H3N2) and are consistent with recent VE observations. Ultimately, better vaccines and vaccine strategies may be needed in order to optimize immunogenicity and VE for HCP and other repeated vaccinees. PMID:26813801

  18. Prospects of HA-Based Universal Influenza Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Hashem, Anwar M.

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines afford substantial protection in humans by inducing strain-specific neutralizing antibodies (Abs). Most of these Abs target highly variable immunodominant epitopes in the globular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (HA). Therefore, current vaccines may not be able to induce heterosubtypic immunity against the divergent influenza subtypes. The identification of broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs) against influenza HA using recent technological advancements in antibody li...

  19. To Dream the Impossible Dream: Universal Influenza Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Yewdell, Jonathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Year in and year out, influenza viruses exact a deadly and expensive toll on humanity. Current vaccines simply do not keep pace with viral immune evasion, providing partial protection, at best, among various age groups. A quantum leap in understanding the basic principles of the adaptive and innate immune responses to influenza viruses offers the opportunity to develop vaccines that forestall, and potentially ultimately defeat, influenza virus antigenic variation.

  20. M2e-Based Universal Influenza A Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Cho, Ki Joon; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The successful isolation of a human influenza virus in 1933 was soon followed by the first attempts to develop an influenza vaccine. Nowadays, vaccination is still the most effective method to prevent human influenza disease. However, licensed influenza vaccines offer protection against antigenically matching viruses, and the composition of these vaccines needs to be updated nearly every year. Vaccines that target conserved epitopes of influenza viruses would in principle not require such updating and would probably have a considerable positive impact on global human health in case of a pandemic outbreak. The extracellular domain of Matrix 2 (M2e) protein is an evolutionarily conserved region in influenza A viruses and a promising epitope for designing a universal influenza vaccine. Here we review the seminal and recent studies that focused on M2e as a vaccine antigen. We address the mechanism of action and the clinical development of M2e-vaccines. Finally, we try to foresee how M2e-based vaccines could be implemented clinically in the future. PMID:26344949

  1. Prospects of HA-Based Universal Influenza Vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwar M. Hashem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current influenza vaccines afford substantial protection in humans by inducing strain-specific neutralizing antibodies (Abs. Most of these Abs target highly variable immunodominant epitopes in the globular domain of the viral hemagglutinin (HA. Therefore, current vaccines may not be able to induce heterosubtypic immunity against the divergent influenza subtypes. The identification of broadly neutralizing Abs (BnAbs against influenza HA using recent technological advancements in antibody libraries, hybridoma, and isolation of single Ab-secreting plasma cells has increased the interest in developing a universal influenza vaccine as it could provide life-long protection. While these BnAbs can serve as a source for passive immunotherapy, their identification represents an important step towards the design of such a universal vaccine. This review describes the recent advances and approaches used in the development of universal influenza vaccine based on highly conserved HA regions identified by BnAbs.

  2. Influenza-vaccination: an inventory of strategies to reach the target population and optimise vaccination uptake.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroneman, M.; Paget, J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Influenza continues to be a considerable health problem of the populations in Europe. Complications of influenza are especially present in elderly patients and patients with chronic conditions such as cardiovascular disorders and respiratory disorders. Vaccination is an effective

  3. Influenza vaccination in the elderly: seeking new correlates of protection and improved vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElhaney, Janet E

    2008-12-01

    Influenza is foremost among all infectious diseases for an age-related increase in risk for serious complications and death. Determining the benefit of current influenza vaccines is largely limited to epidemiologic studies, since placebo-controlled trials of influenza vaccines are no longer considered ethical in the older adult population. Vaccine effectiveness is calculated from the relative reduction in influenza outcomes in individuals who elect to be vaccinated compared with those who do not, the assumptions for which are diverse and have led to considerable controversy as to the exact benefit of influenza vaccination in older adults. In spite of this controversy, there is no doubt that new influenza vaccine technologies are needed to improve protection and reverse the trend of rising hospitalization and death rates related to influenza in older adults despite widespread influenza vaccination programs. This article will review the challenges to new vaccine development, explore the potential correlates of protection against influenza, and describe how new vaccine technologies may improve protection against complicated influenza illness in the older adult population.

  4. Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in the emergency department: is it feasible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrenn, K; Zeldin, M; Miller, O

    1994-08-01

    To assess the numbers of high-risk adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) who have not been vaccinated against influenza or pneumococcal disease and whether emergency physicians are willing or able to routinely provide vaccination. A survey of patients in the ED considered to be at high risk for morbidity and mortality from influenza or pneumococcal disease; an anonymous, mail-back survey of emergency physicians. The ED of a university-affiliated hospital with an annual census of 50,000 patient visits. A convenience sample of adult patients visiting the ED for any complaint who fulfilled the American Thoracic Society and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention requirements as a high-risk patient requiring vaccination with influenza or pneumococcal vaccine. The physicians surveyed were identified from the membership role of the state chapter of the American College of Emergency Physicians. 1) Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination rates for high-risk patients presenting to an ED during influenza season; 2) reasons for lack of immunization; 3) patient willingness to be vaccinated in the ED; 4) vaccination practice patterns for ED physicians; and 5) reasons why ED physicians are unwilling to give these vaccines. 212 high-risk patients were surveyed. 57% and 75% of these patients reported not having received the influenza vaccine and the pneumococcal vaccine, respectively. The main reasons for not being immunized included not being informed they needed it, a prior adverse reaction, and procrastination. Of the unvaccinated patients, 54% were willing to be vaccinated in the ED. Of the surveyed ED physicians, 89% and 93% never or rarely gave influenza and pneumococcal vaccines, respectively. 51% of the ED physicians were willing to give the vaccine. Unwillingness stemmed mainly from: 1) the perception that ED physicians are not primary care providers, 2) inadequate time or personnel; and 3) concerns about adverse reactions or medicolegal liability

  5. Peering into the crystal ball: influenza pandemics and vaccine efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew S; Palese, Peter

    2014-04-10

    The looming threat of a new influenza virus pandemic has fueled ambitious efforts to devise more predictive parameters for assessing the risks associated with emergent virus strains. At the same time, a comprehensive understanding of critical factors that can accurately predict the outcome of vaccination is sorely needed in order to improve the effectiveness of influenza virus vaccines. Will new studies aimed at identifying adaptations required for virus transmissibility and systems-level analyses of influenza virus vaccine responses provide an improved framework for predictive models of viral adaptation and vaccine efficacy? Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Rural parents' vaccination-related attitudes and intention to vaccinate middle and high school children against influenza following educational influenza vaccination intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E.; Pazol, Karen; Gargano, Lisa M.; Orenstein, Walter; Hughes, James M.; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This study examined changes in parental influenza vaccination attitudes and intentions after participating in school-based educational influenza vaccination intervention. Methods: Participants were drawn from three counties participating in a school-based influenza vaccination intervention in rural Georgia (baseline N=324; follow-up N=327). Data were collected pre- and post-intervention from phone surveys with parents’ with children attending middle- and high-school. Attitudes, beliefs, vaccination history, and intention to vaccinate were assessed.  Results:  Parents who participated in the intervention conditions reported significantly higher influenza vaccination rates in their adolescents, relative to a control group, as well as increased vaccination rates post-intervention participation relative to their baseline rates. Intervention participants reported greater intention to have their adolescent vaccinated in the coming year compared to control parents.  Significant differences were observed post intervention in perceived barriers and benefits of vaccination. Conclusions: These findings suggest that a school-delivered educational influenza vaccination intervention targeting parents and teens may influence influenza vaccination in rural communities. Future influenza vaccination efforts geared toward the parents of rural middle- and high-school students may benefit from addressing barriers and benefits of influenza vaccination. PMID:22048112

  7. Barriers to and facilitators of child influenza vaccine - perspectives from parents, teens, marketing and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat-Schelbert, Kavitha; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Matambanadzo, Annamore; Hannibal, Kristin; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2012-03-23

    The CDC recommends annual influenza vaccination for all children age 6 months and older, yet vaccination rates remain modest. Effective strategies to improve influenza vaccination for children are needed. Eight focus groups with 91 parents, teens, pediatric healthcare staff and providers, and immunization and marketing experts were conducted, audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and coded based on grounded theory. Three themes emerged: barriers, facilitators, and strategies. Barriers included fear, misinformation, and mistrust, with exacerbation of these barriers attributed to media messages. Many considered influenza vaccination unnecessary and inconvenient, but would accept vaccination if recipients or other family members were considered high risk, if recommended by their doctor or another trusted person, or if offered or mandated by the school. Access to better information regarding influenza disease burden and vaccine safety and efficacy were notable facilitators, as were prevention of the inconvenience of missing work or important events, and if the child requests to receive the vaccine. Marketing strategies included incentives, jingles, videos, wearable items, strategically-located information sheets or posters, and promotion by informed counselors. Practice-based strategies included staff buy-in, standing orders protocols, vaccination clinics, and educational videos. Teen-specific strategies included message delivery through schools, texting, internet, and social networking sites. To improve influenza vaccination rates for children using practice-based interventions, participants suggested campaigns that provide better information regarding the vaccine, the disease and its implications, and convenient access to vaccination. Strategies targeting adolescents should use web-based social marketing technologies and campaigns based in schools. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Repeated Annual Inactivated Influenza Vaccination among Healthcare Personnel on Serum Hemagglutinin Inhibition Antibody Response to A/Perth/16/2009 (H3N2)-like virus during 2010-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Mark G; Naleway, Allison; Fry, Alicia M; Ball, Sarah; Spencer, Sarah M; Reynolds, Sue; Bozeman, Sam; Levine, Min; Katz, Jacqueline M; Gaglani, Manjusha

    2016-02-10

    Recently, lower estimates of influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against A(H3N2) virus illness among those vaccinated during the previous season or multiple seasons have been reported; however, it is unclear whether these effects are due to differences in immunogenicity. We performed hemagglutination inhibition antibody (HI) assays on serum collected at preseason, ∼ 30 days post-vaccination, and postseason from a prospective cohort of healthcare personnel (HCP). Eligible participants had medical and vaccination records for at least four years (since July, 2006), including 578 HCP who received 2010-11 trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine [IIV3, containing A/Perth/16/2009-like A(H3N2)] and 209 HCP who declined vaccination. Estimates of the percentage with high titers (≥ 40 and>100) and geometric mean fold change ratios (GMRs) to A/Perth/16/2009-like virus by number of prior vaccinations were adjusted for age, sex, race, education, household size, hospital care responsibilities, and study site. Post-vaccination GMRs were inversely associated with the number of prior vaccinations, increasing from 2.3 among those with 4 prior vaccinations to 6.2 among HCP with zero prior vaccinations (F[4,567]=9.97, pvaccination achieved titers >100 compared to only 11% of HCP with 4 prior vaccinations (adjusted odds ratio=6.8, 95% CI=3.1 - 15.3). Our findings point to an exposure-response association between repeated IIV3 vaccination and HI for A(H3N2) and are consistent with recent VE observations. Ultimately, better vaccines and vaccine strategies may be needed in order to optimize immunogenicity and VE for HCP and other repeated vaccinees. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. AS03- and MF59-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccines in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Amanda L.; Kazmin, Dmitri; Napolitani, Giorgio; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A.; Pulendran, Bali; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory disease leading to hospitalization in young children. However, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) have been shown to be ineffective and poorly immunogenic in this population. The development of live-attenuated influenza vaccines and adjuvanted vaccines are important advances in the prevention of influenza in young children. The oil-in-water emulsions MF59 and adjuvant systems 03 (AS03) have been used as adjuvants in both seasonal adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines (ATIVs) and pandemic monovalent influenza vaccines. Compared with non-adjuvanted vaccine responses, these vaccines induce a more robust and persistent antibody response for both homologous and heterologous influenza strains in infants and young children. Evidence of a significant improvement in vaccine efficacy with these adjuvanted vaccines resulted in the use of the monovalent (A/H1N1) AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in children in the 2009 influenza pandemic and the licensure of the seasonal MF59 ATIV for children aged 6 months to 2 years in Canada. The mechanism of action of MF59 and AS03 remains unclear. Adjuvants such as MF59 induce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL10, but independently of type-1 interferon. This proinflammatory response is associated with improved recruitment, activation and maturation of antigen presenting cells at the injection site. In young children MF59 ATIV produced more homogenous and robust transcriptional responses, more similar to adult-like patterns, than did TIV. Early gene signatures characteristic of the innate immune response, which correlated with antibody titers were also identified. Differences were detected when comparing child and adult responses including opposite trends in gene set enrichment at day 3 postvaccination and, unlike adult data, a lack of correlation between magnitude of plasmablast response at day 7 and antibody titers at day 28 in children. These insights show the utility

  10. AS03- and MF59-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccines in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L. Wilkins

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is a major cause of respiratory disease leading to hospitalization in young children. However, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs have been shown to be ineffective and poorly immunogenic in this population. The development of live-attenuated influenza vaccines and adjuvanted vaccines are important advances in the prevention of influenza in young children. The oil-in-water emulsions MF59 and adjuvant systems 03 (AS03 have been used as adjuvants in both seasonal adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines (ATIVs and pandemic monovalent influenza vaccines. Compared with non-adjuvanted vaccine responses, these vaccines induce a more robust and persistent antibody response for both homologous and heterologous influenza strains in infants and young children. Evidence of a significant improvement in vaccine efficacy with these adjuvanted vaccines resulted in the use of the monovalent (A/H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in children in the 2009 influenza pandemic and the licensure of the seasonal MF59 ATIV for children aged 6 months to 2 years in Canada. The mechanism of action of MF59 and AS03 remains unclear. Adjuvants such as MF59 induce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL10, but independently of type-1 interferon. This proinflammatory response is associated with improved recruitment, activation and maturation of antigen presenting cells at the injection site. In young children MF59 ATIV produced more homogenous and robust transcriptional responses, more similar to adult-like patterns, than did TIV. Early gene signatures characteristic of the innate immune response, which correlated with antibody titers were also identified. Differences were detected when comparing child and adult responses including opposite trends in gene set enrichment at day 3 postvaccination and, unlike adult data, a lack of correlation between magnitude of plasmablast response at day 7 and antibody titers at day 28 in children. These insights

  11. AS03- and MF59-Adjuvanted Influenza Vaccines in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Amanda L; Kazmin, Dmitri; Napolitani, Giorgio; Clutterbuck, Elizabeth A; Pulendran, Bali; Siegrist, Claire-Anne; Pollard, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory disease leading to hospitalization in young children. However, seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) have been shown to be ineffective and poorly immunogenic in this population. The development of live-attenuated influenza vaccines and adjuvanted vaccines are important advances in the prevention of influenza in young children. The oil-in-water emulsions MF59 and adjuvant systems 03 (AS03) have been used as adjuvants in both seasonal adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccines (ATIVs) and pandemic monovalent influenza vaccines. Compared with non-adjuvanted vaccine responses, these vaccines induce a more robust and persistent antibody response for both homologous and heterologous influenza strains in infants and young children. Evidence of a significant improvement in vaccine efficacy with these adjuvanted vaccines resulted in the use of the monovalent (A/H1N1) AS03-adjuvanted vaccine in children in the 2009 influenza pandemic and the licensure of the seasonal MF59 ATIV for children aged 6 months to 2 years in Canada. The mechanism of action of MF59 and AS03 remains unclear. Adjuvants such as MF59 induce proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including CXCL10, but independently of type-1 interferon. This proinflammatory response is associated with improved recruitment, activation and maturation of antigen presenting cells at the injection site. In young children MF59 ATIV produced more homogenous and robust transcriptional responses, more similar to adult-like patterns, than did TIV. Early gene signatures characteristic of the innate immune response, which correlated with antibody titers were also identified. Differences were detected when comparing child and adult responses including opposite trends in gene set enrichment at day 3 postvaccination and, unlike adult data, a lack of correlation between magnitude of plasmablast response at day 7 and antibody titers at day 28 in children. These insights show the utility

  12. Haemophilus Influenzae Type b (Hib) Vaccine: What You Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    VACCINE INFORMATION STATEMENT Hib Vaccine ( Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) What You Need to Know Many Vaccine Information Statements are available in Spanish and other languages. See www. immunize. ...

  13. Conjugate Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccines for sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allali, Slimane; Chalumeau, Martin; Launay, Odile; Ballas, Samir K; de Montalembert, Mariane

    2016-02-16

    People affected with sickle cell disease are at high risk of infection from Haemophilus influenzae type b. Before the implementation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccination in high-income countries, this was responsible for a high mortality rate in children under five years of age. In African countries, where coverage of this vaccination is still extremely low, Haemophilus influenzae type b remains one of the most common cause of bacteraemias in children with sickle cell disease. The increased uptake of this conjugate vaccination may substantially improve the survival of children with sickle cell disease. The primary objective was to determine whether Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines reduce mortality and morbidity in children and adults with sickle cell disease.The secondary objectives were to assess the following in children and adults with sickle cell disease: the immunogenicity of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines; the safety of these vaccines; and any variation in effect according to type of vaccine, mode of administration (separately or in combination with other vaccines), number of doses, and age at first dose. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register, compiled from electronic database searches and handsearching of journals and conference abstract books. We also contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies to identify unpublished trials.Date of last search: 23 November 2015. All randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines with placebo or no treatment, or comparing different types of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines in people with sickle cell disease. No trials of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines in people with sickle cell disease were found. There is an absence of evidence from randomised controlled trials relating to the subject of this review. There has

  14. Chitosan Nanoparticle Encapsulated Hemagglutinin-Split Influenza Virus Mucosal Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Sawaengsak, Chompoonuch; Mori, Yasuko; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mitrevej, Ampol; Sinchaipanid, Nuttanan

    2013-01-01

    Subunit/split influenza vaccines are less reactogenic compared with the whole virus vaccines. However, their immunogenicity is relatively low and thus required proper adjuvant and/or delivery vehicle for immunogenicity enhancement. Influenza vaccines administered intramuscularly induce minimum, if any, mucosal immunity at the respiratory mucosa which is the prime site of the infection. In this study, chitosan (CS) nanoparticles were prepared by ionic cross-linking of the CS with sodium tripol...

  15. Vaccines for preventing influenza in people with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cates, C J; Jefferson, T O; Rowe, B H

    2008-04-16

    Influenza vaccination is recommended for asthmatic patients in many countries as observational studies have shown that influenza infection can be associated with asthma exacerbations, but influenza vaccination itself has the potential to adversely affect pulmonary function. A recent overview concluded that there was no clear benefit of influenza vaccination in patients with asthma but this conclusion was not based on a systematic search of the literature. Whilst influenza may cause asthma exacerbations, there is controversy about the use of influenza vaccinations, since they may precipitate an asthma attack in some people. The objective of this review was to assess the efficacy of influenza vaccination in children and adults with asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group trials register and checked reference lists of articles. The last search was carried out in September 2007. Randomised trials of influenza vaccination in children (over two years of age) and adults with asthma. Studies involving people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were excluded. Inclusion criteria and assessment of trial quality were applied by two reviewers independently. Data extraction was done by two reviewers independently. Study authors were contacted for missing information. Nine trials were initially included. Four of these trials were of high quality. Six further articles have been included in three updates (Bueving 2003; Castro 2001; Fleming 2006; Redding 2002; Reid 1998). The included studies covered a wide diversity of people, settings and types of influenza vaccination, but data from the more recent studies that used similar vaccines have been pooled. Bueving 2003 studied 696 children with asthma and did not demonstrate a significant reduction in influenza related asthma exacerbations (Risk Difference 0.01; 95% confidence interval -0.02 to 0.04). The pooled results of two trials involving 2306 people with asthma did not demonstrate a significant increase in asthma

  16. Ischaemic heart disease, influenza and influenza vaccination: a prospective case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macintyre, C Raina; Heywood, Anita E; Kovoor, Pramesh; Ridda, Iman; Seale, Holly; Tan, Timothy; Gao, Zhanhai; Katelaris, Anthea L; Siu, Ho Wai Derrick; Lo, Vincent; Lindley, Richard; Dwyer, Dominic E

    2013-12-01

    Abundant, indirect epidemiological evidence indicates that influenza contributes to all-cause mortality and cardiovascular hospitalisations with studies showing increases in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and death during the influenza season. To investigate whether influenza is a significant and unrecognised underlying precipitant of AMI. Case-control study. Tertiary referral hospital in Sydney, Australia, during 2008 to 2010. Cases were inpatients with AMI and controls were outpatients without AMI at a hospital in Sydney, Australia. Primary outcome was laboratory evidence of influenza. Secondary outcome was baseline self-reported acute respiratory tract infection. Of 559 participants, 34/275 (12.4%) cases and 19/284 (6.7%) controls had influenza (OR 1.97, 95% CI 1.09 to 3.54); half were vaccinated. None were recognised as having influenza during their clinical encounter. After adjustment, influenza infection was no longer a significant predictor of recent AMI. However, influenza vaccination was significantly protective (OR 0.55, 95% CI 0.35 to 0.85), with a vaccine effectiveness of 45% (95% CI 15% to 65%). Recent influenza infection was an unrecognised comorbidity in almost 10% of hospital patients. Influenza did not predict AMI, but vaccination was significantly protective but underused. The potential population health impact of influenza vaccination, particularly in the age group 50-64 years, who are at risk for AMI but not targeted for vaccination, should be further explored. Our data should inform vaccination policy and cardiologists should be aware of missed opportunities to vaccinate individuals with ischaemic heart disease against influenza.

  17. Influenza virus neuraminidase (NA): a target for antivirals and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadesh, Anitha; Salam, Abdul Ajees Abdul; Mudgal, Piya Paul; Arunkumar, Govindakarnavar

    2016-08-01

    Influenza, the most common infectious disease, poses a great threat to human health because of its highly contagious nature and fast transmissibility, often leading to high morbidity and mortality. Effective vaccination strategies may aid in the prevention and control of recurring epidemics and pandemics associated with this infectious disease. However, antigenic shifts and drifts are major concerns with influenza virus, requiring effective global monitoring and updating of vaccines. Current vaccines are standardized primarily based on the amount of hemagglutinin, a major surface antigen, which chiefly constitutes these preparations along with the varying amounts of neuraminidase (NA). Anti-influenza drugs targeting the active site of NA have been in use for more than a decade now. However, NA has not been approved as an effective antigenic component of the influenza vaccine because of standardization issues. Although some studies have suggested that NA antibodies are able to reduce the severity of the disease and induce a long-term and cross-protective immunity, a few major scientific issues need to be addressed prior to launching NA-based vaccines. Interestingly, an increasing number of studies have shown NA to be a promising target for future influenza vaccines. This review is an attempt to consolidate studies that reflect the strength of NA as a suitable vaccine target. The studies discussed in this article highlight NA as a potential influenza vaccine candidate and support taking the process of developing NA vaccines to the next stage.

  18. Trends in U.S. pediatric influenza vaccination from 2006 to 2010 among children with private insurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toback, Seth L; Herley, John; Edelman, Laurel; Ambrose, Christopher S

    2011-06-06

    In the United States, recommendations for the annual influenza vaccination of children have expanded significantly in recent years. Additionally, to facilitate influenza vaccination delivery by providers, recent recommendations have encouraged vaccination as soon as vaccine is available and throughout the influenza season. However, until now, there have been limited data published describing pediatric providers' responses to these recent recommendations. De-identified, patient-level data from an electronic health care reimbursement claims database that contains more than 60% of all medical claims from outpatient settings in the US were analyzed. Only claims from privately insured children were available; administration of federally purchased vaccine (i.e., via the Vaccines for Children program) and vaccinations administered in settings where claims data are not generated were not captured. Weekly counts of influenza vaccinations administered to children 6 months through 18 years of age between August 1 and March 31 for the 2006-2007 through 2009-2010 seasons were projected to yield national estimates. Seasonal vaccination peaked in November for the 2006-2007 and 2007-2008 seasons, October for the 2008-2009 season, and September for the 2009-2010 season. The proportion of vaccinations administered before November 1 increased each season from 2006-2007 through 2009-2010. In all seasons, vaccination dramatically declined in December and continued at a steadily declining rate through the end of the season. Vaccine delivery to children 6-23 months of age was more dispersed over the vaccination season relative to older age groups. Among children 6-23 months and 2-18 years of age, use of preservative-free inactivated vaccine and live attenuated vaccine, respectively, increased significantly over the study period. While pediatric influenza vaccination occurred earlier each year, vaccination in later months has not increased in recent seasons, despite efforts to extend the

  19. Protective effect of a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Borggren, Marie; Rosenstierne, Maiken Worsøe

    2018-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus in swine herds represents a major problem for the swine industry and poses a constant threat for the emergence of novel pandemic viruses and the development of more effective influenza vaccines for pigs is desired. By optimizing the vector backbone and using a needle......-free delivery method, we have recently demonstrated a polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine that induces a broad immune response, including both humoral and cellular immunity. Objectives To investigate the protection of our polyvalent influenza DNA vaccine approach in a pig challenge study. Methods By intradermal...... needle-free delivery to the skin, we immunized pigs with two different doses (500 μg and 800 μg) of an influenza DNA vaccine based on six genes of pandemic origin, including internally expressed matrix and nucleoprotein and externally expressed hemagglutinin and neuraminidase as previously demonstrated...

  20. Polyarteritis nodosa related with influenza vaccine = Poliarteritis nodosa relacionada con vacuna contra la influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo Escobar, Mauricio

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Vasculitis can be secondary to various processes, among them infections, malignancies, connective tissue diseases or medications, or primary, generally idiopathic. The reported adverse events after vaccination can be mild and transient or more serious such as autoimmune diseases. Possibly the most frequently described autoimmune phenomena after influenza vaccination are different forms of vasculitis. We report the case of a patient who presented a clinical picture of vasculitis classified as polyarteritis nodosa that began two weeks after receiving the influenza vaccine. After critically reviewing the literature, this would be the first clearly documented case of polyarteritis nodosa associated with vaccination against influenza.

  1. Efficacy of Influenza Vaccination and Tamiflu? Treatment ? Comparative Studies with Eurasian Swine Influenza Viruses in Pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Duerrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Bauer, Katja; Vissiennon, Th?ophile; Wutzler, Peter; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological developments demonstrated that gene segments of swine influenza A viruses can account for antigenic changes as well as reduced drug susceptibility of pandemic influenza A viruses. This raises questions about the efficacy of preventive measures against swine influenza A viruses. Here, the protective effect of vaccination was compared with that of prophylactic Tamiflu® treatment against two Eurasian swine influenza A viruses. 11-week-old pigs were infected by aerosol nebu...

  2. The safety of influenza vaccines in children: An Institute for Vaccine Safety white paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Neal A; Talaat, Kawsar R; Greenbaum, Adena; Mensah, Eric; Dudley, Matthew Z; Proveaux, Tina; Salmon, Daniel A

    2015-12-30

    Most influenza vaccines are generally safe, but influenza vaccines can cause rare serious adverse events. Some adverse events, such as fever and febrile seizures, are more common in children than adults. There can be differences in the safety of vaccines in different populations due to underlying differences in genetic predisposition to the adverse event. Live attenuated vaccines have not been studied adequately in children under 2 years of age to determine the risks of adverse events; more studies are needed to address this and several other priority safety issues with all influenza vaccines in children. All vaccines intended for use in children require safety testing in the target age group, especially in young children. Safety of one influenza vaccine in children should not be extrapolated to assumed safety of all influenza vaccines in children. The low rates of adverse events from influenza vaccines should not be a deterrent to the use of influenza vaccines because of the overwhelming evidence of the burden of disease due to influenza in children. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Vaccination against influenza at a European pediatric cancer center: immunization rates and attitudes among staff, patients, and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettke, Aleksandra; Jocham, Sophie; Wiener, Andreas; Löcken, Andreas; Groenefeld, Judith; Ahlmann, Martina; Groll, Andreas H

    2017-12-01

    Influenza is an important cause of infectious morbidity in pediatric cancer patients. We conducted a single-center survey to explore adherence and attitudes towards the recommended annual influenza vaccination. Self-administered, standardized questionnaires were distributed to 143 staff members and 264 families. Items analyzed included demographic data, knowledge about influenza, history of prior influenza infections and vaccinations, routes of information and education, and attitudes towards the recommended influenza. Variables associated with vaccination were explored by univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred six staff members with patient contact and 139 primary caretakers completed the questionnaire. Fifty-nine percent of staff members and 60% of the caretakers provided correct answers to all four knowledge questions; 32 and 54% reported a history of prior influenza, and 61 and 47% had received at least one influenza vaccination in the past. Vaccination rates for the previous season were 47, 34, 30, 25, and 29% in staff members, primary caretakers, their partners, diseased children, and their siblings, respectively. Main motivations (>75% in ≥ 1 cohort) for vaccination were prevention of influenza disease and concerns to transmit it to others (77-100%) and reasons for not being immunized concerns of adverse effects and use of alternative protection (33-83%). Variables significantly associated with vaccination by multivariate analysis included receipt of influenza vaccinations in the past (OR 2.2-20.5), recommendations by health care providers (OR 4.8-45.5), a lower level of education (caretakers; OR 2.2), and younger age (children; OR 0.9). The results of this survey indicate insufficient vaccination rates and provide potential approaches for improved vaccination strategies in the setting of pediatric cancer care.

  4. Examining Perceptions about Mandatory Influenza Vaccination of Healthcare Workers through Online Comments on News Stories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lei

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to understand online public perceptions of the debate surrounding the choice of annual influenza vaccinations or wearing masks as a condition of employment for healthcare workers, such as the one enacted in British Columbia in August 2012.Four national and 82 local (British Columbia Canadian online news sites were searched for articles posted between August 2012 and May 2013 containing the words "healthcare workers" and "mandatory influenza vaccinations/immunizations" or "mandatory flu shots and healthcare workers." We included articles from sources that predominantly concerned our topic of interest and that generated reader comments. Two researchers coded the unedited comments using thematic analysis, categorizing codes to allow themes to emerge. In addition to themes, the comments were categorized by: 1 sentiment towards influenza vaccines; 2 support for mandatory vaccination policies; 3 citing of reference materials or statistics; 4 self-identified health-care worker status; and 5 sharing of a personal story.1163 comments made by 648 commenters responding to 36 articles were analyzed. Popular themes included concerns about freedom of choice, vaccine effectiveness, patient safety, and distrust in government, public health, and the pharmaceutical industry. Almost half (48% of commenters expressed a negative sentiment toward the influenza vaccine, 28% were positive, 20% were neutral, and 4% expressed mixed sentiment. Of those who commented on the policy, 75% did not support the condition to work policy, while 25% were in favour. Of the commenters, 11% self-identified as healthcare workers, 13% shared personal stories, and 18% cited a reference or statistic.The perception of the influenza vaccine in the comment sections of online news sites is fairly poor. Public health agencies should consider including online forums, comment sections, and social media sites as part of their communication channels to correct

  5. Prevention and Control of Seasonal Influenza with Vaccines: Recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices - United States, 2017-18 Influenza Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grohskopf, Lisa A; Sokolow, Leslie Z; Broder, Karen R; Walter, Emmanuel B; Bresee, Joseph S; Fry, Alicia M; Jernigan, Daniel B

    2017-08-25

    This report updates the 2016-17 recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) regarding the use of seasonal influenza vaccines (MMWR Recomm Rep 2016;65[No. RR-5]). Routine annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all persons aged ≥6 months who do not have contraindications. A licensed, recommended, and age-appropriate vaccine should be used.For the 2017-18 season, quadrivalent and trivalent influenza vaccines will be available. Inactivated influenza vaccines (IIVs) will be available in trivalent (IIV3) and quadrivalent (IIV4) formulations. Recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV) will be available in trivalent (RIV3) and quadrivalent (RIV4) formulations. Live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV4) is not recommended for use during the 2017-18 season due to concerns about its effectiveness against (H1N1)pdm09 viruses during the 2013-14 and 2015-16 seasons. Recommendations for different vaccine types and specific populations are discussed. No preferential recommendation is made for one influenza vaccine product over another for persons for whom more than one licensed, recommended product is available.Updates to the recommendations described in this report reflect discussions during public meetings of ACIP held on October 20, 2016; February 22, 2017; and June 21, 2017. New and updated information in this report includes the following:•Vaccine viruses included in the 2017-18 U.S. trivalent influenza vaccines will be an A/Michigan/45/2015 (H1N1)pdm09-like virus, an A/Hong Kong/4801/2014 (H3N2)-like virus, and a B/Brisbane/60/2008-like virus (Victoria lineage). Quadrivalent influenza vaccines will contain these three viruses and an additional influenza B vaccine virus, a B/Phuket/3073/2013-like virus (Yamagata lineage).• Information on recent licensures and labelling changes is discussed, including licensure of Afluria Quadrivalent (IIV4; Seqirus, Parkville, Victoria, Australia); Flublok Quadrivalent (RIV4; Protein Sciences, Meriden

  6. Reducing Racial Disparities in Influenza Vaccination Among Children With Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Zimmerman, Richard K; Moehling, Krissy K; Conti, Tracey; Allred, Norma J; Reis, Evelyn C

    2016-01-01

    A multifaceted intervention to raise influenza vaccination rates was tested among children with asthma. In a pre/post study design, 18 primary care practices implemented the 4 Pillars Immunization Toolkit along with other strategies. The primary outcome was the difference in influenza vaccination rates at each practice among children with asthma between the baseline year (before the intervention) and at the end of year 2 (after the intervention), both overall and by race (White vs. non-White). Influenza vaccination rates increased significantly in 13 of 18 practices. The percentage of vaccinated non-White children increased from 46% to 61% (p vaccinated White children increased from 58% to 65% (p vaccination was significantly lower for non-White children before the intervention (odds ratio = 0.66; 95% confidence interval = 0.59-0.73; p vaccination uptake and reduced racial disparities among children with asthma. Copyright © 2016 National Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners. All rights reserved.

  7. Vaccines for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: the Future Is Now.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy F

    2015-05-01

    Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Vaccines for Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae: the Future Is Now

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Infections due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae result in enormous global morbidity in two clinical settings: otitis media in children and respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Recurrent otitis media affects up to 20% of children and results in hearing loss, delays in speech and language development and, in developing countries, chronic suppurative otitis media. Infections in people with COPD result in clinic and emergency room visits, hospital admissions, and respiratory failure. An effective vaccine would prevent morbidity, help control health care costs, and reduce antibiotic use, a major contributor to the global crisis in bacterial antibiotic resistance. The widespread use of the pneumococcal conjugate vaccines is causing a relative increase in H. influenzae otitis media. The partial protection against H. influenzae otitis media induced by the pneumococcal H. influenzae protein D conjugate vaccine represents a proof of principle of the feasibility of a vaccine for nontypeable H. influenzae. An ideal vaccine antigen should be conserved among strains, have abundant epitopes on the bacterial surface, be immunogenic, and induce protective immune responses. Several surface proteins of H. influenzae have been identified as potential vaccine candidates and are in various stages of development. With continued research, progress toward a broadly effective vaccine to prevent infections caused by nontypeable H. influenzae is expected over the next several years. PMID:25787137

  9. A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza infection: vaccine inefficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Nehemya; Drori, Yaron; Pando, Rakefet; Glatman-Freedman, Aharona; Sefty, Hanna; Bassal, Ravit; Stein, Yaniv; Shohat, Tamy; Mendelson, Ella; Hindiyeh, Musa; Mandelboim, Michal

    2017-05-16

    The last influenza pandemic, caused by the swine A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus, began in North America at 2009. Since then, the World Health Organization (WHO) recommended integration of the swine-based virus A/California/07/2009 strain in yearly vaccinations. Yet, infections with A(H1N1)pdm09 have continued in subsequent years. The reasons for this are currently unknown. During the 2015-2016 influenza season, we noted an increased prevalence of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus infection in Israel. Our phylogenetic analysis indicated that the circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 strains belonged to 6B.1 and 6B.2 clades and differed from the vaccinating strain, with approximately 18 amino acid differences found between the circulating strains and the immunizing A/California/07/2009 strain. Hemmaglutination inhibition (HI) assays demonstrated higher antibodies titer against the A/California/07/2009 vaccinating strain as compared to the circulating Israeli strains. We thus suggest that the current vaccination was not sufficiently effective and propose inclusion of the current circulating A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza viruses in the annual vaccine composition.

  10. Mid-Season Influenza Vaccine Effectiveness Estimates for the 2016-2017 Influenza Season (Open Access Publisher’s Version)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    VE) and findings are shared annually at the Food and Drug Administration’s advisory committee meet- ing on U.S. influenza vaccine strain selec- tion...This research has been conducted in compliance with all applicable federal regulations governing the protection of human subjects in research (Pro...evidence-based reports on subjects relevant to the health, safety , and well-being of military service members and other beneficiaries of the Military Health

  11. School-Located Influenza Vaccinations: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szilagyi, Peter G; Schaffer, Stanley; Rand, Cynthia M; Vincelli, Phyllis; Eagan, Ashley; Goldstein, Nicolas P N; Hightower, A Dirk; Younge, Mary; Blumkin, Aaron; Albertin, Christina S; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Humiston, Sharon G

    2016-11-01

    Assess impact of offering school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) clinics using both Web-based and paper consent upon overall influenza vaccination rates among elementary school children. We conducted a cluster-randomized trial (stratified by suburban/urban districts) in upstate New York in 2014-2015. We randomized 44 elementary schools, selected similar pairs of schools within districts, and allocated schools to SLIV versus usual care (control). Parents of children at SLIV schools were sent information and vaccination consent forms via e-mail, backpack fliers, or both (depending on school preferences) regarding school vaccine clinics. Health department nurses conducted vaccine clinics and billed insurers. For all children registered at SLIV/control schools, we compared receipt of influenza vaccination anywhere (primary outcome). The 44 schools served 19 776 eligible children in 2014-2015. Children in SLIV schools had higher influenza vaccination rates than children in control schools county-wide (54.1% vs 47.4%, P vaccination in previous season) confirmed bivariate findings. Among parents who consented for SLIV, nearly half of those notified by backpack fliers and four-fifths of those notified by e-mail consented online. In suburban districts, SLIV did not substitute for primary care influenza vaccination. In urban schools, some substitution occurred. SLIV raised seasonal influenza vaccination rates county-wide and in both suburban and urban settings. SLIV did not substitute for primary care vaccinations in suburban settings where pediatricians often preorder influenza vaccine but did substitute somewhat in urban settings. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  12. Seasonal influenza vaccine policies, recommendations and use in the World Health Organization’s Western Pacific Region Original Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Members of the Western Pacific Region Global Influenza Surveillance and Response System

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Vaccination is the most effective way to prevent seasonal influenza and its severe outcomes. The objective of our study was to synthesize information on seasonal influenza vaccination policies, recommendations and practices in place in 2011 for all countries and areas in the Western Pacific Region of the World Health Organization (WHO. Methods: Data were collected via a questionnaire on seasonal influenza vaccination policies, recommendations and practices in place in 2011. Results: Thirty-six of the 37 countries and areas (97% responded to the survey. Eighteen (50% reported having established seasonal influenza vaccination policies, an additional seven (19% reported having recommendations for risk groups for seasonal influenza vaccination only and 11 (30% reported having no policies or recommendations in place. Of the 25 countries and areas with policies or recommendations, health-care workers and the elderly were most frequently recommended for vaccination; 24 (96% countries and areas recommended vaccinating these groups, followed by pregnant women (19 [76%], people with chronic illness (18 [72%] and children (15 [60%]. Twenty-six (72% countries and areas reported having seasonal influenza vaccines available through public funding, private market purchase or both. Most of these countries and areas purchased only enough vaccine to cover 25% or less of their populations. Discussion: In light of the new WHO position paper on influenza vaccines published in 2012 and the increasing availability of country-specific data, countries and areas should consider reviewing or developing their seasonal influenza vaccination policies to reduce morbidity and mortality associated with annual epidemics and as part of ongoing efforts for pandemic preparedness.

  13. Effectiveness of adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines (Inflexal V ® and Fluad ® ) in preventing hospitalization for influenza and pneumonia in the elderly: a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, Roberto; Amicizia, Daniela; Lai, Piero Luigi; Rossi, Stefania; Panatto, Donatella

    2013-01-01

    Annual vaccination is the main mean of preventing influenza in the elderly. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the adjuvanted seasonal influenza vaccines available in Italy in preventing hospitalization for influenza and pneumonia, a matched case-control study was performed in elderly subjects during the 2010-2011 season in Genoa (Italy). Cases and controls were matched in a 1:1 ratio according to gender, age, socio-economic status and type of influenza vaccine. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated as IVE = [(1-OR)x100] and crude odds ratios were estimated through conditional logistic regression models. Adjusted odds ratios were estimated through multivariable logistic models.   In the study area, influenza activity was moderate in the 2010-2011 season, with optimal matching between circulating viruses and vaccine strains. We recruited 187 case-control pairs; 46.5% of cases and 79.1% of controls had been vaccinated. The adjuvanted influenza vaccines (Fluad (®) considered together with Inflexal V (®) ) were associated with a significant reduction in the risk of hospitalization, their effectiveness being 94.8% (CI 77.1-98.8). Adjusted vaccine effectiveness was 95.2% (CI 62.8-99.4) and 87.8 (CI 0.0-98.9) for Inflexal V (®) and Fluad (®) , respectively. Both adjuvanted vaccines proved effective, although the results displayed statistical significance only for Inflexal V (®) (p = 0.004), while for Fluad (®) statistical significance was not reached (p = 0.09). Our study is the first to provide information on the effectiveness of Inflexal V (®) in terms of reducing hospitalizations for influenza or pneumonia in the elderly, and demonstrates that this vaccine yields a high degree of protection and that its use would generate considerable saving for the National Health Service.

  14. Serological response to influenza vaccination among children vaccinated for multiple influenza seasons.

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    Sajjad Rafiq

    Full Text Available To evaluate if, among children aged 3 to 15 years, influenza vaccination for multiple seasons affects the proportion sero-protected.Participants were 131 healthy children aged 3-15 years. Participants were vaccinated with trivalent inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine (TIV over the 2005-06, 2006-07 and 2007-8 seasons. Number of seasons vaccinated were categorized as one (2007-08; two (2007-08 and 2006-07 or 2007-08 and 2005-06 or three (2005-06, 2006-07, and 2007-08. Pre- and post-vaccination sera were collected four weeks apart. Antibody titres were determined by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI assay using antigens to A/Solomon Islands/03/06 (H1N1, A/Wisconsin/67/05 (H3N2 and B/Malaysia/2506/04. The proportions sero-protected were compared by number of seasons vaccinated using cut-points for seroprotection of 1:40 vs. 1:320. The proportions of children sero-protected against H1N1 and H3N2 was high (>85% regardless of number of seasons vaccinated and regardless of cut-point for seroprotection. For B Malaysia there was no change in proportions sero-protected by number of seasons vaccinated; however the proportions protected were lower than for H1N1 and H3N2, and there was a lower proportion sero-protected when the higher, compared to lower, cut-point was used for sero-protection.The proportion of children sero-protected is not affected by number of seasons vaccinated.

  15. A Systematic Review of Recent Advances in Equine Influenza Vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillot, Romain

    2014-01-01

    Equine influenza (EI) is a major respiratory disease of horses, which is still causing substantial outbreaks worldwide despite several decades of surveillance and prevention. Alongside quarantine procedures, vaccination is widely used to prevent or limit spread of the disease. The panel of EI vaccines commercially available is probably one of the most varied, including whole inactivated virus vaccines, Immuno-Stimulating Complex adjuvanted vaccines (ISCOM and ISCOM-Matrix), a live attenuated equine influenza virus (EIV) vaccine and a recombinant poxvirus-vectored vaccine. Several other strategies of vaccination are also evaluated. This systematic review reports the advances of EI vaccines during the last few years as well as some of the mechanisms behind the inefficient or sub-optimal response of horses to vaccination. PMID:26344892

  16. Who Participates in Seasonal Influenza Vaccination? Past Behavior Moderates the Prediction of Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Ernsting

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Vaccination effectively prevents seasonal influenza. To promote vaccination adherence, it is necessary to understand the motivational process that underlies vaccination behavior. This was examined along with the moderating influence of past behavior on intention formation. Methods. German employees ( = 594 completed questionnaires at baseline and at 7-month followup. Regression analyses were conducted for mediation and moderated mediation. Results. Intention at Time 1 mediated the effect of risk perception, and positive and negative outcome expectancies on Time 2 vaccination. Past behavior moderated this effect: there was a mediation effect for risk perception and outcome expectancies only for those individuals who did not participate annually. Conclusions. Risk perception and outcome expectancies influenced intentions to receive vaccination, which in turn predicted participation. Hence, these social-cognitive variables could be targeted in vaccination campaigns to increase intentions. However, vaccination experience affected the formation of intentions and should be accounted for when developing interventions.

  17. Impact of vaccination on influenza mortality in children Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ramos, Evelyn L; Monárrez-Espino, Joel; Noyola, Daniel E

    2017-03-01

    Influenza is a leading cause of respiratory tract infections among children. In Mexico, influenza vaccination was included in the National Immunization Program since 2004. However, the population health effects of the vaccine on children have not been fully described. Thus, we estimated the impact of influenza immunization in terms of mortality associated with this virus among children younger than 5years of age in Mexico. Mortality rates and years of life lost associated with influenza were estimated using national mortality register data for the period 1998-2012. Age-stratified and cause-specific mortality rates were estimated for all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular events. Influenza-associated mortality was compared between the period prior to introduction of the influenza vaccine as part of the National Immunization Program (1998-2004) and the period thereafter (2004-2012). During the 1998-2012 winter seasons, the average number of all-cause, respiratory and cardiovascular deaths attributable to influenza were 1186, 794 and 21, respectively. Influenza-associated mortality was higher prior to the vaccination period than after influenza was included in the immunization program for all-cause (mean 1660 vs. 780) and respiratory (mean 1063 vs. 563) mortality, but no reduction was seen for cardiovascular mortality. The proportion of all-cause and respiratory deaths attributable to influenza was significantly lower in the post-vaccine period compared with the pre-vaccine period (Pinfluenza vaccination within the Mexican Immunization Program was associated with a reduction in mortality rates attributable to this virus among children younger than 5years of age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Barriers of Influenza Vaccination Intention and Behavior – A Systematic Review of Influenza Vaccine Hesitancy, 2005 – 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Philipp; Rauber, Dorothee; Betsch, Cornelia; Lidolt, Gianni; Denker, Marie-Luisa

    2017-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccine hesitancy is a significant threat to global efforts to reduce the burden of seasonal and pandemic influenza. Potential barriers of influenza vaccination need to be identified to inform interventions to raise awareness, influenza vaccine acceptance and uptake. Objective This review aims to (1) identify relevant studies and extract individual barriers of seasonal and pandemic influenza vaccination for risk groups and the general public; and (2) map knowledge gaps in understanding influenza vaccine hesitancy to derive directions for further research and inform interventions in this area. Methods Thirteen databases covering the areas of Medicine, Bioscience, Psychology, Sociology and Public Health were searched for peer-reviewed articles published between the years 2005 and 2016. Following the PRISMA approach, 470 articles were selected and analyzed for significant barriers to influenza vaccine uptake or intention. The barriers for different risk groups and flu types were clustered according to a conceptual framework based on the Theory of Planned Behavior and discussed using the 4C model of reasons for non-vaccination. Results Most studies were conducted in the American and European region. Health care personnel (HCP) and the general public were the most studied populations, while parental decisions for children at high risk were under-represented. This study also identifies understudied concepts. A lack of confidence, inconvenience, calculation and complacency were identified to different extents as barriers to influenza vaccine uptake in risk groups. Conclusion Many different psychological, contextual, sociodemographic and physical barriers that are specific to certain risk groups were identified. While most sociodemographic and physical variables may be significantly related to influenza vaccine hesitancy, they cannot be used to explain its emergence or intensity. Psychological determinants were meaningfully related to uptake and should

  19. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christenson, Brith; Pauksen, Karlis; Sylvan, Staffan P E

    2008-04-28

    The present prospective study was conducted from 2003-2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area.The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS) even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31%) received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11%) were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34%) individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21%) the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39%) individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28%) the pneumococcal vaccine.Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine). Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age). For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75-84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza season 2005. The present study confirmed the

  20. Effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccines in elderly persons in years of low influenza activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvan Staffan PE

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The present prospective study was conducted from 2003–2005, among all individuals 65 years and older in Uppsala County, a region with 300 000 inhabitants situated close to the Stockholm urban area. The objective of this study was to assess the preventive effect of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in reducing hospitalisation and length of hospital stay (LOHS even during periods of low influenza activity. The specificity of the apparent vaccine associations were evaluated in relation to the influenza seasons. Results In 2003, the total study population was 41,059, of which 12,907 (31% received influenza vaccine of these, 4,447 (11% were administered the pneumococcal vaccine. In 2004, 14,799 (34% individuals received the influenza vaccine and 8,843 (21% the pneumococcal vaccine and in 2005 16,926 (39% individuals were given the influenza vaccine and 12,340 (28% the pneumococcal vaccine. Our findings indicated that 35% of the vaccinated cohort belonged to a medical risk category (mainly those persons that received the pneumococcal vaccine. Data on hospitalisation and mortality during the 3-year period were obtained from the administrative database of the Uppsala county council. During the influenza seasons, reduction of hospital admissions and significantly shorter in-hospital stay for influenza was observed in the vaccinated cohort (below 80 years of age. For individuals who also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, a significant reduction of hospital admissions and of in-hospital stay was observed for invasive pneumococcal disease and for pneumococcal pneumonia. Effectiveness was observed for cardiac failure even in persons that also had received the pneumococcal vaccine, despite that the pneumococcal vaccinated mainly belonged to a medical risk category. Reduction of death from all causes was observed during the influenza season of 2004, in the 75–84-year old age group and in all age-groups during the influenza

  1. Patients with humoral primary immunodeficiency do not develop protective anti-influenza antibody titers after vaccination with trivalent subunit influenza vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Assen, Sander; Holvast, Albert; Telgt, Denise S.C.; Benne, Cornelis A.; de Haan, Aalzen; Westra, Johanna; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    Yearly influenza vaccination is recommended for patients with humoral primary immunodeficiency (hPID). However, humoral responses following vaccination can be expected to be reduced in these patients.The efficacy of influenza vaccination in patients with hPID, anti-influenza antibody responses was

  2. Influenza vaccination in children being treated with chemotherapy for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossen, Ginette M; Kremer, Leontien C M; van de Wetering, Marianne D

    2013-08-01

    Influenza infection is a potential cause of severe morbidity in children with cancer; therefore vaccination against influenza is recommended. However, data are conflicting regarding the immune response to influenza vaccination in children with cancer, and the value of vaccination remains unclear. 1. To assess the efficacy of influenza vaccination in stimulating an immunological response in children with cancer during chemotherapy, compared with control groups.2. To assess the efficacy of influenza vaccination in preventing confirmed influenza and influenza-like illness and/or in stimulating immunological response in children with cancer treated with chemotherapy, compared with placebo, no intervention or different dosage schedules.3. To identify the adverse effects associated with influenza vaccines in children with cancer treated with chemotherapy, compared with other control groups. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE (1966 to 2012) and EMBASE (1980 to 2012) up to August 2012. We also searched reference lists of relevant articles and conference proceedings of the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy (ICAAC), the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer (MASCC) and the International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP). We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) in which the serological response to influenza vaccination of children with cancer was compared with that of control groups. We also considered RCTs and CCTs that compared the effects of influenza vaccination on clinical response and/or immunological response in children with cancer being treated with chemotherapy, compared with placebo, no intervention or different dosage schedules. Two independent review authors assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the data. We included 1 RCT and 9 CCTs

  3. Health-care worker vaccination for influenza: strategies and controversies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derber, Catherine J; Shankaran, Shivanjali

    2012-12-01

    Influenza infections cause significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world, and vaccination rates of health-care workers remain well below target goals. Strategies for increasing vaccination rates include mandatory vaccination of health-care workers, mandatory declination, employee incentives, intensive education, increased access to vaccines, and the use of social media to inform employees of the safety and efficacy of vaccination. While these strategies in combination have been shown to be effective in increasing vaccination rates, personal and religious objections, as well as the potential for infringing on individual autonomy, remain challenges in our efforts to bring health-care worker vaccination rates up to target goals.

  4. Self-reported prenatal influenza vaccination and early childhood vaccine series completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Erika L

    2016-07-01

    No studies have examined associations between prenatal vaccination and childhood vaccination. Mothers who refuse influenza vaccinations during pregnancy report similar attitudes and beliefs to those who refuse vaccinations for their children. The objective of this study was to examine the association between self-reported prenatal influenza vaccination and early childhood vaccination. A retrospective cohort study was conducted with existing surveillance data from 4022 mothers who responded to the 2009-2011 Minnesota Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System survey and child vaccination records from the Minnesota Immunization Information Connection database. The childhood vaccine series outcome included the following vaccines: diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis; poliovirus; measles, mumps, and rubella; Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib); hepatitis B; varicella; and pneumococcal conjugate. To evaluate the association between self-reported prenatal influenza vaccination and early childhood vaccination, unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression was used to estimate log odds for childhood vaccination status, while margins post-estimation commands were used to obtain predicted probabilities and risk differences. Vaccine series completion was 10.86% higher (95% confidence interval (CI) 7.33%-14.40%, adjusted and weighted model) in children of mothers who had a prenatal influenza vaccine compared to those who did not. For individual vaccines in the recommended series, risk differences ranged from 7.83% (95% CI 5.37%, 10.30%) for the Hib vaccine to 10.06% (95% CI 7.29%, 12.83%) for the hepatitis B vaccine. Self-reported prenatal influenza vaccination was associated with increased early childhood vaccination. More research is needed to confirm these results and identify potential intervention strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Considerations for sustainable influenza vaccine production in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nannei, Claudia; Chadwick, Christopher; Fatima, Hiba; Goldin, Shoshanna; Grubo, Myriam; Ganim, Alexandra

    2016-10-26

    Through its Global Action Plan for Influenza Vaccines (GAP), the World Health Organization (WHO) in collaboration with the United States Department of Health and Human Services has produced a checklist to support policy-makers and influenza vaccine manufacturers in identifying key technological, political, financial, and logistical issues affecting the sustainability of influenza vaccine production. This checklist highlights actions in five key areas that are beneficial for establishing successful local vaccine manufacturing. These five areas comprise: (1) the policy environment and health-care systems; (2) surveillance systems and influenza evidence; (3) product development and manufacturing; (4) product approval and regulation; and (5) communication to support influenza vaccination. Incorporating the checklist into national vaccine production programmes has identified the policy gaps and next steps for countries involved in GAP's Technology Transfer Initiative. Lessons learnt from country experiences provide context and insight that complement the checklist's goal of simplifying the complexities of influenza prevention, preparedness, and vaccine manufacturing. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. The Possible Impact of Vaccination for Seasonal Influenza on Emergence of Pandemic Influenza via Reassortment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu-Sheng Zhang

    Full Text Available One pathway through which pandemic influenza strains might emerge is reassortment from coinfection of different influenza A viruses. Seasonal influenza vaccines are designed to target the circulating strains, which intuitively decreases the prevalence of coinfection and the chance of pandemic emergence due to reassortment. However, individual-based analyses on 2009 pandemic influenza show that the previous seasonal vaccination may increase the risk of pandemic A(H1N1 pdm09 infection. In view of pandemic influenza preparedness, it is essential to understand the overall effect of seasonal vaccination on pandemic emergence via reassortment.In a previous study we applied a population dynamics approach to investigate the effect of infection-induced cross-immunity on reducing such a pandemic risk. Here the model was extended by incorporating vaccination for seasonal influenza to assess its potential role on the pandemic emergence via reassortment and its effect in protecting humans if a pandemic does emerge. The vaccination is assumed to protect against the target strains but only partially against other strains. We find that a universal seasonal vaccine that provides full-spectrum cross-immunity substantially reduces the opportunity of pandemic emergence. However, our results show that such effectiveness depends on the strength of infection-induced cross-immunity against any novel reassortant strain. If it is weak, the vaccine that induces cross-immunity strongly against non-target resident strains but weakly against novel reassortant strains, can further depress the pandemic emergence; if it is very strong, the same kind of vaccine increases the probability of pandemic emergence.Two types of vaccines are available: inactivated and live attenuated, only live attenuated vaccines can induce heterosubtypic immunity. Current vaccines are effective in controlling circulating strains; they cannot always help restrain pandemic emergence because of the

  7. Maternal influenza vaccine strategies in Kenya: Which approach would have the greatest impact on disease burden in pregnant women and young infants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMorrow, Meredith L; Emukule, Gideon O; Obor, David; Nyawanda, Bryan; Otieno, Nancy A; Makokha, Caroline; Mott, Joshua A; Bresee, Joseph S; Reed, Carrie

    2017-01-01

    Recent influenza surveillance data from Africa suggest an important burden of influenza-associated morbidity and mortality. In tropical countries where influenza virus transmission may not be confined to a single season alternative strategies for vaccine distribution via antenatal care (ANC) or semiannual campaigns should be considered. Using data on monthly influenza disease burden in women of child-bearing age and infants aged 0-5 months in Kenya from 2010-2014, we estimated the number of outcomes (illnesses, medical visits, hospitalizations, and deaths) that occurred and that may have been averted through influenza vaccination of pregnant women using: 1) a year-round immunization strategy through ANC, 2) annual vaccination campaigns, and 3) semiannual vaccination campaigns. During 2010-2014, influenza resulted in an estimated 279,047 illnesses, 36,276 medical visits, 1612 hospitalizations and 243 deaths in pregnant women and 157,053 illnesses, 65,177 medical visits, 4197 hospitalizations, and 755 deaths in infants aged 0-5 months in Kenya. Depending on the mode of distribution and the vaccine coverage achieved, 12.8-31.4% of influenza-associated disease in pregnant women and 11.6-22.1% in infants aged 0-5 months might have been prevented through maternal influenza immunization. In this model, point estimates for influenza-associated disease averted through maternal vaccination delivered year-round in ANC or semiannually in campaigns were higher than vaccination delivered in a single annual campaign, but confidence intervals overlapped. Vaccinating pregnant women against influenza can reduce the burden of influenza-associated illness, hospitalization and death in both pregnant women and their young infants. Alternative immunization strategies may avert more influenza-associated disease in countries where influenza virus transmission occurs throughout the year.

  8. Maternal influenza vaccine strategies in Kenya: Which approach would have the greatest impact on disease burden in pregnant women and young infants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meredith L McMorrow

    Full Text Available Recent influenza surveillance data from Africa suggest an important burden of influenza-associated morbidity and mortality. In tropical countries where influenza virus transmission may not be confined to a single season alternative strategies for vaccine distribution via antenatal care (ANC or semiannual campaigns should be considered.Using data on monthly influenza disease burden in women of child-bearing age and infants aged 0-5 months in Kenya from 2010-2014, we estimated the number of outcomes (illnesses, medical visits, hospitalizations, and deaths that occurred and that may have been averted through influenza vaccination of pregnant women using: 1 a year-round immunization strategy through ANC, 2 annual vaccination campaigns, and 3 semiannual vaccination campaigns.During 2010-2014, influenza resulted in an estimated 279,047 illnesses, 36,276 medical visits, 1612 hospitalizations and 243 deaths in pregnant women and 157,053 illnesses, 65,177 medical visits, 4197 hospitalizations, and 755 deaths in infants aged 0-5 months in Kenya. Depending on the mode of distribution and the vaccine coverage achieved, 12.8-31.4% of influenza-associated disease in pregnant women and 11.6-22.1% in infants aged 0-5 months might have been prevented through maternal influenza immunization. In this model, point estimates for influenza-associated disease averted through maternal vaccination delivered year-round in ANC or semiannually in campaigns were higher than vaccination delivered in a single annual campaign, but confidence intervals overlapped.Vaccinating pregnant women against influenza can reduce the burden of influenza-associated illness, hospitalization and death in both pregnant women and their young infants. Alternative immunization strategies may avert more influenza-associated disease in countries where influenza virus transmission occurs throughout the year.

  9. Clinician-parent discussions about influenza vaccination of children and their association with vaccine acceptance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Annika M; Robinson, Jeffrey D; Lepere, Katherine; Cunningham, Morgan; Etsekson, Nicole; Opel, Douglas J

    2017-05-09

    To examine how clinicians communicate with parents about influenza vaccination and the effect of these communication behaviors on parental vaccine decision-making. We performed a secondary analysis of data obtained from a cross-sectional observational study in which health supervision visits between pediatric clinicians and English-speaking parents of young children were videotaped. Eligible visits occurred during the 2011-2012 and 2013-2014 influenza seasons, included children ≥6months, and contained an influenza vaccine discussion. A coding scheme of 10 communication behaviors was developed and applied to each visit. Associations between clinician communication behaviors and parental verbal vaccine acceptance and parental visit experience were examined using bivariate analysis and generalized linear mixed models. Fifty visits involving 17 clinicians from 8 practices were included in analysis. The proportion of parents who accepted influenza vaccine was higher when clinicians initiated influenza vaccine recommendations using presumptive rather than participatory formats (94% vs. 28%, pinfluenza vaccine concurrent with (vs. separate from) recommendations for other vaccines due at the visit (83% vs. 33%, pinfluenza vaccine recommendations, pursuit in the face of resistance, and concurrent vaccine recommendations appear to increase parental acceptance of influenza vaccine without negatively affecting visit experience. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The test-negative design for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael L; Nelson, Jennifer C

    2013-04-19

    The test-negative design has emerged in recent years as the preferred method for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) in observational studies. However, the methodologic basis of this design has not been formally developed. In this paper we develop the rationale and underlying assumptions of the test-negative study. Under the test-negative design for influenza VE, study subjects are all persons who seek care for an acute respiratory illness (ARI). All subjects are tested for influenza infection. Influenza VE is estimated from the ratio of the odds of vaccination among subjects testing positive for influenza to the odds of vaccination among subjects testing negative. With the assumptions that (a) the distribution of non-influenza causes of ARI does not vary by influenza vaccination status, and (b) VE does not vary by health care-seeking behavior, the VE estimate from the sample can generalized to the full source population that gave rise to the study sample. Based on our derivation of this design, we show that test-negative studies of influenza VE can produce biased VE estimates if they include persons seeking care for ARI when influenza is not circulating or do not adjust for calendar time. The test-negative design is less susceptible to bias due to misclassification of infection and to confounding by health care-seeking behavior, relative to traditional case-control or cohort studies. The cost of the test-negative design is the additional, difficult-to-test assumptions that incidence of non-influenza respiratory infections is similar between vaccinated and unvaccinated groups within any stratum of care-seeking behavior, and that influenza VE does not vary across care-seeking strata. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Influenza Vaccination Coverage among School Employees: Assessing Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Perio, Marie A.; Wiegand, Douglas M.; Brueck, Scott E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Influenza can spread among students, teachers, and staff in school settings. Vaccination is the most effective method to prevent influenza. We determined 2012-2013 influenza vaccination coverage among school employees, assessed knowledge and attitudes regarding the vaccine, and determined factors associated with vaccine receipt.…

  12. Plant-produced recombinant influenza A vaccines based on the M2e peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardanova, Eugenia S; Ravin, Nikolai V

    2018-03-09

    Influenza is a widely distributed infection that almost annually causes seasonal epidemics. The current egg-based platforms for influenza vaccine production are facing a number of challenges and are failing to satisfy the global demand in the case of pandemics due to the long production time. Recombinant vaccines are an alternative that can be quickly produced in high quantities in standard expression systems. Plants may become a promising biofactory for the large-scale production of recombinant proteins due to low cost, scalability, and safety. Plant-based expression systems have been used to produce recombinant vaccines against influenza based on two targets; the major surface antigen hemagglutinin and the transmembrane protein M2. Different forms of recombinant hemagglutinin were successfully expressed in plants, and some plant-produced vaccines based on hemagglutinin were successfully tested in clinical trials. However, these vaccines remain strain specific, while the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 protein (M2e) could be used for the development of a universal influenza vaccine. In this review, the state of the art in developing plant-produced influenza vaccines based on M2e is presented and placed in perspective. A number of strategies to produce M2e in an immunogenic form in plants have been reported, including its presentation on the surface of plant viruses or virus-like particles formed by capsid proteins, linkage to bacterial flagellin, and targeting to protein bodies. Some M2e-based vaccine candidates were produced at high levels (up to 1 mg/g of fresh plant tissue) and were shown to be capable of stimulating broad-range protective immunity. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Knowledge of and Attitudes to Influenza Vaccination among Community Pharmacists in Catalonia (Spain). 2013-2014 Season: A Cross Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Diana; Soldevila, Núria; Guayta-Escolies, Rafel; Lozano, Pau; Rius, Pilar; Gascón, Pilar; Domínguez, Angela

    2017-07-11

    Annual recommendations on influenza seasonal vaccination include community pharmacists, who have low vaccination coverage. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between influenza vaccination in community pharmacists and their knowledge of and attitudes to vaccination. An online cross-sectional survey of community pharmacists in Catalonia, Spain, was conducted between September and November 2014. Sociodemographic, professional and clinical variables, the history of influenza vaccination and knowledge of and attitudes to influenza and seasonal influenza vaccination were collected. The survey response rate was 7.33% (506 out of 6906); responses from 463 community pharmacists were included in the final analyses. Analyses were performed using multivariable logistic regression models and stepwise backward selection method for variable selection. The influenza vaccination coverage in season 2013-2014 was 25.1%. There was an association between vaccination and correct knowledge of the virus responsible for epidemics (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 1.74; 95% CI 1.03-2.95), recommending vaccination in the postpartum (aOR = 3.63; 95% CI 2.01-6.55) and concern about infecting their clients (aOR = 5.27; 95% CI 1.88-14.76). In conclusion, community pharmacists have a very low influenza vaccination coverage, are not very willing to recommend vaccination to all their customers but they are concerned about infecting their clients.

  14. The Benefits and Risks of Pandemic Influenza Vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.G. Wijnans (Leonoor)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractIn 2009 and 2010 the world experienced the first influenza pandemic of the 21st century. As the new influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus spread across the world, vaccines were being produced and licensed at an unprecedented scale and speed. In Europe, adjuvanted and non-adjuvanted H1N1pdm09

  15. 75 FR 10268 - Pandemic Influenza Vaccines-Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Office of the Secretary Pandemic Influenza Vaccines... potential to cause, sporadic human infections or have mutated to cause pandemics in humans; Whereas, these viruses may evolve into virus strains capable of causing a pandemic of human influenza because these...

  16. Missed Opportunities for Influenza Vaccination Among Hospitalized Children With Influenza at a Tertiary Care Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Suchitra; Williams, Joshua T B; Torok, Michelle R; Cunningham, Maureen A; Glodè, Mary P; Wilson, Karen M

    2016-09-01

    To identify the extent and characteristics of missed opportunities for influenza vaccination among children hospitalized with influenza at a tertiary children's hospital. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospitalized patients with polymerase chain reaction-confirmed influenza admitted to Children's Hospital Colorado from 2010 to 2014. We reviewed medical records for vaccination status and previous visits. The primary outcome was the proportion of underimmunized patients hospitalized with influenza with at least 1 missed opportunity visit (visit before influenza diagnosis in which an eligible patient did not receive the influenza vaccine). The relationship between sociodemographic characteristics and the primary outcome were examined using χ(2) tests and nonparametric tests, and variables with P vaccination. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that high-risk status (adjusted odds ratio 6.9, 95% confidence interval 3.8-12.4) was associated with increased odds of having a missed opportunity visit. Most missed opportunity visits were to subspecialty clinics (42%), and most visits (71%) occurred from September to November. More than 40% of hospitalizations for influenza in children are associated with at least 1 missed opportunity visit at a tertiary center. Our findings highlight the potential role of tertiary care institutions in increasing influenza vaccination rates among children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  17. Seasonal influenza vaccination delivery through community pharmacists in England: evaluation of the London pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkins, Katherine; van Hoek, Albert Jan; Watson, Conall; Baguelin, Marc; Choga, Lethiwe; Patel, Anika; Raj, Thara; Jit, Mark; Griffiths, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness and cost of the pan-London pharmacy initiative, a programme that allows administration of seasonal influenza vaccination to eligible patients at pharmacies. Design We analysed 2013–2015 data on vaccination uptake in pharmacies via the Sonar reporting system, and the total vaccination uptake via 2011–2015 ImmForm general practitioner (GP) reporting system data. We conducted an online survey of London pharmacists who participate in the programme to assess time use data, vaccine choice, investment costs and opinions about the programme. We conducted an online survey of London GPs to assess vaccine choice of vaccine and opinions about the pharmacy vaccine delivery programme. Setting All London boroughs. Participants London-based GPs, and pharmacies that currently offer seasonal flu vaccination. Interventions Not applicable. Main outcome measures Comparison of annual vaccine uptake in London across risk groups from years before pharmacy vaccination introduction to after pharmacy vaccination introduction. Completeness of vaccine uptake reporting data. Cost to the National Health Service (NHS) of flu vaccine delivery at pharmacies with that at GPs. Cost to pharmacists of flu delivery. Opinions of pharmacists and GPs regarding the flu vaccine pharmacy initiative. Results No significant change in the uptake of seasonal vaccination in any of the risk groups as a result of the pharmacy initiative. While on average a pharmacy-administered flu vaccine dose costs the NHS up to £2.35 less than a dose administered at a GP, a comparison of the 2 recording systems suggests there is substantial loss of data. Conclusions Flu vaccine delivery through pharmacies shows potential for improving convenience for vaccine recipients. However, there is no evidence that vaccination uptake increases and the use of 2 separate recording systems leads to time-consuming data entry and missing vaccine record data. PMID:26883237

  18. Development of Live-Attenuated Influenza Vaccines against Outbreaks of H5N1 Influenza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglei Yi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Several global outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus have increased the urgency of developing effective and safe vaccines against H5N1. Compared with H5N1 inactivated vaccines used widely, H5N1 live-attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs have advantages in vaccine efficacy, dose-saving formula, long-lasting effect, ease of administration and some cross-protective immunity. Furthermore, H5N1 LAIVs induce both humoral and cellular immune responses, especially including improved IgA production at the mucosa. The current trend of H5N1 LAIVs development is toward cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive or replication-defective vaccines, and moreover, H5N1 LAIVs plus mucosal adjuvants are promising candidates. This review provides an update on the advantages and development of H5N1 live-attenuated influenza vaccines.

  19. [Vaccination against influenza in pregnant women - safety and effectiveness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Woźniak Kosek, Agnieszka; Brydak, Lidia Bernadeta

    2013-01-01

    Influenza is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. During seasonal influenza epidemics and pandemics, pregnancy places otherwise healthy women at an increased risk of complications from influenza. The factors believed to increase the susceptibility of complicated influenza infection during pregnancy are linked to the physiologic changes, including immunologic changes (attenuation of the cell-mediated immune responses, selective suppression of T-helper 1 cell mediated immunity while the adaptive humoral immunity remains unimpaired), increased cardiac output and oxygen consumption and tidal volume. Pregnant women have similar incidence of seasonal influenza as the general population, however because of the physiological changes, they are at an increased risk of complications (including secondary pneumonia, acute respiratory insufficiency increased risk of stillbirth, premature deliveries) and death. Immunization of pregnant women against influenza is currently recommended in many countries. Vaccination against influenza with trivalent inactivated vaccine (TIV) has been proven to be safe and effective. Lack of harmful effect of TIV on pregnant women and newborns has been demonstrated in several studies: no increased risk of spontaneous abortions, preterm birth, low birth weight, congenital malformations, cesarean section have been reported. Vaccination against influenza has been proven to be effective in reducing rates and severity of the disease in vaccinated mothers and their children. Several studies revealed a decreased risk of influenza-like illnesses among mothers who were vaccinated during pregnancy but also a decreased risk of laboratory confirmed cases of influenza and hospitalizations due to influenza and its complications among newborns and infants born to vaccinated mothers. Currently available inactivated influenza vaccines are not licensed for use in infants younger than 6 months. Protection of young infants against the infection in early

  20. Efficient vaccine against pandemic influenza: combining DNA vaccination and targeted delivery to MHC class II molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grødeland, Gunnveig; Bogen, Bjarne

    2015-06-01

    There are two major limitations to vaccine preparedness in the event of devastating influenza pandemics: the time needed to generate a vaccine and rapid generation of sufficient amounts. DNA vaccination could represent a solution to these problems, but efficacy needs to be enhanced. In a separate line of research, it has been established that targeting of vaccine molecules to antigen-presenting cells enhances immune responses. We have combined the two principles by constructing DNA vaccines that encode bivalent fusion proteins; these target hemagglutinin to MHC class II molecules on antigen-presenting cells. Such DNA vaccines rapidly induce hemagglutinin-specific antibodies and T cell responses in immunized mice. Responses are long-lasting and protect mice against challenge with influenza virus. In a pandemic situation, targeted DNA vaccines could be produced and tested within a month. The novel DNA vaccines could represent a solution to pandemic preparedness in the advent of novel influenza pandemics.

  1. Possible Triggering Effect of Influenza Vaccination on Psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Tahsin Gunes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, recurrent, immune-mediated inflammatory disease and it can be provoked or exacerbated by a variety of different environmental factors, particularly infections and drugs. In addition, a possible association between vaccination and the new onset and/or exacerbation of psoriasis has been reported by a number of different authors. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of influenza vaccination on patients with psoriasis. Here, we report the findings from 43 patients suffering from psoriasis (clinical phenotypes as mixed guttate/plaque lesions, palmoplantar or scalp psoriasis whose diseases had been triggered after influenza vaccination applied in the 2009-2010 season. The short time intervals between vaccination and psoriasis flares in our patients and the lack of other possible triggers suggest that influenza vaccinations may have provocative effects on psoriasis. However, further large and controlled studies need to be carried out to confirm this relationship.

  2. Expression of hBD-2 induced by 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhenwei; Lei, Han

    2012-10-01

    Human β-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide with high activity and broad spectrum activity. hBD-2 expression may be highly elevated by microorganisms and inflammation. We reported that the majority of common vaccines used, including 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine, Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine, could induce the expression of hBD-2 in epithelial cells. Among them, the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine was effective at a lower concentration (0.5 µg/ml), while Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine and split influenza virus vaccine were effective at the concentration of 1 µg/ml. However, bacteriostatic experiments revealed that the split influenza virus vaccine was capable of inducing the highest antimicrobial activity. The medium of the 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccine treatment group had a higher antimicrobial activity than the medium of the Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine treatment group. The transcriptional regulator of hBD-2, that is, the NF-κB subunit, had a high level of activity, while the normal epithelial cells showed barely detectable activity, indicating that these vaccines have potential for clinical application.

  3. Circulating CXCR5+PD-1+ response predicts influenza vaccine antibody responses in young adults but not elderly adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herati, Ramin Sedaghat; Reuter, Morgan A; Dolfi, Douglas V; Mansfield, Kathleen D; Aung, Htin; Badwan, Osama Z; Kurupati, Raj K; Kannan, Senthil; Ertl, Hildegund; Schmader, Kenneth E; Betts, Michael R; Canaday, David H; Wherry, E John

    2014-10-01

    Although influenza vaccination is recommended for all adults annually, the incidence of vaccine failure, defined as weak or absent increase in neutralizing Ab titers, is increased in the elderly compared with young adults. The T follicular helper cell (Tfh) subset of CD4 T cells provides B cell help in germinal centers and is necessary for class-switched Ab responses. Previous studies suggested a role for circulating Tfh cells (cTfh) following influenza vaccination in adults, but cTfh have not been studied in elderly adults in whom weak vaccine responses are often observed. In this study, we studied cTfh expressing CXCR5 and programmed death-1 (PD-1). cTfh from elderly adults were present at reduced frequency, had decreased in vitro B cell help ability, and had greater expression of ICOS compared with young adults. At 7 d after inactivated influenza vaccination, cTfh correlated with influenza vaccine-specific IgM and IgG responses in young adults but not in elderly adults. In sum, we have identified aging-related changes in cTfh that correlated with reduced influenza vaccine responses. Future rational vaccine design efforts should incorporate Tfh measurement as an immune correlate of protection, particularly in the setting of aging. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Association Between Hospitalization With Community-Acquired Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza Pneumonia and Prior Receipt of Influenza Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J; Self, Wesley H; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T; Stockmann, Chris R; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R; Wunderink, Richard G; Anderson, Evan J; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M; Foppa, Ivo M; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R; Edwards, Kathryn M

    2015-10-13

    Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. To assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 at 4 US sites. In this case-control study, we used EPIC data from patients 6 months or older with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (case) and influenza-negative (control) patients with pneumonia, controlling for demographics, comorbidities, season, study site, and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1 - adjusted odds ratio) × 100%. Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) had laboratory-confirmed influenza. Twenty-eight of 162 cases (17%) with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 of 2605 controls (29%) with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI, 0.28-0.68; estimated vaccine effectiveness, 56.7%; 95% CI, 31.9%-72.5%). Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory-confirmed influenza-associated pneumonia, compared with those with pneumonia not

  5. Association between hospitalization with community acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia and prior receipt of influenza vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grijalva, Carlos G.; Zhu, Yuwei; Williams, Derek J.; Self, Wesley H.; Ampofo, Krow; Pavia, Andrew T.; Stockmann, Chris R.; McCullers, Jonathan; Arnold, Sandra R.; Wunderink, Richard G.; Anderson, Evan J.; Lindstrom, Stephen; Fry, Alicia M.; Foppa, Ivo M.; Finelli, Lyn; Bramley, Anna M.; Jain, Seema; Griffin, Marie R.; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2015-01-01

    Importance Few studies have evaluated the relationship between influenza vaccination and pneumonia, a serious complication of influenza infection. Objective Assess the association between influenza vaccination status and hospitalization for community-acquired laboratory-confirmed influenza pneumonia. Design, Setting and Participants The Etiology of Pneumonia in the Community (EPIC) study was a prospective observational multicenter study of hospitalizations for community-acquired pneumonia conducted from January 2010 through June 2012 in four US sites. We used EPIC study data from patients ≥6 months of age with laboratory-confirmed influenza infection and verified vaccination status during the influenza seasons, and excluded patients with recent hospitalization, from chronic care residential facilities, and with severe immunosuppression. Logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios, comparing the odds of vaccination between influenza-positive (cases) and influenza-negative (controls) pneumonia patients, controlling for demographics, co-morbidities, season, study site and timing of disease onset. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated as (1-odds ratio) × 100%. Exposure Influenza vaccination, verified through record review. Outcome Influenza pneumonia, confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction performed on nasal/oropharyngeal swabs. Results Overall, 2767 patients hospitalized for pneumonia were eligible for the study; 162 (5.9%) were influenza positive. Twenty-eight (17%) of 162 cases with influenza-associated pneumonia and 766 (29%) of 2605 controls with influenza-negative pneumonia had been vaccinated. The adjusted odds ratio of prior influenza vaccination between cases and controls was 0.43 (95% CI 0.28–0.68 [estimated vaccine effectiveness 56.7% (95% CI 31.9–72.5)]). Conclusions and relevance Among children and adults hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia, those with laboratory confirmed influenza

  6. Pharmacoeconomic evaluation of influenza vaccination programs in elderly in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Iannazzo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: influenza infection is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population, especially in the presence of underlying disease. Vaccination has proven effective in the reduction of influenza-like illness (ILI cases and influenza-related hospitalizations, drug consumption, primary care consultations and death. The aim of this study is to assess the economic impact in Italy of different prophylactic strategies (vaccination with a standard vaccine, with the innovative MF59® adjuvated vaccine and no vaccination comparing their costs and outcomes in the elderly population. Methods: a pharmacoeconomic simulation model to estimate costs and consequences of influenza with the three intervention strategies has been developed. Health economics and demographic data are taken from specific Italian sources, and vaccine effectiveness data are taken from published literature. Direct sanitary costs are considered according to current prices and tariffes. Results: it was estimated that 9,800,000 of the about 12,000,000 people with at least 65 years currently resident in Italy can be considered at high risk for influenza complications because of underlying chronic diseases. Absence of vaccination could lead to more than 2 millions of ILI cases, and 30,000 related deaths. The reduction of cases attainable with the implementation of a vaccination program would lead to an estimated 1.5 million cases with a standard vaccine, and to 1.3 million with a strategy based on the MF59® adjuvated vaccine. The standard vaccination strategy could produce a moderate total cost increase of about € 45,000,000 (+4.3%, whereas the use of the adjuvated vaccine would lead to an estimated saving of about € 80,000,000 (-7.9%, both compared to the null option. Cost savings are mainly related to hospital admissions avoided with the use of vaccines. Incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER of the standard vaccine versus no vaccination strategy is of

  7. The influence of altruism on influenza vaccination decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eunha; Chapman, Gretchen B; Townsend, Jeffrey P; Galvani, Alison P

    2012-09-07

    Game theory is based on the assumption that individuals act according to self-interest and make decisions that maximize their personal payoffs. To test this fundamental assumption, we conducted a survey study in the context of influenza vaccination decisions. Contrary to the assumption of self-interest, we found that altruism plays an important role in vaccination decisions. Nevertheless, altruistic motivation has not yet been considered in epidemiological models, in predictions of vaccination decisions or in the design of vaccination policies. To determine the impact of altruism on the adherence to optimal vaccination policies and on resulting disease burden, we incorporated altruism into a game-theoretic epidemiological model of influenza vaccination. We found that altruism significantly shifted vaccination decisions away from individual self-interest and towards the community optimum, greatly reducing the total cost, morbidity and mortality for the community. Therefore, promoting altruism could be a potential strategy to improve public health outcomes.

  8. Enhanced immune responses by skin vaccination with influenza subunit vaccine in young hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Esser, E Stein; McMaster, Sean R; Kalluri, Priya; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Prausnitz, Mark R; Skountzou, Ioanna; Denning, Timothy L; Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Compans, Richard W

    2015-09-08

    Skin has gained substantial attention as a vaccine target organ due to its immunological properties, which include a high density of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this vaccination route not only in animal models but also in adults. Young children represent a population group that is at high risk from influenza infection. As a result, this group could benefit significantly from influenza vaccine delivery approaches through the skin and the improved immune response it can induce. In this study, we compared the immune responses in young BALB/c mice upon skin delivery of influenza vaccine with vaccination by the conventional intramuscular route. Young mice that received 5 μg of H1N1 A/Ca/07/09 influenza subunit vaccine using MN demonstrated an improved serum antibody response (IgG1 and IgG2a) when compared to the young IM group, accompanied by higher numbers of influenza-specific antibody secreting cells (ASCs) in the bone marrow. In addition, we observed increased activation of follicular helper T cells and formation of germinal centers in the regional lymph nodes in the MN immunized group, rapid clearance of the virus from their lungs as well as complete survival, compared with partial protection observed in the IM-vaccinated group. Our results support the hypothesis that influenza vaccine delivery through the skin would be beneficial for protecting the high-risk young population from influenza infection. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Seasonal influenza vaccination trends from 2007-2011 in privately insured children and adults in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, Evgeniya; Ambrose, Christopher S; Kern, David; Block, Stan L; Caspard, Herve; Tunceli, Ozgur

    2014-11-12

    To ensure adequate protection from seasonal influenza in the US, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends vaccination of all persons aged 6 months or older, with rare exceptions. It also advises starting vaccination as soon as available and continuing throughout the influenza season. This study examined US seasonal vaccination trends during five consecutive influenza seasons in privately-insured children and adults. This retrospective, observational cohort study examined trends in influenza vaccination during the 2007-2008 through 2011-2012 influenza seasons using administrative claims data from a large national insurer. The size of analysis population ranged from 1144,098 to 1245,487 (children, ≥6 months-17 years of age) and from 3931,622 to 4158,223 (adults, 18-64 years of age). Vaccination frequency increased through 2010-2011, was most frequent in young children, and decreased with age. Vaccination rates were highest in the Northeast and lowest in the West and were higher in individuals with frequent outpatient office visits than in those with no or rare visits, with larger differences seen in children. Between 2007 and 2011, the use of preservative-free inactivated vaccine increased, the use of multidose vaccines containing preservatives decreased, and the use of live attenuated influenza vaccines increased among children 2-17 years of age. From 2007-2008 through 2009-2010, the timing of vaccination each year began earlier than the previous one; it remained stable from 2009-2010 through 2011-2012. Annual influenza vaccination claims for privately-insured children and adults increased and shifted earlier from 2007 through 2009-2011. During the 2011-2012 influenza season, 25.4% of children aged 6 months-17 years and 12.3% of adults aged 18-64 years were vaccinated. Increasing influenza vaccination should remain a priority, and alternative venues for seasonal influenza vaccination should be considered in order to meet the Healthy People 2020

  10. Enhanced immune responses by skin vaccination with influenza subunit vaccine in young hosts

    OpenAIRE

    Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G.; Esser, E. Stein; McMaster, Sean R.; Kalluri, Priya; Lee, Jeong-Woo; Prausnitz, Mark R.; Skountzou, Ioanna; Denning, Timothy L.; Kohlmeier, Jacob E.; Compans, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Skin has gained substantial attention as a vaccine target organ due to its immunological properties, which include a high density of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Previous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of this vaccination route not only in animal models but also in adults. Young children represent a population group that is at high risk from influenza infection. As a result, this group could benefit significantly from influenza vaccine delivery approaches through...

  11. Influenza vaccination guidelines and vaccine sales in southeast Asia: 2008-2011.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Gupta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Southeast Asia is a region with great potential for the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus. Global efforts to improve influenza surveillance in this region have documented the burden and seasonality of influenza viruses and have informed influenza prevention strategies, but little information exists about influenza vaccination guidelines and vaccine sales. METHODS: To ascertain the existence of influenza vaccine guidelines and define the scope of vaccine sales, we sent a standard three-page questionnaire to the ten member nations of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations. We also surveyed three multinational manufacturers who supply influenza vaccines in the region. RESULTS: Vaccine sales in the private sector were <1000 per 100,000 population in the 10 countries. Five countries reported purchasing vaccine for use in the public sector. In 2011, Thailand had the highest combined reported rate of vaccine sales (10,333 per 100,000. In the 10 countries combined, the rate of private sector sales during 2010-2011 (after the A(H1N12009pdm pandemic exceeded 2008 pre-pandemic levels. Five countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam had guidelines for influenza vaccination but only two were consistent with global guidelines. Four recommended vaccination for health care workers, four for elderly persons, three for young children, three for persons with underlying disease, and two for pregnant women. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of vaccine sales in Southeast Asia remains low, but there was a positive impact in sales after the A(H1N12009pdm pandemic. Low adherence to global vaccine guidelines suggests that more work is needed in the policy arena.

  12. Fugleinfluenza og perspektiverne for vaccination mod pandemisk influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2008-01-01

    on existing and future vaccination strategies directed towards prevention of pandemic influenza is presented. There is an urgent need to develop paninfluenza-specific vaccines and invest substantially in new technologies in order to better meet this threat. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-24......We may expect that the next influenza pandemic will affect about half the world's population within a year and that it will cause unpredictable mortality rates. In this perspective, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of new pandemic influenza strains and a discussion...

  13. Fugleinfluenza og perspektiverne for vaccination mod pandemisk influenza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2008-01-01

    We may expect that the next influenza pandemic will affect about half the world's population within a year and that it will cause unpredictable mortality rates. In this perspective, we review the molecular mechanisms underlying the development of new pandemic influenza strains and a discussion...... on existing and future vaccination strategies directed towards prevention of pandemic influenza is presented. There is an urgent need to develop paninfluenza-specific vaccines and invest substantially in new technologies in order to better meet this threat. Udgivelsesdato: 2008-Nov-24...

  14. Review: interventions to increase influenza vaccination among healthcare workers in hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollmeyer, Helge; Hayden, Frederick; Mounts, Anthony; Buchholz, Udo

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Hollmeyer et al. (2012) Review: interventions to increase influenza vaccination among healthcare workers in hospitals. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 7(4), 604–621. Annual influenza vaccination rates among hospital healthcare workers (HCW) are almost universally low despite recommendations from WHO and public health authorities in many countries. To assist in the development of successful vaccination programmes, we reviewed studies where interventions aimed to increase the uptake of influenza vaccination among hospital HCW. We searched PUBMED from 1990 up to December 2011 for publications with predetermined search strategies and of pre‐defined criteria for inclusion or exclusion. We evaluated a large number of ‘intervention programmes’ each employing one or more ‘intervention components’ or strategies, such as easy access to vaccine or educational activities, with the goal to raise influenza vaccine uptake rates in hospital HCW during one influenza season. Included studies reported results of intervention programmes and compared the uptake with the season prior to the intervention (historical control) or to another intervention programme within the same season that started from the same set of baseline activities. Twenty‐five studies performed in eight countries met our selection criteria and described 45 distinct intervention programmes. Most studies used their own facility as historical control and evaluated only one season. The following elements were used in intervention programmes that increased vaccine uptake: provision of free vaccine, easy access to the vaccine (e.g. through mobile carts or on‐site vaccination), knowledge and behaviour modification through educational activities and/or reminders and/or incentives, management or organizational changes, such as the assignment of personnel dedicated to the intervention programme, long‐term implementation of the strategy, requiring active declination and

  15. Effectiveness of live attenuated influenza vaccine and inactivated influenza vaccine in children during the 2014-2015 season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Huong Q; Caspard, Herve; Griffin, Marie R; Poehling, Katherine A; Gaglani, Manjusha; Belongia, Edward A; Talbot, H Keipp; Peters, Timothy R; Murthy, Kempapura; Ambrose, Christopher S

    2017-05-09

    A clinical study found that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) was superior to inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) against drifted A(H3N2) viruses in children. During the 2014-2015 influenza season, widespread circulation of antigenically and genetically drifted A(H3N2) viruses provided an opportunity to evaluate subtype-specific vaccine effectiveness (VE) of quadrivalent LAIV (LAIV4) and IIV in children. Children (2-17years) with febrile acute respiratory illness vaccination dates were obtained from medical records or immunization registries. VE was estimated using a test-negative design comparing odds of vaccination among influenza cases and test-negative controls with adjustment for potential confounders. Among 1696 children enrolled, 1511 (89%) were included in the analysis. Influenza was detected in 427 (28%) children; 317 had influenza A(H3N2) and 110 had influenza B. Most influenza isolates were characterized as a drifted strain of influenza A(H3N2) or a drifted strain of B/Yamagata. For LAIV4, adjusted VE was 50% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27-66%) against any influenza, 30% (95% CI, -6% to 54%) against influenza A(H3N2), and 87% (95% CI, 63-96%) against type B. For IIV, adjusted VE was 39% (95% CI, 18-54%) against any influenza, 40% (95% CI, 16-58%) against A(H3N2), and 29% (95% CI, -15% to 56%) against type B. Odds of influenza for LAIV4 versus IIV recipients were similar against influenza A(H3N2) (odds ratio [OR], 1.17; 95% CI, 0.73-1.86) and lower against influenza B (OR, 0.18; 95% CI, 0.06-0.55). LAIV4 and IIV provided similar protection against a new antigenic variant A(H3N2). LAIV4 provided significantly greater protection than IIV against a drifted influenza B strain. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01997450. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. SAFETY AND EFFICIENCY OF INACTIVATED OF SUBUNIT INFLUENZA VACCINE AT MASS VACCINATION OF CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu.Z. Gendon

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the results of infantile mass vaccination with inactivated subunit influenza vaccine (Influvac. It shows that vaccination of 57–72% of children aged 3–17 from organized collectives residing in Mytishchi and Orekhovoczuevo districts of Moscow region was accompanied with nearly triple reduce of flu rates vs. Narofominsk and Odintsovo districts where vaccination was occasional (< 1% of children. The efficiency of the vaccination made 63,7%. Low reactogenicity of the influenza vaccine was recorded. Its convenient packing allows vaccination of large number of children in a short time. The article justifies the necessity of yearly vaccinations even in case of similarity of flu virus strain.Key words: children, mass vaccination, subunit flu vaccine, safety.

  17. Seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine protects against 1918 Spanish influenza virus in ferrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influenza H1N1 pandemic of 1918 was one of the worst medical disasters in human history. Recent studies have demonstrated that the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of the 1918 virus and 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus, the latter now a component of the seasonal trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV),...

  18. Seasonal influenza vaccination at school: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humiston, Sharon G; Schaffer, Stanley J; Szilagyi, Peter G; Long, Christine E; Chappel, Tahleah R; Blumkin, Aaron K; Szydlowski, Jill; Kolasa, Maureen S

    2014-01-01

    Influenza vaccination coverage for U.S. school-aged children is below the 80% national goal. Primary care practices may not have the capacity to vaccinate all children during influenza vaccination season. No real-world models of school-located seasonal influenza (SLV-I) programs have been tested. Determine the feasibility, sustainability, and impact of an SLV-I program providing influenza vaccination to elementary school children during the school day. In this pragmatic randomized controlled trial of SLV-I during two vaccination seasons, schools were randomly assigned to SLV-I versus standard of care. Seasonal influenza vaccine receipt, as recorded in the state immunization information system (IIS), was measured. Intervention and control schools were located in a single western New York county. Participation (intervention or control) included the sole urban school district and suburban districts (five in Year 1, four in Year 2). After gathering parental consent and insurance information, live attenuated and inactivated seasonal influenza vaccines were offered in elementary schools during the school day. Data on receipt of ≥1 seasonal influenza vaccination in Year 1 (2009-2010) and Year 2 (2010-2011) were collected on all student grades K through 5 at intervention and control schools from the IIS in the Spring of 2010 and 2011, respectively. Additionally, coverage achieved through SLV-I was compared to coverage of children vaccinated elsewhere. Preliminary data analysis for Year 1 occurred in Spring 2010; final quantitative analysis for both years was completed in late Fall 2012. Results are shown for 2009-2010 and 2010-2011, respectively: Children enrolled in suburban SLV-I versus control schools had vaccination coverage of 47% vs 36%, and 52% vs 36% (pschool, school district) during both vaccination seasons, children were more likely to be vaccinated in SLV-I versus control schools; ORs were 1.6 (95% CI=1.4, 1.9; pvaccine during school is a promising approach to

  19. Subdeltoid/subacromial bursitis associated with influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Ian F

    2014-01-01

    A 76-year-old male presented with subacromial/subdeltoid bursitis following influenza vaccine administration into the left deltoid muscle. This shoulder injury related to vaccine administration (SIRVA) could have been prevented by the use of a safe, evidence based protocol for the intramuscular injection of the deltoid muscle.

  20. Effectiveness of influenza vaccine in the community-dwelling elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nichol, Kristin L.; Nordin, James D.; Nelson, David B.; Mullooly, John P.; Hak, Eelko

    2007-01-01

    Background Reliable estimates of the effectiveness of influenza vaccine among persons 65 years of age and older are important for informed vaccination policies and programs. Short-term studies may provide misleading pictures of long-term benefits, and residual confounding may have biased past

  1. Considerations of strategies to provide influenza vaccine year round

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambach, Philipp; Alvarez, Alba Maria Ropero; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Ortiz, Justin R.; Hombach, Joachim; Verweij, Marcel; Hendriks, Jan; Palkonyay, Laszlo; Pfleiderer, Michael

    2015-01-01

    There is potential for influenza vaccine programmes to make a substantial impact on severe disease in low-resource settings, however questions around vaccine composition and programmatic issues will require special attention. Some countries may benefit from immunization programmes that provide

  2. School-Located Influenza Vaccination Clinics: Local Health Department Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransom, James

    2009-01-01

    Universal childhood influenza vaccination presents challenges and opportunities for health care and public health systems to vaccinate the children who fall under the new recommendation. Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommendations and guidelines are helpful, but they do not provide strategies on how to deliver immunization…

  3. Control of Influenza and Poliomyelitis with Killed Virus Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas; Salk, Darrell

    1977-01-01

    Discusses control of poliomyelitis and influenza by live and killed virus vaccines. Considered are the etiological agents, pathogenic mechanisms and epidemiology of each disease. Reviews recent scientific studies of the diseases. Recommends use of killed virus vaccines in controlling both diseases. (CS)

  4. Intranasal delivery of influenza subunit vaccine formulated with GEM particles as an adjuvant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saluja, Vinay; Amorij, Jean P; van Roosmalen, Maarten L; Leenhouts, Kees; Huckriede, Anke; Hinrichs, Wouter L J; Frijlink, Henderik W

    Nasal administration of influenza vaccine has the potential to facilitate influenza control and prevention. However, when administered intranasally (i.n.), commercially available inactivated vaccines only generate systemic and mucosal immune responses if strong adjuvants are used, which are often

  5. A Systematic Review of Safety and Immunogenicity of Influenza Vaccination Strategies in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Pearlie P; Handler, Lara; Weber, David J

    2017-12-14

    Immunogenicity from seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV) remains suboptimal in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTR). We conducted a systematic review that compared the safety and immunogenicity of non-standard influenza vaccination strategies to single dose IIV in SOTR. Booster dose(s) and possibly high dose (HD) influenza vaccination strategies appear to hold promise for improving vaccination immunogenicity in SOTR. Administration of intradermal and MF59-adjuvanted trivalent IIV (IIV3) did not improve vaccine immunogenicity compared to single dose intramuscular IIV. Alternative vaccine strategies were generally well-tolerated; a higher frequency of injection site reactions and systemic adverse events were noted in SOTR who received HD, intradermal or adjuvanted IIV3 and HD IIV3 respectively. Allograft rejection rates were similar in both groups. SOTR should continue to receive standard dose IIV annually in accordance to current recommendations pending future studies to determine the optimal timing, frequency and dose(s) of IIV using the booster dose strategy. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. School-located influenza vaccination and absenteeism among elementary school students in a Hispanic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Patricia C; Ynalvez, Marcus Antonius; Gonzalez, Hector F; Castillo, Keila D

    2013-08-01

    Seasonal influenza is recognized as a significant health burden to children and is a cause of excess school absenteeism in children. In 2008, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommended annual influenza vaccination for all children 6 months to 18 years of age. School nurses influence participation in this recommendation by conducting school-located influenza vaccination (SLIV) programs at their campuses. Knowing the effect of SLIV programs on student absenteeism may motivate school nurses and district administrators to conduct such vaccination programs. This study examines the impact of an SLIV program on elementary school absenteeism in an inner city school district with a predominantly Hispanic population. Using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors, we analyzed data from 3,775 records obtained by stratified random sampling. Results of the study indicate that students vaccinated through an SLIV program have fewer absences than unvaccinated students. A surprising result of the study shows that students vaccinated through an SLIV program had fewer absences than students vaccinated elsewhere. These results are of particular importance to school nurses who work with large Hispanic populations. Our study illustrates one way that a school nurse can assess the effect of an SLIV program on absenteeism.

  7. Seasonal influenza vaccination for children in Thailand: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aronrag Meeyai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza is a major cause of mortality worldwide. Routine immunization of children has the potential to reduce this mortality through both direct and indirect protection, but has not been adopted by any low- or middle-income countries. We developed a framework to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination policies in developing countries and used it to consider annual vaccination of school- and preschool-aged children with either trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV or trivalent live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV in Thailand. We also compared these approaches with a policy of expanding TIV coverage in the elderly.We developed an age-structured model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of eight vaccination policies parameterized using country-level data from Thailand. For policies using LAIV, we considered five different age groups of children to vaccinate. We adopted a Bayesian evidence-synthesis framework, expressing uncertainty in parameters through probability distributions derived by fitting the model to prospectively collected laboratory-confirmed influenza data from 2005-2009, by meta-analysis of clinical trial data, and by using prior probability distributions derived from literature review and elicitation of expert opinion. We performed sensitivity analyses using alternative assumptions about prior immunity, contact patterns between age groups, the proportion of infections that are symptomatic, cost per unit vaccine, and vaccine effectiveness. Vaccination of children with LAIV was found to be highly cost-effective, with incremental cost-effectiveness ratios between about 2,000 and 5,000 international dollars per disability-adjusted life year averted, and was consistently preferred to TIV-based policies. These findings were robust to extensive sensitivity analyses. The optimal age group to vaccinate with LAIV, however, was sensitive both to the willingness to pay for health benefits and to assumptions

  8. Strengthening the influenza vaccine virus selection and development process: Report of the 3rd WHO Informal Consultation for Improving Influenza Vaccine Virus Selection held at WHO headquarters, Geneva, Switzerland, 1-3 April 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampofo, William K; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Bashir, Uzma; Cox, Nancy J; Fasce, Rodrigo; Giovanni, Maria; Grohmann, Gary; Huang, Sue; Katz, Jackie; Mironenko, Alla; Mokhtari-Azad, Talat; Sasono, Pretty Multihartina; Rahman, Mahmudur; Sawanpanyalert, Pathom; Siqueira, Marilda; Waddell, Anthony L; Waiboci, Lillian; Wood, John; Zhang, Wenqing; Ziegler, Thedi

    2015-08-26

    investigations but could drive a new surveillance paradigm. However, despite the advances made, significant challenges will need to be addressed before next-generation technologies become routine, particularly in low-resource settings. Emerging approaches and techniques such as synthetic genomics, systems genetics, systems biology and mathematical modelling are capable of generating potentially huge volumes of highly complex and diverse datasets. Harnessing the currently theoretical benefits of such bioinformatics ("big data") concepts for the influenza vaccine virus selection and development process will depend upon further advances in data generation, integration, analysis and dissemination. Over the last decade, growing awareness of influenza as an important global public health issue has been coupled to ever-increasing demands from the global community for more-equitable access to effective and affordable influenza vaccines. The current influenza vaccine landscape continues to be dominated by egg-based inactivated and live attenuated vaccines, with a small number of cell-based and recombinant vaccines. Successfully completing each step in the annual influenza vaccine manufacturing cycle will continue to rely upon timely and regular communication between the WHO GISRS, manufacturers and regulatory authorities. While the pipeline of influenza vaccines appears to be moving towards a variety of niche products in the near term, it is apparent that the ultimate aim remains the development of effective "universal" influenza vaccines that offer longer-lasting immunity against a broad range of influenza A subtypes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. The comparative value of various employer-sponsored influenza vaccination clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Richard K; Wiringa, Ann E; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou J; Rousculp, Matthew D; Mitgang, Elizabeth A; Lee, Bruce Y

    2012-09-01

    Many US firms offer influenza vaccination clinics to prevent lost productivity due to influenza. Strategies to promote and offer vaccination differ, and the economic value of the strategies is unknown. Decision analytic modeling and Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analyses estimated the one-season cost-consequences of three types of influenza clinics (trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine only, vaccine choice [trivalent inactivated influenza or intranasal {live attenuated influenza} vaccine], or vaccine choice plus incentive) in firms of 50 and 250 employees, from the employer's perspective. On-site influenza vaccination was generally cost-saving over no vaccination. For the scenario of vaccine effectiveness of 70% and intermediate transmissibility, the incremental costs per employee for a firm of 50 employees were -$6.41 (ie, cost savings) for inactivated vaccine only versus no vaccination, -$1.48 for vaccine choice versus inactivated vaccine, and $1.84 for vaccine choice plus incentive versus vaccine choice. Clinics offering a choice of vaccines were slightly less costly under many scenarios. Generally, incremental costs were lower (1) in larger firms; (2) when influenza was assumed to be more contagious; and (3) when vaccine effectiveness was assumed to be higher. Employer-sponsored influenza vaccination clinics are generally cost-saving.

  10. Estimation of type- and subtype-specific influenza vaccine effectiveness in Victoria, Australia using a test negative case control method, 2007-2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grant Kristina A

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antigenic variation of influenza virus necessitates annual reformulation of seasonal influenza vaccines, which contain two type A strains (H1N1 and H3N2 and one type B strain. We used a test negative case control design to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE against influenza by type and subtype over two consecutive seasons in Victoria, Australia. Methods Patients presenting with influenza-like illness to general practitioners (GPs in a sentinel surveillance network during 2007 and 2008 were tested for influenza. Cases tested positive for influenza by polymerase chain reaction and controls tested negative for influenza. Vaccination status was recorded by sentinel GPs. Vaccine effectiveness was calculated as [(1 - adjusted odds ratio × 100%]. Results There were 386 eligible study participants in 2007 of whom 50% were influenza positive and 19% were vaccinated. In 2008 there were 330 eligible study participants of whom 32% were influenza positive and 17% were vaccinated. Adjusted VE against A/H3N2 influenza in 2007 was 68% (95% CI, 32 to 85% but VE against A/H1N1 (27%; 95% CI, -92 to 72% and B (84%; 95% CI, -2 to 98% were not statistically significant. In 2008, the adjusted VE estimate was positive against type B influenza (49% but negative for A/H1N1 (-88% and A/H3N2 (-66%; none was statistically significant. Conclusions Type- and subtype-specific assessment of influenza VE is needed to identify variations that cannot be differentiated from a measure of VE against all influenza. Type- and subtype-specific influenza VE estimates in Victoria in 2007 and 2008 were generally consistent with strain circulation data.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of seasonal quadrivalent versus trivalent influenza vaccination in the United States: A dynamic transmission modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Anita J; Talbird, Sandra E; Davis, Ashley E; Thommes, Edward W; Meier, Genevieve

    2017-03-04

    Trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (IIV3s) protect against 2 A strains and one B lineage; quadrivalent versions (IIV4s) protect against an additional B lineage. The objective was to assess projected health and economic outcomes associated with IIV4 versus IIV3 for preventing seasonal influenza in the US. A cost-effectiveness model was developed to interact with a dynamic transmission model. The transmission model tracked vaccination, influenza cases, infection-spreading interactions, and recovery over 10 y (2012-2022). The cost-effectiveness model estimated influenza-related complications, direct and indirect costs (2013-2014 US$), health outcomes, and cost-effectiveness. Inputs were taken from published/public sources or estimated using regression or calibration. Outcomes were discounted at 3% per year. Scenario analyses tested the reliability of the results. Seasonal vaccination with IIV4 versus IIV3 is predicted to reduce annual influenza cases by 1,973,849 (discounted; 2,325,644 undiscounted), resulting in 12-13% fewer cases and influenza-related complications and deaths. These reductions are predicted to translate into 18,485 more quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) accrued annually for IIV4 versus IIV3. Increased vaccine-related costs ($599 million; 5.7%) are predicted to be more than offset by reduced influenza treatment costs ($699 million; 12.2%), resulting in direct medical cost saving annually ($100 million; 0.6%). Including indirect costs, savings with IIV4 are predicted to be $7.1 billion (5.6%). Scenario analyses predict IIV4 to be cost-saving in all scenarios tested apart from low infectivity, where IIV4 is predicted to be cost-effective. In summary, seasonal influenza vaccination in the US with IIV4 versus IIV3 is predicted to improve health outcomes and reduce costs.

  12. Recommendations and offers for adult influenza vaccination, 2011-2012 season, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Katharine M; Santibanez, Tammy A; Black, Carla L; Ding, Helen; Graitcer, Samuel B; Bridges, Carolyn B; Kennedy, Erin D

    2017-03-01

    Provider recommendations and offers for influenza vaccination improve adult influenza vaccination coverage. Analysis was performed to describe receipt of influenza vaccination recommendations and offers among adults who visited a healthcare provider (HCP) during the 2011-2012 influenza season and describe differences between those receiving and not receiving recommendations and offers for influenza vaccination. Associations between influenza vaccination and receipt of recommendations and offers were examined. Respondents to a random digit dial telephone survey who had visited a HCP since July 1, 2011 were asked if they had received a recommendation for influenza vaccination. Those receiving a recommendation were asked if they received an offer for vaccination. Participants were characterized by demographic and access to health care variables. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between participant characteristics and recommendation alone, between participant characteristics and recommendation and offer, and between influenza vaccination and recommendation and offer. Of those who reported visiting a HCP, 43.8% reported receiving a recommendation for influenza vaccination. Of those who reported receiving a recommendation, 76.6% reported receiving an offer for influenza vaccination. Persons with high-risk conditions and persons over 65 years were more likely to receive recommendations for influenza vaccination when compared to those without high-risk conditions and 18-49 year olds, respectively. Those reporting receipt of a recommendation and offer for influenza vaccination were 1.76 times more likely and those reporting receipt of a recommendation but no offer were 1.72 times more likely to report being vaccinated for influenza controlling for all patient characteristics. Less than half of respondents reported receipt of recommendations and offers of influenza vaccination during the 2011-2012 influenza season and disparities exist between groups

  13. Recommendations and offers for adult influenza vaccination, 2011–2012 season, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedict, Katharine M.; Santibanez, Tammy A.; Black, Carla L.; Ding, Helen; Graitcer, Samuel B.; Bridges, Carolyn B.; Kennedy, Erin D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Provider recommendations and offers for influenza vaccination improve adult influenza vaccination coverage. Analysis was performed to describe receipt of influenza vaccination recommendations and offers among adults who visited a healthcare provider (HCP) during the 2011–2012 influenza season and describe differences between those receiving and not receiving recommendations and offers for influenza vaccination. Associations between influenza vaccination and receipt of recommendations and offers were examined. Methods Respondents to a random digit dial telephone survey who had visited a HCP since July 1, 2011 were asked if they had received a recommendation for influenza vaccination. Those receiving a recommendation were asked if they received an offer for vaccination. Participants were characterized by demographic and access to health care variables. Logistic regression was used to examine the relationships between participant characteristics and recommendation alone, between participant characteristics and recommendation and offer, and between influenza vaccination and recommendation and offer. Results Of those who reported visiting a HCP, 43.8% reported receiving a recommendation for influenza vaccination. Of those who reported receiving a recommendation, 76.6% reported receiving an offer for influenza vaccination. Persons with high-risk conditions and persons over 65 years were more likely to receive recommendations for influenza vaccination when compared to those without high-risk conditions and 18–49 year olds, respectively. Those reporting receipt of a recommendation and offer for influenza vaccination were 1.76 times more likely and those reporting receipt of a recommendation but no offer were 1.72 times more likely to report being vaccinated for influenza controlling for all patient characteristics. Conclusions Less than half of respondents reported receipt of recommendations and offers of influenza vaccination during the 2011–2012

  14. Seasonal influenza split vaccines confer partial cross-protection against heterologous influenza virus in ferrets when combined with the CAF01 adjuvant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Dennis; Christensen, Jan P.; Korsholm, Karen S.

    2018-01-01

    help to B cells and CD8(+) T cells. However, the seasonal influenza vaccine is poor at inducing CD4(+) T-cell responses and needs to be combined with an adjuvant facilitating this response. In this study, we applied the ferret model to investigate the cross-protective efficacy of a heterologous......Influenza epidemics occur annually, and estimated 5-10% of the adult population and 20-30% of children will become ill from influenza infection. Seasonal vaccines primarily work through the induction of neutralizing antibodies against the principal surface antigen hemagglutinin (HA). This important...... role of HA-specific antibodies explains why previous pandemics have emerged when new HAs have appeared in circulating human viruses. It has long been recognized that influenza virus-specific CD4(+) T cells are important in protection from infection through direct effector mechanisms or by providing...

  15. School-Located Influenza Vaccination Decreases Laboratory-Confirmed Influenza and Improves School Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannaraj, Pia S.; Wang, Hai-Lin; Rivas, Hector; Wiryawan, Hilda; Smit, Michael; Green, Nicole; Aldrovandi, Grace M.; El Amin, Alvin Nelson; Mascola, Laurene

    2014-01-01

    Background. School-located influenza vaccination (SLV) programs can efficiently immunize large numbers of school-aged children. We evaluated the impact of SLV on laboratory-confirmed influenza and absenteeism. Methods. Active surveillance for influenza-like illness (ILI) was conducted on 4455 children in 4 SLV intervention and 4 control elementary schools (grades K–6) matched for sociodemographic characteristics during the 2010–2011 influenza season in Los Angeles County, California. Combined nose/throat swabs were collected from febrile children with ILI at presentation to the school nurse or during absenteeism. Results. In SLV schools, 26.9%–46.6% of enrolled students received at least 1 dose of either inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccine compared with 0.8%–4.3% in control schools. Polymerase chain reaction for respiratory viruses (PCR) was performed on 1021 specimens obtained from 898 children. Specimens were positive for influenza in 217 (21.3%), including 2009 H1N1 (30.9%), H3 (9.2%), and B (59.9%). Children attending SLV schools, regardless of vaccination status, were 30.8% (95% confidence interval, 10.1%–46.8%) less likely to acquire influenza compared with children at control schools. Unvaccinated children were indirectly protected in the school with nearly 50% vaccination coverage compared with control schools (influenza rate, 27.1 vs 60.0 per 1000 children; P = .023). Unvaccinated children missed more school days than vaccinated children (4.3 vs 2.8 days per 100 school days; P school population resulted in decreased influenza rates and improved school attendance. Herd immunity for unvaccinated children may occur in schools with vaccination coverage approaching 50%. PMID:24829215

  16. Influenza vaccines in low and middle income countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Jördis J.; Klein Breteler, Janna; Tam, John S.; Hutubessy, Raymond C.W.; Jit, Mark; de Boer, Michiel R.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Economic evaluations on influenza vaccination from low resource settings are scarce and have not been evaluated using a systematic approach. Our objective was to conduct a systematic review on the value for money of influenza vaccination in low- and middle-income countries. Methods: PubMed and EMBASE were searched for economic evaluations published in any language between 1960 and 2011. Main outcome measures were costs per influenza outcome averted, costs per quality-adjusted life years gained or disability-adjusted life years averted, costs per benefit in monetary units or cost-benefit ratios. Results: Nine economic evaluations on seasonal influenza vaccine met the inclusion criteria. These were model- or randomized-controlled-trial (RCT)-based economic evaluations from middle-income countries. Influenza vaccination provided value for money for elderly, infants, adults and children with high-risk conditions. Vaccination was cost-effective and cost-saving for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and in elderly above 65 y from model-based evaluations, but conclusions from RCTs on elderly varied. Conclusion: Economic evaluations from middle income regions differed in population studied, outcomes and definitions used. Most findings are in line with evidence from high-income countries highlighting that influenza vaccine is likely to provide value for money. However, serious methodological limitations do not allow drawing conclusions on cost-effectiveness of influenza vaccination in middle income countries. Evidence on cost-effectiveness from low-income countries is lacking altogether, and more information is needed from full economic evaluations that are conducted in a standardized manner. PMID:23732900

  17. Influence of influenza vaccination on recurrent hospitalization in patients with heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, H; Beton, O; Acar, G; Temizhan, A; Cavusoğlu, Y; Guray, U; Zoghi, M; Ural, D; Ekmekci, A; Gungor, H; Sari, I; Oguz, D; Yucel, H; Zorlu, A; Yilmaz, M B

    2017-05-01

    The current study aimed to evaluate the influence of regular annual influenza vaccinations on cardiovascular (CV) death and heart failure-related hospitalizations (HFrH) in stable outpatients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction. The Turkish research team-HF (TREAT-HF) is a network undertaking multicenter, observational cohort studies in HF. This study is a subgroup analysis of TREAT-HF outpatient cohorts who completed a questionnaire on influenza vaccination status and for whom follow-up data were available. A total of 656 patients with available follow-up data for CV death and HFrH including recurrent hospitalization were included in the study. Patients were classified into two groups: those who received regular influenza vaccination (40 %) and those who did not receive vaccination. During a mean follow-up of 15 ±6 months, 113 (18 %) patients had CV death and 471 (72 %) patients had at least one HFrH. The CV death rate was similar in both groups of patients (16 vs. 19 %, p = 0.37), whereas, HFrH and recurrent HFrH were significantly less frequently encountered in patients who received regular influenza vaccination than in those who did not receive vaccination (43 vs. 92 % and 16 vs. 66 %, p vaccination status (HR = 0.30, 95 % CI = 0.17-0.51, p vaccination does not influence CV deaths; however, it decreases HFrH including recurrent episodes of HFrH in outpatients with heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

  18. The impact of influenza vaccination requirements for hospital personnel in California: knowledge, attitudes, and vaccine uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Katherine M; Uscher-Pines, Lori; Han, Bing; Lindley, Megan C; Lorick, Suchita A

    2014-03-01

    Seasonal influenza infections are a leading cause of illness, death, and lost productivity. Vaccinating health care personnel (HCP) can reduce transmission of influenza virus to patients and reduce influenza-related absenteeism, enabling the health care system to meet elevated demand for care during influenza outbreaks. We evaluated the impact of California's 2006 influenza vaccination requirement for hospital workers (requiring vaccination or signed declinations) on uptake and vaccination-related attitudes, beliefs, and knowledge among hospital HCP. We used a causal difference-in-differences approach to compare changes over the prior 10 years in the self-reported frequency of influenza vaccination for California hospital HCP and those from other states without similar laws using data from a stratified sample (N = 3,529) of HCP drawn from online survey panels. We also examined cross-sectional differences in awareness of vaccination policies, promotion efforts, and attitudes toward influenza vaccination. All analyses used propensity score weighting to balance the observable characteristics of the 2 samples. We found that compared with their counterparts in other states, California hospital HCP were (1) more likely to report working under a formal written policy for influenza vaccination, (2) no more likely to be vaccinated, and (3) less likely to report working for an employer who provided financial incentives for vaccination or rewarded or recognized employees for being vaccinated. Our results suggest that state-level vaccination requirements such as those enacted by California, may not be sufficient to increase uptake among hospital HCP. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Factors associated with seasonal influenza vaccination in pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henninger, Michelle L; Irving, Stephanie A; Thompson, Mark; Avalos, Lyndsay Ammon; Ball, Sarah W; Shifflett, Pat; Naleway, Allison L

    2015-05-01

    This observational study followed a cohort of pregnant women during the 2010-2011 influenza season to determine factors associated with vaccination. Participants were 1105 pregnant women who completed a survey assessing health beliefs related to vaccination upon enrollment and were then followed to determine vaccination status by the end of the 2010-2011 influenza season. We conducted univariate and multivariate analyses to explore factors associated with vaccination status and a factor analysis of survey items to identify health beliefs associated with vaccination. Sixty-three percent (n=701) of the participants were vaccinated. In the univariate analyses, multiple factors were associated with vaccination status, including maternal age, race, marital status, educational level, and gravidity. Factor analysis identified two health belief factors associated with vaccination: participant's positive views (factor 1) and negative views (factor 2) of influenza vaccination. In a multivariate logistic regression model, factor 1 was associated with increased likelihood of vaccination (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=2.18; 95% confidence interval [CI]=1.72-2.78), whereas factor 2 was associated with decreased likelihood of vaccination (aOR=0.36; 95% CI=0.28-0.46). After controlling for the two health belief factors in multivariate analyses, demographic factors significant in univariate analyses were no longer significant. Women who received a provider recommendation were about three times more likely to be vaccinated (aOR=3.14; 95% CI=1.99-4.96). Pregnant women's health beliefs about vaccination appear to be more important than demographic and maternal factors previously associated with vaccination status. Provider recommendation remains one of the most critical factors influencing vaccination during pregnancy.

  20. Influenza vaccine effectiveness against hospitalisation with confirmed influenza in the 2010-11 seasons: a test-negative observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen C Cheng

    Full Text Available Immunisation programs are designed to reduce serious morbidity and mortality from influenza, but most evidence supporting the effectiveness of this intervention has focused on disease in the community or in primary care settings. We aimed to examine the effectiveness of influenza vaccination against hospitalisation with confirmed influenza. We compared influenza vaccination status in patients hospitalised with PCR-confirmed influenza with patients hospitalised with influenza-negative respiratory infections in an Australian sentinel surveillance system. Vaccine effectiveness was estimated from the odds ratio of vaccination in cases and controls. We performed both simple multivariate regression and a stratified analysis based on propensity score of vaccination. Vaccination status was ascertained in 333 of 598 patients with confirmed influenza and 785 of 1384 test-negative patients. Overall estimated crude vaccine effectiveness was 57% (41%, 68%. After adjusting for age, chronic comorbidities and pregnancy status, the estimated vaccine effectiveness was 37% (95% CI: 12%, 55%. In an analysis accounting for a propensity score for vaccination, the estimated vaccine effectiveness was 48.3% (95% CI: 30.0, 61.8%. Influenza vaccination was moderately protective against hospitalisation with influenza in the 2010 and 2011 seasons.

  1. Which influenza vaccine formulation should be used in Kenya? A comparison of influenza isolates from Kenya to vaccine strains, 2007-2013

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waiboci, L.W.; Mott, J.A.; Kikwai, G.; Arunga, G.; Xu, X.; Mayieka, L.; Emukule, G.O.; Muthoka, P.; Njenga, M.K.; Fields, B.S.; Katz, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Every year the World Health Organization (WHO) recommends which influenza virus strains should be included in a northern hemisphere (NH) and a southern hemisphere (SH) influenza vaccine. To determine the best vaccine formulation for Kenya, we compared influenza viruses collected in

  2. Prevalence of antibodies and humoral response after seasonal trivalent vaccination against influenza B lineages in an elderly population of Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Ivan Sanz; Rello, Silvia Rojo; Lejarazu, Raúl Ortiz de

    2017-11-24

    The aim of this study was to analyze the presence of antibodies against both Yamagata and Victoria influenza B lineages and to check the response after seasonal trivalent vaccination. Haemagglutination inhibition assays were performed with pre-and post-vaccination serum samples from 174 individuals ≥65 years of age vaccinated with seasonal trivalent influenza vaccines during the 2006-2007, 2008-2009, 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 vaccine campaigns. 33.9% of individuals showed pre-vaccine protective antibodies (≥1/40) against B/Yamagata lineage and 41.4% against B/Victoria lineage. The annual trivalent vaccine induced significant homologous seroconversion in 14-35.6% of individuals in each vaccine campaign. The population ≥65 years has low-moderate seroprotection against B influenza lineages. Trivalent vaccination induced a slight increase of seroprotection. The trivalent vaccine should be administered to all individuals ≥65 years in all vaccine campaigns. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of selenium on immunogenicity of influenza vaccine in the elderly: A case-control double-blinded clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Janbakhsh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Influenza can cause more severe diseases and higher rate of morbidity and mortality in the elderly population. Therefore, they should receive influenza vaccine annually. However, the host response to vaccine is less in older individuals. On the other hand, selenium can act as a stimulator of the immune system and cause increased immunity and response to vaccine. This study was carried out to determine the effect of selenium on antibody production against influenza vaccine. By verifying this effect, selenium can be recommended as an adjuvant therapy in the elderly. Methods: A total of 110 subjects were selected at Infectious Diseases Research Center of Imam Reza Hospital in Kermanshah. They were divided into two groups of adjuvant (N=56 and placebo (N=54. The adjuvant group received influenza vaccine and selenium tablet. The placebo group received influenza vaccine and placebo tablet. Venous blood samples were taken before and four weeks after vaccination and the results were compared between the two groups. Results: Seroconversion, seroprotection, and geometric mean titer (GMT for three strains (H1N1, H3N2, and B were assessed. The seroconversion and GMT rates against influenza B vaccine component were significantly higher in adjuvant group than placebo group. Conclusion: Considering the ability of selenium in induction of a better response to influenza vaccine in older people as well as its low cost and accessibility, selenium can be used to increase antibody level in such cases.

  4. Influenza (Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... develop influenza. Weakened immune system. Cancer treatments, anti-rejection drugs, corticosteroids and HIV/AIDS can weaken your ... for Disease Control and Prevention recommends annual flu vaccination for everyone over the age of 6 months. ...

  5. Psychosocial Influences on Parental Decision-Making Regarding Vaccination Against Seasonal Influenza for Young Children in Hong Kong: a Longitudinal Study, 2012-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Qiuyan; Lam, Wendy Wing Tak; Cowling, Benjamin J; Fielding, Richard

    2016-10-01

    Vaccination uptake remained low, although annual subsidies are provided to encourage 6-72-month-old Hong Kong children to be vaccinated against seasonal influenza. This study was aimed to investigate the psychosocial influences on parental decision-making regarding young children's seasonal influenza vaccination. One-thousand two-hundred twenty-six parents of eligible children were recruited using random digit dialing in August-October 2012 to assess baseline perceptions and re-contacted in March 2013 to record children's vaccination uptake. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed to examine factors associated with parental decision about children's vaccination based on the complete data of 1222 respondents. Of the 1226 respondents who completed the follow-up survey, 34.3 % reported that their child was vaccinated during the follow-up period. Child's past influenza vaccination history (β = 0.48), belief in vaccination safety (β = 0.35), and social norms (β = 0.25) were strongly associated with parental intention to vaccinate their child which directly predicted child vaccination uptake (β = 0.57). Belief in vaccination safety (β = 0.42) and social norms (β = 0.36) were strongly associated with vaccination intention of parents whose children never received influenza vaccine. Interventions that address concerns on vaccination safety and utilize social norms may be effective to initiate Chinese parents to vaccinate their children.

  6. Key points in evaluating immunogenicity of pandemic influenza vaccines: A lesson from immunogenicity studies of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohfuji, Satoko; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Ide, Yuichiro; Egawa, Yumi; Saito, Tomoko; Kondo, Kyoko; Ito, Kazuya; Kase, Tetsuo; Maeda, Akiko; Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-09-18

    Immunogenicity studies on pandemic influenza vaccine are necessary to inform rapid development and implementation of a vaccine during a pandemic. Thus, strategies for immunogenicity assessment are required. To identify essential factors to consider when evaluating the immunogenicity of pandemic influenza vaccines using the experience in Japan with the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. We conducted a search of observational studies using PubMed and IchushiWeb. Search terms included "influenza vaccine AND (immunogenicity OR immune response) AND Japan AND (2009 OR pdm09) NOT review," and was limited to studies conducted in humans. A total of 33 articles were identified, of which 16 articles met the inclusion criteria. Immunogenicity of the commercially available influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine satisfied the international criteria for influenza vaccine immunogenicity in all study populations. The most remarkable immune response was observed in junior high school students, while the lowest immune response was observed in hematological malignancy patients. Similar to immunogenicity studies on seasonal influenza vaccines, factors such as patient background (e.g., age, underlying condition, pre-vaccination titer, body mass index, etc.) and study procedure (e.g., concurrent measurement of pre- and post-vaccination antibody titer, effects of infection during the study period) may have affected the assessment of immunogenicity to the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. In addition, prior vaccination with the seasonal influenza vaccine may inhibit antibody induction by the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine. This review discusses factors and strategies that must be considered and addressed during immunogenicity assessments of pandemic influenza vaccines, which may provide useful information for future influenza pandemics. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Influenza Vaccines : What Do We Want and How Can We Get It?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geeraedts, Felix; Huckriede, Anke; Pulendran, B; Katsikis, PD; Schoenberger, SP

    2011-01-01

    Influenza vaccines have been in use for more than 60 years and have proven to be efficacious in protecting from influenza infections during epidemics and the recent H1N1 pandemic. The development of influenza vaccines has so far been largely based on empirical grounds, which leaves room for vaccine

  8. Retrospective public health impact of a quadrivalent influenza vaccine in the United States

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crepey, Pascal; de Boer, Pieter T.; Postma, Maarten J.; Pitman, Richard

    IntroductionVaccination is an effective preventive strategy against influenza. However, current trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) contain only one of the two influenza B lineages that circulate each year. Vaccine mismatches are frequent because predicting which one will predominate is difficult.

  9. Death and serious illness following influenza vaccination: a multidisciplinary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rue-Cover, Alison; Iskander, John; Lyn, Shauna; Burwen, Dale R; Gargiullo, Paul; Shadomy, Sean; Blostein, Joel; Bridges, Carolyn B; Haber, Penina; Satzger, R Duane; Ball, Robert; Seward, Jane F

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate a possible association between influenza vaccination and four deaths and four serious illnesses among 114 recent influenza vaccinees in a long-term care facility (LTCF) and two deaths from a nearby physician's office. All had received vaccine from the same lot (Lot A). Field investigation including (1) a retrospective cohort study among LTCF residents who received Lot A or other influenza vaccine, (2) review of medical records of cases of death or serious illness, (3) active surveillance of deaths among 1500 community based Lot A vaccinees and (4) laboratory testing of vaccine from available Lot A vials. Medical record reviews showed no common clinical syndrome or cause of death. Laboratory testing of Lot A samples revealed no evidence of tampering and no differences compared to an unrelated lot. The risk of death or hospitalization was not significantly different between persons who received Lot A versus a comparison lot, Lot B (incidence rate ratio (IRR) = 0.9, 95%CI = 0.3-3.3). There was no clinical or biological evidence pointing to inherent vaccine safety issues, nor was there a detectable increased risk of death or hospitalization among persons vaccinated with Lot A. Lot specific clustering of adverse events (AEs) may reflect medical events causally unrelated to vaccination. Rapid investigations of potential AEs are important to ensure vaccine safety and to maintain public and healthcare provider confidence in vaccines.

  10. Vaccination of influenza a virus decreases transmission rates in pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romagosa Anna

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Limited information is available on the transmission and spread of influenza virus in pig populations with differing immune statuses. In this study we assessed differences in transmission patterns and quantified the spread of a triple reassortant H1N1 influenza virus in naïve and vaccinated pig populations by estimating the reproduction ratio (R of infection (i.e. the number of secondary infections caused by an infectious individual using a deterministic Susceptible-Infectious-Recovered (SIR model, fitted on experimental data. One hundred and ten pigs were distributed in ten isolated rooms as follows: (i non-vaccinated (NV, (ii vaccinated with a heterologous vaccine (HE, and (iii vaccinated with a homologous inactivated vaccine (HO. The study was run with multiple replicates and for each replicate, an infected non-vaccinated pig was placed with 10 contact pigs for two weeks and transmission of influenza evaluated daily by analyzing individual nasal swabs by RT-PCR. A statistically significant difference between R estimates was observed between vaccinated and non-vaccinated pigs (p R (95%CI was 1 (0.39-2.09 and 0 for the HE and the HO groups respectively, compared to an Ro value of 10.66 (6.57-16.46 in NV pigs (p

  11. Challenges in evaluating influenza vaccine effectiveness and the mortality benefits controversy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichol, Kristin L

    2009-10-23

    Randomized, controlled trials are the gold standard study design. However, ethical constraints and practical considerations may necessitate other types of studies for evaluating influenza vaccine effectiveness in the elderly--a high priority group for annual vaccination in many countries. Observational studies therefore comprise the bulk of the vaccine effectiveness evidence in older persons, but these types of studies can be susceptible to selection bias and residual confounding. All observational studies should utilize strategies to minimize the impact of bias and confounding. Recent studies questioning the plausibility of reported mortality benefits among vaccinated elderly persons may themselves be based on assumptions that are susceptible to important limitations and multiple biases. Future studies that incorporate prospectively collected information on functional status, life expectancy, and other types of data may provide additional insights into these concerns. At present, even after taking into account the potential for residual bias and confounding, most studies confirm the benefits of vaccination among the elderly for reducing hospitalization and death.

  12. Retrospective public health impact of a quadrivalent influenza vaccine in the United States over the period 2000-2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crépey, P.; De Boer, P.; Postma, M.J.; Pitman, R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Vaccination has proven to be an efficient preventive strategy against influenza infection. Each year, two genetically distinct influenza B lineages cocirculate. Current trivalent influenza vaccines (TIVs) contain only one influenza B and two influenza A strains, but vaccine mismatch are

  13. Health care workers' influenza vaccination: motivations and mandatory mask policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorribo, V; Lazor-Blanchet, C; Hugli, O; Zanetti, G

    2015-12-01

    Vaccination of health care workers (HCW) against seasonal influenza (SI) is recommended but vaccination rate rarely reach >30%. Vaccination coverage against 2009 pandemic influenza (PI) was 52% in our hospital, whilst a new policy requiring unvaccinated HCW to wear a mask during patient care duties was enforced. To investigate the determinants of this higher vaccination acceptance for PI and to look for an association with the new mask-wearing policy. A retrospective cohort study, involving HCW of three critical departments of a 1023-bed, tertiary-care university hospital in Switzerland. Self-reported 2009-10 SI and 2009 PI vaccination statuses, reasons and demographic data were collected through a literature-based questionnaire. Descriptive statistics, uni- and multivariate analyses were then performed. There were 472 respondents with a response rate of 54%. Self-reported vaccination acceptance was 64% for PI and 53% for SI. PI vaccination acceptance was associated with being vaccinated against SI (OR 9.5; 95% CI 5.5-16.4), being a physician (OR 7.7; 95% CI 3.1-19.1) and feeling uncomfortable wearing a mask (OR 1.7; 95% CI 1.0-2.8). Main motives for refusing vaccination were: preference for wearing a surgical mask (80% for PI, not applicable for SI) and concerns about vaccine safety (64%, 50%) and efficacy (44%, 35%). The new mask-wearing policy was a motivation for vaccination but also offered an alternative to non-compliant HCW. Concerns about vaccine safety and efficiency and self-interest of health care workers are still main determinants for influenza vaccination acceptance. Better incentives are needed to encourage vaccination amongst non-physician HCW. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Pediatric orbital cellulitis in the Haemophilus influenzae vaccine era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Abhishek; Liu, Eugene S; Le, Tran D; Adatia, Feisal A; Buncic, J Raymond; Blaser, Susan; Richardson, Susan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the microbiology of pediatric orbital cellulitis in blood cultures and abscess drainage cultures following the introduction of the Haemophilus influenzae serotype b (Hib) vaccine. The medical records of all pediatrics patients (aged influenzae orbital cellulitis, including bacteremia and meningitis. A total of 149 patients were diagnosed with preseptal or orbital cellulitis, of whom 101 (mean age, 7.2 ± 4.0) had true orbital cellulitis. No patients grew H. influenzae from blood cultures. Of the 101 patients, 30 (29.7%) required surgical drainage and had abscess drainage fluid sent for microbiology. Of these, 18 (64.3%) had a positive culture: 4 (13.3%) grew H. influenzae from their abscess drainage fluid samples; 1 grew H. influenzae alone; and 3 had mixed growth that included H. influenzae. The patients positive for H. influenzae were significantly older and had significantly larger abscesses. Although there were no cases of H. influenzae bacteremia or meningitis in our cases of orbital cellulitis, abscess drainage fluid microbiology indicated that H. influenzae remains a cause of orbital cellulitis. H. influenzae abscess volume was significantly larger than other bacterial abscesses and was associated with abscesses of mixed bacterial growth in older children. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Equine influenza: evaluation of the humoral immune response through the hemagglutination inhibition and single radial haemolysis, in vaccinated horses with commercial and experimental vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalva Assunção Portari Mancini

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Equine Influenza: evaluation of the humoral immune response through the hemagglutination inhibition and single radial haemolysis, in horses vaccinated with commercial and experimental vaccines. From 4 equine groups, the antibody protection levels against influenza were evaluted through the hemagglutination inhibition and single radial haemolysis. One group of these animals received immunization from 2 doses of influenza vaccine, of experimental preparation, at the Butantan Institute, São Paulo, Brasil (IB. Two other horse groups, regularly vaccinated received the annual booster dose from both commercial and experimental vaccines (IB. A control group remained without vaccination. Differences were observed among the antibody level medians of the serum samples harvested prior and post immunization of those vaccinated animals. No evident differences were detected among the antibody level medians from animals that received annual booster doses, due to the persistence of the protective antibody level, 12 months after the regular immunization. In the control group, the animals showed low antibody levels, for both serum samples. In fact these results suggested the good serologic response of both vaccines, the commercial and the experimental, tested preparations.

  16. [Current state of influenza vaccination and factors affecting vaccination rate among pregnant women].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Og Son; Yoon, Sung Won

    2014-10-01

    This study was done to examine the actual state of influenza vaccination among pregnant women and factors affecting vaccination rate. Data were collected using self-report questionnaires. Participants were pregnant women who participated in a prenatal education program at an acute care hospital in 2013. Data collected from 218 pregnant women were analyzed using the SPSS 18.0 Program. Only 48.6% of the pregnant women had received vaccination when the influenza was prevalent. Statistically significant factors affecting the influenza vaccination rate among pregnant women were vaccination experience in the previous year, knowledge and attitude about vaccination, and gestation period. Results indicate that the influenza vaccination rate among pregnant women is lower than that of elders, healthcare workers, and patients with chronic diseases, who have been considered to be the mandatory vaccination recipients. Therefore, it is necessary to develop programs and policies which provide information including safety of vaccines for pregnant women and to induce positive attitudes towards vaccination for these women, in order to ultimately improve the vaccination rate.

  17. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Influenza Vaccination among Adults with Chronic Medical Conditions Vary by Age in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Degan; Qiao, Yanru; Brown, Natalie E; Wang, Junling

    2017-01-01

    People living with chronic health conditions exhibit higher risk for developing severe complications from influenza according to the Centers for Diseases Control and Prevention. Although racial and ethnic disparities in influenza vaccination have been documented, it has not been comprehensively determined whether similar disparities are present among the adult population with at least one such condition. To study if racial and ethnic disparities in relation to influenza vaccination are present in adults suffering from at least one chronic condition and if such inequalities differ between age groups. The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2011-2012) was used to study the adult population (age ≥18) who had at least one chronic health condition. Baseline differences in population traits across racial and ethnic groups were identified using a chi-square test. This was conducted among various age groups. In addition, survey logistic regression was utilized to produce odds ratios of receiving influenza vaccination annually between racial and ethnic groups. The total sample consisted of 15,499 adults living with at least one chronic health condition. The numbers of non-Hispanic whites (whites), non-Hispanic blacks (blacks), and Hispanics were 8,658, 3,585, and 3,256, respectively. Whites (59.93%) were found to have a higher likelihood of self-reporting their receipt of the influenza vaccine in comparison to the black (48.54%) and Hispanic (48.65%) groups (P0.05). After controlling for patient characteristics, the difference in influenza vaccine coverage between whites and the minority groups were no longer significant for adults aged 50-64 years. However, the difference were still statistically significant for those aged ≥65 years. In the United States, there are significant disparities in influenza vaccination by race and ethnicity for adults over 65 years with at least one chronic health condition. Future research is needed to help develop more targeted interventions

  18. Options and Obstacles for Designing a Universal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yo Han; Seong, Baik Lin

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of antibodies specific to a highly conserved stalk region of the influenza virus hemagglutinin (HA), eliciting such antibodies has been considered the key to developing a universal influenza vaccine that confers broad-spectrum protection against various influenza subtypes. To achieve this goal, a prime/boost immunization strategy has been heralded to redirect host immune responses from the variable globular head domain to the conserved stalk domain of HA. While this approach has been successful in eliciting cross-reactive antibodies against the HA stalk domain, protective efficacy remains relatively poor due to the low immunogenicity of the domain, and the cross-reactivity was only within the same group, rather than among different groups. Additionally, concerns are raised on the possibility of vaccine-associated enhancement of viral infection and whether multiple boost immunization protocols would be considered practical from a clinical standpoint. Live attenuated vaccine hitherto remains unexplored, but is expected to serve as an alternative approach, considering its superior cross-reactivity. This review summarizes recent advancements in the HA stalk-based universal influenza vaccines, discusses the pros and cons of these approaches with respect to the potentially beneficial and harmful effects of neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, and suggests future guidelines towards the design of a truly protective universal influenza vaccine. PMID:25196381

  19. Implementation of a community pharmacy-based influenza vaccination program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, M E; Chalstrom, C V; Currie, J D; Sorofman, B

    1997-01-01

    To increase accessibility of influenza vaccine in a rural community by establishing a community pharmacy-based influenza vaccination program. An independent pharmacy in a rural eastern Iowa community of 5,000 people. Protocols for identification and screening of patients, administration of vaccine, and treatment of emergencies were developed by the pharmacist and approved by the county health department medical director. Administration of vaccine began October 15, 1996, and was completed on December 6, 1996. Patients were prospectively and retrospectively identified to receive the vaccination. Informed consent was obtained. Vaccine was administered by the pharmacist after screening for contraindications and counseling the patient. Weekly vaccination records were forwarded to the collaborating physician to update patient charts. To determine whether accessibility of influenza vaccine in the community was increased through pharmacist administration, the proportion of patients immunized in the pharmacy who were not vaccinated the previous year was determined. The pharmacist administered 343 doses of vaccine. Two-thirds of the immunized patients (67.9%) reported also being immunized the previous year. These patients were generally older (65 years of age +/- 13) than the previously nonimmunized patients (54 years of age +/- 16). However, 60.8% of the patients not immunized the previous year reported either they would not have gone elsewhere for the immunization (45.3%), or were unsure (25.5%). The data collected suggest that pharmacist administration of influenza vaccination in a rural community pharmacy increases access and, possibly, immunization rates. This may be especially true among high-risk younger adults who are often overlooked and would not normally have received the immunization.

  20. School-located influenza vaccination decreases laboratory-confirmed influenza and improves school attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannaraj, Pia S; Wang, Hai-Lin; Rivas, Hector; Wiryawan, Hilda; Smit, Michael; Green, Nicole; Aldrovandi, Grace M; El Amin, Alvin Nelson; Mascola, Laurene

    2014-08-01

    School-located influenza vaccination (SLV) programs can efficiently immunize large numbers of school-aged children. We evaluated the impact of SLV on laboratory-confirmed influenza and absenteeism. Active surveillance for influenza-like illness (ILI) was conducted on 4455 children in 4 SLV intervention and 4 control elementary schools (grades K-6) matched for sociodemographic characteristics during the 2010-2011 influenza season in Los Angeles County, California. Combined nose/throat swabs were collected from febrile children with ILI at presentation to the school nurse or during absenteeism. In SLV schools, 26.9%-46.6% of enrolled students received at least 1 dose of either inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccine compared with 0.8%-4.3% in control schools. Polymerase chain reaction for respiratory viruses (PCR) was performed on 1021 specimens obtained from 898 children. Specimens were positive for influenza in 217 (21.3%), including 2009 H1N1 (30.9%), H3 (9.2%), and B (59.9%). Children attending SLV schools, regardless of vaccination status, were 30.8% (95% confidence interval, 10.1%-46.8%) less likely to acquire influenza compared with children at control schools. Unvaccinated children were indirectly protected in the school with nearly 50% vaccination coverage compared with control schools (influenza rate, 27.1 vs 60.0 per 1000 children; P = .023). Unvaccinated children missed more school days than vaccinated children (4.3 vs 2.8 days per 100 school days; P attendance. Herd immunity for unvaccinated children may occur in schools with vaccination coverage approaching 50%. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Optimal strategies of social distancing and vaccination against seasonal influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Eunha

    2013-01-01

    Optimal control strategies for controlling seasonal influenza transmission in the US are of high interest, because of the significant epidemiological and economic burden of influenza. To evaluate optimal strategies of vaccination and social distancing, we used an age-structured dynamic model of seasonal influenza. We applied optimal control theory to identify the best way of reducing morbidity and mortality at a minimal cost. In combination with the Pontryagins maximum principle, we calculated time-dependent optimal policies of vaccination and social distancing to minimize the epidemiological and economic burden associated with seasonal influenza. We computed optimal age-specific intervention strategies and analyze them under various costs of interventions and disease transmissibility. Our results show that combined strategies have a stronger impact on the reduction of the final epidemic size. Our results also suggest that the optimal vaccination can be achieved by allocating most vaccines to preschool-age children (age under five) followed by young adults (age 20-39) and school age children (age 6-19). We find that the optimal vaccination rates for all age groups are highest at the beginning of the outbreak, requiring intense effort at the early phase of an epidemic. On the other hand, optimal social distancing of clinical cases tends to last the entire duration of an outbreak, and its intensity is relatively equal for all age groups. Furthermore, with higher transmissibility of the influenza virus (i.e. higher R0), the optimal control strategy needs to include more efforts to increase vaccination rates rather than efforts to encourage social distancing. Taken together, public health agencies need to consider both the transmissibility of the virus and ways to encourage early vaccination as well as voluntary social distancing of symptomatic cases in order to determine optimal intervention strategies against seasonal influenza.

  2. Parental views on vaccine safety and future vaccinations of children who experienced an adverse event following routine or seasonal influenza vaccination in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrella, Adriana; Gold, Michael; Marshall, Helen; Braunack-Mayer, Annette; Watson, Maureen; Baghurst, Peter

    2012-05-01

    To assess parental vaccine safety views and future vaccination decisions after an adverse event following immunization (AEFI) experienced by their child. A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted of parents of children aged 0-7 y, identified in AEFI reports submitted to the South Australian Immunization Section, Department Health. The reports included childhood National Immunization Program (NIP), seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Interviews were conducted following a national suspension of the 2010 seasonal trivalent influenza (STIV) vaccine. Parental attitudes toward vaccine safety, reasons for reporting the AEFI and impact on future vaccination intent were assessed. Of 179 parents interviewed, 88% were confident in the safety of vaccines in general. Parents reporting an AEFI to the STIV were more likely to state the event had influenced future vaccination decisions than the NIP vaccine reporters (65% vs 14%, p vaccinate their children against influenza. Media reports of the 2010 STIV program suspension was the most common reason for reporting an AEFI for parents of children who received an influenza vaccination. The AEFI experience did not impact on parental decision to continue with routine childhood NIP schedules, regardless of whether children received influenza or NIP vaccines. In contrast, most parents whose child experienced an AEFI to the 2010 STIV stated decreased confidence in the safety of influenza vaccines, which is likely to have impacted on the uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination in 2011. Addressing influenza vaccine safety concerns to promote influenza vaccination in the community is required.

  3. Possible Impact of Yearly Childhood Vaccination With Trivalent Inactivated Influenza Vaccine (TIV) on the Immune Response to the Pandemic Strain H1N1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ahdi; Fischer, Howard; Li, Xiaoming; Asmar, Basim

    2016-03-01

    Annual vaccination of children against seasonal influenza with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) has shown to be beneficial. However, this yearly practice may have unintended effect. Studies have shown that infection with wild type influenza A viruses can stimulate protective heterotypic immunity against unrelated or new influenza subtypes. We hypothesized that a consequence of yearly TIV vaccination is lack of induction of heterotypic immunity against the recent H1N1 pandemic. This was a retrospective case-control study. We reviewed the medical records of polymerase chain reaction-confirmed cases of 2009 H1N1 influenza infection in children 6 months to 18 years and a matched control group seen during the pandemic. We identified 353 polymerase chain reaction-confirmed H1N1 cases and 396 matching control subjects. Among the H1N1 group, 202/353 (57%) cases received a total of 477 doses of seasonal TIV compared with 218/396 (55%) in the control group who received a total of 435 doses. Seasonal TIV uptake was significantly higher in the H1N1 group 477/548 (87%) than in the control group, 435/532 (81%) (P = .017). Seasonal TIV uptake was significantly higher in H1N1-infected group. The finding suggests that the practice of yearly vaccination with TIV might have negatively affected the immune response against the novel pandemic H1N1 strain. Given the rarity of pandemic novel influenza viruses, and the high predictability of seasonal influenza occurrence, the practice of yearly influenza vaccination should be continued. However, the use of live attenuated intranasal vaccine, as opposed to TIV, may allow for the desirable development of a vigorous heterotypic immune response against future pandemics. © The Author(s) 2015.

  4. Influenza Vaccination in Community Dwelling Elderly Persons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.C.G. Voordouw (Bettie)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractAn influenza epidemic was first described in 1173, although there are reports of influenza as early as 412 BC. Recurrent epidemics and incidental pandemics caused by influenza virus are documented since the last 400 years. These were based upon clinical observation and epidemiology.

  5. Response to 2009 pandemic influenza a (H1N1) vaccine in HIV-infected patients and the influence of prior seasonal influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Soonawala (Darius); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); L.B.S. Gelinck (Luc); L.G. Visser (Leo); F.P. Kroon (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The immunogenicity of 2009 pandemic influenza A(H1N1) (pH1N1) vaccines and the effect of previous influenza vaccination is a matter of current interest and debate. We measured the immune response to pH1N1 vaccine in HIV-infected patients and in healthy controls. In addition

  6. Evaluation of the Canterbury under-18 seasonal influenza vaccination programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calder, Kristi; Bidwell, Susan; Brunton, Cheryl; Pink, Ramon

    2014-07-18

    To evaluate the performance of the 2013 Canterbury under-18 seasonal influenza vaccination programme (Christchurch, New Zealand). Routinely collected under 18 influenza vaccination uptake data were analysed to determine levels of vaccination uptake and equity of uptake across ethnic groups (NZ European, Maori and Pacific) and by level of deprivation. Qualitative data were collected to identify strategies that helped to achieve high uptake in primary care practices and schools. Overall uptake of influenza vaccination in 2013 was 32.9%, (compared to 18.5% in 2012), close to the target of 40%. Overall uptake in primary care was higher than in the school-based programme (29.2% versus 19.7%). Maori students had higher uptake than NZ European students in the school-based programme. In primary care, uptake for both Maori and Pacific children was lower than overall uptake and there was a marked gradient in uptake by socioeconomic quintile, with 30.2% uptake in the least deprived quintile compared to 21.9% uptake in the most deprived quintile. The cumulative effect of 3 years' consistency in offering the under-18 influenza vaccination in primary care practices, assisted by a timely media campaign and additional awareness generated by the school-based programme, has resulted in a marked increase in uptake of the vaccine in primary care in 2013. However, this was not equitably distributed. The school-based programme achieved better equity of uptake by deprivation and ethnicity. The challenge is to achieve both high and equitable uptake.

  7. Standardisation of inactivated influenza vaccines-Learning from history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, John M; Weir, Jerry P

    2018-03-01

    The single radial immunodiffusion assay has been the accepted method for determining the potency of inactivated influenza vaccines since 1978. The worldwide adoption of this assay for vaccine standardisation was facilitated through collaborative studies that demonstrated a high level of reproducibility and its applicability to the different types of influenza vaccine being produced at that time. Clinical evidence indicated the relevance of SRID as a potency assay. Unique features of the SRID assay are likely responsible for its longevity even as newer technologies for vaccine characterisation have been developed and refined. Nevertheless, there are significant limitations to the SRID assay that indicate the need for improvement, and there has been a substantial amount of work undertaken in recent years to develop and evaluate alternative potency assays, including collaborative studies involving research laboratories, regulatory agencies and vaccine manufacturers. Here, we provide an overview of the history of inactivated influenza vaccine potency testing, the current state of alternative assay development and the some of the major challenges to be overcome before implementation of new assays for potency determination. © 2018 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Characterization of regional influenza seasonality patterns in China and implications for vaccination strategies: spatio-temporal modeling of surveillance data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Yu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of influenza seasonal patterns in the inter-tropical zone impedes the establishment of effective routine immunization programs. China is a climatologically and economically diverse country, which has yet to establish a national influenza vaccination program. Here we characterize the diversity of influenza seasonality in China and make recommendations to guide future vaccination programs.We compiled weekly reports of laboratory-confirmed influenza A and B infections from sentinel hospitals in cities representing 30 Chinese provinces, 2005-2011, and data on population demographics, mobility patterns, socio-economic, and climate factors. We applied linear regression models with harmonic terms to estimate influenza seasonal characteristics, including the amplitude of annual and semi-annual periodicities, their ratio, and peak timing. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling and hierarchical clustering were used to identify predictors of influenza seasonal characteristics and define epidemiologically-relevant regions. The annual periodicity of influenza A epidemics increased with latitude (mean amplitude of annual cycle standardized by mean incidence, 140% [95% CI 128%-151%] in the north versus 37% [95% CI 27%-47%] in the south, p0.6 in provinces located within 27.4°N-31.3°N, slope of latitudinal gradient with latitude -0.016 [95% CI -0.025 to -0.008], p<0.001. In contrast, influenza B activity predominated in colder months throughout most of China. Climate factors were the strongest predictors of influenza seasonality, including minimum temperature, hours of sunshine, and maximum rainfall. Our main study limitations include a short surveillance period and sparse influenza sampling in some of the southern provinces.Regional-specific influenza vaccination strategies would be optimal in China; in particular, annual campaigns should be initiated 4-6 months apart in Northern and Southern China. Influenza surveillance should be strengthened in mid

  9. Vaccination Against Seasonal or Pandemic Influenza in Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Alexandre; Mabire, Cédric; Hugli, Olivier; Dorribo, Victor; Zanetti, Giorgio; Lazor-Blanchet, Catherine; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2016-04-01

    Influenza is a major concern for Emergency Medical Services (EMS); EMS workers' (EMS-Ws) vaccination rates remain low despite promotion. Determinants of vaccination for seasonal influenza (SI) or pandemic influenza (PI) are unknown in this setting. The influence of the H1N1 pandemic on EMS-W vaccination rates, differences between SI and PI vaccination rates, and the vaccination determinants were investigated. A survey was conducted in 2011 involving 65 Swiss EMS-Ws. Socio-professional data, self-declared SI/PI vaccination status, and motives for vaccine refusal or acceptation were collected. Response rate was 95%. The EMS-Ws were predominantly male (n=45; 73%), in good health (87%), with a mean age of 36 (SD=7.7) years. Seventy-four percent had more than six years of work experience. Self-declared vaccination rates were 40% for both SI and PI (PI+/SI+), 19% for PI only (PI+/SI-), 1.6% for SI only (PI-/SI+), and 39% were not vaccinated against either (PI-/SI-). Women's vaccination rates specifically were lower in all categories but the difference was not statistically significant. During the previous three years, 92% of PI+/SI+ EMS-Ws received at least one SI vaccination; it was 8.3% in the case of PI-/SI- (P=.001) and 25% for PI+/SI- (P=.001). During the pandemic, SI vaccination rate increased from 26% during the preceding year to 42% (P=.001). Thirty percent of the PI+/SI+ EMS-Ws declared that they would not get vaccination next year, while this proportion was null for the PI-/SI- and PI+/SI- groups. Altruism and discomfort induced by the surgical mask required were the main motivations to get vaccinated against PI. Factors limiting PI or SI vaccination included the option to wear a mask, avoidance of medication, fear of adverse effects, and concerns about safety and effectiveness. Average vaccination rate in this study's EMS-Ws was below recommended values, particularly for women. Previous vaccination status was a significant determinant of PI and future

  10. Practical aspects of vaccination of poultry against avian influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spackman, Erica; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J

    2014-12-01

    Although little has changed in vaccine technology for avian influenza virus (AIV) in the past 20 years, the approach to vaccination of poultry (chickens, turkeys and ducks) for avian influenza has evolved as highly pathogenic AIV has become endemic in several regions of the world. Vaccination for low pathogenicity AIV is also becoming routine in regions where there is a high level of field challenge. In contrast, some countries will not use vaccination at all and some will only use it on an emergency basis during eradication efforts (i.e. stamping-out). There are pros and cons to each approach and, since every outbreak situation is different, no one method will work equally well in all situations. Numerous practical aspects must be considered when developing an AIV control program with vaccination as a component, such as: (1) the goals of vaccination must be defined; (2) the population to be vaccinated must be clearly identified; (3) there must be a plan to obtain and administer good quality vaccine in a timely manner and to achieve adequate coverage with the available resources; (4) risk factors for vaccine failure should be mitigated as much as possible; and, most importantly, (5) biosecurity must be maintained as much as possible, if not enhanced, during the vaccination period. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Reasons given for not receiving an influenza vaccination, 2011–12 influenza season, United States☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibanez, Tammy A.; Kennedy, Erin D.

    2017-01-01

    Background Influenza vaccination coverage in the United States remains below national targets and racial/ethnic differences persist. Objectives To gain insights into potential strategies for improving influenza vaccination by examining reasons given for not receiving an influenza vaccination during the 2011–12 influenza season. Methods Data from the National Flu Survey were analyzed for the 2011–12 influenza season. Tests of association between reasons for non-vaccination and demographic variables were conducted using Wald chi-square tests. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were used to determine variables independently associated with each reason for non-vaccination. Results For adults and children, there were no racial/ethnic differences in the overall most frequent reason for non-vaccination: “unlikely to get very sick from the flu”. Regarding adults, there were racial/ethnic differences in seven of the twelve reasons for non-vaccination in bivariate analyses, but only three remained significant in the multivariable models. Most notable of these was that blacks (40.9%) were more likely than Hispanics (27.0%), whites (25.2%), and adults of other/multiple races (21.2%) to report concerns about getting the flu from the vaccination and blacks (39.8%) were more likely than whites (28.4%) and adults of other/multiple races (29.3%) to report concerns about side effects from the vaccine. Regarding children, there were racial/ethnic differences for three of the reasons for non-vaccination, and these remained significant in the multivariable models. The most noteworthy of these was that more black (44.4%) than white (24.0%) and other/multiple race (19.0%) parents had concerns about their child getting the flu from the vaccination. Other demographic variables (age, gender income, MSA for adults and age and income for children) were also associated with reasons for non-vaccination based on the multivariable models. Conclusions There are racial/ethnic group

  12. Safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of an inactivated influenza vaccine in healthy adults: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial over two influenza seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouveret Nancy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Seasonal influenza imposes a substantial personal morbidity and societal cost burden. Vaccination is the major strategy for influenza prevention; however, because antigenically drifted influenza A and B viruses circulate annually, influenza vaccines must be updated to provide protection against the predicted prevalent strains for the next influenza season. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy, safety, reactogenicity, and immunogenicity of a trivalent inactivated split virion influenza vaccine (TIV in healthy adults over two influenza seasons in the US. Methods The primary endpoint of this double-blind, randomized study was the average efficacy of TIV versus placebo for the prevention of vaccine-matched, culture-confirmed influenza (VMCCI across the 2005-2006 and 2006-2007 influenza seasons. Secondary endpoints included the prevention of laboratory-confirmed (defined by culture and/or serology influenza, as well as safety, reactogenicity, immunogenicity, and consistency between three consecutive vaccine lots. Participants were assessed actively during both influenza seasons, and nasopharyngeal swabs were collected for viral culture from individuals with influenza-like illness. Blood specimens were obtained for serology one month after vaccination and at the end of each influenza season's surveillance period. Results Although the point estimate for efficacy in the prevention of all laboratory-confirmed influenza was 63.2% (97.5% confidence interval [CI] lower bound of 48.2%, the point estimate for the primary endpoint, efficacy of TIV against VMCCI across both influenza seasons, was 46.3% with a 97.5% CI lower bound of 9.8%. This did not satisfy the pre-specified success criterion of a one-sided 97.5% CI lower bound of >35% for vaccine efficacy. The VMCCI attack rates were very low overall at 0.6% and 1.2% in the TIV and placebo groups, respectively. Apart from a mismatch for influenza B virus lineage in 2005

  13. Vaccines within vaccines: the use of adenovirus types 4 and 7 as influenza vaccine vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Eric A

    2014-01-01

    Adenovirus Types 4 and 7 (Ad4 and Ad7) are associated with acute respiratory distress (ARD). In order to prevent widespread Ad-associated ARD (Ad-ARD) the United States military immunizes new recruits using a safe and effective lyophilized wildtype Ad4 and Ad7 delivered orally in an enteric-coated capsule. We cloned Ad4 and Ad7 and modified them to express either a GFP-Luciferase (GFPLuc) fusion gene or a centralized influenza H1 hemagglutinin (HA1-con). BALB/c mice were injected with GFPLuc expressing viruses intramuscularly (i.m.) and intranasally (i.n.). Ad4 induced significantly higher luciferase expression levels as compared with Ad7 by both routes. Ad7 transduction was restored using a human CD46+ transgenic mouse model. Mice immunized with serial dilutions of viruses expressing the HA1-con influenza vaccine gene were challenged with 100 MLD 50 of influenza virus. Ad4 protected BALB/c mice at a lower dose by i.m. immunization as compared with Ad7. Unexpectedly, there was no difference in protection by i.n. immunization. Although Ad7 i.m. transduction was restored in CD46+ transgenic mice, protection against influenza challenge required even higher doses as compared with the BALB/c mice. However, Ad7 i.n. immunized CD46+ transgenic mice were better protected as compared with Ad4. Interestingly, the restoration of Ad7 transduction in CD46+ mice did not increase vaccine efficacy and indicates that Ad7 may transduce a different subset of cells through alternative receptors in the absence of CD46. These data indicate that both Ad4 and Ad7 can effectively induce anti-H1N1 immunity against a heterologous challenge using a centralized H1 gene. Future studies in non-human primates or human clinical trials will determine the overall effectiveness of Ad4 and Ad7 as vaccines for influenza.

  14. Effectiveness of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine introduction into routine childhood immunization in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowgill, Karen D.; Ndiritu, Moses; Nyiro, Joyce; Slack, Mary P. E.; Chiphatsi, Salome; Ismail, Amina; Kamau, Tatu; Mwangi, Isaiah; English, Mike; Newton, Charles R. J. C.; Feikin, Daniel R.; Scott, J. Anthony G.

    2006-01-01

    Context Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) conjugate vaccine is not perceived as a public health priority in Africa because data on Hib disease burden and vaccine effectiveness are scarce. Hib immunization was introduced in Kenyan infants in 2001. Objective to define invasive Hib disease incidence and Hib vaccine program effectiveness. Design, Setting, Patients culture-based surveillance for invasive Hib disease at Kilifi District Hospital from 2000 to 2005 was linked to demographic surveillance of 38,000 children aged <5 years in Kilifi District, Kenya. HIV infection and Hib vaccination status were determined for children with Hib disease admitted 2002–2005. Interventions Conjugate Hib vaccine within the routine childhood immunization program at ages 6, 10 and 14 weeks from November 2001 Main outcome measures Incidence of culture-proven Hib invasive disease before and after vaccine introduction and vaccine program effectiveness (1-incidence rate ratio) Results Prior to vaccine introduction the median age of Hib cases was 8 months; case fatality was 23%. Among children aged <5 years the annual incidence of invasive Hib disease 1 year before and 1 and 3 years after vaccine introduction was 66, 47 and 7.6 per 100,000, respectively. For children <2 years, incidence was 119, 82 and 16, respectively. In 2004–2005 vaccine effectiveness was 88% (95% CI 73–96%) among children <5 years and 87% (95% CI 66–96%) among children <2 years. Of 53 Hib cases admitted during 2002–2005, 29 (55%) were age-ineligible to have received vaccine, 12 (23%) had not been vaccinated despite being eligible, and 12 (23%) had received ≥2 doses of vaccine (2 were HIV-positive). Conclusions In Kenya, introduction of Hib vaccine into the routine childhood immunization program reduced Hib disease incidence among children aged <5 years to 12% of its baseline level. This impact was not observed until the third year after vaccine introduction. PMID:16896110

  15. Japanese anti- versus pro-influenza vaccination websites: a text-mining analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuhara, Tsuyoshi; Ishikawa, Hirono; Okada, Masafumi; Kato, Mio; Kiuchi, Takahiro

    2018-03-23

    Anti-vaccination sentiment exists worldwide and Japan is no exception. Health professionals publish pro-influenza vaccination messages online to encourage proactive seeking of influenza vaccination. However, influenza vaccine coverage among the Japanese population is less than optimal. The contents of pro- and anti-influenza vaccination websites may contribute to readers' acceptance of one or the other position. We aimed to use a text-mining method to examine frequently appearing content on websites for and against influenza vaccination. We conducted online searches in January 2017 using two major Japanese search engines (Google Japan and Yahoo! Japan). Targeted websites were classified as 'pro', 'anti' or 'neutral' depending on their claims, with author(s) classified as 'health professionals', 'mass media' or 'laypersons'. Text-mining analysis was conducted, and statistical analysis was performed using a chi-squared test. Of the 334 websites analyzed, 13 content topics were identified. The three most frequently appearing content topics on pro-vaccination websites were vaccination effect for preventing serious cases of influenza, side effects of vaccination, and efficacy rate of vaccination. The three most frequent topics on anti-vaccination websites were ineffectiveness of influenza vaccination, toxicity of vaccination, and side effects of vaccination. The main disseminators of each topic, by author classification, were also revealed. We discuss possible tactics of online influenza vaccination promotion to counter anti-vaccination websites.

  16. The Association between Influenza Vaccination and Other Preventative Health Behaviors in a Cohort of Pregnant Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheminske, Megan; Henninger, Michelle; Irving, Stephanie A.; Thompson, Mark; Williams, Jenny; Shifflett, Pat; Ball, Sarah W.; Avalos, Lyndsay Ammon; Naleway, Allison L.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Although pregnant women are a high-priority group for seasonal influenza vaccination, vaccination rates in this population remain below target levels. Previous studies have identified sociodemographic predictors of vaccine choice, but relationships between preconception heath behaviors and seasonal influenza vaccination are poorly…

  17. Parental perceptions of childhood seasonal influenza vaccination in Singapore: A cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Mabel S F; Tan, Hweeyong; Hartman, Mikael; Tam, Clarence C; Hoo, Cheehow; Lim, Jiaqing; Chiow, Simin; Lee, Simin; Thng, Renzhi; Cai, Mingzhe; Tan, Yanru; Lock, Jingzhan

    2017-10-27

    Seasonal influenza vaccination is recommended in children aged 6-59months, but little is known about child vaccination coverage and determinants in Asian settings. We report the results of a survey of knowledge, attitudes, practices, and determinants of child influenza vaccination in Singapore. In December 2015-March 2016, we conducted a survey of 332 parents of children aged 6months to 5years attending pre-schools. We assessed child influenza vaccine coverage and parental knowledge, attitudes, and practices of child influenza vaccination. We used multivariable regression and structural equation models to identify factors associated with child influenza vaccination. Knowledge about influenza, perceived benefit of vaccination, and willingness to vaccinate were high. However, only 32% of children had ever received influenza vaccine, and only 15% in the past year. Factors independently associated with child influenza vaccination included: being recommended influenza vaccine by a child's doctor (prevalence ratio (PR)=2.47, 95% CI: 1.75-3.48); receiving influenza vaccine information from a private general practitioner (PR=1.47, 95% CI: 1.05-2.04); regularly receiving pre-travel influenza vaccine (PR=1.64, 95% CI: 1.19-2.25); higher willingness to vaccinate (PR=1.58, 95% CI:1.24-2.04 per unit increase in willingness score); and feeling well-informed about influenza vaccine (PR=1.44, 95% CI: 1.04-1.99). Parents who obtained influenza vaccine information from television were less likely to have vaccinated their child (PR=0.44, 95% CI: 0.23-0.85). Path analysis indicated that being recommended vaccination by a child's doctor increased willingness to vaccinate and self-efficacy (feeling well-informed about influenza vaccine). Median willingness-to-pay for a dose of influenza vaccine was SGD30 (interquartile range: SGD20-SGD50), and was higher in parents of vaccinated compared with unvaccinated children (SGD45vs SGD30, p=0.0012). Knowledge and willingness to vaccinate was

  18. Safety, immunogenicity and infectivity of new live attenuated influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isakova-Sivak, Irina; Rudenko, Larisa

    2015-01-01

    Live attenuated influenza vaccines (LAIVs) are believed to be immunologically superior to inactivated influenza vaccines, because they can induce a variety of adaptive immune responses, including serum antibodies, mucosal and cell-mediated immunity. In addition to the licensed cold-adapted LAIV backbones, a number of alternative LAIV approaches are currently being developed and evaluated in preclinical and clinical studies. This review summarizes recent progress in the development and evaluation of LAIVs, with special attention to their safety, immunogenicity and infectivity for humans, and discusses their perspectives for the future.

  19. [Influenza vaccination coverage in children with risk conditions in Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Roser; Campins, Magda; Rodrigo, José Ángel; Uriona, Sonia; Vilca, Luz María

    2015-01-01

    Influenza vaccination is recommended in Catalonia in children older than 6 months with risk conditions for developing flu-related complications. The aim of this study is to determine influenza vaccine coverage in children with risk conditions and their association with socio-demographic factors and medical variables. Descriptive cross-sectional study of children with risk conditions for developing influenza complications (aged between 6months and 15years old) assigned to Primary Health Care centers in Catalonia at the beginning of the 2011-2012 influenza vaccination campaign. The information on vaccination status and study variables were obtained from data registered on electronic health records by primary care teams. The relationship between influenza vaccination and demographic and medical variables was analyzed using bivariate analysis and a multiple logistic regression model. Influenza vaccination coverage was 23.9%. Variables associated with influenza vaccination were: age 2years or older (aOR: 1.6 [1.4-1.7] in children 3-5years old; 1.8 [1.7-2.0] in those 6-10 years, and 2.2 [2.0 -2.4] in children ≥11years]); male sex (aOR: 1.1 [1.0-1.1]); foreign nationality (aOR: 1.2 [1.2-1.3]); age-appropriate immunization according to the systematic immunization schedule (aOR: 3.3 [2.8-3.8]); more than one visit to the primary care physician (5 or more visits) (aOR: 4.1 [3.8-4.4]), and more than one risk condition (3 or more conditions) (aOR: 2.5 [1.6-3.9]). Compared to other countries, influenza vaccination coverage among children with risk conditions is low in our study. Strategies to improve coverage should be implemented. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  20. Bacterially produced recombinant influenza vaccines based on virus-like particles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Jegerlehner

    Full Text Available Although current influenza vaccines are effective in general, there is an urgent need for the development of new technologies to improve vaccine production timelines, capacities and immunogenicity. Herein, we describe the development of an influenza vaccine technology which enables recombinant production of highly efficient influenza vaccines in bacterial expression systems. The globular head domain of influenza hemagglutinin, comprising most of the protein's neutralizing epitopes, was expressed in E. coli and covalently conjugated to bacteriophage-derived virus-like particles produced independently in E.coli. Conjugate influenza vaccines produced this way were used to immunize mice and found to elicit immune sera with high antibody titers specific for the native influenza hemagglutinin protein and high hemagglutination-inhibition titers. Moreover vaccination with these vaccines induced full protection against lethal challenges with homologous and highly drifted influenza strains.

  1. A universal influenza virus vaccine candidate confers protection against pandemic H1N1 infection in preclinical ferret studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Liu, Wen-Chun; Choi, Angela; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Atlas, Talia; Rajendran, Madhusudan; Solórzano, Alicia; Berlanda-Scorza, Francesco; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Palese, Peter; Albrecht, Randy A; Krammer, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Influenza viruses evade human adaptive immune responses due to continuing antigenic changes. This makes it necessary to re-formulate and re-administer current seasonal influenza vaccines on an annual basis. Our pan-influenza vaccination approach attempts to redirect antibody responses from the variable, immuno-dominant hemagglutinin head towards the conserved-but immuno-subdominant-hemagglutinin stalk. The strategy utilizes sequential immunization with chimeric hemagglutinin-based vaccines expressing exotic head domains, and a conserved hemagglutinin stalk. We compared a live-attenuated influenza virus prime followed by an inactivated split-virus boost to two doses of split-virus vaccines and assessed the impact of adjuvant on protection against challenge with pandemic H1N1 virus in ferrets. All tested immunization regimens successfully induced broadly cross-reactive antibody responses. The combined live-attenuated/split virus vaccination conferred superior protection against pandemic H1N1 infection compared to two doses of split-virus vaccination. Our data support advancement of this chimeric hemagglutinin-based vaccine approach to clinical trials in humans.

  2. Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccination Rates and Factors Affecting Vaccination among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ülkü Aka Aktürk

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are recommended in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients to decrease associated risks at all stages. Although the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is high in our country, as previously reported, vaccination rates are low. Aims: To assess the vaccination rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and factors that may affect these. Study Design: Multi-centre cross-sectional study. Methods: Patients admitted to the chest diseases clinics of six different centres between 1 February 2013 and 1 January 2014 with a pre-diagnosis of Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease according to the Global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease criteria, who were in a stable condition were included in the study. The survey, which included demographic characteristics, socio-economic status, severity of disease and vaccination information, was first tested on a small patient population before the study. The survey was completed by the investigators after obtaining written informed consent. Results: The average age of the 296 included patients was 66.3±9.3 years and 91.9% were male. Of these, 36.5% had the influenza vaccination and 14.1% had the pneumococcal vaccination. The most common reason for not being vaccinated was ‘no recommendation by doctors’: 57.2% in the case of influenza vaccinations, and 46.8% in the case of pneumococcal vaccinations. Both vaccination rates were significantly higher in those patients with comorbidities (influenza vaccination p0.05. Vaccination rates were significantly higher in those with a white-collar occupation and higher education level, and who presented to a university hospital (p<0.001. Conclusion: Medical professionals do not request vaccinations as often as the International Guidelines suggest for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Awareness of the importance of these vaccinations among both doctors and patients

  3. Immunogenicity and Efficacy of Different Haemophilus influenzae type b Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mojgani, N.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus influenzae, a major cause of meningitis in young children leading to death and other neurological sequelae. The disease leaves 15 to 35% of the survivors with permanent disabilities, such as, mental retardation or deafness. Despite the availability of new and more powerful antibiotics children with Hib meningitis still suffer from high mortality or morbidity. The emergence of multiresistant Hib strains causes increasing difficulties in selecting proper antibiotics for the treatment. Since 1970, the capsular polysaccharide polyribosylribitol phosphate (PRP in H. influenzae b has been the target for vaccine development. The first Hib polysaccharide vaccine licensed in 1985, proved immunogenic in human adults, but failed to elicit an immune response in children under 2 years of age who were at greatest risk of developing the invasive Hib infection. These factors led to one of the most exciting advances in pediatrics, the development of Hib conjugate vaccines. Unlike most other vaccines for preventing a particular disease which are generally similar for all types, the specific characteristics of the available Hib conjugate vaccines licensed vary from each other in structure and immunological properties. In this review the immunogenicity and efficacy of Hib vaccines including a PRP vaccine; b Conjugate vaccines; and c Combination vaccines is evaluated.

  4. Influenza (flu) vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccine Information Statement. Influenza (Flu) Vaccine (Inactivated or Recombinant): What you need to know. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website at www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/ ...

  5. Efficacy of trivalent influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed influenza among young children in a randomized trial in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfes, Melissa A; Goswami, Doli; Sharmeen, Amina Tahia; Yeasmin, Sultana; Parvin, Nasrin; Nahar, Kamrun; Rahman, Mustafizur; Barends, Marion; Ahmed, Dilruba; Rahman, Mohammed Ziaur; Bresee, Joseph; Luby, Stephen; Moulton, Lawrence H; Santosham, Mathuram; Fry, Alicia M; Brooks, W Abdullah

    2017-12-15

    Few trials have evaluated influenza vaccine efficacy (VE) in young children, a group particularly vulnerable to influenza complications. We aimed to estimate VE against influenza in children aged Children aged 6-23 months were enrolled 1:1 in a parallel, double-blind, randomized controlled trial of trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) versus inactivated polio vaccine (IPV); conducted August 2010-March 2014 in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Children received two pediatric doses of vaccine, one month apart, and were followed for one year for febrile and respiratory illness. Field assistants conducted weekly home-based, active surveillance and ill children were referred to the study clinic for clinical evaluation and nasopharyngeal wash specimen collection. Analysis included all children who received a first vaccine dose and compared yearly incidence of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-confirmed influenza between trial arms. The VE was estimated as 1-(rate ratio of illness) × 100%, using unadjusted Poisson regression. The trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01319955. Across four vaccination rounds, 4081 children were enrolled and randomized, contributing 2576 child-years of observation to the IIV3 arm and 2593 child-years to the IPV arm. Influenza incidence was 10 episodes/100 child-years in the IIV3 arm and 15 episodes/100 child-years in the IPV arm. Overall, the VE was 31% (95% confidence interval 18, 42%) against any RT-PCR-confirmed influenza. The VE varied by season, but was similar by influenza type/subtype and participant age and sex. Vaccination of young children with IIV3 provided a significant reduction in laboratory-confirmed influenza; however, exploration of additional influenza vaccine strategies, such as adjuvanted vaccines or standard adult vaccine doses, is warranted to find more effective influenza vaccines for young children in low-income countries. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Post licensure surveillance of influenza vaccines in the Vaccine Safety Datalink in the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rongxia; Stewart, Brock; McNeil, Michael M; Duffy, Jonathan; Nelson, Jennifer; Kawai, Alison Tse; Baxter, Roger; Belongia, Edward A; Weintraub, Eric

    2016-08-01

    The changes in each year in influenza vaccine antigenic components as well as vaccine administration patterns may pose new risks of adverse events following immunization (AEs). To evaluate the safety of influenza vaccines annually administered to people ≥ 6 months, we conducted weekly post licensure surveillance for seven pre-specified adverse events following receipt of influenza vaccines during the 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 seasons in the Vaccine Safety Datalink (VSD). We used both a historically-controlled cohort design with the Poisson-based maximized sequential probability ratio test (maxSPRT) and a self-controlled risk interval (SCRI) design with the binomial-based maxSPRT. For each adverse event outcome, we defined the risk interval on the basis of biologic plausibility and prior literature. For the historical cohort design, numbers of expected adverse events were calculated from the prior seven seasons, adjusted for age and site. For the SCRI design, a comparison window was defined either before vaccination or after vaccination, depending on each specific outcome. An elevated risk of febrile seizures 0-1 days following trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (IIV3) was identified in children aged 6-23 months during the 2014-2015 season using the SCRI design. We found the relative risk (RR) of febrile seizures following concomitant administration of IIV3 and PCV13 was 5.3 with a 95% CI 1.87-14.75. Without concomitant PCV 13 administration, the estimated risk decreased and was no longer statistically significant (RR: 1.4; CI: 0.54 - 3.61). No increased risks, other than for febrile seizures, were identified in influenza vaccine safety surveillance during 2013-2014 and 2014-2015 seasons in the VSD. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. A chimeric haemagglutinin-based influenza split virion vaccine adjuvanted with AS03 induces protective stalk-reactive antibodies in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, Raffael; Kinzler, David; Choi, Angela; Hirsh, Ariana; Beaulieu, Edith; Lecrenier, Nicolas; Innis, Bruce L; Palese, Peter; Mallett, Corey P; Krammer, Florian

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal influenza virus vaccines are generally effective at preventing disease, but need to be well matched to circulating virus strains for maximum benefit. Influenza viruses constantly undergo antigenic changes because of their high mutation rate in the immunodominant haemagglutinin (HA) head domain, which necessitates annual re-formulation and re-vaccination for continuing protection. In case of pandemic influenza virus outbreaks, new vaccines need to be produced and quickly distributed. Novel influenza virus vaccines that redirect the immune response towards more conserved epitopes located in the HA stalk domain may remove the need for annual vaccine re-formulation and could also protect against emergent pandemic strains to which the human population is immunologically naive. One approach to create such universal influenza virus vaccines is the use of constructs expressing chimeric HAs. By sequential immunization with vaccine strains expressing the same conserved HA stalk domain and exotic HA heads to which the host is naive, antibodies against the stalk can be boosted to high titres. Here we tested a monovalent chimeric HA-based prototype universal influenza virus split virion vaccine candidate with and without AS03 adjuvant in primed mice. We found that the chimeric HA-based vaccination regimen induced higher stalk antibody titres than the seasonal vaccine. The stalk antibody responses were long lasting, cross-reactive to distantly related HAs and provided protection in vivo in a serum transfer challenge model. The results of this study are promising and support further development of a universal influenza vaccine candidate built on the chimeric HA technology platform.

  8. Pattern of exposure to information and its impact on seasonal influenza vaccination uptake in nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, E K H; Lee, S; Lee, S S

    2017-12-01

    Uptake of annual influenza vaccination of healthcare workers (HCWs) varies, and remains at a suboptimal level in many countries. As HCWs are often exposed to a variety of information about vaccination, the pattern of exposure may impact their decision; this deserves further investigation. Practising nurses in Hong Kong were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey in February 2016, after the winter seasonal peak. The questionnaire covered demographics, work nature and experiences, vaccination uptake history and reasons for vaccination decisions. Two behavioural categories for access to information were defined - passive exposure to information and active information-seeking - differentiated by the source, type and nature of information accessed. Chi-squared test, Mann-Whitney U-test and logistic regression were performed to compare vaccinated and unvaccinated nurses. In total, 1177 valid returns were received from nurses. The median age of respondents was 32 years and 86% were female. The overall vaccination rate was 33%. Passive exposure to information from the workplace, professional body and social network was not predictive of vaccination decision, but passive exposure to information from mass media was predictive [odds ratio (OR) 1.78]. Active information-seeking, such as consulting a senior (OR 2.46), organizing promotional activities (OR 2.85) and undertaking an information search (OR 2.43), was significantly associated with increased vaccination uptake. A cumulative effect could be demonstrated for active information-seeking (OR 1.86), but not for passive exposure to information. The current strategy of promotions and campaigns for seasonal influenza vaccination in HCWs may not be effective in increasing vaccination coverage. Measures targeting information-seeking behaviours may serve as an alternative approach. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Public health impact and economic benefits of quadrivalent influenza vaccine in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamotte, Aurélien; Clay, Emilie; Macabeo, Bérengère; Caicedo, Andrès; Lopez, Juan Guillermo; Bricks, Lucia; Romero Prada, Martín; Marrugo, Rubén; Alfonso, Pamela; Moreno Arévalo, Brechla; Franco, Danilo; Garcia Diaz, Lourdes; Isaza de Molto, Yadira

    2017-04-03

    Annual trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) containing 2 A strains and one B lineage have been recommended for the prevention of influenza in most of Latin American countries. However, the circulation of 2 B lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) and difficulties in predicting the predominating lineage have led to the development of quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIV), including both B lineages. Thus, the objective was to estimate the public health impact and influenza-related costs if QIV would have been used instead of TIV in 3 Latin American countries. We used a static model over the seasons 2010-2014 in Brazil, 2007-2014 in Colombia and 2006-2014 in Panama, focusing on population groups targeted by local vaccination recommendations: young children, adults with risk factors and the elderly. In Brazil, between 2010 and 2014, using QIV instead of TIV would have avoided US$ 6,200 per 100,000 person-years in societal costs, based on 168 influenza cases, 89 consultations, 3.2 hospitalizations and 0.38 deaths per 100,000 person-years. In Colombia and Panama, these would have ranged from US$ 1,000 to 12,700 (based on 34 cases, 13-25 consultations, 0.6-8.9 hospitalizations and 0.04-1.74 deaths) and from US$ 3,000 to 33,700 (based on 113 cases, 55-82 consultations, 0.5-27.8 hospitalizations and 0.08-6.87 deaths) per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Overall, the broader protection offered by QIV would have reduced the influenza humanistic and economic burden in the 3 countries. Despite the lack of local data leading to several extrapolations, this study is the first to give quantitative estimates of the potential benefits of QIV in Latin America.

  10. Public health impact and economic benefits of quadrivalent influenza vaccine in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamotte, Aurélien; Clay, Emilie; Macabeo, Bérengère; Caicedo, Andrès; Lopez, Juan Guillermo; Bricks, Lucia; Romero Prada, Martín; Marrugo, Rubén; Alfonso, Pamela; Moreno Arévalo, Brechla; Franco, Danilo; Garcia Diaz, Lourdes; Isaza de Molto, Yadira

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Annual trivalent influenza vaccines (TIV) containing 2 A strains and one B lineage have been recommended for the prevention of influenza in most of Latin American countries. However, the circulation of 2 B lineages (Victoria and Yamagata) and difficulties in predicting the predominating lineage have led to the development of quadrivalent influenza vaccines (QIV), including both B lineages. Thus, the objective was to estimate the public health impact and influenza-related costs if QIV would have been used instead of TIV in 3 Latin American countries. We used a static model over the seasons 2010–2014 in Brazil, 2007–2014 in Colombia and 2006–2014 in Panama, focusing on population groups targeted by local vaccination recommendations: young children, adults with risk factors and the elderly. In Brazil, between 2010 and 2014, using QIV instead of TIV would have avoided US$ 6,200 per 100,000 person-years in societal costs, based on 168 influenza cases, 89 consultations, 3.2 hospitalizations and 0.38 deaths per 100,000 person-years. In Colombia and Panama, these would have ranged from US$ 1,000 to 12,700 (based on 34 cases, 13–25 consultations, 0.6–8.9 hospitalizations and 0.04–1.74 deaths) and from US$ 3,000 to 33,700 (based on 113 cases, 55–82 consultations, 0.5–27.8 hospitalizations and 0.08–6.87 deaths) per 100,000 person-years, respectively. Overall, the broader protection offered by QIV would have reduced the influenza humanistic and economic burden in the 3 countries. Despite the lack of local data leading to several extrapolations, this study is the first to give quantitative estimates of the potential benefits of QIV in Latin America. PMID:28118092

  11. Cost-effectiveness of an influenza vaccination program offering intramuscular and intradermal vaccines versus intramuscular vaccine alone for elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Man-Kit; You, Joyce H S

    2016-05-11

    Intradermal (ID) injection is an alternative route for influenza vaccine administration in elderly with potential improvement of vaccine coverage. This study aimed to investigate the cost-effectiveness of an influenza vaccination program offering ID vaccine to elderly who had declined intramuscular (IM) vaccine from the perspective of Hong Kong public healthcare provider. A decision analytic model was used to simulate outcomes of two programs: IM vaccine alone (IM program), and IM or ID vaccine (IM/ID program) in a hypothetic cohort of elderly aged 65 years. Outcome measures included influenza-related direct medical cost, infection rate, mortality rate, quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) loss, and incremental cost per QALY saved (ICER). Model inputs were derived from literature. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the impact of uncertainty of model variables. In base-case analysis, the IM/ID program was more costly (USD52.82 versus USD47.59 per individual to whom vaccine was offered) with lower influenza infection rate (8.71% versus 9.65%), mortality rate (0.021% versus 0.024%) and QALYs loss (0.00336 versus 0.00372) than the IM program. ICER of IM/ID program was USD14,528 per QALY saved. One-way sensitivity analysis found ICER of IM/ID program to exceed willingness-to-pay threshold (USD39,933) when probability of influenza infection in unvaccinated elderly decreased from 10.6% to 5.4%. In 10,000 Monte Carlo simulations of elderly populations of Hong Kong, the IM/ID program was the preferred option in 94.7% of time. An influenza vaccination program offering ID vaccine to elderly who had declined IM vaccine appears to be a highly cost-effective option. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Introducing a pneumococcal vaccine to an existing influenza immunization program : vaccination rates and predictors of noncompliance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Opstelten, W; Hak, E; Verheij, T J; van Essen, G A

    2001-01-01

    PURPOSE: Influenza vaccination has been recommended for all elderly people in The Netherlands since 1996, with greater than 80% compliance. It is unknown, however, if the addition of another vaccine to this immunization program will affect compliance. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: General practitioners

  13. Avian influenza mucosal vaccination in chickens with replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    We evaluated protection conferred by mucosal vaccination with replication competent adenovirus (RCA)-free recombinant adenovirus expressing a codon-optimized avian influenza (AI) H5 gene (AdTW68.H5ck). Commercial layer-type chicken groups were singly vaccinated ocularly at 5 days of age, or singly v...

  14. Seasonal and 2009 H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake, predictors of vaccination and self-reported barriers to vaccination among secondary school teachers and staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Julia E; Sales, Jessica M; Morfaw, Christopher; Jones, LaDawna M; Murray, Dennis; Wingood, Gina M; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M

    2011-01-01

    Objective Teachers, like healthcare workers, may be a strategic target for influenza immunization programs. Influenza vaccination is critical to protect both teachers and the students they come into contact with. This study assessed factors associated with seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake among middle- and high-school teachers. Results Seventy-eight percent of teachers who planned to receive seasonal influenza vaccine and 36% of those who planned to receive H1N1 influenza vaccine at baseline reported that they did so. Seasonal vaccine uptake was significantly associated with perceived severity (odds ratio [OR] 1.57, p = 0.05) and self-efficacy (OR 4.46, p = 0.006). H1N1 vaccine uptake was associated with perceived barriers (OR 0.7, p = 0.014) and social norms (OR 1.39, p = 0.05). The number one reason for both seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccine uptake was to avoid getting seasonal/H1N1 influenza disease. The number one reason for seasonal influenza vaccine refusal was a concern it would make them sick and for H1N1 influenza vaccine refusal was concern about vaccine side effects. Methods Participants were recruited from two counties in rural Georgia. Data were collected from surveys in September 2009 and May 2010. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the association between teachers' attitudes toward seasonal and H1N1 influenza vaccination and vaccine uptake. Conclusions There is a strong association between the intention to be vaccinated against influenza (seasonal or 2009 H1N1) and actual vaccination uptake. Understanding and addressing factors associated with teachers' influenza vaccine uptake may enhance future influenza immunization efforts. PMID:21263225

  15. Magnetic resonance imaging of abnormal shoulder pain following influenza vaccination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okur, Gokcan [Etimesgut Military Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey); Chaney, Kimberly A. [Presence St. Joseph Hospital, Department of Radiology, Elgin, IL (United States); Lomasney, Laurie M. [Loyola University Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Maywood, IL (United States)

    2014-09-15

    The influenza vaccine is increasingly available to the general public and mandated by many employers in the United States. The prevalence of post-vaccination complications is likely on the rise. Complications are well known to general clinicians, but are under-reported in the imaging literature. We present four cases of post-vaccination shoulder pain with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. An intrasubstance fluid-like signal in deep muscular and/or tendinous structures was the most common finding on MRI of these four cases. Focal bone marrow signal within the humeral head and inflammatory changes in the subacromial/subdeltoid bursa were also observed. The most likely reason for a humeral intraosseous edema-like signal was presumed injection of vaccine substance directly into osseous structures that might lead to focal osteitis. In the published literature, there is little emphasis on the imaging of local injection site complications accompanying influenza vaccination. We intended to increase familiarity of MRI findings in the setting of prolonged or severe clinical symptoms following influenza vaccination through the imaging findings of these four cases. (orig.)

  16. Influenza and Pneumonia Vaccination Rates and Factors Affecting Vaccination among Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aka Aktürk, Ülkü; Görek Dilektaşlı, Aslı; Şengül, Aysun; Musaffa Salepçi, Banu; Oktay, Nuray; Düger, Mustafa; Arık Taşyıkan, Hale; Durmuş Koçak, Nagihan

    2017-05-05

    Influenza and pneumococcal vaccinations are recommended in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients to decrease associated risks at all stages. Although the prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is high in our country, as previously reported, vaccination rates are low. To assess the vaccination rates of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and factors that may affect these. Multi-centre cross-sectional study. Patients admitted to the chest diseases clinics of six different centres between 1 February 2013 and 1 January 2014 with a pre-diagnosis of Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease according to the Global initiative for chronic obstructive lung disease criteria, who were in a stable condition were included in the study. The survey, which included demographic characteristics, socio-economic status, severity of disease and vaccination information, was first tested on a small patient population before the study. The survey was completed by the investigators after obtaining written informed consent. The average age of the 296 included patients was 66.3±9.3 years and 91.9% were male. Of these, 36.5% had the influenza vaccination and 14.1% had the pneumococcal vaccination. The most common reason for not being vaccinated was 'no recommendation by doctors': 57.2% in the case of influenza vaccinations, and 46.8% in the case of pneumococcal vaccinations. Both vaccination rates were significantly higher in those patients with comorbidities (influenza vaccination pvaccination p=0.06). There was no significant correlation with age, gender, smoking and severity of disease (p>0.05). Vaccination rates were significantly higher in those with a white-collar occupation and higher education level, and who presented to a university hospital (pvaccinations as often as the International Guidelines suggest for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Awareness of the importance of these vaccinations among both doctors and patients needs to be

  17. Beliefs and Opinions of Health Care Workers and Students Regarding Influenza and Influenza Vaccination in Tuscany, Central Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guglielmo Bonaccorsi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Immunization of health care workers (HCWs against influenza has been associated with improvements in patient safety. The aim of this study is to assess the beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge of HCWs and health profession students regarding influenza. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to HCWs in three local Florentine healthcare units, at Careggi University Teaching Hospital, and to students in health profession degree programs. A total of 2576 questionnaires were fully completed. A total of 12.3% of subjects responded that they were “always vaccinated” in all three of the seasonal vaccination campaigns studied (2007–2008 to 2009–2010, 13.1% had been vaccinated once or twice, and 74.6% had not received vaccinations. Although the enrolled subjects tended to respond that they were “never vaccinated,” they considered influenza to be a serious illness and believed that the influenza vaccine is effective. The subjects who refused vaccination more frequently believed that the vaccine could cause influenza and that it could have serious side effects. More than 60% of the “always vaccinated” group completely agreed that HCWs should be vaccinated. Self-protection and protecting family members or other people close to the respondent from being infected and representing potential sources of influenza infection can be considered motivating factors for vaccination. The results highlight the importance of improving vaccination rates among all HCWs through multi-component interventions. Knowledge of influenza should be reinforced.

  18. Influenza vaccination: from epidemiological aspects and advances in research to dissent and vaccination policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparini, R; Amicizia, D; Lai, P L; Panatto, D

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is a serious public health problem, since seasonal epidemics affect approximately 5-10% of the population and thus give rise to a heavy social and healthcare burden. The heavy burden of disease is due to several factors, one of which is the biological features of the pathogen. Indeed influenza viruses display high mutation rates and undergo frequent genetic reassortment. Minor variations cause seasonal epidemics and major variations, which result from the hybridization of viruses typical of different animal species, can lead to pandemics. Vaccination remains the most efficacious means of mitigating the harmful healthcare and social effects of influenza. Influenza vaccines have evolved over time in order to offer broader protection against circulating strains. Trivalent vaccines containing two A viruses and one B virus are currently available. However, given the co-circulation of both B virus lineages (B/Yamagata and B/Victoria), quadrivalent vaccines have recently been developed. The new quadrivalent vaccines constitute a great advance, in that they can offer broader strain coverage. Despite the availability of effective and safe influenza vaccines, the Italian public's trust in vaccination has declined and, in the last few years, influenza vaccination coverage rates have decreased both among the elderly and among at-risk adults. It is therefore necessary that users, in their own interests, regain trust in this important means of disease prevention. In order to mitigate the damage wreaked by influenza, it seems important to: (i) improve clinical-epidemiological and virological surveillance of the disease; (ii) promote the development of new efficacious vaccines, as has recently been done through the introduction of the quadrivalent vaccine; (iii) extend free vaccination to the entire population, as in the US and Canada; (iv) ensure that general healthcare professionals are properly informed and always updated with regard to vaccination; (v) promote public

  19. Impact of influenza B lineage-level mismatch between trivalent seasonal influenza vaccines and circulating viruses, 1999-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkinen, Terho; Ikonen, Niina; Ziegler, Thedi

    2014-12-01

    Influenza B virus strains in trivalent influenza vaccines are frequently mismatched to the circulating B strains, but the population-level impact of such mismatches is unknown. We assessed the impact of vaccine mismatch on the epidemiology of influenza B during 12 recent seasonal outbreaks of influenza in Finland. We analyzed all available nationwide data on virologically confirmed influenza infections in all age groups in Finland between 1 July 1999 and 30 June 2012, with the exclusion of the pandemic season of 2009-2010. We derived data on influenza infections and the circulation of different lineages of B viruses during each season from the Infectious Diseases Register and the National Influenza Center, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Finland. A total of 34 788 cases of influenza were recorded. Influenza A accounted for 74.0% and influenza B for 26.0% of all typed viruses. Throughout the 12 seasons, we estimated that 41.7% (3750 of 8993) of all influenza B infections were caused by viruses representing the other genetic lineage than the one in the vaccine. Altogether, opposite-lineage influenza B viruses accounted for 10.8% of all influenza infections in the population, the proportion being highest (16.8%) in children aged 10-14 years and lowest (2.6%) in persons aged ≥70 years. The population-level impact of lineage-level mismatch between the vaccine and circulating strains of influenza B viruses is substantial, especially among children and adolescents. The results provide strong support for the inclusion of both influenza B lineages in seasonal influenza vaccines. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness against influenza in 2012-2013 : A hospital-based case-control study in Lithuania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Rahamat-Langendoen, Janette; Ambrozaitis, Arvydas; Mickiene, Aukse; Jancoriene, Ligita; Kuliese, Monika; Velyvyte, Daiva; Niesters, Hubert; Stolk, Ronald P.; Zagminas, Kestutis; Hak, Eelko

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Due to scarce information on seasonal influenza vaccine effectiveness (SIVE) against severe clinical influenza outcomes in risk populations, we conducted a case-control study to assess its effects against laboratory-confirmed influenza in hospitalized patients during the 2012-2013

  1. Improving influenza vaccination in chronically ill children using a tertiary-care based vaccination clinic: Is there a role for the live-attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Joanna; McCormack, Deirdre; Quach, Caroline

    2016-02-03

    Children with underlying medical conditions should receive influenza vaccine (IV) yearly; yet this remains sub-optimal. We aimed to describe our experience with a tertiary-care hospital-based influenza vaccination clinic for this at-risk population. From October to December 2012, 2013, and 2014, we ran an influenza vaccination clinic at the Montreal Children's Hospital, where children with high-risk conditions come for their follow-up. Both injectable IV (IIV) and live-attenuated IV (LAIV) were offered free of charge to patients and their household contacts. Upon vaccination, parents were asked to fill a pre-piloted questionnaire. We vaccinated a total of 2640 high-risk children and 1912 household members during the three influenza vaccination seasons. In 2012 and 2013, 631 and 630 patients with chronic illnesses were vaccinated, compared to 1379 in 2014. Caregivers preferred LAIV primarily because no needle was involved (49.0%) and because it was perceived as less painful (46.9%). LAIV was administered to 69% (2012), 55% (2013) and 47% (2014) of high-risk children. The main reason for not receiving LAIV was because it was contra-indicated. A small fraction of children previously vaccinated with LAIV who did not present any contraindication to LAIV opted for IIV: 12/101 (11.8%) in 2013 and 16/272 (5.9%) in 2014. In 2014, this was mainly due to a previous negative experience with LAIV (11/16). Having an influenza vaccination clinic on site at a tertiary care hospital, where children come for their scheduled visits, facilitates yearly influenza vaccination in children with chronic illnesses. LAIV is preferred by caregivers and patients, when not contraindicated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Increasing Influenza Vaccine Uptake. A Comprehensive Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Looijmans - van den Akker, I.

    2009-01-01

    General introduction: To prevent influenza virus infection, immunization against influenza has been recommended for individuals with increased risk of complications. These groups comprise individuals of 60 years and older, individuals with risk-elevating co-morbid conditions, residents of nursing

  3. Effectiveness and implementation of influenza vaccination : a non-experimental approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hak, E.

    2001-01-01

    Large-scale prevention by influenza vaccination aims at reducing post-influenza complications among those who need it at most. This thesis aims at describing the risk of complications and benefits of vaccination. In chapter 2 we determine prognostic factors for influenza-associated

  4. Predictors of seasonal influenza vaccination among healthcare workers in hospitals : a descriptive meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riphagen-Dalhuisen, Josien; Gefenaite, Giedre; Hak, Eelko

    Objective Vaccinating healthcare workers (HCWs) against influenza is one of the most important methods of decreasing influenza transmission among at-risk patients in healthcare facilities. However, despite recommendations, the rate of uptake of influenza vaccine among HCWs remains low. The objective

  5. Mandatory influenza vaccination for all healthcare personnel: a review on justification, implementation and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tiffany L; Jing, Ling; Bocchini, Joseph A

    2017-10-01

    As healthcare-associated influenza is a serious public health concern, this review examines legal and ethical arguments supporting mandatory influenza vaccination policies for healthcare personnel, implementation issues and evidence of effectiveness. Spread of influenza from healthcare personnel to patients can result in severe harm or death. Although most healthcare personnel believe that they should be vaccinated against seasonal influenza, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that only 79% of personnel were vaccinated during the 2015-2016 season. Vaccination rates were as low as 44.9% in institutions that did not promote or offer the vaccine, compared with rates of more than 90% in institutions with mandatory vaccination policies. Policies that mandate influenza vaccination for healthcare personnel have legal and ethical justifications. Implementing such policies require multipronged approaches that include education efforts, easy access to vaccines, vaccine promotion, leadership support and consistent communication emphasizing patient safety. Mandatory influenza vaccination for healthcare personnel is a necessary step in protecting patients. Patients who interact with healthcare personnel are often at an elevated risk of complications from influenza. Vaccination is the best available strategy for protecting against influenza and evidence shows that institutional policies and state laws can effectively increase healthcare personnel vaccination rates, decreasing the risk of transmission in healthcare settings. There are legal and ethical precedents for institutional mandatory influenza policies and state laws, although successful implementation requires addressing both administrative and attitudinal barriers.

  6. Dutch influenza vaccination rate drops for fifth consecutive year

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tacken, M.A.J.B.; Jansen, B.; Mulder, J.; Campbell, S.M.; Braspenning, J.C.C.

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence and trend of the influenza vaccination-rate of the overall target population in the period 2008-2013, with a specific focus on groups at risk such as patients with cardiovascular diseases, lung diseases, diabetes and aged 60 years and older. METHODS: In an

  7. Mass Media Campaign Impacts Influenza Vaccine Obtainment of University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shropshire, Ali M.; Brent-Hotchkiss, Renee; Andrews, Urkovia K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effectiveness of a mass media campaign in increasing the rate of college student influenza vaccine obtainment. Participants/Methods: Students ("N" = 721) at a large southern university completed a survey between September 2011 and January 2012 assessing what flu clinic media sources were visualized and if they…

  8. Influenza Vaccination in the Face of Maternal Antibody Results in Enhanced Pneumonia Following Heterologous, Homosubtypic Influenza Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inactivated influenza vaccines do not provide cross-protection to diverse antigenic strains that could be circulating or suddenly arise in a population. It is desirable to vaccinate at a young age to provide maximum protection from influenza; however, maternally-derived factors (antibody or cells) c...

  9. New USDA licensed avian influenza vaccine (rHVT-AI) for protection against H5 avian influenza and usage discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recently, a new avian influenza vaccine was licensed by USDA for use in the United States for protection of commercial poultry. The vaccine is a recombinant herpes virus of turkeys expressing the hemagglutinin gene of an H5 subtype avian influenza virus belonging to the 2.2 clade of the H5N1 highly ...

  10. Evaluating a standardized measure of healthcare personnel influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindley, Megan C; Lorick, Suchita A; Geevarughese, Anita; Lee, Soo-Jeong; Makvandi, Monear; Miller, Brady L; Nace, David A; Smith, Carmela; Ahmed, Faruque

    2013-09-01

    Methods of measuring influenza vaccination of healthcare personnel (HCP) vary substantially, as do the groups of HCP that are included in any given set of measurements. Thus, comparison of vaccination rates across healthcare facilities is difficult. The goal of the study was to determine the feasibility of implementing a standardized measure for reporting HCP influenza vaccination data in various types of healthcare facilities. A total of 318 facilities recruited in four U.S. jurisdictions agreed to participate in the evaluation, including hospitals, long-term care facilities, dialysis clinics, ambulatory surgery centers, and physician practices. HCP in participating facilities were categorized as employees, credentialed non-employees, or other non-employees using standard definitions. Data were gathered using cross-sectional web-based surveys completed at three intervals between October 2010 and May 2011; data were analyzed in February 2012. 234 facilities (74%) completed all three surveys. Most facilities could report on-site employee vaccination; almost one third could not provide complete data on HCP vaccinated outside the facility, contraindications, or declinations, primarily due to missing non-employee data. Inability to determine vaccination status of credentialed and other non-employees was cited as a major barrier to measure implementation by 24% and 27% of respondents, respectively. Using the measure to report employee vaccination status was feasible for most facilities; tracking non-employee HCP was more challenging. Based on evaluation findings, the measure was revised to limit the types of non-employees included. Although the revised measure is less comprehensive, it is more likely to produce valid vaccination coverage estimates. Use of this standardized measure can inform quality improvement efforts and facilitate comparison of HCP influenza vaccination among facilities. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Simplifying influenza vaccination during pandemics: sublingual priming and intramuscular boosting of immune responses with heterologous whole inactivated influenza vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugappan, Senthil; Patil, Harshad P; Frijlink, Henderik W; Huckriede, Anke; Hinrichs, Wouter L J

    2014-03-01

    The best approach to control the spread of influenza virus during a pandemic is vaccination. Yet, an appropriate vaccine is not available early in the pandemic since vaccine production is time consuming. For influenza strains with a high pandemic potential like H5N1, stockpiling of vaccines has been considered but is hampered by rapid antigenic drift of the virus. It has, however, been shown that immunization with a given H5N1 strain can prime the immune system for a later booster with a drifted variant. Here, we investigated whether whole inactivated virus (WIV) vaccine can be processed to tablets suitable for sublingual (s.l.) use and whether s.l. vaccine administration can prime the immune system for a later intramuscular (i.m.) boost with a heterologous vaccine. In vitro results demonstrate that freeze-drying and tableting of WIV did not affect the integrity of the viral proteins or the hemagglutinating properties of the viral particles. Immunization experiments revealed that s.l. priming with WIV (prepared from the H5N1 vaccine strain NIBRG-14) 4 weeks prior to i.m. booster immunization with the same virus strongly enhanced hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) titers against NIBRG-14 and the drifted variant NIBRG-23. Moreover, s.l. (and i.m.) immunization with NIBRG-14 also primed for a subsequent heterologous i.m. booster immunization with NIBRG-23 vaccine. In addition to HI serum antibodies, s.l. priming enhanced lung and nose IgA responses, while i.m. priming enhanced lung IgA but not nose IgA levels. Our results identify s.l. vaccination as a user-friendly method to prime for influenza-specific immune responses toward homologous and drifted variants.

  12. Plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibody response after influenza vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiao-Song; Sasaki, Sanae; Narvaez, Carlos F; Zhang, Caiqiu; Liu, Hui; Woo, Jennifer C; Kemble, George W; Dekker, Cornelia L; Davis, Mark M; Greenberg, Harry B

    2011-02-28

    Conventional measurement of antibody responses to vaccines largely relies on serum antibodies, which are primarily produced by bone marrow plasma cells and may not represent the entire vaccine-induced B cell repertoire, including important functional components such as those targeted to mucosal sites. After immunization or infection, activated B cells differentiate into plasmablasts in local lymphoid organs, then traffic through circulation to the target sites where they further develop into plasma cells. On day 7 after influenza vaccination, a burst of plasmablasts, highly enriched for vaccine-specific antibody secreting cells, appears in the peripheral blood. This provides a unique window to the overall B cell response to the vaccine, without interference of pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibody. In this study we isolated B cells from volunteers on day 7 after immunization with the inactivated influenza vaccine and cultured them ex vivo to collect plasmablast-derived polyclonal antibodies (PPAb). The PPAb contained secreted IgG and IgA, which was approximately 0.2ng per antibody secreting cell. Influenza-specific IgG and IgA binding activity was detected in PPAb at dilutions up to 10(5) by ELISA. The ratio of the titers of influenza-specific IgA to IgG by ELISA was 4-fold higher in PPAb than in day 28 post-vaccination sera, suggesting that vaccine-induced IgA is enriched in PPAb compared to sera. Functional activity was also detected in PPAb as determined by microneutralization and hemagglutination inhibition assays. In addition to bulk B cell cultures, we also cultured plasmablast subsets sorted by cell surface markers to generate PPAb. These results suggest that PPAb better reflects the mucosal IgA response than serum samples. Since PPAb are exclusively produced by recently activated B cells, it allows assessing vaccine-induced antibody response without interference from pre-existing cross-reactive serum antibodies and permits an assessment of antibody

  13. The evaluation of a nucleoprotein ELISA for the detection of equine influenza antibodies and the differentiation of infected from vaccinated horses (DIVA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Pamela; Gildea, Sarah; Arkins, Sean; Walsh, Cathal; Cullinane, Ann

    2013-12-01

    Antibodies against equine influenza virus (EIV) are traditionally quantified by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) or single radial haemolysis (SRH). To evaluate an ELISA for the detection of antibodies against influenza nucleoprotein in the diagnosis and surveillance of equine influenza (EI). The ELISA was compared with the SRH and HI tests. Serial serum samples from 203 naturally and 14 experimentally infected horses, from 60 weanlings following primary vaccination with five different vaccines (two whole inactivated vaccines, two ISCOM-based subunit vaccines and a recombinant canarypox virus vaccine) and from 44 adult horses following annual booster vaccination with six different vaccines were analysed. Fewer seroconversions were detected in clinical samples by ELISA than by SRH or HI but ELISA was more sensitive than SRH in naïve foals post-experimental infection. The ELISA did not detect the antibody response to vaccination with the recombinant canarypox virus vaccine confirming the usefulness of the combination of this kit and vaccine to differentiate between naturally infected and vaccinated horses, that is, DIVA. No DIVA capacity was evident with the other vaccines. The results suggest that this ELISA is a useful supplementary test for the diagnosis of EI although less sensitive than HI or SRH. It is an appropriate test for EI surveillance in a naïve population and may be combined with the recombinant canarypox virus vaccine but not with other commercially available subunit vaccines, in a DIVA strategy. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. Association of School-Based Influenza Vaccination Clinics and School Absenteeism--Arkansas, 2012-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gicquelais, Rachel E.; Safi, Haytham; Butler, Sandra; Smith, Nathaniel; Haselow, Dirk T.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Influenza is a major cause of seasonal viral respiratory illness among school-aged children. Accordingly, the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) coordinates >800 school-based influenza immunization clinics before each influenza season. We quantified the relationship between student influenza vaccination in Arkansas public schools…

  15. Influenza Vaccination Rate and Reasons for Nonvaccination in Children With Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livni, Gilat; Wainstein, Alina; Birk, Einat; Chodick, Gabriel; Levy, Itzhak

    2017-11-01

    Influenza is a major cause of respiratory morbidity worldwide. It poses a risk of complications in children with cardiac disease. Influenza vaccine is considered the most effective and safe means of preventing the disease. The aims of this study were to determine the rate of influenza vaccination in children with cardiac disease and to identify the reasons for failure to vaccinate in this patient population. The study group included 186 children and their parents who attended the cardiology institute of a tertiary pediatric medical center between September and October 2012. Parents were asked to complete a questionnaire covering demographics, clinical features, influenza vaccination, receipt of advice from medical professionals regarding vaccination and personal knowledge about and attitude toward the influenza vaccine. Median age of the children was 7.6 years. Thirty-six percent had been vaccinated in the previous influenza season. Vaccination was unrelated to the child's age or sex or the parents' education. Factors significantly affecting the decision of the parents to have their child vaccinated were their knowledge, beliefs and conceptions about the vaccine and their receipt of a recommendation to do so from the pediatrician or cardiologist (P vaccination against influenza is low in children with heart disease. Major factors encouraging vaccination are proper parental knowledge and the recommendation of the primary physician or cardiologist. Medical professionals caring for this patient population should be alerted to the need to routinely counsel parents on the importance of influenza vaccination.

  16. Determinants of influenza vaccination among solid organ transplant recipients attending Sicilian reference center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restivo, Vincenzo; Vizzini, Giovanni; Mularoni, Alessandra; Di Benedetto, Cinzia; Gioè, Santi Mauro; Vitale, Francesco

    2017-02-01

    Among solid organ transplant recipients, influenza infection is commonly associated with higher morbidity and mortality than immunocompetent hosts. Therefore, in these subjects influenza vaccination is of paramount importance. The main objective of the study was to assess compliance to vaccination and analyze factors associated with influenza vaccination of solid organ transplant recipients admitted to the Sicilian solid organ transplant Reference Center IRCCS-ISMETT in Palermo during 2014-2015 influenza season. Thirty one (37.8%) out of 82 solid organ transplant recipients were vaccinated against influenza. The main reason for vaccination refusal was fear of adverse reaction (n = 16, 31.4%), impaired health status (n = 14, 27.4%) and low vaccine efficacy (n = 10, 19.6%). Vaccinated solid organ transplant recipients compare with unvaccinated had smaller hospital admissions for infectious respiratory diseases (9.7% Vs 23.5%) during surveillance period. On multivariate analysis the factors positively associated with influenza vaccination were the advice of Reference Center physicians (OR 53.4, p vaccine against pneumococcus (OR 7.0, p = 0.016). This study showed that Reference Center physicians play a key role on vaccine communication and recommendation for patients at risk and it underlines the effectiveness of influenza vaccination in solid organ transplant recipients. However, it remains that, although physician advice resulted a strong determinant for vaccination, influenza vaccination coverage in this subset of population remains still unsatisfactory.

  17. Influenza vaccination in preventing outbreaks in schools: A long-term ecological overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Wang, Quanyi; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Li; Wu, Shuangsheng; Zhang, Yi; Sun, Ying; Duan, Wei; Ma, Chunna; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Xingxing; MacIntyre, C Raina

    2017-12-18

    Influenza vaccination is the most effective way to reduce the incidence of influenza infections. However, the role of influenza vaccination, such as school-based influenza vaccination, in preventing the influenza outbreaks in schools remains unclear now. In this study, a total of 286 school febrile outbreaks involving 6863 cases in the Beijing area from September 1, 2006 to March 31, 2017 were analyzed. We also tested 294 circulating strains isolated in Beijing during the same period and compared with that of vaccine strains identified every influenza season. The virological match/mismatch between vaccine strains and circulating strains, and the coverage of vaccination in schools were analyzed against outbreaks during the 11 years. It showed that over 80% school febrile outbreaks were caused by influenza A/B virus, the most frequent being A(H3N2) virus (53.25%), followed by A(H1N1)pdm09 virus (25.11%) and B virus (21.64%). More importantly, low vaccine coverage (in 2006-2007 influenza season) and vaccine mismatch (in 2014-2015 and 2015-2016 influenza season) were associated with an increased number of influenza school outbreaks. High vaccination coverage with a matched vaccine can significantly reduce influenza outbreaks in schools (OR: 0.111, p school-based influenza vaccination in preventing outbreaks using trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine in schools. Thus the school-based vaccine policy should be paid more attention in China and other countries worldwide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Harnessing Local Immunity for an Effective Universal Swine Influenza Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchilian, Elma; Holzer, Barbara

    2017-05-05

    Influenza A virus infections are a global health threat to humans and are endemic in pigs, contributing to decreased weight gain and suboptimal reproductive performance. Pigs are also a source of new viruses of mixed swine, avian, and human origin, potentially capable of initiating human pandemics. Current inactivated vaccines induce neutralising antibody against the immunising strain but rapid escape occurs through antigenic drift of the surface glycoproteins. However, it is known that prior infection provides a degree of cross-protective immunity mediated by cellular immune mechanisms directed at the more conserved internal viral proteins. Here we review new data that emphasises the importance of local immunity in cross-protection and the role of the recently defined tissue-resident memory T cells, as well as locally-produced, and sometimes cross-reactive, antibody. Optimal induction of local immunity may require aerosol delivery of live vaccines, but it remains unclear how long protective local immunity persists. Nevertheless, a universal vaccine might be extremely useful for disease prevention in the face of a pandemic. As a natural host for influenza A viruses, pigs are both a target for a universal vaccine and an excellent model for developing human influenza vaccines.

  19. B cell responses to influenza infection and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Christopher; Ellebedy, Ali H; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-01-01

    Although vaccines against influenza are widely available, control of the disease remains elusive. In part, this is due to the inability of current vaccines to induce durable, broadly protective immune responses. Prevention of influenza depends primarily on effective antibody responses that block virus entry. Following infection, high-affinity IgA antibodies are generated in the respiratory tract that lead to immune exclusion, while IgG prevents systemic spread. These are effective and long-lasting but also exert immune pressure. Mutation of the antigenic determinants of influenza therefore rapidly leads to emergence of novel variants that evade previously generated protective responses. Not only do vaccines suffer from this strain-specific limitation, but also they are suboptimal in their ability to induce durable immunity. However, recent evidence has demonstrated the possibility of inducing broadly cross-reactive antibody responses. Further understanding of the ways in which high-titer, long-lived antibody responses directed against such cross-reactive epitopes can be induced would lead to the development of novel vaccines that may remove the requirement for recurrent vaccination.

  20. An audit of influenza and pneumococcal vaccination in rheumatology outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitchell William S

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza and pneumococcal vaccination are recommended for a number of clinical risk groups including patients treated with major immunosuppressant disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs. Such immunisation is not only safe but immunogenic in patients with rheumatic diseases. We sought to establish dual vaccination rates and significant influencing factors amongst our hospital rheumatology outpatients. Method We audited a sample of 101 patients attending hospital rheumatology outpatient clinics on any form of disease modifying treatment by clinical questionnaire and medical record perusal. Further data were collected from the local immunisation coordinating agency and analysed by logistic regression modelling. Results Although there was a high rate of awareness with regard to immunisation, fewer patients on major immunosuppressants were vaccinated than patients with additional clinical risk factors against influenza (53% vs 93%, p Conclusion Influenza and pneumococcal immunisation is suboptimal amongst patients on current immunosuppressant treatments attending rheumatology outpatient clinics. Raising awareness amongst patients may not be sufficient to improve vaccination rates and alternative strategies such as obligatory pneumococcal vaccination prior to treatment initiation and primary care provider education need to be explored.

  1. Reduction of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus in eggs from chickens once or twice vaccinated with an oil-emulsified inactivated H5 avian influenza vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The negative impact of high pathogenicity avian influenza virus (HPAIV) infection on egg production and deposition of virus in eggs, as well as any protective effect of vaccination, is unknown. Individually housed non-vaccinated, sham-vaccinated and inactivated H5N9 vaccinated once or twice adult Wh...

  2. Fluzone High-Dose Seasonal Influenza Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dose vaccine available? This vaccine is approved for marketing in 0.5 mL preservative-free, single dose, ... Branch, Division of Public Affairs Email Recommend Tweet YouTube Instagram Listen Watch RSS ABOUT About CDC Jobs ...

  3. Safety and immunogenicity of a quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine compared to licensed trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, David P; Robertson, Corwin A; Noss, Michael J; Blatter, Mark M; Biedenbender, Rex; Decker, Michael D

    2013-01-21

    To evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a prototype quadrivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (QIV) containing two influenza B strains, one of each lineage, compared with licensed trivalent inactivated influenza vaccines (TIVs) containing either a Victoria B-lineage strain (2009-2010 TIV) or a Yamagata B-lineage strain (2008-2009 TIV). Healthy adults ≥18 years of age were eligible to participate in this phase II, open-label, randomized, controlled, multicenter study conducted in the US. Participants received a single dose of 2009-2010 TIV, 2008-2009 TIV, or QIV. Sera were collected before and 21 days after vaccine administration to test for hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) antibodies to each of the four influenza strains. Immunogenicity endpoints included geometric mean HAI antibody titers (GMTs) and rates of seroprotection (titer ≥1:40) and seroconversion (4-fold rise pre- to post-vaccination). Safety endpoints included frequency of solicited injection-site and systemic reactions occurring within 3 days of vaccination, and unsolicited non-serious adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) within 21 days of vaccination. One hundred and ninety participants were enrolled to each vaccine group. QIV induced GMTs to each A and B strain that were noninferior to those induced by the 2009-2010 and 2008-2009 TIVs (i.e., lower limit of the two-sided 95% confidence interval of the ratio of GMT(QIV)/GMT(TIV)>0.66 for each strain). Rates of seroprotection and seroconversion were similar in all groups. Incidence and severity of solicited injection-site and systemic reactions, AEs, and SAEs were similar among groups. QIV, containing two B strains (one from each B lineage), was as safe and immunogenic as licensed TIV. QIV has the potential to be a useful alternative to TIV and offer protection against both B lineages. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vector vaccines for control of avian influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaccines play a critical role in the poultry industries efforts at disease control and prevention. However, providing safe, efficacious, and cost-effective vaccines remains a constant issue to the industry. In addition, many viruses undergo mutation in the field requiring vaccine adjustments. Recent...

  5. Adult influenza vaccination guideline | Feldman | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Benefits, harms, costs. Successful vaccination may be effective. in protecting against acute respiratory tract infection, and preventing hospitalisation, complicating pneumonia and death. The vaccine is safe with only occasional reports of anaphylaxis. Contraindications to the vaccine are anaphylactic hypersensitivity to eggs, ...

  6. Heterosubtypic cross-protection induced by whole inactivated influenza virus vaccine in mice : Influence of the route of vaccine administration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Budimir, Natalija; de Haan, Aalzen; Meijerhof, Tjarko; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Huckriede, Anke; Wilschut, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Background Development of influenza vaccines capable of inducing broad protection against different virus subtypes is necessary given the ever-changing viral genetic landscape. Previously, we showed that vaccination with whole inactivated virus (WIV) induces heterosubtypic protection against lethal

  7. Place of influenza vaccination among children—United States, 2010–11 through 2013–14 influenza seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibanez, Tammy A.; Vogt, Tara M.; Zhai, Yusheng; McIntyre, Anne F.

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies are published on settings adults receive influenza vaccination but few have reported on settings children are vaccinated and how this might be changing over time or vary by socio-demographics. Methods Data from the National Immunization Survey-Flu were analyzed to assess place of influenza vaccination among vaccinated children 6 months–17 years during the 2010–11, 2011–12, 2012–13, and 2013–14 influenza seasons. The percentage of children vaccinated at each place was calculated overall and by age, race/ethnicity, income, and Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). Results The places children received influenza vaccination varied little over four recent influenza seasons. From the 2010–11 through 2013–14 influenza seasons the percentage of vaccinated children receiving influenza vaccination at a doctor’s office was 64.1%, 65.1%, 65.3%, and 65.3%, respectively with no differences from one season to the next. Likewise, for vaccination at clinics or health centers (17.8%, 17.5%, 17.0%. 18.0%), health departments (3.2%, 3.6%, 3.0%, 2.8%), and other non-medical places (1.6%, 1.4%, 1.2%, 1.1%), there were no differences from one season to the next. There were some differences for vaccinations at hospitals, pharmacies, and schools. There was considerable variability in the place of influenza vaccination by age, race/ethnicity, income, and MSA. Fewer Hispanic children were vaccinated at a doctor’s office than black, white, and other or multiple race children and fewer black children and children of other or multiple races were vaccinated at a doctor’s office than white children. More children at or below the poverty level were vaccinated at a clinic or health center than all of the other income groups. Conclusion Most vaccinated children receive their influenza vaccination at a doctor’s office. Place of vaccination changed little over four recent influenza seasons. Large variability in place of vaccination exists by age, race

  8. Place of influenza vaccination among children--United States, 2010-11 through 2013-14 influenza seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santibanez, Tammy A; Vogt, Tara M; Zhai, Yusheng; McIntyre, Anne F

    2016-03-04

    Studies are published on settings adults receive influenza vaccination but few have reported on settings children are vaccinated and how this might be changing over time or vary by socio-demographics. Data from the National Immunization Survey-Flu were analyzed to assess place of influenza vaccination among vaccinated children 6 months-17 years during the 2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-13, and 2013-14 influenza seasons. The percentage of children vaccinated at each place was calculated overall and by age, race/ethnicity, income, and Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA). The places children received influenza vaccination varied little over four recent influenza seasons. From the 2010-11 through 2013-14 influenza seasons the percentage of vaccinated children receiving influenza vaccination at a doctor's office was 64.1%, 65.1%, 65.3%, and 65.3%, respectively with no differences from one season to the next. Likewise, for vaccination at clinics or health centers (17.8%, 17.5%, 17.0%. 18.0%), health departments (3.2%, 3.6%, 3.0%, 2.8%), and other non-medical places (1.6%, 1.4%, 1.2%, 1.1%), there were no differences from one season to the next. There were some differences for vaccinations at hospitals, pharmacies, and schools. There was considerable variability in the place of influenza vaccination by age, race/ethnicity, income, and MSA. Fewer Hispanic children were vaccinated at a doctor's office than black, white, and other or multiple race children and fewer black children and children of other or multiple races were vaccinated at a doctor's office than white children. More children at or below the poverty level were vaccinated at a clinic or health center than all of the other income groups. Most vaccinated children receive their influenza vaccination at a doctor's office. Place of vaccination changed little over four recent influenza seasons. Large variability in place of vaccination exists by age, race/ethnicity, income, and MSA. Monitoring place of vaccination can help

  9. Parents' perceptions of influenza and why they accept or decline the nasal vaccine for their child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulsdale, Phoebe; Grant, Aimee; Fletcher, Margaret; Finn, Adam

    2017-04-11

    Background Nasal influenza vaccine is offered each year to all children from age two to higher age groups. There is little UK research on whether parents support this vaccination programme. Aim The aim of this study was to explore parents' perceptions of influenza as an illness in children and why they decide to accept or decline nasal influenza vaccine for their child. Method A survey was first distributed to parents via a single primary school. Ten parents were then sampled in semi-structured interviews. From the survey, 91% (n=78) of the parents favoured routine vaccinations but only 47% (n=40) were supportive of nasal influenza vaccination. Findings From the interviews, reasons highlighted for accepting or declining the vaccine concerned the importance of trust, community responsibility, controllability and the perception of risk. Conclusion Parents who typically support vaccination may doubt the necessity of a influenza vaccination for their child. This may reduce uptake and undermine the programme.

  10. Perceptions of Hong Kong Chinese women toward influenza vaccination during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Carol Y S; Dodgson, Joan E; Tarrant, Marie

    2016-01-02

    Pregnant women are the highest priority group for seasonal influenza vaccination. However, their vaccination uptake remains suboptimal. The purpose of this study is to explore Hong Kong women's perceptions of the threat of influenza infection during pregnancy, the risks and benefits of influenza vaccination, and their decision-making processes. We used a qualitative descriptive design and recruited women who had just given births to a live infant from April to June 2011. Participants were recruited from a large teaching hospital in Hong Kong and were interviewed in the immediate postpartum period. A total of 32 postpartum women were interviewed, and two had been vaccinated during pregnancy. Following thematic analysis, three themes emerged: perceived risk of influenza infection, perceived risk of influenza vaccine, and decision-making cues. Overall, participants held negative impressions about influenza vaccination during pregnancy, and they underestimated the threat of influenza to themselves and their fetus. They were also confused about the safety and efficacy of the influenza vaccine and the differences between preventive strategies and treatment for influenza. Most participants reported that their health care providers (HCPs) did not offer or recommend vaccination. Because of negative media reports about vaccination, participants were hesitant to receive the vaccine. Motivating forces for vaccine acceptance were a perceived high prevalence of circulating influenza during their pregnancy and HCP recommendations and reassurances that the vaccination was safe, effective, and beneficial for the fetus. Vaccination promotion strategies need to focus on encouraging HCPs to take the initiative to discuss vaccination with their pregnant clients and provide accurate and unbiased information about the risks of influenza and the benefits of vaccination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Intranasally administered Endocine formulated 2009 pandemic influenza H1N1 vaccine induces broad specific antibody responses and confers protection in ferrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltais, Anna-Karin; Stittelaar, Koert J; Veldhuis Kroeze, Edwin J B; van Amerongen, Geert; Dijkshoorn, Marcel L; Krestin, Gabriel P; Hinkula, Jorma; Arwidsson, Hans; Lindberg, Alf; Osterhaus, Albert D M E

    2014-05-30

    Influenza is a contagious respiratory disease caused by an influenza virus. Due to continuous antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses, influenza vaccines need to be adjusted before every influenza season. This allows annual vaccination with multivalent seasonal influenza vaccines, recommended especially for high-risk groups. There is a need for a seasonal influenza vaccine that induces broader and longer lasting protection upon easy administration. Endocine is a lipid-based mucosal adjuvant composed of endogenous lipids found ubiquitously in the human body. Intranasal administration of influenza antigens mixed with this adjuvant has been shown to induce local and systemic immunity as well as protective efficacy against homologous influenza virus challenge in mice. Here we used ferrets, an established animal model for human influenza virus infections, to further investigate the potential of Endocine as an adjuvant. Intranasal administration of inactivated pandemic H1N1/California/2009 split antigen or whole virus antigen mixed with Endocine induced high levels of serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) and virus neutralization (VN) antibody titers that were also cross reactive against distant swine viruses of the same subtype. HI and VN antibody titers were already demonstrated after a single nasal immunization. Upon intratracheal challenge with a homologous challenge virus (influenza virus H1N1/The Netherlands/602/2009) immunized ferrets were fully protected from virus replication in the lungs and largely protected against body weight loss, virus replication in the upper respiratory tract and pathological changes in the respiratory tract. Endocine formulated vaccines containing split antigen induced higher HI and VN antibody responses and better protection from body weight loss and virus shedding in the upper respiratory tract than the Endocine formulated vaccine containing whole virus antigen. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All

  12. Invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections in children in Kamikawa subprefecture, Hokkaido, Japan, 2006-2015: The effectiveness of H. influenzae type b vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Hiroshi; Adachi, Yoko; Morozumi, Miyuki; Ubukata, Kimiko

    2017-07-01

    We evaluated 24 children with invasive Haemophilus influenzae infections between 2006 and 2015 in Kamikawa subprefecture of Hokkaido, Japan. The most frequent disease was pneumonia in 12 cases (50.0%), followed by meningitis in 7 (29.2%) and bacteremia in 5 (20.8%). Patients ranged in age from 3 months to 12 years of age. Seventeen (70.8%) of the total were less than 2 years old. The incidence rate of H. influenzae infection varied from 15.1 to 36.3 per 100,000 population in the Kamikawa area during the period from 2006 through 2011. The corresponding rate decreased to 10.4 per 100,000 population in 2012, and there were no cases after 2013. Meningitis occurred in 1-2 patients annually from 2006 to 2011, showing an incidence rate of 4-10 per 100,000 population per year, while no cases were reported during or after 2012. No patients with invasive H. influenzae infection died, but sequelae were seen at discharge in 1 patient with meningitis, that had hydrocephalus and developmental delay. In Japan, introduction of the H. influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine was in November 2008. Initially, this vaccination was voluntary, resulting in a low vaccination rate. According to the national policy, and the self-pay burden for vaccination was decreased in December 2010, and the vaccination rate increased markedly to over 90%. This report provides a meaningful demonstration that introduction of the Hib vaccine markedly reduced invasive H. influenzae infections, exerting a beneficial effect in Japan, as it has in the world. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Haemophilus influenzae Type b (Hib) vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc. ... statements/hib.pdf . CDC review information for Hib (Haemophilus Influenzae Type b) VIS: Page last reviewed: April 2, ...

  14. 76 FR 79203 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Avian Influenza Vaccines for Domesticated Poultry/Wild...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-21

    ... Veterinary Influenza Vaccines. Sustained outbreaks of highly pathogenic influenza in animals increase the... advantages: (a) More efficient and versatile than the conventional inactivated whole-virus vaccines; (b) Can... vaccinated animals to be differentiated from naturally infected animals, key if governments mandate...

  15. Acute posterior multifocal placoid pigment epitheliopathy and granulomatous uveitis following influenza vaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Gonome

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion and importance: As influenza vaccinations are administered worldwide, ophthalmologists should be aware of the ocular side effects following vaccination. Although rare, the possibility of APMPPE occurrence following influenza vaccination should be considered; additionally, the recovery phase of APMPPE may be associated with granulomatous uveitis that requires steroid therapy.

  16. Variation in loss of immunity shapes influenza epidemics and the impact of vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolthuis, Rutger G; Wallinga, Jacco; van Boven, Michiel

    2017-09-19

    Protective antibody immunity against the influenza A virus wanes in 2-7 years due to antigenic drift of the virus' surface proteins. The duration of immune protection is highly variable because antigenic evolution of the virus is irregular. Currently, the variable nature of the duration of immunity has had little attention in analyses of the impact of vaccination, including cost-effectiveness studies. We developed a range of mathematical transmission models to investigate the effect of variable duration of immunity on the size of seasonal epidemics. The models range from simple conceptual to more realistic, by distinguishing between infection- versus vaccination-induced immunity, by inclusion of primary vaccine failure, by assuming a leaky vaccine, and by the inclusion of age-dependent contact patterns. We show that annual variation in the duration of immunity causes large variation in the size of epidemics, and affects the effectiveness of vaccination. Accumulation of susceptible individuals in one or more mild seasons results in a disproportionately large outbreak in a subsequent season. Importantly, variation in the duration of immunity increases the average infection attack rate when the vaccination coverage is around the outbreak threshold. Specifically, in a tailored age-stratified model with a realistic reproduction number (R 0 = 1.4) and vaccination coverage of 25%, we find that the attack rate in unvaccinated children (vaccination, and that vaccine effectiveness cannot be judged for each year in isolation. Our findings have implications for vaccination strategies that aim to maximize the vaccination coverage while extending the age range of persons eligible for vaccination.

  17. How rural and urban parents describe convenience in the context of school-based influenza vaccination: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Candace; Russell, Margaret L; Collins, Ramona; MacDonald, Judy; Frank, Christine J; Davis, Amy E

    2015-01-22

    Seasonal influenza vaccine uptake among school-age children has been low, particularly among rural children, even in jurisdictions in Canada where this immunization is publicly funded. Providing this vaccination at school may be convenient for parents and might contribute to increased vaccine uptake, particularly among rural children. We explore the construct of convenience as an advantage of school based influenza vaccination. We also explore for rural urban differences in this construct. Participants were parents of school-aged children from Alberta, Canada. We qualitatively analyzed focus group data from rural parents using a thematic template that emerged from prior work with urban parents. Both groups of parents had participated in focus groups to explore their perspectives on the acceptability of adding an annual influenza immunization to the immunization program that is currently delivered in Alberta schools. Data from within the theme of 'convenience' from both rural and urban parents were then further explored for sub-themes within convenience. Data were obtained from nine rural and nine urban focus groups. The template of themes that had arisen from prior analysis of the urban data applied to the rural data. Convenience was a third level theme under Advantages. Five fourth level themes emerged from within convenience. Four of the five sub-themes were common to both rural and urban participants: reduction of parental burden to schedule, reduction in parental lost time, decrease in parental stress and increase in physical access points for influenza immunization. The fifth subtheme, increases temporal access to influenza immunization, emerged uniquely from the rural data. Both rural and urban parents perceived that convenience would be an advantage of adding an annual influenza immunization to the vaccinations currently given to Alberta children at school. Improving temporal access to such immunization may be a more relevant aspect of convenience to rural

  18. SAFETY OF CELL-DERIVED SUBUNIT ADJUVANTED INFLUENZA VACCINE FOR CHILDREN VACCINATION: DOUBLE-BLIND RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M. Kharit

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the safety data for cell-derived inactivated subunit adjuvanted influenza vaccine «Grippol Neo» in children 3–17 years old in comparison with reference egg-derived inactivated subunit vaccine «Grippol plus». Good test vaccine tolerability and high efficacy profile is demonstrated. Based on the results obtained vaccine «Grippol Neo» is recommended for mass influenza prophylaxis in pediatry, including National Immunization Schedule.Key words: children, influenza, vaccination, «Grippol Neo».(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. – 2010;9(4:44-49

  19. Searching the Web for Influenza Vaccines: HealthMap Vaccine Finder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huston, Jane E; Mekaru, Sumiko R; Kluberg, Sheryl; Brownstein, John S

    2015-08-01

    The goal of the HealthMap Vaccine Finder is to provide a free, comprehensive, online service where users can search for locations that offer immunizations. In this article, we describe the data and systems underlying the HealthMap Vaccine Finder (HVF) and summarize the project's first year of operations. We collected data on vaccination services from a variety of providers for 2012-2013. Data are used to populate an online, public, searchable map. In its first year, HVF collected information from 1256 providers representing 46 381 locations. The public Web site received 625 124 visits during the 2012-2013 influenza vaccination season. HVF is a unique tool that connects the public to vaccine providers in their communities. During the 2012-2013 influenza season, HVF experienced significant usage and was able to respond to user feedback with new features.

  20. THE COMPARISON OF INFLUENZA VACCINE EFFICACY ON RESPIRATORY DISEASE AMONG IRANIAN PILGRIMS IN THE 2003 AND 2004 SEASONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Razavi

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged cough occurs in a large proportion of the 2 million pilgrims who participate in the annual Hajj in Saudi Arabia. There is no unique cause for pilgrims’ respiratory involvement, but several studies suggest a high incidence of influenza as a cause of the disease. To determine influenza vaccine efficacy against respiratory disease in pilgrims, we conducted two similar cohort studies on 51100 Iranian pilgrims who had participated in the annual Hajj in the years 2003 and 2004. We calculated vaccine efficacy in these two years with the use of “1- odd’s ratio” formula and compared the results. The vaccine efficacy for prevention of influenza like illness in the year 2003 was 51% but the vaccine was not efficient in the year 2004. It was concluded that etiologic agents other than influenza virus should be considered as the cause of respiratory disease in Hajj. Bacterial infections superimposed on chronic respiratory diseases, and allergic or toxic conditions are suggested caourses for more investigation.

  1. Understanding knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors related to influenza and the influenza vaccine in US-Mexico border communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phippard, Alba E; Kimura, Akiko C; Lopez, Karla; Kriner, Paula

    2013-08-01

    Hispanics are less likely to receive the influenza vaccine compared to other racial and ethnic groups in the US. Hispanic residents of the US-Mexico border region may have differing health beliefs and behaviors, and their cross-border mobility impacts disease control. To assess beliefs and behaviors regarding influenza prevention and control among border populations, surveys were conducted at border clinics. Of 197 respondents, 34 % reported conditions for which vaccination is indicated, and travel to Mexico was common. Few (35 %) believed influenza could make them 'very sick', and 76 % believed they should take antibiotics to treat influenza. Influenza vaccine awareness was high, and considered important, but only 36 % reported recent vaccination. The belief that influenza vaccination is 'very important' was strongly associated with recent vaccination; "Didn't think about it" was the most common reason for being un-vaccinated. Misconceptions about influenza risk, prevention and treatment were common in this Hispanic border population; improved educational efforts and reminder systems could impact vaccination behaviors.

  2. Influenza vaccination accelerates recovery of ferrets from lymphopenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Music, Nedzad; Reber, Adrian J; Lipatov, Aleksandr S; Kamal, Ram P; Blanchfield, Kristy; Wilson, Jason R; Donis, Ruben O; Katz, Jacqueline M; York, Ian A

    2014-01-01

    Ferrets are a useful animal model for human influenza virus infections, since they closely mimic the pathogenesis of influenza viruses observed in humans. However, a lack of reagents, especially for flow cytometry of immune cell subsets, has limited research in this model. Here we use a panel of primarily species cross-reactive antibodies to identify ferret T cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), B cells, and granulocytes in peripheral blood. Following infection with seasonal H3N2 or H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses, these cell types showed rapid and dramatic changes in frequency, even though clinically the infections were mild. The loss of B cells and CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the increase in neutrophils, were especially marked 1-2 days after infection, when about 90% of CD8+ T cells disappeared from the peripheral blood. The different virus strains led to different kinetics of leukocyte subset alterations. Vaccination with homologous vaccine reduced clinical symptoms slightly, but led to a much more rapid return to normal leukocyte parameters. Assessment of clinical symptoms may underestimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in restoring homeostasis.

  3. Influenza vaccination accelerates recovery of ferrets from lymphopenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nedzad Music

    Full Text Available Ferrets are a useful animal model for human influenza virus infections, since they closely mimic the pathogenesis of influenza viruses observed in humans. However, a lack of reagents, especially for flow cytometry of immune cell subsets, has limited research in this model. Here we use a panel of primarily species cross-reactive antibodies to identify ferret T cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL, B cells, and granulocytes in peripheral blood. Following infection with seasonal H3N2 or H1N1pdm09 influenza viruses, these cell types showed rapid and dramatic changes in frequency, even though clinically the infections were mild. The loss of B cells and CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the increase in neutrophils, were especially marked 1-2 days after infection, when about 90% of CD8+ T cells disappeared from the peripheral blood. The different virus strains led to different kinetics of leukocyte subset alterations. Vaccination with homologous vaccine reduced clinical symptoms slightly, but led to a much more rapid return to normal leukocyte parameters. Assessment of clinical symptoms may underestimate the effectiveness of influenza vaccine in restoring homeostasis.

  4. Surveillance and vaccine effectiveness of an influenza epidemic predominated by vaccine-mismatched influenza B/Yamagata-lineage viruses in Taiwan, 2011-12 season.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Lo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The 2011-12 trivalent influenza vaccine contains a strain of influenza B/Victoria-lineage viruses. Despite free provision of influenza vaccine among target populations, an epidemic predominated by influenza B/Yamagata-lineage viruses occurred during the 2011-12 season in Taiwan. We characterized this vaccine-mismatched epidemic and estimated influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE. METHODS: Influenza activity was monitored through sentinel viral surveillance, emergency department (ED and outpatient influenza-like illness (ILI syndromic surveillance, and case-based surveillance of influenza with complications and deaths. VE against laboratory-confirmed influenza was evaluated through a case-control study on ILI patients enrolled into sentinel viral surveillance. Logistic regression was used to estimate VE adjusted for confounding factors. RESULTS: During July 2011-June 2012, influenza B accounted for 2,382 (72.5% of 3,285 influenza-positive respiratory specimens. Of 329 influenza B viral isolates with antigen characterization, 287 (87.2% were B/Yamagata-lineage viruses. Proportions of ED and outpatient visits being ILI-related increased from November 2011 to January 2012. Of 1,704 confirmed cases of influenza with complications, including 154 (9.0% deaths, influenza B accounted for 1,034 (60.7% of the confirmed cases and 103 (66.9% of the deaths. Reporting rates of confirmed influenza with complications and deaths were 73.5 and 6.6 per 1,000,000, respectively, highest among those aged ≥65 years, 50-64 years, 3-6 years, and 0-2 years. Adjusted VE was -31% (95% CI: -80, 4 against all influenza, 54% (95% CI: 3, 78 against influenza A, and -66% (95% CI: -132, -18 against influenza B. CONCLUSIONS: This influenza epidemic in Taiwan was predominated by B/Yamagata-lineage viruses unprotected by the 2011-12 trivalent vaccine. The morbidity and mortality of this vaccine-mismatched epidemic warrants careful consideration of introducing a

  5. Direct and indirect impact of influenza vaccination of young children on school absenteeism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, James C; Beckett, Dawn; Snyder, Jonathan; Cummings, Ginny E; King, Bradley S; Magder, Laurence S

    2012-01-05

    Special mass influenza vaccination programs of elementary school-aged children (ESAC) in some or all Maryland Counties were conducted during the falls of 2005-2007. From 3% to 46% of ESAC received live attenuated influenza vaccine during these county programs, which were in addition to routine influenza vaccination efforts conducted in county medical offices. Anonymous, all cause public school absentee data for all grades was available from 11 of Maryland's 24 counties. Binomial regression was used to estimate associations between the percentage of children vaccinated in each county and the degree of increase in absenteeism rates during influenza outbreaks. We estimated that, for every 20% increase in vaccination rates for ESAC during these special programs, a 4% decrease in the rise in absentee rates occurred during influenza outbreak periods in both elementary and upper schools (P<0.05). These results suggest both direct and indirect benefits of influenza vaccination of young children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety and Efficacy of Vaccination Against Influenza in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ori Elkayam

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccination against influenza is currently recommended for patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. The safety and efficacy of vaccination in patients suffering from rheumatic diseases is still a matter of debate. This review summarizes the studies performed on the safety and immunogenicity of influenza vaccination in patients with RA as well as the rheumatic complications of the vaccine in otherwise healthy persons. Several trials have shown that the vaccine induces an adequate humoral response and does not induce clinical exacerbation of RA. Rheumatic complications (mainly vasculitis following influenza vaccination in the general population are scarce.

  7. Effectiveness of influenza vaccine against laboratory-confirmed influenza, in the late 2011–2012 season in Spain, among population targeted for vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Spain, the influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) was estimated in the last three seasons using the observational study cycEVA conducted in the frame of the existing Spanish Influenza Sentinel Surveillance System. The objective of the study was to estimate influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza-like illness (ILI) among the target groups for vaccination in Spain in the 2011–2012 season. We also studied influenza VE in the early (weeks 52/2011-7/2012) and late (weeks 8-14/2012) phases of the epidemic and according to time since vaccination. Methods Medically attended patients with ILI were systematically swabbed to collect information on exposure, laboratory outcome and confounding factors. Patients belonging to target groups for vaccination and who were swabbed 4 months, respectively, since vaccination. A decrease in VE with time since vaccination was only observed in individuals aged ≥ 65 years. Regarding the phase of the season, decreasing point estimates were only observed in the early phase, whereas very low or null estimates were obtained in the late phase for the shortest time interval. Conclusions The 2011–2012 influenza vaccine showed a low-to-moderate protective effect against medically attended, laboratory-confirmed influenza in the target groups for vaccination, in a late season and with a limited match between the vaccine and circulating strains. The suggested decrease in influenza VE with time since vaccination was mostly observed in the elderly population. The decreasing protective effect of the vaccine in the late part of the season could be related to waning vaccine protection because no viral changes were identified throughout the season. PMID:24053661

  8. Effectiveness of seasonal influenza vaccination in community-dwelling elderly people: an individual participant data meta-analysis of test-negative design case-control studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darvishian, Maryam; van den Heuvel, Edwin R; Bissielo, Ange; Castilla, Jesus; Cohen, Cheryl; Englund, Helene; Gefenaite, Giedre; Huang, Wan-Ting; la Bastide-van Gemert, Sacha; Martinez-Baz, Iván; McAnerney, Johanna M; Ntshoe, Genevie M; Suzuki, Motoi; Turner, Nikki; Hak, Eelko

    2017-03-01

    aggregate data meta-analysis. Furthermore, six additional datasets were provided by data collaborators, which resulted in individual participant data for a total of 5210 participants. A total of 4975 patients had the required data for analysis. Of these, 3146 (63%) were controls and 1829 (37%) were cases. Influenza vaccination was significantly effective during epidemic seasons irrespective of vaccine match status (matched adjusted vaccine effectiveness 44·38%, 95% CI 22·63-60·01; mismatched adjusted vaccine effectiveness 20·00%, 95% CI 3·46-33·68; analyses in the imputed dataset). Seasonal influenza vaccination did not show significant effectiveness during non-epidemic seasons. We found substantial variation in vaccine effectiveness across virus types and subtypes, with the highest estimate for A H1N1 pdm09 (53·19%, 10·25-75·58) and the lowest estimate for B virus types (-1·52%, -39·58 to 26·16). Although we observed no significant differences between subgroups in each category (hemisphere, age, and health status), influenza vaccination showed a protective effect among elderly people with cardiovascular disease, lung disease, or aged 75 years and younger. Influenza vaccination is moderately effective against laboratory-confirmed influenza in elderly people during epidemic seasons. More research is needed to investigate factors affecting vaccine protection (eg, brand-specific or type-specific vaccine effectiveness and repeated annual vaccination) in elderly people. University Medical Center Groningen. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Immunological characterization of conjugated Haemophilus influenzae type b vaccine failure in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukels, M. A.; Spanjaard, L.; Sanders, L. A.; Rijkers, G. T.

    2001-01-01

    Infant vaccination with conjugated Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine is highly effective in protecting against invasive Hib infections, but vaccine failures do occur. Twenty-one vaccine failures are reported since the introduction of the Hib conjugate vaccine in The Netherlands. Of the 14

  10. Immunization-Safety Monitoring Systems for the 2009 H1N1 Monovalent Influenza Vaccination Program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salmon, Daniel A.; Akhtar, Aysha; Mergler, Michelle J.; Vannice, Kirsten S.; Izurieta, Hector; Ball, Robert; Lee, Grace M.; Vellozzi, Claudia; Garman, Patrick; Cunningham, Francesca; Gellin, Bruce; Koh, Howard; Lurie, Nicole

    The effort to vaccinate the US population against the 2009 H1N1 influenza virus hinged, in part, on public confidence in vaccine safety. Early in the vaccine program, >20% of parents reported that they would not vaccinate their children. Concerns about the safety of the vaccines were reported by

  11. Interventions to increase influenza vaccination rates in children with high-risk conditions--a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aigbogun, N W; Hawker, J I; Stewart, A

    2015-02-04

    Influenza is a common cause of morbidity and mortality, especially among the elderly and those with certain chronic diseases. Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for individuals in at-risk groups, but rates of vaccination are particularly low in children with high-risk conditions (HRCs). To conduct a systematic review of studies that have examined interventions aimed at improving influenza vaccination in children with HRCs. Two databases - PubMed and SCOPUS - were searched (with no time or language restrictions) using a combination of keywords - Influenza AND vaccination OR immunization OR children AND asthma OR malignancy OR high-risk AND reminder. Duplicates were removed, and abstracts of relevant articles were screened using specific inclusion/exclusion criteria. Thirteen articles were selected, and five additional studies were identified following a review of the reference lists of the initial thirteen articles, bringing the total number to eighteen. Most studies were conducted in the United States. Among the 18 studies, there was one systematic review of a specific intervention in asthmatic children, seven randomized controlled trials (RCTs), six before-and-after studies, one non-randomized controlled trial, one retrospective cohort study, one quasi-experimental post-test study, and one letter to editors. Interventions reported include multi-component strategies, letter reminders, telephone recall, letters plus telephone calls, an asthma education tool and year-round scheduling for influenza vaccination, amongst others. There is good evidence that reminder letters will improve influenza vaccination uptake in children with HRCs, but the evidence that telephone recall or a combination of letter reminder and telephone recall will improve uptake is weak. It is not known if multiple reminder letters are more effective than single letters or if multi-component strategies are more effective than single or dual component strategies. There is a need for further

  12. Partnering with nursing service improves health care worker influenza vaccination rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Mary R; Hayes, Deborah M; Bennett, Anita M

    2009-08-01

    Increasing the influenza vaccination rate in health care workers (HCWs) promotes patient safety as well as employee health. The average HCW influenza vaccination rate is approximately 35%. Various studies have analyzed the reasons for the low vaccination rate in HCWs and developed strategies aimed at increasing this rate. At the study hospital, the Nursing Department was contacted to recruit influenza (flu) coordinators from the various hospital departments to coordinate administration of influenza vaccinations in their respective departments, with the aim of increasing HCW vaccination rates. The flu coordinators received education about the influenza vaccine along with lists of employees, vaccination supplies, and consent/declination forms. Each flu coordinator was responsible for contacting the employees in his or her department/unit. Both consent and declination responses were documented. Of the hospital's 3238 employees (including physicians), a total of 2534 were contacted (78%). Of these, 2008 consented to receive the influenza vaccine and 526 declined. This represented a 37% increase in the total number of HCWs contacted and a 20% increase in vaccine recipients over the previous influenza season. Partnering with the Nursing Department increased the accessibility to and acceptance of influenza vaccination among HCWs. The HCWs reported positive experiences about receiving the vaccine in the work environment.

  13. Factors associated with seasonal influenza vaccine uptake among children in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Shono, Aiko; Kondo, Masahide

    2015-01-01

    Background Seasonal influenza vaccine was once part of the routine immunization schedule that is routinely offered to all children in Japan, but it is now excluded from the schedule. This study aimed to investigate factors influential to parents? decision to have their children receive seasonal influenza vaccine, as well as types of seasonal influenza vaccine information that is given to parents. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional online survey of 555 participants who have at least one ch...

  14. Intranasal vaccination promotes detrimental Th17-mediated immunity against influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asher Maroof

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza disease is a global health issue that causes significant morbidity and mortality through seasonal epidemics. Currently, inactivated influenza virus vaccines given intramuscularly or live attenuated influenza virus vaccines administered intranasally are the only approved options for vaccination against influenza virus in humans. We evaluated the efficacy of a synthetic toll-like receptor 4 agonist CRX-601 as an adjuvant for enhancing vaccine-induced protection against influenza infection. Intranasal administration of CRX-601 adjuvant combined with detergent split-influenza antigen (A/Uruguay/716/2007 (H3N2 generated strong local and systemic immunity against co-administered influenza antigens while exhibiting high efficacy against two heterotypic influenza challenges. Intranasal vaccination with CRX-601 adjuvanted vaccines promoted antigen-specific IgG and IgA antibody responses and the generation of polyfunctional antigen-specific Th17 cells (CD4(+IL-17A(+TNFα(+. Following challenge with influenza virus, vaccinated mice transiently exhibited increased weight loss and morbidity during early stages of disease but eventually controlled infection. This disease exacerbation following influenza infection in vaccinated mice was dependent on both the route of vaccination and the addition of the adjuvant. Neutralization of IL-17A confirmed a detrimental role for this cytokine during influenza infection. The expansion of vaccine-primed Th17 cells during influenza infection was also accompanied by an augmented lung neutrophilic response, which was partially responsible for mediating the increased morbidity. This discovery is of significance in the field of vaccinology, as it highlights the importance of both route of vaccination and adjuvant selection in vaccine development.