WorldWideScience

Sample records for annual carbon dynamics

  1. Reconstruction of annual carbon dynamics and balance for an oligotrophic pine fen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alm, J.; Silvola, J.; Aaltonen, H. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Biology; Talanov, A.; Ikkonen, E. [Karelian Research Centre of Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation). Inst. of Biology; Nykaenen, H.; Martikainen, P.J. [National Public Health Inst. Kuopio (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Microbiology

    1996-12-31

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is bound by mire vegetation in photosynthesis during the growing season, and is re-released by respiration of plants, soil animals and microorganisms consuming dead organic matter. A small proportion of annual primary production may fall below the water table to anoxic conditions and thus escapes the oxidative decomposition. Also from anoxic peat, carbon is released with clear seasonal and spatial variation as methane (CH{sub 4}.). The rate of carbon accumulation in peat depends on the annual inbalance of plant production and litter decomposition. Exchange of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} between peat, vegetation and the atmosphere thus reflects the dynamics of carbon flows in the ecosystem. Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange (PN), total CO{sub 2} release (RTOT) and CH{sub 4} release (D) from different treeless surfaces of low-sedge Sphagnum papillosum pine fen was studied in eastern Finland. (8 refs.)

  2. Satellites Based Annual Carbon Dynamics of Africa Tropical Vegetation During the 2003-2014 Period

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccini, A.

    2015-12-01

    Tracking terrestrial carbon fluxes and predicting how tropical forests will respond to continuous global change requires accurate estimates of annual changes in the density and distribution of carbon stocks at local to global scales. Existing evidence for tropical forests as a carbon sink is based on a limited number of repeated field measurements (Phillips et al. 1998,Lewis et al. 2009, Brienen et al. 2015), while spatially explicit estimates over large areas are limited to emissions derived from deforestation without being able to account for degradation and gain (Harris et al. 2012, Hansen et al. 2013). Here we use 12 years (2003-2014) of satellite data to quantify wall-to-wall annual net changes in aboveground carbon density, showing that Africa tropical forests are a net carbon source on the order of 72.1 ± 32.9 Tg C yr-1. This net release of carbon consists of losses of 205.0 ± 24.7 Tg C yr1 and gains of -132.9 ± 19.3 Tg C yr1. The net gains result from forest growth; net losses result from both reductions in forest area due to deforestation and in biomass density within forests due to degradation; this last accounting overall for 68.9 % of the losses. We anticipate several advantages over the traditional estimates. It measures carbon lost from forest degradation as well as from deforestation. It measures the gains of carbon in forest growth. Data are available to determine annual changes with associated uncertainty. The approach focuses directly on changes in carbon. While global emissions from fossil fuel stabilized in 2014 for the first time in the past 40 years, results from this study indicate that the annual rate of emissions from tropical forests has tended upward over the latest years of the 2003-2014 period.

  3. Long term estimation of carbon dynamic and sequestration for Iranian agro-ecosystem: I- Net primary productivity and annual carbon input for common agricultural crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Nassiri Mahalati

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of carbon input is one of the most important factors for estimating soil carbon changes and potential for carbon sequestration. To evaluate the net primary productivity (NPP and soil carbon input in agricultural eco-systems of Iran, data for yield, cultivated area, harvest index (HI and shoot /root ratio in different crops including: wheat, barley, maize, cotton, rice, alfalfa and chickpea were obtained for different provinces. Then, allocated carbon to different organs of plant were calculated based on carbon allocation coefficients and finally, the net primary productivity based on carbon (NPPc was calculated. The ratio of NPPc that was annually returned to soil was considered as carbon annual input. The results showed that the maximum amount of NPPc for wheat, barely and alfalfa were obtained in Khazari climate for rice, chickpea and cotton was achieved in warm-wet climate and for maize was gained in warm-dry climate. In all regions of Iran, chickpea had the lowest effect on NPPc and consequently on carbon sequestration. The highest amount of carbon input per unit area among studied crops and different regions were observed in Khazari region for alfalfa whereas, the lowest carbon input per unit area was relation to chickpea in cold region. The lowest gap between actual and potential of carbon sequestration was observed in alfalfa whereas wheat, rice and cotton showed the most gap by 0.4, 0.38 and 0.37, respectively.

  4. Deforestation in Amazonia impacts riverine carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langerwisch, Fanny; Walz, Ariane; Rammig, Anja; Tietjen, Britta; Thonicke, Kirsten; Cramer, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Fluxes of organic and inorganic carbon within the Amazon basin are considerably controlled by annual flooding, which triggers the export of terrigenous organic material to the river and ultimately to the Atlantic Ocean. The amount of carbon imported to the river and the further conversion, transport and export of it depend on temperature, atmospheric CO2, terrestrial productivity and carbon storage, as well as discharge. Both terrestrial productivity and discharge are influenced by climate and land use change. The coupled LPJmL and RivCM model system (Langerwisch et al., 2016) has been applied to assess the combined impacts of climate and land use change on the Amazon riverine carbon dynamics. Vegetation dynamics (in LPJmL) as well as export and conversion of terrigenous carbon to and within the river (RivCM) are included. The model system has been applied for the years 1901 to 2099 under two deforestation scenarios and with climate forcing of three SRES emission scenarios, each for five climate models. We find that high deforestation (business-as-usual scenario) will strongly decrease (locally by up to 90 %) riverine particulate and dissolved organic carbon amount until the end of the current century. At the same time, increase in discharge leaves net carbon transport during the first decades of the century roughly unchanged only if a sufficient area is still forested. After 2050 the amount of transported carbon will decrease drastically. In contrast to that, increased temperature and atmospheric CO2 concentration determine the amount of riverine inorganic carbon stored in the Amazon basin. Higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations increase riverine inorganic carbon amount by up to 20 % (SRES A2). The changes in riverine carbon fluxes have direct effects on carbon export, either to the atmosphere via outgassing or to the Atlantic Ocean via discharge. The outgassed carbon will increase slightly in the Amazon basin, but can be regionally reduced by up to 60 % due to

  5. Annual Report 2000. Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, Steven D.; McDowell, Robin S.

    2001-04-15

    This annual report describes the research and accomplishments of the Chemical Structure and Dynamics Program in the year 2000, one of six research programs at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) - a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is meeting the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding by 1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; 2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes relevant to environmental chemistry; and 3) developing state-of-the-art research and analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in natural and contaminated systems.

  6. Azure Dynamics Corporation annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Azure Dynamics Corporation is an international leader in the development of proprietary hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) and electric powertrains. In 2004, the company moved its Canadian operations to Vancouver where it can develop and test its technology. Azure has developed HEV technology for the light to medium duty commercial vehicle category. In particular, its main business is the commercialization of HEV and electric vehicle (EV) control and powertrain systems for commercial vehicles (ACS Technology). In 2004, Azure announced an agreement with British-based Leyland Product Development, Zebra Batteries and Renault Trucks to produce a master electric delivery van. It also introduced the first hybrid electric taxi in London and delivered 30 vehicles in the initial phase of an agreement with Purolator that could see delivery of up to 2,000 vehicles. Azure also acquired Solectria Corporation in the United States and is currently developing a powertrain platform for vehicles in the medium-duty weight range of 7,500 to 14,000 pounds gross vehicle weight, and another powertrain for vehicles in the light-duty weight range of 5,000 to 7,5000 pounds gross vehicle weight. Commercial sales of its product is targeted for 2005. This annual report includes information on the company's net earnings and investor profiles, and includes consolidated financial statements and common share information such as assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and cash flows. tabs., figs

  7. Annual Report 1999 Environmental Dynamics and Simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NS Foster-Mills

    2000-06-28

    This annual report describes selected 1999 research accomplishments for the Environmental Dynamics and Simulation (ED and S) directorate, one of six research organizations in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). These accomplishments are representative of the different lines of research underway in the ED and S directorate. EMSL is one of US Department of Energy's (DOE) national scientific user facilities and is the centerpiece of DOE's commitment to providing world-class experimental, theoretical, and computational capabilities for solving the nation's environmental problems. Capabilities in the EMSL include over 100 major instrument systems for use by the resident research staff, their collaborators, and users of the EMSL. These capabilities are used to address the fundamental science that will be the basis for finding solutions to national environmental issues such as cleaning up contamianted areas at DOE sites across the country and developing green technologies that will reduce or eliminate future pollution production. The capabilities are also used to further the understanding of global climate change and environmental issues relevant to energy production and use and health effects resulting from exposure to contaminated environments.

  8. Annual carbon balance of a peatland 10 yr following restoration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Strack

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Undisturbed peatlands represent long-term net sinks of carbon; however, peat extraction converts these systems into large and persistent sources of greenhouse gases. Although rewetting and restoration following peat extraction have taken place over the last several decades, very few studies have investigated the longer term impact of this restoration on peatland carbon balance. We determined the annual carbon balance of a former horticulturally-extracted peatland restored 10 yr prior to the study and compared these values to the carbon balance measured at neighboring unrestored and natural sites. Carbon dioxide (CO2 and methane (CH4 fluxes were measured using the chamber technique biweekly during the growing season from May to October 2010 and three times over the winter period. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC export was measured from remnant ditches in the unrestored and restored sites. During the growing season the restored site had greater uptake of CO2 than the natural site when photon flux density was greater than 1000 μmol m−2 s−1, while the unrestored site remained a source of CO2. Ecosystem respiration was similar between natural and restored sites, which were both significantly lower than the unrestored site. Methane flux remained low at the restored site except from open water pools, created as part of restoration, and remnant ditches. Export of DOC during the growing season was 5.0 and 28.8 g m−2 from the restored and unrestored sites, respectively. Due to dry conditions during the study year all sites acted as net carbon sources with annual balance of the natural, restored and unrestored sites of 250.7, 148.0 and 546.6 g C m−2, respectively. Although hydrological conditions and vegetation community at the restored site remained intermediate between natural and unrestored conditions, peatland restoration resulted in a large reduction in annual carbon loss from the system resulting in a carbon balance more similar to a natural

  9. Annual Report: Carbon Capture (30 September 2012)

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    Luebke, David; Morreale, Bryan; Richards, George; Syamlal, Madhava

    2014-04-16

    Capture of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a critical component in reducing greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuel-based processes. The Carbon Capture research to be performed is aimed at accelerating the development of efficient, cost-effective technologies which meet the post-combustion programmatic goal of capture of 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced from an existing coal-fired power plant with less than a 35% increase in the cost of electricity (COE), and the pre-combustion goal of 90% CO{sub 2} capture with less than a 10% increase in COE. The specific objective of this work is to develop innovative materials and approaches for the economic and efficient capture of CO{sub 2} from coal-based processes, and ultimately assess the performance of promising technologies at conditions representative of field application (i.e., slip stream evaluation). The Carbon Capture research includes seven core technical research areas: post-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; pre-combustion solvents, sorbents, and membranes; and oxygen (O{sub 2}) production. The goal of each of these tasks is to develop advanced materials and processes that are able to reduce the energy penalty and cost of CO{sub 2} (or O{sub 2}) separation over conventional technologies. In the first year of development, materials will be examined by molecular modeling, and then synthesized and experimentally characterized at lab scale. In the second year, they will be tested further under ideal conditions. In the third year, they will be tested under realistic conditions. The most promising materials will be tested at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC) using actual flue or fuel gas. Systems analyses will be used to determine whether or not materials developed are likely to meet the Department of Energy (DOE) COE targets. Materials which perform well and appear likely to improve in performance will be licensed for further development outside of the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL

  10. Terahertz Dynamics in Carbon Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Junichiro

    2012-02-01

    This NSF Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE) project supports a unique interdisciplinary and international partnership investigating terahertz (THz) dynamics in nanostructures. The 0.1 to 10 THz frequency range of the electromagnetic spectrum is where electrical transport and optical transitions merge, offering exciting opportunities to study a variety of novel physical phenomena in condensed matter. By combining THz technology and nanotechnology, we can advance our understanding of THz physics while improving and developing THz devices. Specifically, this PIRE research explores THz dynamics of electrons in carbon nanomaterials, namely, nanotubes and graphene --- low-dimensional, sp^2-bonded carbon systems with unique finite-frequency properties. Japan and the U.S. are global leaders in both THz research and carbon research, and stimulating cooperation is critical to further advance THz science and to commercialize products developed in the lab. However, obstacles exist for international collaboration --- primarily linguistic and cultural barriers --- and this PIRE project aims to address these barriers through the integration of our research and education programs. Our strong educational portfolio endeavours to cultivate interest in nanotechnology amongst young U.S. undergraduate students and encourage them to pursue graduate study and academic research in the physical sciences, especially those from underrepresented groups. Our award-winning International Research Experience for Undergraduates Program, NanoJapan, provides structured research internships in Japanese university laboratories with Japanese mentors --- recognized as a model international education program for science and engineering students. The project builds the skill sets of nanoscience researchers and students by cultivating international and inter-cultural awareness, research expertise, and specific academic interests in nanotechnology. U.S. project partners include Rice

  11. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1994-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally-important interfaces. The research program is built around the established relationship between structure, thermodynamics, and kinetics. This research effort continues to evolve into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems (e.g., well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules), and studies of complex systems found in the environment. Experimental studies of molecular and supramolecular structures and thermodynamics are key to understanding the nature of matter, and lead to direct comparison with computational results. Kinetic and mechanistic measurements, combined with real-time dynamics measurements of atomic and molecular motions during chemical reactions, provide for a molecular-level description of chemical reactions. The anticipated results of this work are the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical processes at complex interfaces, the development of new techniques for the detection and measurement of species at such interfaces, and the interpretation and extrapolation of the observations in terms of models of interfacial chemistry. The Chemical Structure and Dynamics research program includes five areas described in detail in this report: Reaction mechanisms at solid interfaces; Solution and solution interfaces; Structure and dynamics of biological systems; Analytical methods development; and atmospheric chemistry. Extended abstracts are presented for 23 studies.

  12. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS ampersand D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species

  13. Chemical structure and dynamics: Annual report 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1997-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species.

  14. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1996-05-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program is a major component of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory`s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), providing a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for the characterization of waste tanks and pollutant distributions, and for detection and monitoring of trace atmospheric species.

  15. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE's environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous

  16. Chemical Structure and Dynamics annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.; McDowell, R.S.

    1998-03-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS and D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. The authors respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by: (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage; and (3) developing state-of-the-art analytical methods for characterizing complex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. The focus of the research is defined primarily by DOE`s environmental problems: fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface environment, processing and storage of waste materials, cellular effects of chemical and radiological insult, and atmospheric chemistry as it relates to air quality and global change. Twenty-seven projects are described under the following topical sections: Reaction mechanisms at interfaces; High-energy processes at environmental interfaces; Cluster models of the condensed phase; and Miscellaneous.

  17. Annual Report 1998: Chemical Structure and Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    SD Colson; RS McDowell

    1999-05-10

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics (CS&D) program is a major component of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Labo- ratory (EMSL), developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide a state-of- the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. We respond to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at a wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces; (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interracial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in envi- ronmental chemistry and in nuclear waste proc- essing and storage; and (3) developing state-of- the-art analytical methods for characterizing com- plex materials of the types found in stored wastes and contaminated soils, and for detecting and monitoring trace atmospheric species. Our program aims at achieving a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces and, more generally, in condensed media, compa- rable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for pre- dicting macroscopic chemical behavior in con- densed and heterogeneous media, which will add significantly to the value of field-scale envi- ronmental models, predictions of short- and long- term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other areas related to the primary missions of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  18. Chemical structure and dynamics. Annual report 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colson, S.D.

    1995-07-01

    The Chemical Structure and Dynamics program was organized as a major component of Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Environmental and Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a state-of-the-art collaborative facility for studies of chemical structure and dynamics. Our program responds to the need for a fundamental, molecular-level understanding of chemistry at the wide variety of environmentally important interfaces by (1) extending the experimental characterization and theoretical description of chemical reactions to encompass the effects of condensed media and interfaces, and (2) developing a multidisciplinary capability for describing interfacial chemical processes within which the new knowledge generated can be brought to bear on complex phenomena in environmental chemistry and in nuclear waste processing and storage. This research effort was initiated in 1989 and will continue to evolve over the next few years into a program of rigorous studies of fundamental molecular processes in model systems, such as well-characterized surfaces, single-component solutions, clusters, and biological molecules; and studies of complex systems found in the environment (multispecies, multiphase solutions; solid/liquid, liquid/liquid, and gas/surface interfaces; colloidal dispersions; ultrafine aerosols; and functioning biological systems). The success of this program will result in the achievement of a quantitative understanding of chemical reactions at interfaces, and more generally in condensed media, that is comparable to that currently available for gas-phase reactions. This understanding will form the basis for the development of a priori theories for predictions of macroscopic chemical behavior in condensed and heterogeneous media, adding significantly to the value of field-scale environmental models, the prediction of short- and long-term nuclear waste storage stabilities, and other problems related to the primary missions of the DOE.

  19. Integrating plant carbon dynamics with mutualism ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pringle, Elizabeth G

    2016-04-01

    Plants reward microbial and animal mutualists with carbohydrates to obtain nutrients, defense, pollination, and dispersal. Under a fixed carbon budget, plants must allocate carbon to their mutualists at the expense of allocation to growth, reproduction, or storage. Such carbon trade-offs are indirectly expressed when a plant exhibits reduced growth or fecundity in the presence of its mutualist. Because carbon regulates the costs of all plant mutualisms, carbon dynamics are a common platform for integrating these costs in the face of ecological complexity and context dependence. The ecophysiology of whole-plant carbon allocation could thus elucidate the ecology and evolution of plant mutualisms. If mutualisms are costly to plants, then they must be important but frequently underestimated sinks in the terrestrial carbon cycle. © 2015 The Author. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Soil organic carbon dynamics jointly controlled by climate, carbon inputs, soil properties and soil carbon fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhongkui; Feng, Wenting; Luo, Yiqi; Baldock, Jeff; Wang, Enli

    2017-10-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics are regulated by the complex interplay of climatic, edaphic and biotic conditions. However, the interrelation of SOC and these drivers and their potential connection networks are rarely assessed quantitatively. Using observations of SOC dynamics with detailed soil properties from 90 field trials at 28 sites under different agroecosystems across the Australian cropping regions, we investigated the direct and indirect effects of climate, soil properties, carbon (C) inputs and soil C pools (a total of 17 variables) on SOC change rate (r C , Mg C ha -1  yr -1 ). Among these variables, we found that the most influential variables on r C were the average C input amount and annual precipitation, and the total SOC stock at the beginning of the trials. Overall, C inputs (including C input amount and pasture frequency in the crop rotation system) accounted for 27% of the relative influence on r C , followed by climate 25% (including precipitation and temperature), soil C pools 24% (including pool size and composition) and soil properties (such as cation exchange capacity, clay content, bulk density) 24%. Path analysis identified a network of intercorrelations of climate, soil properties, C inputs and soil C pools in determining r C . The direct correlation of r C with climate was significantly weakened if removing the effects of soil properties and C pools, and vice versa. These results reveal the relative importance of climate, soil properties, C inputs and C pools and their complex interconnections in regulating SOC dynamics. Ignorance of the impact of changes in soil properties, C pool composition and C input (quantity and quality) on SOC dynamics is likely one of the main sources of uncertainty in SOC predictions from the process-based SOC models. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Inter-annual Variations of the Carbon Footprint in Beijing Tianjin and Hebei Agro-ecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TIAN Zhi-hui

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Based on the integration of Beijing, Tianjin and Hebei, we investigated inter-annual changes in carbon footprint from 2005 to 2014 in the agro-ecosystem of suburban Beijing Tianjin and Hebei. Our findings indicated that:(1 Carbon sink decreased 6.6 percent annually. The average annual carbon storage amount was 4 855 000 tons, with food crops constituting the highest proportion;(2 Carbon emission in the system showed a gradually decreasing trend, with agricultural chemicals as significant contributors. The annual average carbon emission was 7 278 000 tons in the Beijing Tianjin and Hebei farmland ecosystem. The largest amount of carbon emissions came from agricultural chemicals, nitrogen(from fertilizerwas the biggest contributor;(3 The average carbon footprint was 1 612 000 hm2 in the Beijing Tianjin and Hebei farmland ecosystem and showed a decreasing trend along with an ecological surplus of carbon.

  2. Carbon dynamics in wetland restoration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalenko, K.; Ciborowski, J.; Gardner-Costa, J.; Slama, C. [Windsor Univ., ON (Canada); Daly, C.; Hornung, J. [Suncor Energy, Calgary, AB (Canada); Dixon, G.; Farwell, A. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada); Foote, L.; Frederick, K.; Roy, M. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada); Liber, K. [Saskatchewan Univ., Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Smits, J. [Calgary Univ., AB (Canada); Wytrykush, C. [Syncrude Canada Ltd., Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2010-07-01

    This study focused on the reclamation of wetland ecosystems impacted by oil sands development in the boreal wetlands. Although these wetlands play an important role in global carbon balance, their ecosystem function is compromised by direct and regional anthropogenic disturbance and climate change. Large oil sand mining areas that require reclamation generate substantial quantities of extraction process-affected materials. In order to determine if the reclaimed wetlands were restored to equivalent ecosystem function, this study evaluated carbon flows and food web structure in oil sands-affected wetlands. The purpose was to determine whether a prescribed reclamation strategy or topsoil amendment accelerates reclaimed wetland development to produce self-sustaining peatlands. In addition to determining carbon fluxes, this study measured compartment standing stocks for residual hydrocarbons, organic substrate, bacterioplankton, phytoplankton, biofilm, macrophytes, detritus, zoobenthos and aquatic-terrestrial exports. Most biotic 28 compartments differed between oil-sands-affected and reference wetlands, but the difference lessened with age. Macroinvertebrate trophic diversity was lower in oil sands-affected wetlands. Peat amendment seemed to speed convergence for some compartments but not others. These results were discussed in the context of restoration of ecosystem function and optimization of reclamation strategies.

  3. Seasonal changes in stable carbon isotope ratios within annual growth rings of Pinus radiata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walcroft, A.; Silvester, W.; Whitehead, D.; Kelliher, F.

    1997-01-01

    The stable isotope composition of photosynthetically assimilated carbon (δ 13 C) is determined by the ratio of the leaf internal CO 2 concentration (c i ) to that of the ambient air (c a ), and so reflects the contribution of both stomatal conductance (g s ) and the rate of photosynthesis (A). Assimilated carbon which is subsequently laid down as wood in annual growth rings may therefore represent a time integrated record of physiological responses by the whole tree to seasonal changes in the environmental variables regulating growth. We analysed the stable carbon isotope composition of Pinus radiata wood collected from two plantation forest sites in New Zealand which differ markedly in temperature, rainfall and soil characteristics. For both sites, discs were cut from the stem of several trees near ground level and whole wood samples were taken from within individual annual growth rings over a number of years. At one site, diameter bands were installed over the 1994 - 1996 growing seasons in order to date precisely the formation of wood during that time. Trees at each site consistently showed a seasonal pattern in the stable isotope composition of wood within individual growth rings. The amplitude of seasonal δ 13 C variation at the wet and dry sites were 1-2 per thousand and 4 per thousand respectively. Mean δ 13 C values from the wet site were 3 per thousand more 13 C depleted than those from the dry site implying lower water-use efficiency (carbon assimilation per unit transpiration). A process-based, model of stomatal conductance and CO 2 assimilation was combined with a soil-water balance model to estimate the average daily leaf-level intercellular CO 2 concentration (c i ). Over two growing seasons at each site there was generally good agreement between mean canopy-level c i derived from the tree-ring δ 13 C data and modelled leaf-level c i levels. Further, the ratio of annual CO 2 assimilation to transpiration estimated by the model for each site

  4. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2013)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Syamlal, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Cottrell, Roger [URS Corporation. (URS), San Francisco, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sundaresan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sun, Xin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Storlie, C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bhattacharyya, D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Tong, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zitney, Stephen E [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Dale, Crystal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shinn, John [SynPatEco, Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    2013-09-30

    -ANOVA-UQ) for calibration and validation of CFD models. 8. A new basic data submodel in Aspen Plus format for a representative high viscosity capture solvent, 2-MPZ system. 9. An updated RM tool for CFD (REVEAL) that can create a RM from MFIX. A new lightweight, stand-alone version will be available in late 2013. 10. An updated RM integration tool to convert the RM from REVEAL into a CAPE-OPEN or ACM model for use in a process simulator. 11. An updated suite of unified steady-state and dynamic process models for solid sorbent carbon capture included bubbling fluidized bed and moving bed reactors. 12. An updated and unified set of compressor models including steady-state design point model and dynamic model with surge detection. 13. A new framework for the synthesis and optimization of coal oxycombustion power plants using advanced optimization algorithms. This release focuses on modeling and optimization of a cryogenic air separation unit (ASU). 14. A new technical risk model in spreadsheet format. 15. An updated version of the sorbent kinetic/equilibrium model for parameter estimation for the 1st generation sorbent model. 16. An updated process synthesis superstructure model to determine optimal process configurations utilizing surrogate models from ALAMO for adsorption and regeneration in a solid sorbent process. 17. Validation models for NETL Carbon Capture Unit utilizing sorbent AX. Additional validation models will be available for sorbent 32D in 2014. 18. An updated hollow fiber membrane model and system example for carbon capture. 19. An updated reference power plant model in Thermoflex that includes additional steam extraction and reinjection points to enable heat integration module. 20. An updated financial risk model in spreadsheet format.

  5. Modelling annual pasture dynamics: Application to stomatal ozone deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Ignacio; Bermejo, Victoria; Elvira, Susana; Sanz, Javier; Gimeno, Benjamín S.; Alonso, Rocío

    2010-07-01

    Modelling ozone (O 3) deposition for impact risk assessment is still poorly developed for herbaceous vegetation, particularly for Mediterranean annual pastures. High inter-annual climatic variability in the Mediterranean area makes it difficult to develop models characterizing gas exchange behaviour and air pollutant absorption suitable for risk assessment. This paper presents a new model to estimate stomatal conductance (g s) of Trifolium subterraneum, a characteristic species of dehesa pastures. The MEDPAS (MEDiterranean PAStures) model couples 3 modules estimating soil water content (SWC), vegetation growth and gs. The gs module is a reparameterized version of the stomatal component of the EMEP DO 3SE O 3 deposition model. The MEDPAS model was applied to two contrasting years representing typical dry and humid springs respectively and with different O 3 exposures. The MEDPAS model reproduced realistically the gs seasonal and inter-annual variations observed in the field. SWC was identified as the major driver of differences across years. Despite the higher O 3 exposure in the dry year, meteorological conditions favoured 2.1 times higher gs and 56 day longer growing season in the humid year compared to the dry year. This resulted in higher ozone fluxes absorbed by T. subterraneum in the humid year. High inter-family variability was found in gas exchange rates, therefore limiting the relevance of single species O 3 deposition flux modelling for dehesa pastures. Stomatal conductance dynamics at the canopy level need to be considered for more accurate O 3 flux modelling for present and future climate scenarios in the Mediterranean area.

  6. Forest annual carbon cost : A global-scale analysis of autotrophic respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piao, Shilonog; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Ciais, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A.; Chen, Anping; Chao, C. A O; Fang, Jingyun; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Yiqi, L. U O; Wang, Shaopeng

    Forest autotrophic respiration (Ra) plays an important role in the carbon balance of forest ecosystems. However, its drivers at the global scale are not well known. Based on a global forest database, we explore the relationships of annual Ra with mean annual temperature (MAT) and biotic factors

  7. Impacts of disturbance history on annual carbon stocks and fluxes in southeastern US forests during 1986-2010 using remote sensing, forest inventory data, and a carbon cycle model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, H.; Zhou, Y.; Williams, C. A.

    2017-12-01

    Accurate assessment of forest carbon storage and uptake is central to policymaking aimed at mitigating climate change and understanding the role forests play in the global carbon cycle. Disturbance events are highly heterogeneous in space and time, impacting forest carbon dynamics and challenging the quantification and reporting of carbon stocks and fluxes. This study documents annual carbon stocks and fluxes from 1986 and 2010 mapped at 30-m resolution across southeastern US forests, characterizing how they respond to disturbances and ensuing regrowth. Forest inventory data (FIA) are used to parameterize a carbon cycle model (CASA) to represent post-disturbance carbon trajectories of carbon pools and fluxes with time following harvest, fire and bark beetle disturbances of varying severity and across forest types and site productivity settings. Time since disturbance at 30 meters is inferred from two remote-sensing data sources: disturbance year (NAFD, MTBS and ADS) and biomass (NBCD 2000) intersected with FIA-derived curves of biomass accumulation with stand age. All of these elements are combined to map carbon stocks and fluxes at a 30-m resolution for the year 2010, and to march backward in time for continuous, annual reporting. Results include maps of annual carbon stocks and fluxes for forests of the southeastern US, and analysis of spatio-temporal patterns of carbon sources/sinks at local and regional scales.

  8. The role of storage dynamics in annual wheat prices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schewe, Jacob; Otto, Christian; Frieler, Katja

    2017-05-01

    Identifying the drivers of global crop price fluctuations is essential for estimating the risks of unexpected weather-induced production shortfalls and for designing optimal response measures. Here we show that with a consistent representation of storage dynamics, a simple supply-demand model can explain most of the observed variations in wheat prices over the last 40 yr solely based on time series of annual production and long term demand trends. Even the most recent price peaks in 2007/08 and 2010/11 can be explained by additionally accounting for documented changes in countries’ trade policies and storage strategies, without the need for external drivers such as oil prices or speculation across different commodity or stock markets. This underlines the critical sensitivity of global prices to fluctuations in production. The consistent inclusion of storage into a dynamic supply-demand model closes an important gap when it comes to exploring potential responses to future crop yield variability under climate and land-use change.

  9. Microbial carbon recycling: an underestimated process controlling soil carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basler, A.; Dippold, M.; Helfrich, M.; Dyckmans, J.

    2015-07-01

    The mean residence times (MRT) of different compound classes of soil organic matter (SOM) do not match their inherent recalcitrance to decomposition. One reason for this is the stabilisation within the soil matrix, but recycling, i.e. the reuse of "old" organic material to form new biomass may also play a role as it uncouples the residence times of organic matter from the lifetime of discrete molecules in soil. We analysed soil sugar dynamics in a natural 30 years old labelling experiment after a~wheat-maize vegetation change to determine the extent of recycling and stabilisation in plant and microbial derived sugars: while plant derived sugars are only affected by stabilisation processes, microbial sugars may be subject to both, stabilisation and recycling. To disentangle the dynamics of soil sugars, we separated different density fractions (free particulate organic matter (fPOM), light occluded particulate organic matter (≤1.6 g cm-3; oPOM1.6), dense occluded particulate organic matter (≤2 g cm-3; oPOM2) and mineral-associated organic matter (>2 g cm-3; Mineral)) of a~silty loam under long term wheat and maize cultivation. The isotopic signature of sugars was measured by high pressure liquid chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (HPLC/IRMS), after hydrolysis with 4 M Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA). While apparent mean residence times (MRT) of sugars were comparable to total organic carbon in the bulk soil and mineral fraction, the apparent MRT of sugars in the oPOM fractions were considerably lower than those of the total carbon of these fractions. This indicates that oPOM formation was fuelled by microbial activity feeding on new plant input. In the bulk soil, mean residence times of the mainly plant derived xylose (xyl) were significantly lower than those of mainly microbial derived sugars like galactose (gal), rhamnose (rha), fucose (fuc), indicating that recycling of organic matter is an important factor regulating organic matter dynamics

  10. The annual cycle of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasing, T.J.; Marland, G.; Broniak, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    Time-series of estimated monthly carbon dioxide emissions from consumption of coal, petroleum and natural gas in the United States from 1981 to 2002 have been derived from energy consumption data. The data series for coal and natural gas each reveal a consistent seasonal pattern, with a winter peak for gas and two peaks (summer and winter) for coal. The annual cycle of total emissions has an amplitude of about 20 Tg-C, and is dominated by CO 2 released from consumption of natural gas. Summation of the monthly estimates to obtain annual values reveals good agreement with other estimates of CO 2 emissions. The varying proportions of CO 2 emitted from each fuel type over the course of a year lead to an annual cycle in the carbon isotope ratio ( 13 C), with a range of about 2 . These monthly carbon emissions estimates should be helpful in understanding the carbon cycle by providing (1) monthly/seasonal input for carbon cycle models, (2) estimates of the annual cycle of the 13 C isotope ratio in fossil-fuel CO 2 emissions and (3) data at fine enough time intervals to investigate effects of seasonal climate variations and changes in seasonally dependent use patterns of certain appliances (e.g. air conditioners) on fossil-fuel carbon emissions

  11. Climatic and biotic controls on annual carbon storage in Amazonian ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, H.; Melillo, J.M.; Kicklighter, D.W.; McGuire, A.D.; Helfrich, J.; Moore, B.; Vorosmarty, C.J.

    2000-01-01

    1 The role of undisturbed tropical land ecosystems in the global carbon budget is not well understood. It has been suggested that inter-annual climate variability can affect the capacity of these ecosystems to store carbon in the short term. In this paper, we use a transient version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model (TEM) to estimate annual carbon storage in undisturbed Amazonian ecosystems during the period 1980-94, and to understand the underlying causes of the year-to-year variations in net carbon storage for this region. 2 We estimate that the total carbon storage in the undisturbed ecosystems of the Amazon Basin in 1980 was 127.6 Pg C, with about 94.3 Pg C in vegetation and 33.3 Pg C in the reactive pool of soil organic carbon. About 83% of the total carbon storage occurred in tropical evergreen forests. Based on our model's results, we estimate that, over the past 15 years, the total carbon storage has increased by 3.1 Pg C (+ 2%), with a 1.9-Pg C (+2%) increase in vegetation carbon and a 1.2-Pg C (+4%) increase in reactive soil organic carbon. The modelled results indicate that the largest relative changes in net carbon storage have occurred in tropical deciduous forests, but that the largest absolute changes in net carbon storage have occurred in the moist and wet forests of the Basin. 3 Our results show that the strength of interannual variations in net carbon storage of undisturbed ecosystems in the Amazon Basin varies from a carbon source of 0.2 Pg C/year to a carbon sink of 0.7 Pg C/year. Precipitation, especially the amount received during the drier months, appears to be a major controller of annual net carbon storage in the Amazon Basin. Our analysis indicates further that changes in precipitation combine with changes in temperature to affect net carbon storage through influencing soil moisture and nutrient availability. 4 On average, our results suggest that the undisturbed Amazonian ecosystems accumulated 0.2 Pg C/year as a result of climate

  12. [Carbon isotope fractionation in plants]: Annual technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Leary, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    Plants fractionate carbon isotopes during photosynthesis in ways which reflect photosynthetic pathway and environment. The fractionation is product of contributions from diffusion, carboxylation and other factors which can be understood using models which have been developed in our work. The object of our work is to use this fractionation to learn about the factors which control the efficiency of photosynthesis. Unlike previous studies, we do not rely principally on combustion methods, but instead develop more specific methods with substantially higher resolving power. We have recently developed a new short-term method for studying carbon isotope fractionation which promises to provide a level of detail about temperature, species, and light intensity effects on photosynthesis which has not been available until now. We are studying the isotopic compositions of metabolites (particularly aspartic acid) in C 3 plants in order to determine the role of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase in C 3 photosynthesis. We are studying the relative roles of diffusion and carboxylation in nocturnal CO 2 fixation in CAM plants. We are studying the use of isotopic content as an index of water-use efficiency in C 3 plants. We are developing new methods for studying carbon metabolism in plants. 3 refs

  13. Seasonal and annual dynamics of frozen ground, central highland of Iceland, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This dataset documents a nine-year study to investigate the seasonal and annual dynamics of frozen ground and explore the relationship with environmental factors....

  14. Looking skyward to study ecosystem carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Dennis G.

    2012-01-01

    Between May and October 2011 the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program, conducted a field campaign at the ARM Southern Great Plains site in north central Oklahoma to evaluate a new instrument for quantitative image-based monitoring of sky conditions and solar radiation. The High Dynamic Range All-Sky Imaging System (HDR-ASIS) was developed by USGS to support studies of cloud- and aerosol-induced variability in the geometric properties of solar radiation (the sky radiance distribution) and its effects on photosynthesis and uptake of carbon dioxide (CO2) by terrestrial ecosystems. Under a clean, cloudless atmosphere when the Sun is above the horizon, most of the solar radiation reaching an area of the Earth's surface is concentrated in a beam coming directly from the Sun; a relatively small proportion arrives as diffuse radiation from the rest of the sky. Clouds and atmospheric aerosols cause increased scattering of the beam radiation, which increases the proportion of diffuse radiation at the surface.

  15. Soil organic carbon quality in forested mineral wetlands at different mean annual temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinzia Fissore; Christian P. Giardina; Randall K. Kolka; Carl C. Trettin

    2009-01-01

    Forested mineral soil wetlands (FMSW) store large stocks of soil organic carbon (SOC), but little is known on: (i) whether the quality of SOC stored in these soils (proportion of active versus more resistant SOC compounds) differs from SOC in upland soils; (ii) how the quality of SOC in FMSW varies with mean annual temperature (MAT); and (iii) whether SOC decomposition...

  16. Annual Report: Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) (30 September 2012)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, David C. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Syamlal, Madhava [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Cottrell, Roger [URS Corporation. (URS), San Francisco, CA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Kress, Joel D. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sun, Xin [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sundaresan, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States); Sahinidis, Nikolaos V. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Zitney, Stephen E. [NETL; Bhattacharyya, D. [West Virginia Univ., Morgantown, WV (United States); National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Tong, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lin, Guang [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dale, Crystal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Engel, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Calafiura, Paolo [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Beattie, Keith [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Shinn, John [SynPatEco. Pleasant Hill, CA (United States)

    2012-09-30

    The Carbon Capture Simulation Initiative (CCSI) is a partnership among national laboratories, industry and academic institutions that is developing and deploying state-of-the-art computational modeling and simulation tools to accelerate the commercialization of carbon capture technologies from discovery to development, demonstration, and ultimately the widespread deployment to hundreds of power plants. The CCSI Toolset will provide end users in industry with a comprehensive, integrated suite of scientifically validated models, with uncertainty quantification (UQ), optimization, risk analysis and decision making capabilities. The CCSI Toolset incorporates commercial and open-source software currently in use by industry and is also developing new software tools as necessary to fill technology gaps identified during execution of the project. Ultimately, the CCSI Toolset will (1) enable promising concepts to be more quickly identified through rapid computational screening of devices and processes; (2) reduce the time to design and troubleshoot new devices and processes; (3) quantify the technical risk in taking technology from laboratory-scale to commercial-scale; and (4) stabilize deployment costs more quickly by replacing some of the physical operational tests with virtual power plant simulations. CCSI is organized into 8 technical elements that fall under two focus areas. The first focus area (Physicochemical Models and Data) addresses the steps necessary to model and simulate the various technologies and processes needed to bring a new Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) technology into production. The second focus area (Analysis & Software) is developing the software infrastructure to integrate the various components and implement the tools that are needed to make quantifiable decisions regarding the viability of new CCS technologies. CCSI also has an Industry Advisory Board (IAB). By working closely with industry from the inception of the project to identify

  17. The role of minerals and mean annual temperature on soil carbon accumulation: A modeling analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramoff, R. Z.; Georgiou, K.; Tang, J.; Torn, M. S.; Riley, W. J.

    2016-12-01

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the largest actively cycling terrestrial C pool with mean residence times that can exceed 10,000 years. There is strong evidence suggesting that SOC dynamics depend on soil temperature and C inputs to soil through net primary production (NPP), but it is unclear what the relative importance of these factors is relative to SOC protection by minerals. Recent empirical studies have suggested that mineral protection explains more variation in SOC stock sizes and C respiration fluxes than does NPP or climate. Our previous modeling has demonstrated that representing the chemistry of mineral sorption in a microbially-explicit model affects the temperature sensitivity of SOC dynamics. We apply this modeling framework to interpret observations of SOC stocks, mineral surface availability, mean annual temperature (MAT), and NPP collected along a 4,000 km transect in South America. We use a Random Forest machine learning algorithm and regression to analyze our model output and the empirical data. This analysis shows that mineral surface availability is the dominant control over C respiration and SOC stock, and is substantially larger than the effects of belowground NPP. We further show that minerals interact with MAT to determine the observed range of SOC stocks along this transect in the present day, as well as projected SOC stocks under long-term warming. Our model-data comparison suggests that soil mineralogy and MAT will explain the majority of the spatial variation in SOC stock over decadal-to-millennial timescales. We extend the analysis of these interactions using the ACME Land Model (ALM) coupled with an explicit representation of microbes, minerals, and vertical transport of solutes and gases. The model results confirm the dominant effects of minerals on organic matter decomposition throughout the soil column.

  18. Drought during canopy development has lasting effect on annual carbon balance in a deciduous temperate forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asko Noormets; Steve G. McNulty; Jared L. DeForest; Ge Sun; Qinglin Li; Jiquan Chen

    2008-01-01

    Climate change projections predict an intensifying hydrologic cycle and an increasing frequency of droughts, yet quantitative understanding of the effects on ecosystem carbon exchange remains limitedHere, the effect of contrasting precipitation and soil moisture dynamics were evaluated on forest carbon exchange using 2 yr of...

  19. Terrestrial carbon storage dynamics: Chasing a moving target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Y.; Shi, Z.; Jiang, L.; Xia, J.; Wang, Y.; Kc, M.; Liang, J.; Lu, X.; Niu, S.; Ahlström, A.; Hararuk, O.; Hastings, A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Medlyn, B. E.; Rasmussen, M.; Smith, M. J.; Todd-Brown, K. E.; Wang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems have been estimated to absorb roughly 30% of anthropogenic CO2 emissions. Past studies have identified myriad drivers of terrestrial carbon storage changes, such as fire, climate change, and land use changes. Those drivers influence the carbon storage change via diverse mechanisms, which have not been unified into a general theory so as to identify what control the direction and rate of terrestrial carbon storage dynamics. Here we propose a theoretical framework to quantitatively determine the response of terrestrial carbon storage to different exogenous drivers. With a combination of conceptual reasoning, mathematical analysis, and numeric experiments, we demonstrated that the maximal capacity of an ecosystem to store carbon is time-dependent and equals carbon input (i.e., net primary production, NPP) multiplying by residence time. The capacity is a moving target toward which carbon storage approaches (i.e., the direction of carbon storage change) but usually does not attain. The difference between the capacity and the carbon storage at a given time t is the unrealized carbon storage potential. The rate of the storage change is proportional to the magnitude of the unrealized potential. We also demonstrated that a parameter space of NPP, residence time, and carbon storage potential can well characterize carbon storage dynamics quantified at six sites ranging from tropical forests to tundra and simulated by two versions (carbon-only and coupled carbon-nitrogen) of the Australian Community Atmosphere-Biosphere Land Ecosystem (CABLE) Model under three climate change scenarios (CO2 rising only, climate warming only, and RCP8.5). Overall this study reveals the unified mechanism unerlying terrestrial carbon storage dynamics to guide transient traceability analysis of global land models and synthesis of empirical studies.

  20. Annual Carbon Emissions from Deforestation in the Amazon Basin between 2000 and 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Peng; Huang, Chengquan; Saatchi, Sassan S.; Hansen, Matthew C.; Townshend, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) is considered one of the most cost-effective strategies for mitigating climate change. However, historical deforestation and emission rates―critical inputs for setting reference emission levels for REDD+―are poorly understood. Here we use multi-source, time-series satellite data to quantify carbon emissions from deforestation in the Amazon basin on a year-to-year basis between 2000 and 2010. We first derive annual deforestation indicators by using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Vegetation Continuous Fields (MODIS VCF) product. MODIS indicators are calibrated by using a large sample of Landsat data to generate accurate deforestation rates, which are subsequently combined with a spatially explicit biomass dataset to calculate committed annual carbon emissions. Across the study area, the average deforestation and associated carbon emissions were estimated to be 1.59 ± 0.25 M ha•yr−1 and 0.18 ± 0.07 Pg C•yr−1 respectively, with substantially different trends and inter-annual variability in different regions. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon increased between 2001 and 2004 and declined substantially afterwards, whereas deforestation in the Bolivian Amazon, the Colombian Amazon, and the Peruvian Amazon increased over the study period. The average carbon density of lost forests after 2005 was 130 Mg C•ha−1, ~11% lower than the average carbon density of remaining forests in year 2010 (144 Mg C•ha−1). Moreover, the average carbon density of cleared forests increased at a rate of 7 Mg C•ha−1•yr−1 from 2005 to 2010, suggesting that deforestation has been progressively encroaching into high-biomass lands in the Amazon basin. Spatially explicit, annual deforestation and emission estimates like the ones derived in this study are useful for setting baselines for REDD+ and other emission mitigation programs, and for evaluating the performance of such efforts

  1. Annual Carbon Emissions from Deforestation in the Amazon Basin between 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiao-Peng; Huang, Chengquan; Saatchi, Sassan S; Hansen, Matthew C; Townshend, John R

    2015-01-01

    Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation (REDD+) is considered one of the most cost-effective strategies for mitigating climate change. However, historical deforestation and emission rates-critical inputs for setting reference emission levels for REDD+-are poorly understood. Here we use multi-source, time-series satellite data to quantify carbon emissions from deforestation in the Amazon basin on a year-to-year basis between 2000 and 2010. We first derive annual deforestation indicators by using the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer Vegetation Continuous Fields (MODIS VCF) product. MODIS indicators are calibrated by using a large sample of Landsat data to generate accurate deforestation rates, which are subsequently combined with a spatially explicit biomass dataset to calculate committed annual carbon emissions. Across the study area, the average deforestation and associated carbon emissions were estimated to be 1.59 ± 0.25 M ha•yr(-1) and 0.18 ± 0.07 Pg C•yr(-1) respectively, with substantially different trends and inter-annual variability in different regions. Deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon increased between 2001 and 2004 and declined substantially afterwards, whereas deforestation in the Bolivian Amazon, the Colombian Amazon, and the Peruvian Amazon increased over the study period. The average carbon density of lost forests after 2005 was 130 Mg C•ha(-1), ~11% lower than the average carbon density of remaining forests in year 2010 (144 Mg C•ha(-1)). Moreover, the average carbon density of cleared forests increased at a rate of 7 Mg C•ha(-1)•yr(-1) from 2005 to 2010, suggesting that deforestation has been progressively encroaching into high-biomass lands in the Amazon basin. Spatially explicit, annual deforestation and emission estimates like the ones derived in this study are useful for setting baselines for REDD+ and other emission mitigation programs, and for evaluating the performance of such efforts.

  2. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2002

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2003-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The departmenthas core competences in: optical sensors......, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, includingEURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2002...

  3. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2000

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Johansen, Per Michael; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2001-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has corecompetences in: optical sensors, optical materials......, optical storage, biooptics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danishresearch councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2000 is presented....

  4. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2003

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2004-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The departmenthas core competences in: optical sensors......, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics, fusion plasma physics and plasma technology. The research is supported by several EUprogrammes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities...

  5. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanson, Steen Grüner; Johansen, Per Michael; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2000-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within the three programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competences in:optical sensors, optical materials, biooptics......, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. Asummary of the activities in 1999 is presented....

  6. Forest structure and carbon dynamics in Amazonian tropical rain forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Simone; de Camargo, Plinio Barbosa; Selhorst, Diogo; da Silva, Roseana; Hutyra, Lucy; Chambers, Jeffrey Q; Brown, I Foster; Higuchi, Niro; dos Santos, Joaquim; Wofsy, Steven C; Trumbore, Susan E; Martinelli, Luiz Antonio

    2004-08-01

    Living trees constitute one of the major stocks of carbon in tropical forests. A better understanding of variations in the dynamics and structure of tropical forests is necessary for predicting the potential for these ecosystems to lose or store carbon, and for understanding how they recover from disturbance. Amazonian tropical forests occur over a vast area that encompasses differences in topography, climate, and geologic substrate. We observed large differences in forest structure, biomass, and tree growth rates in permanent plots situated in the eastern (near Santarém, Pará), central (near Manaus, Amazonas) and southwestern (near Rio Branco, Acre) Amazon, which differed in dry season length, as well as other factors. Forests at the two sites experiencing longer dry seasons, near Rio Branco and Santarém, had lower stem frequencies (460 and 466 ha(-1) respectively), less biodiversity (Shannon-Wiener diversity index), and smaller aboveground C stocks (140.6 and 122.1 Mg C ha(-1)) than the Manaus site (626 trees ha(-1), 180.1 Mg C ha(-1)), which had less seasonal variation in rainfall. The forests experiencing longer dry seasons also stored a greater proportion of the total biomass in trees with >50 cm diameter (41-45 vs 30% in Manaus). Rates of annual addition of C to living trees calculated from monthly dendrometer band measurements were 1.9 (Manaus), 2.8 (Santarém), and 2.6 (Rio Branco) Mg C ha(-1) year(-1). At all sites, trees in the 10-30 cm diameter class accounted for the highest proportion of annual growth (38, 55 and 56% in Manaus, Rio Branco and Santarém, respectively). Growth showed marked seasonality, with largest stem diameter increment in the wet season and smallest in the dry season, though this may be confounded by seasonal variation in wood water content. Year-to-year variations in C allocated to stem growth ranged from nearly zero in Rio Branco, to 0.8 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1) in Manaus (40% of annual mean) and 0.9 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1) (33% of

  7. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, S.G.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B.

    1996-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following two programme areas: (1) optical diagnostics and information processing and (2) plasma and fluid dynamics. The optical activities are concentrated on optical materials, diagnostics and sensors. The plasma and fluid dynamics activities are concentrated on nonlinear dynamics in fluids, plasmas and optics as well as on plasma and fluid diagnostics. Scientific computing is an integral part of the work. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 1995 is presented. (au) 36 ills., 166 refs

  8. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.G.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B. [eds.

    1996-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following two programme areas: (1) optical diagnostics and information processing and (2) plasma and fluid dynamics. The optical activities are concentrated on optical materials, diagnostics and sensors. The plasma and fluid dynamics activities are concentrated on nonlinear dynamics in fluids, plasmas and optics as well as on plasma and fluid diagnostics. Scientific computing is an integral part of the work. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 1995 is presented. (au) 36 ills., 166 refs.

  9. Annual report of the Dynamic Meteorology Laboratory, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    Research on climate simulation; data assimilation and forecasting; nonlinear dynamics and atmospheric turbulence; wave dynamics in the middle atmosphere; African and tropical meteorology and climatology; spectroscopy and modeling of atmospheric radiation; satellite meteorology and climatology; and active lidar remote sensing is presented [fr

  10. Annual report of the Dynamic Meteorology Laboratory, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Research on climate simulation; data assimilation and forecasting; nonlinear dynamics and atmospheric turbulence; wave dynamics in the middle atmosphere; African and tropical meteorology and climatology; spectroscopy and modeling of atmospheric radiation; satellite meteorology and climatology; and active lidar remote sensing is presented [fr

  11. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual Progress Report for 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, S.G.; Lynov, J.P.; Petersen, P.M.; Skaarup, B.

    2003-05-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1 Laser systems and optical materials (2 Optical diagnostics and information processing and (3 Plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competences in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2002 is presented. (au)

  12. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual progress report for 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, S.G.; Lynov, J.P.; Petersen, P.M.; Skaarup, B.

    2002-03-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: 1) laser systems and optical materials, 2) optical diagnostics and information processing and 3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competence in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, bio-optics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2001 is presented. (au)

  13. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2001

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner; Lynov, Jens-Peter

    2002-01-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The departmenthas core competences in: optical sensors......, optical materials, optical storage, biooptics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM,by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2001 is presented....

  14. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, S.G.; Johansen, P.M.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B.

    2001-05-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competence in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, bio-optics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2000 is presented. (au)

  15. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual progress report for 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, S.G.; Lynov, J.P.; Petersen, P.M.; Skaarup, B. (eds.)

    2004-05-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1 laser systems and optical materials, (2 optical diagnostics and information processing and (3 plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competences in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics, fusion plasma physics and plasma technology. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2003 is presented. (au)

  16. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual Progress Report for 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindslev, H.; Hanson, S.G.; Lynov, J.P.; Petersen, P.M.; Skaarup, B

    2003-05-01

    The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) Laser systems and optical materials (2) Optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) Plasma and fluid dynamics. The department has core competences in: optical sensors, optical materials, optical storage, biophotonics, numerical modelling and information processing, non-linear dynamics and fusion plasma physics. The research is supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by Danish research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 2002 is presented. (au)

  17. Dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes under a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This paper reports the results of an investigation into the effect of transverse magnetic fields on dynamic characteristics of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs). Couple dynamic equations of MWNTs subjected to a transverse magnetic field are derived and solved by considering the Lorentz magnetic forces ...

  18. Dynamics of carbon 14 in soils: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamponnet, C.

    2004-01-01

    In terrestrial ecosystems, soil is the main interface between atmosphere, hydrosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. Its interactions with carbon cycle are primordial. Information about carbon 14 dynamics in soils is quite dispersed and an up-to-date status is therefore presented in this paper. Carbon 14 dynamics in soils are governed by physical processes (soil structure, soil aggregation, soil erosion) chemical processes (sequestration by soil components either mineral or organic), and soil biological processes (soil microbes, soil fauna, soil biochemistry). The relative importance of such processes varied remarkably among the various biomes (tropical forest, temperate forest, boreal forest, tropical savannah, temperate pastures, deserts, tundra, marshlands, agro ecosystems) encountered in the terrestrial eco-sphere. Moreover, application for a simplified modelling of carbon 14 dynamics in soils is proposed. (author)

  19. Integrating microbial diversity in soil carbon dynamic models parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, Benjamin; Menasseri-Aubry, Safya; Leterme, Philippe; Maron, Pierre-Alain; Viaud, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    Faced with the numerous concerns about soil carbon dynamic, a large quantity of carbon dynamic models has been developed during the last century. These models are mainly in the form of deterministic compartment models with carbon fluxes between compartments represented by ordinary differential equations. Nowadays, lots of them consider the microbial biomass as a compartment of the soil organic matter (carbon quantity). But the amount of microbial carbon is rarely used in the differential equations of the models as a limiting factor. Additionally, microbial diversity and community composition are mostly missing, although last advances in soil microbial analytical methods during the two past decades have shown that these characteristics play also a significant role in soil carbon dynamic. As soil microorganisms are essential drivers of soil carbon dynamic, the question about explicitly integrating their role have become a key issue in soil carbon dynamic models development. Some interesting attempts can be found and are dominated by the incorporation of several compartments of different groups of microbial biomass in terms of functional traits and/or biogeochemical compositions to integrate microbial diversity. However, these models are basically heuristic models in the sense that they are used to test hypotheses through simulations. They have rarely been confronted to real data and thus cannot be used to predict realistic situations. The objective of this work was to empirically integrate microbial diversity in a simple model of carbon dynamic through statistical modelling of the model parameters. This work is based on available experimental results coming from a French National Research Agency program called DIMIMOS. Briefly, 13C-labelled wheat residue has been incorporated into soils with different pedological characteristics and land use history. Then, the soils have been incubated during 104 days and labelled and non-labelled CO2 fluxes have been measured at ten

  20. Dynamic simulation of the carbon-in-pulp and carbon-in-leach processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. P. de Andrade Lima

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-in-leach and carbon-in-pulp are continuous processes that use activated carbon in a cascade of large agitated tanks, which have been widely used to recover or concentrate precious metals in gold extraction plants. In the carbon-in-pulp process adsorption occurs after the leaching cascade section of the plant, and in the carbon-in-leach process leaching and adsorption occur simultaneously. In both processes the activated carbon is moved from one tank to another in countercurrent with the ore pulp until the recovery of the loaded carbon in the first tank. This paper presents a dynamic model that describes, with minor changes, the carbon-in-leach, the carbon-in-pulp, and the gold leaching processes. The model is numerically solved and calibrated with experimental data from a plant and used to perform a study of the effect of the activated carbon transfer strategy on the performance of the adsorption section of the plant. Based on the calculated values of the gold loss in the liquid and of the gold recovered in the loaded activated carbon that leaves the circuit, the results indicate that strategies in which a significant amount of activated carbon is held in the first tank and the contact time between the carbon and the pulp is longer are the best carbon transfer strategies for these processes.

  1. Optics and fluid dynamics department annual progress report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, S.G.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Michelsen, P.

    1995-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department is performed within the following two programme areas: optics and continuum physics. In optics the activities are within (a) optical materials and electromagnetic propagation, (b) diagnostics and sensors, and (c) information processing. In continuum physics the activities are (a) nonlinear dynamics and (b) computer physics. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils, and by industry. A special activity is the implementation of pellet injectors for fusion research. A summary of activities in 1994 is presented. (au) (27 ills., 44 refs.)

  2. Optics and fluid dynamics department annual progress report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B.

    1993-01-01

    Research in the Optics and FLuid Dynamics Department is performed within two sections. The Optics Section has activities within (a) optical materials, (b) quasielastic light scattering and diagnostics in solids, fluids and plasmas, and (c) optical and electronic information processing. The Continuum Physics Section performs (a) studies of nonlinear dynamical processes in continuum systems, (b) investigations of other problems in fusion plasma physics, and (c) develops pellet injectors for fusion experiments. Most of these activities are done in connection with the Euratom Association. A summary of activities in 1992 is presented. (au) (25 ills., 36 refs.)

  3. Optics and fluid dynamics department annual progress report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.G.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Michelsen, P.

    1995-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department is performed within the following two programme areas: optics and continuum physics. In optics the activities are within (a) optical materials and electromagnetic propagation, (b) diagnostics and sensors, and (c) information processing. In continuum physics the activities are (a) nonlinear dynamics and (b) computer physics. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils, and by industry. A special activity is the implementation of pellet injectors for fusion research. A summary of activities in 1994 is presented. (au) (27 ills., 44 refs.).

  4. Carbon dynamics in an Imperata grassland in Northeast India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amrabati Thokchom

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon stocks and soil CO2 flux were assessed in an Imperata cylindrica grassland of Manipur, Northeast India. Carbon stocks in the vegetative components were estimated to be 11.17 t C/ha and soil organic carbon stocks were 55.94 t C/ha to a depth of 30 cm. The rates of carbon accumulation in above-ground and below-ground biomass were estimated to be 11.85 t C/ha/yr and 11.71 t C/ha/yr, respectively. Annual soil CO2 flux was evaluated as 6.95 t C/ha and was highly influenced by soil moisture, soil temperature and soil organic carbon as well as by C stocks in above-ground biomass. Our study on the carbon budget of the grassland ecosystem revealed that annually 23.56 t C/ha was captured by the vegetation through photosynthesis, and 6.95 t C/ha was returned to the atmosphere through roots and microbial respiration, with a net balance of 16.61 t C/ha/yr being retained in the grassland ecosystem. Thus the present Imperata grassland exhibited a high capacity to remove atmospheric CO2 and to induce high C stocks in the soil provided it is protected from burning and overgrazing.Keywords: Above-ground biomass, below-ground biomass, carbon stocks, carbon storage, net primary productivity, soil CO2 flux.DOI: 10.17138/TGFT(419-28  

  5. Dynamic Effects of the Earth's Rotation Caused by the Annual and Semi-Annual Cyclic Mass Redistribution of the Planet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Barkin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with development of the theory of perturbed rotational motion of a celestial body with variable geometry of the masses. Its main task is to study the impact of annual and semi-annual variations of the Earth's mass geometry (a component of its inertia tensor, as well as a component of its relative angular momentum, on the movement of the Earth's poles and its axial rotation. The body is considered to be a free (isolated, and the problem formulation corresponds to the classical Liouville problem on rotation of a variable body. Euler conical movement of the axially symmetric body with an arbitrary constant half-angle  is assumed as the unperturbed motion. In the classical theory of the Earth's rotation this angle is usually assumed to be zero.In the last 20 years, accuracy to determine the Earth rotation parameters owing to using methods of space geodesy and method of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI has increased by about three orders of magnitude and has made about  i.e., in angle measure it is about 10 - 20 arc-microseconds. According to experts, the theory of the Earth's rotation with such precision is not created yet. The paper is focused just on the new dynamic studies of the Earth rotation at a higher level of accuracy than has been done in previous studies, using a new approach to the problem, based on the new forms of the equations of motion (in the Andoyer variables and the analytical methods of perturbation theory (small parameter method.The problem of perturbed rotational motion with variable geometry and variable mass relative angular momentum in the first approximation is solved in Andoyer variables and projections of the angular velocity of the planet rotation. The analytical solution allows us to run applications to study dynamic effects from above factors for various bodies in the solar system, including the Earth. The solution allowed us to obtain the following parameters of the fundamental effects in the

  6. Annual and seasonal distribution of intertidal foraminifera and stable carbon isotope geochemistry, Bandon Marsh, Oregon, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milker, Yvonne; Horton, Benjamin; Vane, Christopher; Engelhart, Simon; Nelson, Alan R.; Witter, Robert C.; Khan, Nicole S.; Bridgeland, William

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the influence of inter-annual and seasonal differences on the distribution of live and dead foraminifera, and the inter-annual variability of stable carbon isotopes (d13C), total organic carbon (TOC) values and carbon to nitrogen (C/N) ratios in bulk sediments from intertidal environments of Bandon Marsh (Oregon, USA). Living and dead foraminiferal species from 10 stations were analyzed over two successive years in the summer (dry) and fall (wet) seasons. There were insignificant inter-annual and seasonal variations in the distribution of live and dead species. But there was a noticeable decrease in calcareous assemblages (Haynesina sp.) between live populations and dead assemblages, indicating that most of the calcareous tests were dissolved after burial; the agglutinated assemblages were comparable between constituents. The live populations and dead assemblages were dominated by Miliammina fusca in the tidal flat and low marsh, Jadammina macrescens, Trochammina inflata and M. fusca in the high marsh, and Trochamminita irregularis and Balticammina pseudomacrescens in the highest marsh to upland. Geochemical analyses (d13C, TOC and C/N of bulk sedimentary organic matter) show no significant influence of inter-annual variations but a significant correlation of d13C values (R = 20.820, p , 0.001), TOC values (R = 0.849, p , 0.001) and C/N ratios (R = 0.885, p , 0.001) to elevation with respect to the tidal frame. Our results suggest that foraminiferal assemblages and d13C and TOC values, as well as C/N ratios, in Bandon Marsh are useful in reconstructing paleosea-levels on the North American Pacific coast.

  7. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, S.G.; Lading, L.; Michelsen, P.; Skaarup, B.

    1994-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department is performed within the following two programme areas: optics and continuum physics. In optics the activities are within (a) optical materials, (b) quasi-elastic light scattering and diagnostics in solids, fluids, and plasmas, and (c) optical and electronic information processing. Within continuum physics the activities are within (a) studies of non-linear dynamical processes in continuum systems, (b) investigations of problems with relevance to fusion plasma physics. The injection of pellets in fusion experiments has been investigated and pellet injectors to European fusion experiments are manufactured. The department is also responsible for the EURATOM collaboration within fusion plasma physics. A summary of activities in 1993 is presented. (au) (27 ills., 24 refs.)

  8. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.G.; Johansen, P.M.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B. [eds.

    1997-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following three programme areas: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The work is concentrated on combinations of systems, structures and materials. The systems work is focused on sensors, information processing an storage; the structures work is concentrated on pattern formation and diffractive elements; the materials work is centred on the understanding and utilisation of nonlinear phenomena. Scientific computing is an integral part of the work. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 1996 is presented. (au) 53 ills., 232 refs.

  9. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, S.G.; Johansen, P.M.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B.

    1997-01-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following three programme areas: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The work is concentrated on combinations of systems, structures and materials. The systems work is focused on sensors, information processing an storage; the structures work is concentrated on pattern formation and diffractive elements; the materials work is centred on the understanding and utilisation of nonlinear phenomena. Scientific computing is an integral part of the work. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 1996 is presented. (au) 53 ills., 232 refs

  10. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, S.G.; Johansen, P.M.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B. [eds.

    1998-04-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following three programme areas: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The work is concentrated on combinations of systems, structures and materials. The systems work is focused on sensors, information processing and storage; the structures work is concentrated on pattern formation and diffractive elements; the materials work is centred on the understanding and utilisation of nonlinear phenomena for optical components and systems. Scientific computing is an integral part of the work. Biomedical optics is a new activity and the work on polymer optics is enhanced considerably. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 1997 is presented. (au) 1 tab., 63 ills., 249 refs.

  11. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department annual progress report for 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, S.G.; Johansen, P.M.; Lading, L.; Lynov, J.P.; Skaarup, B.

    1998-04-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following three programme areas: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing and (3) plasma and fluid dynamics. The work is concentrated on combinations of systems, structures and materials. The systems work is focused on sensors, information processing and storage; the structures work is concentrated on pattern formation and diffractive elements; the materials work is centred on the understanding and utilisation of nonlinear phenomena for optical components and systems. Scientific computing is an integral part of the work. Biomedical optics is a new activity and the work on polymer optics is enhanced considerably. The activities are supported by several EU programmes, including EURATOM, by research councils and by industry. A summary of the activities in 1997 is presented. (au)

  12. Non-native plant litter enhances soil carbon dioxide emissions in an invaded annual grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling; Wang, Hong; Zou, Jianwen; Rogers, William E; Siemann, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Litter decomposition is a fundamental ecosystem process in which breakdown and decay of plant detritus releases carbon and nutrients. Invasive exotic plants may produce litter that differs from native plant litter in quality and quantity. Such differences may impact litter decomposition and soil respiration in ways that depend on whether exotic and native plant litters decompose in mixtures. However, few field experiments have examined how exotic plants affect soil respiration via litter decomposition. Here, we conducted an in situ study of litter decomposition of an annual native grass (Eragrostis pilosa), a perennial exotic forb (Alternanthera philoxeroides), and their mixtures in an annual grassland in China to examine potential invasion effects on soil respiration. Alternanthera litter decomposed faster than Eragrostis litter when each was incubated separately. Mass loss in litter mixes was more rapid than predicted from rates in single species bags (only 35% of predicted mass remained at 8 months) showing synergistic effects. Notably, exotic plant litter decomposition rate was unchanged but native plant litter decomposition rate was accelerated in mixtures (decay constant k = 0.20 month(-1)) compared to in isolation (k = 0.10 month(-1)). On average, every litter type increased soil respiration compared to bare soil from which litter was removed. However, the increases were larger for mixed litter (1.82 times) than for Alternanthera litter (1.58 times) or Eragrostis litter (1.30 times). Carbon released as CO2 relative to litter carbon input was also higher for mixed litter (3.34) than for Alternathera litter (2.29) or Eragrostis litter (1.19). Our results indicated that exotic Alternanthera produces rapidly decomposing litter which also accelerates the decomposition of native plant litter in litter mixtures and enhances soil respiration rates. Thus, this exotic invasive plant species will likely accelerate carbon cycling and increase soil respiration

  13. Temporal carbon dynamics of forests in Washington, US: implications for ecological theory and carbon management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal L. Raymond; Donald. McKenzie

    2014-01-01

    We quantified carbon (C) dynamics of forests in Washington, US using theoretical models of C dynamics as a function of forest age. We fit empirical models to chronosequences of forest inventory data at two scales: a coarse-scale ecosystem classification (ecosections) and forest types (potential vegetation) within ecosections. We hypothesized that analysis at the finer...

  14. Hydrological niche separation explains seasonal and inter-annual variations of vegetation dynamics in seasonally dry tropical forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; Medvigy, D.; Powers, J. S.; Becknell, J. M.; Guan, K.

    2015-12-01

    Despite ample water supply, vegetation dynamics are subject to seasonal water stress in large fraction of tropical forests. These seasonally dry tropical forests (SDTFs) account for over 40% of tropical forests, harbor high biodiversity, have large potential carbon sink due to forest recovery from human disturbance and also play a critical role in global carbon budget and inter-annual variations. Plants in this biome display notably diverse responses to seasonal and inter-annual variations of water availability, especially inter-specific variations in canopy seasonality and biomass growth. Current process-based dynamic vegetation models cannot represent these diversities and are shown to perform poorly on simulating drought responses of tropical forests, calling into question of their ability to accurately simulate future changes in SDTFs. Accumulated field observations, suggest that hydrological niche separation driven by coordinated plant functional traits is associated with plants' performance under drought. Yet, it remains not clear whether the physiology-level hydrological niche separation can explain the ecosystem-level diversity observed in SDTFs. Here, we test the theory with a model-data fusion approach. We implemented a new plant hydrodynamic module that is able to track leaf water potential at sub-daily scale in ED2 model. We further incorporated a hydrological niche separation scheme based on a meta-data analysis of key functional traits in SDTFs. Simulated ecological patterns with and without hydrological niche separation were then compared with remote-sensing and long-term field observations from an SDTF site in Palo Verde, Costa Rica. Using several numerical experiments, we specifically examine the following questions: (i) Whether hydrological niche separation can explain the diversity in canopy seasonality and biomass growth? (ii) How important are the yet uncertain belowground functional traits, especially root profile in determining canopy

  15. Carbon dynamics of contrasting agricultural practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghee, Claire; Hallett, Paul; Neilson, Roy; Robinson, David; Paterson, Eric

    2013-04-01

    Application of organic amendments can improve soil quality and provide crop nutrients. To optimise these agricultural benefits from organic applications, the capacity of microbe-driven nutrient and carbon cycling must be understood and exploited. Consideration is therefore required of the complex interactions between the rhizosphere, microbial biomass and organic amendment. We hypothesise that the labile C present in root exudates of plants increases the mineralisation of organic matter in soil, constituting a mechanism to promote nutrient acquisition. This mechanism is known as the 'priming effect', but is poorly understood in the context of agricultural carbon and nutrient management. Field data from the Centre of Sustainable Cropping (CSC) research platform (Dundee, Scotland, UK) are utilised to build an understanding of soil C and N fluxes between contrasting agricultural practices. The field site uses a split-plot design to compare (i) compost amended soils with reduced tillage and chemical inputs and (ii) conventionally managed soils, reflective of current UK commercial arable practice. Significant differences (p= compost amended and conventionally managed soils at field-scale with respect to soil microbial biomass (SMB), total organic carbon (TOC) and mineral nitrogen. Investigation into the priming effect within compost amended soils was subsequently undertaken under laboratory conditions. Stable isotope analysis and measurements of soil biotic parameters were used to quantify priming resulting from Spring Barley (Hordeum vulgare cv. Optic) cultivation for (i) unamended and (ii) municipal compost incorporated soils. Compost treatments comprised amendments of 25, 50 and 150 t/Ha and planted soils were compared with unplanted controls. Soil mesocosms were maintained under controlled environmental conditions within labelling chambers supplied continuously with 13C-depleted CO2. Throughout a 41-day incubation period, soil CO2 efflux and dissolved organic carbon

  16. Ecosystem carbon storage does not vary with increasing mean annual temperature in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Selmants; Creighton Litton; Christian P. Giardina; Greg P. Asner

    2014-01-01

    Theory and experiment agree that climate warming will increase carbon fluxes between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The effect of this increased exchange on terrestrial carbon storage is less predictable, with important implications for potential feedbacks to the climate system. We quantified how increased mean annual temperature (MAT) affects ecosystem...

  17. Does carbon availability control temporal dynamics of radial growth in Norway spruce (Picea abies)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhuber, Walter; Gruber, Andreas; Swidrak, Irene

    2015-04-01

    Intra-annual dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation of coniferous species exposed to soil dryness revealed early culmination of maximum growth in late spring prior to occurrence of more favourable environmental conditions, i.e., repeated high rainfall events during summer (Oberhuber et al. 2014). Because it is well known that plants can adjust carbon allocation patterns to optimize resource uptake under prevailing environmental constraints, we hypothesize that early decrease in radial stem growth is an adaptation to cope with drought stress, which might require an early switch of carbon allocation to belowground organs. Physical blockage of carbon transport in the phloem through girdling causes accumulation and depletion of carbohydrates above and below the girdle, respectively, making this method quite appropriate to investigate carbon relationships in trees. Hence, in a common garden experiment we will manipulate the carbon status of Norway spruce (Picea abies) saplings by phloem blockage at different phenological stages during the growing season. We will present the methodological approach and first results of the study aiming to test the hypothesis that carbon status of the tree affects temporal dynamics of cambial activity and wood formation in conifers under drought. Acknowledgment The research is funded by the Austrian Science Fund (FWF): P25643-B16 "Carbon allocation and growth of Scots pine". Reference Oberhuber W, A Gruber, W Kofler, I Swidrak (2014) Radial stem growth in response to microclimate and soil moisture in a drought-prone mixed coniferous forest at an inner Alpine site. Eur J For Res 133:467-479.

  18. (Monitoring interfacial dynamics by pulsed laser techniques): (Annual report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Our approach in these studies is to use Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) to monitor the response of the system at a known time delay following a fast perturbation such as a voltage pulse or photoexcitation. In the first experiments of this kind, we reported the success in performing these experiments using a 10 ns, 10 Hz YAG laser. By monitoring the SH light generated by the IR laser pulse at numerous delays after a potential step, we captured the complete transient response of the charging of the double layer after the perturbation. One drawback to these studies was that it took several hours to capture a single decay curves since each delay point required signal averaging at a repetition rate of 0.03 Hz. We alleviated this problem by setting up a 76 Hz, 100 psec YAG laser with photon counting equipment which enabled us to continuously monitor the SHG response to the applied voltage step. The adsorption and desorption of specifically and nonspecifically adsorbed anions on polycrystalline Ag electrodes biased within the limits of the ideally polarizable region (/minus/1.2 V to /minus/0.1 V vs. Ag/AgCl) was begun. The results demonstrate the utility of fast pulsed laser light as a continuous monitor of surface dynamics on the millisecond timescale using this time resolved SHG method. 5 refs.

  19. Revised methane emissions factors and spatially distributed annual carbon fluxes for global livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Julie; Asrar, Ghassem R; West, Tristram O

    2017-09-29

    Livestock play an important role in carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Recent research suggests that existing bottom-up inventories of livestock methane emissions in the US, such as those made using 2006 IPCC Tier 1 livestock emissions factors, are too low. This may be due to outdated information used to develop these emissions factors. In this study, we update information for cattle and swine by region, based on reported recent changes in animal body mass, feed quality and quantity, milk productivity, and management of animals and manure. We then use this updated information to calculate new livestock methane emissions factors for enteric fermentation in cattle, and for manure management in cattle and swine. Using the new emissions factors, we estimate global livestock emissions of 119.1 ± 18.2 Tg methane in 2011; this quantity is 11% greater than that obtained using the IPCC 2006 emissions factors, encompassing an 8.4% increase in enteric fermentation methane, a 36.7% increase in manure management methane, and notable variability among regions and sources. For example, revised manure management methane emissions for 2011 in the US increased by 71.8%. For years through 2013, we present (a) annual livestock methane emissions, (b) complete annual livestock carbon budgets, including carbon dioxide emissions, and (c) spatial distributions of livestock methane and other carbon fluxes, downscaled to 0.05 × 0.05 degree resolution. Our revised bottom-up estimates of global livestock methane emissions are comparable to recently reported top-down global estimates for recent years, and account for a significant part of the increase in annual methane emissions since 2007. Our results suggest that livestock methane emissions, while not the dominant overall source of global methane emissions, may be a major contributor to the observed annual emissions increases over the 2000s to 2010s. Differences at regional and local scales may help

  20. Simulated impacts of insect defoliation on forest carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    D. Medvigy; K.L. Clark; N.S. Skowronski; K.V.R. Schäfer

    2012-01-01

    Many temperate and boreal forests are subject to insect epidemics. In the eastern US, over 41 million meters squared of tree basal area are thought to be at risk of gypsy moth defoliation. However, the decadal-to-century scale implications of defoliation events for ecosystem carbon dynamics are not well understood. In this study, the effects of defoliation intensity,...

  1. Dynamic Behavior of Sand: Annual Report FY 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoun, T; Herbold, E; Johnson, S

    2012-03-15

    Currently, design of earth-penetrating munitions relies heavily on empirical relationships to estimate behavior, making it difficult to design novel munitions or address novel target situations without expensive and time-consuming full-scale testing with relevant system and target characteristics. Enhancing design through numerical studies and modeling could help reduce the extent and duration of full-scale testing if the models have enough fidelity to capture all of the relevant parameters. This can be separated into three distinct problems: that of the penetrator structural and component response, that of the target response, and that of the coupling between the two. This project focuses on enhancing understanding of the target response, specifically granular geomaterials, where the temporal and spatial multi-scale nature of the material controls its response. As part of the overarching goal of developing computational capabilities to predict the performance of conventional earth-penetrating weapons, this project focuses specifically on developing new models and numerical capabilities for modeling sand response in ALE3D. There is general recognition that granular materials behave in a manner that defies conventional continuum approaches which rely on response locality and which degrade in the presence of strong response nonlinearities, localization, and phase gradients. There are many numerical tools available to address parts of the problem. However, to enhance modeling capability, this project is pursuing a bottom-up approach of building constitutive models from higher fidelity, smaller spatial scale simulations (rather than from macro-scale observations of physical behavior as is traditionally employed) that are being augmented to address the unique challenges of mesoscale modeling of dynamically loaded granular materials. Through understanding response and sensitivity at the grain-scale, it is expected that better reduced order representations of response can

  2. Dynamic energy models and carbon mitigation policies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Luke A.

    In this dissertation I examine a specific class of energy models and their implications for carbon mitigation policies. The class of models includes a production function capable of reproducing the empirically observed phenomenon of short run rigidity of energy use in response to energy price changes and long run exibility of energy use in response to energy price changes. I use a theoretical model, parameterized using empirical data, to simulate economic performance under several tax regimes where taxes are levied on capital income, investment, and energy. I also investigate transitions from one tax regime to another. I find that energy taxes intended to reduce energy use can successfully achieve those goals with minimal or even positive impacts on macroeconomic performance. But the transition paths to new steady states are lengthy, making political commitment to such policies very challenging.

  3. Accounting for forest carbon pool dynamics in product carbon footprints: Challenges and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newell, Joshua P.; Vos, Robert O.

    2012-01-01

    Modification and loss of forests due to natural and anthropogenic disturbance contribute an estimated 20% of annual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions worldwide. Although forest carbon pool modeling rarely suggests a ‘carbon neutral’ flux profile, the life cycle assessment community and associated product carbon footprint protocols have struggled to account for the GHG emissions associated with forestry, specifically, and land use generally. Principally, this is due to underdeveloped linkages between life cycle inventory (LCI) modeling for wood and forest carbon modeling for a full range of forest types and harvest practices, as well as a lack of transparency in globalized forest supply chains. In this paper, through a comparative study of U.S. and Chinese coated freesheet paper, we develop the initial foundations for a methodology that rescales IPCC methods from the national to the product level, with reference to the approaches in three international product carbon footprint protocols. Due to differences in geographic origin of the wood fiber, the results for two scenarios are highly divergent. This suggests that both wood LCI models and the protocols need further development to capture the range of spatial and temporal dimensions for supply chains (and the associated land use change and modification) for specific product systems. The paper concludes by outlining opportunities to measure and reduce uncertainty in accounting for net emissions of biogenic carbon from forestland, where timber is harvested for consumer products. - Highlights: ► Typical life cycle assessment practice for consumer products often excludes significant land use change emissions when estimating carbon footprints. ► The article provides a methodology to rescale IPCC guidelines for product-level carbon footprints. ► Life cycle inventories and product carbon footprint protocols need more comprehensive land use-related accounting. ► Interdisciplinary collaboration linking the LCA and

  4. Rising Mean Annual Temperature Increases Carbon Flux and Alters Partitioning, but Does Not Change Ecosystem Carbon Storage in Hawaiian Tropical Montane Wet Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litton, C. M.; Giardina, C. P.; Selmants, P.

    2014-12-01

    Terrestrial ecosystem carbon (C) storage exceeds that in the atmosphere by a factor of four, and represents a dynamic balance among C input, allocation, and loss. This balance is likely being altered by climate change, but the response of terrestrial C cycling to warming remains poorly quantified, particularly in tropical forests which play a disproportionately large role in the global C cycle. Over the past five years, we have quantified above- and belowground C pools and fluxes in nine permanent plots spanning a 5.2°C mean annual temperature (MAT) gradient (13-18.2°C) in Hawaiian tropical montane wet forest. This elevation gradient is unique in that substrate type and age, soil type, soil water balance, canopy vegetation, and disturbance history are constant, allowing us to isolate the impact of long-term, whole ecosystem warming on C input, allocation, loss and storage. Across the gradient, soil respiration, litterfall, litter decomposition, total belowground C flux, aboveground net primary productivity, and estimates of gross primary production (GPP) all increase linearly and positively with MAT. Carbon partitioning is dynamic, shifting from below- to aboveground with warming, likely in response to a warming-induced increase in the cycling and availability of soil nutrients. In contrast to observed patterns in C flux, live biomass C, soil C, and total ecosystem C pools remained remarkably constant with MAT. There was also no difference in soil bacterial taxon richness, phylogenetic diversity, or community composition with MAT. Taken together these results indicate that in tropical montane wet forests, increased temperatures in the absence of water limitation or disturbance will accelerate C cycling, will not alter ecosystem C storage, and will shift the products of photosynthesis from below- to aboveground. These results agree with an increasing number of studies, and collectively provide a unique insight into anticipated warming-induced changes in tropical

  5. Patterns and controls of inter-annual variability in the terrestrial carbon budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Marcolla

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial carbon fluxes show the largest variability among the components of the global carbon cycle and drive most of the temporal variations in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2. Understanding the environmental controls and trends of the terrestrial carbon budget is therefore essential to predict the future trajectories of the CO2 airborne fraction and atmospheric concentrations. In the present work, patterns and controls of the inter-annual variability (IAV of carbon net ecosystem exchange (NEE have been analysed using three different data streams: ecosystem-level observations from the FLUXNET database (La Thuile and 2015 releases, the MPI-MTE (model tree ensemble bottom–up product resulting from the global upscaling of site-level fluxes, and the Jena CarboScope Inversion, a top–down estimate of surface fluxes obtained from observed CO2 concentrations and an atmospheric transport model. Consistencies and discrepancies in the temporal and spatial patterns and in the climatic and physiological controls of IAV were investigated between the three data sources. Results show that the global average of IAV at FLUXNET sites, quantified as the standard deviation of annual NEE, peaks in arid ecosystems and amounts to  ∼  120 gC m−2 y−1, almost 6 times more than the values calculated from the two global products (15 and 20 gC m−2 y−1 for MPI-MTE and the Jena Inversion, respectively. Most of the temporal variability observed in the last three decades of the MPI-MTE and Jena Inversion products is due to yearly anomalies, whereas the temporal trends explain only about 15 and 20 % of the variability, respectively. Both at the site level and on a global scale, the IAV of NEE is driven by the gross primary productivity and in particular by the cumulative carbon flux during the months when land acts as a sink. Altogether these results offer a broad view on the magnitude, spatial patterns and environmental drivers of IAV

  6. Patterns and controls of inter-annual variability in the terrestrial carbon budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcolla, Barbara; Rödenbeck, Christian; Cescatti, Alessandro

    2017-08-01

    The terrestrial carbon fluxes show the largest variability among the components of the global carbon cycle and drive most of the temporal variations in the growth rate of atmospheric CO2. Understanding the environmental controls and trends of the terrestrial carbon budget is therefore essential to predict the future trajectories of the CO2 airborne fraction and atmospheric concentrations. In the present work, patterns and controls of the inter-annual variability (IAV) of carbon net ecosystem exchange (NEE) have been analysed using three different data streams: ecosystem-level observations from the FLUXNET database (La Thuile and 2015 releases), the MPI-MTE (model tree ensemble) bottom-up product resulting from the global upscaling of site-level fluxes, and the Jena CarboScope Inversion, a top-down estimate of surface fluxes obtained from observed CO2 concentrations and an atmospheric transport model. Consistencies and discrepancies in the temporal and spatial patterns and in the climatic and physiological controls of IAV were investigated between the three data sources. Results show that the global average of IAV at FLUXNET sites, quantified as the standard deviation of annual NEE, peaks in arid ecosystems and amounts to ˜ 120 gC m-2 y-1, almost 6 times more than the values calculated from the two global products (15 and 20 gC m-2 y-1 for MPI-MTE and the Jena Inversion, respectively). Most of the temporal variability observed in the last three decades of the MPI-MTE and Jena Inversion products is due to yearly anomalies, whereas the temporal trends explain only about 15 and 20 % of the variability, respectively. Both at the site level and on a global scale, the IAV of NEE is driven by the gross primary productivity and in particular by the cumulative carbon flux during the months when land acts as a sink. Altogether these results offer a broad view on the magnitude, spatial patterns and environmental drivers of IAV from a variety of data sources that can be

  7. Where Does The Carbon Go? Carbon Dynamics And Fire of a North Australian Tropical Savanna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutley, L. B.; Beringer, J.; Tapper, N. J.; Cernusak, L.

    2007-12-01

    The role of fire as one of the primary natural carbon cycling mechanisms is a key issue in considering global change feedbacks. In north Australia, the dominant ecosystem is tropical savanna and for mesic savannas within 100 km of the northern coastline, fire, storms and cyclones all impact carbon stocks. Fire is the most frequent disturbance agent as fires burn with a near annual frequency in these systems. We aimed to determine the annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP) from these savannas and the impact of fire on productivity. We established a long-term eddy covariance flux tower at Howard Springs, Australia and present here 5 years of data from 2001 to 2005. Fire has direct impacts through emissions but also has indirect effects through the loss of productivity due to reduced functional leaf area index and the carbon costs of rebuilding the canopy. The impact of fire on the canopy latent energy exchange was evident for 40 days while the canopy was rebuilt; however, the carbon balance took approximately 70 days to recover. The annual fire free NEP at Howard Springs was estimated at -4.3 t C ha-1 y-1 with a range of -3.5 to -5.1 t C ha-1 y-1 across years. We calculated the average annual indirect fire effect as 0.7 t C ha-1 y-1 using a neural network model approach and estimated average emissions of fine and coarse fuels as 1.6 t C ha-1 y-1. This allowed us to calculate a net biome production of 2.0 t C ha-1 y-1. We then partitioned this remaining sink and suggest that most of this can be accounted for by woody increment (1.2 t C ha-1 y-1) and shrub encroachment (0.5 t C ha-1 y-1). Given the consistent sink at this site, even under an almost annual fire regime, there may be management options to increase carbon sequestration by reducing fire frequency.

  8. Dynamic topography and the Cenozoic carbonate compensation depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, S. M.; Moucha, R.; Raymo, M. E.; Derry, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    The carbonate compensation depth (CCD), the ocean depth at which the calcium carbonate accumulation rate goes to zero, can provide valuable insight into climatic and weathering conditions over the Cenozoic. The paleoposition of the CCD can be inferred from sediment core data. As the carbonate accumulation rate decreases linearly with depth between the lysocline and CCD, the CCD can be calculated using a linear regression on multiple sediment cores with known carbonate accumulation rates and paleodepths. It is therefore vital to have well-constrained estimates of paleodepths. Paleodepths are typically calculated using models of thermal subsidence and sediment loading and compaction. However, viscous convection-related stresses in the mantle can warp the ocean floor by hundreds of meters over broad regions and can also vary significantly over millions of years. This contribution to paleobathymetry, termed dynamic topography, can be calculated by modeling mantle flow backwards in time. Herein, we demonstrate the effect dynamic topography has on the inference of the late Cenozoic CCD with an example from the equatorial Pacific, considering sites from IODP Expeditions 320/321. The equatorial Pacific, given its large size and high productivity, is closely tied to the global carbon cycle. Accordingly, long-term changes in the equatorial Pacific CCD can be considered to reflect global changes in weathering fluxes and the carbon cycle, in addition to more regional changes in productivity and thermohaline circulation. We find that, when the dynamic topography contribution to bathymetry is accounted for, the equatorial Pacific CCD is calculated to be appreciably shallower at 30 Ma than previous estimates would suggest, implying a greater deepening of the Pacific CCD over the late Cenozoic.

  9. Growing up with stress - carbon sequestration and allocation dynamics of a broadleaf evergreen forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebel, Anne; Bennett, Lauren T.; Arndt, Stefan K.

    2016-04-01

    Evergreen forests have the potential to sequester carbon year-round due to the presence of leaves with a multi-year lifespan. Eucalypt forests occur in warmer climates where temperature and radiation are not imposing a strong seasonality. Thus, unlike deciduous or many coniferous trees, many eucalypts grow opportunistically as conditions allow. As such, many eucalypts do not produce distinct growth rings, which present challenges to the implementation of standard methods and data interpretation approaches for monitoring and explaining carbon allocation dynamics in response to climatic stress. As a consequence, there is a lack of detailed understanding of seasonal growth dynamics of evergreen forests as a whole, and, in particular, of the influence of climatic drivers on carbon allocation to the various biomass pools. We used a multi-instrument approach in a mixed species eucalypt forest to investigate the influence of climatic drivers on the seasonal growth dynamics of a predominantly temperate and moisture-regulated environment in south-eastern Australia. Ecosystem scale observations of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) from a flux tower in the Wombat forest near Melbourne indicated that the ecosystem is a year-round carbon sink, but that intra-annual variations in temperature and moisture along with prolonged heat waves and dry spells resulted in a wide range of annual sums over the past three years (NEE ranging from ~4 to 12 t C ha-1 yr-1). Dendrometers were used to monitor stem increments of the three dominant eucalypt species. Stem expansion was generally opportunistic with the greatest increments under warm but moist conditions (often in spring and autumn), and the strongest indicators of stem growth dynamics being radiation, vapour pressure deficit and a combined heat-moisture index. Differences in the seasonality of stem increments between species were largely due to differences in the canopy position of sampled individuals. The greatest stem increments were

  10. Modelling carbon dynamics from urban land conversion: fundamental model of city in relation to a local carbon cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schellnhuber Hans-Joachim

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The main task is to estimate the qualitative and quantitative contribution of urban territories and precisely of the process of urbanization to the Global Carbon Cycle (GCC. Note that, on the contrary to many investigations that have considered direct anthropogenic emission of CO2(urbanized territories produce ca. 96–98% of it, we are interested in more subtle, and up until the present time, weaker processes associated with the conversion of the surrounding natural ecosystems and landscapes into urban lands. Such conversion inevitably takes place when cities are sprawling and additional "natural" lands are becoming "urbanized". Results In order to fulfil this task, we first develop a fundamental model of urban space, since the type of land cover within a city makes a difference for a local carbon cycle. Hence, a city is sub-divided by built-up, „green" (parks, etc. and informal settlements (favelas fractions. Another aspect is a sub-division of the additional two regions, which makes the total number reaching eight regions, while the UN divides the world by six. Next, the basic model of the local carbon cycle for urbanized territories is built. We consider two processes: carbon emissions as a result of conversion of natural lands caused by urbanization; and the transformation of carbon flows by "urbanized" ecosystems; when carbon, accumulated by urban vegetation, is exported to the neighbouring territories. The total carbon flow in the model depends, in general, on two groups of parameters. The first includes the NPP, and the sum of living biomass and dead organic matter of ecosystems involved in the process of urbanization, and namely them we calculate here, using a new more realistic approach and taking into account the difference in regional cities' evolution. Conclusion There is also another group of parameters, dealing with the areas of urban territories, and their annual increments. A method of dynamic forecasting

  11. Carbon Prices: Dynamic analysis of European and Californian markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Rita Mafalda Dionisio de

    Carbon markets' goal is to promote the reduction of emissions of greenhouse gases where it is most cost-efficient. This makes the price of the tradable good - carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) - a key variable in management and risk decisions, in markets related to activities connected with the burning of fossil fuels, such as power generation. This work aims to improve the analysis of carbon prices' dynamics, considering the possibility of multidirectional effects between prices of CO2e, energy (primary and final), offsets licenses and the economy performance, in various frequencies. The two main research questions are: (i) what drives carbon price variations? (ii) what variations do carbon prices drive? We used two comple-mentary methodologies: (a) a vector autoregression model (of common use in macroeconomics and financial markets but not in carbon-energy relations), which allows the analysis of causality and of impulse-response functions of daily prices; and (b) an innovative multivariate wavelet analysis, which allows us to understand the relationship and causal link between the variables in the time and frequency dimensions, particularly in longer cycles (4 8 and 8 20 months), not perceived in previous studies. As case studies we considered the European (EU ETS) and Califor-nia (AB32) carbon markets. This is the first research to present the analysis of the referred US market. The analysis covers the 2008-2013 period, intentionally excluding the EU ETS phase I, for greater consistency of results. Results suggest that the economy and electricity drive the price of European carbon, while gas and oil have a greater role in California. So, there is a greater influence of final energy prices in the most mature market. We also observe that the price of CERs does not affect the European carbon price. On the other hand, this study shows for the first time that carbon prices have impacts on electricity prices over longer cycles (8 20 months) and in coal over short

  12. Annual Forest Monitoring as part of Indonesia's National Carbon Accounting System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustiyo, K.; Roswintiarti, O.; Tjahjaningsih, A.; Dewanti, R.; Furby, S.; Wallace, J.

    2015-04-01

    Land use and forest change, in particular deforestation, have contributed the largest proportion of Indonesia's estimated greenhouse gas emissions. Indonesia's remaining forests store globally significant carbon stocks, as well as biodiversity values. In 2010, the Government of Indonesia entered into a REDD+ partnership. A spatially detailed monitoring and reporting system for forest change which is national and operating in Indonesia is required for participation in such programs, as well as for national policy reasons including Monitoring, Reporting, and Verification (MRV), carbon accounting, and land-use and policy information. Indonesia's National Carbon Accounting System (INCAS) has been designed to meet national and international policy requirements. The INCAS remote sensing program is producing spatially-detailed annual wall-to-wall monitoring of forest cover changes from time-series Landsat imagery for the whole of Indonesia from 2000 to the present day. Work on the program commenced in 2009, under the Indonesia-Australia Forest Carbon Partnership. A principal objective was to build an operational system in Indonesia through transfer of knowledge and experience, from Australia's National Carbon Accounting System, and adaptation of this experience to Indonesia's requirements and conditions. A semi-automated system of image pre-processing (ortho-rectification, calibration, cloud masking and mosaicing) and forest extent and change mapping (supervised classification of a 'base' year, semi-automated single-year classifications and classification within a multi-temporal probabilistic framework) was developed for Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM+. Particular attention is paid to the accuracy of each step in the processing. With the advent of Landsat 8 data and parallel development of processing capability, capacity and international collaborations within the LAPAN Data Centre this processing is being increasingly automated. Research is continuing into improved

  13. Observations and assessment of forest carbon dynamics following disturbance in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. J. Goetz; B. Bond-Lamberty; B. E. Law; J. A. Hicke; C. Huang; R. A. Houghton; S. McNulty; T. O’Halloran; M. Harmon; A. J. H. Meddens; E. M. Pfeifer; D. Mildrexler; E. S. Kasischke

    2012-01-01

    Disturbance processes of various types substantially modify ecosystem carbon dynamics both temporally and spatially, and constitute a fundamental part of larger landscape-level dynamics. Forests typically lose carbon for several years to several decades following severe disturbance, but our understanding of the duration and dynamics of post-disturbance forest carbon...

  14. Carbon dioxide and methane emission dynamics in central London (UK)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfter, Carole; Nemitz, Eiko; Barlow, Janet F.; Wood, Curtis R.

    2013-04-01

    London, with a population of 8.2 million, is the largest city in Europe. It is heavily built-up (typically 8% vegetation cover within the central boroughs) and boasts some of the busiest arteries in Europe despite efforts to reduce traffic in the city centre with the introduction of a congestion charging scheme in 2007. We report on two substantial pollution monitoring efforts in the heart of London between October 2006 and present. Fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O) were measured continuously by eddy-covariance in central London from October 2006 until May 2008 from a 190 m telecommunication tower (BT tower; 51° 31' 17.4'' N 0° 8' 20.04'' W). The eddy-covariance system consisted of a Gill R3-50 ultrasonic anemometer operated at 20 Hz and a LI-COR 6262 infrared gas analyser. Air was sampled 0.3 m below the sensor head of the ultrasonic anemometer - which was itself mounted on a 3 m mast to the top of a 15 m lattice tower situated on the roof of the tower (instrument head at 190 m above street level) - and pulled down 45 m of 12.7 mm OD Teflon tubing. In addition, meteorological variables (temperature, relative humidity, pressure, precipitation, wind speed and direction) were also measured with a multi-sensor (Weather Transmitter WXT510, Vaisala). Eddy-covariance measurements at the BT tower location were reinstated in July 2011 and include methane (CH4), CO2 and H2O concentrations measured by a Picarro fast methane analyser (G2301-f). CO2 emissions were found to be mainly controlled by fossil fuel combustion (e.g. traffic, commercial and domestic heating). Diurnal averages of CO2 fluxes were found to be highly correlated to traffic. However changes in heating-related natural gas consumption and, to a lesser extent, photosynthetic activity in two large city centre green spaces (Hyde Park and Regent's Park) explained the seasonal variability. Annual estimates of net exchange of CO2 obtained by eddy-covariance agreed well with up-scaled data from the UK

  15. Insights into soil carbon dynamics across climatic gradients from carbon-pool specific radiocarbon analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Voort, Tessa Sophia; Hagedorn, Frank; McIntyre, Cameron; Zell, Claudia; Eglinton, Timothy Ian

    2017-04-01

    Soil carbon constitutes the largest terrestrial reservoir of organic carbon, and therefore understanding the mechanisms and drivers of carbon stabilization is crucial, especially in the framework of climate change. The understanding of the dependence of soil organic turnover in specific carbon pools as related to e.g. climate, soil texture and mineralogy is limited. In this framework, radiocarbon constitutes a uniquely powerful tool that help to unravel carbon dynamics from decadal to millennial timescales. This project combines bulk and pool-specific radiocarbon analyses in the top and deep soil on a wide range of forested soils that span a large climatic gradient (MAT 1.3-9.2°C, MAP 600 to 2100 mm m-2y-1). These well-studies sites are part of the Long-Term Forest Ecosystem Research (LWF) program of the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape research (WSL). This study aims to combine the insights gained from bulk and pool-specific turnover to environmental conditions and molecular composition of soil carbon. The pools investigated span the mineral-associated (occluded and heavy fractions from density fractionation) and potentially water-soluble (free light fractions from density fractionation and water extractable organic carbon) organic carbon fractions. Pool-specific radiocarbon work is augmented by the measurement of abundance of compounds such as alkanes, fatty acids and lignin phenols on a subset of samples. Initial results show disparate patterns depending on soil type and in particular soil texture, which could be indicative of various stabilization mechanisms in different soils. Overall, this study provides new insights into the controls of soil organic matter dynamics as related to environmental conditions, in particular in specific sub-pools of carbon.

  16. Northern peatland carbon stocks and dynamics: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. C. Yu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Peatlands contain a large belowground carbon (C stock in the biosphere, and their dynamics have important implications for the global carbon cycle. However, there are still large uncertainties in C stock estimates and poor understanding of C dynamics across timescales. Here I review different approaches and associated uncertainties of C stock estimates in the literature, and on the basis of the literature review my best estimate of C stocks and uncertainty is 500 ± 100 (approximate range gigatons of C (Gt C in northern peatlands. The greatest source of uncertainty for all the approaches is the lack or insufficient representation of data, including depth, bulk density and carbon accumulation data, especially from the world's large peatlands. Several ways to improve estimates of peat carbon stocks are also discussed in this paper, including the estimates of C stocks by regions and further utilizations of widely available basal peat ages.

    Changes in peatland carbon stocks over time, estimated using Sphagnum (peat moss spore data and down-core peat accumulation records, show different patterns during the Holocene, and I argue that spore-based approach underestimates the abundance of peatlands in their early histories. Considering long-term peat decomposition using peat accumulation data allows estimates of net carbon sequestration rates by peatlands, or net (ecosystem carbon balance (NECB, which indicates more than half of peat carbon (> 270 Gt C was sequestrated before 7000 yr ago during the Holocene. Contemporary carbon flux studies at 5 peatland sites show much larger NECB during the last decade (32 ± 7.8 (S.E. g C m−2 yr–1 than during the last 7000 yr (∼ 11 g C m−2 yr–1, as modeled from peat records across northern peatlands. This discrepancy highlights the urgent need for carbon accumulation data and process understanding, especially at decadal and centennial timescales

  17. Annual litterfall dynamics and nutrient deposition depending on elevation and land use at Mt. Kilimanjaro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, J.; Pabst, H.; Mnyonga, J.; Kuzyakov, Y.

    2015-10-01

    Litterfall is one of the major pathways connecting above- and below-ground processes. The effects of climate and land-use change on carbon (C) and nutrient inputs by litterfall are poorly known. We quantified and analyzed annual patterns of C and nutrient deposition via litterfall in natural forests and agroforestry systems along the unique elevation gradient of Mt. Kilimanjaro. Tree litter in three natural (lower montane, Ocotea and Podocarpus forests), two sustainably used (homegardens) and one intensively managed (shaded coffee plantation) ecosystems was collected on a biweekly basis from May 2012 to July 2013. Leaves, branches and remaining residues were separated and analyzed for C and nutrient contents. The annual pattern of litterfall was closely related to rainfall seasonality, exhibiting a large peak towards the end of the dry season (August-October). This peak decreased at higher elevations with decreasing rainfall seasonality. Macronutrients (N, P, K) in leaf litter increased at mid elevation (2100 m a.s.l.) and with land-use intensity. Carbon content and micronutrients (Al, Fe, Mn, Na) however, were unaffected or decreased with land-use intensity. While leaf litterfall decreased with elevation, total annual input was independent of climate. Compared to natural forests, the nutrient cycles in agroforestry ecosystems were accelerated by fertilization and the associated changes in dominant tree species.

  18. Intra-annual dynamics of non-structural carbohydrates in the cambium of mature conifer trees reflects radial growth demands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, Sonia; Giovannelli, Alessio; Treydte, Kerstin; Traversi, Maria Laura; King, Gregory M; Frank, David; Fonti, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    The presence of soluble carbohydrates in the cambial zone, either from sugars recently produced during photosynthesis or from starch remobilized from storage organs, is necessary for radial tree growth. However, considerable uncertainties on carbohydrate dynamics and the consequences on tree productivity exist. This study aims to better understand the variation in different carbon pools at intra-annual resolution by quantifying how cambial zone sugar and starch concentrations fluctuate over the season and in relation to cambial phenology. A comparison between two physiologically different species growing at the same site, i.e., the evergreen Picea abies Karst. and the deciduous Larix decidua Mill., and between L. decidua from two contrasting elevations, is presented to identify mechanisms of growth limitation. Results indicate that the annual cycle of sugar concentration within the cambial zone is coupled to the process of wood formation. The highest sugar concentration is observed when the number of cells in secondary wall formation and lignification stages is at a maximum, subsequent to most radial growth. Starch disappears in winter, while other freeze-resistant non-structural carbohydrates (NSCs) increase. Slight differences in NSC concentration between species are consistent with the differing climate sensitivity of the evergreen and deciduous species investigated. The general absence of differences between elevations suggests that the cambial activity of trees growing at the treeline was not limited by the availability of carbohydrates at the cambial zone but instead by environmental controls on the growing season duration.

  19. Soil organic matter dynamics and the global carbon cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, W.M.; Emanuel, W.R.; King, A.W.

    1992-01-01

    The large size and potentially long residence time of the soil organic matter pool make it an important component of the global carbon cycle. Net terrestrial primary production of about 60 Pg C·yr -1 is, over a several-year period of time, balanced by an equivalent flux of litter production and subsequent decomposition of detritus and soil organic matter. We will review many of the major factors that influence soil organic matter dynamics that need to be explicitly considered in development of global estimates of carbon turnover in the world's soils. We will also discuss current decomposition models that are general enough to be used to develop a representation of global soil organic matter dynamics

  20. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Jing Tao; Gunst, Tue; Brandbyge, Mads

    2011-01-01

    carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias...... of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects. Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic...... voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed...

  1. Dynamic replacement and loss of soil carbon on eroding cropland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; Sharpe, J.M.; Parton, W.J.; Ojima, D.S.; Fries, T.L.; Huntington, T.G.; Dabney, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Links between erosion/sedimentation history and soil carbon cycling were examined in a highly erosive setting in Mississippi loess soils. We sampled soils on (relatively) undisturbed and cropped hillslopes and measured C, N, 14C, and CO2 flux to characterize carbon storage and dynamics and to parameterize Century and spreadsheet 14C models for different erosion and tillage histories. For this site, where 100 years of intensive cotton cropping were followed by fertilization and contour plowing, there was an initial and dramatic decline in soil carbon content from 1870 to 1950, followed by a dramatic increase in soil carbon. Soil erosion amplifies C loss and recovery: About 100% of the original, prehistoric soil carbon was likely lost over 127 years of intensive land use, but about 30% of that carbon was replaced after 1950. The eroded cropland was therefore a local sink for CO2 since the 1950s. However, a net CO2 sink requires a full accounting of eroded carbon, which in turn requires that decomposition rates in lower slopes or wetlands be reduced to about 20% of the upland value. As a result, erosion may induce unaccounted sinks or sources of CO2, depending on the fate of eroded carbon and its protection from decomposition. For erosion rates typical of the United States, the sink terms may be large enough (1 Gt yr-1, back-of-the-envelope) to warrant a careful accounting of site management, cropping, and fertilization histories, as well as burial rates, for a more meaningful global assessment.

  2. Simulated impacts of insect defoliation on forest carbon dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medvigy, D; Clark, K L; Skowronski, N S; Schäfer, K V R

    2012-01-01

    Many temperate and boreal forests are subject to insect epidemics. In the eastern US, over 41 million meters squared of tree basal area are thought to be at risk of gypsy moth defoliation. However, the decadal-to-century scale implications of defoliation events for ecosystem carbon dynamics are not well understood. In this study, the effects of defoliation intensity, periodicity and spatial pattern on the carbon cycle are investigated in a set of idealized model simulations. A mechanistic terrestrial biosphere model, ecosystem demography model 2, is driven with observations from a xeric oak–pine forest located in the New Jersey Pine Barrens. Simulations indicate that net ecosystem productivity (equal to photosynthesis minus respiration) decreases linearly with increasing defoliation intensity. However, because of interactions between defoliation and drought effects, aboveground biomass exhibits a nonlinear decrease with increasing defoliation intensity. The ecosystem responds strongly with both reduced productivity and biomass loss when defoliation periodicity varies from 5 to 15 yr, but exhibits a relatively weak response when defoliation periodicity varies from 15 to 60 yr. Simulations of spatially heterogeneous defoliation resulted in markedly smaller carbon stocks than simulations with spatially homogeneous defoliation. These results show that gypsy moth defoliation has a large effect on oak–pine forest biomass dynamics, functioning and its capacity to act as a carbon sink. (letter)

  3. Long-term dynamics of dissolved organic carbon: implications for drinking water supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledesma, José L J; Köhler, Stephan J; Futter, Martyn N

    2012-08-15

    Surface waters are the main source of drinking water in many regions. Increasing organic carbon concentrations are a cause for concern in Nordic countries since both dissolved and particulate organic carbon can transport contaminants and adversely affect drinking water treatment processes. We present a long-term study of dynamics of total (particulate and dissolved) organic carbon (TOC) concentrations in the River Fyris. This river supplies drinking water to approximately 200000 people in Uppsala, Sweden. The River Fyris is a main tributary to Lake Mälaren, which supplies drinking water to approximately 2 million people in the greater Stockholm area. Utilities responsible for drinking water supply in both Uppsala and Stockholm have expressed concerns about possible increases in TOC. We evaluate organic carbon dynamics within the Fyris catchment by calculating areal mass exports using observed TOC concentrations and modeled flows and by modeling dissolved organic carbon (as a proxy for TOC) using the dynamic, process based INCA-C model. Exports of TOC from the catchment ranged from 0.8 to 5.8 g m(-2) year(-1) in the period 1995-2010. The variation in annual exports was related to climatic variability which influenced seasonality and amount of runoff. Exports and discharge uncoupled at the end of 2008. A dramatic increase in TOC concentrations was observed in 2009, which gradually declined in 2010-2011. INCA-C successfully reproduced the intra- and inter-annual variation in concentrations during 1996-2008 and 2010-2011 but failed to capture the anomalous increase in 2009. We evaluated a number of hypotheses to explain the anomaly in 2009 TOC values, ultimately none proved satisfactory. We draw two main conclusions: there is at least one unknown or unmeasured process controlling or influencing surface water TOC and INCA-C can be used as part of the decision-making process for current and future use of rivers for drinking water supply. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B

  4. Irradiation of carbon nanotubes with carbon projectiles: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denton, Cristian D. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, Universidad de Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain); Heredia-Avalos, Santiago; Moreno-Marin, Juan Carlos [Departamento de Fisica, Ingenieria de Sistemas y Teoria de la Senal, Universidad de Alicante, 03080 Alicante (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    The irradiation of carbon based nanostructures with ions and electrons has been shown to be an appropriate tool to tailor their properties. The defects induced in the nanostructures during irradiation are able to modify their mechanical and electronic properties. Here we simulate the irradiation of carbon nanotubes with carbon ions using a molecular dynamics code. We use the Tersoff potential joined smoothly to the Universal Ziegler-Biersack-Littmark potential at short distances. We study the number of defects produced after irradiation with a single carbon ion finding a saturation with its energy at {proportional_to} 3 keV. We observe, after continuum irradiation with low energy ions, the formation of bumps in the irradiated region. For larger energy ions we find that the diameter of the nanotube shrinks as shown in previous works. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Carbon dynamics after forest harvest in Central Siberia: the ZOTTO footprint area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panov, Alexey; Zrazhevskaya, Galina; Shibistova, Olga; Onuchin, Alexander; Heimann, Martin

    2013-04-01

    Temperate and boreal forests of the Northern Hemisphere have been recognized as important carbon sinks. Accurate calculation of forest carbon budget and estimation of the temporal variations of forest net carbon fluxes are important topics to elucidate the ''missing sink'' question and follow up the changing carbon dynamics in forests. In the frame of the ongoing Russian-German partner project the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO; www.zottoproject.org) a unique international research platform for large-scale climatic observations is operational about 20 km west of the Yenisei river (60.8°N; 89.35°E). The data of the ongoing greenhouse gas and aerosol measurements at the tall tower are used in atmospheric inversions studies to infer the distribution of carbon sinks and sources over the whole Northern Eurasia. The tall tower footprint area estimates of carbon stocks and fluxes are highly demanded for bottom-up validation of inversion estimates. The ZOTTO site lies in a vast region of forests and wetlands, still relatively undisturbed by anthropogenic influences, but a moderate human impact on vegetation, represented mainly by logging activities, becomes essential. Therefore, accurate estimates of carbon pools in vegetation and soil following harvesting are essential to inversion studies for ZOTTO and critical to predictions of both local ecosystem sustainability and global C exchange with the atmosphere. We present our investigation of carbon dynamics after forest harvest in the tall tower footprint area (~1000 km2). The changes in C pools and annual sequestration were quantified among several clear-cut lichen pine (Pinus sylvestris Lamb.) stands representing various stages of secondary succession with a "space-for-time substitution" technique. When viewed as a chronosequence, these stands represent snapshots showing how the effects of logging may propagate through time. The study concluded that ecosystems during the first 15 yrs after forest harvest become C

  6. Soil respiration and organic carbon dynamics with grassland conversions to woodlands in temperate china.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Soils are the largest terrestrial carbon store and soil respiration is the second-largest flux in ecosystem carbon cycling. Across China's temperate region, climatic changes and human activities have frequently caused the transformation of grasslands to woodlands. However, the effect of this transition on soil respiration and soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics remains uncertain in this area. In this study, we measured in situ soil respiration and SOC storage over a two-year period (Jan. 2007-Dec. 2008 from five characteristic vegetation types in a forest-steppe ecotone of temperate China, including grassland (GR, shrubland (SH, as well as in evergreen coniferous (EC, deciduous coniferous (DC and deciduous broadleaved forest (DB, to evaluate the changes of soil respiration and SOC storage with grassland conversions to diverse types of woodlands. Annual soil respiration increased by 3%, 6%, 14%, and 22% after the conversion from GR to EC, SH, DC, and DB, respectively. The variation in soil respiration among different vegetation types could be well explained by SOC and soil total nitrogen content. Despite higher soil respiration in woodlands, SOC storage and residence time increased in the upper 20 cm of soil. Our results suggest that the differences in soil environmental conditions, especially soil substrate availability, influenced the level of annual soil respiration produced by different vegetation types. Moreover, shifts from grassland to woody plant dominance resulted in increased SOC storage. Given the widespread increase in woody plant abundance caused by climate change and large-scale afforestation programs, the soils are expected to accumulate and store increased amounts of organic carbon in temperate areas of China.

  7. Importance of vegetation dynamics for future terrestrial carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlström, Anders; Xia, Jianyang; Arneth, Almut; Luo, Yiqi; Smith, Benjamin

    2015-05-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently sequester about one third of anthropogenic CO2 emissions each year, an important ecosystem service that dampens climate change. The future fate of this net uptake of CO2 by land based ecosystems is highly uncertain. Most ecosystem models used to predict the future terrestrial carbon cycle share a common architecture, whereby carbon that enters the system as net primary production (NPP) is distributed to plant compartments, transferred to litter and soil through vegetation turnover and then re-emitted to the atmosphere in conjunction with soil decomposition. However, while all models represent the processes of NPP and soil decomposition, they vary greatly in their representations of vegetation turnover and the associated processes governing mortality, disturbance and biome shifts. Here we used a detailed second generation dynamic global vegetation model with advanced representation of vegetation growth and mortality, and the associated turnover. We apply an emulator that describes the carbon flows and pools exactly as in simulations with the full model. The emulator simulates ecosystem dynamics in response to 13 different climate or Earth system model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 ensemble under RCP8.5 radiative forcing. By exchanging carbon cycle processes between these 13 simulations we quantified the relative roles of three main driving processes of the carbon cycle; (I) NPP, (II) vegetation dynamics and turnover and (III) soil decomposition, in terms of their contribution to future carbon (C) uptake uncertainties among the ensemble of climate change scenarios. We found that NPP, vegetation turnover (including structural shifts, wild fires and mortality) and soil decomposition rates explained 49%, 17% and 33%, respectively, of uncertainties in modelled global C-uptake. Uncertainty due to vegetation turnover was further partitioned into stand-clearing disturbances (16%), wild fires (0%), stand

  8. Importance of vegetation dynamics for future terrestrial carbon cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlström, Anders; Smith, Benjamin; Xia, Jianyang; Luo, Yiqi; Arneth, Almut

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial ecosystems currently sequester about one third of anthropogenic CO 2 emissions each year, an important ecosystem service that dampens climate change. The future fate of this net uptake of CO 2 by land based ecosystems is highly uncertain. Most ecosystem models used to predict the future terrestrial carbon cycle share a common architecture, whereby carbon that enters the system as net primary production (NPP) is distributed to plant compartments, transferred to litter and soil through vegetation turnover and then re-emitted to the atmosphere in conjunction with soil decomposition. However, while all models represent the processes of NPP and soil decomposition, they vary greatly in their representations of vegetation turnover and the associated processes governing mortality, disturbance and biome shifts. Here we used a detailed second generation dynamic global vegetation model with advanced representation of vegetation growth and mortality, and the associated turnover. We apply an emulator that describes the carbon flows and pools exactly as in simulations with the full model. The emulator simulates ecosystem dynamics in response to 13 different climate or Earth system model simulations from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 ensemble under RCP8.5 radiative forcing. By exchanging carbon cycle processes between these 13 simulations we quantified the relative roles of three main driving processes of the carbon cycle; (I) NPP, (II) vegetation dynamics and turnover and (III) soil decomposition, in terms of their contribution to future carbon (C) uptake uncertainties among the ensemble of climate change scenarios. We found that NPP, vegetation turnover (including structural shifts, wild fires and mortality) and soil decomposition rates explained 49%, 17% and 33%, respectively, of uncertainties in modelled global C-uptake. Uncertainty due to vegetation turnover was further partitioned into stand-clearing disturbances (16%), wild fires (0%), stand

  9. Seasonal not annual rainfall determines grassland biomass response to carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovenden, Mark J; Newton, Paul C D; Wills, Karen E

    2014-07-31

    The rising atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) should stimulate ecosystem productivity, but to what extent is highly uncertain, particularly when combined with changing temperature and precipitation. Ecosystem response to CO2 is complicated by biogeochemical feedbacks but must be understood if carbon storage and associated dampening of climate warming are to be predicted. Feedbacks through the hydrological cycle are particularly important and the physiology is well known; elevated CO2 reduces stomatal conductance and increases plant water use efficiency (the amount of water required to produce a unit of plant dry matter). The CO2 response should consequently be strongest when water is limiting; although this has been shown in some experiments, it is absent from many. Here we show that large annual variation in the stimulation of above-ground biomass by elevated CO2 in a mixed C3/C4 temperate grassland can be predicted accurately using seasonal rainfall totals; summer rainfall had a positive effect but autumn and spring rainfall had negative effects on the CO2 response. Thus, the elevated CO2 effect mainly depended upon the balance between summer and autumn/spring rainfall. This is partly because high rainfall during cool, moist seasons leads to nitrogen limitation, reducing or even preventing biomass stimulation by elevated CO2. Importantly, the prediction held whether plots were warmed by 2 °C or left unwarmed, and was similar for C3 plants and total biomass, allowing us to make a powerful generalization about ecosystem responses to elevated CO2. This new insight is particularly valuable because climate projections predict large changes in the timing of rainfall, even where annual totals remain static. Our findings will help resolve apparent differences in the outcomes of CO2 experiments and improve the formulation and interpretation of models that are insensitive to differences in the seasonal effects of rainfall on the CO2 response.

  10. Seasonal variation in carbon dioxide exchange over a Mediterranean annual grassland in California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, L; Baldocchi, D

    2004-05-01

    Understanding how environmental variables affect the processes that regulate the carbon flux over grassland is critical for large-scale modeling research, since grasslands comprise almost one-third of the earth's natural vegetation. To address this issue, fluxes of CO{sub 2} (F{sub c}, flux toward the surface is negative) were measured over a Mediterranean, annual grassland in California, USA for 2 years with the eddy covariance method. To interpret the biotic and abiotic factors that modulate F{sub c} over the course of a year we decomposed net ecosystem CO{sub 2} exchange into its constituent components, ecosystem respiration (R{sub eco}) and gross primary production (GPP). Daytime R{sub eco} was extrapolated from the relationship between temperature and nighttime F{sub c} under high turbulent conditions. Then, GPP was estimated by subtracting daytime values of F{sub c} from daytime estimates of R{sub eco}. Results show that most of carbon exchange, both photosynthesis and respiration, was limited to the wet season (typically from October to mid-May). Seasonal variations in GPP followed closely to changes in leaf area index, which in turn was governed by soil moisture, available sunlight and the timing of the last frost. In general, R{sub eco} was an exponential function of soil temperature, but with season-dependent values of Q{sub 10}. The temperature-dependent respiration model failed immediately after rain events, when large pulses of R{sub eco} were observed. Respiration pulses were especially notable during the dry season when the grass was dead and were the consequence of quickly stimulated microbial activity. Integrated values of GPP, R{sub eco}, and net ecosystem exchange (NEE) were 867, 735, and -132g C m{sup -2}, respectively, for the 2000-2001 season, and 729, 758, and 29g C m{sup -2} for the 2001-2002 season. Thus, the grassland was a moderate carbon sink during the first season and a weak carbon source during the second season. In contrast to a

  11. Molten carbonate fuel cell: dynamic numerical modeling and experimental investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leal, Elisangela Martins [National Institute for Space Research, Cachoeira Paulista, SP (Brazil). Combustion and Propulsion Lab.], e-mail: elisangela@lcp.inpe.br; Jabbari, Faryar [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Dept.], e-mail: fjabbari@uci.edu; Brouwer, Jacob [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States). National Fuel Cell Research Center], e-mail: jb@nfcrc.uci.edu

    2006-07-01

    In this paper, a detailed model incorporating simplified geometric resolution of a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) with detailed and dynamic simulation of all physical, chemical, and electrochemical processes in the stream-wise direction is presented. The model was developed using mass and momentum conservation, electrochemical and chemical reaction mechanisms, and heat transfer. Results from the model are compared with data from an experimental MCFC unit. Furthermore, the model was applied to predict dynamic variations of voltage, current and temperature in an MCFC as it responds to varying load demands. The voltage was evaluated by applying a model developed by Yu h and Selman (1991a, 1991b). The results show that the model can be used to predict voltage and dynamic response characteristics of an MCFC accurately and consistently for a variety of temperatures and pressures. (author)

  12. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dattelbaum, D. M.; Gustavsen, R. L.; Sheffield, S. A.; Stahl, D. B.; Scharff, R. J.; Rigg, P. A.; Furmanski, J.; Orler, E. B.; Patterson, B.; Coe, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    The dynamic (shock) responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE) composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3). The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP) composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall) for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber) directions.

  13. The dynamic response of carbon fiber-filled polymer composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patterson B.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic (shock responses of two carbon fiber-filled polymer composites have been quantified using gas gun-driven plate impact experimentation. The first composite is a filament-wound, highly unidirectional carbon fiber-filled epoxy with a high degree of porosity. The second composite is a chopped carbon fiber- and graphite-filled phenolic resin with little-to-no porosity. Hugoniot data are presented for the carbon fiber-epoxy (CE composite to 18.6 GPa in the through-thickness direction, in which the shock propagates normal to the fibers. The data are best represented by a linear Rankine-Hugoniot fit: Us = 2.87 + 1.17 ×up(ρ0 = 1.536g/cm3. The shock wave structures were found to be highly heterogeneous, both due to the anisotropic nature of the fiber-epoxy microstructure, and the high degree of void volume. Plate impact experiments were also performed on a carbon fiber-filled phenolic (CP composite to much higher shock input pressures, exceeding the reactants-to-products transition common to polymers. The CP was found to be stiffer than the filament-wound CE in the unreacted Hugoniot regime, and transformed to products near the shock-driven reaction threshold on the principal Hugoniot previously shown for the phenolic binder itself. [19] On-going research is focused on interrogating the direction-dependent dyanamic response and dynamic failure strength (spall for the CE composite in the TT and 0∘ (fiber directions.

  14. Current-induced dynamics in carbon atomic contacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Tao Lü

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The effect of electric current on the motion of atoms still poses many questions, and several mechanisms are at play. Recently there has been focus on the importance of the current-induced nonconservative forces (NC and Berry-phase derived forces (BP with respect to the stability of molecular-scale contacts. Systems based on molecules bridging electrically gated graphene electrodes may offer an interesting test-bed for these effects.Results: We employ a semi-classical Langevin approach in combination with DFT calculations to study the current-induced vibrational dynamics of an atomic carbon chain connecting electrically gated graphene electrodes. This illustrates how the device stability can be predicted solely from the modes obtained from the Langevin equation, including the current-induced forces. We point out that the gate offers control of the current, independent of the bias voltage, which can be used to explore current-induced vibrational instabilities due the NC/BP forces. Furthermore, using tight-binding and the Brenner potential we illustrate how Langevin-type molecular-dynamics calculations including the Joule heating effect for the carbon-chain systems can be performed. Molecular dynamics including current-induced forces enables an energy redistribution mechanism among the modes, mediated by anharmonic interactions, which is found to be vital in the description of the electrical heating.Conclusion: We have developed a semiclassical Langevin equation approach that can be used to explore current-induced dynamics and instabilities. We find instabilities at experimentally relevant bias and gate voltages for the carbon-chain system.

  15. The Role of Stream Water Carbon Dynamics and Export in the Carbon Balance of a Tropical Seasonal Rainforest, Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Yi-Ping; Schaefer, Douglas A.; Sha, Li-Qing; Deng, Yun; Deng, Xiao-Bao; Dai, Kai-Jie

    2013-01-01

    A two-year study (2009 ∼ 2010) was carried out to investigate the dynamics of different carbon (C) forms, and the role of stream export in the C balance of a 23.4-ha headwater catchment in a tropical seasonal rainforest at Xishuangbanna (XSBN), southwest China. The seasonal volumetric weighted mean (VWM) concentrations of total inorganic C (TIC) and dissolved inorganic C (DIC) were higher, and particulate inorganic C (PIC) and organic C (POC) were lower, in the dry season than the rainy season, while the VWM concentrations of total organic C (TOC) and dissolved organic C (DOC) were similar between seasons. With increased monthly stream discharge and stream water temperature (SWT), only TIC and DIC concentrations decreased significantly. The most important C form in stream export was DIC, accounting for 51.8% of the total C (TC) export; DOC, POC, and PIC accounted for 21.8%, 14.9%, and 11.5% of the TC export, respectively. Dynamics of C flux were closely related to stream discharge, with the greatest export during the rainy season. C export in the headwater stream was 47.1 kg C ha−1 yr−1, about 2.85% of the annual net ecosystem exchange. This finding indicates that stream export represented a minor contribution to the C balance in this tropical seasonal rainforest. PMID:23437195

  16. The role of stream water carbon dynamics and export in the carbon balance of a tropical seasonal rainforest, southwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jun Zhou

    Full Text Available A two-year study (2009 ~ 2010 was carried out to investigate the dynamics of different carbon (C forms, and the role of stream export in the C balance of a 23.4-ha headwater catchment in a tropical seasonal rainforest at Xishuangbanna (XSBN, southwest China. The seasonal volumetric weighted mean (VWM concentrations of total inorganic C (TIC and dissolved inorganic C (DIC were higher, and particulate inorganic C (PIC and organic C (POC were lower, in the dry season than the rainy season, while the VWM concentrations of total organic C (TOC and dissolved organic C (DOC were similar between seasons. With increased monthly stream discharge and stream water temperature (SWT, only TIC and DIC concentrations decreased significantly. The most important C form in stream export was DIC, accounting for 51.8% of the total C (TC export; DOC, POC, and PIC accounted for 21.8%, 14.9%, and 11.5% of the TC export, respectively. Dynamics of C flux were closely related to stream discharge, with the greatest export during the rainy season. C export in the headwater stream was 47.1 kg C ha(-1 yr(-1, about 2.85% of the annual net ecosystem exchange. This finding indicates that stream export represented a minor contribution to the C balance in this tropical seasonal rainforest.

  17. Forest annual carbon cost: a global-scale analysis of autotrophic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piao, Shilong; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Ciais, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A; Chen, Anping; Cao, Chao; Fang, Jingyun; Friedlingstein, Pierre; Luo, Yiqi; Wang, Shaopeng

    2010-03-01

    Forest autotrophic respiration (R(a)) plays an important role in the carbon balance of forest ecosystems. However, its drivers at the global scale are not well known. Based on a global forest database, we explore the relationships of annual R(a) with mean annual temperature (MAT) and biotic factors including net primary productivity (NPP), total biomass, stand age, mean tree height, and maximum leaf area index (LAI). The results show that the spatial patterns of forest annual R(a) at the global scale are largely controlled by temperature. R(a) is composed of growth (R(g)) and maintenance respiration (R(m)). We used a modified Arrhenius equation to express the relationship between R(a) and MAT. This relationship was calibrated with our data and shows that a 10 degrees C increase in MAT will result in an increase of annual R(m) by a factor of 1.9-2.5 (Q10). We also found that the fraction of total assimilation (gross primary production, GPP) used in R(a) is lowest in the temperate regions characterized by a MAT of approximately 11 degrees C. Although we could not confirm a relationship between the ratio of R(a) to GPP and age across all forest sites, the R(a) to GPP ratio tends to significantly increase in response to increasing age for sites with MAT between 8 degrees and 12 degrees C. At the plant scale, direct up-scaled R(a) estimates were found to increase as a power function with forest total biomass; however, the coefficient of the power function (0.2) was much smaller than that expected from previous studies (0.75 or 1). At the ecosystem scale, R(a) estimates based on both GPP - NPP and TER - R(h) (total ecosystem respiration - heterotrophic respiration) were not significantly correlated with forest total biomass (P > 0.05) with either a linear or a power function, implying that the previous individual-based metabolic theory may be not suitable for the application at ecosystem scale.

  18. Temperature and vegetation effects on soil organic carbon quality along a forested mean annual temperature gradient in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinzia Fissore; Christian P. Giardina; Randall K. Kolka; Carl C. Trettin; Gary M. King; Martin F. Jurgensen; Christopher D. Barton; S. Douglas McDowell

    2008-01-01

    Both climate and plant species are hypothesized to influence soil organic carbon (SOC) quality, but accurate prediction of how SOC process rates respond to global change will require an improved understanding of how SOC quality varies with mean annual temperature (MAT) and forest type. We investigated SOC quality in paired hardwood and pine stands growing in coarse...

  19. Airborne Measurement of Ecosystem Carbon Dynamics over Heterogeneous Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, T. J.; Hill, T. C.; Clement, R.; Moncrieff, J.; Disney, M.; Nichol, C. J.; Williams, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Terrestrial carbon sinks are currently believed to account for the removal and storage of approximately 25% of anthropogenic carbon emissions from the atmosphere. The processes involved are numerous and complex and many feedbacks are at play. The ability to study the dynamics of different ecosystems at scales meaningful to climatic forcing is essential for understanding the key processes involved and identifying crucial sensitivities and thresholds. Airborne platforms with the requisite instrumentation offer the opportunity to directly measure biological processes and atmospheric structures at scales that are not achievable by ground measurements alone. The current generation of small research aircraft such as the University of Edinburgh’s Diamond HK36TTC ECO Dimona present excellent platforms for measurement of both the atmosphere and terrestrial surface. In this study we present results from airborne CO2/H2O flux measuring campaigns in contrasting climatic systems to quantify spatial patterns in ecosystem photosynthesis. Several airborne campaigns were undertaken in Arctic Finland, as part of the Arctic Biosphere Atmosphere Coupling at Multiple Scales (ABACUS) project (2008), and mainland UK as part of the UK Population Biology Network (UKPopNet) 2009 project, to explore the variability in surface CO2 flux across spatial scales larger than captured using conventional ground based eddy covariance. We discuss the application of our aircraft platform as a tool to address the challenge of understanding carbon dynamics within landscapes of heterogeneous vegetation class, terrain and hydrology using complementary datasets acquired from airborne eddy covariance and remote sensing.

  20. Dynamics of maize carbon contribution to soil organic carbon in association with soil type and fertility level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Jiubo; Li, Hui; Li, Shuangyi; An, Tingting; Farmer, John; Fu, Shifeng; Wang, Jingkuan

    2015-01-01

    Soil type and fertility level influence straw carbon dynamics in the agroecosystems. However, there is a limited understanding of the dynamic processes of straw-derived and soil-derived carbon and the influence of the addition of straw carbon on soil-derived organic carbon in different soils associated with different fertility levels. In this study, we applied the in-situ carborundum tube method and 13C-labeled maize straw (with and without maize straw) at two cropland (Phaeozem and Luvisol soils) experimental sites in northeast China to quantify the dynamics of maize-derived and soil-derived carbon in soils associated with high and low fertility, and to examine how the addition of maize carbon influences soil-derived organic carbon and the interactions of soil type and fertility level with maize-derived and soil-derived carbon. We found that, on average, the contributions of maize-derived carbon to total organic carbon in maize-soil systems during the experimental period were differentiated among low fertility Luvisol (from 62.82% to 42.90), high fertility Luvisol (from 53.15% to 30.00%), low fertility Phaeozem (from 58.69% to 36.29%) and high fertility Phaeozem (from 41.06% to 16.60%). Furthermore, the addition of maize carbon significantly decreased the remaining soil-derived organic carbon in low and high fertility Luvisols and low fertility Phaeozem before two months. However, the increasing differences in soil-derived organic carbon between both soils with and without maize straw after two months suggested that maize-derived carbon was incorporated into soil-derived organic carbon, thereby potentially offsetting the loss of soil-derived organic carbon. These results suggested that Phaeozem and high fertility level soils would fix more maize carbon over time and thus were more beneficial for protecting soil-derived organic carbon from maize carbon decomposition.

  1. Belowground Water Dynamics Under Contrasting Annual and Perennial Plant Communities in an Agriculturally-Dominated Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, G.; Asbjornsen, H.; Helmers, M. J.; Shepherd, G. W.

    2005-12-01

    The conversion from grasslands and forests to row-crops in the Midwest has affected soil water cycling because plant characteristics are one of the main parameters determining soil storage capacity, infiltration rates, and surface runoff. Little is known, however, about the extent of modification of soil water dynamics under different plant communities. To address this important issue, we are documenting soil water dynamics under contrasting perennial and annual plant communities in an agriculturally-dominated landscape. Measurements of soil moisture and depths of uptake of source water were obtained for six vegetative cover types (corn and soybean field, brome pasture, degraded savanna, restored savanna, and restored prairie) at the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, Iowa. The depths of uptake of soil water were determined on the basis of oxygen isotope composition of soil water and stem water. Measurements were performed once a month during an entire growing season. Preliminary results indicate that soil water present under the different vegetation types show similar profiles with depth during the dry months. Soil water in the upper 5 cm is enriched in oxygen-18 by about 5 per mil relative to soil water at 100 cm. Our preliminary results also indicate that the isotopic composition of stem water from annual plants is typically higher by about 2 per mil relative to that of stem water from perennial plants during the dry period. Whereas the oxygen isotopic composition for corn stem water is -5.49 per mil, that for elm and oak stem water is -7.62 and -7.51 per mil, respectively. The higher isotope values for corn suggest that annual crop plants are withdrawing water from shallower soil horizons relative to perennial plants. Moreover, our preliminary data suggest lower moisture content in soil under annual plant cover. We propose that the presence of deeper roots in the perennial vegetation allows these plants to tap into deeper water sources when

  2. Dynamics and climate change mitigation potential of soil organic carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, Rolf; Bossio, Deborah

    2014-11-01

    When assessing soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration and its climate change (CC) mitigation potential at global scale, the dynamic nature of soil carbon storage and interventions to foster it should be taken into account. Firstly, adoption of SOC-sequestration measures will take time, and reasonably such schemes could only be implemented gradually at large-scale. Secondly, if soils are managed as carbon sinks, then SOC will increase only over a limited time, up to the point when a new SOC equilibrium is reached. This paper combines these two processes and predicts potential SOC sequestration dynamics in agricultural land at global scale and the corresponding CC mitigation potential. Assuming that global governments would agree on a worldwide effort to gradually change land use practices towards turning agricultural soils into carbon sinks starting 2014, the projected 87-year (2014-2100) global SOC sequestration potential of agricultural land ranged between 31 and 64 Gt. This is equal to 1.9-3.9% of the SRES-A2 projected 87-year anthropogenic emissions. SOC sequestration would peak 2032-33, at that time reaching 4.3-8.9% of the projected annual SRES-A2 emission. About 30 years later the sequestration rate would have reduced by half. Thus, SOC sequestration is not a C wedge that could contribute increasingly to mitigating CC. Rather, the mitigation potential is limited, contributing very little to solving the climate problem of the coming decades. However, we deliberately did not elaborate on the importance of maintaining or increasing SOC for sustaining soil health, agro-ecosystem functioning and productivity; an issue of global significance that deserves proper consideration irrespectively of any potential additional sequestration of SOC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Carbon cycle dynamics within Oregon’s urban-suburban-forested-agricultural landscapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Beverly E. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Still, Christopher Jason [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Schmidt, Andres [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2017-06-15

    Our overarching goal was to develop and utilize an observation-based analysis framework to assess interactions between climate and mosaics of land use, land cover and urbanization on regional carbon, water, and energy dynamics, and potential changes associated with land management and climate. Carbon, water and energy cycling was quantified for the range of current and potential land uses under present and future climates. The study region of Oregon has a strong climatic gradient from the coastal mesic forests (2500mm ppt) to the Willamette Valley, Cascade Mountains, and the Northern Great Basin semi-arid “cold desert” to the east (300 mm). The study was focused on the effects of (1) conversion of semi-arid sagebrush and Willamette Valley agricultural crops to bioenergy production; (2) afforestation of idle land and rangelands deemed suitable for forests or poplar crops under future climate conditions. We found that net ecosystem production (NEP), the net of ecosystem photosynthesis and respiration, was 10 times higher in the high biomass forests of the Coast Range compared with drier regions like sagebrush in the Northern Great Basin, which was nearly zero (Schmidt et al. 2016). The state total NEP averaged about 30 teragrams carbon (Tg C) per year for the years 2012 to 2014 using our model framework that we developed for predictions of current and future NEP, and compared well with our detailed inventory estimates (28 Tg C annual average for 2011-2015 for forests only; Law et al. 2017). Running our model framework until the year 2050, we found that climate alone only increased NEP by less than 1 Tg C per decade (~3%) using the current trajectory of carbon dioxide emissions, however, changes are expected to be more rapid in subsequent years. We evaluated the possibility of land use change from grass seed crops to poplar for bioenergy, which slightly increased NEP by 2050. The most important variable for carbon sequestration estimates (net carbon sources and

  4. Global investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Tiantian

    2016-11-17

    Understanding the complex nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is essential to enable utilization of these structures in devices and practical applications. We present in this work an investigation of the global nonlinear dynamics of a slacked CNT when actuated by large electrostatic and electrodynamic excitations. The coexistence of several attractors is observed. The CNT is modeled as an Euler–Bernoulli beam. A reduced-order model based on the Galerkin method is developed and utilized to simulate the static and dynamic responses. Critical computational challenges are posed due to the complicated form of the electrostatic force, which describes the interaction between the upper electrode, consisting of the cylindrically shaped CNT, and the lower electrode. Toward this, we approximate the electrostatic force using the Padé expansion. We explore the dynamics near the primary and superharmonic resonances. The nanostructure exhibits several attractors with different characteristics. To achieve deep insight and describe the complexity and richness of the behavior, we analyze the nonlinear response from an attractor-basins point of view. The competition of attractors is highlighted. Compactness and/or fractality of their basins are discussed. Both the effects of varying the excitation frequency and amplitude are examined up to the dynamic pull-in instability.

  5. Impact of Carbon Nanoparticle Shape on Polymer Dynamics in Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Brad; Dadmun, Mark

    2012-02-01

    In forming quality nanocomposites of carbon-based nanoparticles (CNPs) in a polymer matrix, achieving and maintaining a high degree of dispersion is a crucial problem. One method to attain well-dispersed CNP nanocomposites is to incorporate non-covalent interactions between the CNP and matrix, which also impacts the dynamics of the polymer chain. In this work, T2 NMR relaxometry (T2 NMR) examines the effect on polymer chain dynamics of incorporating CNPs into polystyrene-co-acrylonitrile (SAN) random copolymer matrices. In SAN-CNP composites, the segmental-chain dynamics can be influenced by the non-covalent interactions formed with the nanoparticle (interacting), but are also influenced by the CNP steric bulk alone (non-interacting). The use of T2 NMR allows for the examination of the influence of the extent of non-covalent interactions on this segmental chain level. This segmental level view also allows for the distinction between relaxation dynamics of the interacting and non-interacting regimes. Current data indicates that increased acrylonitrile content in the copolymer results in increased non-covalent interactions and overall slowing of chain dynamics.

  6. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics in ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical processes that influence POC sources and sinks. Using field observations and satellite ocean color products, we developed a nw multiple regression algorithm to estimate POC on the Louisiana Continental Shelf (LCS) from satellite observations. The algorithm had reliable performance with mean relative error (MRE) of ?40% and root mean square error (RMSE) of ?50% for MODIS and SeaWiFS images for POC ranging between ?80 and ?1200 mg m23, and showed similar performance for a large estuary (Mobile Bay). Substantial spatiotemporal variability in the satellite-derived POC was observed on the LCS, with high POC found on the inner shelf (satellite data with carefully developed algorithms can greatly increase

  7. ANNUAL AND DIURNAL CYCLES OF THE INVERSE RELATION BETWEEN PLANT TRANSPIRATION AND CARBON SEQUESTRATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernán Alonso Moreno

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding biogeochemical cycles and especially carbon budgets is clue to validate global change models in the present and near future. As a consequence, sinks and sources of carbon in the world are being studied. One of those sinks is the non-well known behavior of the planet vegetation which involves the processes of photosynthesis and respiration. Carbon sequestration rates are highly related to the transpiration through a molecular diffusion process occurring at the stomatal level which can be recorded by an eddy covariance micrometeorological station. This paper explores annual and diurnal cycles of latent heat (LE and CO2 net (FC fluxes over 6 different ecosystems. Based on the physics of the transpiration process, different time-scale analysis are performed, finding a near-linear relation between LE and CO2 net fluxes, which is stronger at the more vegetated areas. The North American monsoon season increases carbon up taking and LE-CO2 flux relation preserves at different time scales analysis (hours to days to months.El conocimiento de los ciclos biogeoquímicos y, en especial, de los balances de carbono es clave para la validación de los modelos de cambio global para el presente y el futuro cercano. Como consecuencia, en el mundo se estudian las fuentes y los sumideros de carbono. Uno de esos sumideros es la vegetación del planeta, que involucra los procesos de respiración y fotosíntesis y cuyo comportamiento se empieza a estudiar. Las tasas de captura del carbono están muy ligadas a la transpiración mediante un proceso de difusión molecular en los estomas, que puede registrarse por un sistema micrometeorológico de eddy covarianza. Este artículo explora los ciclos anuales y diurnos de los flujos netos de CO2 y calor latente de seis ecosistemas diferentes. Se desarrollan diversos análisis de escala temporal, basados en la física de la transpiración, y se halla una relación cuasilineal entre los flujos netos de calor

  8. Linear Theory of Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics: Implications in Modeling Soil Respiration and Carbon Sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porporato, A.; Manzoni, S.; Katul, G.

    2008-12-01

    The long-term, large-scale soil organic carbon dynamics are typically described by mathematical models based on networks of linear reservoirs. Properties of these networks can be diagnosed from linear system theory (i.e. impulse-response transformations), which is seldom used in soil biogeochemistry, although it can be used to compare and test different models in the context of long-term carbon sequestration in soils. In this work, the general theory of linear impulse-response systems is briefly reviewed and linked to the theory of stochastic point processes. Two characteristic times are considered, the residence time (i.e., the time spent by a molecule in the system) and age (the time elapsed since the molecule entered the system). Both are represented through their probability density functions, which are computed explicitly as a function of model structure. Different cases are analyzed and compared, ranging from a simple individual-pool model, to feedback models involving loops (as in models of soil organic carbon-microbial interactions and physical adsorption-desorption), and to more complex networks often used to simulate in the details the soil organic carbon processes. As examples for these complex networks, the compartmental model CENTURY (Parton et al., 1987), and the continuum-quality Q-model (Agren and Bosatta, 1996) are considered. We assess the relative importance of model structural characteristics to determine the organic carbon residence time and age distributions.

  9. A Molecular Dynamics Study on the Confinement of Carbon Dioxide Molecules in Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazor, Meagan; Rende, Deniz; Baysal, Nihat; Ozisik, Rahmi

    2012-02-01

    The influence of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration on global warming is considered as one of the primary environmental issues of the past two decades. The main source of CO2 emission is human activity, such as the use of fossil fuels in transportation and industrial plants. Following the release of Kyoto Protocol in 1997, effective ways of controlling CO2 emissions received much attention. As a result, various materials such as activated carbon, zeolites, and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were investigated for their CO2 adsorbing properties. CNTs were reported to have CO2 adsorption capability twice that of activated carbon, hence they received the most attention. In the current study, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were used as one dimensional nanoporous materials and their CO2 adsorption capacity was analyzed with Molecular Dynamics simulations. Results indicated that SWNTs are excellent CO2 adsorbers and their effectiveness increase at low CO2 concentrations. In addition, we showed that by varying temperature, CO2 can be removed from the SWNTs, providing a simple method to reuse SWNTs.

  10. Multiple temporal scale variability during the twentieth century in global carbon dynamics simulated by a coupled climate-terrestrial carbon cycle model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Tomomichi [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Frontier Research Center for Global Change, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); University of Bristol, QUEST, Department of Earth Sciences, Bristol (United Kingdom); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Postdoctoral Fellow for Research Abroad, Tokyo (Japan); Ito, Akihiko [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Frontier Research Center for Global Change, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan); National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Kawamiya, Michio [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Frontier Research Center for Global Change, Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    A coupled climate-carbon cycle model composed of a process-based terrestrial carbon cycle model, Sim-CYCLE, and the CCSR/NIES/FRCGC atmospheric general circulation model was developed. We examined the multiple temporal scale functions of terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics induced by human activities and natural processes and evaluated their contribution to fluctuations in the global carbon budget during the twentieth century. Global annual net primary production (NPP) and heterotrophic respiration (HR) increased gradually by 6.7 and 4.7%, respectively, from the 1900s to the 1990s. The difference between NPP and HR was the net carbon uptake by natural ecosystems, which was 0.6 Pg C year{sup -1} in the 1980s, whereas the carbon emission induced by human land-use changes was 0.5 Pg C year{sup -1}, largely offsetting the natural terrestrial carbon sequestration. Our results indicate that monthly to interannual variation in atmospheric CO{sub 2} growth rate anomalies show 2- and 6-month time lags behind anomalies in temperature and the NiNO{sub 3} index, respectively. The simulated anomaly amplitude in monthly net carbon flux from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere was much larger than in the prescribed air-to-sea carbon flux. Fluctuations in the global atmospheric CO{sub 2} time series were dominated by the activity of terrestrial vegetation. These results suggest that terrestrial ecosystems have acted as a net neutral reservoir for atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations during the twentieth century on an interdecadal timescale, but as the dominant driver for atmospheric CO{sub 2} fluctuations on a monthly to interannual timescale. (orig.)

  11. Dynamic stability analysis of caisson breakwater in lifetime considering the annual frequency of severe storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-chi; Wang, Yuan-zhan; Hong, Ning-ning

    2015-04-01

    In the dynamic stability analysis of a caisson breakwater, most of current studies pay attention to the motion characteristics of caisson breakwaters under a single periodical breaking wave excitation. And in the lifetime stability analysis of caisson breakwater, it is assumed that the caisson breakwater suffers storm wave excitation once annually in the design lifetime. However, the number of annual severe storm occurrence is a random variable. In this paper, a series of random waves are generated by the Wen Sheng-chang wave spectrum, and the histories of successive and long-term random wave forces are built up by using the improved Goda wave force model. It is assumed that the number of annual severe storm occurrence is in the Poisson distribution over the 50-year design lifetime, and the history of random wave excitation is generated for each storm by the wave spectrum. The response histories of the caisson breakwater to the random waves over 50-year design lifetime are calculated and taken as a set of samples. On the basis of the Monte Carlo simulation technique, a large number of samples can be obtained, and the probability assessment of the safety of the breakwater during the complete design lifetime is obtained by statistical analysis of a large number of samples. Finally, the procedure of probability assessment of the breakwater safety is illustrated by an example.

  12. Nonlinear Dynamics of Carbon Nanotubes Under Large Electrostatic Force

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Tiantian

    2015-06-01

    Because of the inherent nonlinearities involving the behavior of CNTs when excited by electrostatic forces, modeling and simulating their behavior is challenging. The complicated form of the electrostatic force describing the interaction of their cylindrical shape, forming upper electrodes, to lower electrodes poises serious computational challenges. This presents an obstacle against applying and using several nonlinear dynamics tools typically used to analyze the behavior of complicated nonlinear systems undergoing large motion, such as shooting, continuation, and integrity analysis techniques. This works presents an attempt to resolve this issue. We present an investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes when actuated by large electrostatic forces. We study expanding the complicated form of the electrostatic force into enough number of terms of the Taylor series. Then, we utilize this form along with an Euler-Bernoulli beam model to study for the first time the dynamic behavior of CNTs when excited by large electrostatic force. The geometric nonlinearity and the nonlinear electrostatic force are considered. An efficient reduced-order model (ROM) based on the Galerkin method is developed and utilized to simulate the static and dynamic responses of the CNTs. Several results are generated demonstrating softening and hardening behavior of the CNTs near their primary and secondary resonances. The effects of the DC and AC voltage loads on the behavior have been studied. The impacts of the initial slack level and CNT diameter are also demonstrated.

  13. NONLINEAR DYNAMICS OF CARBON NANOTUBES UNDER LARGE ELECTROSTATIC FORCE

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Tiantian

    2015-06-01

    Because of the inherent nonlinearities involving the behavior of CNTs when excited by electrostatic forces, modeling and simulating their behavior is challenging. The complicated form of the electrostatic force describing the interaction of their cylindrical shape, forming upper electrodes, to lower electrodes poises serious computational challenges. This presents an obstacle against applying and using several nonlinear dynamics tools typically used to analyze the behavior of complicated nonlinear systems undergoing large motion, such as shooting, continuation, and integrity analysis techniques. This works presents an attempt to resolve this issue. We present an investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes when actuated by large electrostatic forces. We study expanding the complicated form of the electrostatic force into enough number of terms of the Taylor series. Then, we utilize this form along with an Euler-Bernoulli beam model to study for the first time the dynamic behavior of CNTs when excited by large electrostatic force. The geometric nonlinearity and the nonlinear electrostatic force are considered. An efficient reduced-order model (ROM) based on the Galerkin method is developed and utilized to simulate the static and dynamic responses of the CNTs. Several results are generated demonstrating softening and hardening behavior of the CNTs near their primary and secondary resonances. The effects of the DC and AC voltage loads on the behavior have been studied. The impacts of the initial slack level and CNT diameter are also demonstrated.

  14. Aggregate and soil organic carbon dynamics in South Chilean Andisols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huygens, D.; Boeckx, P.; Van Cleemput, O.; Oyarzún, C.; Godoy, R.

    2005-06-01

    Extreme sensitivity of soil organic carbon (SOC) to climate and land use change warrants further research in different terrestrial ecosystems. The aim of this study was to investigate the link between aggregate and SOC dynamics in a chronosequence of three different land uses of a south Chilean Andisol: a second growth Nothofagus obliqua forest (SGFOR), a grassland (GRASS) and a Pinus radiata plantation (PINUS). Total carbon content of the 0-10cm soil layer was higher for GRASS (6.7 kg C m-2) than for PINUS (4.3 kg C m-2, while TC content of SGFOR (5.8 kg C m-2) was not significantly different from either one. High extractable oxalate and pyrophosphate Al concentrations (varying from 20.3-24.4 g kg-1, and 3.9-11.1 g kg-1, respectively) were found in all sites. In this study, SOC and aggregate dynamics were studied using size and density fractionation experiments of the SOC, δ13C and total carbon analysis of the different SOC fractions, and C mineralization experiments. The results showed that electrostatic sorption between and among amorphous Al components and clay minerals is mainly responsible for the formation of metal-humus-clay complexes and the stabilization of soil aggregates. The process of ligand exchange between SOC and Al would be of minor importance resulting in the absence of aggregate hierarchy in this soil type. Whole soil C mineralization rate constants were highest for SGFOR and PINUS, followed by GRASS (respectively 0.495, 0.266 and 0.196 g CO2-Cm-2d-1 for the top soil layer). In contrast, incubation experiments of isolated macro organic matter fractions gave opposite results, showing that the recalcitrance of the SOC decreased in another order: PINUS>SGFOR>GRASS. We deduced that electrostatic sorption processes and physical protection of SOC in soil aggregates were the main processes determining SOC stabilization. As a result, high aggregate carbon concentrations, varying from 148 till 48 g kg-1, were encountered for all land use sites. Al

  15. Estimating annual soil carbon loss in agricultural peatland soils using a nitrogen budget approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilie R Kirk

    Full Text Available Around the world, peatland degradation and soil subsidence is occurring where these soils have been converted to agriculture. Since initial drainage in the mid-1800s, continuous farming of such soils in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta has led to subsidence of up to 8 meters in places, primarily due to soil organic matter (SOM oxidation and physical compaction. Rice (Oryza sativa production has been proposed as an alternative cropping system to limit SOM oxidation. Preliminary research on these soils revealed high N uptake by rice in N fertilizer omission plots, which we hypothesized was the result of SOM oxidation releasing N. Testing this hypothesis, we developed a novel N budgeting approach to assess annual soil C and N loss based on plant N uptake and fallow season N mineralization. Through field experiments examining N dynamics during growing season and winter fallow periods, a complete annual N budget was developed. Soil C loss was calculated from SOM-N mineralization using the soil C:N ratio. Surface water and crop residue were negligible in the total N uptake budget (3 - 4 % combined. Shallow groundwater contributed 24 - 33 %, likely representing subsurface SOM-N mineralization. Assuming 6 and 25 kg N ha-1 from atmospheric deposition and biological N2 fixation, respectively, our results suggest 77 - 81 % of plant N uptake (129 - 149 kg N ha-1 was supplied by SOM mineralization. Considering a range of N uptake efficiency from 50 - 70 %, estimated net C loss ranged from 1149 - 2473 kg C ha-1. These findings suggest that rice systems, as currently managed, reduce the rate of C loss from organic delta soils relative to other agricultural practices.

  16. Estimating annual soil carbon loss in agricultural peatland soils using a nitrogen budget approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Emilie R; van Kessel, Chris; Horwath, William R; Linquist, Bruce A

    2015-01-01

    Around the world, peatland degradation and soil subsidence is occurring where these soils have been converted to agriculture. Since initial drainage in the mid-1800s, continuous farming of such soils in the California Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (the Delta) has led to subsidence of up to 8 meters in places, primarily due to soil organic matter (SOM) oxidation and physical compaction. Rice (Oryza sativa) production has been proposed as an alternative cropping system to limit SOM oxidation. Preliminary research on these soils revealed high N uptake by rice in N fertilizer omission plots, which we hypothesized was the result of SOM oxidation releasing N. Testing this hypothesis, we developed a novel N budgeting approach to assess annual soil C and N loss based on plant N uptake and fallow season N mineralization. Through field experiments examining N dynamics during growing season and winter fallow periods, a complete annual N budget was developed. Soil C loss was calculated from SOM-N mineralization using the soil C:N ratio. Surface water and crop residue were negligible in the total N uptake budget (3 - 4 % combined). Shallow groundwater contributed 24 - 33 %, likely representing subsurface SOM-N mineralization. Assuming 6 and 25 kg N ha-1 from atmospheric deposition and biological N2 fixation, respectively, our results suggest 77 - 81 % of plant N uptake (129 - 149 kg N ha-1) was supplied by SOM mineralization. Considering a range of N uptake efficiency from 50 - 70 %, estimated net C loss ranged from 1149 - 2473 kg C ha-1. These findings suggest that rice systems, as currently managed, reduce the rate of C loss from organic delta soils relative to other agricultural practices.

  17. New insights into carbon allocation by trees from the hypothesis that annual wood production is maximized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Ross E; Dewar, Roderick C

    2013-09-01

    Allocation of carbon (C) between tree components (leaves, fine roots and woody structures) is an important determinant of terrestrial C sequestration. Yet, because the mechanisms underlying C allocation are poorly understood, it is a weak link in current earth-system models. We obtain new theoretical insights into C allocation from the hypothesis (MaxW) that annual wood production is maximized. MaxW is implemented using a model of tree C and nitrogen (N) balance with a vertically resolved canopy and root system for stands of Norway spruce (Picea abies). MaxW predicts optimal vertical profiles of leaf N and root biomass, optimal canopy leaf area index and rooting depth, and the associated optimal pattern of C allocation. Key insights include a predicted optimal C-N functional balance between leaves at the base of the canopy and the deepest roots, according to which the net C export from basal leaves is just sufficient to grow the basal roots required to meet their N requirement. MaxW links the traits of basal leaves and roots to whole-tree C and N uptake, and unifies two previous optimization hypotheses (maximum gross primary production, maximum N uptake) that have been applied independently to canopies and root systems. © 2013 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  18. Causes and consequences of complex population dynamics in an annual plant, Cardamine pensylvanica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crone, E.E.

    1995-11-08

    The relative importance of density-dependent and density-independent factors in determining the population dynamics of plants has been widely debated with little resolution. In this thesis, the author explores the effects of density-dependent population regulation on population dynamics in Cardamine pensylvanica, an annual plant. In the first chapter, she shows that experimental populations of C. pensylvanica cycled from high to low density in controlled constant-environment conditions. These cycles could not be explained by external environmental changes or simple models of direct density dependence (N{sub t+1} = f[N{sub t}]), but they could be explained by delayed density dependence (N{sub t+1} = f[N{sub t}, N{sub t+1}]). In the second chapter, she shows that the difference in the stability properties of population growth models with and without delayed density dependence is due to the presence of Hopf as well as slip bifurcations from stable to chaotic population dynamics. She also measures delayed density dependence due to effects of parental density on offspring quality in C. pensylvanica and shows that this is large enough to be the cause of the population dynamics observed in C. pensylvanica. In the third chapter, the author extends her analyses of density-dependent population growth models to include interactions between competing species. In the final chapter, she compares the effects of fixed spatial environmental variation and variation in population size on the evolutionary response of C. pensylvanica populations.

  19. Priming alters soil carbon dynamics during forest succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Na; Xu, Xingliang; Wang, Juan; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    The mechanisms underlying soil carbon (C) dynamics during forest succession remain challenged. We examined priming of soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition along a vegetation succession: grassland, young and old-growth forests. Soil C was primed much more strongly in young secondary forest than in grassland or old-growth forest. Priming resulted in large C losses (negative net C balance) in young-forest soil, whereas C stocks increased in grassland and old-growth forest. Microbial composition assessed by phospholipid fatty acids (PLFA) and utilization of easily available organics (13C-PLFA) indicate that fungi were responsible for priming in young-forest soils. Consequently, labile C inputs released by litter decomposition and root exudation determine microbial functional groups that decompose SOM during forest succession. These findings provide novel insights into connections between SOM dynamics and stabilization with microbial functioning during forest succession and show that priming is an important mechanism for contrasting soil C dynamics in young and old-growth forests.

  20. Endotoxemia reduces cerebral perfusion but enhances dynamic cerebrovascular autoregulation at reduced arterial carbon dioxide tension*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brassard, Patrice; Kim, Yu-Sok; van Lieshout, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE:: The administration of endotoxin to healthy humans reduces cerebral blood flow but its influence on dynamic cerebral autoregulation remains unknown. We considered that a reduction in arterial carbon dioxide tension would attenuate cerebral perfusion and improve dynamic cerebral autoreg...

  1. Human impacts on soil carbon dynamics of deep-rooted Amazonian forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepstad, Daniel C.; Stone, Thomas A.; Davidson, Eric A.

    1994-01-01

    Deforestation and logging degrade more forest in eastern and southern Amazonia than in any other region of the world. This forest alteration affects regional hydrology and the global carbon cycle, but our current understanding of these effects is limited by incomplete knowledge of tropical forest ecosystems. It is widely agreed that roots are concentrated near the soil surface in moist tropical forests, but this generalization incorrectly implies that deep roots are unimportant in water and C budgets. Our results indicate that half of the closed-canopy forests of Brazilian Amazonic occur where rainfall is highly seasonal, and these forests rely on deeply penetrating roots to extract soil water. Pasture vegetation extracts less water from deep soil than the forest it replaces, thus increasing rates of drainage and decreasing rates of evapotranspiration. Deep roots are also a source of modern carbon deep in the soil. The soils of the eastern Amazon contain more carbon below 1 m depth than is present in above-ground biomass. As much as 25 percent of this deep soil C could have annual to decadal turnover times and may be lost to the atmosphere following deforestation. We compared the importance of deep roots in a mature, evergreen forest with an adjacent man-made pasture, the most common type of vegetation on deforested land in Amazonia. The study site is near the town of Paragominas, in the Brazilian state of Para, with a seasonal rainfall pattern and deeply-weathered, kaolinitic soils that are typical for large portions of Amazonia. Root distribution, soil water extraction, and soil carbon dynamics were studied using deep auger holes and shafts in each ecosystem, and the phenology and water status of the leaf canopies were measured. We estimated the geographical distribution of deeply-rooting forests using satellite imagery, rainfall data, and field measurements.

  2. Inter-annual variation of carbon uptake by a plantation oak woodland in south-eastern England

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Wilkinson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The carbon balance of an 80-yr-old deciduous oak plantation in the temperate oceanic climate of the south-east of Great Britain was measured by eddy covariance over 12 yr (1999–2010. The mean annual net ecosystem productivity (NEP was 486 g C m−2 yr−1 (95% CI of ±73 g C m−2 yr−1, and this was partitioned into a gross primary productivity (GPP of 2034 ± 145 g C m−2 yr−1, over a 165 (±6 day growing season, and an annual loss of carbon through respiration and decomposition (ecosystem respiration, Reco of 1548 ± 122 g C m−2 yr−1. Although the maximum variation of NEP between years was large (333 g C m−2 yr−1, the ratio of Reco/GPP remained relatively constant (0.76 ± 0.02 CI. Some anomalies in the annual patterns of the carbon balance could be linked to particular weather events, such as low summer solar radiation and low soil moisture content (values below 30% by volume. The European-wide heat wave and drought of 2003 did not reduce the NEP of this woodland because of good water supply from the surface-water gley soil. The inter-annual variation in estimated intercepted radiation only accounted for ~ 47% of the variation in GPP, although a significant relationship (p < 0.001 was found between peak leaf area index and annual GPP, which modified the efficiency with which incident radiation was used in net CO2 uptake. Whilst the spring start and late autumn end of the net CO2 uptake period varied substantially (range of 24 and 27 days respectively, annual GPP was not related to growing season length. Severe outbreaks of defoliating moth caterpillars, mostly Tortrix viridana L. and Operophtera brumata L., caused considerable damage to the forest canopy in 2009 and 2010, resulting in reduced GPP in these two years. Inter-annual variation in

  3. Impacts of natural and human-induced disturbances on carbon dynamics in Northern Eurasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvidenko, A.; Shchepashchenko, D.

    2012-12-01

    Disturbance regimes (DR) of vegetation ecosystems of Northern Eurasia (NE, limited to Russian territories) are represented by complicated and interacting sets of natural and human-induced disturbances (D). We present a unified classification of D and DR in major land cover classes of Northern Eurasia (forests, agriculture, wetlands, shrubs & grasses), their connections to succession regularities, and minimal informative set of indicators, which are able to describe both specifics of individual types of D and their impacts on annual carbon budget. The assessment of extent, severity and consequences of D was done based on an Integrated Land Information System for Russia, which accumulated all relevant spatially distributed information including multi-sensor and multi-temporal remote sensing concept, in situ measurements and ground data from diverse inventories and surveys. Major emissions caused by D are produced by consumption of plant products (agriculture and forestry), wild fire, and biotic D (basically insect outbreaks). For example, the annual flux due to human consumption of plant products is estimated at 170 Tg C yr-1. Wild fire in 1998-2010 enveloped 106.9 x 106 ha-1, on average 8.23 x 106 ha-1 yr-1, with variation from 4.2 to 17.3 x 106 ha-1 yr-1. Average direct carbon emissions due to wildfire were estimated to be at 121.0 Tg C yr-1, including 84.6% as C-CO2, 8.2% C-CO, C-CH4 - 1.1%, C-NMHC - 1.2%, organic carbon - 1.2% and black carbon - 0.1%, particulate matter 3.5%, of which PM2.5 - 1.2%. About 2/3 of burnt area and carbon emissions were on forest land. While the area of fire on wetlands was only 7.3%, this land class delivered 15.2% of the total fire emissions. Emissions caused by biotic D (accounted for forests only) is estimated at 50.8 Tg C yr-1. Overall, direct emissions due to D amounted at about 350 Tg C yr-1, or ~7% of annual Net Primary Production of terrestrial ecosystems of Russia. These data do not include long-term consequences of D, which

  4. DRAINMOD-FOREST: Integrated Modeling of Hydrology, Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics, and Plant Growth for Drained Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Shiying; Youssef, Mohamed A; Skaggs, R Wayne; Amatya, Devendra M; Chescheir, G M

    2012-01-01

    We present a hybrid and stand-level forest ecosystem model, DRAINMOD-FOREST, for simulating the hydrology, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics, and tree growth for drained forest lands under common silvicultural practices. The model was developed by linking DRAINMOD, the hydrological model, and DRAINMOD-N II, the soil C and N dynamics model, to a forest growth model, which was adapted mainly from the 3-PG model. The forest growth model estimates net primary production, C allocation, and litterfall using physiology-based methods regulated by air temperature, water deficit, stand age, and soil N conditions. The performance of the newly developed DRAINMOD-FOREST model was evaluated using a long-term (21-yr) data set collected from an artificially drained loblolly pine ( L.) plantation in eastern North Carolina, USA. Results indicated that the DRAINMOD-FOREST accurately predicted annual, monthly, and daily drainage, as indicated by Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients of 0.93, 0.87, and 0.75, respectively. The model also predicted annual net primary productivity and dynamics of leaf area index reasonably well. Predicted temporal changes in the organic matter pool on the forest floor and in forest soil were reasonable compared to published literature. Both predicted annual and monthly nitrate export were in good agreement with field measurements, as indicated by Nash-Sutcliffe coefficients above 0.89 and 0.79 for annual and monthly predictions, respectively. This application of DRAINMOD-FOREST demonstrated its capability for predicting hydrology and C and N dynamics in drained forests under limited silvicultural practices. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  5. Soil carbon dynamics inferred from carbon isotope compositions of soil organic matter and soil respiration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koarashi, Jun; Asano, Tomohiro; Iida, Takao; Moriizumi, Jun

    2004-01-01

    To better understand 14 C cycling in terrestrial ecosystems, 14 C abundances were evaluated for fractionated soil organic matter (SOM) and soil respiration in an urban forest. In 2001 soil profile, Δ 14 C values of litter and bulk SOM increased rapidly from litter surface (62.7 per mille) to uppermost mineral soil layer (244.9 per mille), and then decreased sharply to 6 cm depth of mineral soil (125.0 per mille). Carbon enriched in 14 C by atmospheric nuclear weapons testing had penetrated to at least 16 cm depth of mineral soil. The average Δ 14 C in atmospheric CO 2 was 58.8 per mille in August 2001, suggesting recent carbon input to the topmost litter layer. Although a similar depth distribution was observed for Δ 14 C values of residual SOM after acid hydrolysis, the Δ 14 C values were slightly lower than those in bulk SOM. This indicates input of 'bomb' C into this organic fraction and higher 14 C abundance in acid-soluble SOM. The most of CO 2 may be derived from the microbial decomposition of the acid-soluble, or labile, SOM. Therefore, the labile SOM may become most influential pool for soil carbon cycling. In contrast, carbon in base-insoluble SOM remained considerably low in 14 C abundance at all depths, suggesting no or little incorporation of 'bomb' C to this fraction. Values of Δ 14 C in soil respiration ranged from 91.9 to 146.4 per mille in August 2001, showing a significant contribution from decomposition of SOM fixed over past 2-40 years. These results indicate that the use of bulk SOM as a representative of soil carbon pool would lead to severe misunderstand of the soil C dynamics on decadal and shorter time scales. (author)

  6. Extreme late-summer drought causes neutral annual carbon balance in southwestern ponderosa pine forests and grasslands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolb, Thomas; Dore, Sabina; Montes-Helu, Mario

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the impacts of extreme late-summer drought on carbon balance in a semi-arid forest region in Arizona. To understand drought impacts over extremes of forest cover, we measured net ecosystem production (NEP), gross primary production (GPP), and total ecosystem respiration (TER) with eddy covariance over five years (2006–10) at an undisturbed ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) forest and at a former forest converted to grassland by intense burning. Drought shifted annual NEP from a weak source of carbon to the atmosphere to a neutral carbon balance at the burned site and from a carbon sink to neutral at the undisturbed site. Carbon fluxes were particularly sensitive to drought in August. Drought shifted August NEP at the undisturbed site from sink to source because the reduction of GPP (70%) exceeded the reduction of TER (35%). At the burned site drought shifted August NEP from weak source to neutral because the reduction of TER (40%) exceeded the reduction of GPP (20%). These results show that the lack of forest recovery after burning and the exposure of undisturbed forests to late-summer drought reduce carbon sink strength and illustrate the high vulnerability of forest carbon sink strength in the southwest US to predicted increases in intense burning and precipitation variability. (letter)

  7. Assessing NEE and Carbon Dynamics Among European Forestecosystems: Development and Validation of a New Phenology and Soil Carbon Routines within the Process Oriented 3D-Cmcc-Forest-Ecosystem Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, S.; Collalti, A.; Santini, M.; Valentini, R.

    2014-12-01

    The two main processes involved in forest ecosystems carbon balance are photosynthesis and respiration. Ecosystem respiration is determined by heterotrophic and autotrophic respiration, the former driven by microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM), the latter by growth and maintenance of plant tissues. Thus it is extremely important to reliably quantify ecosystem respiration in order to estimate the global carbon budget of a forest ecosystem, namely the Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE). For the very same reason we have improved the 6.1 version of the 3D-CMCC-Forest Ecosystem Model (3D-CMCC-FEM) with both a multilayer soil Carbon dynamics routine and several modifications in phenology and littering. Bud burst phenology has been improved with a new "Nonstructural Carbon injection function" representing the quantity of Carbon destined to new leaves and fineroots growth; fall phenology has been improved with a novel physical driven logistic function to simulate leaf falling. Soil carbon dynamics throughout the Residues, Microbial and Humads pools follow a zero order kinetics equation, representing microbial decomposition activity. The sum of CO2 oxidized at each decomposition step form Heterotrophic respiration.The present work focuses on the presentation of the 6.1 version of the 3D-CMCC-FEM and its validation against six FLUXNET sites representing a transect throughout the main European forest Ecosystems. The validation on about 10 years of simulation involved NEE, GPP and Reco: - Seasonal trends; - Daily, monthly and annual fluxes; - Interannual anomalies (annual and MJJ).

  8. Thermal Transport in Carbon Nanotubes using Molecular Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Andrew; Khatun, Mahfuza

    2011-10-01

    We will present results of thermal transport phenomena in Carbon Nanotube (CNT) structures. CNTs have many interesting physical properties, and have the potential for device applications. Specifically, CNTs are robust materials with high thermal conductance and excellent electrical conduction properties. A review of electrical and thermal conduction of the structures will be discussed. The research requires analytical analysis as well as simulation. The major thrust of this study is the usage of the molecular dynamics (MD) simulator, LAMMPS (Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator). A significant investigation using the LAMMPS code is conducted on the existing Beowulf Computing Cluster at BSU. NanoHUB, an open online resource to the entire nanotechnology community developed by the researchers of Purdue University, is used for further supplementary resources. Results will include the time-dependence of temperature, kinetic energy, potential energy, heat flux correlation, and heat conduction.

  9. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernest, J.B. [Fluor Daniel, Inc., Irvine, CA (United States); Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K. [Fuel Cell Engineering, Danbury, CT (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  10. Dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes and dissolved carbon in a subtropical coastal lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza eSchmitz Fontes

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available To understand the dynamics of planktonic prokaryotes in a subtropical lake and its relationship with carbon, we conducted water sampling through four 48 h periods in Peri Lake for one year. Planktonic prokaryotes were characterized by the abundance and biomass of heterotrophic bacteria and of cyanobacteria (coccoid and filamentous cells. During all experiments, we measured wind speed, water temperature (WT, pH, dissolved oxygen (DO, precipitation, dissolved organic carbon (DOC, dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC, and carbon dioxide (CO2. DOC was higher in the summer experiment (average = 465 μM - WT = 27°C and lower in the winter experiment (average = 235 μM – WT = 17°C, with no significant variability throughout the daily cycles. CO2 concentrations presented a different pattern, with a minimum in the warm waters of the summer period (8.31 μM and a maximum in the spring (37.13 μM. Daily trends were observed for pH, DO, WT, and CO2. At an annual scale, both biological and physical-chemical controls were important regulators of CO2. Heterotrophic bacteria abundance and biomass were higher in the winter experiment (5.60 x 109 cells L-1 and 20.83 μmol C L-1 and lower in the summer (1.87 x 109 cells L-1 and 3.95 μmol C L-1. Filamentous cyanobacteria (0.23 x 108 – 0.68 x 108 filaments L-1 produced up to 167.16 μmol C L-1 as biomass (during the warmer period, whereas coccoid cyanobacteria contributed only 0.38 μmol C L-1. Precipitation, temperature, and the biomass of heterotrophic bacteria were the main regulators of CO2 concentrations. Temperature had a negative effect on the concentration of CO2, which may be indirectly attributed to high heterotroph activity in the autumn and winter periods. DOC was positively correlated with the abundance of total cyanobacteria and negatively with heterotrophic bacteria. Thus, planktonic prokaryotes have played an important role in the dynamics of both dissolved inorganic and organic carbon in the lake.

  11.  Marine derived dinoflagellates in Antarctic saline lakes: Community composition and annual dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rengefors, K.; Layborn-Parry, L.; Logares, R.

    2008-01-01

    leaving a small number of well-adapted species. Our objective was to investigate the species composition and annual dynamics of dinoflagellate communities in three saline Antarctic lakes. We observed that dinoflagellates occur year-round despite extremely low PAR during the southern winter, which suggests...... polar dinoflagellate community, and not freshwater species. Polarella glacialis Montresor, Procaccini et Stoecker, a bipolar marine species, was for the first time described in a lake habitat and was an important phototrophic component in the higher salinity lakes. In the brackish lakes, we found a new......The saline lakes of the Vestfold Hills in Antarctica offer a remarkable natural laboratory where the adaptation of planktonic protists to a range of evolving physiochemical conditions can be investigated. This study illustrates how an ancestral marine community has undergone radical simplification...

  12. Thirteenth annual conference of the Computation Fluid Dynamics Society of Canada (CFD 2005). Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The Thirteenth Annual Conference of the Computational Fluid Dynamics Society of Canada, CFD 2005, was held in St. John's, Newfoundland from July 31 to August 3, 2005. The conference covers a variety of disciplines, including hydrodynamics, aerodynamics/aero-acoustics/aero-elasticity, combustion and heat transfer, hydrology, automotive, nuclear and other industrial application areas. Flows considered include non-Newtonian and multiphase flows, subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic flows, cavitating flows, free-surface flows, jet flows, vortex flows, detonation flows, plasma arc flows and porous media flows. A major theme of these flows is turbulence, and there are many papers that consider Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES), although Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes methods remain popular. There is a strong interest in high performance computing (HPC) because of the increased throughput it affords. Flow visualization and post processing is also highlighted in many papers

  13. The effects of permafrost thaw on soil hydrologic, thermal, and carbon dynamics in an Alaskan peatland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan A. O' Donnell; M.Torre Jorgenson; Jennifer W. Harden; A.David McGuire; Mikhail Z. Kanevskiy; Kimberly P. Wickland

    2012-01-01

    Recent warming at high-latitudes has accelerated permafrost thaw in northern peatlands, and thaw can have profound effects on local hydrology and ecosystem carbon balance. To assess the impact of permafrost thaw on soil organic carbon (OC) dynamics, we measured soil hydrologic and thermal dynamics and soil OC stocks across a collapse-scar bog chronosequence in interior...

  14. Ganglion dynamics and its implications to geologic carbon dioxide storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E; Jove-Colon, Carlos

    2013-01-02

    Capillary trapping of a nonwetting fluid phase in the subsurface has been considered as an important mechanism for geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO(2)). This mechanism can potentially relax stringent requirements for the integrity of cap rocks for CO(2) storage and therefore can significantly enhance storage capacity and security. We here apply ganglion dynamics to understand the capillary trapping of supercritical CO(2) (scCO(2)) under relevant reservoir conditions. We show that, by breaking the injected scCO(2) into small disconnected ganglia, the efficiency of capillary trapping can be greatly enhanced, because the mobility of a ganglion is inversely dependent on its size. Supercritical CO(2) ganglia can be engineered by promoting CO(2)-water interface instability during immiscible displacement, and their size distribution can be controlled by injection mode (e.g., water-alternating-gas) and rate. We also show that a large mobile ganglion can potentially break into smaller ganglia due to CO(2)-brine interface instability during buoyant rise, thus becoming less mobile. The mobility of scCO(2) in the subsurface is therefore self-limited. Vertical structural heterogeneity within a reservoir can inhibit the buoyant rise of scCO(2) ganglia. The dynamics of scCO(2) ganglia described here provides a new perspective for the security and monitoring of subsurface CO(2) storage.

  15. Plant compensation to grazing and soil carbon dynamics in a tropical grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchie, Mark E

    2014-01-01

    The effects of grazing on soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics, particularly in the tropics, are still poorly understood. Plant compensation to grazing, whereby plants maintain leaf area (C input capacity) despite consumption (C removal) by grazers, has been demonstrated in tropical grasslands but its influence on SOC is largely unexplored. Here, the effect of grazing on plant leaf area index (LAI) was measured in a field experiment in Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. LAI changed little for grazing intensities up to 70%. The response curve of LAI versus grazing intensity was used in a mass balance model, called SNAP, of SOC dynamics based on previous data from the Serengeti. The model predicted SOC to increase at intermediate grazing intensity, but then to decline rapidly at the highest grazing intensities. The SNAP model predictions were compared with observed SOC stocks in the 24 grazed plots of a 10-year grazing exclosure experiment at eight sites across the park that varied in mean annual rainfall, soil texture, grazing intensity and plant lignin and cellulose. The model predicted current SOC stocks very well (R (2) > 0.75), and suggests that compensatory plant responses to grazing are an important means of how herbivores might maintain or increase SOC in tropical grasslands.

  16. BOREAS RSS-08 BIOME-BGC SSA Simulations of Annual Water and Carbon Fluxes

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Derived maps of landcover type and crown and stem biomass as model inputs to determine annual evapotranspiration, gross primary production, autotrophic respiration...

  17. Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of growth, non-structural carbohydrates and C stable isotopes in a Mediterranean beech forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scartazza, Andrea; Moscatello, Stefano; Matteucci, Giorgio; Battistelli, Alberto; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2013-07-01

    Seasonal and inter-annual dynamics of growth, non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) and carbon isotope composition (δ(13)C) of NSC were studied in a beech forest of Central Italy over a 2-year period characterized by different environmental conditions. The net C assimilated by forest trees was mainly used to sustain growth early in the season and to accumulate storage carbohydrates in trunk and root wood in the later part of the season, before leaf shedding. Growth and NSC concentration dynamics were only slightly affected by the reduced soil water content (SWC) during the drier year. Conversely, the carbon isotope analysis on NSC revealed seasonal and inter-annual variations of photosynthetic and post-carboxylation fractionation processes, with a significant increase in δ(13)C of wood and leaf soluble sugars in the drier summer year than in the wetter one. The highly significant correlation between δ(13)C of leaf soluble sugars and SWC suggests a decrease of the canopy C isotope discrimination and, hence, an increased water-use efficiency with decreasing soil water availability. This may be a relevant trait for maintaining an acceptable plant water status and a relatively high C sink capacity during dry seasonal periods. Our results suggest a short- to medium-term homeostatic response of the Collelongo beech stand to variations in water availability and solar radiation, indicating that this Mediterranean forest was able to adjust carbon-water balance in order to prevent C depletion and to sustain plant growth and reserve accumulation during relatively dry seasons.

  18. Carbon Transformations and Source - Sink Dynamics along a River, Marsh, Estuary, Ocean Continuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, I. C.; Crosswell, J.; Czapla, K.; Van Dam, B.

    2017-12-01

    Estuaries, the transition zone between land and the coastal ocean, are highly dynamic systems in which carbon sourced from watersheds, marshes, atmosphere, and ocean may be transformed, sequestered, or exported. The net fate of carbon in estuaries, governed by the interactions of biotic and physical drivers varying on spatial and temporal scales, is currently uncertain because of limited observational data. In this study, conducted in a temperate, microtidal, and shallow North Carolina USA estuary, carbon exchanges via river, tributary, and fringing salt marsh, air-water fluxes, sediment C accumulation, and metabolism were monitored over two-years, with sharply different amounts of rainfall. Air-water CO2 fluxes and metabolic variables were simultaneously measured in channel and shoal by conducting high-resolution surveys at dawn, dusk and the following dawn. Marsh CO2 exchanges, sediment C inputs, and lateral exports of DIC and DOC were also measured. Carbon flows between estuary regions and export to the coastal ocean were calculated by quantifying residual transport of DIC and TOC down-estuary as flows were modified by sources, sinks and internal transformations. Variation in metabolic rates, CO2, TOC and DIC exchanges were large when determined for short time and limited spatial scales. However, when scaled to annual and whole estuarine scales, variation tended to decrease because of counteracting metabolic rates and fluxes between channel and shoal or between seasons. Although overall salt marshes accumulated OC, they were a negligible source of DIC and DOC to the estuary, and net inputs of C to the marsh were mainly derived from sediment OC. These results, as observed in other observational studies of estuaries, show that riverine input, light, temperature and metabolism are major controls on carbon cycling. Comparison of our results with other types of estuaries varying in depth, latitude, and nutrification demonstrates large discrepancies underscoring the

  19. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO2) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO2 will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO2 and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO2-H2O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO2. The basic problem of CO2 injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO2 injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO2 injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO2. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO2 into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO2) the viscosity of carbon

  20. The topology of non-linear global carbon dynamics: from tipping points to planetary boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderies, J M; Carpenter, S R; Steffen, Will; Rockström, Johan

    2013-01-01

    We present a minimal model of land use and carbon cycle dynamics and use it to explore the relationship between non-linear dynamics and planetary boundaries. Only the most basic interactions between land cover and terrestrial, atmospheric, and marine carbon stocks are considered in the model. Our goal is not to predict global carbon dynamics as it occurs in the actual Earth System. Rather, we construct a conceptually reasonable heuristic model of a feedback system between different carbon stocks that captures the qualitative features of the actual Earth System and use it to explore the topology of the boundaries of what can be called a ‘safe operating space’ for humans. The model analysis illustrates the existence of dynamic, non-linear tipping points in carbon cycle dynamics and the potential complexity of planetary boundaries. Finally, we use the model to illustrate some challenges associated with navigating planetary boundaries. (letter)

  1. Carbon dioxide and methane dynamics in a human-dominated lowland coastal river network (Shanghai, China)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhongjie; Wang, Dongqi; Li, Yangjie; Deng, Huanguang; Hu, Beibei; Ye, Mingwu; Zhou, Xuhui; Da, Liangjun; Chen, Zhenlou; Xu, Shiyuan

    2017-07-01

    Evasion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) in streams and rivers play a critical role in global carbon (C) cycle, offsetting the C uptake by terrestrial ecosystems. However, little is known about CO2 and CH4 dynamics in lowland coastal rivers profoundly modified by anthropogenic perturbations. Here we report results from a long-term, large-scale study of CO2 and CH4 partial pressures (pCO2 and pCH4) and evasion rates in the Shanghai river network. The spatiotemporal variabilities of pCO2 and pCH4 were examined along a land use gradient, and the annual CO2 and CH4 evasion were estimated to assess its role in regional C budget. During the study period (August 2009 to October 2011), the overall mean pCO2 and median pCH4 from 87 surveyed rivers were 5846 ± 2773 μatm and 241 μatm, respectively. Internal metabolic CO2 production and dissolved inorganic carbon input via upstream runoff were the major sources sustaining the widespread CO2 supersaturation, coupling pCO2 to biogeochemical and hydrological controls, respectively. While CH4 was oversaturated throughout the river network, CH4 hot spots were concentrated in the small urban rivers and highly discharge-dependent. The Shanghai river network played a disproportionately important role in regional C budget, offsetting up to 40% of the regional terrestrial net ecosystem production and 10% of net C uptake in the river-dominated East China Sea fueled by anthropogenic nutrient input. Given the rapid urbanization in global coastal areas, more research is needed to quantify the role of lowland coastal rivers as a major landscape C source in global C budget.

  2. Nexus Thinking on Soil Carbon Dynamics and Soil Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, R.

    2016-12-01

    Anthropocene is driven by global population of 7.5 billion in 2016, increasing annually by 80 million and projected to be 9.7 billion by 2050. The ecological impact (I=PAT, where P is population, A is affluence, and T is technology) of the population is similar to that of a geological force. Thus, humanity's impact is driven by demands for food, water, energy, and services derived from soil. Soil health, its capacity to function as a vital living system, is determined by quantity and quality of soil organic carbon (SOC) in the root zone ( 50cm). Maintenance of SOC at above the threshold level (1.5 to 2.0% by weight in the root zone) is critical to performing numerous ecosystem services for human wellbeing and nature conservancy. These services and functions strongly depend on nexus or inter-connectivity of biological processes within the pedosphere. The nexus is strongly governed by coupled biogeochemical cycling of water (H2O), carbon (C), nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and sulfur (S). Further, it is the nexus between pedological and biological processes that renews and purifies water by denaturing and filtering pollutants; circulates C among biotic and abiotic pools in close association with other elements (N, P, S); provides habitat and energy source for soil biota (macro, meso, and micro flora and fauna), facilitates exchanges of gases between soil and the atmosphere and moderates climate, and creates favorable rhizospheric processes that promote plant growth and enhance net primary productivity. Soil health, governed by SOC quality and quantity, determines the provisioning of numerous ecosystem services and the importance of nexus thinking is highlighted by the truism that "health of soil, plants, animals, human and ecosystem is one and indivisible." The sequestration of SOC depends on land use and soil management strategies which create a positive C budget. Thus, input of biomass-C into the soil must exceed the losses by erosion, mineralization and leaching

  3. Quantifying terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed, Upper Yangtze, China from 1975 to 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Yin, Runsheng; Li, Zhengpeng; Deng, Yulin; Tan, Kun; Deng, Xiangzheng; Rothstein, David; Qi, Jiaguo

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the spatial and temporal dynamics of carbon stocks in terrestrial ecosystems and carbon fluxes between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is critical to our understanding of regional patterns of carbon budgets. Here we use the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System to simulate the terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics in the Jinsha watershed of China’s upper Yangtze basin from 1975 to 2000, based on unique combinations of spatial and temporal dynamics of major driving forces, such as climate, soil properties, nitrogen deposition, and land use and land cover changes. Our analysis demonstrates that the Jinsha watershed ecosystems acted as a carbon sink during the period of 1975–2000, with an average rate of 0.36 Mg/ha/yr, primarily resulting from regional climate variation and local land use and land cover change. Vegetation biomass accumulation accounted for 90.6% of the sink, while soil organic carbon loss before 1992 led to a lower net gain of carbon in the watershed, and after that soils became a small sink. Ecosystem carbon sink/source patterns showed a high degree of spatial heterogeneity. Carbon sinks were associated with forest areas without disturbances, whereas carbon sources were primarily caused by stand-replacing disturbances. It is critical to adequately represent the detailed fast-changing dynamics of land use activities in regional biogeochemical models to determine the spatial and temporal evolution of regional carbon sink/source patterns.

  4. Predicting Reactive Transport Dynamics in Carbonates using Initial Pore Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, H. P.; Nunes, J. P. P.; Blunt, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding rock-fluid interaction at the pore-scale is imperative for accurate predictive modelling of carbon storage permanence. However, coupled reactive transport models are computationally expensive, requiring either a sacrifice of resolution or high performance computing to solve relatively simple geometries. Many recent studies indicate that initial pore structure many be the dominant mechanism in determining the dissolution regime. Here we investigate how well the initial pore structure is predictive of distribution and amount of dissolution during reactive flow using particle tracking on the initial image. Two samples of carbonate rock with varying initial pore space heterogeneity were reacted with reservoir condition CO2-saturated brine and scanned dynamically during reactive flow at a 4-μm resolution between 4 and 40 times using 4D X-ray micro-tomography over the course of 1.5 hours using μ-CT. Flow was modelled on the initial binarized image using a Navier-Stokes solver. Particle tracking was then run on the velocity fields, the streamlines were traced, and the streamline density was calculated both on a voxel-by-voxel and a channel-by-channel basis. The density of streamlines was then compared to the amount of dissolution in subsequent time steps during reaction. It was found that for the flow and transport regimes studied, the streamline density distribution in the initial image accurately predicted the dominant pathways of dissolution and gave good indicators of the type of dissolution regime that would later develop. This work suggests that the eventual reaction-induced changes in pore structure are deterministic rather than stochastic and can be predicted with high resolution imaging of unreacted rock.

  5. Introducing litter quality to the ecosystem model LPJ-GUESS: Effects on short- and long-term soil carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portner, Hanspeter; Wolf, Annett; Rühr, Nadine; Bugmann, Harald

    2010-05-01

    and 2007 [Rühr(2009)] and present soil carbon stocks [Heim et al.(2009)]. Our Results show, that for short-term soil carbon dynamics, e.g. estimates of heterotrophic soil respiration on an annual basis, the inclusion of the dependency on litter quality is not necessary, as the differences are minor only. However, when considering long-term soil carbon dynamics, e.g. simulated estimates of present soil carbon content, the dependency on litter quality shows effect, as there are correlations with specific site factors such as site location and forest type. The inclusion of the dependence on litter quality therefore may be of importance for the projection of future soil carbon dynamics, as forest types may well be altered due to climatic change. References [Heim et al.(2009)] A. Heim, L. Wehrli, W. Eugster, and M.W.I. Schmidt. Effects of sampling design on the probability to detect soil carbon stock changes at the swiss CarboEurope site Lägeren. Geoderma, 149(3-4):347-354, 2009. [Rühr(2009)] Nadine Katrin Rühr. Soil respiration in a mixed mountain forest : environmental drivers and partitioning of component fluxes. PhD thesis, ETH, 2009. [Smith et al.(2001)] Benjamin Smith, I. Colin Prentice, and Martin T. Sykes. Representation of vegetation dynamics in the modelling of terrestrial ecosystems: comparing two contrasting approaches within european climate space. Global Ecology and Biogeography, 10(6):621-637, 2001. [Tuomi et al.(2008)] Mikko Tuomi, Pekka Vanhala, Kristiina Karhu, Hannu Fritze, and Jari Liski. Heterotrophic soil respiration-Comparison of different models describing its temperature dependence. Ecological Modelling, 211(1-2): 182-190, 2008.

  6. Historical and projected trends in landscape drivers affecting carbon dynamics in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastick, Neal J.; Duffy, Paul A.; Genet, Hélène; Rupp, T. Scott; Wylie, Bruce K.; Johnson, Kristofer; Jorgenson, M. Torre; Bliss, Norman B.; McGuire, Anthony David; Jafarov, Elchin; Knight, Joseph F.

    2017-01-01

    Modern climate change in Alaska has resulted in widespread thawing of permafrost, increased fire activity, and extensive changes in vegetation characteristics that have significant consequences for socioecological systems. Despite observations of the heightened sensitivity of these systems to change, there has not been a comprehensive assessment of factors that drive ecosystem changes throughout Alaska. Here we present research that improves our understanding of the main drivers of the spatiotemporal patterns of carbon dynamics using in situ observations, remote sensing data, and an array of modeling techniques. In the last 60 yr, Alaska has seen a large increase in mean annual air temperature (1.7°C), with the greatest warming occurring over winter and spring. Warming trends are projected to continue throughout the 21st century and will likely result in landscape-level changes to ecosystem structure and function. Wetlands, mainly bogs and fens, which are currently estimated to cover 12.5% of the landscape, strongly influence exchange of methane between Alaska's ecosystems and the atmosphere and are expected to be affected by thawing permafrost and shifts in hydrology. Simulations suggest the current proportion of near-surface (within 1 m) and deep (within 5 m) permafrost extent will be reduced by 9–74% and 33–55% by the end of the 21st century, respectively. Since 2000, an average of 678 595 ha/yr was burned, more than twice the annual average during 1950–1999. The largest increase in fire activity is projected for the boreal forest, which could result in a reduction in late-successional spruce forest (8–44%) and an increase in early-successional deciduous forest (25–113%) that would mediate future fire activity and weaken permafrost stability in the region. Climate warming will also affect vegetation communities across arctic regions, where the coverage of deciduous forest could increase (223–620%), shrub tundra may increase (4–21%), and

  7. Long term estimation of carbon dynamic and sequestration for Iranian agro-ecosystem: II- Sequestration and emission of carbon for common agricultural crops using ICBM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M nasiri mahalati

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Carbon sequestration is one of the most important approaches to reduce CO2 concentration in the atmosphere. Increase of CO2 in the atmosphere has prompted renewed interest in increasing the stocks of carbon (C in the world’s croplands to mitigate climate change and also improve soil quality IPCC (2000. To better characterize, predict and manage soil C dynamics, more precise and accurate estimates of C inputs to the soil is required. The C fixed in plants by photosynthesis and added to the soil as above- and below-ground litter, is the primary source of C in ecosystems (Warembourg & Paul, 1977. Predicting the changes in C stocks (notably in soils, therefore, depends on reliable estimates of net primary productivity (NPP and the proportion of the NPP returned to the soil (Paustian et al., 1997. The annual NPP in agroecosystems, and the distribution of C in plant parts, is usually calculated from agricultural yield, the plant component most often measured. For carbon sequestration estimation, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of management practices on soil organic carbon (SOC dynamics in a wide range of production systems and climatic zones. Soil organic carbon is essential for maintaining fertility, water retention, and plant production in terrestrial ecosystems. The amount of SOC stored within an ecosystem, dependes on the quantity and quality of organic matter returned to the soil matrix, the soils ability to retain organic carbon (a function of texture and cation exchange capacity, and biotic influences of both temperature and precipitation. The abiotic influences on SOC dynamics, such as moisture, temperature, aeration and the composition of plant residues are reasonably well understood. The objective of this study was to evaluate the amount of carbon sequestration by agor-ecosystems and also the amount of CO2 emitted from agro-ecosystems in Iran. Material and methods The amount of carbon input for seven main crops

  8. Forest carbon in North America: annual storage and emissions from British Columbia’s harvest, 1965–2065

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dymond Caren C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The default international accounting rules estimate the carbon emissions from forest products by assuming all harvest is immediately emitted to the atmosphere. This makes it difficult to assess the greenhouse gas (GHG consequences of different forest management or manufacturing activities that maintain the storage of carbon. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC addresses this issue by allowing other accounting methods. The objective of this paper is to provide a new model for estimating annual stock changes of carbon in harvested wood products (HWP. Results The model, British Columbia Harvested Wood Products version 1 (BC-HWPv1, estimates carbon stocks and fluxes for wood harvested in BC from 1965 to 2065, based on new parameters on local manufacturing, updated and new information for North America on consumption and disposal of wood and paper products, and updated parameters on methane management at landfills in the USA. Based on model results, reporting on emissions as they occur would substantially lower BC’s greenhouse gas inventory in 2010 from 48 Mt CO2 to 26 Mt CO2 because of the long-term forest carbon storage in-use and in the non-degradable material in landfills. In addition, if offset projects created under BC’s protocol reported 100 year cumulative emissions using the BC-HWPv1 the emissions would be lower by about 11%. Conclusions This research showed that the IPCC default methods overestimate the emissions North America wood products. Future IPCC GHG accounting methods could include a lower emissions factor (e.g. 0.52 multiplied by the annual harvest, rather than the current multiplier of 1.0. The simulations demonstrated that the primary opportunities for climate change mitigation are in shifting from burning mill waste to using the wood for longer-lived products.

  9. Stable carbon isotope depth profiles and soil organic carbon dynamics in the lower Mississippi Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, J.G.; Harden, J.W.; Fries, T.L.

    2006-01-01

    Analysis of depth trends of 13C abundance in soil organic matter and of 13C abundance from soil-respired CO2 provides useful indications of the dynamics of the terrestrial carbon cycle and of paleoecological change. We measured depth trends of 13C abundance from cropland and control pairs of soils in the lower Mississippi Basin, as well as the 13C abundance of soil-respired CO2 produced during approximately 1-year soil incubation, to determine the role of several candidate processes on the 13C depth profile of soil organic matter. Depth profiles of 13C from uncultivated control soils show a strong relationship between the natural logarithm of soil organic carbon concentration and its isotopic composition, consistent with a model Rayleigh distillation of 13C in decomposing soil due to kinetic fractionation during decomposition. Laboratory incubations showed that initially respired CO 2 had a relatively constant 13C content, despite large differences in the 13C content of bulk soil organic matter. Initially respired CO2 was consistently 13C-depleted with respect to bulk soil and became increasingly 13C-depleted during 1-year, consistent with the hypothesis of accumulation of 13C in the products of microbial decomposition, but showing increasing decomposition of 13C-depleted stable organic components during decomposition without input of fresh biomass. We use the difference between 13C / 12C ratios (calculated as ??-values) between respired CO 2 and bulk soil organic carbon as an index of the degree of decomposition of soil, showing trends which are consistent with trends of 14C activity, and with results of a two-pooled kinetic decomposition rate model describing CO2 production data recorded during 1 year of incubation. We also observed inconsistencies with the Rayleigh distillation model in paired cropland soils and reasons for these inconsistencies are discussed. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Evaluation of atmospheric aerosol and tropospheric ozone effects on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Min

    period of 2003-2010. Ecosystem heterotrophic respiration (RH) was negatively affected by the aerosol loading. These results support previous conclusions of the advantage of aerosol light scattering effect on plant productions in other studies but suggest there is strong spatial variation. This study finds indirect aerosol effects on terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics through affecting plant phenology, thermal and hydrological environments. All these evidences suggested that the aerosol direct radiative effect on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon dynamics should be considered to better understand the global carbon cycle and climate change. An ozone sub-model is developed in this dissertation and fully coupled with iTem. The coupled model, named iTemO3 considers the processes of ozone stomatal deposition, plant defense to ozone influx, ozone damage and plant repairing mechanism. By using a global atmospheric chemical transport model (GACTM) estimated ground-level ozone concentration data, the model estimated global annual stomatal ozone deposition is 234.0 Tg O3 yr-1 and indicates which regions have high ozone damage risk. Different plant functional types, sunlit and shaded leaves are shown to have different responses to ozone. The model predictions suggest that ozone has caused considerable change on global terrestrial ecosystem carbon storage and carbon exchanges over the study period 2004-2008. The study suggests that uncertainty of the key parameters in iTemO3 could result in large errors in model predictions. Thus more experimental data for better model parameterization is highly needed.

  11. Organic carbon dynamics in mangrove ecosystems: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kristensen, E.; Bouillon, S.; Dittmar, T.; Marchand, C.

    2008-01-01

    Our current knowledge on production, composition, transport, pathways and transformations of organic carbon in tropical mangrove environments is reviewed and discussed. Organic carbon entering mangrove foodwebs is either produced autochthonously or imported by tides and/or rivers. Mangrove litter

  12. Soil Organic Carbon dynamics in agricultural soils of Veneto Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bampa, F. B.; Morari, F. M.; Hiederer, R. H.; Toth, G. T.; Giandon, P. G.; Vinci, I. V.; Montanarella, L. M.; Nocita, M.

    2012-04-01

    One of the eight soil threats expressed in the European Commission's Thematic Strategy for Soil Protection (COM (2006)231 final) it's the decline in Soil Organic Matter (SOM). His preservation is recognized as with the objective to ensure that the soils of Europe remain healthy and capable of supporting human activities and ecosystems. One of the key goals of the strategy is to maintain and improve Soil Organic Carbon (SOC) levels. As climate change is identified as a common element in many of the soil threats, the European Commission (EC) intends to assess the actual contribution of the soil protection to climate change mitigation and the effects of climate change on the possible depletion of SOM. A substantial proportion of European land is occupied by agriculture, and consequently plays a crucial role in maintaining natural resources. Organic carbon preservation and sequestration in the EU's agricultural soils could have some potential to mitigate the effects of climate change, particularly linked to preventing certain land use changes and maintaining SOC stocks. The objective of this study is to assess the SOC dynamics in agricultural soils (cropland and grassland) at regional scale, focusing on changes due to land use. A sub-objective would be the evaluation of the most used land management practices and their effect on SOC content. This assessment aims to determine the geographical distribution of the potential GHG mitigation options, focusing on hot spots in the EU, where mitigation actions would be particularly efficient and is linked with the on-going work in the JRC SOIL Action. The pilot area is Veneto Region. The data available are coming from different sources, timing and involve different variables as: soil texture, climate, soil disturbance, managements and nutrients. The first source of data is the LUCAS project (Land Use/Land Cover Area Frame statistical Survey). Started in 2001, the LUCAS project aims to monitor changes in land cover/use and

  13. Annual dynamics of North Sea bacterioplankton: seasonal variability superimposes short-term variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Judith; Wichels, Antje; Teeling, Hanno; Chafee, Meghan; Scharfe, Mirco; Gerdts, Gunnar

    2015-09-01

    The dynamics of coastal marine microbial communities are driven by seasonally changing abiotic and biotic factors as well as by rapidly occurring short-term changes such as river fresh water influxes or phytoplankton blooms. We examined the variability of the free-living bacterioplankton at Helgoland Roads (German Bight, North Sea) over a period of one year with high temporal and taxonomic resolution to reveal variation patterns and main influencing factors. 16S rRNA gene tag sequencing of the bacterioplankton community hints at annual recurrence and resilience of few main taxa belonging to Alphaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria, Flavobacteriia, Acidimicrobiia and Thermoplasmata. Multiple regression analyses with various environmental factors revealed changes in water current patterns and resulting phytoplankton blooms as the main driving factors for short-term variation and temperature as the overlying factor for seasonal variation. Comparison of bacterioplankton successions during spring and summer phytoplankton blooms revealed the same dominating Flavobacteriia operational taxonomic units (OTUs) but shifts in Roseobacter related OTUs (Alphaproteobacteria) and SAR92 clade members (Gammaproteobacteria). Network analysis suggests that during spring and summer phytoplankton blooms temperature-dependent guilds are formed. In conclusion, our data imply that short-term bacterioplankton successions in response to phytoplankton blooms are indirectly affected by temperature, which is a major niche-defining factor in the German Bight. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Annual Irrigation Dynamics in the U.S. Northern High Plains Derived from Landsat Satellite Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deines, Jillian M.; Kendall, Anthony D.; Hyndman, David W.

    2017-09-01

    Sustainable management of agricultural water resources requires improved understanding of irrigation patterns in space and time. We produced annual, high-resolution (30 m) irrigation maps for 1999-2016 by combining all available Landsat satellite imagery with climate and soil covariables in Google Earth Engine. Random forest classification had accuracies from 92 to 100% and generally agreed with county statistics (r2 = 0.88-0.96). Two novel indices that integrate plant greenness and moisture information show promise for improving satellite classification of irrigation. We found considerable interannual variability in irrigation location and extent, including a near doubling between 2002 and 2016. Statistical modeling suggested that precipitation and commodity price influenced irrigated extent through time. High prices incentivized expansion to increase crop yield and profit, but dry years required greater irrigation intensity, thus reducing area in this supply-limited region. Data sets produced with this approach can improve water sustainability by providing consistent, spatially explicit tracking of irrigation dynamics over time.

  15. Dynamic viscosities of the ternary liquid mixtures (dimethyl carbonate + methanol + ethanol) and (dimethyl carbonate + methanol + hexane) at several temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, A. [Chemical Engineering Department, Vigo University, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Pereiro, A.B. [Chemical Engineering Department, Vigo University, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Canosa, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Vigo University, 36310 Vigo (Spain); Tojo, J. [Chemical Engineering Department, Vigo University, 36310 Vigo (Spain)]. E-mail: jtojo@uvigo.es

    2006-05-15

    Densities, {rho} speeds of sound, u and dynamic viscosities, {eta} of the ternary mixtures {l_brace}dimethyl carbonate (DMC) + methanol + ethanol{r_brace} and (dimethyl carbonate + methanol + hexane) were gathered at T = (293.15, 298.15, 308.15, and 313.15) K. From experimental data viscosity deviations, {delta}{eta} of the ternary mixtures were evaluated. These results have been correlated using the Cibulka equation. The fitting parameters and the standard deviations of the ternary viscosity deviations are given. UNIFAC-VISCO group contribution method was used to predict the dynamic viscosities of the ternary mixtures at several temperatures.

  16. Baseline-Dependent Responses of Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics to Climate and Land Disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengxi Tan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C sequestration through optimizing land use and management is widely considered a realistic option to mitigate the global greenhouse effect. But how the responses of individual ecosystems to changes in land use and management are related to baseline soil organic C (SOC levels still needs to be evaluated at various scales. In this study, we modeled SOC dynamics within both natural and managed ecosystems in North Dakota of the United States and found that the average SOC stock in the top 20 cm depth of soil lost at a rate of 450 kg C ha−1 yr−1 in cropland and 110 kg C ha−1 yr−1 in grassland between 1971 and 1998. Since 1998, the study area had become a SOC sink at a rate of 44 kg C ha−1 yr−1. The annual rate of SOC change in all types of lands substantially depends on the magnitude of initial SOC contents, but such dependency varies more with climatic variables within natural ecosystems and with management practices within managed ecosystems. Additionally, soils with high baseline SOC stocks tend to be C sources following any land surface disturbances, whereas soils having low baseline C contents likely become C sinks following conservation management.

  17. Baseline-dependent responses of soil organic carbon dynamics to climate and land disturbances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhengxi; Liu, Shuguang

    2013-01-01

    Terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration through optimizing land use and management is widely considered a realistic option to mitigate the global greenhouse effect. But how the responses of individual ecosystems to changes in land use and management are related to baseline soil organic C (SOC) levels still needs to be evaluated at various scales. In this study, we modeled SOC dynamics within both natural and managed ecosystems in North Dakota of the United States and found that the average SOC stock in the top 20 cm depth of soil lost at a rate of 450 kg C ha−1 yr−1 in cropland and 110 kg C ha−1 yr−1 in grassland between 1971 and 1998. Since 1998, the study area had become a SOC sink at a rate of 44 kg C ha−1 yr−1. The annual rate of SOC change in all types of lands substantially depends on the magnitude of initial SOC contents, but such dependency varies more with climatic variables within natural ecosystems and with management practices within managed ecosystems. Additionally, soils with high baseline SOC stocks tend to be C sources following any land surface disturbances, whereas soils having low baseline C contents likely become C sinks following conservation management.

  18. Management Impacts on Carbon Dynamics in a Sierra Nevada Mixed Conifer Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dore, Sabina; Fry, Danny L; Collins, Brandon M; Vargas, Rodrigo; York, Robert A; Stephens, Scott L

    2016-01-01

    Forest ecosystems can act as sinks of carbon and thus mitigate anthropogenic carbon emissions. When forests are actively managed, treatments can alter forests carbon dynamics, reducing their sink strength and switching them from sinks to sources of carbon. These effects are generally characterized by fast temporal dynamics. Hence this study monitored for over a decade the impacts of management practices commonly used to reduce fire hazards on the carbon dynamics of mixed-conifer forests in the Sierra Nevada, California, USA. Soil CO2 efflux, carbon pools (i.e. soil carbon, litter, fine roots, tree biomass), and radial tree growth were compared among un-manipulated controls, prescribed fire, thinning, thinning followed by fire, and two clear-cut harvested sites. Soil CO2 efflux was reduced by both fire and harvesting (ca. 15%). Soil carbon content (upper 15 cm) was not significantly changed by harvest or fire treatments. Fine root biomass was reduced by clear-cut harvest (60-70%) but not by fire, and the litter layer was reduced 80% by clear-cut harvest and 40% by fire. Thinning effects on tree growth and biomass were concentrated in the first year after treatments, whereas fire effects persisted over the seven-year post-treatment period. Over this period, tree radial growth was increased (25%) by thinning and reduced (12%) by fire. After seven years, tree biomass returned to pre-treatment levels in both fire and thinning treatments; however, biomass and productivity decreased 30%-40% compared to controls when thinning was combined with fire. The clear-cut treatment had the strongest impact, reducing ecosystem carbon stocks and delaying the capacity for carbon uptake. We conclude that post-treatment carbon dynamics and ecosystem recovery time varied with intensity and type of treatments. Consequently, management practices can be selected to minimize ecosystem carbon losses while increasing future carbon uptake, resilience to high severity fire, and climate related

  19. Using city-wide mobile noise assessments to estimate bicycle trip annual exposure to Black Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekoninck, Luc; Botteldooren, Dick; Int Panis, Luc

    2015-10-01

    Several studies have shown that a significant amount of daily air pollution exposure, in particular Black Carbon (BC), is inhaled during bicycle trips. Previously, the instantaneous BC exposure of cyclists was modeled as the sum of a background concentration and a local traffic related component based on a local assessment of traffic noise. We present a fast and low cost methodology to achieve a city-wide assessment of yearly average BC exposure of cyclists along their trips, based on a city-wide mobile noise sensing campaign. The methodology requires participatory sensing measurements of noise, partially combined with BC and/or other air pollutants sensitive to local traffic variations. The combined measurements cover the spatial and meteorological variability and provide the data for an instantaneous exposure model. The mobile noise-only measurements map the full city; and yearly meteorology statistics are used to extrapolate the instantaneous exposure model to a yearly average map of in-traffic air pollution exposure. Less than four passages at each segment along the network with mobile noise equipment are necessary to reach a standard error of 500 ng/m(3) for the yearly average BC exposure. A strong seasonal effect due to the BC background concentration is detected. The background contributes only 25% to the total trip exposure during spring and summer. During winter the background component increases to 50-60%. Engine related traffic noise along the bicyclist's route is a valid indicator of the BC exposure along the route, independent of the seasonal background. Low exposure route selection results in an exposure reduction of 35% in winter and 60% in summer, sensitive to the weather conditions, specific trip attributes and the available alternatives. The methodology is relevant for further research into the local effects of air pollution on health. Mobile noise mapping adds local traffic data including traffic dynamics into the air pollution exposure

  20. Preface: Impacts of extreme climate events and disturbances on carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jingfeng; Liu, Shuguang; Stoy, Paul C.

    2016-01-01

    The impacts of extreme climate events and disturbances (ECE&D) on the carbon cycle have received growing attention in recent years. This special issue showcases a collection of recent advances in understanding the impacts of ECE&D on carbon cycling. Notable advances include quantifying how harvesting activities impact forest structure, carbon pool dynamics, and recovery processes; observed drastic increases of the concentrations of dissolved organic carbon and dissolved methane in thermokarst lakes in western Siberia during a summer warming event; disentangling the roles of herbivores and fire on forest carbon dioxide flux; direct and indirect impacts of fire on the global carbon balance; and improved atmospheric inversion of regional carbon sources and sinks by incorporating disturbances. Combined, studies herein indicate several major research needs. First, disturbances and extreme events can interact with one another, and it is important to understand their overall impacts and also disentangle their effects on the carbon cycle. Second, current ecosystem models are not skillful enough to correctly simulate the underlying processes and impacts of ECE&D (e.g., tree mortality and carbon consequences). Third, benchmark data characterizing the timing, location, type, and magnitude of disturbances must be systematically created to improve our ability to quantify carbon dynamics over large areas. Finally, improving the representation of ECE&D in regional climate/earth system models and accounting for the resulting feedbacks to climate are essential for understanding the interactions between climate and ecosystem dynamics.

  1. Nitrogen and carbon dynamics in prairie vegetation strips across topographical gradients in mixed Central Iowa agroecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marlín Pérez-Suárez; Michael J. Castellano; Randall Kolka; Heidi Asbjornsen; Matthew. Helmers

    2014-01-01

    Reductions of nitrogen (N) export from agricultural lands because of changes in specific N stocks andfluxes by incorporation of small amounts of prairie vegetation strips (PVS) are poorly understood. Theprimary objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of the presence and topographical position of PVSon soil and plant carbon (C) and N stocks relative to annual...

  2. Simulating coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics following bark beetle outbreaks in the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven L. Edburg; Jeffrey A. Hicke; David M. Lawrence; Peter E. Thornton

    2011-01-01

    Insect outbreaks are major ecosystem disturbances, affecting a similar area as forest fires annually across North America. Tree mortality caused by bark beetle outbreaks alters carbon cycling in the first several years following the disturbance by reducing stand-level primary production and by increasing the amount of dead organic matter available for decomposition....

  3. Coccolithophore populations and their contribution to carbonate export during an annual cycle in the Australian sector of the Antarctic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigual Hernández, Andrés S.; Flores, José A.; Sierro, Francisco J.; Fuertes, Miguel A.; Cros, Lluïsa; Trull, Thomas W.

    2018-03-01

    The Southern Ocean is experiencing rapid and relentless change in its physical and biogeochemical properties. The rate of warming of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current exceeds that of the global ocean, and the enhanced uptake of carbon dioxide is causing basin-wide ocean acidification. Observational data suggest that these changes are influencing the distribution and composition of pelagic plankton communities. Long-term and annual field observations on key environmental variables and organisms are a critical basis for predicting changes in Southern Ocean ecosystems. These observations are particularly needed, since high-latitude systems have been projected to experience the most severe impacts of ocean acidification and invasions of allochthonous species. Coccolithophores are the most prolific calcium-carbonate-producing phytoplankton group playing an important role in Southern Ocean biogeochemical cycles. Satellite imagery has revealed elevated particulate inorganic carbon concentrations near the major circumpolar fronts of the Southern Ocean that can be attributed to the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Recent studies have suggested changes during the last decades in the distribution and abundance of Southern Ocean coccolithophores. However, due to limited field observations, the distribution, diversity and state of coccolithophore populations in the Southern Ocean remain poorly characterised. We report here on seasonal variations in the abundance and composition of coccolithophore assemblages collected by two moored sediment traps deployed at the Antarctic zone south of Australia (2000 and 3700 m of depth) for 1 year in 2001-2002. Additionally, seasonal changes in coccolith weights of E. huxleyi populations were estimated using circularly polarised micrographs analysed with C-Calcita software. Our findings indicate that (1) coccolithophore sinking assemblages were nearly monospecific for E. huxleyi morphotype B/C in the Antarctic zone waters in 2001-2002; (2

  4. Coccolithophore populations and their contribution to carbonate export during an annual cycle in the Australian sector of the Antarctic zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Rigual Hernández

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Southern Ocean is experiencing rapid and relentless change in its physical and biogeochemical properties. The rate of warming of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current exceeds that of the global ocean, and the enhanced uptake of carbon dioxide is causing basin-wide ocean acidification. Observational data suggest that these changes are influencing the distribution and composition of pelagic plankton communities. Long-term and annual field observations on key environmental variables and organisms are a critical basis for predicting changes in Southern Ocean ecosystems. These observations are particularly needed, since high-latitude systems have been projected to experience the most severe impacts of ocean acidification and invasions of allochthonous species. Coccolithophores are the most prolific calcium-carbonate-producing phytoplankton group playing an important role in Southern Ocean biogeochemical cycles. Satellite imagery has revealed elevated particulate inorganic carbon concentrations near the major circumpolar fronts of the Southern Ocean that can be attributed to the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi. Recent studies have suggested changes during the last decades in the distribution and abundance of Southern Ocean coccolithophores. However, due to limited field observations, the distribution, diversity and state of coccolithophore populations in the Southern Ocean remain poorly characterised. We report here on seasonal variations in the abundance and composition of coccolithophore assemblages collected by two moored sediment traps deployed at the Antarctic zone south of Australia (2000 and 3700 m of depth for 1 year in 2001–2002. Additionally, seasonal changes in coccolith weights of E. huxleyi populations were estimated using circularly polarised micrographs analysed with C-Calcita software. Our findings indicate that (1 coccolithophore sinking assemblages were nearly monospecific for E. huxleyi morphotype B/C in the Antarctic zone

  5. PnET Models: Carbon, Nitrogen, Water Dynamics in Forest Ecosystems (Vers. 4 and 5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: PnET (Photosynthetic / EvapoTranspiration model) is a nested series of models of carbon, water, and nitrogen dynamics in forest ecosystems. The models can...

  6. PnET Models: Carbon, Nitrogen, Water Dynamics in Forest Ecosystems (Vers. 4 and 5)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — PnET (Photosynthetic / EvapoTranspiration model) is a nested series of models of carbon, water, and nitrogen dynamics in forest ecosystems. The models can be used to...

  7. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of differing...

  8. LBA-ECO ND-11 Litter Decomposition, Carbon, and Nitrogen Dynamics in Agroforestry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: This data set contains the results of an experiment to determine litter decomposition and dynamics of carbon and nitrogen release from plant litter of...

  9. Annual benthic metabolism and organic carbon fluxes in a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay dominated by the macroalgae Caulerpa prolifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio eRuiz-Halpern

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Coastal areas play an important role on carbon cycling. Elucidating the dynamics on the production, transport and fate of organic carbon is relevant to gain a better understanding of the role coastal areas play in the global carbon budget. Here, we assess the metabolic status and associated organic carbon fluxes of a semi-enclosed Mediterranean bay supporting a meadow of Caulerpa prolifera. We test whether the EDOC pool is a significant component of the organic carbon pool and associated fluxes in this ecosystem. The Bay of Portocolom was in net metabolic balance on a yearly basis, but heterotrophic during the summer months. Community respiration (CR was positively correlated to C. prolifera biomass, while net community production (NCP had a negative correlation. The benthic compartment represented, on average, 72.6 ± 5.2 % of CR and 86.8 ± 4.5 % of gross primary production (GPP. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC production peaked in summer and was always positive, with the incubations performed in the dark almost doubling the flux of those performed in the light. Exchangeable dissolved organic carbon (EDOC, however, oscillated between production and uptake, being completely recycled within the system and representing around 14% of the DOC flux. The pools of bottom and surface DOC were high for an oligotrophic environment, and were positively correlated to the pool of EDOC. Thus, despite being in metabolic balance, this ecosystem acted as a conduit for organic carbon (OC, as it is able to export OC to adjacent areas derived from allochtonous inputs during heterotrophic conditions. These inputs likely come from groundwater discharge, human activity in the watershed, delivered to the sediments through the high capacity of C. prolifera to remove particles from the water column, and from the air-water exchange of EDOC, demonstrating that these communities are a major contributor to the cycling of OC in coastal embayments.

  10. ORCHIDEE-SOM: modeling soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) dynamics along vertical soil profiles in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camino-Serrano, Marta; Guenet, Bertrand; Luyssaert, Sebastiaan; Ciais, Philippe; Bastrikov, Vladislav; De Vos, Bruno; Gielen, Bert; Gleixner, Gerd; Jornet-Puig, Albert; Kaiser, Klaus; Kothawala, Dolly; Lauerwald, Ronny; Peñuelas, Josep; Schrumpf, Marion; Vicca, Sara; Vuichard, Nicolas; Walmsley, David; Janssens, Ivan A.

    2018-03-01

    Current land surface models (LSMs) typically represent soils in a very simplistic way, assuming soil organic carbon (SOC) as a bulk, and thus impeding a correct representation of deep soil carbon dynamics. Moreover, LSMs generally neglect the production and export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) from soils to rivers, leading to overestimations of the potential carbon sequestration on land. This common oversimplified processing of SOC in LSMs is partly responsible for the large uncertainty in the predictions of the soil carbon response to climate change. In this study, we present a new soil carbon module called ORCHIDEE-SOM, embedded within the land surface model ORCHIDEE, which is able to reproduce the DOC and SOC dynamics in a vertically discretized soil to 2 m. The model includes processes of biological production and consumption of SOC and DOC, DOC adsorption on and desorption from soil minerals, diffusion of SOC and DOC, and DOC transport with water through and out of the soils to rivers. We evaluated ORCHIDEE-SOM against observations of DOC concentrations and SOC stocks from four European sites with different vegetation covers: a coniferous forest, a deciduous forest, a grassland, and a cropland. The model was able to reproduce the SOC stocks along their vertical profiles at the four sites and the DOC concentrations within the range of measurements, with the exception of the DOC concentrations in the upper soil horizon at the coniferous forest. However, the model was not able to fully capture the temporal dynamics of DOC concentrations. Further model improvements should focus on a plant- and depth-dependent parameterization of the new input model parameters, such as the turnover times of DOC and the microbial carbon use efficiency. We suggest that this new soil module, when parameterized for global simulations, will improve the representation of the global carbon cycle in LSMs, thus helping to constrain the predictions of the future SOC response to global

  11. Moss and soil contributions to the annual net carbon flux of a maturing boreal forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, J.W.; O'Neill, K. P.; Trumbore, S.E.; Veldhuis, H.; Stocks, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    We used input and decomposition data from 14C studies of soils to determine rates of vertical accumulation of moss combined with carbon storage inventories on a sequence of burns to model how carbon accumulates in soils and moss after a stand-killing fire. We used soil drainage - moss associations and soil drainage maps of the old black spruce (OBS) site at the BOREAS northern study area (NSA) to areally weight the contributions of each moderately well drained, feathermoss areas; poorly drained sphagnum - feathermoss areas; and very poorly drained brown moss areas to the carbon storage and flux at the OBS NSA site. On this very old (117 years) complex of black spruce, sphagnum bog veneer, and fen systems we conclude that these systems are likely sequestering 0.01-0.03 kg C m-2 yr-' at OBS-NSA today. Soil drainage in boreal forests near Thompson, Manitoba, controls carbon storage and flux by controlling moss input and decomposition rates and by controlling through fire the amount and quality of carbon left after burning. On poorly drained soils rich in sphagnum moss, net accumulation and long-term storage of carbon is higher than on better drained soils colonized by feathermosses. The carbon flux of these contrasting ecosystems is best characterized by soil drainage class and stand age, where stands recently burned are net sources of CO2, and maturing stands become increasingly stronger sinks of atmospheric CO2. This approach to measuring carbon storage and flux presents a method of scaling to larger areas using soil drainage, moss cover, and stand age information.

  12. Comparing soil organic carbon dynamics in plantation and secondary forest in wet tropics in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI YIQING; MING XU; ZOU XIAOMING; PEIJUN SHI§; YAOQI ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    We compared the soil carbon dynamics between a pine plantation and a secondary forest, both of which originated from the same farmland abandoned in 1976 with the same cropping history and soil conditions, in the wet tropics in Puerto Rico from July 1996 to June 1997. We found that the secondary forest accumulated the heavy-fraction organic carbon (HF-OC) measured by...

  13. Stream carbon dynamics in low-gradient headwaters of a forested watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    April Bryant-Mason; Y. Jun Xu; Johnny M. Grace

    2013-01-01

    Headwater streams drain more than 70 percent of the total watershed area in the United States. Understanding of carbon dynamics in the headwater systems is of particular relevance for developing best silvicultural practices to reduce carbon export. This study was conducted in a low-gradient, predominantly forested watershed located in the Gulf Coastal Plain region, to...

  14. Satellite observation of particulate organic carbon dynamics on the Louisiana continental shelf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Particulate organic carbon (POC) plays an important role in coastal carbon cycling and the formation of hypoxia. Yet, coastal POC dynamics are often poorly understood due to a lack of long-term POC observations and the complexity of coastal hydrodynamic and biogeochemical process...

  15. Population dynamics of Agriophyllum squarrosum, a pioneer annual plant endemic to mobile sand dunes, in response to global climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Qian, Chaoju; Yin, Hengxia; Shi, Yong; Zhao, Jiecai; Yin, Chengliang; Luo, Wanyin; Dong, Zhibao; Chen, Guoxiong; Yan, Xia; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Climate change plays an important role in the transition of ecosystems. Stratigraphic investigations have suggested that the Asian interior experienced frequent transitions between grassland and desert ecosystems as a consequence of global climate change. Using maternally and bi-parentally inherited markers, we investigated the population dynamics of Agriophyllum squarrosum (Chenopodiaceae), an annual pioneer plant endemic to mobile sand dunes. Phylogeographic analysis revealed that A. squarr...

  16. Dynamics of three types of annual plants competing for water and light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pȩkalski, Andrzej; Szwabiński, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    We present and discuss a Monte Carlo model describing the dynamics of three types of annual plants which have different tolerances to shade and drought. External conditions (water and light) fluctuate around some values which are our control parameters and which decide how many resources the system receives. The plants compete with their nearest neighbours for the resources, however not in the same way. We show that for certain ranges of the control parameters a coexistence of the three species is observed. We discuss how the characteristics of the the plants - their number, germination, biomass or the number of nearest neighbours, depend on the two control parameters characterising external conditions. We show that elimination is done at the level of adult plants, not seedlings. We find also cooperative behaviour of plants in difficult conditions, as observed in field studies and we propose an explanation for this fact. Apart from plants tolerating shade but requiring more water and those tolerating drought but needing more light, which are common in nature, we introduce a third species with intermediary demands. We investigate under what conditions this new species could dominate and whether the total number of plants, regardless of their type, is larger with or without the intermediate plant. We show that in our model, like in nature, systems with two kinds of plants with opposite characteristics are, in general, as effective as a system with an additional third type of plants. We show that two contradictory hypotheses made by biologists, concerning the demands of plants in drought and shade, could be both true, however in different regimes.

  17. Amazon River dissolved load: temporal dynamics and annual budget from the Andes to the ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moquet, Jean-Sébastien; Guyot, Jean-Loup; Crave, Alain; Viers, Jérôme; Filizola, Naziano; Martinez, Jean-Michel; Oliveira, Tereza Cristina; Sánchez, Liz Stefanny Hidalgo; Lagane, Christelle; Casimiro, Waldo Sven Lavado; Noriega, Luis; Pombosa, Rodrigo

    2016-06-01

    The aim of the present study is to estimate the export fluxes of major dissolved species at the scale of the Amazon basin, to identify the main parameters controlling their spatial distribution and to identify the role of discharge variability in the variability of the total dissolved solid (TDS) flux through the hydrological cycle. Data are compiled from the monthly hydrochemistry and daily discharge database of the "Programa Climatologico y Hidrologico de la Cuenca Amazonica de Bolivia" (PHICAB) and the HYBAM observatories from 34 stations distributed over the Amazon basin (for the 1983-1992 and 2000-2012 periods, respectively). This paper consists of a first global observation of the fluxes and temporal dynamics of each geomorphological domain of the Amazon basin. Based on mean interannual monthly flux calculations, we estimated that the Amazon basin delivered approximately 272 × 10(6) t year(-1) (263-278) of TDS during the 2003-2012 period, which represents approximately 7 % of the continental inputs to the oceans. This flux is mainly made up by HCO3, Ca and SiO2, reflecting the preferential contributions of carbonate and silicate chemical weathering to the Amazon River Basin. The main tributaries contributing to the TDS flux are the Marañon and Ucayali Rivers (approximately 50 % of the TDS production over 14 % of the Amazon basin area) due to the weathering of carbonates and evaporites drained by their Andean tributaries. An Andes-sedimentary area-shield TDS flux (and specific flux) gradient is observed throughout the basin and is first explained by the TDS concentration contrast between these domains, rather than variability in runoff. This observation highlights that, under tropical context, the weathering flux repartition is primarily controlled by the geomorphological/geological setting and confirms that sedimentary areas are currently active in terms of the production of dissolved load. The log relationships of concentration vs discharge have

  18. Depth heterogeneity of soil organic carbon dynamics in a heavily grazed alpine meadow on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau: A radiocarbon-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shi-Yong; He, Honglin; Cheng, Peng; Hou, Zhanfang

    2017-07-01

    A deep understanding of soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics on the Tibetan Plateau is crucial for predicting the response of the alpine carbon pool to future climate changes. Here we present information about SOC stocks and turnover time in a heavily grazed alpine meadow on the Tibetan Plateau based on radiocarbon (14C) measurements and inverse modeling. Our results reveal that the alpine meadow soil is composed of three distinct carbon pools. The topsoil represents the active carbon pool, which has a carbon inventory-weighted mean turnover time of 64 years. The CO2 efflux due to the mineral soil respiration from this pool is approximately 48.45 g C m-2 yr-1, accounting for 91% of the total heterotrophic soil respiration. The intermediate carbon pool has an inventory-weighted mean turnover time of 780 years, and the rate of mineral soil respiration in this pool is an order of magnitude lower than that in the active carbon pool. The parental materials feature the passive carbon pool, which has millennia-long turnover time and the mineral soil respiration is trivial. Comparing our results with other 14C-based studies suggests that grazing intensity may alter not only the SOC stocks but also the soil respiration rate in the alpine grassland ecosystem. The heavily grazed alpine meadow broadly fits the exponential relationship between turnover time and mean annual air temperature identified by meta-analysis of published data from the Tibetan Plateau, alpine grassland, and forest sites elsewhere.

  19. Carbon stocks and dynamics under improved tropical pasture and silvopastoral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mosquera Vidal, O.; Buurman, P.; Ramirez, B.L.; Amezquita, M.C.

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of land use change on soil organic carbon, the carbon contents and stocks of primary forest, degraded pasture, and four improved pasture systems in Colombian Amazonia were compared in a flat and a sloping landscape. The improved pastures were Brachiaria humidicola, and

  20. Carbon Dynamics and Export from Flooded Wetlands: A Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Described in this article is development and validation of a process based model for carbon cycling in flooded wetlands, called WetQual-C. The model considers various biogeochemical interactions affecting C cycling, greenhouse gas emissions, organic carbon export and retention. ...

  1. Annual variation of strato-mesospheric carbon monoxide measured by ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Velazco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present long-term time-series of strato-mesospheric CO vertical columns measured from stations located in Antarctica, mid-latitudes and the Arctic, covering the period from 1997–2005. The instrument and the measurement technique allows the separation of tropospheric and strato-mesospheric contributions to the CO column, therefore providing information on the chemistry and dynamics both at low and high altitudes. Data from polar stations show a similar annual variability of strato-mesospheric CO with a strong maximum in late winter and spring. A small enhancement in late summer for some stations, which we call the "summer bulge", can be seen occasionally. Generally, the mid-latitude stations show no significant annual variability of strato-mesospheric CO columns. Measurements were compared with a two-dimensional chemistry-transport model of the middle atmosphere. The annual and latitudinal variations of CO are reproduced well by a model run including thermospheric CO. Comparison with two model scenarios show that the polar winter maximum is due solely to downward transport of thermospheric CO, while CHOx chemistry in the stratosphere could probably contribute to the summer maximum.

  2. A dynamic mathematical model for packed columns in carbon capture plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Jørgensen, John Bagterp; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup

    2015-01-01

    is suitable for gas-liquid packed columns, e.g. for CO2 absorption and desorption. The model is based on rigorous thermodynamic and conservation principles and it is set up to preserve these properties upon numerical integration in time. The developed model is applied for CO2 absorption and desorption......In this paper, we present a dynamic mathematical model for the absorption and desorption columns in a carbon capture plant. Carbon capture plants must be operated in synchronization with the operation of thermal power plants. Dynamic and flexible operation of the carbon capture plant is important...

  3. Carbon Debt of CRP Lands Converted to Annual and Perennial Bioenergy Crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, M.; Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Chen, J.; Robertson, G. P.

    2017-12-01

    The net greenhouse gas fluxes of an ecosystem are directly influenced by land use conversions. In the USA, 5 Mha of grassland in the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) have been converted to agricultural production in response to higher demand for corn grain biofuel. The global warming impact (GWI) of these biofuel crops can remain positive for many years following the conversions until the "carbon debt" incurred upon conversion is repaid. Model estimates suggest that 340-351 ×106 Mt of carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2eq) would be released to the atmosphere after the conversions. These estimates, while highly uncertain, appear to have payback times of decades or even centuries. In a field experiment conducted from 2009-16, we converted CRP grassland and conventionally-tilled agricultural (AGR) land to grain (corn) and cellulosic (switchgrass and restored prairie) biofuel feedstocks. We conducted life cycle analysis (LCA) on all converted lands by accounting for greenhouse gas fluxes related to farming operations, agronomic inputs, and soil-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchanges. We found that cumulative carbon debt for the conversion on former CRP grasslands over the 8 years is -295, 652 and 7661 gCO2eq m-2 for switchgrass, restored prairie and corn, respectively, where a positive debt indicates net emissions to the atmosphere. These indicate that the switchgrass field repaid its carbon debt in the 8th year following conversion; and the restored prairie field will likely repay its carbon debt in the next year. The corn field, however, is projected to pay its carbon debt in another 250 years. The same biofuel crops established on former AGR lands became net CO2eq sinks within two years following the conversion. Our findings indicate that the GWI estimates and the time needed to repay CO2eq debt due to conversion of grasslands to bioenergy crops is underestimated by current models.

  4. Responses of Carbon Dynamics to Nitrogen Deposition in Typical Freshwater Wetland of Sanjiang Plain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of nitrogen deposition (N-deposition on the carbon dynamics in typical Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland of Sanjiang Plain were studied by a pot-culture experiment during two continuous plant growing seasons. Elevated atmospheric N-deposition caused significant increases in the aboveground net primary production and root biomass; moreover, a preferential partition of carbon to root was also observed. Different soil carbon fractions gained due to elevated N-deposition and their response intensities followed the sequence of labile carbon > dissolved organic carbon > microbial biomass carbon, and the interaction between N-deposition and flooded condition facilitated the release of different carbon fractions. Positive correlations were found between CO2 and CH4 fluxes and liable carbon contents with N-deposition, and flooded condition also tended to facilitate CH4 fluxes and to inhibit the CO2 fluxes with N-deposition. The increases in soil carbon fractions occurring in the nitrogen treatments were significantly correlated with increases in root, aboveground parts, total biomass, and their carbon uptake. Our results suggested that N-deposition could enhance the contents of active carbon fractions in soil system and carbon accumulation in plant of the freshwater wetlands.

  5. Carbonate chemistry dynamics and biological processes along a river-sea gradient (Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Gianmarco; Giani, Michele; Cibic, Tamara; Karuza, Ana; Kralj, Martina; Del Negro, Paola

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we investigated, for two years and with a bi-monthly frequency, how physical, chemical, and biological processes affect the marine carbonate system in a coastal area characterized by high alkalinity riverine discharge (Gulf of Trieste, northern Adriatic Sea, Mediterranean Sea). By combining synoptic measurements of the carbonate system with in situ determinations of the primary production (14C incorporation technique) and secondary prokaryotic carbon production (3H-leucine incorporation) along a river-sea gradient, we showed that the conservative mixing between river endmember and off-shore waters was the main driver of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) distribution and seasonal variation. However, during spring and summer seasons also the influence of biological uptake and release of DIC was significant. In the surface water of June 2012, the spreading and persistence of nutrient-rich freshwater stimulated the primary production (3.21 μg C L- 1 h- 1) and net biological DIC decrease (- 100 μmol kg- 1), reducing the dissolved CO2 concentration and increasing the pHT. Below the pycnocline of August 2012, instead, an elevated bacterial carbon production rate (0.92 μg C L- 1 h- 1) was related with net DIC increase (92 μmol kg- 1), low dissolved oxygen concentration, and strong pHT reduction, suggesting the predominance of bacterial heterotrophic respiration over primary production. The flux of carbon dioxide estimated at the air-sea interface exerted a low influence on the seasonal variation of the carbonate system. A complex temporal and spatial dynamic of the air-sea CO2 exchange was also detected, due to the combined effects of seawater temperature, river discharge, and water circulation. On annual scale the system was a sink of atmospheric CO2. However, in summer and during elevated riverine discharges, the area close to the river's mouth acted as a source of carbon dioxide. Also the wind speed was crucial in controlling the air-sea CO2

  6. Carbon dynamics in topsoil and subsoil along a cultivated toposequence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Elsgaard, Lars; Thomsen, Ingrid Kaag

    2014-01-01

    Topography-induced spatial heterogeneity influences soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and microbial degradation (respiration) both in topsoil and subsoil compartments. However, the interaction between topographic position and soil horizons has rarely been assessed. This study aimed to investigate ...

  7. Revised methane emissions factors and spatially distributed annual carbon fluxes for global livestock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livestock play an important role in carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Recent research suggests that existing bottom-up inventories of livestock methane emissions in the U.S., such as those made using 2006 IPCC Tier 1 livestock emissions factors, are too low. Thi...

  8. Influence of spring phenology on seasonal and annual carbon balance in two contrasting New England forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew D. Richardson; David Y. Hollinger; D. Bryan Dail; John T. Lee; J. William Munger; John O' Keefe

    2009-01-01

    Spring phenology is thought to exert a major influence on the carbon (C) balance of temperate and boreal ecosystems. We investigated this hypothesis using four spring onset phenological indicators in conjunction with surface-atmosphere CO2 exchange data from the conifer-dominated Howland Forest and deciduous-dominated Harvard Forest AmeriFlux...

  9. Holocene carbon dynamics at the forest-steppe ecotone of southern Siberia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackay, Anson William; Seddon, Alistair W R; Leng, Melanie J; Heumann, Georg; Morley, David W; Piotrowska, Natalia; Rioual, Patrick; Roberts, Sarah; Swann, George E A

    2017-05-01

    The forest-steppe ecotone in southern Siberia is highly sensitive to climate change; global warming is expected to push the ecotone northwards, at the same time resulting in degradation of the underlying permafrost. To gain a deeper understanding of long-term forest-steppe carbon dynamics, we use a highly resolved, multiproxy, palaeolimnological approach, based on sediment records from Lake Baikal. We reconstruct proxies that are relevant to understanding carbon dynamics including carbon mass accumulation rates (CMAR; g C m -2  yr -1 ) and isotope composition of organic matter (δ 13 C TOC ). Forest-steppe dynamics were reconstructed using pollen, and diatom records provided measures of primary production from near- and off-shore communities. We used a generalized additive model (GAM) to identify significant change points in temporal series, and by applying generalized linear least-squares regression modelling to components of the multiproxy data, we address (1) What factors influence carbon dynamics during early Holocene warming and late Holocene cooling? (2) How did carbon dynamics respond to abrupt sub-Milankovitch scale events? and (3) What is the Holocene carbon storage budget for Lake Baikal. CMAR values range between 2.8 and 12.5 g C m -2  yr -1 . Peak burial rates (and greatest variability) occurred during the early Holocene, associated with melting permafrost and retreating glaciers, while lowest burial rates occurred during the neoglacial. Significant shifts in carbon dynamics at 10.3, 4.1 and 2.8 kyr bp provide compelling evidence for the sensitivity of the region to sub-Milankovitch drivers of climate change. We estimate that 1.03 Pg C was buried in Lake Baikal sediments during the Holocene, almost one-quarter of which was buried during the early Holocene alone. Combined, our results highlight the importance of understanding the close linkages between carbon cycling and hydrological processes, not just temperatures, in southern Siberian environments

  10. Multi-factor controls on terrestrial carbon dynamics in urbanized areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Tian, H.; Pan, S.; Lockaby, G.; Chappelka, A.

    2014-12-01

    As urban land expands rapidly across the globe, much concern has been raised that urbanization may alter the terrestrial carbon cycle. Urbanization involves complex changes in land structure and multiple environmental factors. Little is known about the relative contribution of these individual factors and their interactions to the terrestrial carbon dynamics, however, which is essential for assessing the effectiveness of carbon sequestration policies focusing on urban development. This study developed a comprehensive analysis framework for quantifying relative contribution of individual factors (and their interactions) to terrestrial carbon dynamics in urbanized areas. We identified 15 factors belonging to five categories, and we applied a newly developed factorial analysis scheme to the southern United States (SUS), a rapidly urbanizing region. In all, 24 numeric experiments were designed to systematically isolate and quantify the relative contribution of individual factors. We found that the impact of land conversion was far larger than other factors. Urban managements and the overall interactive effects among major factors, however, created a carbon sink that compensated for 42% of the carbon loss in land conversion. Our findings provide valuable information for regional carbon management in the SUS: (1) it is preferable to preserve pre-urban carbon pools than to rely on the carbon sinks in urban ecosystems to compensate for the carbon loss in land conversion. (2) In forested areas, it is recommendable to improve landscape design (e.g., by arranging green spaces close to the city center) to maximize the urbanization-induced environmental change effect on carbon sequestration. Urbanization-induced environmental change will be less effective in shrubland regions. (3) Urban carbon sequestration can be significantly improved through changes in management practices, such as increased irrigation and fertilizer and targeted use of vehicles and machinery with least

  11. Nonzero-Sum Relationships in Mitigating Urban Carbon Emissions: A Dynamic Network Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shaoqing; Chen, Bin; Su, Meirong

    2015-10-06

    The "stove-pipe" way of thinking has been mostly used in mitigating carbon emissions and managing socioeconomics because of its convenience of implementation. However, systems-oriented approaches become imperative in pursuit of an efficient regulation of carbon emissions from systems as complicated as urban systems. The aim of this paper is to establish a dynamic network approach that is capable of assessing the effectiveness of carbon emissions mitigation in a more holistic way. A carbon metabolic network is constructed by modeling the carbon flows between economic sectors and environment. With the network shocked by interventions to the sectoral carbon flows, indirect emissions from the city are accounted for under certain carbon mitigation strategies. The nonzero-sum relationships between sectors and environmental components are identified based on utility analysis, which synthesize the nature of direct and indirect network interactions. The results of the case study of Beijing suggest that the stove-pipe mitigation strategies targeted the economic sectors might be not as efficient as they were expected. A direct cutting in material or energy import to the sectors may result in a rebound in indirect emissions and thus fails to achieve the carbon mitigation goal of the city as a whole. A promising way of foreseeing the dynamic mechanism of emissions is to analyze the nonzero-sum relationships between important urban components. Thinking cities as systems of interactions, the network approach is potentially a strong tool for appraising and filtering mitigation strategies of carbon emissions.

  12. Projecting pest population dynamics under global warming: the combined effect of inter- and intra-annual variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidon, Royi; Tsueda, Hirotsugu; Morin, Efrat; Morin, Shai

    2016-06-01

    The typical short generation length of insects makes their population dynamics highly sensitive not only to mean annual temperatures but also to their intra-annual variations. To consider the combined effect of both thermal factors under global warming, we propose a modeling framework that links general circulation models (GCMs) with a stochastic weather generator and population dynamics models to predict species population responses to inter- and intra-annual temperature changes. This framework was utilized to explore future changes in populations of Bemisia tabaci, an invasive insect pest-species that affects multiple agricultural systems in the Mediterranean region. We considered three locations representing different pest status and climatic conditions: Montpellier (France), Seville (Spain), and Beit-Jamal (Israel). We produced ensembles of local daily temperature realizations representing current and future (mid-21st century) climatic conditions under two emission scenarios for the three locations. Our simulations predicted a significant increase in the average number of annual generations and in population size, and a significant lengthening of the growing season in all three locations. A negative effect was found only in Seville for the summer season, where future temperatures lead to a reduction in population size. High variability in population size was observed between years with similar annual mean temperatures, suggesting a strong effect of intra-annual temperature variation. Critical periods were from late spring to late summer in Montpellier and from late winter to early summer in Seville and Beit-Jamal. Although our analysis suggested that earlier seasonal activity does not necessarily lead to increased populations load unless an additional generation is produced, it is highly likely that the insect will become a significant pest of open-fields at Mediterranean latitudes above 40° during the next 50 years. Our simulations also implied that current

  13. Ignoring detailed fast-changing dynamics of land use overestimates regional terrestrial carbon sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Q. Zhao

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Land use change is critical in determining the distribution, magnitude and mechanisms of terrestrial carbon budgets at the local to global scales. To date, almost all regional to global carbon cycle studies are driven by a static land use map or land use change statistics with decadal time intervals. The biases in quantifying carbon exchange between the terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere caused by using such land use change information have not been investigated. Here, we used the General Ensemble biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS, along with consistent and spatially explicit land use change scenarios with different intervals (1 yr, 5 yrs, 10 yrs and static, respectively, to evaluate the impacts of land use change data frequency on estimating regional carbon sequestration in the southeastern United States. Our results indicate that ignoring the detailed fast-changing dynamics of land use can lead to a significant overestimation of carbon uptake by the terrestrial ecosystem. Regional carbon sequestration increased from 0.27 to 0.69, 0.80 and 0.97 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 when land use change data frequency shifting from 1 year to 5 years, 10 years interval and static land use information, respectively. Carbon removal by forest harvesting and prolonged cumulative impacts of historical land use change on carbon cycle accounted for the differences in carbon sequestration between static and dynamic land use change scenarios. The results suggest that it is critical to incorporate the detailed dynamics of land use change into local to global carbon cycle studies. Otherwise, it is impossible to accurately quantify the geographic distributions, magnitudes, and mechanisms of terrestrial carbon sequestration at the local to global scales.

  14. Inter-annual variation in the response of Pinus taeda tree growth to long term Free Air Carbon dioxide Enrichment (FACE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D. J.; Aref, S.; Ho, R. M.; Pippen, J. S.; Hamilton, J.; de Lucia, E. H.

    2005-12-01

    Rising carbon dioxide is predicted to increase forest productivity, though the duration of the response and how it might be altered by annual variation in rainfall and temperature are not well understood. For eight years we measured the basal area of trees exposed to Free Air Carbon-dioxide Enrichment (FACE) in a rapidly growing Pinus taeda plantation and used these measurements to estimate monthly and annual growth. We coupled these measurements with a mathematical model to estimate the start and end of growth in each year. Elevated carbon dioxide increased the basal area increment (BAI) of trees by 13 to 27 percent. Exposure to elevated carbon dioxide increased the growth rate but not the duration of the growing season in most years. With the exception of one year following an extreme drought and a severe ice storm, BAI was positively correlated with the amount of rainfall during the growing season. The inter-annual variation in the relative enhancement of BAI caused by elevated carbon dioxide was strongly related to the combination of temperature and rainfall during the growing season. There was no evidence of a systematic reduction in the stimulation of growth during the first eight years of this experiment, suggesting that hypothesized limitation of the carbon dioxide response caused by nitrogen availability has yet to occur.

  15. Carbon diffusion in molten uranium: an ab initio molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Kerry E.; Abrecht, David G.; Kessler, Sean H.; Henson, Neil J.; Devanathan, Ram; Schwantes, Jon M.; Reilly, Dallas D.

    2018-04-01

    In this work we used ab initio molecular dynamics within the framework of density functional theory and the projector-augmented wave method to study carbon diffusion in liquid uranium at temperatures above 1600 K. The electronic interactions of carbon and uranium were described using the local density approximation (LDA). The self-diffusion of uranium based on this approach is compared with literature computational and experimental results for liquid uranium. The temperature dependence of carbon and uranium diffusion in the melt was evaluated by fitting the resulting diffusion coefficients to an Arrhenius relationship. We found that the LDA calculated activation energy for carbon was nearly twice that of uranium: 0.55 ± 0.03 eV for carbon compared to 0.32 ± 0.04 eV for uranium. Structural analysis of the liquid uranium-carbon system is also discussed.

  16. Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) annual report 2007; Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) memoria de actividades 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Concha Prieto Alas (ed.)

    2008-07-01

    The annual report gives facts and figures about INCAR and outlines research lines in organic petrology, coke quality, carbon capture and control, coal utilisation, hydrogen generation, coal carbon materials, materials for generation and purification of hydrogen and energy storage, adsorbents, carbon-carbon composites, synthesis of nanostructured raw materials and valorisation of different residues. The next section gives details of the organisation and structure of INCAR. This is followed by a listing of scientific activities, a record of the organisation's output (publications, lectures, meetings etc.) and details of its national and international scientific corporation, teaching programme (courses and seminars), and research awards.

  17. Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) annual report 2006; Instituto Nacional del Carbon (INCAR) Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) memoria de actividades 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The annual report gives facts and figures about INCAR and outlines research lines (in organic petrology, coke quality, carbon capture and control, coal utilisation, hydrogen generation, coal carbon materials, materials for generation and purification of hydrogen and energy storage, adsorbents, carbon-carbon composites, and synthesis of nanostructured raw materials). The next section gives details of the organization and structure of INCAR. This is followed by a listing of scientific activities, a record of the organization's output (publications, lectures, meetings etc.) and details of its national and international scientific corporation, teaching program (courses and seminars), and research awards.

  18. Modelling temperature acclimation effects on the carbon dynamics of forest ecosystems in the conterminous United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The projected rise in temperature in the 21st century will alter forest ecosystem functioning and carbon dynamics. To date, the acclimation of plant photosynthesis to rising temperature has not been adequately considered in earth system models. Here we present a study on regional ecosystem carbon dynamics under future climate scenarios incorporating temperature acclimation effects into a large-scale ecosystem model, the terrestrial ecosystem model (TEM. We first incorporate a general formulation of the temperature acclimation of plant photosynthesis into TEM, and then apply the revised model to the forest ecosystems of the conterminous United States for the 21st century under the future Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES climate scenarios A1FI, A2, B1 and B2. We find that there are significant differences between the estimates of carbon dynamics from the previous and the revised models. The largest differences occur under the A1FI scenario, in which the model that considers acclimation effects predicts that the region will act as a carbon sink, and that cumulative carbon in the 21st century will be 35 Pg C higher than the estimates from the model that does not consider acclimation effects. Our results further indicate that in the region there are spatially different responses to temperature acclimation effects. This study suggests that terrestrial ecosystem models should take temperature acclimation effects into account so as to more accurately quantify ecosystem carbon dynamics at regional scales.

  19. Fire and Microtopography in Peatlands: Feedbacks and Carbon Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benscoter, B.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2011-12-01

    Fire is the dominant natural disturbance in peatland ecosystems. Over the past decade, peat fires have emerged as an important issue for global climate change, human health, and economic loss, largely due to the extreme peat fire events in Indonesia and Russia that severely impacted metropolitan areas and social infrastructure. However, the impact and importance of fire in peatland ecosystems are more far-reaching. Combustion of vegetation and soil organic matter releases an average of 2.2 kg C m-2 to the atmosphere, primarily as CO2, as well as a number of potentially harmful emissions such as fine particulate matter and mercury. Additionally, while peatlands are generally considered to be net sinks of atmospheric carbon, the removal of living vegetation by combustion halts primary production following fire resulting in a net loss of ecosystem carbon to the atmosphere for several years. The recovery of carbon sink function is linked to plant community succession and development, which can vary based on combustion severity and the resulting post-fire microhabitat conditions. Microtopography has a strong influence on fire behavior and combustion severity during peatland wildfires. In boreal continental peatlands, combustion severity is typically greatest in low-lying hollows while raised hummocks are often lightly burned or unburned. The cross-scale influence of microtopography on landscape fire behavior is due to differences in plant community composition between microforms. The physiological and ecohydrological differences among plant communities result in spatial patterns in fuel availability and condition, influencing the spread, severity, and type of combustion over local to landscape scales. In addition to heterogeneous combustion loss of soil carbon, this differential fire behavior creates variability in post-fire microhabitat conditions, resulting in differences in post-fire vegetation succession and carbon exchange trajectories. These immediate and legacy

  20. Carbon budget estimation of a subarctic catchment using a dynamic ecosystem model at high spatial resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, J.; Miller, P. A.; Persson, A.; Olefeldt, D.; Pilesjo, P.; Heliasz, M.; Jackowicz-Korczynski, M.; Yang, Z.; Smith, B.; Callaghan, T. V.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-05-01

    A large amount of organic carbon is stored in high-latitude soils. A substantial proportion of this carbon stock is vulnerable and may decompose rapidly due to temperature increases that are already greater than the global average. It is therefore crucial to quantify and understand carbon exchange between the atmosphere and subarctic/arctic ecosystems. In this paper, we combine an Arctic-enabled version of the process-based dynamic ecosystem model, LPJ-GUESS (version LPJG-WHyMe-TFM) with comprehensive observations of terrestrial and aquatic carbon fluxes to simulate long-term carbon exchange in a subarctic catchment at 50 m resolution. Integrating the observed carbon fluxes from aquatic systems with the modeled terrestrial carbon fluxes across the whole catchment, we estimate that the area is a carbon sink at present and will become an even stronger carbon sink by 2080, which is mainly a result of a projected densification of birch forest and its encroachment into tundra heath. However, the magnitudes of the modeled sinks are very dependent on future atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Furthermore, comparisons of global warming potentials between two simulations with and without CO2 increase since 1960 reveal that the increased methane emission from the peatland could double the warming effects of the whole catchment by 2080 in the absence of CO2 fertilization of the vegetation. This is the first process-based model study of the temporal evolution of a catchment-level carbon budget at high spatial resolution, including both terrestrial and aquatic carbon. Though this study also highlights some limitations in modeling subarctic ecosystem responses to climate change, such as aquatic system flux dynamics, nutrient limitation, herbivory and other disturbances, and peatland expansion, our study provides one process-based approach to resolve the complexity of carbon cycling in subarctic ecosystems while simultaneously pointing out the key model developments for capturing

  1. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon in the northwestern Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    DileepKumar, M.; Rajendran, A; Somasundar, K.; Haake, B.; Jenisch, A; Shuo, Z.; Ittekkot, V.; Desai, B.N.

    and fate of DOC in relation to other carbon and nitrogen components in a region with variable productivity. MATERIAL AND METHODS All the samplings were carried out on board R/V "Sonne" during cruise No. 42 (April-June 1986) as part of the Indo... of the former (Fukami et al., 1981; Cho and Azam, 1988). Using a factor of 0.75 for CO2/O2 and the equation for skeletal carbonate dissolution (ICO2) by Kroopnick (1985), we evaluate the relative significance of or- ganic and inorganic matter decomposition...

  2. The changing global carbon cycle: Linking plant-soil carbon dynamics to global consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapin, F. S.; McFarland, J.; McGuire, David A.; Euskirchen, E.S.; Ruess, Roger W.; Kielland, K.

    2009-01-01

    Most current climate-carbon cycle models that include the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle are based on a model developed 40 years ago by Woodwell & Whittaker (1968) and omit advances in biogeochemical understanding since that time. Their model treats net C emissions from ecosystems as the balance between net primary production (NPP) and heterotrophic respiration (HR, i.e. primarily decomposition).

  3. The changing global carbon cycle: linking local plant-soil carbon dynamics to global consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    F. Stuart Chapin; Jack McFarland; A. David McGuire; Eugenie S. Euskirchen; Roger W. Ruess; Knut. Kielland

    2009-01-01

    Most current climate-carbon cycle models that include the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle are based on a model developed 40 years ago by Woodwell & Whittaker (1968) and omit advances in biogeochemical understanding since that time. Their model treats net C emissions from ecosystems as the balance between net primary production (NPP) and heterotrophic respiration (HR,...

  4. Challenges and Opportunities assessing Methane and Carbon Dioxide dynamics in Tidal Wetlands - the Blue Carbon Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, K. V.; Duman, T.; Kurepa, S.

    2016-12-01

    Blue carbon as the new currency for wetland carbon accounting has gained traction and will be incorporated into the new State of the Carbon Cycle Report (SOCCR2). In this analysis, an example of an urban tidal estuary will highlight some of the challenges that lie ahead. The bottom up approach of estimating methane budgets is highly uncertain and does not match top down approaches of methane emission estimates. Bottom up scaling relies on patchy, partly non-representative chamber measurements that are also not capable of measuring methane ebullition events. Fast methane (CH4) gas analyzers such as the LI7700 are now enabling continuous ecosystem scale (eddy flux) measurements and assessment in conjunction with carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements, avoiding the patchy up-scaling from chamber measurements. Reconciling small scale, patchy chamber measurements with ecosystem fluxes and subsequent regional analysis are still challenging and hamper accurate assessment of coastal wetland carbon fluxes and thus "Blue Carbon" accounting. A long-term assessment at a tidal wetland in the Northeastern US showed large interannual variations in net ecosystem exchange and methane emission, further illustrating difficulties in assessing "additionality" of blue carbon credits. Likewise, current modeling strategies do not account for ebullitive methane fluxes. We will contextualize the research findings of a tidal wetland with current efforts in carbon accounting.

  5. Carbon-14 activity of fallout in Araucaria angustifolia annual growth rings, from Arapoti, Parana State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisi, Claudio Sergio; Pessenda, Luiz Carlos Ruiz; Tomazello Filho, Mario

    2000-01-01

    During the period of nuclear tests between 1950 and 1960, an input of artificial 14 C (fallout effect) occurred in the natural reservoirs. 14 C determinations in the Northern Hemisphere showed values of Δ 14 C up to 960 in the year of 1964. To determine the fallout 14 C activity in Brazil, wood samples from Araucaria angustifolia (Bert.) O. Kuntze, Araucariaceae, were collected in Arapoti-PR (24 deg 11 S , 49 deg 58 O ). The annual tree rings were selected by dendrochronology. The cellulose was extracted and its 14 C activity determined by liquid scintillation method. The results showed a significant increase of the Δ 14 C up to 590 in 1965, about 60% higher than the natural activity, gradually decreasing after the end of nuclear tests. These results were correlated with those obtained in the Northen Hemisphere and will be used in the studies of CO 2 mechanisms distribuition to the atmosphere and other natural reservoirs. (author)

  6. Calculation of diffusion coefficients for carbon dioxide + solute system near the critical conditions by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Higashi, Hidenori; Oda, Tsuyoshi; Iwai, Yoshio; Arai, Yasuhiko

    2004-01-01

    A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation was adopted to calculate the diffusion coefficients for a pseudo-binary system of carbon dioxide and for a carbon dioxide + solute system at 308.2 and 318.2K. The calculated results were compared with the self- and tracer diffusion coefficients calculated by an equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation. The simulated results for the pseudo-binary system of carbon dioxide by the non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation are in good agreement ...

  7. Studies of carbon--isotope fractionation. Annual progress report, December 1, 1974--November 30, 1975

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishida, T.

    1975-12-01

    The vapor pressure isotope effect of /sup 13/C//sup 12/C-substitution in CClF/sub 3/ was measured at temperatures between 169/sup 0/ and 206/sup 0/K by means of cryogenic distillation. The /sup 13/C//sup 12/C-vapor pressure isotope effect in CHF/sub 3/ was also studied at temperatures between 161/sup 0/ and 205/sup 0/K by a similar method. The construction of a cryostat has progressed as scheduled. The investigation of carbon isotope exchange equilibria between carbon dioxide and various carbamates dissolved in various organic solvents has continued. The five-stage system of Taylor-Ghate design was improved to shorten the transient time. A single stage apparatus was designed, built, and tested. These systems are used to measure the equilibrium constants and various phase equilibria involved in the carbon dioxide--carbamate system. The investigation of the explicit method of total isotope effect has made progress. A satisfactory approximation was found for the classical partition function of a Morse oscillator. The method gives a reasonable result at rho identical with /sup 1///sub 2/..sqrt..(u/sub e//x/sub e/) greater than 1.5. The medium cluster approach was applied to isotopic methanes to investigate the effects of intermolecular distance and mutual orientations of molecules in the liquid upon vapor pressure isotope effect. It was found that all geometrical effects studied tend to vanish as the size of clusters is increased. Isotope effect in the zero-point energy shifts on condensation was calculated on the basis of London dispersion forces in liquid and a semi-empirical molecular orbital theory, and was favorably compared with experimental results. (auth)

  8. Adsorption dynamics of copper ion by low cost activated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arivoli, S.; Saravanan, S.; Nandhakumar, V.; Nagarajan, Sulochana

    2009-01-01

    The activated carbon was prepared using solid waste called Terminalia Catappa Linn shell and the physicochemical properties of carbon were investigated to explore the adsorption process. The effectiveness of such carbon in adsorbing copper ion from aqueous solution has been studied as a function of agitation time, adsorbent dosage, initial metal ion concentration, temperature, pH, and desorption. Adsorption equilibrium studies were carried out in order to optimize the experimental conditions. The adsorption of copper ion onto carbon followed a first order kinetic model. Adsorption data were modeled using both Langmuir and Freundlich classical adsorption isotherms. The adsorption capacity Qm was 30.60, 33.85, 35.87, and 38.35 at initial PH 7.0. The equilibrium time was found to be 40 min for all initial concentrations studied. Desorption studies were performed with dilute HCl and show that ion exchange is the predominant copper ion adsorption mechanism. The adsorbent was found to be both effective and economically viable. (author)

  9. 1 Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics under different plantation crops of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using the SOC as indicator, the soil organic matter content needs to be improved upon for sustainable productivity. ... microorganisms which are involved in litter degradation process. However, there. J S Ogeh* ... by the linear regression study. Keywords: Soil organic carbon, plantation crops, different ages, tropics, cashew,.

  10. Colossal carbon! Disturbance and biomass dynamics in Alaska's national forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Kirkland; Tara Barrett

    2016-01-01

    The Chugach and Tongass National Forests are changing, possibly in response to global warming. Forested areas within Alaska's temperate rain forests are creeping into areas that were previously too cold or too wet. These forests are also becoming denser. As biomass increases, the amount of carbon stored in the forest also increases. Tara Barrett, a...

  11. Temperate forest dynamics and carbon storage: A 26-year case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Overall, these results suggest that the forest is in a post-disturbance recovery phase, although favourable climatic conditions over the last three decades may also have had an influence on AGB accumulation. Keywords: aboveground biomass, carbon sequestration, forest conservation, long-term monitoring, succession ...

  12. Investigation of the interfacial properties of polyurethane/carbon nanotube hybrid composites: A molecular dynamics study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goclon, Jakub; Panczyk, Tomasz; Winkler, Krzysztof

    2018-03-01

    Considering the varied applications of hybrid polymer/carbon nanotube composites and the constant progress in the synthesis methods of such materials, we report a theoretical study of interfacial layer formation between pristine single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and polyurethane (PU) using molecular dynamic simulations. We vary the SWCNT diameter and the number of PU chains to examine various PU-SWCNT interaction patterns. Our simulations indicate the important role of intra-chain forces in PU. No regular polymeric structures could be identified on the carbon nanotube surface during the simulations. We find that increasing the SWCNT diameter results in stronger polymer binding. However, higher surface loadings of PU lead to stronger interpenetration by the polymeric segments; this effect is more apparent for SWCNTs with small diameters. Our core finding is that the attached PU binds most strongly to the carbon nanotubes with the largest diameters. Polymer dynamics reveal the loose distribution of PU chains in these systems.

  13. Physicochemical characteristics and droplet impact dynamics of superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aria, Adrianus I; Gharib, Morteza

    2014-06-17

    The physicochemical and droplet impact dynamics of superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays are investigated. These superhydrophobic arrays are fabricated simply by exposing the as-grown carbon nanotube arrays to a vacuum annealing treatment at a moderate temperature. This treatment, which allows a significant removal of oxygen adsorbates, leads to a dramatic change in wettability of the arrays, from mildly hydrophobic to superhydrophobic. Such change in wettability is also accompanied by a substantial change in surface charge and electrochemical properties. Here, the droplet impact dynamics are characterized in terms of critical Weber number, coefficient of restitution, spreading factor, and contact time. Based on these characteristics, it is found that superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays are among the best water-repellent surfaces ever reported. The results presented herein may pave a way for the utilization of superhydrophobic carbon nanotube arrays in numerous industrial and practical applications, including inkjet printing, direct injection engines, steam turbines, and microelectronic fabrication.

  14. Molecular dynamics study of cavitation in carbon nanotube reinforced polyethylene nanocomposite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logunov, M. A.; Orekhov, N. D.

    2018-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have proved to be very promising fillers for polymer nanocomposites. However, because of the lack of a detailed understanding of the principles of the nanoinclusion interaction with polymer matrixes, the properties of such materials are poorly understood. In the present study, within the coarse-grained molecular-dynamics methods, aspects of the interaction of amorphous polyethylene matrix with carbon nanotubes and the influence of CNTs on the cavitation during the nanocomposite deformation are studied.

  15. A 6 year longitudinal study of post-fire woody carbon dynamics in California's forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianca N.I. Eskelson; Vicente J. Monleon; Jeremy S. Fried

    2016-01-01

    We examined the dynamics of aboveground forest woody carbon pools — live trees, standing dead trees, and down wood—during the first 6 years following wildfire across a wide range of conditions, which are characteristic of California forest fires. From repeated measurements of the same plots, we estimated change in woody carbon pools as a function of crown fire severity...

  16. Nearshore Carbon and Sediment Dynamics of an Eroding Permafrost Coast: Herschel Island, Yukon Territory, Canada

    OpenAIRE

    Radosavljevic, Boris; Lantuit, Hugues; Fritz, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The study presented herein seeks to determine the fate of sediment and carbon supplied into the nearshore zone by coastal erosion and thermokarst in permafrost landscapes. To accomplish this, the sediment and carbon sources and sinks will be identified and quantified using remotely sensed imagery, bathymetric and sidescan surveys, shallow seismic profiles, and the interpretation of sediment cores. Coastal dynamics on arctic coasts are characterized by a seasonal dichotomy. Sea ice and land...

  17. Fresh Water Generation from Aquifer-Pressured Carbon Storage: Annual Report FY09

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolery, T; Aines, R; Hao, Y; Bourcier, W; Wolfe, T; Haussman, C

    2009-11-25

    This project is establishing the potential for using brine pressurized by Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) operations in saline formations as the feedstock for desalination and water treatment technologies including reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF). The aquifer pressure resulting from the energy required to inject the carbon dioxide provides all or part of the inlet pressure for the desalination system. Residual brine is reinjected into the formation at net volume reduction, such that the volume of fresh water extracted balances the volume of CO{sub 2} injected into the formation. This process provides additional CO{sub 2} storage capacity in the aquifer, reduces operational risks (cap-rock fracturing, contamination of neighboring fresh water aquifers, and seismicity) by relieving overpressure in the formation, and provides a source of low-cost fresh water to offset costs or operational water needs. This multi-faceted project combines elements of geochemistry, reservoir engineering, and water treatment engineering. The range of saline formation waters is being identified and analyzed. Computer modeling and laboratory-scale experimentation are being used to examine mineral scaling and osmotic pressure limitations. Computer modeling is being used to evaluate processes in the storage aquifer, including the evolution of the pressure field. Water treatment costs are being evaluated by comparing the necessary process facilities to those in common use for seawater RO. There are presently limited brine composition data available for actual CCS sites by the site operators including in the U.S. the seven regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (CSPs). To work around this, we are building a 'catalog' of compositions representative of 'produced' waters (waters produced in the course of seeking or producing oil and gas), to which we are adding data from actual CCS sites as they become available. Produced waters comprise the most common

  18. Spatial variation in seed bank dynamics of two annual brome species in the northern Great Plains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annual bromes decrease forage production in northern central plains rangelands of North America. Early life history stages are when plants are most failure-prone, yet studying death post-germination and prior to emergence is difficult. In seed bank collections conducted over the course of two growin...

  19. Reducing tillage intensity affects the cumulative emergence dynamics of annual grass weeds in winter cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scherner, A; Melander, B; Jensen, P K

    2017-01-01

    Annual grass weeds such as Apera spica-venti and Vulpia myuros are promoted in non-inversion tillage systems and winter cereal-based crop rotations. Unsatisfactory weed control in these conditions is often associated with a poor understanding of the emergence pattern of these weed species. The ai...

  20. Effects of carbon nanofiller characteristics on PTT chain conformation and dynamics: A computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asadinezhad, Ahmad; Kelich, Payam

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Poly (trimethylene terephthalate) (PTT) conformation adopts a folded shape near nanofiller surface. • Graphene and carbon nanotube with different size and chemistry were simulated. • Graphene functionalization induces stronger confinement on PTT chain conformation. • PTT chain motion alters in dynamics mode as it becomes adsorbed onto nanofillers. • PTT reveals further changes near graphene than carbon nanotube surface. - Abstract: The effects of nanofiller chemistry and geometry on static and dynamic properties of an aromatic polyester, poly (trimethylene terephthalate), were addressed thanks to long-run classical molecular dynamics simulation. Two carbon nanofillers, graphene and carbon nanotube, were employed, where graphene was used in pristine and functionalized forms and carbon nanotube was used in two different diameters. The nanofiller geometry and chemistry were found to exert significant effects on conformation and dynamic behavior of PTT chain at the interface within the time scale the simulation was performed. It was found that PTT chain underwent interaction of van der Waals type with nanofiller via two subsequent phases, adsorption and orientation. The former stage, with definite characteristic time, involved translation of polymer chain toward interface while the latter was controlled by vibrational motions of chain atoms. The consequence of interaction was an increase in conformational order of polymer chain by transition to folded shape being favorable for any subsequent structural ordering (crystallization). The interaction of polymer with nanofiller gave rise to a reduction in overall mobility of polymer chain characterized by crossover from normal diffusive motion to subdiffusive mode.

  1. Carbon Dynamics in Heathlands in Response to a Changing Climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Pia Lund

    Climate is changing, and more adverse changes are expected in the future. Changes, caused by continuously rising atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gasses as CO2, will affect ecosystem processes and functions in the future and hence the cycling of carbon. The vaste amount of studies have...... focused on effects of climate change on aboveground biomass, less have been conducted on belowground biomass, and the thesis is one of few studies comprising both above- and belowground biomass and take interactions of climate change factors into account. To follow the fate of carbon in the ecosystem we...... no persistent changes over the years. Responses of aboveground and belowground biomass were coupled, and Deschampsia flexuosa showed high ability to adapt to treatments. As the major response was observed belowground, I further studied decomposition of fine roots. Fine roots of Deschampsia flexuosa from deep...

  2. Simulation of a dynamical ecotourism system with low carbon activity: A case from western China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuan; Huang, Ping; Xu, Hong

    2018-01-15

    Currently, sustainable tourism is becoming more and more important in developing ecological economies. To achieve low-carbon development, some industries, such as logistics and municipal solid waste, have already taken action, but tourism has not attached sufficient importance to this issue. This paper designs an ecotourism system including tourism, carbon waste (solid waste and sewage), and ecology (water supply and green areas) to simulate low-carbon ecotourism through a quantitative approach. This paper explores the tourism system as well as some interactive factors and studies their quantitative relationship based on historical data. A feedback-loop dynamical system model is designed to simulate tourism, waste carbon, and ecology simultaneously. Finally, a case study applying the feedback-loop dynamical system model to Leshan City, a typical travel destination with colorful natural resources in western China, is conducted to indicate the development of ecotourism in an environmentally friendly economy, which verifies the positive effects of the model. Results show a coordinating upward tendency of tourism, solid waste carbon, and ecology from the dynamical model. When tourism increases, solid waste accumulation increases; however, the amount of sewage dumped directly into nature decreases sharply. After analysis of investment policy scenarios, the research indicates that more funds for sewage treatment will attract more tourists. To maintain the equilibrium of carbon waste, more funds shall be invested in solid waste treatment in the long term. Some discussions about local policy are included. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Olefin metathesis for effective polymer healing via dynamic exchange of strong carbon-carbon bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhibin; Lu, Yixuan

    2015-09-15

    A method of preparing a malleable and/or self-healing polymeric or composite material is provided. The method includes providing a polymeric or composite material comprising at least one alkene-containing polymer, combining the polymer with at least one homogeneous or heterogeneous transition metal olefin metathesis catalyst to form a polymeric or composite material, and performing an olefin metathesis reaction on the polymer so as to form reversible carbon-carbon double bonds in the polymer. Also provided is a method of healing a fractured surface of a polymeric material. The method includes bringing a fractured surface of a first polymeric material into contact with a second polymeric material, and performing an olefin metathesis reaction in the presence of a transition metal olefin metathesis catalyst such that the first polymeric material forms reversible carbon-carbon double bonds with the second polymeric material. Compositions comprising malleable and/or self-healing polymeric or composite material are also provided.

  4. Improved recovery demonstration for Williston Basin carbonates. Annual report, June 10, 1995--June 9, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carrell, L.A.; Sippel, M.A.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to demonstrate targeted infill and extension drilling opportunities, better determinations of oil-in-place, methods for improved completion efficiency and the suitability of waterflooding in Red River and Ratcliffe shallow-shelf carbonate reservoirs in the Williston Basin, Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota. Improved reservoir characterization utilizing three-dimensional and multi-component seismic are being investigated for identification of structural and stratigraphic reservoir compartments. These seismic characterization tools are integrated with geological and engineering studies. Improved completion efficiency is being tested with extended-reach jetting lance and other ultra-short-radius lateral technologies. Improved completion efficiency, additional wells at closer spacing and better estimates of oil in place will result in additional oil recovery by primary and enhanced recovery processes.

  5. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blake, D.M.

    1998-01-01

    'This report summarizes the results of work done during the first 1.3 years of a three year project. During the first nine months effort focussed on the design, construction and testing of a closed recirculating system that can be used to study photochemistry in supercritical carbon dioxide at pressures up to 5,000 psi and temperatures up to about 50 C. This was followed by a period of work in which the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene and acetone in supercritical, liquid, and gaseous carbon dioxide containing dissolved oxygen was demonstrated. The photocatalyst was titanium dioxide supported on glass spheres. This was the first time it was possible to observe photocatalytic oxidation in a supercritical fluid and to compare reaction in the three fluid phases of a solvent. This also demonstrated that it is possible to purify supercritical and liquid carbon dioxide using photochemical oxidation with no chemical additions other than oxygen. The oxidation of benzene produced no intermediates detectable using on line spectroscopic analysis or by gas chromatographic analysis of samples taken from the flow system. The catalyst surface did darken as the reaction proceeded indicating that oxidation products were accumulating on the surface. This is analogous to the behavior of aromatic compounds in air phase photocatalytic oxidation. The reaction of acetone under similar conditions resulted in the formation of low levels of by-products. Two were identified as products of the reaction of acetone with itself (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one and 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone) using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer detector. Two other by-products also appear to be from the self-reaction of acetone. By-products of this type had not been observed in prior studies of the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of acetone. The by-products that have been observed can also be oxidized under the treatment conditions. The above results establish that photocatalytic oxidation of

  6. Climatic Effects on the Inter-Annual Variability of Carbon Fluxes for North America and Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomelleri, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Migliavacca, M.; Reichstein, M.; Fluxnet Lathuille Synthesis Team (Cf. Www. Fluxdata. Org)

    2010-12-01

    The connection between climate variability and global carbon cycle has already been shown to be linked with the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) (1). A positive phase of the NAO is associated with more and stronger winter storms crossing the North Atlantic on a more northerly route, causing major anomalies in sea surface temperature, currents and convective activity throughout the North Atlantic. A long-term trend towards very positive values has culminated in the early 1990s, and since then a decreasing trend is happening (1). Identification of the climatic drivers of the net ecosystem fluxes is becoming a rising issue. In particular the effects of year-to-year climate variability on regional budgets and the understanding of the underlying biogeochemical processes are of fundamental importance due to the intensification of extreme climatic events like precipitation (2) and drought events (3). We identified the relations between climatic variability (i.e. NAO) and the regional carbon budgets of North America and Europe over the period from 1989 to 2008. In doing this we kept special focus both on temporal and spatial scale. For this purpose we took advantage of the high-density of FLUXNET measurement sites in these areas. We applied a radiation use efficiency model for gross primary production (4) combined with a semi-empirical total ecosystem respiration model (5). As drivers for the model we used climatic and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FPAR) records. We utilized in-situ calibrated model parameters to estimate the regional ecosystem carbon fluxes. The model was spatially applied according to the similarity in the climatic-phenological space of each grid pixel with the measurement site to which it was calibrated (e.g., 6). We found that for Europe NAO could explain NEE variability in a reasonable way for northern and southern Europe, but for the mid-latitude region this was not the case. For North America the patterns were less clear

  7. Revised methane emissions factors and spatially distributed annual carbon fluxes for global livestock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, Julie; Asrar, Ghassem R.; West, Tristram O.

    2017-09-29

    Background: Livestock play an important role in carbon cycling through consumption of biomass and emissions of methane. Recent research suggests that existing bottom-up inventories of livestock methane emissions in the US, such as those made using 2006 IPCC Tier 1 livestock emissions factors, are too low. This may be due to outdated information used to develop these emissions factors. In this study, we update information for cattle and swine by region, based on reported recent changes in animal body mass, feed quality and quantity, milk productivity, and management of animals and manure. We then use this updated information to calculate new livestock methane emissions factors for enteric fermentation in cattle, and for manure management in cattle and swine.

  8. The Influence of Stand Development on Annual Carbon Exchange in Ponderosa Pine in Eastern Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurpius, M. R.; Irvine, J.; Law, B. E.; Unsworth, M. H.

    2003-12-01

    It is commonly assumed that productivity, and therefore total carbon sequestration, is higher in young, actively growing stands than in old-growth stands. We show that ponderosa pine stands in Oregon did not fit this pattern. Carbon and water fluxes were measured continuously by eddy covariance above young-, mature-, and old-aged ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Dougl. Ex P. & C. Laws.) stands located within 10 km of each other in central Oregon. The general study area is on the east side of the Cascade Mountains and is classified as high desert: winters are cool and wet while summers are hot and dry, resulting in seasonal drought stress. The old site is composed of patches of multiple age classes: 27% (by ground area) old trees (> 250 years old), 25% young trees (cutting and summer maximum LAI is 3.0 (0.1 in understory shrubs). The young site (approx. 16 yrs. old) was previously an old-growth forest that was clearcut in 1978 and allowed to regenerate naturally, and the maximum summer LAI was 1.2 (0.4 in understory shrubs). The mature site had the highest gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) (1350 gC m-2 y-1) but also the highest ecosystem respiration (Re) (940 gC m-2 y-1). The old site had moderately high GEP (1200 gC m-2 y-1) and lower Re (690 gC m-2 y-1). The young site had the lowest GEP (730 gC m-2 y-1 in 2000-2001 and 790 gC m-2 y-1 in 2002) and the lowest Re (550 gC m-2 y-1 in 2000-2001 and 600 gC m-2 y-1 in 2002). Despite having the highest LAI, the mature site did not have the highest net ecosystem exchange (NEE). The balance of GEP and Re resulted in the highest NEE occurring at the old site (-580 +/-75 gC m-2 y-1), which experiences the least severe drought stress according to water potential and sapflow data. NEE at the mature site was moderately high (-435 +/-60 gC m-2 y-1) and was lowest at the young site (-170 +/-20 gC m-2 y-1 in 2000-2001 and -160 +/-20 gC m-2 y-1 in 2002) which experiences the most severe drought stress. The ratio of Re:GEP was 0.6, 0

  9. Dynamic and inertial controls on forest carbon-water relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, T.; Silva, L.; Horwath, W. R.

    2017-12-01

    This study fuses theory, empirical measurements, and statistical models to evaluate multiple processes controlling coupled carbon-water cycles in forest ecosystems. A series of latitudinal and altitudinal transects across the California Sierra Nevada was used to study the effects of climatic and edaphic gradients on intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE) - CO2 fixed per unit of water lost via transpiration - of nine dominant trees species. Transfer functions were determined between leaf, litter, and soil organic matter stable isotope ratios of carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen, revealing causal links between the physiological performance of tree species and stand-level estimations of productivity and water balance. Our results show that species iWUE is governed both by leaf traits (24% of the variation) and edaphic properties, such as parent material and soil development (3% and 12% of the variation, respectively). We show that soil properties combined with isotopic indicators can be used to explain constraints over iWUE by regulating water and nutrient availability across elevation gradients. Based on observed compositional shifts likely driven by changing climates in the region, encroachment of broad leaf trees could lead to an 80% increase in water loss via transpiration for each unit of CO2 fixed in Sierra mixed conifer zones. A combination of field-based, laboratory, and remote sensed data provide a useful framework for differentiating the effect of multiple controls of carbon and water cycles in temperate forest ecosystems.

  10. DYNAMICS OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ABANDONED GRASSLANDS OF NORTHEASTERN MEXICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Israel Yerena Yamallel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Livestock activities due to the improper handling of the load capacity, suffer from low productivity in their grasslands, which are abandoned giving rise to the appearance of species considered invasive and undesirable for producers, without knowing the qualities of these as mitigating of climate change. The objective of the present study was to estimate the carbon content in tamaulipan thornscrub and three abandoned grasslands with a time of abandonment of 10, 20 and 30 years. For the estimation of the carbon content was used a systematic sampling design, in each area were established four sampling sites of 1,600 m2. The primary scrub is the system that resulted in the largest value of carbon content of 14.25 Mg ha-1, followed by the grasslands of 30, 20 and 10 years with 8.03, 7.33 and 4.13 Mg ha-1 respectively. It was concluded that recovering the initial state of the primary scrub take many years, as can be seen in the grasslands system 30 years reaching only 56% of what it had in reserves of primary scrub.

  11. WIMP detection and slow ion dynamics in carbon nanotube arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Cavoto, G.; Cocina, F.; Ferretti, J.; Polosa, A.D.

    2016-06-24

    Large arrays of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), open at one end, could be used as target material for the directional detection of weakly interacting dark matter particles (WIMPs). As a result of a WIMP elastic scattering on a CNT, a carbon ion might be injected in the body of the array and propagate through multiple collisions within the lattice. The ion may eventually emerge from the surface with open end CNTs, provided that its longitudinal momentum is large enough to compensate energy losses and its transverse momentum approaches the channeling conditions in a single CNT. Therefore, the angle formed between the WIMP wind apparent orientation and the direction of parallel carbon nanotube axes must be properly chosen. We focus on very low ion recoil kinetic energies, related to low mass WIMPs (~ 10 GeV) where most of the existing experiments have low sensitivity. Relying on some exact results on two-dimensional lattices of circular obstacles, we study the low energy ion motion in the transverse plane with ...

  12. The application of Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics to the study of tetrahedral amorphous carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, D.R.; McCulloch, D.G.; Goringe, C.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Car-Parrinello method for carrying out molecular dynamics enables the forces between atoms to be calculated by solving Schroedinger's equation for the valence electrons using Density Functional Theory. The method is capable of giving good structural predictions for amorphous network solids by quenching from the melt, even in situations where the bonding changes from one site to another. In amorphous carbon where, depending on its environment, carbon may show sp 2 or sp 3 bonds. The method is applied here to the study of network solids using the example of tetrahedral amorphous carbon

  13. Visualizing the growth dynamics of individual single-wall carbon nanotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Zhang, Lili; He, Maoshuai

    In order to meet the increasing demand of faster and more flexible electronics and optical devices and at the same time decrease the use of the critical metals, carbon based devices are in fast development. Single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) based electronics is a way of addressing...... around the studied sample at elevated temperature gives a unique way of monitoring gas-solid interactions such as CNT growth. Here we show the direct experimental evidence on the growth dynamics of SW-CNTs from Co/MgO catalysts using CO as carbon source inside the environmental TEM. The evolution...

  14. Dynamics of intracellular polymers in enhanced biological phosphorus removal processes under different organic carbon concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Lizhen; Ren, Li; Tang, Bo; Wu, Guangxue; Guan, Yuntao

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) may deteriorate or fail during low organic carbon loading periods. Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) in EBPR were acclimated under both high and low organic carbon conditions, and then dynamics of polymers in typical cycles, anaerobic conditions with excess organic carbons, and endogenous respiration conditions were examined. After long-term acclimation, it was found that organic loading rates did not affect the yield of PAOs and the applied low organic carbon concentrations were advantageous for the enrichment of PAOs. A low influent organic carbon concentration induced a high production of extracellular carbohydrate. During both anaerobic and aerobic endogenous respirations, when glycogen decreased to around 80 ± 10 mg C per gram of volatile suspended solids, PAOs began to utilize polyphosphate significantly. Regressed by the first-order reaction model, glycogen possessed the highest degradation rate and then was followed by polyphosphate, while biomass decay had the lowest degradation rate.

  15. Dynamic Self-Stiffening and Structural Evolutions of Polyacrylonitrile/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinhui; Zhou, Pucha; An, Feng; Liu, Yaodong; Lu, Chunxiang

    2017-02-15

    The self-stiffening under external dynamic strain has been observed for some artificial materials, especially for nanocomposites. However, few systematic studies have been carried out on their structural evolutions, and the effect of the types of nanofillers was unclear. In this study, we used a semicrystalline polymer, polyacrylonitrile (PAN), and various types of carbon nanomaterials including C 60 , carbon nanotube (CNT), and graphene oxide (GO). An external uniaxial dynamic strain at small amplitude of 0.2% was applied on the prepared nanocomposite films. It was observed that PAN/CNT exhibited significant self-stiffening behavior, whereas PAN/GO showed no response. Systematic characterizations were performed to determine the structural evolutions of PAN/CNT film during dynamic strain testing, and it was found that the external dynamic strain not only induced the crystallization of PAN chains but also aligned CNT along the strain direction.

  16. The dynamics of avian influenza in western Arctic snow geese: implications for annual and migratory infection patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Michael D.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Brown, Justin D.; Goldberg, Diana R.; Ip, Hon S.; Baranyuk, Vasily V.

    2015-01-01

    Wild water birds are the natural reservoir for low-pathogenic avian influenza viruses (AIV). However, our ability to investigate the epizootiology of AIV in these migratory populations is challenging, and despite intensive worldwide surveillance, remains poorly understood. We conducted a cross-sectional, retrospective analysis in Pacific Flyway lesser snow geese Chen caerulescens to investigate AIV serology and infection patterns. We collected nearly 3,000 sera samples from snow geese at 2 breeding colonies in Russia and Canada during 1993-1996 and swab samples from > 4,000 birds at wintering and migration areas in the United States during 2006-2011. We found seroprevalence and annual seroconversion varied considerably among years. Seroconversion and infection rates also differed between snow goose breeding colonies and wintering areas, suggesting that AIV exposure in this gregarious waterfowl species is likely occurring during several phases (migration, wintering and potentially breeding areas) of the annual cycle. We estimated AIV antibody persistence was longer (14 months) in female geese compared to males (6 months). This relatively long period of AIV antibody persistence suggests that subtype-specific serology may be an effective tool for detection of exposure to subtypes associated with highly-pathogenic AIV. Our study provides further evidence of high seroprevalence in Arctic goose populations, and estimates of annual AIV seroconversion and antibody persistence for North American waterfowl. We suggest future AIV studies include serology to help elucidate the epizootiological dynamics of AIV in wild bird populations.

  17. Non-Equilibrium Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Poiseuille Flow in a Carbon Nanochannel

    OpenAIRE

    Ni, Guo Liang; He, Ming Li; Hua, Yao Zu; Abareshi, Bagher

    2017-01-01

    International audience; The numerical simulation of a Poiseuille flow in a narrow channel using the molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) is performed. Poiseuille flow of liquid Argon in a carbon nanochannel is simulated by embedding the fluid particles in a uniform force field. Density, velocity and Temperature profiles across the channel are investigated. When particles will be inserted into the flow, it is expected that the dynamics of flow will depend on the thermostat chosen. To obtain a m...

  18. Incorporating microbial dormancy dynamics into soil decomposition models to improve quantification of soil carbon dynamics of northern temperate forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yujie [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences; Yang, Jinyan [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources; Northeast Forestry Univ., Harbin (China). Center for Ecological Research; Zhuang, Qianlai [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences; Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Agronomy; Harden, Jennifer W. [U.S. Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); McGuire, Anthony D. [Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, U.S. Geological Survey, Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit; Liu, Yaling [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Earth, Atmospheric, and Planetary Sciences; Wang, Gangsheng [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Climate Change Science Inst. and Environmental Sciences Division; Gu, Lianhong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Division

    2015-11-20

    Soil carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Microbial-based decomposition models have seen much growth recently for quantifying this role, yet dormancy as a common strategy used by microorganisms has not usually been represented and tested in these models against field observations. Here in this study we developed an explicit microbial-enzyme decomposition model and examined model performance with and without representation of microbial dormancy at six temperate forest sites of different forest types. We then extrapolated the model to global temperate forest ecosystems to investigate biogeochemical controls on soil heterotrophic respiration and microbial dormancy dynamics at different temporal-spatial scales. The dormancy model consistently produced better match with field-observed heterotrophic soil CO2 efflux (RH) than the no dormancy model. Our regional modeling results further indicated that models with dormancy were able to produce more realistic magnitude of microbial biomass (<2% of soil organic carbon) and soil RH (7.5 ± 2.4 PgCyr-1). Spatial correlation analysis showed that soil organic carbon content was the dominating factor (correlation coefficient = 0.4-0.6) in the simulated spatial pattern of soil RH with both models. In contrast to strong temporal and local controls of soil temperature and moisture on microbial dormancy, our modeling results showed that soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C:N) was a major regulating factor at regional scales (correlation coefficient = -0.43 to -0.58), indicating scale-dependent biogeochemical controls on microbial dynamics. Our findings suggest that incorporating microbial dormancy could improve the realism of microbial-based decomposition models and enhance the integration of soil experiments and mechanistically based modeling.

  19. Graphene and carbon nanotubes ultrafast relaxation dynamics and optics

    CERN Document Server

    Malic, Ermin

    2013-01-01

    The book introduces the reader into the ultrafast nanoworld of graphene and carbon nanotubes, including their microscopic tracks and unique optical finger prints. The author reviews the recent progress in this field by combining theoretical and experimental achievements. He offers a clear theoretical foundation by presenting transparently derived equations. Recent experimental breakthroughs are reviewed. By combining both theory and experiment as well as main results and detailed theoretical derivations, the book turns into an inevitable source for a wider audience from graduate students to researchers in physics, materials science, and electrical engineering who work on optoelectronic devices, renewable energies, or in the semiconductor industry.

  20. Carbon dioxide and methane dynamics in Russian tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Paul Torbjörn; Kiepe, Isabell; Herbst, Mathias

    Russia. The area is situated at 67°N in the European part of northeast Russia within the Pechora basin. The Russian tundra region is an area which has recently been subject to many speculations in relation to climatic change effects and greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange but still little scientific......, and discuss possible implications of climatic change on this lowland tundra ecosystem. This study have been conducted as a part of the CARBO-North project (2006-2010), a project within the EU 6th framework programme, aiming at quantifying the carbon budget in Northern Russia across temporal and spatial scales....

  1. Linking root hydraulic properties to carbon allocation patterns in annual plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, A.; Ewers, B. E.; Adjesiwor, A. T.; Kniss, A. R.

    2017-12-01

    Incorporation of root structure and function into biophysical models is an important tool to predict plant water and nutrient uptake from the soil, plant carbon (C) assimilation, partitioning and release to the soils. Most of the models describing root water uptake (RWU) are based on semi-empirical (i.e. built on physiological hypotheses, but still combined with empirical functions) approaches and hydraulic parameters involved are hardly available. Root conductance is essential to define the interaction between soil-to-root and canopy-to-atmosphere. Also root hydraulic limitations to water flow can impact gas exchange rates and plant biomass partitioning. In this study, sugar beet (B. vulgaris) seeds under two treatments, grass (Kentucky bluegrass) and no grass (control), were planted in 19 L plastic buckets in June 2016. Photosynthetic characteristics (e.g. gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence), leaf morphology and anatomy, root morphology and above and below ground biomass of the plants was monitored at 15, 30, 50, 70 and 90 days after planting (DAP). Further emphasis was placed on the limits to water flow by coupling of hydraulic conductance (k) whole root-system with water relation parameters and gas exchange rates in fully established plants.

  2. The effect of cyclic and dynamic loads on carbon steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudland, D.L.; Scott, P.M.; Wilkowski, G.M.

    1996-02-01

    This report presents the results of four 152-mm (6-inch) diameter, unpressurized, circumferential through-wall-cracked, dynamic pipe experiments fabricated from STS410 carbon steel pipe manufactured in Japan. For three of these experiments, the through-wall crack was in the base metal. The displacement histories applied to these experiments were a quasi-static monotonic, dynamic monotonic, and dynamic, cyclic (R = -1) history. The through-wall crack for the third experiment was in a tungsten-inert-gas weld, fabricated in Japan, joining two lengths of STS410 pipe. The displacement history for this experiment was the same history applied to the dynamic, cyclic base metal experiment. The test temperature for each experiment was 300 C (572 F). The objective of these experiments was to compare a Japanese carbon steel pipe material with US pipe material, to ascertain whether this Japanese steel was as sensitive to dynamic and cyclic effects as US carbon steel pipe. In support of these pipe experiments, quasi-static and dynamic, tensile and fracture toughness tests were conducted. An analysis effort was performed that involved comparing experimental crack initiation and maximum moments with predictions based on available fracture prediction models, and calculating J-R curves for the pipe experiments using the η-factor method

  3. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuexin Shao

    Full Text Available Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC, excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC. The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1 and DOC (306 mg kg-1, while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1, and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1. Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1, and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1 and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1; however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1, β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1, and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1. Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands.

  4. Seasonal Dynamics of Soil Labile Organic Carbon and Enzyme Activities in Relation to Vegetation Types in Hangzhou Bay Tidal Flat Wetland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Xuexin; Yang, Wenying; Wu, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Soil labile organic carbon and soil enzymes play important roles in the carbon cycle of coastal wetlands that have high organic carbon accumulation rates. Soils under three vegetations (Phragmites australis, Spartina alterniflora, and Scirpusm mariqueter) as well as bare mudflat in Hangzhou Bay wetland of China were collected seasonally. Seasonal dynamics and correlations of soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that there were significant differences among vegetation types in the contents of soil organic carbon (SOC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC), excepting for that of microbial biomass carbon (MBC). The P. australis soil was with the highest content of both SOC (7.86 g kg-1) and DOC (306 mg kg-1), while the S. mariqueter soil was with the lowest content of SOC (6.83 g kg-1), and the bare mudflat was with the lowest content of DOC (270 mg kg-1). Soil enzyme activities were significantly different among vegetation types except for urease. The P. australis had the highest annual average activity of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (21.4 mg kg-1 h-1), and the S. alterniflora had the highest annual average activities of β-glycosidase (4.10 mg kg-1 h-1) and invertase (9.81 mg g-1 24h-1); however, the bare mudflat had the lowest activities of alkaline phosphomonoesterase (16.2 mg kg-1 h-1), β-glycosidase (2.87 mg kg-1 h-1), and invertase (8.02 mg g-1 24h-1). Analysis also showed that the soil labile organic carbon fractions and soil enzyme activities had distinct seasonal dynamics. In addition, the soil MBC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease and β-glucosidase. The DOC content was significantly correlated with the activities of urease, alkaline phosphomonoesterase, and invertase. The results indicated that vegetation type is an important factor influencing the spatial-temporal variation of soil enzyme activities and labile organic carbon in coastal wetlands.

  5. Disentangling density-dependent dynamics using full annual cycle models and Bayesian model weight updating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Orin J.; McGowan, Conor P.; Devers, Patrick K.

    2017-01-01

    Density dependence regulates populations of many species across all taxonomic groups. Understanding density dependence is vital for predicting the effects of climate, habitat loss and/or management actions on wild populations. Migratory species likely experience seasonal changes in the relative influence of density dependence on population processes such as survival and recruitment throughout the annual cycle. These effects must be accounted for when characterizing migratory populations via population models.To evaluate effects of density on seasonal survival and recruitment of a migratory species, we used an existing full annual cycle model framework for American black ducks Anas rubripes, and tested different density effects (including no effects) on survival and recruitment. We then used a Bayesian model weight updating routine to determine which population model best fit observed breeding population survey data between 1990 and 2014.The models that best fit the survey data suggested that survival and recruitment were affected by density dependence and that density effects were stronger on adult survival during the breeding season than during the non-breeding season.Analysis also suggests that regulation of survival and recruitment by density varied over time. Our results showed that different characterizations of density regulations changed every 8–12 years (three times in the 25-year period) for our population.Synthesis and applications. Using a full annual cycle, modelling framework and model weighting routine will be helpful in evaluating density dependence for migratory species in both the short and long term. We used this method to disentangle the seasonal effects of density on the continental American black duck population which will allow managers to better evaluate the effects of habitat loss and potential habitat management actions throughout the annual cycle. The method here may allow researchers to hone in on the proper form and/or strength of

  6. Temperature exerts no influence on carbon isotope ratios in soil along the 400 mm isopleth of mean annual precipitation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guoan

    2017-04-01

    Soil organic carbon is the largest pool of carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem, and its isotopic composition is affected by a number of factors. However, the influence of environmental factors, especially temperature, on soil organic carbon isotope values is poorly constrained. This impedes the application of the variability of organic carbon isotopes to reconstructions of paleoclimate, paleoecology, and global carbon cycling. Given the considerable temperature gradient along the 400 mm isohyet (isopleth of mean annual precipitation - MAP) in China, this isohyet provides ideal experimental sites for studying the influence of temperature on soil organic carbon isotopes. In this study, the effect of temperature on surface soil carbon isotope composition was assessed by a comprehensive investigation of 27 sites across a temperature gradient along the isohyet. Results demonstrate that temperature does not play a role in soil carbon isotope. This suggests that organic carbon isotopes in sediments cannot be used for paleotemperature reconstruction and that the effect of temperature on organic carbon isotopes can be neglected in the reconstruction of paleoclimate and paleovegetation. Multiple regressions with MAT (mean annual temperature), MAP, altitude, latitude, and longitude as independent variables and soil carbon isotope as the dependent variable show that these five environmental factors together account for only 9% of soil carbon isotope variance. However, one-way ANOVA analyses suggest that soil type and vegetation type are significant factors influencing soil carbon isotope. Multiple regressions, in which the five aforementioned environmental factors were taken as quantitative variables, and vegetation type, soil type based on the Chinese Soil Taxonomy, and World Reference Base (WRB) soil type were separately used as dummy variables, show that 36.2, 37.4, and 29.7%, respectively, of the variability in soil carbon isotope are explained. Compared to the multiple

  7. Incorporating microbial dormancy dynamics into soil decomposition models to improve quantification of soil carbon dynamics of northern temperate forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yujie; Yang, Jinyan; Zhuang, Qianlai; Harden, Jennifer W.; McGuire, A. David; Liu, Yaling; Wang, Gangsheng; Gu, Lianhong

    2015-01-01

    Soil carbon dynamics of terrestrial ecosystems play a significant role in the global carbon cycle. Microbial-based decomposition models have seen much growth recently for quantifying this role, yet dormancy as a common strategy used by microorganisms has not usually been represented and tested in these models against field observations. Here we developed an explicit microbial-enzyme decomposition model and examined model performance with and without representation of microbial dormancy at six temperate forest sites of different forest types. We then extrapolated the model to global temperate forest ecosystems to investigate biogeochemical controls on soil heterotrophic respiration and microbial dormancy dynamics at different temporal-spatial scales. The dormancy model consistently produced better match with field-observed heterotrophic soil CO2 efflux (RH) than the no dormancy model. Our regional modeling results further indicated that models with dormancy were able to produce more realistic magnitude of microbial biomass (dormancy, our modeling results showed that soil carbon-to-nitrogen ratio (C:N) was a major regulating factor at regional scales (correlation coefficient = −0.43 to −0.58), indicating scale-dependent biogeochemical controls on microbial dynamics. Our findings suggest that incorporating microbial dormancy could improve the realism of microbial-based decomposition models and enhance the integration of soil experiments and mechanistically based modeling.

  8. Spatiotemporal visualization of subcellular dynamics of carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Serag, Maged F.

    2012-12-12

    To date, there is no consensus on the relationship between the physicochemical characteristics of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their biological behavior; however, there is growing evidence that the versatile characteristics make their biological fate largely unpredictable and remain an issue of limited knowledge. Here we introduce an experimental methodology for tracking and visualization of postuptake behavior and the intracellular fate of CNTs based on the spatial distribution of diffusion values throughout the plant cell. By using raster scan image correlation spectroscopy (RICS), we were able to generate highly quantitative spatial maps of CNTs diffusion in different cell compartments. The spatial map of diffusion values revealed that the uptake of CNTs is associated with important subcellular events such as carrier-mediated vacuolar transport and autophagy. These results show that RICS is a useful methodology to elucidate the intracellular behavior mechanisms of carbon nanotubes and potentially other fluorescently labeled nanoparticles, which is of relevance for the important issues related to the environmental impact and health hazards. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  9. Climate policies between carbon prices, oil rents and urban dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waisman, H.

    2012-01-01

    This thesis investigates the effects of constraints imposed on economic interactions by limitations due to natural resources, among which oil and urban land play a crucial role in the context of climate change. These dimensions, often neglected in existing analyses, have an ambiguous effect since they suggest both the risk of enhanced costs if carbon limitations reinforce the sub-optimalities caused by pre-existing constraints, but also, conversely, the possibility of co-benefits if the climate policy helps to correct some pre-existing imperfections of socio-economic trajectories. To investigate this issue, an innovative modeling framework of the energy-economy interactions is elaborated that embarks the specificities of the deployment of oil production capacities and the issues related to the spatial organization in urban areas. We demonstrate that, beyond the carbon price, the costs of climate policy essentially depend on the sequencing of complementary measures, with a crucial role of spatial policy designed to control transport-related emissions through mobility. (author)

  10. Response of tundra ecosystems to elevated atmospheric carbon dioxide. [Annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oechel, W.C.; Grulke, N.E.

    1988-12-31

    Our past research shows that arctic tussock tundra responds to elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with marked increases in net ecosystem carbon flux and photosynthetic rates. However, at ambient temperatures and nutrient availabilities, homeostatic adjustments result in net ecosystem flux rates dropping to those found a contemporary CO{sub 2} levels within three years. Evidence for ecosystem-level acclimation in the first season of elevated CO{sub 2} exposure was found in 1987. Photosynthetic rates of Eriophorum vaginatum, the dominant species, adjusts to elevated CO{sub 2} within three weeks. Past research also indicates other changes potentially important to ecosystem structure and function. Elevated CO{sub 2} treatment apparently delays senescence and increases the period of positive photosynthetic activity. Recent results from the 1987 field season verify the results obtained in the 1983--1986 field seasons: Elevated CO{sub 2} resulted in increased ecosystem-level flux rates. Regressions fitted to the seasonal flux rates indicate an apparent 10 d extension of positive CO{sub 2} uptake reflecting a delay of the onset of plant dormancy. This delay in senescence could increase the frost sensitivity of the system. Major end points proposed for this research include the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and the interaction of elevated atmospheric CO{sub 2} with elevated soil temperature and increased nutrient availability on: (1) Net ecosystem CO{sub 2} flux; (2) Net photosynthetic rates; (3) Patterns and resource controls on homeostatic adjustment in the above processes to elevated CO{sub 2}; (4) Plant-nutrient status, litter quality, and forage quality; (5) Soil-nutrient status; (6) Plant-growth pattern and shoot demography.

  11. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Hanson, S.G.

    1991-02-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department covers plasma physics, fluid dynamics, optics, and neural networks. Plasma physics is concentrated on basic investigations with relevance to fusion plasmas. Both theoretical and experimental work has been performed. Pellet injection systems have been developed. Within the area of fluid dynamics spectral models for studying the dynamcis of coherent structures have been developed. Optical diagnostic methods based on quasi-elastic light scattering have been developed. Beam propagation in random and nonlinear media has been investigated. Spatial and temporal processing schemes, especially for pattern recognition, have been investigated. (author)

  12. Measuring radiation damage dynamics by pulsed ion beam irradiation: 2016 project annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucheyev, Sergei O. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-01-04

    The major goal of this project is to develop and demonstrate a novel experimental approach to access the dynamic regime of radiation damage formation in nuclear materials. In particular, the project exploits a pulsed-ion-beam method in order to gain insight into defect interaction dynamics by measuring effective defect interaction time constants and defect diffusion lengths. For Year 3, this project had the following two major milestones: (i) the demonstration of the measurement of thermally activated defect-interaction processes by pulsed ion beam techniques and (ii) the demonstration of alternative characterization techniques to study defect dynamics. As we describe below, both of these milestones have been met.

  13. Fluido-Dynamic and Electromagnetic Characterization of 3D Carbon Dielectrophoresis with Finite Element Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Martinez-Duarte

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The following work presents the fluido-dynamic and electromagnetic characterization of an array of 3D electrodes to be used in high throughput and high efficiency Carbon Dielectrophoresis (CarbonDEP applications such as filters, continuous particle enrichment and positioning of particle populations for analysis. CarbonDEP refers to the induction of Dielectrophoresis (DEP by carbon surfaces. The final goal is, through an initial stage of modeling and analysis, to reduce idea-to-prototype time and cost of CarbonDEP devices to be applied in the health care field. Finite Element Analysis (FEA is successfully conducted to model flow velocity and electric fields established by polarized high aspect ratio carbon cylinders, and its planar carbon connecting leads, immersed in a water-based medium. Results demonstrate correlation between a decreasing flow velocity gradient and an increasing electric field gradient toward electrodes’ surfaces which is optimal for selected CarbonDEP applications. Simulation results are experimentally validated in the proposed applications.

  14. Applications of Remote Sensing for Studying Lateral Carbon Fluxes and Inundation Dynamics in Tidal Wetlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, B. T.; Tzortziou, M.; McDonald, K. C.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands play a key role in Earth's carbon cycle. However, wetland carbon cycling exhibits a high level of spatiotemporal dynamism, and thus, is not as well understood as carbon cycling in other ecosystems. In order to accurately characterize wetland carbon cycling and fluxes, wetland vegetation phenology, seasonal inundation dynamics, and tidal regimes must be understood as these factors influence carbon generation and transport. Here, we use radar remote sensing to map wetland properties in the Chesapeake Bay, the largest estuary in the United States with more than 1,500 square miles of tidal wetlands, across a range of tidal amplitudes, salinity regimes, and soil organic matter content levels. We have been using Sentinel-1 and ALOS PALSAR-1 radar measurements to characterize vegetation and seasonal inundation dynamics with the future goal of characterizing salinity gradients and tidal regimes. Differences in radar backscatter from various surface targets has been shown to effectively discriminate between dry soil, wet soil, vegetated areas, and open water. Radar polarization differences and ratios are particularly effective at distinguishing between vegetated and non-vegetated areas. Utilizing these principles, we have been characterizing wetland types using supervised classification techniques including: Random Forest, Maximum Likelihood, and Minimum Distance. The National Wetlands Inventory has been used as training and validation data. Ideally, the techniques we outline in this research will be applicable to the characterization of wetlands in coastal areas outside of Chesapeake Bay.

  15. Young's moduli of carbon materials investigated by various classical molecular dynamics schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayk, Florian; Ehrens, Julian; Heitmann, Tjark; Vorndamme, Patrick; Mrugalla, Andreas; Schnack, Jürgen

    2018-05-01

    For many applications classical carbon potentials together with classical molecular dynamics are employed to calculate structures and physical properties of such carbon-based materials where quantum mechanical methods fail either due to the excessive size, irregular structure or long-time dynamics. Although such potentials, as for instance implemented in LAMMPS, yield reasonably accurate bond lengths and angles for several carbon materials such as graphene, it is not clear how accurate they are in terms of mechanical properties such as for instance Young's moduli. We performed large-scale classical molecular dynamics investigations of three carbon-based materials using the various potentials implemented in LAMMPS as well as the EDIP potential of Marks. We show how the Young's moduli vary with classical potentials and compare to experimental results. Since classical descriptions of carbon are bound to be approximations it is not astonishing that different realizations yield differing results. One should therefore carefully check for which observables a certain potential is suited. Our aim is to contribute to such a clarification.

  16. Land-use dynamics influence estimates of carbon sequestration potential in tropical second-growth forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Naomi B.; Uriarte, María; DeFries, Ruth; Gutierrez-Velez, Victor H.; Pinedo-Vasquez, Miguel A.

    2017-07-01

    Many countries have made major commitments to carbon sequestration through reforestation under the Paris Climate Agreement, and recent studies have illustrated the potential for large amounts of carbon sequestration in tropical second-growth forests. However, carbon gains in second-growth forests are threatened by non-permanence, i.e. release of carbon into the atmosphere from clearing or disturbance. The benefits of second-growth forests require long-term persistence on the landscape, but estimates of carbon potential rarely consider the spatio-temporal landscape dynamics of second-growth forests. In this study, we used remotely sensed imagery from a landscape in the Peruvian Amazon to examine patterns of second-growth forest regrowth and permanence over 28 years (1985-2013). By 2013, 44% of all forest cover in the study area was second growth and more than 50% of second-growth forest pixels were less than 5 years old. We modeled probabilities of forest regrowth and clearing as a function of landscape factors. The amount of neighboring forest and variables related to pixel position (i.e. distance to edge) were important for predicting both clearing and regrowth. Forest age was the strongest predictor of clearing probability and suggests a threshold response of clearing probability to age. Finally, we simulated future trajectories of carbon sequestration using the parameters from our models. We compared this with the amount of biomass that would accumulate under the assumption of second-growth permanence. Estimates differed by 900 000 tonnes, equivalent to over 80% of Peru’s commitment to carbon sequestration through ‘community reforestation’ under the Paris Agreement. Though the study area has more than 40 000 hectares of second-growth forest, only a small proportion is likely to accumulate significant carbon. Instead, cycles between forest and non-forest are common. Our results illustrate the importance of considering landscape dynamics when assessing

  17. [Seasonal dynamics of soil organic carbon and active organic carbon fractions in Calamagrostis angustifolia wetlands topsoil under different water conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Cui-Cui; Song, Chang-Chun; Li, Ying-Chen; Guo, Yue-Dong

    2011-01-01

    The experiment was carried in Sanjiang Plain in the northeast of China during the growing season in 2009. Soil organic carbon (SOC), as well as the soil active organic carbon fractions in the 0-20 cm soil layer of Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland under different water conditions were on monthly observation. Based on the research and indoor analysis, the seasonal dynamics of light fractions of soil organic carbon (LFOC) and microbial biomass carbon (MBC) were analyzed. The results indicated that the SOC contents had significantly seasonal dynamics, and the hydrological circle had apparently driving effect on LFOC and MBC during the growing season, especially under the seasonal flooded condition. The freeze-thaw process reduced the SOC, LFOC, MBC contents, with the decreases of 74.53%, 80.93%, 83.09%, while both carbon contents of light and heavy fractions were reduced at the same time. The result also showed that the seasonal flooding condition increased the proportion of LFOC in topsoil, which was larger in marsh meadow (13.58%) than in wet meadow (11.96%), whilst the MBC in marsh meadow (1 397.21 mg x kg(-1)) was less than the latter (1 603.65 mg x kg(-1)), proving that the inundated environment inhibited the mineralization and decomposition of organic matter. But the microbial activity could be adaptive to the flooding condition. During the growing season the MBC soared to 1 829.21 mg x kg(-1) from 337.56 mg x kg(-1) in July, and the microbial quotient was 1.51 times higher than that in June, indicating the high microbial efficacy of soil organic matter. Meanwhile, there was a significant correlation between the contents of LFOC and SOC (r = 0.816), suggesting that higher LFOC content was favorable to the soil carbon accumulation. Moreover, in the seasonal flooded Calamagrostis angustifolia wetland the soil LFOC content was significantly correlated with MBC (r = 0.95), implying that the available carbon source had more severe restriction on the microbial

  18. Modeling water, carbon, and nitrogen dynamics for two drained pine plantations under intensive management practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiying Tian; Mohamed A. Youssef; R. Wayne Skaggs; Devendra Amatya; George M. Chescheir

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports results of a study to test the reliability of the DRAINMOD-FOREST model for predicting water, soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in intensively managed forests. The study site, two adjacent loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) plantations (referred as D2 and D3), are located in the coastal plain of North Carolina, USA. Controlled drainage (with weir...

  19. Amazon forest carbon dynamics predicted by profiles of canopy leaf area and light environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    S. C. Stark; V. Leitold; J. L. Wu; M. O. Hunter; C. V. de Castilho; F. R. C. Costa; S. M. McMahon; G. G. Parker; M. Takako Shimabukuro; M. A. Lefsky; M. Keller; L. F. Alves; J. Schietti; Y. E. Shimabukuro; D. O. Brandao; T. K. Woodcock; N. Higuchi; P. B de Camargo; R. C. de Oliveira; S. R. Saleska

    2012-01-01

    Tropical forest structural variation across heterogeneous landscapes may control above-ground carbon dynamics. We tested the hypothesis that canopy structure (leaf area and light availability) – remotely estimated from LiDAR – control variation in above-ground coarse wood production (biomass growth). Using a statistical model, these factors predicted biomass growth...

  20. BACTERIOPLANKTON DYNAMICS IN PENSACOLA BAY, FL, USA: ROLE OF PHYTOPLANKTON AND DETRIAL CARBON SOURCES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterioplankton Dynamics in Pensacola Bay, FL, USA: Role of Phytoplankton and Detrital Carbon Sources (Abstract). To be presented at the16th Biennial Conference of the Estuarine Research Foundation, ERF 2001: An Estuarine Odyssey, 4-8 November 2001, St. Pete Beach, FL. 1 p. (ER...

  1. Effects of harvest on carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a Pacific Northwest forest catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alex Abdelnour; Robert B. McKane; Marc Stieglitz; Feifei Pan; Yiwei. Cheng

    2013-01-01

    We used a new ecohydrological model, Visualizing Ecosystems for Land Management Assessments (VELMA), to analyze the effects of forest harvest on catchment carbon and nitrogen dynamics. We applied the model to a 10 ha headwater catchment in the western Oregon Cascade Range where two major disturbance events have occurred during the past 500 years: a stand-replacing fire...

  2. Carbon respiration and nitrogen dynamics in Corsican pine litter amended with aluminium and tannins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraal, P.; Nierop, K.G.J.; Kaal, J.; Tietema, A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the carbon (C) mineralisation and nitrogen (N) dynamics in litter from a Corsican pine forest in response to individual and combined additions of aluminium (M), condensed tannin (extracted from fresh Corsican pine needles) and hydrolysable tannin (commercial tannic acid). Production

  3. An integrated model of soil, hydrology, and vegetation for carbon dynamics in wetland ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu Zhang; Changsheng Li; Carl C. Trettin; Harbin Li; Ge Sun

    2002-01-01

    Wetland ecosystems are an important component in global carbon (C) cycles and may exert a large influence on global clinlate change. Predictions of C dynamics require us to consider interactions among many critical factors of soil, hydrology, and vegetation. However, few such integrated C models exist for wetland ecosystems. In this paper, we report a simulation model...

  4. Burrowing herbivores alter soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics in a semi-arid ecosystem, Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth L. Clark; Lyn C. Branch; Jose L. Hierro; Diego. Villarreal

    2016-01-01

    Activities of burrowing herbivores, including movement of soil and litter and deposition of waste material, can alter the distribution of labile carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) in soil, affecting spatial patterning of nutrient dynamics in ecosystems where they are abundant. Their role in ecosystem processes in surface soil has been studied extensively, but effects of...

  5. Dynamic mechanical and dielectric properties of ethylene vinyl acetate/carbon nanotube composites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Valentová, H.; Ilčíková, M.; Czaniková, K.; Špitalský, Z.; Šlouf, Miroslav; Nedbal, J.; Omastová, M.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2014), s. 496-512 ISSN 0022-2348 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020118 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : carbon nanotubes * dielectric relaxation spectroscopy * dynamic mechanical analysis Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.740, year: 2014

  6. Dynamics in carbon exchange fluxes for a grazed semi-arid savanna ecosystem in West Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tagesson, Torbern; Fensholt, Rasmus; Cropley, Ford

    2015-01-01

    The main aim of this paper is to study land-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide (CO2) for semi-arid savanna ecosystems of the Sahel region and its response to climatic and environmental change. A subsidiary aim is to study and quantify the seasonal dynamics in light use efficiency (ε) being a key...... variable in scaling carbon fluxes from ground observations using earth observation data. The net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide (NEE) 2010-2013 was measured using the eddy covariance technique at a grazed semi-arid savanna site in Senegal, West Africa. Night-time NEE was not related to temperature...... (C) MJ-1 for the dry season and 2.27gCMJ-1 for the peak of the rainy season, and its seasonal dynamics was governed by vegetation phenology, photosynthetically active radiation, soil moisture and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). The CO2 exchange fluxes were very high in comparison to other semi...

  7. Carbon dioxide and methane dynamics in Russian tundra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Paul Torbjörn; Kiepe, Isabell; Herbst, Mathias

    Russia. The area is situated at 67°N in the European part of northeast Russia within the Pechora basin. The Russian tundra region is an area which has recently been subject to many speculations in relation to climatic change effects and greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange but still little scientific......, and discuss possible implications of climatic change on this lowland tundra ecosystem. This study have been conducted as a part of the CARBO-North project (2006-2010), a project within the EU 6th framework programme, aiming at quantifying the carbon budget in Northern Russia across temporal and spatial scales....... evidence is available from this region. At present, there are fundamental questions to answer about the CH4 concentration in the atmosphere and its oscillations and what role CH4 exchange may have under future climatic conditions, To do so, we need to better understand the ecosystem- atmosphere...

  8. Nitrogen Deposition Effects on Soil Carbon Dynamics in Temperate Forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ginzburg Ozeri, Shimon

    edges were used to study the effects of varying N deposition load on SOC stocks and fluxes as well as on the temperature sensitivity of SOM respiration. In a third study, the effects of 20 years of continuous experimental N addition (35 kg N ha-1 year-1) on soil C budget were investigated. Our general...... incubated in litterbags had significantly lower late-stage decomposition rates compared with control litter. However, potential respiration of forest floor and mineral soil was overall unaffected by the experimental N-additions. A temperature treatment of forest floor samples taken from one edge site......Soils contain the largest fraction of terrestrial carbon (C). Understanding the factors regulating the decomposition and storage of soil organic matter (SOM) is essential for predictions of the C sink strength of the terrestrial environment in the light of global change. Elevated long-term nitrogen...

  9. Molecular dynamics study of radiation damage and microstructure evolution of zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes under carbon ion incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Tang, Xiaobin; Chen, Feida; Huang, Hai; Liu, Jian; Chen, Da

    2016-07-01

    The radiation damage and microstructure evolution of different zigzag single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were investigated under incident carbon ion by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The radiation damage of SWCNTs under incident carbon ion with energy ranging from 25 eV to 1 keV at 300 K showed many differences at different incident sites, and the defect production increased to the maximum value with the increase in incident ion energy, and slightly decreased but stayed fairly stable within the majority of the energy range. The maximum damage of SWCNTs appeared when the incident ion energy reached 200 eV and the level of damage was directly proportional to incident ion fluence. The radiation damage was also studied at 100 K and 700 K and the defect production decreased distinctly with rising temperature because radiation-induced defects would anneal and recombine by saturating dangling bonds and reconstructing carbon network at the higher temperature. Furthermore, the stability of a large-diameter tube surpassed that of a thin one under the same radiation environments.

  10. Carbon value dynamics for France: A key driver to support mitigation pledges at country scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assoumou, Edi, E-mail: edi.assoumou@mines-paristech.fr [Centre for Applied Mathematics, MINES ParisTech (France); Maizi, Nadia [Centre for Applied Mathematics, MINES ParisTech (France)

    2011-07-15

    The climate agenda in France and several other countries is a complex combination of unilateral commitments with regional and international objectives. When analyzing national policies, the findings of worldwide analyses are of limited accuracy and the large aggregates on which they are built level out most local specificities and inertia. Specific assessments are hence needed. This paper quantifies the dynamic evolution of carbon values for French climate and energy policy. Its time dependency over successive periods and the effects of setting intermediate targets are evaluated using a long-term optimization model. Addressing critical issues for France, we produce consistent energy, emissions and carbon value estimates with a 5-year time step. Our results are situated above the upper range of carbon value estimates of world models with an overlapping zone. We show that the official policy guideline value is only consistent with an optimistic combination of assumptions. The central estimates are 4 times greater than the guideline carbon value for 2050 and up to 14 times greater in 2020 because of short-term inertia that are costly to move. We also find that with intermediate objectives, the carbon value's dynamic is more than a simple upward curve and that its variability is itself time dependent. - Highlights: > We quantify the dynamic evolution of carbon values for France. > We use a long-term optimization energy model from the MARKAL family. > We compute consistent energy balances for different climate and energy policy. > We show that the official guideline is only consistent with optimistic assumptions. > The dynamic is not a simple upward curve and influencing parameters are analyzed.

  11. Application of Fast Pyrolysis Biochar to a Loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Esben

    and at the same time mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil. In general, the inherent physicochemical characteristics of biochars make these materials attractive agronomic soil conditioners. However, different pyrolysis technologies exist, i.e. slow pyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, and full...... gasification systems, and each of these influence the biochar quality differently. As of yet, there is only limited knowledge on the effect of applying fast pyrolysis biochar (FP-biochar) to soil. This PhD project provides new insights into the short-term impacts of adding FP-biochar to soil on the greenhouse...... gas (GHG) emissions and on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The FP-biochars investigated in the thesis were generated at different reactor temperatures by fast pyrolysis of wheat straw employing a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). The carbohydrate content ranged from more than 35 % in FP...

  12. Historical analysis and modeling of the forest carbon dynamics using the Carbon Budget Model: an example for the Trento Province (NE, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilli R

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Historical analysis and modeling of the forest carbon dynamics using the Carbon Budget Model: an example for the Trento Province (NE, Italy. The Carbon Budget Model (CBM-CFS3 developed by the Canadian Forest Service was applied to data collected by the last Italian National Forest Inventory (INFC for the Trento Province (NE, Italy. CBM was modified and adapted to the different management types (i.e., even-aged high forests, uneven-aged high forests and coppices and silvicultural systems (including clear cuts, single tree selection systems and thinning applied in this province. The aim of this study was to provide an example of down-scaling of this model from a national to a regional scale, providing (i an historical analysis, from 1995 to 2011, and (ii a projection, from 2012 to 2020, of the forest biomass and the carbon stock evolution. The analysis was based on the harvest rate reported by the Italian National Institute of Statistics (from 1995 to 2011, corrected according to the last INFC data and distinguished between timber and fuel woods and between conifers and broadleaves. Since 2012, we applied a constant harvest rate, equal to about 1300 Mm3 yr-1, estimated from the average harvest rate for the period 2006-2011. Model results were consistent with similar data reported in the literature. The average biomass C stock was 90 Mg C ha-1 and the biomass C stock change was 0.97 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 and 0.87 Mg C ha-1 yr-1, for the period 1995 -2011 and 2012-2020, respectively. The C stock cumulated by the timber products since 1995 was 96 Gg C yr-1, i.e., about 28% of the average annual C stock change of the forests, equal to 345 Gg C yr-1. CBM also provided estimates on the evolution of the age class distribution of the even-aged forests and on the C stock of the DOM forest pools (litter, dead wood and soil. This study demonstrates the utility of CBM to provide estimates at a regional or local scale, using not only the data provided by the forest

  13. Atmospheric forcing controlling inter-annual nutrient dynamics in the open Gulf of Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, Jouni; Savchuk, Oleg P.; Elken, Jüri; Dahlbo, Kim; Kuosa, Harri; Raateoja, Mika; Kauppila, Pirkko; Räike, Antti; Pitkänen, Heikki

    2017-07-01

    The loading of P into the Gulf of Finland has decreased markedly, but no overall trend in the concentration of P has been observed in the open Gulf, where the concentrations of both inorganic N and P still have a pronounced inter-annual variability. Our main aim was to study whether the internal processes driven by atmospheric forcing can explain the variation in the nutrient conditions in the Gulf during the period 1992-2014. We observed that the long-term salinity variation of the bottom water in the northern Baltic Proper controls that in the Gulf, and that the deep-water concentrations of oxygen and nutrients are significantly correlated between the basins. This imposes preconditions regarding how atmospheric forcing may influence deep water flows and stratification in the Gulf on a long-term scale. We found that over short timescales, winter winds in particular can control the in- and outflows of water and the vertical stratification and mixing, which to a large extent explained the inter-annual variation in the DIN and TP pools in the Gulf. We conclude that the inter-annual variation in the amounts, ratios, and spatial distribution of nutrients sets variable preconditions for the spring and potential blue-green algae blooms, and that internal processes were able to mask the effects of the P load reductions implemented across the whole Gulf. The transportation of P along the bottom from the northern Baltic Proper and its evident uplift in the Gulf highlights the fact that the nutrient reductions are also needed in the entire catchment of the Baltic Sea to improve the trophic status of the open Gulf.

  14. Human impacts on soil carbon dynamics of deep-rooted Amazonian forests and effect of land use change on the carbon cycle in Amazon soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nepstad, Daniel; Stone, Thomas; Davidson, Eric; Trumbore, Susan E.

    1992-01-01

    The main objective of these NASA-funded projects is to improve our understanding of land-use impacts on soil carbon dynamics in the Amazon Basin. Soil contains approximately one half of tropical forest carbon stocks, yet the fate of this carbon following forest impoverishment is poorly studied. Our mechanistics approach draws on numerous techniques for measuring soil carbon outputs, inputs, and turnover time in the soils of adjacent forest and pasture ecosystems at our research site in Paragominas, state of Para, Brazil. We are scaling up from this site-specific work by analyzing Basin-wide patterns in rooting depth and rainfall seasonality, the two factors that we believe should explain much of the variation in tropical soil carbons dynamics. In this report, we summarize ongoing measurements at our Paragominas study site, progress in employing new field data to understand soil C dynamics, and some surprising results from our regional, scale-up work.

  15. Trends in nanoscale mechanics mechanics of carbon nanotubes, graphene, nanocomposites and molecular dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book contains a collection of the state-of-the-art reviews written by the leading researchers in the areas of nanoscale mechanics, molecular dynamics, nanoscale modeling of nanocomposites and mechanics of carbon nanotubes. No other book has reviews of the recent discoveries such as a nanoscale analog of the Pauli’s principle, i.e., effect of the spatial exclusion of electrons or the SEE effect, a new Registry Matrix Analysis for the nanoscale interfacial sliding and new data on the effective viscosity of interfacial electrons in nanoscale stiction at the interfaces. This volume is also an exceptional resource on the well tested nanoscale modeling of carbon nanotubes and nanocomposites, new nanoscale effects, unique evaluations of the effective thickness of carbon nanotubes under different loads, new data on which size of carbon nanotubes is safer and many other topics. Extensive bibliography concerning all these topics is included along with the lucid short reviews. Numerous illustrations are provided...

  16. Modeling Coupled Landscape Evolution and Soil Organic Carbon Dynamics in Intensively Management Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Q.; Kumar, P.

    2017-12-01

    Soil is the largest reservoir of carbon in the biosphere but in agricultural areas it is going through rapid erosion due disturbance arising from crop harvest, tillage, and tile drainage. Identifying whether the production of soil organic carbon (SOC) from the crops can compensate for the loss due to erosion is critical to ensure our food security and adapt to climate change. In the U.S. Midwest where large areas of land are intensively managed for agriculture practices, predicting soil quantity and quality are critical for maintaining crop yield and other Critical Zone services. This work focuses on modeling the coupled landscape evolutions soil organic carbon dynamics in agricultural fields. It couples landscape evolution, surface water runoff, organic matter transformation, and soil moisture dynamics to understand organic carbon gain and loss due to natural forcing and farming practices, such as fertilizer application and tillage. A distinctive feature of the model is the coupling of surface ad subsurface processes that predicts both surficial changes and transport along with the vertical transport and dynamics. Our results show that landscape evolution and farming practices play dominant roles in soil organic carbon (SOC) dynamics both above- and below-ground. Contrary to the common assumption that a vertical profile of SOC concentration decreases exponentially with depth, we find that in many situations SOC concentration below-ground could be higher than that at the surface. Tillage plays a complex role in organic matter dynamics. On one hand, tillage would accelerate the erosion rate, on the other hand, it would improve carbon storage by burying surface SOC into below ground. Our model consistently reproduces the observed above- and below-ground patterns of SOC in the field sites of Intensively Managed Landscapes Critical Zone Observatory (IMLCZO). This model bridges the gaps between the landscape evolution, below- and above-ground hydrologic cycle, and

  17. Stored Carbon Dynamics are Controlled by a Combination of Evolutionary, Physiological, and Ecological Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubrey, D. P.; Mims, J. T.; Oswald, S. W.; Teskey, R. O.; Mitchell, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Allocation of assimilated carbon to storage provides a critical carbohydrate buffer when metabolic demands exceed current photosynthetic supply; however, our process-level understanding of controls on carbon storage pools and fluxes remains relatively poor. Recent studies have shifted the paradigm from the concept that stored carbon pools are a sink of low priority that accumulate passively when photosynthetic inputs exceed demand toward the concept that these pools are active sinks of high priority. It follows that allocation toward storage—at the expense of growth—is a trait that would be under selective pressure since species that allocate toward storage should be more resilient to disturbance. Using fire-dependent longleaf pine in a series of manipulative and observational studies, we explore how stored carbon dynamics are controlled by a combination of evolutionary, physiological, and ecological pressures. Our manipulative studies revealed large stored carbon pools in roots that maintained belowground metabolism for a year after current photosynthetic supply was restricted. Likewise, the concentration of stored carbon in the smallest, most metabolically active roots was not influenced until nearly one year later. Our observational studies indicated that stored carbon pools differ among closely related species with overlapping natural distributions, but evolutionary histories of different disturbance frequencies and thus, different selective pressures on carbon storage. Our comparisons of stored carbon pools between longleaf trees growing under xeric or mesic soil moisture regimes indicated that allocation toward storage exhibits plasticity through space and time in response to both short- and long-term variations in resource availability. We expect a continuum of responses to disturbances related to ecological niche and evolutionary adaptation that influence the availability of carbohydrates for metabolic demands. We also expect a continuum in stored

  18. Managed Scots pine forests in Central Spain: First results on soil carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pinés, Eugenio; Rubio, Agustín.; Vicente, Pablo; Montes, Fernando; Cañellas, Isabel

    2010-05-01

    Scots pine forests in Sierra de Guadarrama (Central Spain) cover thousands of hectares, and constitute the southern-western limit of the Scots pine's world distribution. It is worth noting that site and climate characteristics of Spanish Scots pine stands greatly vary from Scots pine areas in Central Europe. Specific forest management strategies may help to increase soil carbon sink strength, since further afforestation is constrained in mountain areas in Central Spain. In order to find and develop the most appropriate forest measures to optimize soil carbon sequestration, deeper understanding of forest management effects on soil carbon stocks and fluxes is needed. It is specially desirable in Mediterranean environments, where there is a important lack of information. Further relationships between soil carbon dynamics and different cutting regimes and length of rotation period would improve this understanding. Results found up to now are contradictory, and clearly vary depending on site and climatic conditions. Here, we present preliminary results focused on soil carbon dynamics from two managed Scots pine forests in Central Spain (Valsaín and Navafría), which differ in the cutting-regime intensity (Valsaín: group shelterwood; Navafría uniform shelterwood) and their rotation period length (Valsaín: 120 years; Navafría: 100 years). In each forest, we established one chronosequence, covering the whole stand ages along the rotation period (20 years interval). We estimated soil carbon stocks in the first 20 cm of the mineral soil, in order to detect long-term carbon sequestration, rather than carbon accumulation in the forest floor, which can be directly related to recent harvesting operations. In addition, we present our first results of soil respiration rates, covering the period May-December 2009.

  19. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department. Annual progress report 1 January - 31 December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juul Rasmussen, J.; Hanson, S.G.

    1992-03-01

    Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department covers quasi-elastic light scattering, optical and electronic information processing, continuum physics and activities in connection with the Euratom fusion association. A summary of activities in 1991 is presented. Optical diagnostic methods based on quasielastic light scattering have been developed. Beam propagation in random and nonlinear media has been investigated. Spatial and temporal processing schemes, especially for pattern recognition, have been investigated. Within the area of fluid dynamics spectral models for studying the dynamics of coherent structures have been developed. Coherent structures have been investigated in a plasma and are now also investigated in a rotating fluid. Fusion relevant work performed under the Euratom association includes investigations of turbulent transport and the development of diagnostic methods. A special activity is concentrated on the development of pellet injection systems for fusion research. (au) (1 tab., 20 ills., 37 refs.)

  20. A molecular dynamics simulation study for the mechanical properties of different types of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Mitra, Apurba Krishna

    2012-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes have caught tremendous attention of the researchers during the last decade due to their excellent mechanical, electrical, optical and thermal properties. The exploitation of these fibers as reinforcing agents in making strong fiber composites has been a primary research topic in the recent investigations on composite materials. Although the theoretical results are rather optimistic, the goal of achieving high strength of the carbon nanotube composites is still not satisfactorily realized. We report here a comparative study of the mechanical properties of single-walled, multi-walled and bundle of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Their mechanical behavior is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation, considering Brenner's second generation reactive empirical bond order interatomic potential between the carbon atoms making a tube. For a long range interaction, we have defined a weak van der Waals force which acts between different layers of a multi-walled tube or between different tubes of a bundle. Samples of three isolated armchair single-wall carbon nanotubes of different diameters, a multi-wall armchair carbon nanotube and finally a bundle of three armchair single-walled nanotubes of same diameter are taken. Their fracture pattern and buckling behavior are modeled and compared. Significant changes are observed in the mechanical properties of the samples of different types of carbon nanotubes which arise due to the interaction between the shells of a multi-walled tube or the tubes in a bundle.

  1. [Design of dynamic simulation system for carbon cycle in forest ecosystem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian-Gang; Yu, Xin-Xiao; Zhang, Zhen-Ming; Wang, Chen; Gan, Jing; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Li, Jin-Hai

    2009-11-01

    Modeling techniques are indispensable for the researches on the carbon cycle of forest ecosystem. In this paper, a new general simulation system FORCASS (FORest CArbon Simulation System) was designed and developed under Simulink environment, with the objectives of modeling the carbon cycle dynamics of forest ecosystems. A comprehensive analysis on the framework, design solution, and development process showed that the FORCASS was feasible. This simulation system had the characteristics of 1) it divided the carbon storage in forest ecosystem into four compartments, i.e., vegetation, litter, soil, and animal, and took into account the carbon flows between the compartments, possessing high mechanism and easily to be comprehended, 2) it was a process-based system, taking the Richards growth function of vegetation component biomass carbon storage as the input to solve difference equations, and was easily to export the outputs such as net primary productivity (NPP) and net ecosystem productivity (NEP) at different stand ages, and 3) it had the explicit expansibility because it was developed based on a general framework for carbon cycle patterns.

  2. Dynamics of soil organic carbon and microbial biomass carbon in relation to water erosion and tillage erosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the (137)Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of (137)Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. (137)Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion.

  3. Dynamics of Soil Organic Carbon and Microbial Biomass Carbon in Relation to Water Erosion and Tillage Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaojun, Nie; Jianhui, Zhang; Zhengan, Su

    2013-01-01

    Dynamics of soil organic carbon (SOC) are associated with soil erosion, yet there is a shortage of research concerning the relationship between soil erosion, SOC, and especially microbial biomass carbon (MBC). In this paper, we selected two typical slope landscapes including gentle and steep slopes from the Sichuan Basin, China, and used the 137Cs technique to determine the effects of water erosion and tillage erosion on the dynamics of SOC and MBC. Soil samples for the determination of 137Cs, SOC, MBC and soil particle-size fractions were collected on two types of contrasting hillslopes. 137Cs data revealed that soil loss occurred at upper slope positions of the two landscapes and soil accumulation at the lower slope positions. Soil erosion rates as well as distribution patterns of the erosion is the major process of soil redistribution in the gentle slope landscape, while tillage erosion acts as the dominant process of soil redistribution in the steep slope landscape. In gentle slope landscapes, both SOC and MBC contents increased downslope and these distribution patterns were closely linked to soil redistribution rates. In steep slope landscapes, only SOC contents increased downslope, dependent on soil redistribution. It is noticeable that MBC/SOC ratios were significantly lower in gentle slope landscapes than in steep slope landscapes, implying that water erosion has a negative effect on the microbial biomass compared with tillage erosion. It is suggested that MBC dynamics are closely associated with soil redistribution by water erosion but independent of that by tillage erosion, while SOC dynamics are influenced by soil redistribution by both water erosion and tillage erosion. PMID:23717530

  4. Impacts of Invasive Pests on Forest Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovett, G. M.; Crowley, K. F.

    2014-12-01

    Forests of the U.S. have been subject to repeated invasions of destructive insects and diseases imported from other continents. Like other disturbances, these pests can produce short-term ecosystem effects due to tree mortality, but unlike other disturbances, they often target individual species and therefore can cause long-term species change in the forest. Because tree species vary in their influence on carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycles, pest-induced species change can radically alter the biogeochemistry of a forest. In this paper we use both data and modeling to examine how pest-induced species change may alter the C and N cycling in forests of the eastern U.S. We describe a new forest ecosystem model that distinguishes individual tree species and allows species composition to shift over the course of the model run. Results indicate that the mortality of eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) by hemlock woolly adelgid and its replacement by faster-growing species such as black birch (Betula lenta) will reduce forest floor C stocks but increase productivity as the birch become established. Decline of American beech (Fagus grandifolia) from beech bark disease and its replacement by sugar maple (Acer saccharum) is likely to decrease soil C storage and increase N leaching from the ecosystem. Responses to other invasive pests will also be discussed. The magnitude of these species-specific effects on C and N cycling is in many cases larger than direct effects expected from changes in climate and atmospheric N deposition, indicating that species change should be included in models that predict forest ecosystem function under future environmental conditions.

  5. [Development and testing of theories of population dynamics]. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murdoch, W.W.; Bence, J.R.; McCauley, E.; Nisbet, R.M.

    1990-03-15

    We report new analyses to test competing models of the Daphnia/algal interaction. Our model is good at predicting equilibrium algal densities, and if our new insights can account for stability in this system across a wide range of natural environments, this may contribute to understanding predator-prey dynamics in general.

  6. Annual progress report FY 1977. [Computer calculations of light water reactor dynamics and safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, K.F.; Henry, A.F.

    1977-07-01

    Progress is summarized in a project directed toward development of numerical methods suitable for the computer solution of problems in reactor dynamics and safety. Specific areas of research include methods of integration of the time-dependent diffusion equations by finite difference and finite element methods; representation of reactor properties by various homogenization procedures; application of synthesis methods; and development of response matrix techniques.

  7. Convergence of carbon dioxide emissions in Chinese cities: A continuous dynamic distribution approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jianxin; Wu, Yanrui; Guo, Xiumei; Cheong, Tsun Se

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the spatial dynamics of per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in China. The analyses are conducted by employing a continuous dynamic distribution approach and panel data of 286 cities at the prefecture and above-prefecture level. The results show that per capita CO 2 emissions tend to converge during the sample period of 2002–2011. However, multimodality is found in the ergodic distribution of the full sample. It is also found that there is more persistence in cities with low per capita CO 2 emissions, and more mobility in cities with high per capita CO 2 emissions. The analyses also show that the dynamics of per capita CO 2 emissions are significantly different among various geographical, income and environmental policy groups. The conditional distribution analyses indicate that multimodality cannot be explained independently by any one of the two factors, namely geographical location or income level. The findings in this study may have important policy implications for CO 2 abatement in China. - Highlights: •Spatial dynamics of per capita carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions in 286 Chinese cities. •A continuous dynamic distribution approach and panel data. •Multimodality is found in the ergodic distribution of the full sample. •Significantly different dynamics among various city groups.

  8. Vegetation controls on carbon, water, and energy dynamics with implications for permafrost thaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loranty, M. M.; Berner, L. T.

    2013-12-01

    Changes in ecosystem structure and function characterized by climate induced alterations in vegetation communities will exert strong influence on the fate of permafrost carbon via controls on surface energy partitioning. These controls are likely to occur both directly through changes in ground heat fluxes and indirectly through climate feedbacks associated with changes in albedo and evapotranspiration. Larch forests of northeastern Siberia constitute the largest ecosystem type underlain by continuous permafrost and therefore warrant considerable attention in this regard. Here we report observations of carbon, water, and energy fluxes made using the static chamber method for three understory vegetation communities in a mature northeastern Siberian larch forest. We find that carbon and water fluxes tend to increase in magnitude with NDVI, with carbon fluxes exhibiting net uptake during the growing season in vegetation communities dominated by deciduous shrubs. Communities characterized by a combination of evergreen and deciduous shrubs and mosses, or by lichens we find lower water fluxes and carbon neutrality. In the case of lichens, water fluxes are low while surface and soil temperatures as well as thaw depths are relatively high. These results illustrate the potential for vegetation to influence permafrost dynamics through controls on surface energy partitioning. While our results stem from a relatively small spatial scale, they are a relevant analog for large-scale shifts in arctic and boreal vegetation communities as well as changes in successional dynamics associated with changing disturbance regimes, particularly fire.

  9. Theoretical studies of zirconium and carbon clusters with molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, B.

    1993-08-01

    In this dissertation, we will present a systematic study of structures of fullerenes ranging from C 20 to C 100 by introducing a novel scheme. Using our new scheme, we not only reproduce all known fullerene structures but also successfully predicted several other fullerene structures which were confirmed by experiments. By utilizing the tight-binding molecular-dynamic (TBMD) simulation, we also studied the dynamical behavior of fullerenes: Vibrations, thermal disintegration of individual clusters as well as collisions between fullerenes. If the beauty of carbon fullerene is not enough, people found that carbon can also form tubules and even speculated that they can form three-dimensional graphite-like networks. By extending our fullerene structure searching scheme, we performed a search for the ground-state structure of three dimensional carbon network. We found the most stable structure people ever proposed for simple cubic based networks. From the difference of this new form of carbon and graphite in the electronic and vibrational properties, we propose an experimental probe to identify these novel three-dimensional carbon networks

  10. Population dynamics of Agriophyllum squarrosum, a pioneer annual plant endemic to mobile sand dunes, in response to global climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Chaoju; Yin, Hengxia; Shi, Yong; Zhao, Jiecai; Yin, Chengliang; Luo, Wanyin; Dong, Zhibao; Chen, Guoxiong; Yan, Xia; Wang, Xiao-Ru; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2016-05-23

    Climate change plays an important role in the transition of ecosystems. Stratigraphic investigations have suggested that the Asian interior experienced frequent transitions between grassland and desert ecosystems as a consequence of global climate change. Using maternally and bi-parentally inherited markers, we investigated the population dynamics of Agriophyllum squarrosum (Chenopodiaceae), an annual pioneer plant endemic to mobile sand dunes. Phylogeographic analysis revealed that A. squarrosum could originate from Gurbantunggut desert since ~1.6 Ma, and subsequently underwent three waves of colonisation into other deserts and sandy lands corresponding to several glaciations. The rapid population expansion and distribution range shifts of A. squarrosum from monsoonal climate zones suggested that the development of the monsoonal climate significantly enhanced the population growth and gene flow of A. squarrosum. These data also suggested that desertification of the fragile grassland ecosystems in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau was more ancient than previously suggested and will be aggravated under global warming in the future. This study provides new molecular phylogeographic insights into how pioneer annual plant species in desert ecosystems respond to global climate change, and facilitates evaluation of the ecological potential and genetic resources of future crops for non-arable dry lands to mitigate climate change.

  11. Deforestation, floodplain dynamics, and carbon biogeochemistry in the Amazon Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, M. L.; Dunne, T.; Richey, J.; Melack, J.; Simonett, D. S.; Woodwell, G.

    1984-01-01

    Three aspects of the physical geographic environment of the Amazon Basin are considered: (1) deforestation and reforestation, (2) floodplain dynamics, and (3) fluvial geomorphology. Three independent projects are coupled in this experiment to improve the in-place research and to ensure that the Shuttle Imaging Radar-B (SIR-B) experiment stands on a secure base of ongoing work. Major benefits to be obtained center on: (1) areal and locational information, (2) data from various depression angles, and (3) digital radar signatures. Analysis will be conducted for selected sites to define how well SIR-B data can be used for: (1) definition of extent and location of deforestation in a tropical moist forest, (2) definition and quantification of the nature of the vegetation and edaphic conditions on the (floodplain) of the Amazon River, and (3) quantification of the accuracy with which the geometry and channel shifting of the Amazon River may be mapped using SIR-B imagery in conjunction with other remote sensing data.

  12. Does drought legacy alter the recovery of grassland carbon dynamics from drought?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Michael; Hasibeder, Roland; Fuchslueger, Lucia; Ingrisch, Johannes; Ladreiter-Knauss, Thomas; Lair, Georg; Reinthaler, David; Richter, Andreas; Kaufmann, Rüdiger

    2017-04-01

    Climate projections suggest an increase in the frequency and the severity of extreme climatic events, such as droughts, with consequences for the carbon cycle and its feedbacks to the climate system. An important implication of increasing drought frequency is that possible legacies of previous droughts may increasingly affect ecosystem responses to new drought events, though this has been rarely tested. Based on a series of severe experimental droughts performed during nine subsequent years on a mountain grassland in the Austrian Alps, we present evidence of effects of drought legacies on the recovery of grassland carbon dynamics from drought and analyse the underlying mechanisms. Both single and recurrent droughts led to increased aboveground productivity during drought recovery relative to control plots, favoring the biomass production and leaf area of grass species more strongly than of forbs. Belowground productivity was significantly increased during recovery. This led to higher total root length, even though specific root length was strongly reduced during recovery, particularly after recurrent drought events. Following rewetting, the temperature dependence of soil respiration was increasingly diminished and the Birch effect declined with progressive recurrence of droughts. This was paralleled by a change in soil aggregate stability and soil porosity in plots repeatedly exposed to drought. Isotopic pulse-labelling experiments revealed effects of drought legacy on plant carbon uptake and belowground allocation and altered microbial turnover of recent plant-derived carbon during and after a subsequent drought. Shifts in tissue nitrogen concentration indicate that drought effects on soil nitrogen turnover and availability could play an important role in the recovery of grassland carbon dynamics following both single and recurrent droughts. In conclusion, drought legacies can alter the recovery of grassland carbon dynamics from drought, the effects increasing

  13. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center for Atmospheric Trace Gases Fiscal Year 2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.

    2002-10-15

    The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC), which includes the World Data Center (WDC) for Atmospheric Trace Gases, is the primary global change data and information analysis center of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). More than just an archive of data sets and publications, CDIAC has, since its inception in 1982, enhanced the value of its holdings through intensive quality assurance, documentation, and integration. Whereas many traditional data centers are discipline-based (for example, meteorology or oceanography), CDIAC's scope includes potentially anything and everything that would be of value to users concerned with the greenhouse effect and global climate change, including concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and other radiatively active gases in the atmosphere; the role of the terrestrial biosphere and the oceans in the biogeochemical cycles of greenhouse gases; emissions of CO{sub 2} and other trace gases to the atmosphere; long-term climate trends; the effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on vegetation; and the vulnerability of coastal areas to rising sea levels. CDIAC is located within the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. CDIAC is co-located with ESD researchers investigating global-change topics, such as the global carbon cycle and the effects of carbon dioxide on climate and vegetation. CDIAC staff are also connected with current ORNL research on related topics, such as renewable energy and supercomputing technologies. CDIAC is supported by the Environmental Sciences Division (Jerry Elwood, Director) of DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. CDIAC represents DOE in the multi-agency Global Change Data and Information System (GCDIS). Wanda Ferrell is DOE's Program Manager with overall responsibility for CDIAC. Roger Dahlman is responsible for CDIAC's AmeriFlux tasks, and Anna Palmisano for CDIAC's Ocean Data tasks. CDIAC is made

  14. Peatland Carbon Dynamics in Alaska During Past Warm Climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Cleary, K.; Massa, C.; Hunt, S. J.; Klein, E. S.; Loisel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Peatlands represent a large belowground carbon (C) pool in the biosphere. However, how peatland C sequestration capacity varies with changes in climate and climate-induced disturbance is still poorly understood and debated. Here we summarize results from Alaskan peatlands to document how peat C accumulation has responded to past warm climate intervals. We find that the greatest C accumulation rates at sites from the Kenai Peninsula to the North Slope occurred during the Holocene thermal maximum (HTM) in the early Holocene. This time period also corresponds with explosive formation and expansion of new peatlands on the landscape across Alaska. In addition, we note that many peatlands that existed during the earlier Holocene on the North Slope have disappeared and are presently covered by mineral soils under tundra or sandy deposits. During the Medieval Climate Anomaly (MCA) around 1000-500 years ago, several peatlands in Alaska show high rates of C accumulation when compared to the period before the MCA during the Neoglacial or the following Little Ice Age period. Altogether, our results indicate that the Alaskan landscape was very different during the last 10,000 years and that peatlands can rapidly accumulate C under warm climatic conditions. We speculate that warmth-stimulated increase in plant production surpasses increase in peat decomposition during the early Holocene, and potentially also during the MCA. Other factors that might have contributed to rapid peat accumulation during the early Holocene include increased summer sunlight, lowered sea levels, and decreased sea-ice cover/duration. Summer insolation was ca. 8% higher than today during the early Holocene due to orbital variations, which likely promoted plant productivity by increasing growing seasons sunlight. Furthermore, lower sea levels and exposed shallow continental shelves in the Beaufort Sea (Arctic Ocean) would have made the present-day Arctic Coastal Plain more continental, with warmer summers

  15. Influence of declining mean annual rainfall on the behavior and yield of sediment and particulate organic carbon from tropical watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauch, Ayron M.; MacKenzie, Richard A.; Giardina, Christian P.; Bruland, Gregory L.

    2018-04-01

    The capacity to forecast climate and land-use driven changes to runoff, soil erosion and sediment transport in the tropics is hindered by a lack of long-term data sets and model study systems. To address these issues we utilized three watersheds characterized by similar shape, geology, soils, vegetation cover, and land use arranged across a 900 mm gradient in mean annual rainfall (MAR). Using this space-for-time design, we quantified suspended sediment (SS) and particulate organic carbon (POC) export over 18 months to examine how large-scale climate trends (MAR) affect sediment supply and delivery patterns (hysteresis) in tropical watersheds. Average daily SS yield ranged from 0.128 to 0.618 t km- 2 while average daily POC ranged from 0.002 to 0.018 t km- 2. For the largest storm events, we found that sediment delivery exhibited similar clockwise hysteresis patterns among the watersheds, with no significant differences in the similarity function between watershed pairs, indicating that: (1) in-stream and near-stream sediment sources drive sediment flux; and (2) the shape and timing of hysteresis is not affected by MAR. With declining MAR, the ratio of runoff to baseflow and inter-storm length between pulse events both increased. Despite increases in daily rainfall and the number of days with large rainfall events increasing with MAR, there was a decline in daily SS yield possibly due to the exhaustion of sediment supply by frequent runoff events in high MAR watersheds. By contrast, mean daily POC yield increased with increasing MAR, possibly as a result of increased soil organic matter decomposition, greater biomass, or increased carbon availability in higher MAR watersheds. We compared results to modeled values using the Load Estimator (LOADEST) FORTRAN model, confirming the negative relationship between MAR and sediment yield. However, because of its dependency on mean daily flow, LOADEST tended to under predict sediment yield, a result of its poor ability to

  16. Testing the performance of a Dynamic Global Ecosystem Model: Water balance, carbon balance, and vegetation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucharik, Christopher J.; Foley, Jonathan A.; Delire, Christine; Fisher, Veronica A.; Coe, Michael T.; Lenters, John D.; Young-Molling, Christine; Ramankutty, Navin; Norman, John M.; Gower, Stith T.

    2000-09-01

    While a new class of Dynamic Global Ecosystem Models (DGEMs) has emerged in the past few years as an important tool for describing global biogeochemical cycles and atmosphere-biosphere interactions, these models are still largely untested. Here we analyze the behavior of a new DGEM and compare the results to global-scale observations of water balance, carbon balance, and vegetation structure. In this study, we use version 2 of the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS), which includes several major improvements and additions to the prototype model developed by Foley et al. [1996]. IBIS is designed to be a comprehensive model of the terrestrial biosphere; the model represents a wide range of processes, including land surface physics, canopy physiology, plant phenology, vegetation dynamics and competition, and carbon and nutrient cycling. The model generates global simulations of the surface water balance (e.g., runoff), the terrestrial carbon balance (e.g., net primary production, net ecosystem exchange, soil carbon, aboveground and belowground litter, and soil CO2 fluxes), and vegetation structure (e.g., biomass, leaf area index, and vegetation composition). In order to test the performance of the model, we have assembled a wide range of continental and global-scale data, including measurements of river discharge, net primary production, vegetation structure, root biomass, soil carbon, litter carbon, and soil CO2 flux. Using these field data and model results for the contemporary biosphere (1965-1994), our evaluation shows that simulated patterns of runoff, NPP, biomass, leaf area index, soil carbon, and total soil CO2 flux agree reasonably well with measurements that have been compiled from numerous ecosystems. These results also compare favorably to other global model results.

  17. Dynamics of organic and inorganic carbon in surface sediments of the Yellow River Estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Z.; Wang, X.; Liu, X.; Zhang, E.; Hang, F.

    2017-12-01

    Estuarine sediment is an important carbon reservoir thus may play an important role in the global carbon cycle. However, little is known on the dynamics of organic carbon (OC) and inorganic carbon (IC) in the surface sediment of the Yellow River Estuary, a large estuary in northern China. In this study, we applied element analyses and isotopic approach to study spatial distribution and sources of OC and IC in the Yellow River Estuary. We found that TIC concentration (6.3-20.1 g kg-1) was much higher than TOC (0.2-4.4 g kg-1) in the surface sediment. There showed a large spatial variability in TOC and TIC and their stable isotopes. Both TOC and TIC were higher to the north (2.6 and 14.5 g kg-1) than to the south (1.6 and 12.2 g kg-1), except in the southern bay where TOC and TIC reached 2.7 and 15.4 g kg-1, respectively. Generally, TOC and TIC in our study area was mainly autochthonous. The lower TOC values in the south section were due to relatively higher kinetic energy level whereas the higher values in the bay was attributable to terrigenous matters accumulation and lower kinetic energy level. However, the southern bay revealed the most negative δ13Corg and δ13Ccarb, suggesting that there might exist some transfer of OC to IC in the section. Our study points out that the dynamics of sedimentary carbon in the Yellow River Estuary is influenced by multiple and complex processes, and highlights the importance of carbonate in carbon sequstration.

  18. Intra-annual Dynamics of Xylem Formation in Liquidambar formosana Subjected to Canopy and Understory N Addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaokang Zhang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Increasing N deposition caused by intensive anthropogenic activities is expected to affect forest growth. However, the effects of N deposition on trees are still controversial due to the wide variability in results and experimental methods used. We conducted an experiment involving both canopy and understory N addition to investigate the effects of N-addition on intra-annual xylem formation of Chinese sweetgum (Liquidambar formosana in a warm-temperate forest of Central China. Since 2013, 50 kg N ha-1 year-1 (2.5 times the current natural N deposition was applied monthly from April to December. In 2014 and 2015, the timing and dynamics of xylem formation were monitored weekly during March–December by microcoring the stems of control and treated trees. Similar dynamics of wood formation were observed between canopy and understory N addition. Xylem formation of all the experimental trees started in March and lasted for 119–292 days. Compared to the control, no change was observed in the timing and dynamics of wood formation in N-treated trees. Tree ring-width ranged between 1701 and 4774 μm, with a rate of xylem production of 10.52–26.64 μm day-1. The radial growth of trees was not modified by the treatments. Our findings suggest that short-term N addition is unable to affect the dynamics of xylem formation in Chinese sweetgum in Central China. The effects of N on tree growth observed in previous studies might be related to the duration of the experiment or the imbalance between the amount of natural deposition and N added during treatments.

  19. Intra-annual Dynamics of Xylem Formation inLiquidambar formosanaSubjected to Canopy and Understory N Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaokang; Rossi, Sergio; Huang, Jian-Guo; Jiang, Shaowei; Yu, Biyun; Zhang, Wei; Ye, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Increasing N deposition caused by intensive anthropogenic activities is expected to affect forest growth. However, the effects of N deposition on trees are still controversial due to the wide variability in results and experimental methods used. We conducted an experiment involving both canopy and understory N addition to investigate the effects of N-addition on intra-annual xylem formation of Chinese sweetgum ( Liquidambar formosana ) in a warm-temperate forest of Central China. Since 2013, 50 kg N ha -1 year -1 (2.5 times the current natural N deposition) was applied monthly from April to December. In 2014 and 2015, the timing and dynamics of xylem formation were monitored weekly during March-December by microcoring the stems of control and treated trees. Similar dynamics of wood formation were observed between canopy and understory N addition. Xylem formation of all the experimental trees started in March and lasted for 119-292 days. Compared to the control, no change was observed in the timing and dynamics of wood formation in N-treated trees. Tree ring-width ranged between 1701 and 4774 μm, with a rate of xylem production of 10.52-26.64 μm day -1 . The radial growth of trees was not modified by the treatments. Our findings suggest that short-term N addition is unable to affect the dynamics of xylem formation in Chinese sweetgum in Central China. The effects of N on tree growth observed in previous studies might be related to the duration of the experiment or the imbalance between the amount of natural deposition and N added during treatments.

  20. Intra-annual Dynamics of Xylem Formation in Liquidambar formosana Subjected to Canopy and Understory N Addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shaokang; Rossi, Sergio; Huang, Jian-Guo; Jiang, Shaowei; Yu, Biyun; Zhang, Wei; Ye, Qing

    2018-01-01

    Increasing N deposition caused by intensive anthropogenic activities is expected to affect forest growth. However, the effects of N deposition on trees are still controversial due to the wide variability in results and experimental methods used. We conducted an experiment involving both canopy and understory N addition to investigate the effects of N-addition on intra-annual xylem formation of Chinese sweetgum (Liquidambar formosana) in a warm-temperate forest of Central China. Since 2013, 50 kg N ha-1 year-1 (2.5 times the current natural N deposition) was applied monthly from April to December. In 2014 and 2015, the timing and dynamics of xylem formation were monitored weekly during March–December by microcoring the stems of control and treated trees. Similar dynamics of wood formation were observed between canopy and understory N addition. Xylem formation of all the experimental trees started in March and lasted for 119–292 days. Compared to the control, no change was observed in the timing and dynamics of wood formation in N-treated trees. Tree ring-width ranged between 1701 and 4774 μm, with a rate of xylem production of 10.52–26.64 μm day-1. The radial growth of trees was not modified by the treatments. Our findings suggest that short-term N addition is unable to affect the dynamics of xylem formation in Chinese sweetgum in Central China. The effects of N on tree growth observed in previous studies might be related to the duration of the experiment or the imbalance between the amount of natural deposition and N added during treatments. PMID:29467775

  1. Annual dynamics of impervious surface in the Pearl River Delta, China, from 1988 to 2013, using time series Landsat imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Weng, Qihao

    2016-03-01

    Information on impervious surface distribution and dynamics is useful for understanding urbanization and its impacts on hydrological cycle, water management, surface energy balances, urban heat island, and biodiversity. Numerous methods have been developed and successfully applied to estimate impervious surfaces. Previous methods of impervious surface estimation mainly focused on the spectral differences between impervious surfaces and other land covers. Moreover, the accuracy of estimation from single or multi-temporal images was often limited by the mixed pixel problem in coarse- or medium-resolution imagery or by the intra-class spectral variability problem in high resolution imagery. Time series satellite imagery provides potential to resolve the above problems as well as the spectral confusion with similar surface characteristics due to phenological change, inter-annual climatic variability, and long-term changes of vegetation. Since Landsat time series has a long record with an effective spatial resolution, this study aimed at estimating and mapping impervious surfaces by analyzing temporal spectral differences between impervious and pervious surfaces that were extracted from dense time series Landsat imagery. Specifically, this study developed an efficient method to extract annual impervious surfaces from time series Landsat data and applied it to the Pearl River Delta, southern China, from 1988 to 2013. The annual classification accuracy yielded from 71% to 91% for all classes, while the mapping accuracy of impervious surfaces ranged from 80.5% to 94.5%. Furthermore, it is found that the use of more than 50% of Scan Line Corrector (SLC)-off images after 2003 did not substantially reduced annual classification accuracy, which ranged from 78% to 91%. It is also worthy to note that more than 80% of classification accuracies were achieved in both 2002 and 2010 despite of more than 40% of cloud cover detected in these two years. These results suggested that the

  2. Coralline Algal Skeletal δ13C as a Multicentury Recorder of Carbon Dynamics in the Labrador Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng Xiao Hou, Alicia; Halfar, Jochen; Adey, Walter; Wortmann, Ulrich; Williams, Branwen; Chan, Phoebe

    2017-04-01

    The introduction of isotopically light carbon due to the emission of fossil fuel derived CO2 since the beginning of the industrial revolution has decreased δ13C in the atmosphere and oceans (termed the δ13C Suess effect). Approximately 48% of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement manufacturing were taken up by the oceans during the period 1800 to 1994, decreasing the δ13C of the oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon reservoir (DIC). Rates of oceanic carbon uptake vary regionally in response to several factors including ocean circulation, productivity, and water temperature. Despite the enhanced CO2-uptake ability of the North Atlantic Ocean, carbon fluxes of surface ocean waters in high latitude regions are relatively poorly understood compared to tropical oceans. Therefore, century-scale, high-resolution marine climate archives from high latitude regions are needed in order to better understand both preindustrial carbon isotope dynamics as well as carbon isotope changes in response to anthropogenic forcing. Here, we present a 193-year record of δ13C obtained from the annual growth bands of a long-lived calcified coralline alga collected off the coast of central Labrador, near Kingitok Island, Canada (55.3983° N, 59.8467° W) to observe regional changes in carbon isotopes beginning in the preindustrial period. The algal δ13C record demonstrates an overall decreasing trend of -0.006‰/year from 1819 (1.15‰) to 2012 (-0.013‰), with the fastest rate of decrease (-0.032‰/year) occurring from 1960 (1.63‰) to 2012 (-0.013‰). Comparisons of the coralline algal δ13C record to a bivalve δ13C record (r = 0.30, p < 0.00007) and an atmospheric CO2 δ13C record from compiled ice core and direct measurement data (r =0.35, p < 0.00000051) displays a good correspondence of century-scale δ13C trends. The coralline algal record is interpreted as representing a combination of changes in primary productivity, which dominates the signal during the

  3. The effect of empirical potential functions on modeling of amorphous carbon using molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Longqiu; Xu, Ming; Song, Wenping; Ovcharenko, Andrey; Zhang, Guangyu; Jia, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Empirical potentials have a strong effect on the hybridization and structure of amorphous carbon and are of great importance in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, amorphous carbon at densities ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 g/cm 3 was modeled by a liquid quenching method using Tersoff, 2nd REBO, and ReaxFF empirical potentials. The hybridization, structure and radial distribution function G(r) of carbon atoms were analyzed as a function of the three potentials mentioned above. The ReaxFF potential is capable to model the change of the structure of amorphous carbon and MD results are in a good agreement with experimental results and density function theory (DFT) at low density of 2.6 g/cm 3 and below. The 2nd REBO potential can be used when amorphous carbon has a very low density of 2.4 g/cm 3 and below. Considering the computational efficiency, the Tersoff potential is recommended to model amorphous carbon at a high density of 2.6 g/cm 3 and above. In addition, the influence of the quenching time on the hybridization content obtained with the three potentials is discussed.

  4. Evaluate Habitat Use and Population Dynamics of Lampreys in Cedar Creek, Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirtle, Jodi; Stone, Jennifer; Barndt, Scott

    2003-03-01

    Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) in the Columbia River basin have declined to a remnant of their pre-1940s populations and the status of the western brook lamprey (L. richardsoni) and river lamprey (L. ayresi) is unknown. Identifying the biological and ecological factors limiting lamprey populations is critical to their recovery, but little research has been conducted on these species within the Columbia River basin. This ongoing, multi-year study examines lamprey populations in Cedar Creek, Washington, a third-order tributary to the Lewis River. This annual report describes the activities and results of the third year of this project. Adult (n = 62), metamorphosed (n = 76), transforming (n = 4), and ammocoete (n = 315) stages of Pacific and western brook lamprey were examined in 2002. Lampreys were captured using adult fish ladders, lamprey pots, rotary screw traps, and lamprey electrofishers. In addition, fifty-four spawning ground surveys were conducted during which 124 Pacific lamprey and 13 western brook lamprey nests were identified. Stream gradient of spawning grounds were surveyed to better understand spawning habitat requirements.

  5. Selective optical switching of interface-coupled relaxation dynamics in carbon nanotube-Si heterojunctions

    KAUST Repository

    Ponzoni, Stefano

    2014-10-16

    By properly tuning the photon energy of a femtosecond laser pump, we disentangle, in carbon nanotube-Si (CNT/Si) heterojunctions, the fast relaxation dynamics occurring in CNT from the slow repopulation dynamics due to hole charge transfer at the junction. In this way we are able to track the transfer of the photogenerated holes from the Si depletion layer to the CNT layer, under the action of the built-in heterojunction potential. This also clarifies that CNT play an active role in the junction and do not act only as channels for charge collection and transport.

  6. Diameter-dependent bending dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes in liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhri, Nikta; Tsyboulski, Dmitri A; Cognet, Laurent; Weisman, R Bruce; Pasquali, Matteo

    2009-08-25

    By relating nanotechnology to soft condensed matter, understanding the mechanics and dynamics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in fluids is crucial for both fundamental and applied science. Here, we study the Brownian bending dynamics of individual chirality-assigned SWCNTs in water by fluorescence microscopy. The bending stiffness scales as the cube of the nanotube diameter and the shape relaxation times agree with the semiflexible chain model. This suggests that SWCNTs may be the archetypal semiflexible filaments, highly suited to act as nanoprobes in complex fluids or biological systems.

  7. Annual Report: Carbon Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strazisar, Brian [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States); Guthrie, George [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, (United States)

    2012-09-30

    Activities include laboratory experimentation, field work, and numerical modeling. The work is divided into five theme areas (or first level tasks) that each address a key research need: Flow Properties of Reservoirs and Seals, Fundamental Processes and Properties, Estimates of Storage Potential, Verifying Storage Performance, and Geospatial Data Resources. The project also includes a project management effort which coordinates the activities of all the research teams.

  8. Current and future carbon export by the Connecticut River: using streamflow data archives and rating curves to model annual and seasonal constituent loads under future discharge scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petsch, S.; Armfield, J. R.

    2013-12-01

    Rivers deliver play an important role in global carbon and nutrient cycling through delivery of organic matter to the oceans. However, connections between carbon export and the processes that control river discharge and landscape erosion are poorly understood in modern river systems, hampering efforts to make predictions about watershed carbon export in the face of future land-use and climate changes. The impacts of future changes can be estimated by exploring relationships between river discharge and constituent loads using long-term archives of streamflow and water quality. Here, we use data from USGS streamgage 01184000 to examine the relationships between discharge and constituent loads in the Connecticut River, northeast USA. 85 years of daily discharge data were used to establish probability distributions for annual and seasonal river discharge. Constituent loads (TSS, POC, DOC) and characteristics (POC C/N ratios, % OC in suspended sediments) were used with discharge to determine the form and significance of constituent rating curves. TSS and POC loads follow distinct positive power-law relationships with discharge. Discharge is negatively correlated with weight % OC in suspended sediments and positively correlated with POC C/N ratios. DOC concentrations do not vary with discharge. POC and TSS rating curves vary by season, but the significance of these differences is low (r20.10). Annual mean POC concentrations are 0.5 mg/L, with mean spring POC concentrations (0.7 mg/L) being twice those of summer. Annual mean DOC concentrations are approx. 4 mg/L. Mean annual POC C/N ratios are 8.1, with higher ratios in winter and spring, and lower ratios in summer and fall. The mean annual % OC in suspended sediments is nearly 6%; mean % OC in summer and fall suspended sediments is over 7% while mean % OC in spring suspended sediments is 2.9%. Mean daily spring discharge is twice the annual mean discharge and nearly four times the mean daily summer discharge. As a result

  9. Coastal Wetland Carbon Dynamics Across a Sediment Delivery Gradient in the Atchafalaya and Terrebonne Basins, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCall, A.; Twilley, R.

    2017-12-01

    The Atchafalaya and Terrebonne Basins of the Mississippi River Deltaic Plain are examples of river-occupied and river-abandoned coastal basins that have undergone coupled natural and anthropogenic changes over time, especially in the last 100 years, influencing their respective coastal wetlands physically and ecologically. These basins provide unique, experimental units of sediment delivery to coastal wetlands to test hypotheses of ecosystem service functioning at multiple time and geographic scales. This study investigates wetland carbon dynamics over time at the basin scale and at the coastal-land margin. We are testing the hypotheses that sediment input via freshwater delivery to coastal deltaic floodplains allows for these systems to develop and perform ecosystem services such as biomass production, which promotes soil carbon accumulation that increases the marsh platform elevation, acting as a carbon sink. Meanwhile, decreased sediment supply to coastal deltaic wetlands in the Terrebonne Basin leads to degradation, subsidence of the marsh platform, and a landward migration of wetlands. This decreases the carbon storage capacity over time and leads to an increase in historic sequestered carbon fluxing out of the system and into coastal waters, thus acting as a carbon source. Using historic soil and vegetation data, we found that since 1949, the wetland soil carbon storage capacity has increased by 47% in the Atchafalaya Basin and decreased by 42% in the Terrebonne Basin. We also examined above and belowground productivity and biomass allocation of dominant emergent species of distinct hydrogeomorphic zones along the coastal-land margin. Soil characteristics have also been measured using short-term feldspar plots across these hydrogeomorphic zones. We also measured particulate carbon, dissolved organic carbon, and suspended sediment concentrations to determine the carbon flux in/out of these systems over a typical tidal cycle. These preliminary findings suggests

  10. A neural network-based estimate of the seasonal to inter-annual variability of the Atlantic Ocean carbon sink

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landschützer, P.; Gruber, N.; Bakker, D. C. E.; Schuster, U.; Nakaoka, S.; Payne, M. R.; Sasse, T.; Zeng, J.

    2013-05-01

    equator (-0.007 Pg C yr-1 decade-1). Surface ocean pCO2 was also increasing less than that of the atmosphere over most of the Atlantic south of the equator, leading to a substantial trend toward a stronger CO2 sink for the entire South Atlantic (-0.14 Pg C yr-1 decade-1). The Atlantic carbon sink varies relatively little on inter-annual time-scales (±0.04 Pg C yr-1; 1σ).

  11. Contributions of secondary forest and nitrogen dynamics to terrestrial carbon uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yang

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We use a terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM to investigate the impacts of nitrogen dynamics on regrowing secondary forests over the 20th century. We further examine what the impacts of nitrogen deposition and land use change history are on terrestrial carbon uptake since preindustrial time. Our results suggest that global total net land use emissions for the 1990s associated with changes in cropland, pastureland, and wood harvest are 1.22 GtC/yr. Without considering the secondary forest regrowth, the estimated net global total land use emissions are 1.58 GtC/yr or about 0.36 GtC/yr higher than if secondary forest regrowth is considered. Results also show that without considering the nitrogen dynamics and deposition, the estimated global total secondary forest sink for the 1990s is 0.90 GtC/yr or about 0.54 GtC/yr higher than estimates that include the impacts of nitrogen dynamics and deposition. Nitrogen deposition alone is responsible for about 0.13 GtC/yr of the total secondary forest sink. While nitrogen is not a limiting nutrient in the intact primary forests in tropical regions, our study suggests that nitrogen becomes a limiting nutrient for regrowing secondary forests of the tropical regions, in particular Latin America and Tropical Africa. This is because land use change activities, especially wood harvest, removes large amounts of nitrogen from the system when slash is burnt or wood is removed for harvest. However, our model results show that carbon uptake is enhanced in the tropical secondary forests of the Indian region. We argue that this may be due to enhanced nitrogen mineralization and increased nitrogen availability following land use change in the Indian tropical forest ecosystems. Results also demonstrate that there is a significant amount of carbon accumulating in the Northern Hemisphere where most land use changes and forest regrowth has occurred in recent decades

  12. Contributions of secondary forest and nitrogen dynamics to terrestrial carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, X.; Richardson, T. K.; Jain, A. K.

    2010-10-01

    We use a terrestrial carbon-nitrogen cycle component of the Integrated Science Assessment Model (ISAM) to investigate the impacts of nitrogen dynamics on regrowing secondary forests over the 20th century. We further examine what the impacts of nitrogen deposition and land use change history are on terrestrial carbon uptake since preindustrial time. Our results suggest that global total net land use emissions for the 1990s associated with changes in cropland, pastureland, and wood harvest are 1.22 GtC/yr. Without considering the secondary forest regrowth, the estimated net global total land use emissions are 1.58 GtC/yr or about 0.36 GtC/yr higher than if secondary forest regrowth is considered. Results also show that without considering the nitrogen dynamics and deposition, the estimated global total secondary forest sink for the 1990s is 0.90 GtC/yr or about 0.54 GtC/yr higher than estimates that include the impacts of nitrogen dynamics and deposition. Nitrogen deposition alone is responsible for about 0.13 GtC/yr of the total secondary forest sink. While nitrogen is not a limiting nutrient in the intact primary forests in tropical regions, our study suggests that nitrogen becomes a limiting nutrient for regrowing secondary forests of the tropical regions, in particular Latin America and Tropical Africa. This is because land use change activities, especially wood harvest, removes large amounts of nitrogen from the system when slash is burnt or wood is removed for harvest. However, our model results show that carbon uptake is enhanced in the tropical secondary forests of the Indian region. We argue that this may be due to enhanced nitrogen mineralization and increased nitrogen availability following land use change in the Indian tropical forest ecosystems. Results also demonstrate that there is a significant amount of carbon accumulating in the Northern Hemisphere where most land use changes and forest regrowth has occurred in recent decades. This study indicates

  13. Dynamical and biogeochemical control on the decadal variability of ocean carbon fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Séférian

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Several recent observation-based studies suggest that ocean anthropogenic carbon uptake has slowed down due to the impact of anthropogenic forced climate change. However, it remains unclear whether detected changes over the recent time period can be attributed to anthropogenic climate change or rather to natural climate variability (internal plus naturally forced variability alone. One large uncertainty arises from the lack of knowledge on ocean carbon flux natural variability at the decadal time scales. To gain more insights into decadal time scales, we have examined the internal variability of ocean carbon fluxes in a 1000 yr long preindustrial simulation performed with the Earth System Model IPSL-CM5A-LR. Our analysis shows that ocean carbon fluxes exhibit low-frequency oscillations that emerge from their year-to-year variability in the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the Southern Ocean. In our model, a 20 yr mode of variability in the North Atlantic air-sea carbon flux is driven by sea surface temperature variability and accounts for ~40% of the interannual regional variance. The North Pacific and the Southern Ocean carbon fluxes are also characterised by decadal to multi-decadal modes of variability (10 to 50 yr that account for 20–40% of the interannual regional variance. These modes are driven by the vertical supply of dissolved inorganic carbon through the variability of Ekman-induced upwelling and deep-mixing events. Differences in drivers of regional modes of variability stem from the coupling between ocean dynamics variability and the ocean carbon distribution, which is set by large-scale secular ocean circulation.

  14. Relating coccolithophore calcification rates to phytoplankton community dynamics: Regional differences and implications for carbon export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulton, Alex J.; Adey, Tim R.; Balch, William M.; Holligan, Patrick M.

    2007-03-01

    Recent measurements of surface coccolithophore calcification from the Atlantic Ocean (50°N-50°S) are compared to similar measurements from other oceanic settings. By combining the different data sets of surface measurements, we examine general and regional patterns of calcification relative to organic carbon production (photosynthesis) and other characteristics of the phytoplankton community. Generally, surface calcification and photosynthesis are positively correlated, although the strength of the relationship differs between biogeochemical provinces. Relationships between surface calcification, chlorophyll- a and calcite concentrations are also statistically significant, although again there is considerable regional variability. Such variability appears unrelated to phytoplankton community composition or hydrographic conditions, and may instead reflect variations in coccolithophore physiology. The contribution of inorganic carbon fixation (calcification) to total carbon fixation (calcification plus photosynthesis) is ˜1-10%, and we estimate a similar contribution from coccolithophores to total organic carbon fixation. However, these contributions vary between biogeochemical provinces, and occasionally coccolithophores may account for >20% of total carbon fixation in unproductive central subtropical gyres. Combining surface calcification and photosynthetic rates with standing stocks of calcite, particulate organic carbon, and estimated phytoplankton carbon allows us to examine the fates of these three carbon pools. The relative turnover times vary between different biogeochemical provinces, with no clear relationship to the overall productivity or phytoplankton community structure found in each province. Rather, interaction between coccolithophore physiology (coccolith production and detachment rates), species diversity (cell size), and food web dynamics (grazer ecology) may control the composition and turnover times of calcite particles in the upper ocean.

  15. Effects of Logging on Carbon Dynamics of a Jack Pine Forest Chronosequence in Saskatchewan, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, E. A.; Gower, S. T.; Foley, J. A.; Kucharik, C. J.

    2002-12-01

    The boreal forest covers ~10% of the world's land surface area and contains a disproportionately high amount of global terrestrial carbon (C). However, it is uncertain whether Canada's boreal forest is currently an annual net C sink or source and what role disturbance plays in determining this. The goal of this study was to calculate C budgets for a chronosequence of harvested jack pine (Pinus banksiana Lamb.) sites (1-y-old, 5-7-y-old, 10-12-y-old, ~29-y-old) and a ~79-y-old site established by wildfire. We measured total ecosystem C content (TEC) and above- and belowground net primary productivity (NPP) for each site. Total annual NPP (Mg C ha-1 y-1 +/- 1 S.D.) from May 1999-April 2000 was 0.9 +/- 0.3 at the 1-y-old site, 1.3 +/- 0.1 at the 5-7-y-old site, 2.7 +/- 0.6 at the 10-12-y-old site, 3.5 +/- 0.3 at the 29-y-old site, and 1.7 +/- 0.4 at the 79-y-old site. We measured soil surface CO2 fluxes (RS) using an IRGA with chamber and correlated these measurements with soil temperature to estimate annual RS. To calculate net ecosystem productivity (NEP), we estimated heterotrophic respiration (RH) as 50% of total annual RS, and summed NPP and RH. NEP (Mg C ha-1 y-1 +/- 1 S.D.) from May 1999 through April 2000 was estimated to be -1.4 +/- 0.3 at the 1-y-old site, 0.1 +/- 0.1 at the 5-7-y-old site, 1.1 +/- 0.7 at the 10-12-y-old site, 0.6 +/- 0.4 at the 29-y-old site, and 0.1 +/- 0.5 at the 79-y-old site. The 1-y-old clear-cut was a source of C to the atmosphere; all other sites were either sinks or were essentially C neutral. We also calculated long-term annual NEP values based on the difference in TEC among the five differently-aged sites. These figures agreed well with the flux-based NEP estimates, except in the case of the 1-y-old site, which we determined had been a more productive site with greater forest floor carbon prior to harvest.

  16. The role of tropical deforestation in the global carbon cycle: Spatial and temporal dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, R. A.; Skole, David; Moore, Berrien; Melillo, Jerry; Steudler, Paul

    1995-01-01

    'The Role of Tropical Deforestation in the Global Carbon cycle: Spatial and Temporal Dynamics', was a joint project involving the University of New Hampshire, the Marine Biological Laboratory, and the Woods Hole Research Center. The contribution of the Woods Hole Research Center consisted of three tasks: (1) assist University of New Hampshire in determining the net flux of carbon between the Brazilian Amazon and the atmosphere by means of a terrestrial carbon model; (2) address the spatial distribution of biomass across the Amazon Basin; and (3) assist NASA Headquarters in development of a science plan for the Terrestrial Ecology component of the NASA-Brazilian field campaign (anticipated for 1997-2001). Progress on these three tasks is briefly described.

  17. BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES FOR A COMPACT CARBON ION LINAC FOR THERAPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plastun, A.; Mustapha, B.; Nassiri, A.; Ostroumov, P.

    2016-05-01

    Feasibility of an Advanced Compact Carbon Ion Linac (ACCIL) for hadron therapy is being studied at Argonne National Laboratory in collaboration with RadiaBeam Technologies. The 45-meter long linac is designed to deliver 109 carbon ions per second with variable energy from 45 MeV/u to 450 MeV/u. S-band structure provides the acceleration in this range. The carbon beam energy can be adjusted from pulse to pulse, making 3D tumor scanning straightforward and fast. Front end accelerating structures such as RFQ, DTL and coupled DTL are designed to operate at lower frequencies. The design of the linac was accompanied with extensive end-to-end beam dynamics studies which are presented in this paper.

  18. Carbon dynamics, food web structure and reclamation strategies in Athabasca oil sands wetlands (CRFAW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciborowski, J.; Dixon, G.; Foote, L.; Liber, K.; Smits, J.

    2010-01-01

    This abstract provided details of the Carbon Dynamics, Food Web Structure and Reclamation Strategies in Athabasca Oil Sands Wetlands (CFRAW) program, a collaboration between oil sands industry partners and university laboratories. CFRAW researchers are investigating the effects of mine tailings and process waters on the development, health, and function of wetland communities in post-mining landscapes. The aim of the program is to accurately predict how quickly the reclaimed wetlands will approach conditions seen in reference wetland systems. The program is also examining the effects of hydrocarbons as a surrogate source of carbon after they are metabolized by bacteria. The biological uptake, pathways, and movement through the food web of materials used by the biota in constructed wetlands are also being studied. Flux estimates will be used to determine if wetlands amended with peat will maintain their productivity. A conceptual model of carbon pathways and budgets is also being developed.

  19. Structure and dynamics of porcine submaxillary mucin as determined by natural abundance carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerken, T.A.; Jentoft, N.

    1987-01-01

    Nearly all of the resonances in the 13 C NMR spectrum of porcine submaxillary mucin glycoprotein (PSM) have been assigned to the peptide core carbons and to the carbons in the eight different oligosaccharide side chains that arise from the incomplete biosynthesis of the sialylated A blood group pentasaccharide. By use of these assignments, a nearly complete structural analysis of intact PSM has been performed without resorting to degradative chemical methods. Considerable structural variability in the carbohydrate side chains was observed between mucins obtained from different animals, while no variability was observed between glands in a single animal. The dynamics of the PSM core and carbohydrate side chains were examined by using the carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation times and nuclear Overhauser enhancements of each assigned carbon resonance. The peptide core of PSM exhibits internal segmental flexibility that is virtually identical with that of ovine submaxillary mucin (OSM), whose carbohydrate side chain consists of the α-NeuNAc(2-6)α-Ga1NAc disaccharide. These results differ from most reports of glycoprotein dynamics, which typically find the terminal carbohydrate residues to be undergoing rapid internal rotation about their terminal glycosidic bonds. The results reported here are consistent with previous studies on the conformations of the A and H determinants derived from model oligosaccharides and further indicate that the conformations of these determinants are unchanged when covalently bound to the mucin peptide core. In spite of their carbohydrate side-chain heterogeneity, mucins appear to be ideal glycoproteins for the study of O-linked oligosaccharide conformation and dynamics and for the study of the effects of glycosylation on polypeptide conformation and dynamics

  20. In situ carbon and nitrogen dynamics in ryegrass-clover mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, J.; Eriksen, J.; Jensen, Erik Steen

    2007-01-01

    Carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics in a third production year ryegrass–clover mixture were investigated in the field. Cylinders (diameter 29.7 cm) were installed to depths of 20, 40 and 60 cm and equipped with suction cups to collect percolating pore water. Ryegrass and clover leaves were cross...... on the ratio between dry matter accumulated in the donating and receiving species, the 14C-allocation within the receiving species and the root turnover rate in the soil....

  1. Annual dynamics of halite precipitation in the Dead Sea: In situ observations and their geological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirota, Ido; enzel, Yehouda; Lensky, Nadav G.

    2017-04-01

    Layered halite sequences deposited in deep basins throughout the geological record. However, analogues of such sequences are commonly studied in sallow environments. Here we study active precipitation of halite layers from the only modern analog for deep, halite-precipitating basin, the hypersaline Dead Sea. In situ observations in the Dead Sea link seasonal thermohaline stratification, halite saturation, and the characteristics of the actively forming halite layers. The spatiotemporal evolution of halite precipitation in the Dead Sea was characterized by means of monthly observations of the i) lake thermohaline stratification (temperature, salinity, and density), ii) degree of halite saturation, and iii) textural evolution of the active halite deposits. We present the observed relationships between textural characteristics of layered halite deposits (i.e. grain size, consolidation, and roughness) and the degree of saturation, which in turn reflected the limnology and hydro-climatology. The lakefloor is divided into two principle environments: A deep, hypolimnetic and a shallow, epilimnetic lakefloor. In the deeper hypolimnetic lakefloor halite continuously precipitates with seasonal variations: (a) during summer, consolidated coarse halite crystals form rough surfaces under slight super-saturation. (b) During winter, unconsolidated, fine halite crystals form smooth seafloor deposits under high supersaturation. The observations also emphasize the thought regarding seasonal alternation of halite crystallization mechanism. The shallow epilimnetic lake floor is highly influenced by the seasonal temperature variations, and by intensive summer dissolution of part of the previous year's halite deposit which results in thin sequences with annual unconformities. This emphasizes the control of temperature seasonality on the precipitated halite layers characteristics. In addition, precipitation of halite in the hypolimnetic floor, on the expense of the dissolution of the

  2. Coexistence and evolutionary dynamics mediated by seasonal environmental variation in annual plant communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathias, Andrea; Chesson, Peter

    2013-03-01

    It is well established theoretically that competing species may coexist by having different responses to variation over time in the physical environment. Whereas previous theory has focused mostly on year-to-year environmental variation, we investigate how within-year variation can be the basis of species coexistence. We ask also the important but often neglected question of whether the species differences that allow coexistence are compatible with evolutionary processes. We seek the simplest circumstances that permit coexistence based on within-year environmental variation, and then evaluate the robustness of coexistence in the face of evolutionary forces. Our focus is on coexistence of annual plant species living in arid regions. We first consider environmental variation of a very simple structure where a single pulse of rain occurs, and different species have different patterns of growth activity following the rain pulse. We show that coexistence of two species is possible based on the storage effect coexistence mechanism in this simplest of varying environments. We find an exact expression for the magnitude of the storage effect that allows the functioning of the coexistence mechanism to be analyzed. However, in these simplest of circumstances, coexistence in our models is not evolutionarily stable. Increasing the complexity of the environment to two rain pulses leads to evolutionarily stable species coexistence, and a route to diversity via evolutionary branching. This demonstration of the compatibility of a coexistence mechanism with evolutionary processes is an important step in assessing the likely importance of a mechanism in nature. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Impacts of climatic and atmospheric changes on carbon dynamics in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Chi; Tian Hanqin; Chappelka, Arthur H.; Ren Wei; Chen Hua; Pan Shufen; Liu Mingliang; Styers, Diane M.; Chen Guangsheng; Wang Yuhang

    2007-01-01

    We used the Dynamic Land Ecosystem Model (DLEM) to estimate carbon (C) storage and to analyze the impacts of environmental changes on C dynamics from 1971 to 2001 in Great Smoky Mountain National Park (GRSM). Our simulation results indicate that forests in GRSM have a C density as high as 15.9 kg m -2 , about twice the regional average. Total carbon storage in GRSM in 2001 was 62.2 Tg (T = 10 12 ), 54% of which was in vegetation, the rest in the soil detritus pool. Higher precipitation and lower temperatures in the higher elevation forests result in larger total C pool sizes than in forests at lower elevations. During the study period, the CO 2 fertilization effect dominated ozone and climatic stresses (temperature and precipitation), and the combination of these multiple factors resulted in net accumulation of 0.9 Tg C in this ecosystem. - Model simulations suggest that rising atmospheric CO 2 compensates for the adverse effects of ozone stress on ecosystem carbon dynamics in Great Smoky Mountain National Park

  4. The dynamic links between carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, health spending and GDP growth: A case study for 51 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabouni, Sami; Saidi, Kais

    2017-10-01

    This document investigated the causal relationship between carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions, health spending and GDP growth for 51 countries (divided into three groups of countries: low-income countries; group of countries with lower and upper middle income; group of middle income countries) covering the annual period 1995-2013. Dynamic simultaneous-equations models and generalized method of moments (GMM) are used to investigate this relationship. The main results provide evidence of a causal relationship between the three variables. The empirical results show that there is a bidirectional causality between CO 2 emissions and GDP per capita, between health spending and economic growth for the three groups of estimates. The results also indicate that there is a unidirectional causality from CO 2 emissions to health spending, except low income group countries. We found that health plays an important role in GDP per capita; it limits its effect on a growing deterioration in the quality of the environment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. The role of plant litter on nutrient mineralization and vegetation dynamics in three sage-steppe communities with differing levels of annual grass invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant litter is an integral part of ecosystem nutrient cycling, which directly impacts vegetation dynamics. The net effects of litter are largely determined by the quantity and source material of the litter. Invasion of sage-steppe communities by annual grasses (e.g., Bromus tectorum) has caused dra...

  6. Dynamics of phenanthrenequinone on carbon nano-onion surfaces probed by quasielastic neutron scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chathoth, Suresh M; Anjos, Daniela M; Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M; Overbury, Steven H

    2012-06-21

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to study the dynamics of phenanthrenequinone (PQ) on the surface of onion-like carbon (OLC), or so-called carbon onions, as a function of surface coverage and temperature. For both the high- and low-coverage samples, we observed two diffusion processes; a faster process and nearly an order of magnitude slower process. On the high-coverage surface, the slow diffusion process is of long-range translational character, whereas the fast diffusion process is spatially localized on the length scale of ∼4.7 Å. On the low-coverage surface, both diffusion processes are spatially localized; on the same length scale of ∼4.7 Å for the fast diffusion and a somewhat larger length scale for the slow diffusion. Arrhenius temperature dependence is observed except for the long-range diffusion on the high-coverage surface. We attribute the fast diffusion process to the generic localized in-cage dynamics of PQ molecules, and the slow diffusion process to the long-range translational dynamics of PQ molecules, which, depending on the coverage, may be either spatially restricted or long-range. On the low-coverage surface, uniform surface coverage is not attained, and the PQ molecules experience the effect of spatial constraints on their long-range translational dynamics. Unexpectedly, the dynamics of PQ molecules on OLC as a function of temperature and surface coverage bears qualitative resemblance to the dynamics of water molecules on oxide surfaces, including practically temperature-independent residence times for the low-coverage surface. The dynamics features that we observed may be universal across different classes of surface adsorbates.

  7. Dynamics of Phenanthrenequinone on Carbon Nano-Onion Surfaces Probed by Quasielastic Neutron Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamontov, Eugene; Brown, Gilbert M.; Overbury, Steven H.; Mavila Chathoth, Suresh

    2012-01-01

    We used quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) to study the dynamics of phenanthrenequinone (PQ) on the surface of onion-like carbon (OLC), or so called carbon onions, as a function of surface coverage and temperature. For both the high- and low-coverage samples, we observed two diffusion processes; a faster process and nearly an order of magnitude slower process. On the high-coverage surface, the slow diffusion process is of long-range translational character, whereas the fast diffusion process is spatially localized on the length scale of ∼ 4.7. On the low-coverage surface, both diffusion processes are spatially localized; on the same length scale of ∼ 4.7 for the fast diffusion and a somewhat larger length scale for the slow diffusion. Arrhenius temperature dependence is observed except for the long-range diffusion on the high-coverage surface. We attribute the fast diffusion process to the generic localized in-cage dynamics of PQ molecules, and the slow diffusion process to the long-range translational dynamics of PQ molecules, which, depending on the coverage, may be either spatially restricted, or long-range. On the low-coverage surface, uniform surface coverage is not attained, and the PQ molecules experience the effect of spatial constraints on their long-range translational dynamics. Unexpectedly, the dynamics of PQ molecules on OLC as a function of temperature and surface coverage bears qualitative resemblance to the dynamics of water molecules on oxide surfaces, including practically temperature-independent residence times for the low-coverage surface. The dynamics features that we observed may be universal across different classes of surface adsorbates.

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF A CO2 SEQUESTRATION MODULE BY INTEGRATING MINERAL ACTIVATION AND AQUEOUS CARBONATION. ANNUAL TECHNICAL PROGRESS REPORT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George Alexander; M. Mercedes Maroto-Valer; Parvana Aksoy; Harold Schobert

    2006-01-01

    Mineral carbonation provides a potential option for the long-term storage of carbon dioxide. Serpentine has been chosen as the feedstock mineral, due to its abundance and availability. However, the relatively low reactivity of serpentine has warranted research into physical and chemical treatments that have been shown to greatly increase its reactivity. The use of sulfuric acid as an accelerating medium for the removal of magnesium from serpentine has recently been investigated. In addition to the challenges presented by the dissolution of serpentine, another challenge is the subsequent carbonation of the magnesium ions. A stable hydration sphere for the magnesium ion reduces the carbonation kinetics by obstructing the formation of the carbonation products. Accordingly, this research has evaluated the solubility of carbon dioxide in aqueous solution, the interaction between the dissociation products of carbon dioxide, and the carbonation potential of the magnesium ion

  9. Micro-phytoplankton community structure in the coastal upwelling zone off Concepción (central Chile): Annual and inter-annual fluctuations in a highly dynamic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anabalón, V.; Morales, C. E.; González, H. E.; Menschel, E.; Schneider, W.; Hormazabal, S.; Valencia, L.; Escribano, R.

    2016-12-01

    An intensification of upwelling-favorable winds in recent decades has been detected in some of the main eastern boundary current systems, especially at higher latitudes, but the response of coastal phytoplankton communities in the Humboldt Current System (HCS) remains unknown. At higher latitudes in the HCS (35-40°S), strong seasonality in wind-driven upwelling during spring-summer coincides with an annual increase in coastal chlorophyll-a and primary production, and a dominance of micro-phytoplankton. In order to understand the effects of potential upwelling intensification on the micro-phytoplankton community in this region, annual and inter-annual variability in its structure (total and taxa-specific abundance and biomass) and its association with oceanographic fluctuations were analyzed using in situ time series data (2002-2009) from a shelf station off Concepcion (36.5°S). At the annual scale, total mean abundance and biomass, attributed to a few dominant diatom taxa, were at least one order of magnitude greater during spring-summer than autumn-winter, in association with changes in upwelling and surface salinity and temperature, whereas macro-nutrient concentrations remained relatively high all the year. At the inter-annual scale, total abundance and biomass decreased during the upwelling season of the 2006-2009 period compared with the 2002-2006 period, notably due to lower abundances of Skeletonema and Leptocylindrus, but the relative dominance of a few taxa was maintained. The 2006-2009 period was characterized by higher upwelling intensity, colder and higher salinity waters, and changes in nutrient concentrations and ratios compared with the first period. The inter-annual changes in the micro-phytoplankton community were mostly associated with changes in surface salinity and temperature (changes in upwelling intensity) but also with changes in Si/N and N/P, which relate to other land-derived processes.

  10. Land use and carbon dynamics in the southeastern United States from 1992 to 2050

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Shuqing; Liu, Shuguang; Sohl, Terry; Werner, Jeremy; Young, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Land use and land cover change (LUCC) plays an important role in determining the spatial distribution, magnitude, and temporal change of terrestrial carbon sources and sinks. However, the impacts of LUCC are not well understood and quantified over large areas. The goal of this study was to quantify the spatial and temporal patterns of carbon dynamics in various terrestrial ecosystems in the southeastern United States from 1992 to 2050 using a process-based modeling system and then to investigate the impacts of LUCC. Spatial LUCC information was reconstructed and projected using the FOREcasting SCEnarios of future land cover (FORE-SCE) model according to information derived from Landsat observations and other sources. Results indicated that urban expansion (from 3.7% in 1992 to 9.2% in 2050) was expected to be the primary driver for other land cover changes in the region, leading to various declines in forest, cropland, and hay/pasture. The region was projected to be a carbon sink of 60.4 gC m −2  yr −1 on average during the study period, primarily due to the legacy impacts of large-scale conversion of cropland to forest that happened since the 1950s. Nevertheless, the regional carbon sequestration rate was expected to decline because of the slowing down of carbon accumulation in aging forests and the decline of forest area. (letter)

  11. Quasi-static and dynamic strain sensing using carbon nanotube/epoxy nanocomposite thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anand, Sandeep V; Roy Mahapatra, D

    2009-01-01

    Thin films are developed by dispersing carbon black nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an epoxy polymer. The films show a large variation in electrical resistance when subjected to quasi-static and dynamic mechanical loading. This phenomenon is attributed to the change in the band-gap of the CNTs due to the applied strain, and also to the change in the volume fraction of the constituent phases in the percolation network. Under quasi-static loading, the films show a nonlinear response. This nonlinearity in the response of the films is primarily attributed to the pre-yield softening of the epoxy polymer. The electrical resistance of the films is found to be strongly dependent on the magnitude and frequency of the applied dynamic strain, induced by a piezoelectric substrate. Interestingly, the resistance variation is found to be a linear function of frequency and dynamic strain. Samples with a small concentration of just 0.57% of CNT show a sensitivity as high as 2.5% MPa −1 for static mechanical loading. A mathematical model based on Bruggeman's effective medium theory is developed to better understand the experimental results. Dynamic mechanical loading experiments reveal a sensitivity as high as 0.007% Hz −1 at a constant small-amplitude vibration and up to 0.13%/μ-strain at 0–500 Hz vibration. Potential applications of such thin films include highly sensitive strain sensors, accelerometers, artificial neural networks, artificial skin and polymer electronics

  12. Organic Carbon Stocks, Dynamics and Restoration in Relation to Soils of Agroecosystems in Ethiopia: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getaneh Gebeyehu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Soils represent the largest carbon pool and play important roles for carbon storage for prolonged periods in agroecosystems. A number of studies were conducted to quantify soil organic carbon (SOC worldwide. The objective of this review was to evaluate organic carbon stocks, dynamics and restoration in soils of agroecosystems in Ethiopia. Soil data from 32 different observations, representing four different agroecosystems, were analysed. The mean SOC stocks in the four agroecosystems varied and ranged from 25.66 (sub-humid agroecosystem to 113.17 (humid mid-highland agroecosystems Mg C ha-1 up to one meter depth. The trend of mean SOC followed (in descending order: humid mid-highland (113.17 Mg C ha-1 > per-humid highland (57.14 Mg C ha-1 > semi-arid (25.77 Mg C ha-1 > sub-humid (25.66 Mg C ha-1. Compared with soils of tropical countries, those in Ethiopian agroecosystems contained low SOC storage potential. This might be associated with differences in measurement and analysis methods as 53.1% of the studies employed the Walkley-Black Method, which is known to underestimate carbon stocks in addition to ecological and management effects. However, shifts of land management from rain-fed to irrigation farming systems exhibited progress in the improvement of mean SOC storage potential. The analyses showed that farming systems involving irrigation sequestered more carbon than rain-fed farm systems. The mean SOC in the various agricultural land uses followed the following trend (in descending order: agroforestry (153.57 Mg C ha-1 > grazing land (34.61 Mg C ha-1 > cereal cultivation (24.18 Mg C ha-1. Therefore, the possible solutions for improvement of organic carbon stocks would be implementation of appropriate restoration strategies based on agroecosystems.INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF ENVIRONMENT Volume-6, Issue-1, Dec-Feb 2016/17, page: 1-22 

  13. Molecular dynamics investigation of carbon nanotube junctions in non-aqueous solutions

    KAUST Repository

    Gkionis, Konstantinos

    2014-07-23

    The properties of liquids in a confined environment are known to differ from those in the bulk. Extending this knowledge to geometries defined by two metallic layers in contact with the ends of a carbon nanotube is important for describing a large class of nanodevices that operate in non-aqueous environments. Here we report a series of classical molecular dynamics simulations for gold-electrode junctions in acetone, cyclohexane and N,N-dimethylformamide solutions and analyze the structure and the dynamics of the solvents in different regions of the nanojunction. The presence of the nanotube has little effect on the ordering of the solvents along its axis, while in the transversal direction deviations are observed. Importantly, the orientational dynamics of the solvents at the electrode-nanotube interface differ dramatically from that found when only the electrodes are present.

  14. Carbon balance and crop residue management in dynamic equilibrium under a no-till system in Campos Gerais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ademir de Oliveira Ferreira

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The adoption of no-tillage systems (NT and the maintenance of crop residues on the soil surface result in the long-term increase of carbon (C in the system, promoting C sequestration and reducing C-CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the C sequestration rate and the minimum amount of crop residues required to maintain the dynamic C equilibrium (dC/dt = 0 of two soils (Typic Hapludox with different textural classes. The experiment was arranged in a 2 x 2 x 2 randomized block factorial design. The following factors were analyzed: (a two soil types: Typic Hapludox (Oxisol with medium texture (LVTM and Oxisol with clay texture (LVTA, (b two sampling layers (0-5 and 5-20 cm, and (c two sampling periods (P1 - October 2007; P2 - September 2008. Samples were collected from fields under a long-term (20 years NT system with the following crop rotations: wheat/soybean/black oat + vetch/maize (LVTM and wheat/maize/black oat + vetch/soybean (LVTA. The annual C sequestration rates were 0.83 and 0.76 Mg ha-1 for LVTM and LVTA, respectively. The estimates of the minimum amount of crop residues required to maintain a dynamic equilibrium (dC/dt = 0 were 7.13 and 6.53 Mg ha-1 year-1 for LVTM and LVTA, respectively. The C conversion rate in both studied soils was lower than that reported in other studies in the region, resulting in a greater amount of crop residues left on the soil surface.

  15. Assessing the dynamic material criticality of infrastructure transitions: A case of low carbon electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roelich, Katy; Dawson, David A.; Purnell, Phil; Knoeri, Christof; Revell, Ruairi; Busch, Jonathan; Steinberger, Julia K.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We present a method to analyse material criticality of infrastructure transitions. • Criticality is defined as the potential for, and exposure to, supply disruption. • Our method is dynamic reducing the probability of lock-in to at-risk technologies. • We show that supply disruption potential is reducing but exposure is increasing. - Abstract: Decarbonisation of existing infrastructure systems requires a dynamic roll-out of technology at an unprecedented scale. The potential disruption in supply of critical materials could endanger such a transition to low-carbon infrastructure and, by extension, compromise energy security more broadly because low carbon technologies are reliant on these materials in a way that fossil-fuelled energy infrastructure is not. Criticality is currently defined as the combination of the potential for supply disruption and the exposure of a system of interest to that disruption. We build on this definition and develop a dynamic approach to quantifying criticality, which monitors the change in criticality during the transition towards a low-carbon infrastructure goal. This allows us to assess the relative risk of different technology pathways to reach a particular goal and reduce the probability of being ‘locked in’ to currently attractive but potentially future-critical technologies. To demonstrate, we apply our method to criticality of the proposed UK electricity system transition, with a focus on neodymium. We anticipate that the supply disruption potential of neodymium will decrease by almost 30% by 2050; however, our results show the criticality of low carbon electricity production increases ninefold over this period, as a result of increasing exposure to neodymium-reliant technologies

  16. A comparison of annual and seasonal carbon dioxide effluxes between subarctic Sweden and high-arctic Svalbard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Björkman, Mats P.; Morgner, Elke; Björk, Robert G.

    2010-01-01

    Recent climate change predictions suggest altered patterns of winter precipitation across the Arctic. It has been suggested that the presence, timing and quantity of snow all affect microbial activity, thus influencing CO2 production in soil. In this study annual and seasonal emissions of CO2 were...... in the literature. Winter emissions varied in their contribution to total annual production between 1 and 18%. Artificial snow drifts shortened the snow-free period by 2 weeks and decreased the annual CO2 emission by up to 20%. This study suggests that future shifts in vegetation zones may increase soil respiration...

  17. Designing a dynamic data driven application system for estimating real-time load of dissolved organic carbon in a river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying. Ouyang

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of naturally occurring dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a river is central to estimating surface water quality, aquatic carbon cycling, and global climate change. Currently, determination of the DOC in surface water is primarily accomplished by manually collecting samples for laboratory analysis, which requires at least 24 h. In other words...

  18. Contemporary carbon dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems in the Southeastern Plains of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Loveland, Thomas R.; Kurtz, R.M.

    2004-01-01

    Quantifying carbon dynamics over large areas is frequently hindered by the lack of consistent, high-quality, spatially explicit land use and land cover change databases and appropriate modeling techniques. In this paper, we present a generic approach to address some of these challenges. Land cover change information in the Southeastern Plains ecoregion was derived from Landsat data acquired in 1973, 1980, 1986, 1992, and 2000 within 11 randomly located 20-km × 20-km sample blocks. Carbon dynamics within each of the sample blocks was simulated using the General Ensemble Biogeochemical Modeling System (GEMS), capable of assimilating the variances and covariance of major input variables into simulations using an ensemble approach. Results indicate that urban and forest areas have been increasing, whereas agricultural land has been decreasing since 1973. Forest clear-cutting activity has intensified, more than doubling from 1973 to 2000. The Southeastern Plains has been acting as a carbon sink since 1973, with an average rate of 0.89 Mg C/ha/yr. Biomass, soil organic carbon (SOC), and harvested materials account for 56%, 34%, and 10% of the sink, respectively. However, the sink has declined continuously during the same period owing to forest aging in the northern part of the ecoregion and increased forest clear-cutting activities in the south. The relative contributions to the sink from SOC and harvested materials have increased, implying that these components deserve more study in the future. The methods developed here can be used to quantify the impacts of human management activities on the carbon cycle at landscape to global scales.

  19. Subsoil carbon accumulation on an arable Mollisol is retention dominated, in contrast to input driven carbon dynamics in topsoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem-Miller, Jeffrey; Lehmann, Johannes

    2017-04-01

    The majority of the world's soil organic carbon (OC) stock is stored below 30 cm in depth, yet sampling for soil OC assessment rarely goes below 30 cm. Recent studies suggest that subsoil OC is distinct from topsoil OC in quantity and quality: subsoil OC concentrations are typically much lower and turnover times are much longer, but the mechanisms involved in retention and input of OC to the subsoil are not well understood. Improving our understanding of subsoil OC is essential for balancing the global carbon budget and confronting the challenge of global climate change. This study was undertaken to assess the relationship between OC stock and potential drivers of OC dynamics, including both soil properties and environmental covariates, in topsoil (0 to 30 cm) versus subsoil (30 to 75 cm). The performance of commonly used depth functions in predicting OC stock from 0 to 75 cm was also assessed. Depth functions are a useful tool for extrapolating OC stock below the depth of sampling, but may poorly model "hot spots" of OC accumulation, and be inadequate for modelling the distinct dynamics of topsoil and subsoil OC when applied with a single functional form. We collected two hundred soil cores on an arable Mollisol, sectioned into five depth increments (0-10, 10-20, 20-30, 30-50, and 50-75 cm), and performed the following analyses on each depth increment: concentration of OC, inorganic C, permanganate oxidizable carbon (POXC), and total N, as well as texture, pH, and bulk density; a digital elevation model was used to calculate elevation, slope, curvature, and soil topographic wetness index. We found that topsoil OC stocks were significantly correlated (p 7.0), flat topography, a high OC to total N ratio, and a high ratio of POXC to OC. These findings suggest that at this site, topsoil OC stock is input driven, while OC accumulation in the subsoil is retention dominated. Accordingly, a new depth function is proposed that uses a linear relationship to model OC stock

  20. Revised estimates of the annual net flux of carbon to the atmosphere from changes in land use and land management 1850-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houghton, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    Recent analyses of land-use change in the US and China, together with the latest estimates of tropical deforestation and afforestation from the FAO, were used to calculate a portion of the annual flux of carbon between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere. The calculated flux includes only that portion of the flux resulting from direct human activity. In most regions, activities included the conversion of natural ecosystems to cultivated lands and pastures, including shifting cultivation, harvest of wood (for timber and fuel) and the establishment of tree plantations. In the US, woody encroachment and woodland thickening as a result of fire suppression were also included. The calculated flux of carbon does not include increases or decreases in carbon storage as a result of environmental changes (e.g.; increasing concentrations of CO 2 , N deposition, climatic change or pollution). Globally, the long-term (1850-2000) flux of carbon from changes in land use and management released 156 PgC to the atmosphere, about 60% of it from the tropics. Average annual fluxes during the 1980s and 1990s were 2.0 and 2.2 PgC/yr, respectively, dominated by releases of carbon from the tropics. Outside the tropics, the average net flux of carbon attributable to land-use change and management decreased from a source of 0.06 PgC/yr during the 1980s to a sink of 0.02 PgC/yr during the 1990s. According to the analyses summarized here, changes in land use were responsible for sinks in North America and Europe and for small sources in other non-tropical regions. The revisions were as large as 0.3 PgC/yr in individual regions but were largely offsetting, so that the global estimate for the 1980s was changed little from an earlier estimate. Uncertainties and recent improvements in the data used to calculate the flux of carbon from land-use change are reviewed, and the results are compared to other estimates of flux to evaluate the extent to which processes other than land-use change and

  1. Dynamic hybrid life cycle assessment of energy and carbon of multicrystalline silicon photovoltaic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Pei; Williams, Eric D

    2010-10-15

    This paper advances the life cycle assessment (LCA) of photovoltaic systems by expanding the boundary of the included processes using hybrid LCA and accounting for the technology-driven dynamics of embodied energy and carbon emissions. Hybrid LCA is an extended method that combines bottom-up process-sum and top-down economic input-output (EIO) methods. In 2007, the embodied energy was 4354 MJ/m(2) and the energy payback time (EPBT) was 2.2 years for a multicrystalline silicon PV system under 1700 kWh/m(2)/yr of solar radiation. These results are higher than those of process-sum LCA by approximately 60%, indicating that processes excluded in process-sum LCA, such as transportation, are significant. Even though PV is a low-carbon technology, the difference between hybrid and process-sum results for 10% penetration of PV in the U.S. electrical grid is 0.13% of total current grid emissions. Extending LCA from the process-sum to hybrid analysis makes a significant difference. Dynamics are characterized through a retrospective analysis and future outlook for PV manufacturing from 2001 to 2011. During this decade, the embodied carbon fell substantially, from 60 g CO(2)/kWh in 2001 to 21 g/kWh in 2011, indicating that technological progress is realizing reductions in embodied environmental impacts as well as lower module price.

  2. Using elevation gradients to study climate controls on soil carbon dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumbore, S.; Marzaioli, F.; Castanha, C.; Amundson, R.

    2009-04-01

    Elevation gradients provide the opportunity to study vegetation and climate gradients in a setting where other soil forming factors such as parent material and soil age are held constant. We use the observed changes in radiocarbon content of organic matter fractionated by density and other methods to infer the dynamics of soil carbon and how it varies with elevation along transects in the Sierra Nevada mountains in California, USA. In surface litter layers, changes in the radiocarbon content from 1992 to 2006 in litter layers show that these layers are more dynamic than originally inferred from a comparison based on changes between the 1950s and the 1990s. In mineral soils, fractions often considered to be the most slowly cycling (hydrolysis residue) showed large changes in 14C in the last decade. We use incubations to determine the mean age of carbon respired by microbes along the same gradients; these data are compared to incubations from other sites and show that climate and vegetation are a major controls of the mean age of fast-cycling carbon in litter and soils.

  3. Revealing the Dynamics of Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts on Carbon in Oxygen and Water Using Environmental TEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Langli [Environmental; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental; Shao, Yuyan [Environmental; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental

    2017-10-02

    Deactivation of supported metal nanoparticle catalysts, especially in relevant gas condition, is a critical challenge for many technological applications, including heterogeneous catalysis, electrocatalysis, fuel cells, biomedical imaging and drug delivery. It has been far more commonly realized that deactivation of catalysts stems from surface area loss due to particle coarsening, however, for which the mechanism remains largely unclear. Herein, we use aberration corrected environmental transmission electron microscopy, at atomic level, to in-situ observe the dynamics of Pt catalyst in fuel cell relevant gas conditions. Particles migration and coalescence is observed to be the dominant coarsening process. As compared with the case of H2O, O2 promotes Pt nanoparticle migration on carbon surface. Surprisingly, coating Pt/carbon with a nanofilm of electrolyte (Nafion ionomer) leads to a faster migration of Pt in H2O than in O2, a consequence of Nafion-carbon interface water “lubrication” effect. Atomically, the particles coalescence is featured by re-orientation of particles towards lattice matching, a process driven by orientation dependent van der Waals force. These results provide direct observations of dynamics of metal nanoparticles at critical surface/interface under relevant conditions and yield significant insights into the multi-phase interaction in related technological processes.

  4. An Industrial-Based Consortium to Develop Premium Carbon Products from Coal, Annual Progress Report, October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Bruce G

    2006-09-29

    Since 1998, The Pennsylvania State University has been successfully managing the Consortium for Premium Carbon Products from Coal (CPCPC), which is a vehicle for industry-driven research on the promotion, development, and transfer of innovative technology on premium carbon produces from coal to the U.S. industry. The CPCPC is an initiative being led by Penn State, its co-charter member West Virginia University (WVU), and the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), who also provides the base funding for the program, with Penn State responsible for consortium management. CPCPC began in 1998 under DOE Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40350. This agreement ended November 2004 but the CPCPC activity has continued under the present cooperative agreement, No. DE-FC26-03NT41874, which started October 1, 2003. The objective of the second agreement is to continue the successful operation of the CPCPC. The CPCPC has enjoyed tremendous success with its organizational structure, that includes Penn State and WVU as charter members, numerous industrial affiliate members, and strategic university affiliate members together with NETL, forming a vibrant and creative team for innovative research in the area of transforming coal to carbon products. The key aspect of CPCPC is its industry-led council that selects proposals submitted by CPCPC members to ensure CPCPC target areas have strong industrial support. Base funding for the selected projects is provided by NETL with matching funds from industry. At the annual funding meeting held in October 2003, ten projects were selected for funding. Subcontracts were let from Penn State to the subcontractors on March 1, 2004. Nine of the ten 2004 projects were completed during the previous annual reporting period and their final reports were submitted with the previous annual report (i.e., 10/01/04-09/30/05). The final report for the remaining project, which was submitted during this reporting

  5. Human impacts on 20th century fire dynamics and implications for global carbon and water trajectories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2018-03-01

    Fire is a fundamental Earth system process and the primary ecosystem disturbance on the global scale. It affects carbon and water cycles through changing terrestrial ecosystems, and at the same time, is regulated by weather and climate, vegetation characteristics, and, importantly, human ignitions and suppression (i.e., the direct human effect on fire). Here, we utilize the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) to quantify the impacts of changes in human ignition and suppression on fire dynamics and associated carbon and water cycles. We find that the impact is to significantly reduce the 20th century global burned area by a century average of 38 Mha/yr and by 103 Mha/yr at the end of the century. Land carbon gain is weakened by 17% over the 20th century, mainly due to increased human deforestation fires and associated escape fires (i.e., degradation fires) in the tropical humid forests, even though the decrease in burned area in many other regions due to human fire suppression acts to increase land carbon gain. The direct human effect on fire weakens the upward trend in global runoff throughout the century by 6% and enhances the upward trend in global evapotranspiration since 1945 by 7%. In addition, the above impacts in densely populated, highly developed (if population density > 0.1 person/km2), or moderately populated and developed regions are of opposite sign to those in other regions. Our study suggests that particular attention should be paid to human deforestation and degradation fires in the tropical humid forests when reconstructing and projecting fire carbon emissions and net atmosphere-land carbon exchange and estimating resultant impacts of direct human effect on fire.

  6. Carbon Dynamics in the Hyporheic Zone of a Headwater Mountain Stream in the Cascade Mountains, Oregon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wondzell, S. M.; Corson-rikert, H.; Haggerty, R.; Dosch, N.

    2015-12-01

    We investigated carbon dynamics in the hyporheic zone of a steep, forested, headwater catchment in the Cascade Mountains of western Oregon, USA. Water samples were collected monthly from the stream and a well network between July and December 2013 and again in March 2014. Samples collected from the well network showed that DOC concentrations decreased, and that DIC concentrations increased, with median travel time through the hyporheic zone on all sample dates. Further, the magnitude of the observed increase in DIC was approximately 10-times too large to be explained by metabolism of stream-source DOC. We examined two alternative explanations: 1) that different source waters - either groundwater rich in DIC or lateral inputs of soil water rich in labile DOC that was subsequently metabolized to DIC - mixed with stream water and thereby accounted for the high concentrations of DIC observed in the hyporheic zone, or 2) that changes in the concentrations of DOC and DIC were best explained by in-situ biogeochemical processing of buried particulate organic matter. End-member mixing analyses showed that neither groundwater nor lateral inputs of soil water influenced carbon chemistry within the hyporheic zone. The analyses could not rule out leaching from the overlying unsaturated riparian soils as a potential source of DOC, but the rate of input from this source would have to be much smaller than the rate at which DOC was metabolized in the hyporheic zone because concentrations of DOC in the hyporheic zone were always lower than in the stream. Overall, our results suggest that particulate organic carbon, perhaps augmented with DOC leached from the overlying soils, is the primary source of organic carbon to the hyporheic zone. Further, these measurements suggest that riparian zones supply, via hyporheic exchange, a disproportionately large fraction of carbon to headwater streams and may therefore play an outsized role in the global carbon cycle.

  7. Human impacts on 20th century fire dynamics and implications for global carbon and water trajectories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang; Lawrence, David M.; Bond-Lamberty, Ben

    2018-03-01

    Fire is a fundamental Earth system process and the primary ecosystem disturbance on the global scale. It affects carbon and water cycles through changing terrestrial ecosystems, and at the same time, is regulated by weather and climate, vegetation characteristics, and, importantly, human ignitions and suppression (i.e., the direct human effect on fire). Here, we utilize the Community Land Model version 4.5 (CLM4.5) to quantify the impacts of changes in human ignition and suppression on fire dynamics and associated carbon and water cycles. We find that the impact is to significantly reduce the 20th century global burned area by a century average of 38 Mha/yr and by 103 Mha/yr at the end of the century. Land carbon gain is weakened by 17% over the 20th century, mainly due to increased human deforestation fires and associated escape fires (i.e., degradation fires) in the tropical humid forests, even though the decrease in burned area in many other regions due to human fire suppression acts to increase land carbon gain. The direct human effect on fire weakens the upward trend in global runoff throughout the century by 6% and enhances the upward trend in global evapotranspiration since ~ 1945 by 7%. In addition, the above impacts in densely populated, highly developed (if population density > 0.1 person/km2), or moderately populated and developed regions are of opposite sign to those in other regions. Our study suggests that particular attention should be paid to human deforestation and degradation fires in the tropical humid forests when reconstructing and projecting fire carbon emissions and net atmosphere-land carbon exchange and estimating resultant impacts of direct human effect on fire.

  8. Project Summary (2012-2015) – Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinkle, Ross [University of Central Florida; Benscoter, Brian [Florida Atlantic University; Comas, Xavier [Florida Atlantic University; Sumner, David [USGS; DeAngelis, Donald [USGS

    2015-04-07

    Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change The objectives of this project are to: 1) quantify above- and below-ground carbon stocks of terrestrial ecosystems along a seasonal hydrologic gradient in the headwaters region of the Greater Everglades watershed; 2) develop budgets of ecosystem gaseous carbon exchange (carbon dioxide and methane) across the seasonal hydrologic gradient; 3) assess the impact of climate drivers on ecosystem carbon exchange in the Greater Everglades headwater region; and 4) integrate research findings with climate-driven terrestrial ecosystem carbon models to examine the potential influence of projected future climate change on regional carbon cycling. Note: this project receives a one-year extension past the original performance period - David Sumner (USGS) is not included in this extension.

  9. Robbing Peter to Pay Paul: Modeling the Dynamic Evolution of the Coastal Carbon Sink Across Multiple Landforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, E. R.; Walters, D.; Windham-Myers, L.; Kirwan, M. L.

    2016-12-01

    Evaluating the strength and long-term stability of the coastal carbon sink requires a consideration of the spatial evolution of coastal landscapes in both the horizontal and vertical dimensions. We present a model of the transformation and burial of carbon along a bay-marsh-upland forest complex to explore the response of the coastal carbon sink to sea level rise (SLR) and anthropogenic activity. We establish a carbon mass-balance by coupling dynamic biogeochemically-based models of soil carbon burial in aquatic, intertidal, and upland environments with a physically-based model of marsh edge erosion, vertical growth and migration into adjacent uplands. The modeled increase in marsh vertical growth and carbon burial at moderate rates of sea level rise (3-10 mm/yr) is consistent with a synthesis of 219 field measurements of marsh carbon accumulation that show a significant (ploss of forest carbon stocks. Coastlines with high relief or barriers to wetland migration can become sources of carbon through the erosion of buried carbon stocks, but we show that the recapture of eroded carbon through vertical growth can be an important mechanism for reducing carbon loss. Overall, we show that the coastal carbon balance must be evaluated in a landscape context to account for changes in the size and magnitude of both the stocks and sinks of marsh carbon and for the transfers of carbon between coastal habitats. These results may help inform current efforts to appraise coastal carbon sinks that are beset by issues of landscape heterogeneity and the provenance of buried carbon.

  10. Characterizing dynamic behavior of carbon dioxide nano-jets using molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Pei-Hsing; Chou, Chuen-Shii; Hung, Shang-Chao; Jhan, Jhih-Wei

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports on the use of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to elucidate the dynamic behavior of CO2 through a Graphene/Au(111) nano-injector. We investigated the effects of jet diameter ( d), system temperature ( T), and the extrusion velocity ( v) of a graphite piston plate on the jet pattern, system pressure ( P), and the number of molecules ( N m) in the outflow. Simulation results show that the combined effects of high v and small d induced a larger jet angle, resulting in an increase in the number of CO2 molecules attached to the surface of the outlet. Increasing d enhanced the formation of the T-junction molecular geometry of CO2 molecules, due to the effects of electrostatic attraction between C (0.5888 e) and O (- 0.2944 e) of CO2, which caused the formation of larger agglomerations of CO2 molecules in the vicinity of the nano-injector orifice in the final extrusion stage. The increase in P within the cylinder of the nano-injector was more pronounced during middle and final stages of extrusion, compared with the effects observed during the initial stages. Despite the fact that N m increased noticeably with an increase in T, the value of N m at d = 1.5 nm and T ≥ 300 K greatly exceeded that at d = 1.0 nm and T = 500 K, regardless of the value of v. The numerical simulations presented in this study could be helpful in the design of nano-injectors for a diversity of applications associated with engineering systems and biomedicine at the nano-scale.

  11. Do dynamic global vegetation models capture the seasonality of carbon fluxes in the Amazon basin? A data-model intercomparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo-Coupe, Natalia; Levine, Naomi M; Christoffersen, Bradley O; Albert, Loren P; Wu, Jin; Costa, Marcos H; Galbraith, David; Imbuzeiro, Hewlley; Martins, Giordane; da Araujo, Alessandro C; Malhi, Yadvinder S; Zeng, Xubin; Moorcroft, Paul; Saleska, Scott R

    2017-01-01

    To predict forest response to long-term climate change with high confidence requires that dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) be successfully tested against ecosystem response to short-term variations in environmental drivers, including regular seasonal patterns. Here, we used an integrated dataset from four forests in the Brasil flux network, spanning a range of dry-season intensities and lengths, to determine how well four state-of-the-art models (IBIS, ED2, JULES, and CLM3.5) simulated the seasonality of carbon exchanges in Amazonian tropical forests. We found that most DGVMs poorly represented the annual cycle of gross primary productivity (GPP), of photosynthetic capacity (Pc), and of other fluxes and pools. Models simulated consistent dry-season declines in GPP in the equatorial Amazon (Manaus K34, Santarem K67, and Caxiuanã CAX); a contrast to observed GPP increases. Model simulated dry-season GPP reductions were driven by an external environmental factor, 'soil water stress' and consequently by a constant or decreasing photosynthetic infrastructure (Pc), while observed dry-season GPP resulted from a combination of internal biological (leaf-flush and abscission and increased Pc) and environmental (incoming radiation) causes. Moreover, we found models generally overestimated observed seasonal net ecosystem exchange (NEE) and respiration (R e ) at equatorial locations. In contrast, a southern Amazon forest (Jarú RJA) exhibited dry-season declines in GPP and R e consistent with most DGVMs simulations. While water limitation was represented in models and the primary driver of seasonal photosynthesis in southern Amazonia, changes in internal biophysical processes, light-harvesting adaptations (e.g., variations in leaf area index (LAI) and increasing leaf-level assimilation rate related to leaf demography), and allocation lags between leaf and wood, dominated equatorial Amazon carbon flux dynamics and were deficient or absent from current model

  12. Long-term impacts of manure amendments on carbon and greenhouse gas dynamics of rangelands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Justine J; Parton, William J; Silver, Whendee L

    2015-12-01

    Livestock manure is applied to rangelands as an organic fertilizer to stimulate forage production, but the long-term impacts of this practice on soil carbon (C) and greenhouse gas (GHG) dynamics are poorly known. We collected soil samples from manured and nonmanured fields on commercial dairies and found that manure amendments increased soil C stocks by 19.0 ± 7.3 Mg C ha(-1) and N stocks by 1.94 ± 0.63 Mg N ha(-1) compared to nonmanured fields (0-20 cm depth). Long-term historical (1700-present) and future (present-2100) impacts of management on soil C and N dynamics, net primary productivity (NPP), and GHG emissions were modeled with DayCent. Modeled total soil C and N stocks increased with the onset of dairying. Nitrous oxide (N2 O) emissions also increased by ~2 kg N2 O-N ha(-1)  yr(-1) . These emissions were proportional to total N additions and offset 75-100% of soil C sequestration. All fields were small net methane (CH4 ) sinks, averaging -4.7 ± 1.2 kg CH4 -C ha(-1)  yr(-1) . Overall, manured fields were net GHG sinks between 1954 and 2011 (-0.74 ± 0.73 Mg CO2 e ha(-1)  yr(-1) , CO2 e are carbon dioxide equivalents), whereas nonmanured fields varied around zero. Future soil C pools stabilized 40-60 years faster in manured fields than nonmanured fields, at which point manured fields were significantly larger sources than nonmanured fields (1.45 ± 0.52 Mg CO2 e ha(-1)  yr(-1) and 0.51 ± 0.60 Mg CO2 e ha(-1)  yr(-1) , respectively). Modeling also revealed a large background loss of soil C from the passive soil pool associated with the shift from perennial to annual grasses, equivalent to 29.4 ± 1.47 Tg CO2 e in California between 1820 and 2011. Manure applications increased NPP and soil C storage, but plant community changes and GHG emissions decreased, and eventually eliminated, the net climate benefit of this practice. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. An Automated Chamber Network for Evaluation the Long-term Response and Feedback of Soil Carbon Dynamics to Global Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, N.; Kim, S.; Shimoyama, K.; Kim, Y.; Hirano, T.; Takagi, K.; Fujinuma, Y.; Mukai, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Kakubari, Y.; Wang, Q.; Nakane, K.

    2007-12-01

    Regional networks for measuring carbon sequestration or loss by terrestrial ecosystems on a year round basis have been in operation since the mid-1990s. However, continuous measurements of soil CO2 efflux, the largest component of ecosystem respiration have only been reported over similar time scales at a few of the sites. We have developed a multichannel automated chamber system that can be used for continuous measuring soil CO2 efflux. The system equips 8 to 24 large automated chambers (90*90*50 cm, L*W*H). Since 1997, we have installed the chamber systems in the tundra in west Siberia, boreal forest in Alaska, cool- temperate and temperate forests in Japan, Korea and China, tropical seasonal forest in Thailand, and tropical rainforest in Malaysia. Annual soil CO2 effluxes were estimated to be about 5-6 tC ha-1 y-1 in the boreal and cool-temperate forests, 10 tC ha-1 y-1 in the temperate forests, and 30 tC ha-1 y-1 in the tropical rainforests. Efflux showed significant seasonality in the boreal and temperate forest that corresponding with the seasonal soil temperature. However, the wavelike efflux rates in the tropical forests were correlated with the seasonality of soil moisture. From 2007, a big project that funded by Ministry of the Environment of Japan (MOE) has launched to evaluate the response and feedback of soil carbon dynamics of Japanese forest ecosystems to global change. We are installing another 6 chamber systems at the six of Japanese typical forests to conduct the soil warming experiments. For scaling-up the chamber experiments and understanding the mechanisms of soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics to global change, soil samples from about 100 forest ecosystems will be incubated for modeling development. Furthermore, the environmental (temperature and CO2) controlled large open-top chambers have been employed to investigate the balance of SOM (the input from litter falls and loss due to the decomposition) of forest ecosystems with global change.

  14. Electrochemical oxidation of carbon-containing fuels and their dynamics in low-temperature fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krewer, Ulrike; Vidakovic-Koch, Tanja; Rihko-Struckmann, Liisa

    2011-10-04

    Fuel cells can convert the energy that is chemically stored in a compound into electrical energy with high efficiency. Hydrogen could be the first choice for chemical energy storage, but its utilization is limited due to storage and transport difficulties. Carbon-containing fuels store chemical energy with significantly higher energy density, which makes them excellent energy carriers. The electro-oxidation of carbon-containing fuels without prior reforming is a more challenging and complex process than anodic hydrogen oxidation. The current understanding of the direct electro-oxidation of carbon-containing fuels in low-temperature fuel cells is reviewed. Furthermore, this review covers various aspects of electro-oxidation for carbon-containing fuels in non-steady-state reaction conditions. Such dynamic investigations open possibilities to elucidate detailed reaction kinetics, to sense fuel concentration, or to diagnose the fuel-cell state during operation. Motivated by the challenge to decrease the consumption of fossil fuel, the production routes of the fuels from renewable resources also are reviewed. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. An Atomistic Carbide-Derived Carbon Model Generated Using ReaxFF-Based Quenched Molecular Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew W. Thompson

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a novel atomistic model of carbide-derived carbons (CDCs, which are nanoporous carbons with high specific surface areas, synthesis-dependent degrees of graphitization, and well-ordered, tunable porosities. These properties make CDCs viable substrates in several energy-relevant applications, such as gas storage media, electrochemical capacitors, and catalytic supports. These materials are heterogenous, non-ideal structures and include several important parameters that govern their performance. Therefore, a realistic model of the CDC structure is needed in order to study these systems and their nanoscale and macroscale properties with molecular simulation. We report the use of the ReaxFF reactive force field in a quenched molecular dynamics routine to generate atomistic CDC models. The pair distribution function, pore size distribution, and adsorptive properties of this model are reported and corroborated with experimental data. Simulations demonstrate that compressing the system after quenching changes the pore size distribution to better match the experimental target. Ring size distributions of this model demonstrate the prevalence of non-hexagonal carbon rings in CDCs. These effects may contrast the properties of CDCs against those of activated carbons with similar pore size distributions and explain higher energy densities of CDC-based supercapacitors.

  16. Monitoring and Modeling Carbon Dynamics at a Network of Intensive Sites in the USA and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birdsey, R.; Wayson, C.; Johnson, K. D.; Pan, Y.; Angeles, G.; De Jong, B. H.; Andrade, J. L.; Dai, Z.

    2013-05-01

    The Forest Services of the USA and Mexico, supported by NASA and USAID, have begun to establish a network of intensive forest carbon monitoring sites. These sites are used for research and teaching, developing forest management practices, and forging links to the needs of communities. Several of the sites have installed eddy flux towers to basic meteorology data and daily estimates of forest carbon uptake and release, the processes that determine forest growth. Field sampling locations at each site provide estimates of forest biomass and carbon stocks, and monitor forest dynamic processes such as growth and mortality rates. Remote sensing facilitates scaling up to the surrounding landscapes. The sites support information requirements for implementing programs such as Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+), enabling communities to receive payments for ecosystem services such as reduced carbon emissions or improved forest management. In addition to providing benchmark data for REDD+ projects, the sites are valuable for validating state and national estimates from satellite remote sensing and the national forest inventory. Data from the sites provide parameters for forest models that support strategic management analysis, and support student training and graduate projects. The intensive monitoring sites may be a model for other countries in Latin America. Coordination among sites in the USA, Mexico and other Latin American countries can ensure harmonization of approaches and data, and share experiences and knowledge among countries with emerging opportunities for implementing REDD+ and other conservation programs.

  17. Growth dynamics of carbon-metal particles and nanotubes synthesized by CO2 laser vaporization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokai, F.; Takahashi, K.; Yudasaka, M.; Iijima, S.

    To study the growth of carbon-Co/Ni particles and single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by 20 ms CO2 laser-pulse irradiation of a graphite-Co/Ni (1.2 at.%) target in an Ar gas atmosphere (600 Torr), we used emission imaging spectroscopy and shadowgraphy with a temporal resolution of 1.67 ms. Wavelength-selected emission images showed that C2 emission was strong in the region close to the target (within 2 cm), while for the same region the blackbody radiation from the large clusters or particles increased with increasing distance from the target. Shadowgraph images showed that the viscous flow of carbon and metal species formed a mushroom or a turbulent cloud spreading slowly into the Ar atmosphere, indicating that particles and SWNTs continued to grow as the ejected material cooled. In addition, emission imaging spectroscopy at 1200 °C showed that C2 and hot clusters and particles with higher emission intensities were distributed over much wider areas. We discuss the growth dynamics of the particles and SWNTs through the interaction of the ambient Ar with the carbon and metal species released from the target by the laser pulse.

  18. DRAINMOD-FOREST: Integrated modeling of hydrology, soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and plant growth for drained forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiying Tian; Mohamed A. Youssef; R. Wayne Skaggs; Devendra M. Amatya; G.M. Chescheir

    2012-01-01

    We present a hybrid and stand-level forest ecosystem model, DRAINMOD-FOREST, for simulating the hydrology, carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics, and tree growth for drained forest lands under common silvicultural practices. The model was developed by linking DRAINMOD, the hydrological model, and DRAINMOD-N II, the soil C and N dynamics model, to a forest growth model,...

  19. Top-down constraints on disturbance dynamics in the terrestrial carbon cycle: effects at global and regional scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bloom, A. A.; Exbrayat, J. F.; van der Velde, I.; Peters, W.; Williams, M.

    2014-01-01

    Large uncertainties preside over terrestrial carbon flux estimates on a global scale. In particular, the strongly coupled dynamics between net ecosystem productivity and disturbance C losses are poorly constrained. To gain an improved understanding of ecosystem C dynamics from regional to global

  20. Structural Dynamics of Carbon Dots in Water and N, N-Dimethylformamide Probed by All-Atom Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paloncýová, Markéta; Langer, Michal; Otyepka, Michal

    2018-03-09

    Carbon dots (CDs), one of the youngest members of the carbon nanostructure family, are now widely experimentally studied for their tunable fluorescence properties, bleaching resistance, and biocompatibility. Their interaction with biomolecular systems has also been explored experimentally. However, many atomistic details still remain unresolved. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations enabling atomistic and femtosecond resolutions simultaneously are a well-established tool of computational chemistry which can provide useful insights into investigated systems. Here we present a full procedure for performing MD simulations of CDs. We developed a builder for generating CDs of a desired size and with various oxygen-containing surface functional groups. Further, we analyzed the behavior of various CDs differing in size, surface functional groups, and degrees of functionalization by MD simulations. These simulations showed that surface functionalized CDs are stable in a water environment through the formation of an extensive hydrogen bonding network. We also analyzed the internal dynamics of individual layers of CDs and evaluated the role of surface functional groups on CD stability. We observed that carboxyl groups interconnected the neighboring layers and decreased the rate of internal rotations. Further, we monitored changes in the CD shape caused by an excess of charged carboxyl groups or carbonyl groups. In addition to simulations in water, we analyzed the behavior of CDs in the organic solvent DMF, which decreased the stability of pure CDs but increased the level of interlayer hydrogen bonding. We believe that the developed protocol, builder, and parameters will facilitate future studies addressing various aspects of structural features of CDs and nanocomposites containing CDs.

  1. Carbon and Nitrogen dynamics in deciduous and broad leaf trees under drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Jobin; Schaub, Marcus; Arend, Matthias; Saurer, Matthias; siegwolf, Rolf; Weiler, Markus; Gessler, Arthur

    2017-04-01

    Climate change is projected to lead to an increased frequency and duration of severe drought events in future. Already within the last twenty years, however, drought stress related forest mortality has been increasing across the globe. Tree and forest die off events have multiple adverse effects on ecosystem functioning and might convert previous carbon sinks to act as carbon sources instead and can thus intensify the effect of climate change and global warming. Current predictions of forest's functioning under drought and thus forest mortality under future climatic conditions are constrained by a still incomplete picture of the trees' physiological reactions that allows some trees to survive drought periods while others succumb. Concerning the effects of drought on the carbon balance and on tree hydraulics our picture is getting more complete, but still interactions between abiotic factors and pest and diseases as well as the interaction between carbon and nutrient balances as factors affecting drought induced mortality are not well understood. Reduced carbon allocation from shoots to roots might cause a lack of energy for root nutrient uptake and to a shortage of carbon skeletons for nitrogen assimilation and thus to an impaired nutrient status of trees. To tackle these points, we have performed a drought stress experiment with six different plant species, 3 broad leaf (maple, beech and oak) and 3 deciduous (pine, fir and spruce). Potted two-year-old seedlings were kept inside a greenhouse for 5 months and 3 levels of drought stress (no stress (control), intermediate and intensive drought stress) were applied by controlling water supply. Gas exchange measurements were performed periodically to monitor photosynthesis, transpiration, stomatal conductance. At the pinnacle of drought stress, we applied isotopic pulse labelling: On the one hand we exposed trees to 13CO2 to investigate on carbon dynamics and the allocation of new assimilates within the plant. Moreover

  2. Quantifying carbon sequestration in forest plantations by modeling the dynamics of above and below ground carbon pools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chris A. Maier; Kurt H. Johnsen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive pine plantation management may provide opportunities to increase carbon sequestration in the Southeastern United States. Developing management options that increase fiber production and soil carbon sequestration require an understanding of the biological and edaphic processes that control soil carbon turnover. Belowground carbon resides primarily in three...

  3. Structural modeling of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates by molecular dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawelek, L; Brodka, A; Dore, John C; Hannon, Alex C; Iijima, S; Yudasaka, M; Ohba, T; Kaneko, K; Burian, A

    2013-09-19

    The structure of dahlia-type single-walled carbon nanohorn aggregates has been modeled by classical molecular dynamics simulations, and the validity of the model has been verified by neutron diffraction. Computer-generated models consisted of an outer part formed from single-walled carbon nanohorns with diameters of 20-50 Å and a length of 400 Å and an inner turbostratic graphite-like core with a diameter of 130 Å. The diffracted intensity and the pair correlation function computed for such a constructed model are in good agreement with the neutron diffraction experimental data. The proposed turbostratic inner core explains the occurrence of the additional (002) and (004) graphitic peaks in the diffraction pattern of the studied sample and provides information about the interior structure of the dahlia-type aggregates.

  4. Future active layer dynamics and carbon dioxide production from thawing permafrost layers in Northeast Greenland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollesen, Jørgen; Elberling, Bo; Jansson, P.E.

    2011-01-01

    from a moist permafrost soil in High-Arctic Greenland with observed heat production and carbon dioxide (CO2) release rates from decomposition of previously frozen organic matter. Observations show that the maximum thickness of the active layer at the end of the summer has increased 1 cm yr-1 since 1996......Thawing permafrost and the resulting mineralization of previously frozen organic carbon (C) is considered an important future feedback from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere. Here, we use a dynamic process oriented permafrost model, the CoupModel, to link surface and subsurface temperatures......–105 cm as a result of a 2–6 °C warming. An additional increase in the maximum active layer thickness of a few centimetres may be expected due to heat production from decomposition of organic matter. Simulated future soil temperatures and water contents are subsequently used with measured basal soil...

  5. Cyclic occurrence of fire and its role in carbon dynamics along an edaphic moisture gradient in longleaf pine ecosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Whelan

    Full Text Available Fire regulates the structure and function of savanna ecosystems, yet we lack understanding of how cyclic fire affects savanna carbon dynamics. Furthermore, it is largely unknown how predicted changes in climate may impact the interaction between fire and carbon cycling in these ecosystems. This study utilizes a novel combination of prescribed fire, eddy covariance (EC and statistical techniques to investigate carbon dynamics in frequently burned longleaf pine savannas along a gradient of soil moisture availability (mesic, intermediate and xeric. This research approach allowed us to investigate the complex interactions between carbon exchange and cyclic fire along the ecological amplitude of longleaf pine. Over three years of EC measurement of net ecosystem exchange (NEE show that the mesic site was a net carbon sink (NEE = -2.48 tonnes C ha(-1, while intermediate and xeric sites were net carbon sources (NEE = 1.57 and 1.46 tonnes C ha(-1, respectively, but when carbon losses due to fuel consumption were taken into account, all three sites were carbon sources (10.78, 7.95 and 9.69 tonnes C ha(-1 at the mesic, intermediate and xeric sites, respectively. Nonetheless, rates of NEE returned to pre-fire levels 1-2 months following fire. Consumption of leaf area by prescribed fire was associated with reduction in NEE post-fire, and the system quickly recovered its carbon uptake capacity 30-60 days post fire. While losses due to fire affected carbon balances on short time scales (instantaneous to a few months, drought conditions over the final two years of the study were a more important driver of net carbon loss on yearly to multi-year time scales. However, longer-term observations over greater environmental variability and additional fire cycles would help to more precisely examine interactions between fire and climate and make future predictions about carbon dynamics in these systems.

  6. Remote sensing techniques to monitor nitrogen-driven carbon dynamics in field corn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corp, Lawrence A.; Middleton, Elizabeth M.; Campbell, Petya K. E.; Huemmrich, K. Fred; Cheng, Yen-Ben; Daughtry, Craig S. T.

    2009-08-01

    Patterns of change in vegetation growth and condition are one of the primary indicators of the present and future ecological status of the globe. Nitrogen (N) is involved in photochemical processes and is one of the primary resources regulating plant growth. As a result, biological carbon (C) sequestration is driven by N availability. Large scale monitoring of photosynthetic processes are currently possible only with remote sensing systems that rely heavily on passive reflectance (R) information. Unlike R, fluorescence (F) emitted from chlorophyll is directly related to photochemical reactions and has been extensively used for the elucidation of the photosynthetic pathways. Recent advances in passive fluorescence instrumentation have made the remote acquisition of solar-induced fluorescence possible. The goal of this effort is to evaluate existing reflectance and emerging fluorescence methodologies for determining vegetation parameters related to photosynthetic function and carbon sequestration dynamics in plants. Field corn N treatment levels of 280, 140, 70, and 0 kg N / ha were sampled from an intensive test site for a multi-disciplinary project, Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement (OPE). Aircraft, near-ground, and leaf-level measurements were used to compare and contrast treatment effects within this experiment site assessed with both reflectance and fluorescence approaches. A number of spectral indices including the R derivative index D730/D705, the normalized difference of R750 vs. R705, and simple ratio R800/R750 differentiated three of the four N fertilization rates and yielded high correlations to three important carbon parameters: C:N, light use efficiency, and grain yield. These results advocate the application of hyperspectral sensors for remotely monitoring carbon cycle dynamics in terrestrial ecosystems.

  7. Application of fast pyrolysis biochar to a loamy soil - Effects on carbon and nitrogen dynamics and potential for carbon sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruun, E.W.

    2011-05-15

    Thermal decomposition of biomass in an oxygen-free environment (pyrolysis) produces bio-oil, syngas, and char. All three products can be used to generate energy, but an emerging new use of the recalcitrant carbon-rich char (biochar) is to apply it to the soil in order to enhance soil fertility and at the same time mitigate climate change by sequestering carbon in the soil. In general, the inherent physicochemical characteristics of biochars make these materials attractive agronomic soil conditioners. However, different pyrolysis technologies exist, i.e. slow pyrolysis, fast pyrolysis, and full gasification systems, and each of these influence the biochar quality differently. As of yet, there is only limited knowledge on the effect of applying fast pyrolysis biochar (FP-biochar) to soil. This PhD project provides new insights into the short-term impacts of adding FP-biochar to soil on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and on soil carbon and nitrogen dynamics. The FP-biochars investigated in the thesis were generated at different reactor temperatures by fast pyrolysis of wheat straw employing a Pyrolysis Centrifuge Reactor (PCR). The carbohydrate content ranged from more than 35 % in FP-biochars made at a low reactor temperature (475 deg. C) down to 3 % in FP-biochars made at high temperatures (575 deg. C). The relative amount of carbohydrates in the FP-biochar was found to be correlated to the short-term degradation rates of the FP-biochars when applied to soil. Fast and slow pyrolysis of wheat straw resulted in two different biochar types with each their distinct physical structures and porosities, carbohydrate contents, particle sizes, pH values, BET surface areas, and elemental compositions. These different physicochemical properties obviously have different impacts on soil processes, which underscores that results obtained from soil studies using slow pyrolysis biochars (SP-biochar) are not necessarily applicable for FP-biochars. For example, the incorporation

  8. Measuring and modeling carbon stock change estimates for US forests and uncertainties from apparent inter-annual variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    James E. Smith; Linda S. Heath

    2015-01-01

    Our approach is based on a collection of models that convert or augment the USDA Forest Inventory and Analysis program survey data to estimate all forest carbon component stocks, including live and standing dead tree aboveground and belowground biomass, forest floor (litter), down deadwood, and soil organic carbon, for each inventory plot. The data, which include...

  9. Multi-factor controls on terrestrial carbon dynamics in urbanised areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, C.; Tian, H.; Pan, S.; Lockaby, G.; Chappelka, A.

    2013-11-01

    As urban land cover and populations continue rapidly increasing across the globe, much concern has been raised that urbanization may significantly alter terrestrial carbon dynamics that affects atmospheric CO2 concentration and climate. Urbanization involves complex changes in land structure and multiple environmental factors. Relative contribution of these and their interactive effects need be quantified to better understand urbanization effects on regional C dynamics as well as assess the effectiveness of C sequestration policies focusing on urban green space development. In this study, we analyzed the factors that may control the urbanization effect on ecosystem C dynamics, and proposed a numeric experimental scheme, i.e. scenarios design, to conduct factorial analysis on the effects of different factors. Then as a case study, a dynamic land ecosystem model (DLEM) was applied to quantify the urbanization effect on the C dynamics of the Southern US (SUS) from 1945-2007, and to analyze the relative contributions from each environmental factor and their interactive effects. We found the effect of urban land conversion dominated the C dynamics in the SUS, resulting in about 0.37 Pg C lost from 1945-2007. However, urban ecosystem management and urban-induced environmental changes enhanced C sequestration by 0.12 Pg and 0.03 Pg, respectively. Their C sequestration effects, which amounted to 40% of the magnitude of land conversion effect, partially compensated for the C loss during urbanization. Numeric experiments and factorial analyses indicated complex interactive effects among different factors and between various land covers and environmental controls, findings need to be further confirmed by field studies. The proposed numeric experimental scheme provides a quantitative approach for understanding the complex mechanisms controlling C dynamics, and defining best development practices in urbanised areas.

  10. Seasonal spectral dynamics and carbon fluxes at core EOS sites using EO-1 Hyperion images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomasino, D.; Campbell, P.; Price, R. M.

    2010-12-01

    Fluxes of water and carbon into the atmosphere are critical components in order to monitor and predict climate change. Spatial heterogeneity and seasonal changes in vegetation contribute to ambiguities in regional and global CO2 and water cycle dynamics. Satellite remote sensing is essential for monitoring the spatial and temporal dynamics of various vegetation types for the purposes of determining carbon and water fluxes. Satellite data from the EO-1 Hyperion sensor was acquired for five Earth Observing Satellite (EOS) sites, Mongu (Zambia, Africa), Konza Prairie (Kansas, USA), Duke Forest (North Carolina, USA), Barrow (Alaska, USA) and Sevilleta (New Mexico, USA). Each EOS site represented a distinct vegetative ecosystem type; hardwood forest, grassland, evergreen forest, lichens, and shrubland/grassland respectively. Satellite data was atmospherically corrected using the Atmosphere CORrection Now (ACORN) model and subsequently, the spectral reflectance data was extracted in the vicinity of existing flux towers. The EO-1 Hyperion sensor proved advantageous because of its high and continuous spectral resolution (10 nm intervals from 355 to 2578 nm wavelengths). The high spectral resolution allowed us calculate biophysical indices based on specific wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum that are associated with alterations in foliar chemistry and plant membrane structure (i.e., vegetation stress) brought upon by many environmental factors. Previous studies have focused on relationships within a specific site or vegetation community. This study however, incorporated many sites with different vegetation types and various geographic locations throughout the world. Monitoring the fluctuations in vegetation stress with contemporaneous environmental conditions and carbon flux measurements from each site will provide better insight into water and carbon flux dynamics in many different biomes. Noticeable spectral signatures were identified based on site specific

  11. Importance of soil thermal dynamics on land carbon sequestration in Northern Eurasia during the 21st century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kicklighter, David; Monier, Erwan; Sokolov, Andrei; Zhuang, Qianlai; Melillo, Jerry

    2015-04-01

    Recent modeling studies have suggested that carbon sinks in pan-arctic ecosystems may be weakening partially as a result of warming-induced increases in soil organic matter (SOM) decomposition and the exposure of previously frozen SOM to decomposition. This weakening of carbon sinks is likely to continue in the future as vast amount of carbon in permafrost soils is vulnerable to thaw. Here, we examine the importance of considering soil thermal dynamics when determining the effects of climate change and land-use change on carbon dynamics in Northern Eurasia during the 21st century. This importance is assessed by comparing results for a "business as usual" scenario between a version of the Terrestrial Ecosystem Model that does not consider soil thermal dynamics (TEM 4.4) and a version that does consider these dynamics (TEM 6.0). In this scenario, which is similar to the IPCC Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) 8.5 scenario, the net area covered by food crops and pastures in Northern Eurasia is assumed to remain relatively constant over the 21st century, but the area covered by secondary forests is projected to double as a result of timber harvest and the abandonment of land associated with displacement of agricultural land. Enhanced decomposition from the newly exposed SOM from permafrost thaw also increases nitrogen availability for plant production so that the loss of carbon from the enhanced decomposition is partially compensated by enhanced uptake and storage of atmospheric carbon dioxide in vegetation. Our results indicate that consideration of soil thermal dynamics have a large influence on how simulated terrestrial carbon dynamics in Northern Eurasia respond to changes in climate, atmospheric chemistry (e.g., carbon dioxide fertilization, ozone pollution, nitrogen deposition) and disturbances.

  12. Soil organic carbon dynamics in sugarcane crop in south-central Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Adriana Marcela Silva Olaya

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane cropping is an important component of the Brazil´s economy. As the main feedstock used to produce ethanol, the area occupied with this crop has meaningfully increased in the last years and continues to expand in order to attend to the national and international demand of this biofuel. Despite that it has been demonstrated that land-use transition into sugarcane can negatively impact the soil carbon (C) dynamics, little is known about the effect of those land use changes (LUC) proces...

  13. Dynamic simulations of polypeptide templates to promote Ca-carbonate nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, U.; Biswas, S.; Wang, J.

    2008-12-01

    Over the years, there have been a number of attempts to form synthetic organic templates that mimic dynamic processes at the interface between organic matter and mineral surfaces. One approach has been to isolate the templating matrix from mineralized tissues and examine the growth of calcium salts in the presence of this matrix. Other experiments have focused on synthetic (bio-)organic templates, such as polymers, macromolecular complexes, phospholipid vesicles, pleated polyamino acids entrapped in gelatin self-assembled monolayers on gold substrates, and Langmuir films. In the case of Langmuir monolayers, the amphiphilic molecules can be designed in such a way that they act as artificial two-dimensional nuclei for the promotion of crystal nucleation. Such films have been used as templates to direct the crystal nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate. For example, Buijnsters et al. (2001)1 used Langmuir films of amide-containing phospholipids in the presence of calcium ions to form well-defined two-dimensional domains at the air-water interface. This is the starting point of our molecular dynamics simulations. After deriving a pure-core potential set for fast molecular dynamics simulations, we have created different two-dimensional networks of amide-containing phospho¬lipids that serve as templates for Ca carbonate seed formation. We can vary the distance and structural arrangement of the functional groups to control adsorption and seed formation. The molecular dynamics runs in these calculations contain water with different concentrations of Ca2+ and CO32- ions. We have chosen a slightly different approach for polypeptide chains as template formers. Hybrids of two and three-dimensional networks of these chains with varying connectivities (chemically and structurally) were used to simulate interfaces for early seed formation. Charged (mostly negatively) functional groups on the networks allow polar carbonate surfaces to be exposed at the interface whereas in

  14. Molecular dynamics analysis on axial buckling of functionalized carbon nanotubes in thermal environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehralian, Fahimeh; Tadi Beni, Yaghoub

    2017-11-04

    Molecular dynamics simulations are conducted to investigate the buckling characteristics of functionalized carbon nanotubes (f-CNTs) under axial compression at various temperatures. The influences of functionalization, content of functional groups, chirality and diameter, as well as temperature on buckling response of pristine and functionalized CNTs are investigated. It is found that the buckling capacity of CNTs deteriorates drastically by functionalization, though the increase in the content of functional groups slightly enhances their stability. Besides, the results show that temperature considerably contributes to the stability of nanotubes but interestingly it has the most pronounced impact on pristine CNTs than functionalized ones, as defective CNTs.

  15. Dynamism of household carbon emissions (HCEs) from rural and urban regions of northern and southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraseni, Tek Narayan; Qu, Jiansheng; Yue, Bian; Zeng, Jingjing; Maroulis, Jerry

    2016-10-01

    China contributes 23 % of global carbon emissions, of which 26 % originate from the household sector. Due to vast variations in both climatic conditions and the affordability and accessibility of fuels, household carbon emissions (HCEs) differ significantly across China. This study compares HCEs (per person) from urban and rural regions in northern China with their counterparts in southern China. Annual macroeconomic data for the study period 2005 to 2012 were obtained from Chinese government sources, whereas the direct HCEs for different types of fossil fuels were obtained using the IPCC reference approach, and indirect HCEs were calculated by input-output analysis. Results suggest that HCEs from urban areas are higher than those from rural areas. Regardless of the regions, there is a similarity in per person HCEs in urban areas, but the rural areas of northern China had significantly higher HCEs than those from southern China. The reasons for the similarity between urban areas and differences between rural areas and the percentage share of direct and indirect HCEs from different sources are discussed. Similarly, the reasons and solutions to why decarbonising policies are working in urban areas but not in rural areas are discussed.

  16. Bias-induced modulation of ultrafast carrier dynamics in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Keisuke; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Minami, Yasuo; Kitajima, Masahiro; Katayama, Ikufumi; Takeda, Jun

    2018-02-01

    The gate bias dependence of excited-state relaxation dynamics in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (MCNTs) was investigated using pump-probe transient absorption spectroscopy coupled with electrochemical doping through an ionic liquid. The transient transmittance decayed exponentially with the pump-probe delay time, whose value could be tuned via the Fermi-level modulation of Dirac electrons under a bias voltage. The obtained relaxation time was the shortest when the Fermi level was at the Dirac point of the MCNTs, and exhibited a U-shaped dependence on the bias voltage. Because optical dipole transitions between the Dirac bands are forbidden in MCNTs, the observed dynamics were attributed to carrier relaxation from the E11 band to the Dirac band. Using a model that considers the suppression of electron-electron scattering (impact ionization) due to Pauli blocking, we could qualitatively explain the obtained bias dependence of the relaxation time.

  17. Experiment and simulation study on unidirectional carbon fiber composite component under dynamic 3 point bending loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Guowei; Sun, Qingping; Zeng, Danielle; Li, Dayong; Su, Xuming

    2018-04-10

    In current work, unidirectional (UD) carbon fiber composite hatsection component with two different layups are studied under dynamic 3 point bending loading. The experiments are performed at various impact velocities, and the effects of impactor velocity and layup on acceleration histories are compared. A macro model is established with LS-Dyna for more detailed study. The simulation results show that the delamination plays an important role during dynamic 3 point bending test. Based on the analysis with high speed camera, the sidewall of hatsection shows significant buckling rather than failure. Without considering the delamination, current material model cannot capture the post failure phenomenon correctly. The sidewall delamination is modeled by assumption of larger failure strain together with slim parameters, and the simulation results of different impact velocities and layups match the experimental results reasonable well.

  18. First-Principles Molecular Dynamics Study on Helium- filled Carbon Nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agusta, M K; Prasetiyo, I; Saputro, A G; Dipojono, H K; Maezono, R

    2016-01-01

    Investigation on carbon nanotube (CNT) filled by Helium (He) atoms is conducted using Density Functional Theory and Molecular Dynamics Simulation. It reveals that He atom is repelled by CNT's wall and find its stable position at the tube center. Vibrational analysis on modes corespond to radial inward and outward breathing movement of CNT shows that He filling tends to pull the CNT wall in inward direction. Furthermore, examination on C-C stretch mode reveals that the existence of He improve the stiffness of CNT's wall. Molecular dynamics calculations which are done on (3,3) and (5,5) nanotube with 0.25 gr/cm 3 and 0.5 gr/cm 3 He density at 300 K and 1500 K confirms the increase of stiffness of CNT wall by interaction with He atoms. Effects of variation of chirality, temperature and He density on CNT wall stiffness is also reported. (paper)

  19. Water cycle dynamic increases resilience of vegetation under higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemordant, L. A.; Gentine, P.; Stéfanon, M.; Drobinski, P. J.; Fatichi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plant stomata couple the energy, water and carbon cycles. Photosynthesis requires stomata to open to take up carbon dioxide. In the process water vapor is released as transpiration. As atmospheric CO2 concentration rises, for the same amount of CO2 uptake, less water vapor is transpired, translating into higher water use efficiency. Reduced water vapor losses will increase soil water storage if the leaf area coverage remains similar. This will in turn alter the surface energy partitioning: more heat will be dissipated as sensible heat flux, resulting in possibly higher surface temperatures. In contrast with this common hypothesis, our study shows that the water saved during the growing season by increased WUE can be mobilized by the vegetation and help reduce the maximum temperature of mid-latitude heat waves. The large scale meteorological conditions of 2003 are the basis of four regional model simulations coupling an atmospheric model to a surface model. We performed two simulations with respectively 2003 (CTL) and 2100 (FUT) atmospheric CO2 applied to both the atmospheric and surface models. A third (RAD) and a fourth (FER) simulations are run with 2100 CO2 concentration applied to respectively the atmospheric model only and the surface model only. RAD investigates the impact of the radiative forcing, and FER the response to vegetation CO2 fertilization. Our results show that the water saved through higher water use efficiency during the growing season enabled by higher atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations helps the vegetation to cope during severe heat and dryness conditions in the summer of mid-latitude climate. These results demonstrate that consideration of the vegetation carbon cycle is essential to model the seasonal water cycle dynamic and land-atmosphere interactions, and enhance the accuracy of the model outputs especially for extreme events. They also have important implications for the future of agriculture, water resources management, ecosystems

  20. Scenarios Analysis of the Energies’ Consumption and Carbon Emissions in China Based on a Dynamic CGE Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanying Chi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the development trends and variation characteristics of China’s economy, energy consumption and carbon emissions from 2007 to 2030, and the impacts on China’s economic growth, energy consumption, and carbon emissions under the carbon tax policy scenarios, based on the dynamic computable general equilibrium (CGE model. The results show that during the simulation period, China’s economy will keep a relatively high growth rate, but the growth rate will slow down under the benchmark scenario. The energy consumption intensity and the carbon emissions intensity per unit of Gross Domestic Product (GDP will continually decrease. The energy consumption structure and industrial structure will gradually optimize. With the economic growth, the total energy consumption will constantly increase, and the carbon dioxide emissions are still large, and the situation of energy-saving and emission-reduction is still serious. The carbon tax is very important for energy-saving and emission-reduction and energy consumption structure optimization, and the effect of the carbon tax on GDP is small. If the carbon tax could be levied and the enterprise income tax could be reduced at the same time, the dual goals of reducing energy consumption and carbon emissions and increasing the GDP growth can be achieved. Improving the technical progress level of clean power while implementing a carbon tax policy is very meaningful to optimize energy consumption structure and reduce the carbon emissions, but it has some offsetting effect to reduce energy consumption.

  1. Hydrology of the North Klondike River: carbon export, water balance and inter-annual climate influences within a sub-alpine permafrost catchment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapp, Anthony; Clark, Ian; Macumber, Andrew; Patterson, Tim

    2017-10-01

    Arctic and sub-arctic watersheds are undergoing significant changes due to recent climate warming and degrading permafrost, engendering enhanced monitoring of arctic rivers. Smaller catchments provide understanding of discharge, solute flux and groundwater recharge at the process level that contributes to an understanding of how larger arctic watersheds are responding to climate change. The North Klondike River, located in west central Yukon, is a sub-alpine permafrost catchment, which maintains an active hydrological monitoring station with a record of >40 years. In addition to being able to monitor intra-annual variability, this data set allows for more complex analysis of streamflow records. Streamflow data, geochemistry and stable isotope data for 2014 show a groundwater-dominated system, predominantly recharged during periods of snowmelt. Radiocarbon is shown to be a valuable tracer of soil zone recharge processes and carbon sources. Winter groundwater baseflow contributes 20 % of total annual discharge, and accounts for up to 50 % of total river discharge during the spring and summer months. Although total stream discharge remains unchanged, mean annual groundwater baseflow has increased over the 40-year monitoring period. Wavelet analysis reveals a catchment that responds to El Niño and longer solar cycles, as well as climatic shifts such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation. Dedicated to Professor Peter Fritz on the occasion of his 80th birthday.

  2. Implications of agricultural encroachment on the carbon and greenhouse gas dynamics in tropical African wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Matthew; Kansiime, Frank; Jones, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Cyperus papyrus L. (papyrus) wetlands dominate the permanently inundated wetlands of tropical East Africa and support the livelihoods of millions of people in rural sub-Saharan Africa through the provision of multiple ecosystem services such as the supply of drinking water, fish protein, building materials and biofuels. These wetlands are also extremely important in local and regional scale biogeochemical cycles due to their extensive spatial distribution, high rates of photosynthetic carbon dioxide (CO2) assimilation, long-term carbon (C) sequestration in the form of peat and the control of water loss through evapotranspiration. However, these wetlands are facing significant anthropogenic pressures due to the increasing demand for agricultural land where the papyrus plants are removed and replaced with subsistence crops such as cocoyam (Colocasia esculenta). Eddy covariance measurements were made on an undisturbed papyrus wetland and a cocoyam dominated wetland on the Ugandan shoreline of Lake Victoria to better understand the impacts of agricultural encroachment on the C sequestration potential of these wetlands. Peak rates of net photosynthetic CO2 assimilation at the papyrus wetland were over 40 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1, even under increasing vapour pressure deficit (≥2 kPa), while maximum rates of assimilation at the cocoyam site were 28 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1. Annual rates of papyrus net primary productivity (NPP) were amongst the highest recorded for wetland systems globally (3.09 kg C m-2 yr-1) and the continual regeneration of the papyrus plants, due to an absence of pronounced seasonal climatic variability, can lead to significant C accumulation in the above and belowground biomass (≥88 t C ha-1). Where these wetlands remain inundated and anaerobic conditions prevail, significant detrital and peat deposits can form further increasing the combined C sink capacity of these ecosystems to over 700 t C ha-1. The C sink strength of these wetlands is however offset by

  3. Modeling soil organic carbon dynamics and their driving factors in the main global cereal cropping systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guocheng; Zhang, Wen; Sun, Wenjuan; Li, Tingting; Han, Pengfei

    2017-10-01

    Changes in the soil organic carbon (SOC) stock are determined by the balance between the carbon input from organic materials and the output from the decomposition of soil C. The fate of SOC in cropland soils plays a significant role in both sustainable agricultural production and climate change mitigation. The spatiotemporal changes of soil organic carbon in croplands in response to different carbon (C) input management and environmental conditions across the main global cereal systems were studied using a modeling approach. We also identified the key variables that drive SOC changes at a high spatial resolution (0.1° × 0.1°) and over a long timescale (54 years from 1961 to 2014). A widely used soil C turnover model (RothC) and state-of-the-art databases of soil and climate variables were used in the present study. The model simulations suggested that, on a global average, the cropland SOC density increased at annual rates of 0.22, 0.45 and 0.69 Mg C ha-1 yr-1 under crop residue retention rates of 30, 60 and 90 %, respectively. Increasing the quantity of C input could enhance soil C sequestration or reduce the rate of soil C loss, depending largely on the local soil and climate conditions. Spatially, under a specific crop residue retention rate, relatively higher soil C sinks were found across the central parts of the USA, western Europe, and the northern regions of China. Relatively smaller soil C sinks occurred in the high-latitude regions of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres, and SOC decreased across the equatorial zones of Asia, Africa and America. We found that SOC change was significantly influenced by the crop residue retention rate (linearly positive) and the edaphic variable of initial SOC content (linearly negative). Temperature had weak negative effects, and precipitation had significantly negative impacts on SOC changes. The results can help guide carbon input management practices to effectively mitigate climate change through soil C

  4. Modeling soil organic carbon dynamics and their driving factors in the main global cereal cropping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the soil organic carbon (SOC stock are determined by the balance between the carbon input from organic materials and the output from the decomposition of soil C. The fate of SOC in cropland soils plays a significant role in both sustainable agricultural production and climate change mitigation. The spatiotemporal changes of soil organic carbon in croplands in response to different carbon (C input management and environmental conditions across the main global cereal systems were studied using a modeling approach. We also identified the key variables that drive SOC changes at a high spatial resolution (0.1°  ×  0.1° and over a long timescale (54 years from 1961 to 2014. A widely used soil C turnover model (RothC and state-of-the-art databases of soil and climate variables were used in the present study. The model simulations suggested that, on a global average, the cropland SOC density increased at annual rates of 0.22, 0.45 and 0.69 Mg C ha−1 yr−1 under crop residue retention rates of 30, 60 and 90 %, respectively. Increasing the quantity of C input could enhance soil C sequestration or reduce the rate of soil C loss, depending largely on the local soil and climate conditions. Spatially, under a specific crop residue retention rate, relatively higher soil C sinks were found across the central parts of the USA, western Europe, and the northern regions of China. Relatively smaller soil C sinks occurred in the high-latitude regions of both the Northern and Southern hemispheres, and SOC decreased across the equatorial zones of Asia, Africa and America. We found that SOC change was significantly influenced by the crop residue retention rate (linearly positive and the edaphic variable of initial SOC content (linearly negative. Temperature had weak negative effects, and precipitation had significantly negative impacts on SOC changes. The results can help guide carbon input management practices to

  5. Probing nuclear dynamics and architecture using single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yoon; Li, Junang; Fakhri, Nikta

    Chromatin is a multiscale dynamic architecture that acts as a template for many biochemical processes such as transcription and DNA replication. Recent developments such as Hi-C technology enable an identification of chromatin interactions across an entire genome. However, a single cell dynamic view of chromatin organization is far from understood. We discuss a new live cell imaging technique to probe the dynamics of the nucleus at a single cell level using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). SWNTs are non-perturbing rigid rods (diameter of 1 nm and length of roughly 100 nm) that fluoresce in the near infrared region. Due to their high aspect ratio, they can diffuse in tight spaces and report on the architecture and dynamics of the nucleoplasm. We develop 3D imaging and tracking of SWNTs in the volume of the nucleus using double helix point spread function microscopy (DH-PSF) and discuss the capabilities of the DH-PSF for inferring the 3D orientation of nanotubes based on vectorial diffraction theory.

  6. Coupling Protein Dynamics with Proton Transport in Human Carbonic Anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taraphder, Srabani; Maupin, C Mark; Swanson, Jessica M J; Voth, Gregory A

    2016-08-25

    The role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is one of the most highly debated topics in enzymology. The main controversy centers around what may be defined as functionally significant conformational fluctuations and how, if at all, these fluctuations couple to enzyme catalyzed events. To shed light on this debate, the conformational dynamics along the transition path surmounting the highest free energy barrier have been herein investigated for the rate limiting proton transport event in human carbonic anhydrase (HCA) II. Special attention has been placed on whether the motion of an excess proton is correlated with fluctuations in the surrounding protein and solvent matrix, which may be rare on the picosecond and subpicosecond time scales of molecular motions. It is found that several active site residues, which do not directly participate in the proton transport event, have a significant impact on the dynamics of the excess proton. These secondary participants are shown to strongly influence the active site environment, resulting in the creation of water clusters that are conducive to fast, moderately slow, or slow proton transport events. The identification and characterization of these secondary participants illuminates the role of protein dynamics in the catalytic efficiency of HCA II.

  7. The Distribution Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Emissions Intensity across Chinese Provinces: A Weighted Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Xin Wu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the distribution dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2 emissions intensity across 30 Chinese provinces using a weighted distribution dynamics approach. The results show that CO2 emissions intensity tends to diverge during the sample period of 1995–2014. However, convergence clubs are found in the ergodic distributions of the full sample and two sub-sample periods. Divergence, polarization, and stratification are the dominant characteristics in the distribution dynamics. Weightings with economic and population sizes have important impacts on current distributions and hence long-run steady distributions. Neglecting the size of the economy may underestimate the deterioration in the long-run steady state. The result also shows that conditioning on space and income cannot eliminate the multimodality in the long-run distribution. However, capital intensity has an important impact on the formation of convergence clubs. Our findings will contribute to an understanding of the spatial dynamic behaviors of CO2 emissions across Chinese provinces, and have important policy implications for CO2 emissions reduction in China.

  8. Effect of dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading on fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinoshita, Kanji; Murayama, Kouichi; Ogata, Hiroyuki [and others

    1997-04-01

    The fracture behavior for Japanese carbon steel pipe STS410 was examined under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading through a research program of International Piping Integrity Research Group (EPIRG-2), in order to evaluate the strength of pipe during the seismic event The tensile test and the fracture toughness test were conducted for base metal and TIG weld metal. Three base metal pipe specimens, 1,500mm in length and 6-inch diameter sch.120, were employed for a quasi-static monotonic, a dynamic monotonic and a dynamic cyclic loading pipe fracture tests. One weld joint pipe specimen was also employed for a dynamic cyclic loading test In the dynamic cyclic loading test, the displacement was controlled as applying the fully reversed load (R=-1). The pipe specimens with a circumferential through-wall crack were subjected four point bending load at 300C in air. Japanese STS410 carbon steel pipe material was found to have high toughness under dynamic loading condition through the CT fracture toughness test. As the results of pipe fracture tests, the maximum moment to pipe fracture under dynamic monotonic and cyclic loading condition, could be estimated by plastic collapse criterion and the effect of dynamic monotonic loading and cyclic loading was a little on the maximum moment to pipe fracture of the STS410 carbon steel pipe. The STS410 carbon steel pipe seemed to be less sensitive to dynamic and cyclic loading effects than the A106Gr.B carbon steel pipe evaluated in IPIRG-1 program.

  9. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center - A for atmospheric trace gases. Fiscal year 1996, annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B. [and others

    1997-02-01

    Fiscal year 1996 was especially productive for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report describes publications and statistical data from the CDIAC.

  10. Temporal dynamics of soil organic carbon after land-use change in the temperate zone – carbon response functions as a model approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poeplau, Christopher; Don, Axel; Vesterdal, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Land-use change (LUC) is a major driving factor for the balance of soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks and the global carbon cycle. The temporal dynamic of SOC after LUC is especially important in temperate systems with a long reaction time. On the basis of 95 compiled studies covering 322 sites...... in the temperate zone, carbon response functions (CRFs) were derived to model the temporal dynamic of SOC after five different LUC types (mean soil depth of 30±6 cm). Grassland establishment caused a long lasting carbon sink with a relative stock change of 128±23% and afforestation on former cropland a sink of 116...... of 0.38±0.04 Mg ha-1 yr-1 in afforestations adding up to 38±4 Mg ha-1 labile carbon after 100 years. Carbon loss after deforestation (-32±20%) and grassland conversion to cropland (-36±5%), was rapid with a new SOC equilibrium being reached after 23 and 17 years, respectively. The change rate of SOC...

  11. Winter climate controls soil carbon dynamics during summer in boreal forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haei, Mahsa; Öquist, Mats G; Ilstedt, Ulrik; Laudon, Hjalmar; Kreyling, Juergen

    2013-01-01

    Boreal forests, characterized by distinct winter seasons, store a large proportion of the global terrestrial carbon (C) pool. We studied summer soil C-dynamics in a boreal forest in northern Sweden using a seven-year experimental manipulation of soil frost. We found that winter soil climate conditions play a major role in controlling the dissolution/mineralization of soil organic-C in the following summer season. Intensified soil frost led to significantly higher concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Intensified soil frost also led to higher rates of basal heterotrophic CO 2 production in surface soil samples. However, frost-induced decline in the in situ soil CO 2 concentrations in summer suggests a substantial decline in root and/or plant associated rhizosphere CO 2 production, which overrides the effects of increased heterotrophic CO 2 production. Thus, colder winter soils, as a result of reduced snow cover, can substantially alter C-dynamics in boreal forests by reducing summer soil CO 2 efflux, and increasing DOC losses. (letter)

  12. Carbon-14 dynamics in rice: an extension of the ORYZA2000 model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galeriu, D.; Melintescu, A. [' ' Horia Hulubei' ' National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Life and Environmental Physics Department, 30 Reactorului St., POB MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2014-03-15

    Carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) is a radionuclide of major interest in nuclear power production. The Fukushima accident changed the public attitude on the use of nuclear energy all over the world. In terms of nuclear safety, the need of quality-assured radiological models was emphasized by many international organizations, and for models used by decision-makers (i.e. regulatory environmental models and radiological models), a moderate conservatism, transparency, relative simplicity and user friendliness are required. Because the interaction between crops and the environment is complex and regulated by many feedback mechanisms, however, these requirements are difficult to accomplish. The present study makes a step forward regarding the development of a robust model dealing with food contamination after a short-term accidental emission and considers a single crop species, rice (Oryza sativa), one of the most widely used rice species. Old and more recent experimental data regarding the carbon dynamics in rice plants are reviewed, and a well-established crop growth model, ORYZA2000, is used and adapted in order to assess the dynamics of {sup 14}C in rice after a short-term exposure to {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Here, the model is used to investigate the role of the genotype, management and weather on the concentration of radiocarbon at harvest. (orig.)

  13. The Implications of Growing Bioenergy Crops on Water Resources, Carbon and Nitrogen Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, A. K.; Song, Y.; Kheshgi, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    What is the potential for the crops Corn, Miscanthus and switchgrass to meet future energy demands in the U.S.A., and would they mitigate climate change by offsetting fossil fuel greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? The large-scale cultivation of these bioenergy crops itself could also drive climate change through changes in albedo, evapotranspiration (ET), and GHG emissions. Whether these climate effects will mitigate or exacerbate climate change in the short- and long-term is uncertain. This uncertainty stems from our incomplete understanding of the effects of expanded bioenergy crop production on terrestrial water and energy balance, carbon and nitrogen dynamics, and their interactions. This study aims to understand the implications of growing large-scale bioenergy crops on water resources, carbon and nitrogen dynamics in the United States using a data-modeling framework (ISAM) that we developed. Our study indicates that both Miscanthus and Cave-in-Rock switchgrass can attain high and stable yield over parts of the Midwest, however, this high production is attained at the cost of increased soil water loss as compared to current natural vegetation. Alamo switchgrass can attain high and stable yield in the southern US without significant influence on soil water quantity.

  14. Tropical peatland carbon dynamics simulated for scenarios of disturbance and restoration and climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frolking, S. E.; Warren, M.; Dai, Z.; Kurnianto, S.; Hagen, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Tropical peatlands contain a globally significant carbon pool. Southeast Asian peatlands are being deforested, drained and burned at very high rates, mostly for conversion to industrial oil palm or pulp and paper plantations. The climate mitigation potential of tropical peatlands has gained increasing attention in recent years as persistent greenhouse gas emissions can be avoided or decreased if peatlands remain intact or are rehabilitated. In addition, peatland conservation or rehabilitation for climate mitigation also includes multiple co-benefits such as maintenance of ecosystem services, biodiversity, and air quality from reduced fire occurrence. Inventory guidelines and methodologies have only recently become available, and are based on few data from a limited number of sites. Few heuristic tools are available to evaluate the impact of management practices on carbon dynamics in tropical peatlands, and the potential climate mitigation benefits of peatland restoration. We used a process based dynamic tropical peatland model to explore the C dynamics of several peatland management trajectories represented by hypothetical scenarios, within the context of simulated 21st century climate change. All scenarios with land use, including those with optimal restoration, simulate C loss over the 21st century, with C losses ranging from 10% to essentially 100% of pre-disturbance values. Fire, either prescribed as part of a crop rotation cycle, or stochastic occurrences in sub-optimally managed degraded land can be the dominant C-loss pathway, particularly in the drier climate scenario we tested. A single 25-year oil palm rotation, with a prescribed initial burn, lost 40-50 kg C/m2, equivalent to accumulation during the previous 500 years, 10-30% of which was restored in 75 years of optimal restoration. Our results indicate that even under the most optimistic scenario of hydrological and forest restoration and the wettest climate regime, only about one-third of the carbon

  15. Modeling Pacific Northwest carbon and water cycling using CARAIB Dynamic Vegetation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dury, M.; Kim, J. B.; Still, C. J.; Francois, L. M.; Jiang, Y.

    2015-12-01

    While uncertainties remain regarding projected temperature and precipitation changes, climate warming is already affecting ecosystems in the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Decrease in ecosystem productivity as well as increase in mortality of some plant species induced by drought and disturbance have been reported. Here, we applied the process-based dynamic vegetation model CARAIB to PNW to simulate the response of water and carbon cycling to current and future climate change projections. The vegetation model has already been successfully applied to Europe to simulate plant physiological response to climate change. We calibrated CARAIB to PNW using global Plant Functional Types. For calibration, the model is driven with the gridded surface meteorological dataset UIdaho MACA METDATA with 1/24-degree (~4-km) resolution at a daily time step for the period 1979-2014. The model ability to reproduce the current spatial and temporal variations of carbon stocks and fluxes was evaluated using a variety of available datasets, including eddy covariance and satellite observations. We focused particularly on past severe drought and fire episodes. Then, we simulated future conditions using the UIdaho MACAv2-METDATA dataset, which includes downscaled CMIP5 projections from 28 GCMs for RCP4.5 and RCP8.5. We evaluated the future ecosystem carbon balance resulting from changes in drought frequency as well as in fire risk. We also simulated future productivity and drought-induced mortality of several key PNW tree species.

  16. Ambient concentrations and insights on organic and elemental carbon dynamics in São Paulo, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro dos Santos, Djacinto A.; Brito, Joel F.; Godoy, José Marcus; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-11-01

    The São Paulo Metropolitan Area (SPMA) is a megacity with about 20 million people and about 8 million vehicles, most of which are fueled with a significant fraction of ethanol - making it a unique case worldwide. This study presents organic and elemental carbon measurements using thermal-optical analysis from quartz filters collected in four sampling sites within the SPMA. Overall Organic Carbon (OC) concentration was comparable at all sites, where Street Canyon had the highest concentration (3.37 μg m-3) and Park site the lowest (2.65 μg m-3). Elemental Carbon (EC), emitted as result of incomplete combustion, has been significantly higher at the Street Canyon site (6.11 μg m-3) in contrast to all other three sites, ranging from 2.25 μg m-3 (Downtown) to 1.50 μg m-3 (Park). For all sampling sites, the average OC:EC ratio are found on the lower bound (pollution dynamics in a megacity impacted by a unique vehicular fleet. It also shows the need of implementation of EURO VI technology and to improve mass transport systems such a metro and more bus corridors to allow better transport for 19 million people in the SPMA.

  17. The Inter-Annual Variability Analysis of Carbon Exchange in Low Artic Fen Uncovers The Climate Sensitivity And The Uncertainties Around Net Ecosystem Exchange Partitioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, E. L.; Lund, M.; Williams, M. D.; Christensen, T. R.; Tamstorf, M. P.

    2015-12-01

    An improvement in our process-based understanding of CO2 exchanges in the Arctic, and their climate sensitivity, is critical for examining the role of tundra ecosystems in changing climates. Arctic organic carbon storage has seen increased attention in recent years due to large potential for carbon releases following thaw. Our knowledge about the exact scale and sensitivity for a phase-change of these C stocks are, however, limited. Minor variations in Gross Primary Production (GPP) and Ecosystem Respiration (Reco) driven by changes in the climate can lead to either C sink or C source states, which likely will impact the overall C cycle of the ecosystem. Eddy covariance data is usually used to partition Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) into GPP and Reco achieved by flux separation algorithms. However, different partitioning approaches lead to different estimates. as well as undefined uncertainties. The main objectives of this study are to use model-data fusion approaches to (1) determine the inter-annual variability in C source/sink strength for an Arctic fen, and attribute such variations to GPP vs Reco, (2) investigate the climate sensitivity of these processes and (3) explore the uncertainties in NEE partitioning. The intention is to elaborate on the information gathered in an existing catchment area under an extensive cross-disciplinary ecological monitoring program in low Arctic West Greenland, established under the auspices of the Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) program. The use of such a thorough long-term (7 years) dataset applied to the exploration in inter-annual variability of carbon exchange, related driving factors and NEE partition uncertainties provides a novel input into our understanding about land-atmosphere CO2 exchange.

  18. Molecular Dynamics Modeling of Carbon Nanotube Composite Fracture Using ReaxFF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Benjamin D.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Odegard, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) fiber reinforced composites with specific tensile strengths and moduli approaching those of aerospace grade carbon fiber composites have recently been reported. This achievement was enabled by the emerging availability of high N/tex yarns in kilometer-scale quantities. While the production of this yarn is an impressive advance, its strength is still much lower than that of the individual CNTs comprising the yarn. Closing this gap requires understanding load transfer between CNTs at the nanometer dimensional scale. This work uses reactive molecular dynamics simulations to gain an understanding at the nanometer scale of the key factors that determine CNT nanocomposite mechanical performance, and to place more realistic upper bounds on the target properties. While molecular dynamics simulations using conventional force fields can predict elastic properties, the ReaxFF reactive forcefield can also model fracture behavior because of its ability to accurately describe bond breaking and formation during a simulation. The upper and lower bounds of CNT composite properties are investigated by comparing systems composed of CNTs continuously connected across the periodic boundary with systems composed of finite length CNTs. These lengths, effectively infinite for the continuous tubes and an aspect ratio of 13 for the finite length case, result from practical limitations on the number of atoms that can be included in a simulation. Experimentally measured aspect ratios are typically on the order of 100,000, so the calculated results should represent upper and lower limits on experimental mechanical properties. Finally, the effect of various degrees of covalent crosslinking between the CNTs and amorphous carbon matrix is considered to identify the amount of CNT-matrix covalent bonding that maximizes overall composite properties.

  19. Soil Carbon Dynamics Along an Elevation Gradient in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten Jr., C.T.

    2004-04-13

    The role of soil C dynamics in the exchange of CO{sub 2} between the terrestrial biosphere and the atmosphere is at the center of many science questions related to global climate change. The purpose of this report is to summarize measured trends in environmental factors and ecosystem processes that affect soil C balance along elevation gradients in the southern Appalachian Mountains of eastern Tennessee and western North Carolina, USA. Three environmental factors that have potentially significant effects on soil C dynamics (temperature, precipitation, and soil N availability) vary in a predictable manner with altitude. Forest soil C stocks and calculated turnover times of labile soil C increase with elevation, and there is an apparent inverse relationship between soil C storage and mean annual temperature. Relationships between climate variables and soil C dynamics along elevation gradients must be interpreted with caution because litter chemistry, soil moisture, N availability, and temperature are confounded; all potentially interact in complex ways to regulate soil C storage through effects on decomposition. Some recommendations are presented for untangling these complexities. It is concluded that past studies along elevation gradients have contributed to a better but not complete understanding of environmental factors and processes that potentially affect soil C balance. Furthermore, there are advantages linked to the use of elevation gradients as an approach to climate change research when hypotheses are placed in a strong theoretical or mechanistic framework. Climate change research along elevation gradients can be both convenient and economical. More importantly, ecosystem processes and attributes affecting soil C dynamics along elevation gradients are usually the product of the long-term interactions between climate, vegetation, and soil type. Investigations along elevation gradients are a useful approach to the study of environmental change, and its effect

  20. Nuclear quantum effect on hydrogen adsorption site of zeolite-templated carbon model using path integral molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Kimichi; Kayanuma, Megumi; Tachikawa, Masanori; Ogawa, Hiroshi; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Kyotani, Takashi; Nagashima, Umpei

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The stable hydrogen adsorption sites on C 36 H 12 were evaluated at 300 K using path integral molecular dynamics. → In the static MO calculation and conventional MD simulation, five stable adsorption sites of hydrogen atom were found. → In path integral simulation, only four stable adsorption sites were obtained. → The thermal and nuclear quantum effects are key role to settle the hydrogen adsorption sites on carbon materials. - Abstract: To settle the hydrogen adsorption sites on buckybowl C 36 H 12 , which is picked up from zeolite-templated carbon (ZTC), we have performed path integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulation including thermal and nuclear quantum fluctuations under semi-empirical PM3 method. In the static PM3 calculation and classical simulation the five stable adsorption sites of hydrogen atom are optimized inside a buckybowl C 36 H 12 , which are labeled as α-, β 1 -, β 2 -, γ-, and δ-carbons from edge to innermost carbon. In PIMD simulation, meanwhile, stable adsorption site is not appeared on δ-carbon, but on only α-, β 1 -, β 2 -, and γ-carbons. This result is due to the fact that the adsorbed hydrogen atom can easily go over the barrier for hydrogen transferring from δ- to β 1 -carbons by thermal and nuclear quantum fluctuations. The thermal and nuclear quantum effects are key role to settle the hydrogen adsorption sites on carbon materials.

  1. Instituto Nacional del Carbon Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas (CSIC) annual report 2000; Instituto Nacional del Carbon Consejo Superior de Investigaciones, Cientificas (CSIC) memoria de actividades 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The annual report explains the organisational structure of INCAR, outlines research projects which include many EU-funded projects on coal preparation, combustion and air pollution control and on coke and coking and lists published papers and conference contributions. It lists projects being conducted jointly with overseas organisations, courses organised by INCAR, conferences with which INCAR has been involved, committee memberships, instrumentation and equipment at INCAR, and personnel.

  2. Ion dynamics in porous carbon electrodes in supercapacitors using in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richey, Francis W; Dyatkin, Boris; Gogotsi, Yury; Elabd, Yossef A

    2013-08-28

    Electrochemical double layer capacitors (EDLCs), or supercapacitors, rely on electrosorption of ions by porous carbon electrodes and offer a higher power and a longer cyclic lifetime compared to batteries. Ionic liquid (IL) electrolytes can broaden the operating voltage window and increase the energy density of EDLCs. Herein, we present direct measurements of the ion dynamics of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis((trifluoromethyl)sulfonyl)imide in an operating EDLC with electrodes composed of porous nanosized carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) and nonporous onion-like carbons (OLCs) with the use of in situ infrared spectroelectrochemistry. For CDC electrodes, IL ions (both cations and anions) were directly observed entering and exiting CDC nanopores during charging and discharging of the EDLC. Conversely, for OLC electrodes, IL ions were observed in close proximity to the OLC surface without any change in the bulk electrolyte concentration during charging and discharging of the EDLC. This provides experimental evidence that charge is stored on the surface of OLCs in OLC EDLCs without long-range ion transport through the bulk electrode. In addition, for CDC EDLCs with mixed electrolytes of IL and propylene carbonate (PC), the IL ions were observed entering and exiting CDC nanopores, while PC entrance into the nanopores was IL concentration dependent. This work provides direct experimental confirmation of EDLC charging mechanisms that previously were restricted to computational simulations and theories. The experimental measurements presented here also provide deep insights into the molecular level transport of IL ions in EDLC electrodes that will impact the design of the electrode materials' structure for electrical energy storage.

  3. Dynamics of riverine CO2 in the Yangtze River fluvial network and their implications for carbon evasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ran, Lishan; Lu, Xi Xi; Liu, Shaoda

    2017-04-01

    Understanding riverine carbon dynamics is critical for not only better estimates of various carbon fluxes but also evaluating their significance in the global carbon budget. As an important pathway of global land-ocean carbon exchange, the Yangtze River has received less attention regarding its vertical carbon evasion compared with lateral transport. Using long-term water chemistry data, we calculated CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) from pH and alkalinity and examined its spatial and temporal dynamics and the impacts of environmental settings. With alkalinity ranging from 415 to > 3400 µeq L-1, the river waters were supersaturated with dissolved CO2, generally 2-20-fold the atmospheric equilibrium (i.e., 390 µatm). Changes in pCO2 were collectively controlled by carbon inputs from terrestrial ecosystems, hydrological regime, and rock weathering. High pCO2 values were observed spatially in catchments with abundant carbonate presence and seasonally in the wet season when recently fixed organic matter was exported into the river network. In-stream processing of organic matter facilitated CO2 production and sustained the high pCO2, although the alkalinity presented an apparent dilution effect with water discharge. The decreasing pCO2 from the smallest headwater streams through tributaries to the mainstem channel illustrates the significance of direct terrestrial carbon inputs in controlling riverine CO2. With a basin-wide mean pCO2 of 2662 ± 1240 µatm, substantial CO2 evasion from the Yangtze River fluvial network is expected. Future research efforts are needed to quantify the amount of CO2 evasion and assess its biogeochemical implications for watershed-scale carbon cycle. In view of the Yangtze River's relative importance in global carbon export, its CO2 evasion would be significant for global carbon budget.

  4. Rheological and dynamic-mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube/vinyl ester-polyester suspensions and their nanocomposites

    OpenAIRE

    Seyhan, Abdullah Tuğrul; Gojny, F. H.; Tanoğlu, Metin; Schulte, K.

    2007-01-01

    Rheological properties of vinyl ester-polyester resin suspensions containing various amounts (0.05, 0.1 and 0.3 wt.%) of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) with and without amine functional groups (-NH2) were investigated by utilization of oscillatory rheometer with parallel plate geometry. Dispersion of corresponding carbon nanotubes within the resin blend was accomplished employing high shear mixing technique (3-roll milling). Based on the dynamic viscoelastic measurements, it was observ...

  5. Exploring the molecular origins of protein dynamics in the active site of human carbonic anhydrase II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sarah E; Bandaria, Jigar N; Fox, Michelle; Vanderah, Elizabeth; Kohen, Amnon; Cheatum, Christopher M

    2009-08-20

    We present three-pulse vibrational echo measurements of azide ion bound to the active site Zn of human carbonic anhydrase II (HCA II) and of two separate active-site mutants Thr199 --> Ala (T199A) and Leu198 --> Phe (L198F). Because structural motions of the protein active site influence the frequency of bound ligands, the differences in the time scales of the frequency-frequency correlation functions (FFCFs) obtained from global fits to each set of data allow us to make inferences about the time scales of the active site dynamics of HCA II. Surprisingly, the deletion of a potential electrostatic interaction in results in very little change in the FFCF, but the insertion of the bulky phenylalanine ring in causes much faster dynamics. We conclude that the fast, sub-picosecond time scale in the correlation function is attributable to hydrogen bond dynamics, and the slow, apparently static contribution is due to the conformational flexibility of Zn-bound azide in the active site.

  6. Dynamic encapsulation of corannulene molecules into a single-walled carbon nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joko, Y; Sasaki, R; Shintani, K

    2017-10-18

    The morphology of corannulene molecules encapsulated in a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) is addressed using atomistic simulations. Firstly, dynamic simulation (DS) of encapsulation of corannulene molecules into a SWCNT is performed using a molecular dynamics (MD) method. It is revealed that corannulene molecules encapsulated in a SWCNT tend to form concave-concave (CC) dimers, and these dimers make stacks tilting against the SWCNT axis or take an arrangement such that their convex surfaces face the inner wall of the SWCNT. This tendency arises from the fact that the van der Waals interactions between the convex surfaces of the corannulene molecules and the inner wall of the SWCNT dominate in their dynamic encapsulation into the SWCNT, and CC dimers are favored based on the energetics. Next, conjugate gradient (CG) energy minimizations starting from two kinds of initial arrangement of corannulene molecules in a SWCNT, concave-convex (CV) and CC/convex-convex (VV) arrangements, are performed. The CG energy minimizations confirm the result of DS that CC dimers are the structural motif of corannulene molecules in a SWCNT. From the final configurations of both the simulations, the tilt angles and intermolecular distances of the stacked molecules are calculated. With increasing the SWCNT diameter, the tilt angles decrease while the intermolecular distances remain almost constant. The tilt angles of the stacked corannulene molecules are approximately expressed by a semi-analytical formula which is derived on the basis of a geometrical constraint condition.

  7. Carbon fate in a large temperate human-impacted river system: Focus on benthic dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilmin, Lauriane; Flipo, Nicolas; Escoffier, Nicolas; Rocher, Vincent; Groleau, Alexis

    2016-07-01

    Fluvial networks play an important role in regional and global carbon (C) budgets. The Seine River, from the Paris urban area to the entrance of its estuary (220 km), is studied here as an example of a large human-impacted river system subject to temperate climatic conditions. We assess organic C (OC) budgets upstream and downstream from one of the world's largest wastewater treatment plants and for different hydrological conditions using a hydrobiogeochemical model. The fine representation of sediment accumulation on the river bed allows for the quantification of pelagic and benthic effects on OC export toward the estuary and on river metabolism (i.e., net CO2 production). OC export is significantly affected by benthic dynamics during the driest periods, when 25% of the inputs to the system is transformed or stored in the sediment layer. Benthic processes also substantially affect river metabolism under any hydrological condition. On average, benthic respiration accounts for one third of the total river respiration along the studied stretch (0.27 out of 0.86 g C m-2 d-1). Even though the importance of benthic processes was already acknowledged by the scientific community for headwater streams, these results stress the major influence of benthic dynamics, and thus of physical processes such as sedimentation and resuspension, on C cycling in downstream river systems. It opens the door to new developments in the quantification of C emissions by global models, whereby biogeochemical processing and benthic dynamics should be taken into account.

  8. The influence of saltmarsh restoration on sediment dynamics and the potential impact on carbon sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Benjamin; Paterson, David

    2017-04-01

    Coastal wetland ecosystems can act as large-capacity carbon sinks, providing a valuable climate change mitigation function. Globally, saltmarshes are estimated to accumulate an average of 244.7g C m-2 yr-1 (Ouyang & Lee 2014). Saltmarsh areas have experienced rapid loss in the recent past of approximately 1-2% per year (Duarte et al. 2008). Efforts to restore these areas could result in additional carbon storage due to extended vegetation cover and altered burial due to changing sediment dynamics. The influence of restoration through transplantation on sediment dynamics within a small estuary on the east coast of Scotland was assessed. Restoration efforts have been implemented since the early 2000s providing examples of old established sites ("old", >10years), young recently planted sites ("young", percentage organic matter content of deposited material is significantly lower in mudflat and young areas (3.78 ± 0.59% and 3.66 ± 0.79% respectively) versus those of natural and old areas (12.08 ± 2.27% and 6.70 ± 1.30% respectively). This relationship suggests that older restored areas are potentially offering the most potential benefit in terms of carbon sequestration, due to higher rates of deposition from the potential load and higher percentage organic content of those deposits. Furthermore, measurements of sediment accretion rates over the same period show natural and old areas to be the most effective at retaining sediment, with average elevation changes of 6.99 ± 1.64mm and 6.56 ± 0.94mm respectively, in comparison to young areas, 4.44 ± 1.58mm, and mudflats, 1.51 ± 1.23mm. Factors influencing these differences could be attributed to type and density of vegetation present and elevation of each area (or immersion period). However, the data suggests restoration could play an important role, which once established, appears to facilitate efficient sediment deposition from potential sediment load and crucially the effective accumulation of organic rich

  9. Carbon dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center: A for Atmospheric trace gases. Annual progress report, FY 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.] [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States). Energy, Environment and Resources Center; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.R.; Stoss, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments made by the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for Atmospheric Trace Gases during the fiscal year 1994. Topics discussed in this report include; organization and staff, user services, systems, communications, Collaborative efforts with China, networking, ocean data and activities of the World Data Center-A.

  10. Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and World Data Center-A for atmospheric trace gases: Fiscal year 1995 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burtis, M.D. [comp.; Cushman, R.M.; Boden, T.A.; Jones, S.B.; Nelson, T.; Stoss, F.W.

    1996-01-01

    Fiscal year 1995 was both a very productive year for the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center and a year of significant change. This document presents information about the most notable accomplishments made during the year. Topics include: high-lights; statistics; future plans; publications, presentations, and awards; and change in organization and staff.

  11. A study of the carbon dynamics of Japanese grassland and forest using 14C and 13C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsuno, Kazumi; Miyairi, Yosuke; Tamura, Kenji; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Kenji

    2010-01-01

    We quantified the carbon contents of grassland and forest soil using conventional methods and studied the changes in their dynamics by measuring δ 13 C and Δ 14 C. Soil samples were taken from a neighboring Miscanthus sinensis grassland and Pinus densiflora forest in central Japan. Both had been maintained as grassland until the 1960s, when the latter was abandoned and became a pine forest by natural succession. The soil carbon content of the forest was much lower than that of the grassland, implying that the soil carbon decreased as the grassland became forest. The δ 13 C values were very similar in the grassland and forest, at approximately -20 per mille , suggesting that M. sinensis (a C4 plant) contributed to carbon storage, whereas there was little carbon accumulation from P. densiflora (a C3 plant) in forest soil. The Δ 14 C values and calculated soil carbon mean residence time (MRT) showed that the soil carbon in the upper A horizon was older, and that in the lower A horizon was younger in forest than in grassland. From these results, we conclude that young, fast-MRT soil carbon is decomposed in the upper A horizon, and old, stable soil carbon was decomposed in the lower A horizon after the pine invasion.

  12. The dynamic response of an activated carbon adsorption column for a step change in adsorbate concentration by the column inlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Visser, J.K.

    1989-01-01

    The dynamic response of an adsorption column for a step change in the inlet concentration was investigated for three commercially available activated carbons namely Le Carbone G 210 AS, Norit RB1 and Norit RB3. n-Octane, n-nonane, n-decane, n-undecane, perfluoromethylcyclohexane and toluene were used as adsorbates to analyse breakthrough curves. Results indicate that the adsorption equilibrium of n-alkanes, perfluoromethylcyclohexane and toluene on Le Carbone G 210 AS activated carbon can be adequately described by the Langmuir isotherm. In the velocity region investigated there was a linear relationship between the linear velocity of the inert carrier gas and the mass transfer coefficient. Desorption breakthrough curves were modelled by the Walter desorption equation and good correlation was achieved for the desorption of n-alkanes from Le Carbone and Norit carbons. The constant separation factor obtained for desorption curves confirmed the highly non linear shape of the equilibruim curve for these systems. Results of the investigation indicate that the mass transfer rate is fastest in the case of Norit RB1 activated carbon because the particle size is the smallest and is slowest for Norit RB3. Norit RB1 or Le Carbone G 210 AS activated carbon are recommended as adsorbent for the removal of oil vapour from hydrogen gas. 84 refs., 162 figs., 137 tabs

  13. Modelling system dynamics and phytoplankton diversity at Ranchi lake using the carbon and nutrient mass balance equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, B; Nivedita, M; Mukherjee, D

    2014-05-01

    Modelling system dynamics in a hyper-eutrophic lake is quite complex especially with a constant influx of detergents and sewage material which continually changes the state variables and interferes with the assessment of the chemical rhythm occurring in polluted conditions as compared to unpolluted systems. In this paper, a carbon and nutrient mass balance model for predicting system dynamics in a complex environment was studied. Studies were conducted at Ranchi lake to understand the altered environmental dynamics in hyper-eutrophic conditions, and its impact on the plankton community. The lake was monitored regularly for five years (2007 - 2011) and the data collected on the carbon flux, nitrates, phosphates and silicates was used to design a mass balance model for evaluating and predicting the system. The model was then used to correlate the chemical rhythm with that of the phytoplankton dynamics and diversity. Nitrates and phosphates were not limiting (mean nitrate and phosphate concentrations were 1.74 and 0.83 mgl⁻¹ respectively). Free carbon dioxide was found to control the system and, interacting with other parameters determined the diversity and dynamics of the plankton community. N/P ratio determined which group of phytoplankton dominated the community, above 5 it favoured the growth of chlorophyceae while below 5 cyanobacteria dominates. TOC/TIC ratio determined the abundance. The overall system was controlled by the availability of free carbon dioxide which served as a limiting factor.

  14. Modeling interactions of soil hydrological dynamics and soil thermal and permafrost dynamics and their effects on carbon cycling in northern high latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Q.; Tang, J.

    2008-12-01

    Large areas of northern high latitude ecosystems are underlain with permafrost. The warming temperature and fires deteriorate the stability of those permafrost, altering hydrological cycle, and consequently soil temperature and active layer depth. These changes will determine the fate of large carbon pools in soils and permafrost over the region. We developed a modeling framework of hydrology, permafrost, and biogeochemical dynamics based on our existing modules of these components. The framework was incorporated with a new snow dynamics module and the effects of soil moisture on soil thermal properties. The framework was tested for tundra and boreal forest ecosystems at field sites with respect to soil thermal and hydrological regimes in Alaska and was then applied to the whole Alaskan ecosystems for the period of 1923-2000 at a daily time step. Our two sets of simulations with and without considering soil moisture effects indicated that the soil temperature profile and active layer depth between two simulations are significant different. The differences of soil thermal regime would expect to result in different carbon dynamics. Next, we will verify the framework with the observed data of soil moisture and soil temperature at poor-drain, moderate-drain, and well-drain boreal forest sites in Alaska. With the verified framework, we will evaluate the effects of interactions of soil thermal and hydrological dynamics on carbon dynamics for the whole northern high latitudes.

  15. An Efficient Reduced-Order Model for the Nonlinear Dynamics of Carbon Nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Tiantian

    2014-08-17

    Because of the inherent nonlinearities involving the behavior of CNTs when excited by electrostatic forces, modeling and simulating their behavior is challenging. The complicated form of the electrostatic force describing the interaction of their cylindrical shape, forming upper electrodes, to lower electrodes poises serious computational challenges. This presents an obstacle against applying and using several nonlinear dynamics tools that typically used to analyze the behavior of complicated nonlinear systems, such as shooting, continuation, and integrity analysis techniques. This works presents an attempt to resolve this issue. We present an investigation of the nonlinear dynamics of carbon nanotubes when actuated by large electrostatic forces. We study expanding the complicated form of the electrostatic force into enough number of terms of the Taylor series. We plot and compare the expanded form of the electrostatic force to the exact form and found that at least twenty terms are needed to capture accurately the strong nonlinear form of the force over the full range of motion. Then, we utilize this form along with an Euler–Bernoulli beam model to study the static and dynamic behavior of CNTs. The geometric nonlinearity and the nonlinear electrostatic force are considered. An efficient reduced-order model (ROM) based on the Galerkin method is developed and utilized to simulate the static and dynamic responses of the CNTs. We found that the use of the new expanded form of the electrostatic force enables avoiding the cumbersome evaluation of the spatial integrals involving the electrostatic force during the modal projection procedure in the Galerkin method, which needs to be done at every time step. Hence, the new method proves to be much more efficient computationally.

  16. The Role of Driving Factors in Historical and Projected Carbon Dynamics in Wetland Ecosystems of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Z.; Helene, G.; He, Y.; Zhuang, Q.; McGuire, A. D.; Bennett, A.; Breen, A. L.; Clein, J.; Euskirchen, E. S.; Johnson, K. D.; Kurkowski, T. A.; Pastick, N. J.; Rupp, S. T.; Wylie, B. K.; Zhu, Z.

    2017-12-01

    Wetlands are important terrestrial ecosystems in Alaska. It is important to understand and assess their role in the regional carbon dynamics in response to historical and projected environmental conditions. A coupled modeling framework that incorporates a fire disturbance model and two biogeochemical models was used to assess the relative influence of changing climate, atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, and fire regime on the historical and future carbon balance in wetland ecosystems of the four main Landscape Conservation Cooperatives (LCCs) of Alaska. Simulations were conducted for the historical period (1950-2009) and future projection period (2010-2099). These simulations estimate that the total carbon (C) storage in wetland ecosystems of Alaska is 5556 Tg C in 2009, with 89% of the C stored in soils. An estimated 175 Tg C was lost during the historical period, which is attributed to greater C lost from the Northwest Boreal LCC than C gained from the other three LCCs. The simulations for the projection period were conducted for six different scenarios driven by climate forcings from two different climate models for each of three CO2 emission scenarios. The mean total carbon storage increased 3.94 Tg C/yr by 2099, with variability among the simulations ranging from 2.02 Tg C/yr to 4.42 Tg C/yr. Across the four LCCs, the largest relative C storage increase occurred in the Arctic and North Pacific LCCs. These increases were primarily driven by increases in net primary production (NPP) that were greater than increases in heterotrophic respiration and fire emissions. Our analysis further indicates that NPP increase was primarily driven by CO2 fertilization ( 5% per 100 ppmv increase) as well as by increases in air temperature ( 1% per ° increase). Increases air temperature were estimated to be the primary cause for a projected 47.7% mean increase in wetlands biogenic CH4 emissions among the simulations ( 15% per ° increase). The combined effects of

  17. Static and dynamic behavior of carbon fiber reinforced aluminum (CARALL) laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhaliwal, Gurpinder Singh

    The main aim of this research work was to investigate the static and dynamic properties of carbon fiber reinforced aluminum laminates cured without using any external adhesive and acid treatment of aluminum layers. A comprehensive study was undertaken to study the effect of adding epoxy resin rich polyester synthetic surface veil cloth layers on the failure modes and flexural and tensile response of these fiber metal laminates (FMLs). The main purpose of adding veil cloth layers was to prevent the occurrence of galvanic corrosion by avoiding direct contact between aluminum and carbon fiber layers. The addition of veil cloth layers leads to the combined failure of all layers in carbon fiber reinforced aluminum laminates at the same time, whereas the carbon fiber/ epoxy layers break before the failure of aluminum layers in samples cured without using veil cloth layers under tensile loading. The delamination was found to be reduced to a great extent in these laminate configurations due to the addition of veil cloth layers. Thermal residual stress developed during the curing of fiber metal laminates were predicted by utilizing analytical equations and finite element modeling. It was found out that the veil cloth layer does not affect much in reducing the thermal residual stress. Low-velocity impact tests were carried out using a drop-weight impact tower by impacting these fiber metal laminates at the center with three different energy levels to address energy absorption characteristics of these composites. Results showed that these laminates give higher forces and smaller displacement with the addition of polyester veil cloth layers due to reduced delaminated area across all interfaces of aluminum and carbon fiber layers, thus increasing slightly the energy absorption capabilities of these laminates. Primary failure modes observed during impact tests in these FMLs were cracks in the non-impacted aluminum layer, carbon fiber (CFRP) layer breakage and delamination b

  18. Adaptive autonomous sampling toward the study of microbial carbon and energy fluxes in a dynamic estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfort, L.; Seaton, C. M.; Wilkin, M.; Baptista, A. M.; Roman, B.; Preston, C. M.; Scholin, C. A.; Melançon, C.; Simon, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    An autonomous microbial sampling device was integrated with a long-term (endurance) environmental sensor system to investigate variation in microbial composition and activities related to complex estuarine dynamics. This integration was a part of ongoing efforts in the Center for Coastal Margin Observation and Prediction (CMOP) to study estuarine carbon and nitrogen cycling using an observation and prediction system (SATURN, http://www.stccmop.org/saturn) as foundational infrastructure. The two endurance stations fitted with physical and biogeochemical sensors that were used in this study are located in the SATURN observation network. The microbial sampler is the Environmental Sample Processor (ESP), a commercially available electromechanical/fluidic system designed for automated collection, preservation and in situ analyses of marine water samples. The primary goal of the integration was to demonstrate that the ESP, developed for sampling of pelagic oceanic environments, could be successfully deployed for autonomous sample acquisition in the highly dynamic and turbid Columbia River estuary. The ability of the ESP to collect material at both pre-determined times and automatically in response to local conditions was tested. Pre-designated samples were acquired at specific times to capture variability in the tidal cycle. Autonomous, adaptive sampling was triggered when conditions associated with specific water masses were detected in real-time by the SATURN station's sensors and then communicated to the ESP via the station computer to initiate sample collection. Triggering criteria were based on our understanding of estuary dynamics, as provided by the analysis of extensive archives of high-resolution, long-term SATURN observations and simulations. In this manner, we used the ESP to selectively sample various microbial consortia in the estuary to facilitate the study of ephemeral microbial-driven processes. For example, during the summer of 2013 the adaptive sampling

  19. Lattice constants of pure methane and carbon dioxide hydrates at low temperatures. Implementing quantum corrections to classical molecular dynamics studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costandy, Joseph; Michalis, Vasileios K.; Economou, Ioannis G., E-mail: i.tsimpanogiannis@qatar.tamu.edu, E-mail: ioannis.economou@qatar.tamu.edu [Chemical Engineering Program, Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Tsimpanogiannis, Ioannis N., E-mail: i.tsimpanogiannis@qatar.tamu.edu, E-mail: ioannis.economou@qatar.tamu.edu [Chemical Engineering Program, Texas A& M University at Qatar, P.O. Box 23874, Doha (Qatar); Environmental Research Laboratory, National Center for Scientific Research NCSR “Demokritos,” 15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece); Stubos, Athanassios K. [Environmental Research Laboratory, National Center for Scientific Research NCSR “Demokritos,” 15310 Aghia Paraskevi, Attikis (Greece)

    2016-03-28

    We introduce a simple correction to the calculation of the lattice constants of fully occupied structure sI methane or carbon dioxide pure hydrates that are obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulations using the TIP4PQ/2005 water force field. The obtained corrected lattice constants are subsequently used in order to obtain isobaric thermal expansion coefficients of the pure gas hydrates that exhibit a trend that is significantly closer to the experimental behavior than previously reported classical molecular dynamics studies.

  20. Modeling Potential Carbon Monoxide Exposure Due to Operation of a Major Rocket Engine Altitude Test Facility Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotzer, Michael J.; Woods, Jody L.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews computational fluid dynamics as a tool for modelling the dispersion of carbon monoxide at the Stennis Space Center's A3 Test Stand. The contents include: 1) Constellation Program; 2) Constellation Launch Vehicles; 3) J2X Engine; 4) A-3 Test Stand; 5) Chemical Steam Generators; 6) Emission Estimates; 7) Located in Existing Test Complex; 8) Computational Fluid Dynamics; 9) Computational Tools; 10) CO Modeling; 11) CO Model results; and 12) Next steps.

  1. Static and Dynamic Mechanical Properties of Graphene Oxide-Incorporated Woven Carbon Fiber/Epoxy Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adak, Nitai Chandra; Chhetri, Suman; Kim, Nam Hoon; Murmu, Naresh Chandra; Samanta, Pranab; Kuila, Tapas

    2018-01-01

    This study investigates the synergistic effects of graphene oxide (GO) on the woven carbon fiber (CF)-reinforced epoxy composites. The GO nanofiller was incorporated into the epoxy resin with variations in the content, and the CF/epoxy composites were manufactured using a vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding process and then cured at 70 and 120 °C. An analysis of the mechanical properties of the GO (0.2 wt.%)/CF/epoxy composites showed an improvement in the tensile strength, Young's modulus, toughness, flexural strength and flexural modulus by 34, 20, 83, 55 and 31%, respectively, when compared to the CF/epoxy composite. The dynamic mechanical analysis of the composites exhibited an enhancement of 56, 114 and 22% in the storage modulus, loss modulus and damping capacity (tanδ), respectively, at its glass transition temperature. The fiber-matrix interaction was studied using a Cole-Cole plot analysis.

  2. Improved dynamic properties of natural rubber filled with irradiation-modified carbon black

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yongpeng; Wen, Shipeng; Shen, Jing; Jiang, Jian; Hu, Shui; Zhang, Liqun; Liu, Li

    2015-06-01

    In this work, carbon black particles (CBs) were modified by high-energy electron beam (EB) irradiation at different doses. The influence of EB irradiation on the surface and particle size of CBs was investigated. Then, the CBs were compounded with natural rubber (NR), and the mechanical properties and dynamic properties of CBs/NR composite were further researched. The results showed that the irradiated CBs had more oxygen-containing groups and smaller particle sizes than original CBs. After irradiation, the content of bound rubber around the irradiated CBs increased, and the mechanical properties of CBs/NR composite were improved. Most importantly, NR filled with irradiated CBs has lower abrasion, higher wet skid resistance, and lower rolling resistance than NR filled with untreated CBs.

  3. Dynamic measurement of mercury adsorption and oxidation on activated carbon in simulated cement kiln flue gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Yuanjing; Jensen, Anker Degn; Windelin, Christian

    2012-01-01

    elemental mercury shows that when HCl is present with either SO2 or NOx the mercury measurement after the converter is unstable and lower than the elemental mercury inlet level. The conclusion is that red brass chips cannot fully reduce oxidized mercury to elemental mercury when simulated cement kiln gas...... is applied. A sodium sulfite-based converter material was prepared by dry impregnation of sodium sulfite and calcium sulfate powders on zeolite pellets using water glass as binder. The sulfite converter works well at 500°C with less than 10ppmv HCl in the simulated cement kiln flue gas. The 95% response time...... of the sulfite converter is short and typically within 2min. Dynamic mercury adsorption and oxidation tests on commercial activated carbons Darco Hg and HOK standard were performed at 150°C using simulated cement kiln gas and a fixed bed reactor system. It is shown that the converter and analyzer system...

  4. Effect of Peierls transition in armchair carbon nanotube on dynamical behaviour of encapsulated fullerene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hieu Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The changes of dynamical behaviour of a single fullerene molecule inside an armchair carbon nanotube caused by the structural Peierls transition in the nanotube are considered. The structures of the smallest C20 and Fe@C20 fullerenes are computed using the spin-polarized density functional theory. Significant changes of the barriers for motion along the nanotube axis and rotation of these fullerenes inside the (8,8 nanotube are found at the Peierls transition. It is shown that the coefficients of translational and rotational diffusions of these fullerenes inside the nanotube change by several orders of magnitude. The possibility of inverse orientational melting, i.e. with a decrease of temperature, for the systems under consideration is predicted.

  5. Improved oil recovery in Mississippian carbonate reservoirs of Kansas near term Class 2. Annual report, September 18, 1994--March 15, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, T.R.; Green, D.W.; Willhite, G.P.

    1998-04-01

    This annual report describes progress during the second year of the project entitled {open_quotes}Improved Oil Recovery in Mississippian Carbonate Reservoirs in Kansas{close_quotes}. This project funded under the Department of Energy`s Class 2 program targets improving the reservoir performance of mature oil fields located in shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs. The focus of this project is development and demonstration of cost-effective reservoir description and management technologies to extend the economic life of mature reservoirs in Kansas and the mid-continent. As part of the project, several tools and techniques for reservoir description and management were developed, modified and demonstrated. These include: (1) a new approach to subsurface visualization using electric logs ({open_quotes}Pseudoseismic{open_quotes}); (2) a low-cost easy-to-use spreadsheet log analysis software (PfEFFER); and (3) an extension of the BOAST-3 computer program for full field reservoir simulation. The world-wide-web was used to provide rapid and flexible dissemination of the project results through the Internet. Included in this report is a summary of significant project results at the demonstration site (Schaben Field, Ness County, Kansas). These results include an outline of the reservoir description based on available and newly acquired data and reservoir simulation results. Detailed information is available on-line through the Internet. Based on the reservoir simulation, three infill wells will be drilled to validate the reservoir description and demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed reservoir management strategies. The demonstration phase of the project has just begun and will be presented in the next annual report.

  6. Nutrient dynamics across a dissolved organic carbon and burn gradient in central Siberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Cardona, B.; Coble, A. A.; Prokishkin, A. S.; Kolosov, R.; Spencer, R. G.; Wymore, A.; McDowell, W. H.

    2016-12-01

    In stream ecosystems, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen (N) processing are tightly linked. In temperate streams, greater DOC concentrations and higher DOC:NO3- ratios promote the greatest nitrate (NO3-) uptake. However, less is known about this relationship in other biomes including the arctic which is undergoing changes due to climate change contributing to thawing of permafrost and alterations in biogeochemical cycles in soils and streams. Headwater streams draining into the N. Tunguska River in the central Siberian plateau are affected by forest fires but little is known about the aquatic biogeochemical implications in both a thawing and burning landscape. There are clear patterns between carbon concentration and fire history where generally DOC concentration in streams decrease after fires and older burn sites have shown greater DOC concentrations and more bioavailable DOC that could promote greater heterotrophic uptake of NO3-. However, the relationship between nutrient dynamics, organic matter composition, and fire history in streams is not very clear. In order to assess the influence of organic matter composition and DOC concentration on nutrient uptake in arctic streams, we conducted a series of short-term nutrient addition experiments following the tracer addition for spiraling curve characterization (TASCC) method, consisting of NO3- and NH4++PO43- additions, across 4 streams that comprise a fire gradient that spans 3- >100 years since the last burn with DOC concentrations ranging between 12-23 mg C/L. We hypothesized that nutrient uptake would be greatest in older burn sites due to greater DOC concentrations and availability. We will specifically examine how nutrient uptake relates to DOC concentration and OM composition (analyzed via FTICR-MS) across the burn gradient. Across the four sites DOC concentration and DOC:NO3- ratios decreased from old burn sites to recently burned sites. Results presented here can elucidate on the potential impacts

  7. A dynamic model to optimize municipal electric power systems by considering carbon emission trading under uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a FFSP (full-infinite fuzzy stochastic programming) method is developed for planning MEPS (municipal electric power systems) associated with GHG (greenhouse gas) control under uncertainty. FFSP can deal with multiple uncertainties presented in terms of fuzzy sets, functional intervals, and random variables. FFSP is also applied to a case study of Beijing for managing MEPS, and reducing the GHG emission through introducing the EU ETS (European Union greenhouse gas emission trading scheme). The results indicate that reasonable solutions have been generated, which can be used for generating schemes of energy resources, electricity production/allocation, and capacity expansion under various economic costs and GHG reduction requirements. The case study demonstrates that FFSP can increase the abilities of reflecting complexities for dynamics of capacity expansion and interaction of multiple uncertainties in MEPS. The results allow in-depth analyses of trade-offs between GHG mitigation and economic objective as well as those between system cost and decision makers' satisfaction degree. Besides, this study can also provide an example to help China construct domestic carbon trading market at municipal scale for addressing the challenges of global climate change. - Highlights: • A dynamic optimization (FFSP) method is developed for tackling uncertainties. • FFSP is applied to planning MEPS (municipal electric power systems) of Beijing. • CET (Carbon emission trading) is introduced into MEPS for mitigating CO 2 emissions. • Trade-offs occur between system cost and satisfaction degree under uncertainties. • Results can provide an example to construct domestic CET market in China

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Carbon Dioxide, Methane, and Their Mixture in Montmorillonite Clay Hydrates

    KAUST Repository

    Kadoura, Ahmad Salim

    2016-05-26

    Molecular dynamics simulations were carried out to study the structural and transport properties of carbon dioxide, methane, and their mixture at 298.15 K in Na-montmorillonite clay in the presence of water. The simulations show that, the self-diffusion coefficients of pure CO2 and CH4 molecules in the interlayers of Na-montmorillonite decrease as their loading increases, possibly because of steric hindrance. The diffusion of CO2 in the interlayers of Na-montmorillonite, at constant loading of CO2, is not significantly affected by CH4 for the investigated CO2/CH4 mixture compositions. We attribute this to the preferential adsorption of CO2 over CH4 in Na-montmorillonite. While the presence of adsorbed CO2 molecules, at constant loading of CH4, very significantly reduces the self-diffusion coefficients of CH4, and relatively larger decrease in those diffusion coefficients are obtained at higher loadings. The preferential adsorption of CO2 molecules to the clay surface screens those possible attractive surface sites for CH4. The competition between screening and steric effects leads to a very slight decrease in the diffusion coefficients of CH4 molecules at low CO2 loadings. The steric hindrance effect, however, becomes much more significant at higher CO2 loadings and the diffusion coefficients of methane molecules significantly decrease. Our simulations also indicate that, similar effects of water on both carbon dioxide and methane, increase with increasing water concentration, at constant loadings of CO2 and CH4 in the interlayers of Na-montmorillonite. Our results could be useful, because of the significance of shale gas exploitation and carbon dioxide storage.

  9. Dynamics of dissolved organic carbon in hillslope discharge: Modeling and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dusek, Jaromir; Vogel, Tomas; Dohnal, Michal; Barth, Johannes A. C.; Sanda, Martin; Marx, Anne; Jankovec, Jakub

    2017-03-01

    Reliable quantitative prediction of water movement and fluxes of dissolved substances - specifically organic carbon - at both the hillslope and the catchment scales remains a challenge due to complex boundary conditions and soil spatial heterogeneity. In addition, microbially mediated transformations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are recognized to determine the balance of DOC in soils. So far, only few studies utilized stable water isotope information in modeling and even fewer linked dissolved carbon fluxes to mixing and/or transport models. In this study, stormflow dynamics of 18O/16O ratios in the water molecules (expressed as δ18O) and DOC were analyzed using a physically-based modeling approach. A one-dimensional dual-continuum vertical flow and transport model was used to simulate the subsurface transport processes in a forest hillslope soil over a period of 2.5 years. The model was applied to describe the transformation of input signals of δ18O and DOC into output signals observed in the hillslope stormflow. To quantify uncertainty associated with the model parameterization, Monte Carlo analysis in conjunction with Latin hypercube sampling was applied. δ18O variations in hillslope discharge and in soil pore water were predicted reasonably well. Despite the complex nature of microbial transformations that caused uncertainty in model parameters and subsequent prediction of DOC transport, the simulated temporal patterns of DOC concentration in stormflow showed similar behavior to that reflected in the observed DOC fluxes. Due to preferential flow, the contribution of the hillslope DOC export was higher than the amounts that are usually found in the available literature.

  10. Obtention and dynamical mechanical behavior of polymer matrix carbon fire reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, Nelson Marques

    2001-01-01

    Polymer matrix composites reinforced with carbon fibres have been extensively used in the nuclear, aeronautics, automotive and leisure industry. This is due to their superior performance when compared to conventional materials in terms of specific strength and specific modulus (3 to 4 times higher than that of mild steels). However, these materials are anisotropic, requiring characterisation for each process and particular application. In the present work, the evaluation of epoxy resin reinforced with unidirectional and continuous carbon fibres was carried out. The composites materials were obtained by filament winding, with three different cure cycles, with two types of carbon fibres (6000 and 12000 filaments per strand) and with fibres volumetric fraction around 60 %. The evaluation of the composites was undertaken using following techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM); dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA); thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC). These techniques allowed the evaluation and comparison of storage modulus, internal energy dissipation, glass transition region and glass transition temperature - Tg, cure cycling. Besides, void volumetric fraction was measured. The results indicate that the DMA is a good alternative technique to DSC and TGA. It provides an indication of the quality of the produced composite, both thermal and mechanical. The technique can assist the quality control of composite components by measuring mechanical and thermal properties - modulus and Tg. The DMA technique was sensitive to cure cycling evaluation. Regarding the obtained composites, the results showed the need for the development of specific cure cycle for each application, establishing a compromise between properties such as storage modulus and internal energy dissipation, and involved costs. The results demonstrated differences between the storage modulus and internal energy dissipation for the two types of used fibres. (author)

  11. Simulations of the Dynamics of Precursor Organic and Prebiotic Carbon-rich Moleculess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, David William; Sadeghpour, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Not only has mid-IR imaging revealed an extraordinary variety of carbon-rich molecules present in the galaxy, but also that they can be seen in a host of different astronomical bodies; from HII regions to planetary nebula, and from young stellar objects to old post-AGB sources. The range of organic species discovered so far include PAHs, fullerenes, long chain hydrocarbons and carbonaceous clusters, some of which are biologically important. There's strong evidence that much of the terrestrial water was delivered to Earth during the Late Heavy Bombardment (LHB) approximately 3.8 - 4.1 Gyr ago [1]. Comparisons of the deuterium-hydrogen ratio of the Vienna Mean Standard Ocean Water and comets like Harley 2, have revealed a striking similarity​ [2]​​. It's not without reason to assume that prebiotic molecules may have been delivered to Earth​, too. ​In this work, reactive molecular dynamics simulations ​[3] are performed to probe the formation of carbon-rich molecules and clusters on graphitic surfaces. The simulations are run over a range of temperatures, densities and carbonaceous surfaces and a comparison is made of the distribution of chain and cluster formation in the gas and condensed phases. Results from these simulations will be presented.[1]. Hartmann, W. K., Ryder, G., Dones, L. & Grinspoon, D. in Origin of the Earth and Moon (eds Canup, R. & Righter, K.) 493--512 (Univ. Arizona Press, Tucson, 2000).[​2]. Hartogh P. et al. Ocean-like water in the Jupiter-family comet 103P/Hartley 2. Nature 478, 218-220 (2011).[3]. Patra N. P. Kral, and H. R. Sadeghpour. Nucleation and stabilization of carbon-rich structures in interstellar media', Astrophysical Journal 785, 6(2014); doi:10.1088/0004-637X/785/1/6.​

  12. Study on the dynamics responses of a transmission system made from carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin, Hang; Cai, Kun; Wei, Ning; Qin, Qing-Hua; Shi, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    A rotational transmission system from coaxial carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is investigated using a computational molecular dynamics approach. The system consists of a motor from a single-walled carbon nanotube and a bearing from a double-walled carbon nanotube. The motor has a high fixed rotational frequency and the two ends of the outer tube in the bearing are fixed. The inner tube in the bearing works as a rotor. Because of the interlayer friction in the bearing, configurations of the joint between the adjacent ends of motor and rotor have significant effects on rotational transmission properties. Four factors are considered in simulation, i.e., the bonding types of atoms (sp 1 and sp 2 ) on the ends of motor and rotor, the difference between motor and rotor radii, the rotational speed of motor, and the environmental temperature. It is found that the synchronous transmission happens if the sp 1 atoms on the jointed ends of motor and rotor are bonded each other and become new sp 2 atoms. Therefore, the lower difference between radii of motor and rotor, higher temperature of environment leads to synchronous rotational transmission easily. If the environmental temperature is too low (e.g., <150 K), the end of motor adjacent to rotor is easily under buckling and new sp 2 atoms appear, too. With capped CNTs or higher radii difference between rotor and motor at an appropriate temperature, a stable asynchronous rotation of rotor can be generated, and the rotor's frequency varying linearly with motor's frequency between 230 and 270 GHz. A multi-signal transmission device combined with oscillating and rotational motion is proposed for motor and stator shares a same size in radius

  13. A hypothesis linking chrysophyte microfossils to lake carbon dynamics on ecological and evolutionary time scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Alexander P.; Siver, Peter A.

    2013-12-01

    Chrysophyte algae are common in the plankton of oligotrophic lakes and produce a rich microfossil record of siliceous cysts and scales. Paleolimnological investigations and phytoplankton records suggest that chrysophyte populations are increasing in a wide range of boreal and arctic lakes, ultimately representing one component of the limnological response to contemporary global changes. However, the exact mechanisms responsible for widespread increases of chrysophyte populations remain elusive. We hypothesize that recent increases in chrysophytes are related to rising pCO2 in lakes, in part because these algae lack carbon concentrating mechanisms and therefore rely on diffusive entry of CO2 to Rubisco during photosynthesis. We assessed the abundance of modern sediment chrysophyte microfossils in relation to summer CO2 relative saturation in 46 New England (USA) lakes, revealing significant positive relationships for both cysts and scales. These observations imply that correlations between chrysophytes and limnological conditions including low pH, oligotrophy, and elevated dissolved organic matter are ultimately underscored by the high pCO2 associated with these conditions. In lakes where chrysophyte populations have expanded over recent decades, we infer that increasingly heterotrophic conditions with respect to CO2 have stimulated production by these organisms. This linkage is supported by the remarkable abundance and diversity of chrysophytes from middle Eocene lake sediments, deposited under atmospheric CO2 concentrations significantly higher than present. The Eocene assemblages suggest that any chrysophyte-CO2 connection borne out of results from modern and sub-recent sediments also operated on evolutionary time scales, and thus the absence of carbon concentrating mechanisms appears to be an ancient feature within the group. Chrysophyte microfossils may potentially provide important insights concerning the temporal dynamics of carbon cycling in aquatic

  14. PEATBOG: a biogeochemical model for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Blodau, C.

    2013-08-01

    Elevated nitrogen deposition and climate change alter the vegetation communities and carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling in peatlands. To address this issue we developed a new process-oriented biogeochemical model (PEATBOG) for analyzing coupled carbon and nitrogen dynamics in northern peatlands. The model consists of four submodels, which simulate: (1) daily water table depth and depth profiles of soil moisture, temperature and oxygen levels; (2) competition among three plants functional types (PFTs), production and litter production of plants; (3) decomposition of peat; and (4) production, consumption, diffusion and export of dissolved C and N species in soil water. The model is novel in the integration of the C and N cycles, the explicit spatial resolution belowground, the consistent conceptualization of movement of water and solutes, the incorporation of stoichiometric controls on elemental fluxes and a consistent conceptualization of C and N reactivity in vegetation and soil organic matter. The model was evaluated for the Mer Bleue Bog, near Ottawa, Ontario, with regards to simulation of soil moisture and temperature and the most important processes in the C and N cycles. Model sensitivity was tested for nitrogen input, precipitation, and temperature, and the choices of the most uncertain parameters were justified. A simulation of nitrogen deposition over 40 yr demonstrates the advantages of the PEATBOG model in tracking biogeochemical effects and vegetation change in the ecosystem.

  15. Carbon dynamics and aggregation in a Vicia faba crop: influence of management practice and cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, Virginia; Zornoza, Raúl; Faz, Ángel; Fernández, Juan

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we assessed the influence of a legume crop (Vicia faba) on the soil properties related to the carbon (C) cycle and soil aggregation, taking into account two cultivars (Muchamiel and Palenca) and two different management practices (conventional and organic). The study was randomly designed in blocks with four replications, in plots of 10 m2. Faba bean crop spanned from 24 November 2014 to 2 March 2015. We took a soil sampling (0-30 cm) from each plot at the end of the cycle to measure soil organic C, recalcitrant C, labile C fractions, microbial biomass C (MBC), aggregate stability and the enzyme activities β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase, dehydrogenase, cellulose and arylesterase. Results showed that the cultivar and the management practice had no significant effect on any of the analyzed properties. Significant positive correlations were only observed between soil organic C and arylesterase activity, recalcitrant C and labile C fractions, and recalcitrant C with arylesterase and cellulase activities. So, it seems that the selected cultivars and management practices had similar effects on C dynamics and aggregation. Both management practices maintain the same levels of soil organic C, the different organic C pools, and aggregate stability. In addition, soil microorganisms are responding to the recalcitrant fraction of the organic carbon by release of cellulases and arylesterases. Acknowledgements: This research was financed by the FP7 European Project Eurolegume (FP7-KBBE- 613781).

  16. Drivers of inorganic carbon dynamics in first-year sea ice: A model study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreau, Sebastien; Vancoppenolle, Martin; Delille, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Sea ice is an active source or a sink for carbon dioxide (CO2), although to what extent is not clear. Here, we analyze CO2 dynamics within sea ice using a one-dimensional halothermodynamic sea ice model including gas physics and carbon biogeochemistry. The ice-ocean fluxes, and vertical transport...... included. The model is evaluated using observations from a 6 month field study at Point Barrow, Alaska, and an ice-tank experi- ment. At Barrow, results show that the DIC budget is mainly driven by physical processes, wheras brine-air CO2 fluxes, ikaite formation, and net primary production, are secondary...... factors. In terms of ice-atmosphere CO2 exchanges, sea ice is a net CO2 source and sink in winter and summer, respectively. The formulation of the ice-atmosphere CO2 flux impacts the simulated near-surface CO2 partial pressure (pCO2), but not the DIC budget. Because the simulated ice-atmosphere CO2 fluxes...

  17. Carbon nanotube vacuum gauges with wide-dynamic range and processes thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A miniature thermal conductivity gauge employs a carbon single-walled-nanotube. The gauge operates on the principle of thermal exchange between the voltage-biased nanotube and the surrounding gas at low levels of power and low temperatures to measure vacuum across a wide dynamic range. The gauge includes two terminals, a source of constant voltage to the terminals, a single-walled carbon nanotube between the terminals, a calibration of measured conductance of the nanotube to magnitudes of surrounding vacuum and a current meter in electrical communication with the source of constant voltage. Employment of the nanotube for measuring vacuum includes calibrating the electrical conductance of the nanotube to magnitudes of vacuum, exposing the nanotube to a vacuum, applying a constant voltage across the nanotube, measuring the electrical conductance of the nanotube in the vacuum with the constant voltage applied and converting the measured electrical conductance to the corresponding calibrated magnitude of vacuum using the calibration. The nanotube may be suspended to minimize heat dissipation through the substrate, increasing sensitivity at even tower pressures.

  18. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  19. Dynamic pore network model of surface heterogeneity in brine-filled porous media for carbon sequestration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Jonathan S; Bazylak, Aimy

    2012-06-21

    Trapping of carbon in deep underground brine-filled reservoirs is a promising approach for the reduction of atmospheric greenhouse gas emissions. However, estimation of the amount of carbon diox