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Sample records for annual anesthesiology residency

  1. What is an anesthesiology resident worth?

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    Ferrera, Marisa H; Beaman, Shawn T; Metro, David G; Handley, Linda J; Walker, James E

    2009-08-01

    To determine the cost of replacing an anesthesiology resident with a certified registered nurse anesthetist (CRNA) for equal operating room (OR) work. Retrospective financial analysis. Academic anesthesiology department. Clinical anesthesia (CA)-1 through CA-3 residents. Cost of replacing anesthesiology residents with CRNAs for equal OR work was determined. The cost of replacing one anesthesiology resident with a CRNA for the same number of OR hours ranged from $9,940.32 to $43,300 per month ($106,241.68 to $432,937.50 per yr). Numbers varied depending on the CRNA pay scale and whether the calculations were based on the number of OR hours worked at our residency program or OR hours worked in a maximum duty hour model. A CRNA is paid substantially more per OR hour worked, at all pay levels, than an anesthesiology resident.

  2. Accreditation council for graduate medical education (ACGME annual anesthesiology residency and fellowship program review: a "report card" model for continuous improvement

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    Long Timothy R

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME requires an annual evaluation of all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to assess program quality. The results of this evaluation must be used to improve the program. This manuscript describes a metric to be used in conducting ACGME-mandated annual program review of ACGME-accredited anesthesiology residencies and fellowships. Methods A variety of metrics to assess anesthesiology residency and fellowship programs are identified by the authors through literature review and considered for use in constructing a program "report card." Results Metrics used to assess program quality include success in achieving American Board of Anesthesiology (ABA certification, performance on the annual ABA/American Society of Anesthesiology In-Training Examination, performance on mock oral ABA certification examinations, trainee scholarly activities (publications and presentations, accreditation site visit and internal review results, ACGME and alumni survey results, National Resident Matching Program (NRMP results, exit interview feedback, diversity data and extensive program/rotation/faculty/curriculum evaluations by trainees and faculty. The results are used to construct a "report card" that provides a high-level review of program performance and can be used in a continuous quality improvement process. Conclusions An annual program review is required to assess all ACGME-accredited residency and fellowship programs to monitor and improve program quality. We describe an annual review process based on metrics that can be used to focus attention on areas for improvement and track program performance year-to-year. A "report card" format is described as a high-level tool to track educational outcomes.

  3. The role of simulation training in anesthesiology resident education.

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    Yunoki, Kazuma; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2018-03-09

    An increasing number of reports indicate the efficacy of simulation training in anesthesiology resident education. Simulation education helps learners to acquire clinical skills in a safe learning environment without putting real patients at risk. This useful tool allows anesthesiology residents to obtain medical knowledge and both technical and non-technical skills. For faculty members, simulation-based settings provide the valuable opportunity to evaluate residents' performance in scenarios including airway management and regional, cardiac, and obstetric anesthesiology. However, it is still unclear what types of simulators should be used or how to incorporate simulation education effectively into education curriculums. Whether simulation training improves patient outcomes has not been fully determined. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the status of simulation in anesthesiology resident education, encourage more anesthesiologists to get involved in simulation education to propagate its influence, and stimulate future research directed toward improving resident education and patient outcomes.

  4. Personality Testing May Improve Resident Selection in Anesthesiology Programs

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    Merlo, Lisa J.; Matveevskii, Alexander S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Current methods of selecting future residents for anesthesiology training programs do not adequately distinguish those who will succeed from the pool of seemingly well-qualified applicants. Some residents, despite high exam scores, may struggle in the OR in stressful situations. Aims This study examined whether specific neuropsychological and personality measures can distinguish high competency residents from low competency residents to aid in resident selection. Methods 25 residents enrolled in an anesthesiology program at a major academic institution were identified for participation. 13 were evaluated identified as “high competency” residents and 12 as “low competency ” by the department's clinical competency committee. Groups were evaluated on measures of fine motor dexterity, executive functioning, processing speed, attention, and personality using IPIP-NEO. Results There were no significant differences between groups on measures of fine-motor dexterity, executive functioning, processing speed, or attention. High competency residents scored significantly higher than low competency residents on measures of cooperation, self-efficacy, and adventurousness, and lower on measures of neuroticism, anxiety, anger, and vulnerability. Conclusion Although measures of fine-motor dexterity, executive functioning, processing speed, and attention do not appear to distinguish between high- and low competency residents in anesthesiology, specific personality characteristics may be associated with future success in an anesthesiology training program. PMID:19995155

  5. Plagiarism in Personal Statements of Anesthesiology Residency Applicants.

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    Parks, Lance J; Sizemore, Daniel C; Johnstone, Robert E

    2016-02-15

    Plagiarism by residency applicants in their personal statements, as well as sites that sell personal statements, have been described, and led in 2011 to advice to avoid plagiarism and the caution that plagiarism detection software was available. We screened personal statements of 467 anesthesiology residency applicants from 2013-2014 using Viper Plagiarism Scanner software, and studied them for plagiarism. After quotes and commonly used phrases were removed, 82 statements contained unoriginal content of 8 or more consecutive words. After the study, 13.6% of personal statements from non-United States medical school graduates, and 4.0% from United States medical school graduates, contained plagiarized material, a significant difference. Plagiarized content ranged up to 58%. Plagiarism continues to occur in anesthesiology residency personal statements, with a higher incidence among graduates of non-United States medical schools.

  6. Developing a trauma curriculum for anesthesiology residents and fellows.

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    Tobin, Joshua M

    2014-04-01

    The board certification process for qualification by the American Board of Anesthesiology is undergoing significant review. A basic sciences examination has been added to the process and the traditional oral examination is evolving into a combined oral interview and practical skills assessment. These recent developments, as well as the growing body of evidence regarding the resuscitation of trauma patients, call for a revision in the curriculum beyond the documentation of participation in the anesthetics of 20 trauma patients. The implications of the 80-h work week are beginning to be appreciated. The development of a new trauma curriculum must take this significant change in residency training into account while incorporating modern educational theory (e.g. simulation) and new data on the resuscitation of trauma patients. Currently, the curriculum for trauma anesthesia requires only that residents participate in the anesthetics of 20 trauma patients. There is no plan for, and little literature regarding, a more extensive educational program. This offers a unique opportunity to innovate a novel curriculum in the anesthesiology residency. The American Society of Anesthesiologists Committee on Trauma and Emergency Preparedness has designed a curriculum that can serve as a template for this important step forward in anesthesiology education.

  7. Results of a Flipped Classroom Teaching Approach in Anesthesiology Residents.

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    Martinelli, Susan M; Chen, Fei; DiLorenzo, Amy N; Mayer, David C; Fairbanks, Stacy; Moran, Kenneth; Ku, Cindy; Mitchell, John D; Bowe, Edwin A; Royal, Kenneth D; Hendrickse, Adrian; VanDyke, Kenneth; Trawicki, Michael C; Rankin, Demicha; Guldan, George J; Hand, Will; Gallagher, Christopher; Jacob, Zvi; Zvara, David A; McEvoy, Matthew D; Schell, Randall M

    2017-08-01

    In a flipped classroom approach, learners view educational content prior to class and engage in active learning during didactic sessions. We hypothesized that a flipped classroom improves knowledge acquisition and retention for residents compared to traditional lecture, and that residents prefer this approach. We completed 2 iterations of a study in 2014 and 2015. Institutions were assigned to either flipped classroom or traditional lecture for 4 weekly sessions. The flipped classroom consisted of reviewing a 15-minute video, followed by 45-minute in-class interactive sessions with audience response questions, think-pair-share questions, and case discussions. The traditional lecture approach consisted of a 55-minute lecture given by faculty with 5 minutes for questions. Residents completed 3 knowledge tests (pretest, posttest, and 4-month retention) and surveys of their perceptions of the didactic sessions. A linear mixed model was used to compare the effect of both formats on knowledge acquisition and retention. Of 182 eligible postgraduate year 2 anesthesiology residents, 155 (85%) participated in the entire intervention, and 142 (78%) completed all tests. The flipped classroom approach improved knowledge retention after 4 months (adjusted mean = 6%; P  = .014; d  = 0.56), and residents preferred the flipped classroom (pre = 46%; post = 82%; P  < .001). The flipped classroom approach to didactic education resulted in a small improvement in knowledge retention and was preferred by anesthesiology residents.

  8. Analysis of Resident Case Logs in an Anesthesiology Residency Program

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    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias Vested

    2016-01-01

    Our goal in this study was to examine Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education case logs for Stanford anesthesia residents graduating in 2013 (25 residents) and 2014 (26 residents). The resident with the fewest recorded patients in 2013 had 43% the number of patients compared with the...

  9. Simulation of spinal nerve blocks for training anesthesiology residents

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    Blezek, Daniel J.; Robb, Richard A.; Camp, Jon J.; Nauss, Lee A.; Martin, David P.

    1998-06-01

    Deep nerve regional anesthesiology procedures, such as the celiac plexus block, are challenging to learn. The current training process primarily involves studying anatomy and practicing needle insertion is cadavers. Unfortunately, the training often continues on the first few patients subjected to the care of the new resident. To augment the training, we have developed a virtual reality surgical simulation designed to provide an immersive environment in which an understanding of the complex 3D relationships among the anatomic structures involved can be obtained and the mechanics of the celiac block procedure practiced under realistic conditions. Study of the relevant anatomy is provided by interactive 3D visualization of patient specific data nd the practice simulated using a head mounted display, a 6 degree of freedom tracker, and a haptic feedback device simulating the needle insertion. By training in a controlled environment, the resident may practice procedures repeatedly without the risks associated with actual patient procedures, and may become more adept and confident in the ability to perform nerve blocks. The resident may select a variety of different nerve block procedures to practice, and may place the virtual patient in any desired position and orientation. The preliminary anatomic models used in the simulation have been computed from the Visible Human Male; however, patient specific models may be generated from patient image data, allowing the physician to evaluate, plan, and practice difficult blocks and/or understand variations in anatomy before attempting the procedure on any specific patient.

  10. Anesthesiology resident personality type correlates with faculty assessment of resident performance.

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    Schell, Randall M; Dilorenzo, Amy N; Li, Hsin-Fang; Fragneto, Regina Y; Bowe, Edwin A; Hessel, Eugene A

    2012-11-01

    To study the association between anesthesiology residents' personality preference types, faculty evaluations of residents' performance, and knowledge. Convenience sample and prospective study. Academic department of anesthesiology. Consenting anesthesiology residents (n = 36). All participants completed the Myers Briggs Type Indicator® (MBTI®). All residents' 6-month summation of daily focal evaluations completed by faculty [daily performance score (DPS); 1 = unsatisfactory, 2 = needs improvement, 3 = meets expectations, 4 = exceeds expectations], as well as a global assessment of performance (GAP) score based on placement of each resident into perceived quartile compared with their peers (ie,1 = first, or top, quartile) by senior faculty (n = 7) who also completed the MBTI, were obtained. The resident MBTI personality preferences were compared with the DPS and GAP scores, the United States Medical Licensing Examination (USMLE) I and II scores, and faculty MBTI personality type. There was no association between personality preference type and performance on standardized examinations (USMLE I, II). The mean GAP score was better (higher quartile score) for Extraverts than Introverts (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0047) and for Sensing versus Intuition (median 2.0 vs 2.6, P = 0.0206) preference. Faculty evaluator MBTI preference type did not influence the GAP scores they assigned residents. Like GAP, the DPS was better for residents with Sensing versus Intuition preference (median 3.5 vs 3.3, P = 0.0111). No difference in DPS was noted between Extraverts and Introverts. Personality preference type was not associated with resident performance on standardized examinations, but it was associated with faculty evaluations of resident performance. Residents with Sensing personality preference were evaluated more favorably on global and focal faculty evaluations than those residents who chose the Intuition preference. Extraverted residents were evaluated more favorably on

  11. Anesthesiology residents' perspective about good teaching--a qualitative needs assessment.

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    Ortwein, Heiderose; Blaum, Wolf E; Spies, Claudia D

    2014-01-01

    Germany, like many other countries, will soon have a shortage of qualified doctors. One reason for the dissatisfaction amongst medical residents are the relatively unstructured residency training programs despite increasing importance of outcome-based education. The aim of our study was to identify characteristics and requirements for good teaching during anesthesiology residency training from the resident's point of view. A consensus workshop with residents from all medical universities in Germany was held. Participants were allocated to one of the three topics, chosen based on a 2009 nationwide evaluation of residency. The three topics were (A) characteristics of helpful/good teachers, (B) characteristics of helpful/good conditions and (C) characteristics of helpful/good curricular structure. Each group followed a nominal group technique consensus process to define and rank characteristics for a good residency. 31 (79.5%) resident representatives were present. The consented results put emphasis on the importance of structured curricula including transparent goals and objectives, in training formative assessments and quality assurance measures for the program. Residents further long for trained trainers with formal teaching qualifications and protected teaching time. Good residency training requires careful consideration of all stakeholders' needs. Results reflect and extend previous findings and are at least to some degree easily implemented. These findings are an important step to establish a broader consensus within the discipline.

  12. Gender Diversity in Anesthesiology Programs: The Role of Current Residents and Department Leadership in the 2014 Match Results.

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    Kranner, Paul W; Mussehl, Denise A; Hess, Aaron S

    2016-01-01

    Nearly half of graduates of American medical colleges are women, yet the percentage of women entering accredited anesthesiology programs remains less than 40%. There are obviously many factors that influence the choice of a residency training program, from geography to reputation to the atmosphere, composition and camaraderie of the department. We examined whether a greater number of current female residents, a female Chair, or a female Program Director were associated with a program matching a greater number of female candidates in the 2014 NRMP Match. An electronic questionnaire was sent to all 132 ACGME-accredited anesthesiology programs immediately following the 2014 Match seeking information on the gender mix of their current residents, the gender of the Chair and Program Director, and the gender composition of their newly-matched candidates. The percentage of current female residents was significantly associated with the percentage of incoming female residents (p = 0.013). There was no association between the percentage of new female residents obtained in the Match and the presence of a female Chair or Program Director. The results of the 2013 NRMP anesthesiology match indicate that programs with a higher proportion of female residents were able to sustain that diversity and successfully match a higher percentage of female candidates. No correlation was seen with Chair and Program Director gender, suggesting further work is needed to define the influence of female role models on female applicants' choice of anesthesiology residency programs.

  13. Decreased Parasympathetic Activity of Heart Rate Variability During Anticipation of Night Duty in Anesthesiology Residents.

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    Wang, Man-Ling; Lin, Pei-Lin; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Huang, Hui-Hsun

    2018-03-01

    In residency programs, it is well known that autonomic regulation is influenced by night duty due to workload stress and sleep deprivation. A less investigated question is the impact on the autonomic nervous system of residents before or when anticipating a night duty shift. In this study, heart rate variability (HRV) was evaluated as a measure of autonomic nervous system regulation. Eight residents in the Department of Anesthesiology were recruited, and 5 minutes of electrocardiography were recorded under 3 different conditions: (1) the morning of a regular work day (baseline); (2) the morning before a night duty shift (anticipating the night duty); and (3) the morning after a night duty shift. HRV parameters in the time and frequency domains were calculated. Repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the HRV parameters among the 3 conditions. There was a significant decrease of parasympathetic-related HRV measurements (high-frequency power and root mean square of the standard deviation of R-R intervals) in the morning before night duty compared with the regular work day. The mean difference of high-frequency power between the 2 groups was 80.2 ms (95% confidence interval, 14.5-146) and that of root mean square of the standard deviation of R-R intervals was 26 milliseconds (95% confidence interval, 7.2-44.8), with P = .016 and .007, respectively. These results suggest that the decrease of parasympathetic activity is associated with stress related to the condition of anticipating the night duty work. On the other hand, the HRV parameters in the morning after duty were not different from the regular workday. The stress of anticipating the night duty work may affect regulation of the autonomic nervous system, mainly manifested as a decrease in parasympathetic activity. The effect of this change on the health of medical personnel deserves our concern.

  14. Comparison of the Laryngeal View during Tracheal Intubation Using Airtraq and Macintosh Laryngoscopes by Unskillful Anesthesiology Residents: A Clinical Study

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    Carlos Ferrando

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain is a novel tracheal intubation device. Studies, performed until now, have compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, concluding that it reduces the intubation times and increase the success rate at first intubation attempt, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. The aim of the study was to evaluate if, in unskillful anesthesiology residents during the laryngoscopy, the Airtraq compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope improves the laryngeal view, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. Methods. A prospective, randomized, crossed-over trial was carried out on 60 patients. Each one of the patients were intubated using both devices by unskillful (less than two hundred intubations with the Macintosh laryngoscope and 10 intubations using the Airtraq anesthesiology residents. The Cormack-Lehane score, the success rate at first intubation attempt, and the laryngoscopy and intubation times were compared. Results. The Airtraq significantly decreased the Cormack-Lehane score (=0.04. On the other hand, there were no differences in times of laryngoscopy (=0.645; IC 95% 3.1, +4.8 and intubation (=0.62; C95%  −6.1, +10.0 between the two devices. No relevant complications were found during the maneuvers of intubation using both devices. Conclusions. The Airtraq is a useful laryngoscope in unskillful anesthesiology residents improving the laryngeal view and, therefore, facilitating the tracheal intubation.

  15. Comparison of the Laryngeal View during Tracheal Intubation Using Airtraq and Macintosh Laryngoscopes by Unskillful Anesthesiology Residents: A Clinical Study.

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    Ferrando, Carlos; Aguilar, Gerardo; Belda, F Javier

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective. The Airtraq laryngoscope (Prodol Meditec, Vizcaya, Spain) is a novel tracheal intubation device. Studies, performed until now, have compared the Airtraq with the Macintosh laryngoscope, concluding that it reduces the intubation times and increase the success rate at first intubation attempt, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. The aim of the study was to evaluate if, in unskillful anesthesiology residents during the laryngoscopy, the Airtraq compared with the Macintosh laryngoscope improves the laryngeal view, decreasing the Cormack-Lehane score. Methods. A prospective, randomized, crossed-over trial was carried out on 60 patients. Each one of the patients were intubated using both devices by unskillful (less than two hundred intubations with the Macintosh laryngoscope and 10 intubations using the Airtraq) anesthesiology residents. The Cormack-Lehane score, the success rate at first intubation attempt, and the laryngoscopy and intubation times were compared. Results. The Airtraq significantly decreased the Cormack-Lehane score (P = 0.04). On the other hand, there were no differences in times of laryngoscopy (P = 0.645; IC 95% 3.1, +4.8) and intubation (P = 0.62; C95%  -6.1, +10.0) between the two devices. No relevant complications were found during the maneuvers of intubation using both devices. Conclusions. The Airtraq is a useful laryngoscope in unskillful anesthesiology residents improving the laryngeal view and, therefore, facilitating the tracheal intubation.

  16. A retrospective review of required projects in systems-based practice in a single anesthesiology residency: a 10-year experience.

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    Sakai, Tetsuro; Emerick, Trent D; Patel, Rita M

    2015-09-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education has emphasized in its core competencies and more recently, in its Milestones Project, that residents understand the importance of systems-based practice (SBP). The objectives of the study are to evaluate the quality of residents' SBP projects and to determine the degrees that were subsequently implemented. A retrospective educational observational study. A university-based anesthesiology training institution. One hundred forty-nine anesthesiology residents in their final (postgraduate year 4) year of training who completed SBP projects for the last 10 years (2004-2013). A structured SBP course was provided for postgraduate year 4 anesthesiology residents with deadlines set such as project identification, data collection, and proposal draft. Each resident's written SBP proposal received inputs by 2 members of the department executive steering committee. The SBP projects concluded with oral presentations by each resident to the department executive steering committee, who provided overall scores. All SBP projects were categorized into 7 categories: safety initiatives, economic analysis, process analysis, policy change recommendations, education initiatives, teamwork/communication, and operating room efficiency. Evaluation scores using a Likert scale (1-9, where 9 is the best) were analyzed. The rate of implementation of project ideas within the department based on the presentations to the executive committee was examined. Of 149 projects, policy change recommendations was the most frequently chosen category (46 projects; 30.9%), followed by process analysis (36 projects; 24.2%). The overall evaluation score was 7.6 ± 0.6 (mean ± SD). A total of 53 projects (35.6%) were implemented in the department. There was no statistical difference between SBPs with implementation vs SBPs without implementation in terms of evaluation scores, year of the presentation, or categories. This SBP project has given residents the

  17. [Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation].

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    Fernandes, Cláudia Regina; Sousa, Rafael Queiroz de; Arcanjo, Francisco Sávio Alves; Neto, Gerardo Cristino de Menezes; Gomes, Josenília Maria Alves; Giaxa, Renata Rocha Barreto

    2015-01-01

    Understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the Social Representation Theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians), who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with prior and posterior experience to the establishment of residency. From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  18. Implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology in the Northeast of Brazil: impact on work processes and professional motivation

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    Cláudia Regina Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: To understand, through the theory of social representations, the influence exerted by the establishment of a residency program in anesthesiology on anesthetic care and professional motivation in a tertiary teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. METHOD: Qualitative methodology. The theoretical framework comprised the phenomenology and the social representation theory. Five multidisciplinary focus groups were formed with 17 health professionals (five surgeons, five anesthesiologists, two nurses, and five nursing technicians, who work in operating rooms and post-anesthesia care units, all with a prior and a posteriori experience to the establishment of residency. RESULTS: From the response content analysis, the following empirical categories emerged: motivation to upgrade, recycling of anesthesiologists and improving anesthetic practice, resident as an interdisciplinary link in perioperative care, improvements in the quality of perioperative care, and recognition of weaknesses in the perioperative process. It was evident from upper gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to prolonged intubation that the creation of a residency in anesthesiology brings advancements that are reflected in the motivation of anesthesiologists; the resident worked as an interdisciplinary link between the multidisciplinary team; there was recognition of weaknesses in the system, which were identified and actions to overcome it were proposed. CONCLUSION: The implementation of a residency program in anesthesiology at a tertiary education hospital in the Northeast of Brazil promoted scientific updates, improved the quality of care and processes of interdisciplinary care, recognized the weaknesses of the service, developed action plans and suggested that this type of initiative may be useful in remote areas of developing countries.

  19. Effect of a simulation-based workshop on breaking bad news for anesthesiology residents: an intervention study.

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    Karam, Vanda Yazbeck; Barakat, Hanane; Aouad, Marie; Harris, Ilene; Park, Yoon Soo; Youssef, Nazih; Boulet, John Jack; Tekian, Ara

    2017-06-14

    Breaking bad news (BBN) to patients and their relatives is a complex and stressful task. The ideal structure, training methods and assessment instruments best used to teach and assess BBN for anesthesiology residents remain unclear. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of an education intervention for BBN based on immersive experiences with a high fidelity simulator and role-play with standardized patients (SPs). A secondary purpose is to gather validity evidence to support the use of a GRIEV_ING instrument to assess BBN skills. The communication skills for BBN of 16 residents were assessed via videotaped SP encounters at baseline and immediately post-intervention. Residents' perceptions about their ability and comfort for BBN were collected using pre and post workshop surveys. Posttest scores were significantly higher than the pretest scores for the GRIEV_ING checklist, as well as on the communication global rating. The GRIEV_ING checklist had acceptable inter-rater and internal-consistency reliabilities. Performance was not related to years of training, or previous BBN experience. Anesthesiology residents' communication skills when BBN in relation to a critical incident may be improved with educational interventions based on immersive experiences with a high fidelity simulator and role-play with SPs.

  20. Effect of Performance Deficiencies on Graduation and Board Certification Rates: A 10-yr Multicenter Study of Anesthesiology Residents.

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    Turner, Judi A; Fitzsimons, Michael G; Pardo, Manuel C; Hawkins, Joy L; Huang, Yue Ming; Rudolph, Maria D D; Keyes, Mary A; Howard-Quijano, Kimberly J; Naim, Natale Z; Buckley, Jack C; Grogan, Tristan R; Steadman, Randolph H

    2016-07-01

    This multicenter, retrospective study was conducted to determine how resident performance deficiencies affect graduation and board certification. Primary documents pertaining to resident performance were examined over a 10-yr period at four academic anesthesiology residencies. Residents entering training between 2000 and 2009 were included, with follow-up through February 2016. Residents receiving actions by the programs' Clinical Competency Committee were categorized by the area of deficiency and compared to peers without deficiencies. A total of 865 residents were studied (range: 127 to 275 per program). Of these, 215 residents received a total of 405 actions from their respective Clinical Competency Committee. Among those who received an action compared to those who did not, the proportion graduating differed (93 vs. 99%, respectively, P board certification (89 vs. 99%, respectively, P board certification rates were consistently high in residents with no, or isolated, deficiencies. Residents deficient in an Essential Attribute, or multiple competencies, are at high risk of not graduating or achieving board certification. More research is needed on the effectiveness and selective deployment of remediation efforts, particularly for high-risk groups.

  1. Lawful Permanent Residents - Annual Report

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    Department of Homeland Security — A lawful permanent resident (LPR) or 'green card' recipient is defined by immigration law as a person who has been granted lawful permanent residence in the United...

  2. Impact of an Innovative Classroom-Based Lecture Series on Residents' Evaluations of an Anesthesiology Rotation.

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    Tanaka, Pedro; Yanez, David; Lemmens, Hendrikus; Djurdjulov, Adam; Scotto, Lena; Borg, Lindsay; Walker, Kim; Bereknyei Merrell, Sylvia; Macario, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Millennial resident learners may benefit from innovative instructional methods. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of a new daily, 15 minutes on one anesthesia keyword, lecture series given by faculty member each weekday on resident postrotation evaluation scores. Methods. A quasi-experimental study design was implemented with the residents' rotation evaluations for the 24-month period ending by 7/30/2013 before the new lecture series was implemented which was compared to the 14-month period after the lecture series began on 8/1/2013. The primary endpoint was "overall teaching quality of this rotation." We also collected survey data from residents at clinical rotations at two other different institutions during the same two evaluation periods that did not have the education intervention. Results. One hundred and thirty-one residents were eligible to participate in the study. Completed surveys ranged from 77 to 87% for the eight-question evaluation instrument. On a 5-point Likert-type scale the mean score on "overall teaching quality of this rotation" increased significantly from 3.9 (SD 0.8) to 4.2 (SD 0.7) after addition of the lecture series, whereas the scores decreased slightly at the comparison sites. Conclusion. Rotation evaluation scores for overall teaching quality improved with implementation of a new structured slide daily lectures series.

  3. Comparing Anesthesiology Residency Training Structure and Requirements in Seven Different Countries on Three Continents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro; Madsen, Matias V

    2017-01-01

    , for example, the duration of post-medical school training and national requirements for certain rotations, a number of cases, faculty supervision, national in-training written exams, and duty hour limits. These data were augmented by review of each country's publicly available residency training documents...... as available on the internet. Post-medical school anesthesia residency duration varied: three years (Brazil), four years (USA), five years (Canada and Switzerland), six years (Japan and Denmark) to nine years (UK), as did the number of explicitly required clinical rotations of a defined duration: zero (Denmark......), one (Switzerland and UK), four (Brazil), six (Canada), and 12 (USA). Minimum case requirements exist in the USA, Japan, and Brazil, but not in the other countries. National written exams taken during training exist for all countries studied except Japan and Denmark. The countries studied increasingly...

  4. [Simulation-based intervention to improve anesthesiology residents communication with families of critically ill patients--preliminary prospective evaluation].

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    Berkenstadt, Haim; Perlson, Daria; Shalomson, Orit; Tuval, Atalia; Haviv-Yadid, Yael; Ziv, Amitai

    2013-08-01

    Although effective communication with families of critically ill patients is a vital component of quality care, training in this field is neglected. The article aims to validate communication skills training program for anesthesiology residents in the intensive care set up. Ten anesthesia residents, following 3 months of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) rotation, had 4 hours of lectures and one day simulation-based communication skills training with families of critically ill patients. Participants completed an attitude questionnaire over 3 time periods--before training [t1], immediately following training (t2) and three months following training (t3). The participants' communication skills were assessed by two blinded independent observers using the SEGUE framework while performing a simulation-based scenario at t1 and t3. Seven participants finished the study protocol. Participants ndicated communication importance as 3.68 +/- 0.58 (t1), 4.05 +/- 0.59 (t2), 4.13 +/- 0.64 (t3); their communication ability as 3.09 +/- 0.90 (t1), 3.70 +/- 0.80 (t2), 3.57 +/- 0.64 (t3); the contribution of lecture to communication 3.04 +/- 0.43 (t1), 3.83 +/- 0.39 (t2), 3.87 +/- 0.51 (t3), and contribution of simulation training to communication 3.00 +/- 0.71 (t1), 4.04 +/- 0.52 (t2), 3.84 +/- 0.31 (t3). The differences did not reach statistical significance. Objective assessment of the communication skills using the SEGUE framework indicated that 6/7 participants improved their communication skills, with communication ability before training at 2.66 +/- 0.83 and 1 month following training it was 3.38 +/- 0.78 (p = 0.09). This preliminary study demonstrates the value of communication skills training in the intensive care environment.

  5. 20th Annual Residence Hall Construction Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agron, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Even in difficult economic times, colleges and universities continue to invest in residence hall construction projects as a way to attract new students and keep existing ones on campus. According to data from "American School & University"'s 20th annual Residence Hall Construction Report, the median new project completed in 2008 was…

  6. Comparison of the didactic lecture with the simulation/model approach for the teaching of a novel perioperative ultrasound curriculum to anesthesiology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsingh, Davinder; Alexander, Brenton; Le, Khanhvan; Williams, Wendell; Canales, Cecilia; Cannesson, Maxime

    2014-09-01

    To expose residents to two methods of education for point-of-care ultrasound, a traditional didactic lecture and a model/simulation-based lecture, which focus on concepts of cardiopulmonary function, volume status, and evaluation of severe thoracic/abdominal injuries; and to assess which method is more effective. Single-center, prospective, blinded trial. University hospital. Anesthesiology residents who were assigned to an educational day during the two-month research study period. Residents were allocated to two groups to receive either a 90-minute, one-on-one didactic lecture or a 90-minute lecture in a simulation center, during which they practiced on a human model and simulation mannequin (normal pathology). Data points included a pre-lecture multiple-choice test, post-lecture multiple-choice test, and post-lecture, human model-based examination. Post-lecture tests were performed within three weeks of the lecture. An experienced sonographer who was blinded to the education modality graded the model-based skill assessment examinations. Participants completed a follow-up survey to assess the perceptions of the quality of their instruction between the two groups. 20 residents completed the study. No differences were noted between the two groups in pre-lecture test scores (P = 0.97), but significantly higher scores for the model/simulation group occurred on both the post-lecture multiple choice (P = 0.038) and post-lecture model (P = 0.041) examinations. Follow-up resident surveys showed significantly higher scores in the model/simulation group regarding overall interest in perioperative ultrasound (P = 0.047) as well understanding of the physiologic concepts (P = 0.021). A model/simulation-based based lecture series may be more effective in teaching the skills needed to perform a point-of-care ultrasound examination to anesthesiology residents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [French national survey on evaluation by residents in anesthesiology and critical care of choice's motivations of the specialty and their practical and theoretical training].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perbet, S; Eisenmann, N; Constantin, J-M; Colomb, S; Soummer, A; Jaber, S; Bazin, J-E

    2010-02-01

    The duration of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care (AIC) residency increased from four to five years in 2002 in France. AIC is a specialty increasingly chosen in relation to medical and surgical specialties. We conducted a national survey by questionnaire on the evaluation of their theoretical and practical training by the French residents. A questionnaire (demographics, motivations for the choice, training) was sent to 1422 residents, enrolled since 2002, in each province. In total, 562 questionnaires (40 %) were returned. The mean age of residents is 28+/-2 years, 46 % are women, on average in 6th semester [1-10th]. The obtained specialty was their first choice for 90 % and of the obtained city home for 73 %. Residents declare that the place of their definitive installation will be chosen depending on the quality of life mainly. So, 97 % referred the same choice of specialty. Training in locoregional anaesthesia (LRA) was evaluated correct or good by 53 % of residents and in the management of difficult intubation correct or good by 62 %. Theoretical training was assessed correct by 31 % of responders and good by 53 % and practical training correct by 25 % and good by 61 %. The AIC is now a specialty of positive choice by students. This choice is reinforced by teaching and practice during the residency. The global training is as good as a whole. Residents wish to deepen in some areas (ultrasound, LRA, critical reading, medical redaction) and an evaluation of their practical training with simulations. French AIC residents seem satisfied with almost all their training and referred the same choice of specialty. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. The status of women in academic anesthesiology: a progress report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Cynthia A; Stock, Marie Christine

    2008-07-01

    The number of women in medicine has increased steadily in the last half century. In this study, we reassessed the status of women in academic anesthesiology departments in the United States in 2006. Medical student, resident, and faculty rank gender data were obtained from the Association of American Medical Colleges. Data regarding the make-up and gender of anesthesia subspecialty society leadership, the editorial boards of Anesthesia & Analgesia and Anesthesiology, the awardees of anesthesia research grants, American Board of Anesthesiology examiners, and department chairs were obtained from websites, organization management personnel, and the Wood Library-Museum of Anesthesiology. Anesthesiology data were compared with composite data from medical school departments in other clinical specialties and to data from previous years, beginning in 1985. The percentage of medical school graduates, anesthesiology residents, and anesthesiology faculty members who are women has increased since 1985; however, the rate of increase in the percentage of women is significantly faster for medical school graduates compared with anesthesiology residents (P research grants awarded to women has not changed over several decades. The status of women in academic anesthesiology in the first decade of the millennium has, by some measures, advanced compared with 20 yr ago. However, by other measures, there has been no change. The task ahead is to identify factors that discourage qualified women medical students, residents, and junior faculty members from pursuing careers in academic anesthesiology and advancing in academic rank.

  9. Low-Fidelity Haptic Simulation Versus Mental Imagery Training for Epidural Anesthesia Technical Achievement in Novice Anesthesiology Residents: A Randomized Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Grace; Krohner, Robert G; Metro, David G; Rosario, Bedda L; Jeong, Jong-Hyeon; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2016-05-01

    There are many teaching methods for epidural anesthesia skill acquisition. Previous work suggests that there is no difference in skill acquisition whether novice learners engage in low-fidelity (LF) versus high-fidelity haptic simulation for epidural anesthesia. No study, however, has compared the effect of LF haptic simulation for epidural anesthesia versus mental imagery (MI) training in which no physical practice is attempted. We tested the hypothesis that MI training is superior to LF haptic simulation training for epidural anesthesia skill acquisition. Twenty Post-Graduate Year 2 (PGY-2) anesthesiology residents were tested at the beginning of the training year. After a didactic lecture on epidural anesthesia, they were randomized into 2 groups. Group LF had LF simulation training for epidural anesthesia using a previously described banana simulation technique. Group MI had guided, scripted MI training in which they initially were oriented to the epidural kit components and epidural anesthesia was described stepwise in detail, followed by individual mental rehearsal; no physical practice was undertaken. Each resident then individually performed epidural anesthesia on a partial-human task trainer on 3 consecutive occasions under the direct observation of skilled evaluators who were blinded to group assignment. Technical achievement was assessed with the use of a modified validated skills checklist. Scores (0-21) and duration to task completion (minutes) were recorded. A linear mixed-effects model analysis was performed to determine the differences in scores and duration between groups and over time. There was no statistical difference between the 2 groups for scores and duration to task completion. Both groups showed similarly significant increases (P = 0.0015) in scores over time (estimated mean score [SE]: group MI, 15.9 [0.55] to 17.4 [0.55] to 18.6 [0.55]; group LF, 16.2 [0.55] to 17.7 [0.55] to 18.9 [0.55]). Time to complete the procedure decreased

  10. Merel Harmel: Portrait of an Anesthesiology Pioneer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reves, J G; Newman, Mark F

    2016-02-01

    Merel Harmel, MD, was the first anesthesiologist to give anesthesia for a palliative congenital heart operation performed by Alfred Blalock, MD. He was the first resident in anesthesiology at Johns Hopkins and was the first academic department chairman at 3 different universities during his long career. He was successful because of his steadfast belief that academic anesthesia could and must flourish and his incessant optimism no matter how daunting the many obstacles in his professional life.

  11. Implementing a successful journal club in an anesthesiology residency program [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/xe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel D Pitner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Journal clubs are an integral element of residency training. We report the successful implementation of a monthly structured journal club in our anesthesia residency program. Based on resident surveys before and one year after its start, the journal club led to a significantly higher confidence in how to critically appraise literature and present a manuscript. The journal club also improved the residents' ability to search the literature and their statistical knowledge, skills that are essential in the practice of evidence-based medicine. We describe key features that may aid other training programs in organizing a stimulating an educational and sustainable journal club.

  12. Anesthesiology and competitive strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Wendy L; Gold, Barbara

    2009-03-01

    Whether we like it or not, medicine is big business. The argument is sometimes made that standard management strategies from the business world do not apply to medicine because the economics and practice of medicine are unique--driven by science and rapid rates of change. But an exploding knowledge base, light-speed technological development, and ever-changing reimbursement schemes are not exclusive to medicine and health care. Some fundamental principles of finance, business management, and strategic development have evolved to deal with problems of rapid change. These principles do apply to modern medicine. The business side of anesthesia practice is off-putting to many clinicians. However, knowledge of the market forces at play can help enhance patient care, improve service, expand opportunities, and extend the perimeter of the discipline. The mission and current market position of anesthesiology practice are considered here.

  13. Anesthesiology, automation, and artificial intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, John C; Joshi, Girish P

    2018-01-01

    There have been many attempts to incorporate automation into the practice of anesthesiology, though none have been successful. Fundamentally, these failures are due to the underlying complexity of anesthesia practice and the inability of rule-based feedback loops to fully master it. Recent innovations in artificial intelligence, especially machine learning, may usher in a new era of automation across many industries, including anesthesiology. It would be wise to consider the implications of such potential changes before they have been fully realized.

  14. 24 CFR 206.211 - Annual determination of principal residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... residence. 206.211 Section 206.211 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... determination of principal residence. At least once during each calendar year, the mortgagee shall determine whether or not the property is the principal residence of at least one mortgagor. The mortgagee shall...

  15. Leadership and management of academic anesthesiology departments in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, Berend; Galford, Jennifer A

    2009-03-01

    To characterize the approach of academic chairs of anesthesiology in leading and managing their departments, and to gain insights into what they considered the most difficult challenges as chairs. Internet-based survey instrument conducted during July and August of 2006. Academic medical center. Department chairs of 132 academic anesthesiology programs who were listed on the Society of Academic Anesthesiology Chairs Listserv, were surveyed. The overall number of respondents were reported. However, as all questions were voluntary, not all were answered by each respondent. Observations are therefore reported as absolute numbers and percentages on a question-by-question basis. Respondents were asked to rank responses to some questions in order of importance (eg, 1 = most important). These data are presented as rank ordered median values, determined by the Kruskal-Wallis Test. Significant differences between groups were determined by Dunn's post test. A P-value leadership as most important. Seventy-nine percent had developed "Vision" statements for the department and 64% of respondents had set goals for divisions. To communicate within departments, 74% of Chairs had at least monthly faculty meetings and 50% held at least yearly faculty retreats. Chairs preferred communicating contentious issues face to face. Ninety-five percent of Chairs held at least yearly performance appraisals and 85% had an established incentive system in the department. Academic productivity (73%) and clinical time (68%) were the most common components of the incentive system. In 65% of departments, Chairs delegated the program directorship and in 73%, the running of the National Residency Matching Program. The financial state of the department was shared at least annually in 93% of departments. In most departments (77%), faculty salary ranges were known but individual faculty salaries were not shared. Chairs considered the most important leadership challenge to be setting direction for the

  16. Recruitment of house staff into anesthesiology: a longitudinal evaluation of factors responsible for selecting a career in anesthesiology and an individual training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustin, Ian D; Long, Timothy R; Rose, Steven H; Wass, C Thomas

    2014-03-01

    To re-evaluate factors responsible for selecting a career in anesthesiology and for selecting an anesthesiology training program. The perceptions of anesthesiology residents about employment opportunities and future job security were also re-examined. Novel data on the impact of duty hour restrictions on residency training were obtained. Survey instrument. Academic medical center. 63 residents enrolled in the anesthesiology residency at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN (clinical base year and clinical anesthesia years 1-3) during the 2010-11 academic year. All responses were anonymous. Current study data were compared to data from two similar studies published by the authors (1995-96 and 2000-01) using an f-exact test. A P-value ≤ 0.05 was considered significant. 55 of 63 (87%) residents responded to the survey. The most frequently cited reasons for selecting a career in anesthesiology were: anesthesiology is a "hands-on" specialty (49%), critical care medicine is included in the scope of training/practice (33%), anesthesiology provides opportunities to perform invasive procedures (31%), and the work is immediately gratifying (31%). When current data were compared with data from the 1995-96 survey, respondents reported significant decreases in interest in physiology/pharmacology (42% vs 21%; P = 0.03), opportunities to conduct research (13% vs 2%; P = 0.05) and opportunities to train in pain medicine (13% vs 0%; P = 0.01) as reasons for selecting anesthesiology. When current data were compared with data from the 2000-2001 survey, respondents reported a significant increase in critical care medicine (7% vs 33%, P = 0.01), significant decreases in time off (36% vs 11%; P = 0.01) and work time mostly devoted to patient care (20% vs 2%; P = 0.01) as factors in selecting anesthesiology as a career. Nearly all (94%) respondents reported a high level of satisfaction with their specialty choice and would choose anesthesiology again if currently graduating medical school

  17. Anesthesiology — Reanimatology: Historical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Editorial Board of the journal «Obshchaya Reanimatologiya» intends to publish a series of papers dedicated to the history of the science «Anesthesiology and Reanimatology». In the first paper, the authors attempted to gather historical facts concerning the development of anesthesia. This makes it possible to analyze the course of development of the thought of scientists and physicians, the time of striking discoveries in our specialty, to reflect the most important points that impulses the expansion and optimization of methods of anesthesia and resuscitation. The authors understand clearly that they have no sufficient number of factors associated with the history of anesthesiology and reanimatology and they will be grateful in receiving any comments and additional information on historical aspects, specialized sections of the science, bibliographic data of Russian and foreign sciences dealing with this specialty. The to offer apologies for possible inaccuracies since controversial questions occasionally arise as to authorship and priority of ideas and usage of any methods in practice. There are not sometimes coincidences in the dates of the same events in different references used by us. The authors believe that the proposed historical analysis will generally provide a keen insight into the overall picture of development of world anesthesiology and reanimatology.

  18. Duck Valley Resident Fish Stocking Program, 2000 Final Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodson, Guy; Pero, Vincent

    2002-01-01

    The Shoshone-Paiute Tribes fish-stocking program was begun in 1988 and is intended to provide a subsistence fishery for the tribal members. The program stocks catchable and fingerling size trout in Mt. View and Sheep Creek Reservoirs. Rainbow trout are purchased from only certified disease-free facilities to be stocked in our reservoirs. This project will help restore a fishery for tribal members that historically depended on wild salmon and steelhead in the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers and their tributaries for their culture as well as for subsistence. This project is partial substitution for loss of anadromous fish production due to construction and operation of hydroelectric dams on the Columbia and Snake Rivers. Until anadromous fish can be returned to the Owyhee and Bruneau Rivers this project will continue indefinitely. As part of this project the Shoshone-Paiute Tribes will also receive income in the form of fees from non-tribal members who come to fish these reservoirs. Regular monitoring and evaluation of the fishery will include sampling for length/weight/condition and for signs of disease. A detailed Monitoring and evaluation plan has been put in place for this project. However due to budget limitations on this project only the fishery surveys and limited water quality work can be completed. A creel survey was initiated in 1998 and we are following the monitoring and evaluation schedule for this program (as budget allows) as well as managing the budget and personnel. This program has been very successful in the past decade and has provided enjoyment and sustenance for both tribal and non-tribal members. All biological data and stocking rates will be including in the Annual reports to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

  19. Managing intergenerational differences in academic anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangraw, Robert E; Whitten, Charles W

    2007-12-01

    Common definitions for workplace generations are the silent generation (born 1925-1945), the baby boomer generation (1946-1962), generation X (1963-1981), and generation Y (1982-2000). Distinct motivational and value perceptions stereotype generations. This review defines the characteristics of workplace generations today and provides insight into how differences influence the workplace environment. Senior faculty members are mostly boomers, whereas residents and junior faculty members tend to belong to generation X. Medical students and incoming interns are from generation Y. When compared with boomers, generation X is more savvy with technology, more independent, less loyal to the institution, and seeks balance between work and lifestyle. The 80-h resident working week restriction has reinforced differences between older and younger physicians. Generation Y exhibits traits that are similar to those of generation X. Their increased interest in anesthesiology may reflect, in part, their assumption that it affords better control of lifestyle. Understanding, improved communication strategies, mentorship, and flexibility in methods employed to achieve common goals are most likely to capture the interest and cooperation of members of generation X and possibly Y. Future studies should test effects of particular interventions on outcome in terms of recruitment and performance milestones.

  20. Competency-based education in anesthesiology: history and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Thomas J; Fox, Chris A

    2014-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education is transitioning to a competency-based system with milestones to measure progress and define success of residents. The confines of the time-based residency will be relaxed. Curriculum must be redesigned and assessments will need to be precise and in-depth. Core anesthesiology faculty will be identified and will be the "trained observers" of the residents' progress. There will be logistic challenges requiring creative management by program directors. There may be residents who achieve "expert" status earlier than the required 36 months of clinical anesthesia education, whereas others may struggle to achieve acceptable status and will require additional education time. Faculty must accept both extremes without judgment. Innovative new educational opportunities will need to be created for fast learners. Finally, it will be important that residents embrace this change. This will require programs to clearly define the specific aims and measurement endpoints for advancement and success.

  1. Importância do treinamento de residentes em eventos adversos durante anestesia: experiência com o uso do simulador computadorizado Importancia del entrenamiento de los practicantes (médicos en ejercicio en eventos adversos durante la anestesia: experiencia con el uso del simulador computadorizado Importance of critical events training for anesthesiology residents: experience with computer simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domingos Dias Cicarelli

    2005-04-01

    durante los procedimientos anestésicos. Sin embargo, continua importante el entrenamiento de los médicos practicantes para este tipo de ocurrencia. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar el desempeño práctico de los médicos practicantes de Anestesiología en eventos adversos durante una anestesia simulada. MÉTODO: Fueron evaluados 17 médicos en especialización de primero y segundo años de Anestesiología (ME1 y ME2 y 5 instructores del Centro de Enseñanza y Entrenamiento (CEE del HCFMUSP (Título Superior en Anestesiología - TSA. Fue utilizado el simulador computadorizado Anesthesia Simulator Consultant (ASC versión 2.0 - 1995/Anesoft para realización de las simulaciones de los eventos. Los incidentes críticos escogidos fueron fibrilación ventricular (FV y choque anafiláctico. Después de la realización de la simulación, fueron impresos los resultados de cada participante, evaluados y puntuados las conductas adoptadas para resolver los incidentes críticos pre-determinados. Los participantes evaluaron el simulador a través de un cuestionario para ser respondido. RESULTADOS: No hubo diferencia estadística entre las medias obtenidas por los grupos, sin embargo, se notó una tendencia de un desempeño mejor de los grupos TSA y ME2 en la simulación de FV. En relación al choque anafiláctico, hubo una tendencia de desempeño mejor del grupo TSA. CONCLUSIONES: El entrenamiento para el diagnóstico y conductas en eventos adversos debe ser un foco de atención durante el entrenamiento de médicos practicantes y en la actualización de anestesiologistas. El uso del simulador puede ser una de las formas de realizar el entrenamiento en estas situaciones.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Because of monitoring and drugs evolution, there has been a decrease in the incidence of critical events during anesthetic procedures. Despite this low frequency, critical event training for Anesthesiology residents remains important. This study aimed at evaluating Anesthesiology

  2. Theory and design of an Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES) for residences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nephew, E.A.; Abbatiello, L.A.; Ballou, M.L.

    1980-05-01

    The basic concept of the Annual Cycle Energy System (ACES) - an integrated system for supplying space heating, hot water, and air conditioning to a building - and the theory underlying its design and operation are described. Practical procedures for designing an ACES for a single-family residence, together with recommended guidelines for the construction and installation of system components, are presented. Methods are discussed for estimating the life-cycle cost, component sizes, and annual energy consumption of the system for residential applications in different climatic regions of the US.

  3. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2010-2015. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census...

  4. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — 2010-2016. U.S. Census Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Selected Age Groups by Sex for the United States. The estimates are based on the 2010 Census...

  5. Resident fish stock status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams : 2000 annual report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lockwood, N.; McLellan, J.; Crossley, B.

    2001-01-01

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project

  6. Anesthesiology Nurse Scheduling using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leopoldo Altamirano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article we present an approach designed to solve a real world problem: the Anesthesiology Nurse Scheduling Problem (ANSP at a public French hospital. The anesthesiology nurses are one of the most shared resources in the hospital and we attempt to find a fair/balanced schedule for them, taking into account a set of constraints and the nursesarsquo; stated preferences, concerning the different shifts. We propose a particle swarm optimization algorithm to solve the ANSP. Finally, we compare our technique with previous results obtained using integer programming.

  7. Deliberate practice for achieving and maintaining expertise in anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Randolph H; Rickard, Timothy C

    2015-02-01

    For the dedicated anesthesiologist, a high level of expertise is needed to deliver good care to patients and to provide excellent service to surgeons, anesthesia colleagues, and others. Expertise helps the anesthesiologist recover from difficult situations and generally makes the practice run more effectively. Expertise also contributes to quality of life through higher self-esteem and long-term career satisfaction. We begin by reviewing the attributes that characterize expert performance and discussing how a specific training format, known as deliberate practice, contributes to acquisition and maintenance of expertise. Deliberate practice involves rehearsal of specific tasks to mastery, ideally under the eye of a mentor to provide feedback. This amounts to an orchestrated effort to improve that enables trainees to progress to expert levels of performance. With few exceptions, people who become recognized experts have pursued deliberate practice on the order of 4 hours per day for 10 to 15 years. In contrast, those who practice their profession in a rote manner see their skills plateau well below the level of top performers. Anesthesiology instruction with attending supervision provides all of the necessary components for deliberate practice, and it can be effective in anesthesia. Using deliberate practice in teaching requires organization in selecting training topics, effort in challenging students to excel, and skill in providing feedback. In this article, we discuss how educational programs can implement deliberate practice in anesthesiology training, review resources for instructors, and suggest how anesthesiologists can continue the practice after residency.

  8. Pediatric Anesthesiology Fellows' Perception of Quality of Attending Supervision and Medical Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzon, Hubert A; Hajduk, John; De Oliveira, Gildasio; Suresh, Santhanam; Nizamuddin, Sarah L; McCarthy, Robert; Jagannathan, Narasimhan

    2018-02-01

    Appropriate supervision has been shown to reduce medical errors in anesthesiology residents and other trainees across various specialties. Nonetheless, supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellows has yet to be evaluated. The main objective of this survey investigation was to evaluate supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellows in the United States. We hypothesized that there was an indirect association between perceived quality of faculty supervision of pediatric anesthesiology fellow trainees and the frequency of medical errors reported. A survey of pediatric fellows from 53 pediatric anesthesiology fellowship programs in the United States was performed. The primary outcome was the frequency of self-reported errors by fellows, and the primary independent variable was supervision scores. Questions also assessed barriers for effective faculty supervision. One hundred seventy-six pediatric anesthesiology fellows were invited to participate, and 104 (59%) responded to the survey. Nine of 103 (9%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 4%-16%) respondents reported performing procedures, on >1 occasion, for which they were not properly trained for. Thirteen of 101 (13%, 95% CI, 7%-21%) reported making >1 mistake with negative consequence to patients, and 23 of 104 (22%, 95% CI, 15%-31%) reported >1 medication error in the last year. There were no differences in median (interquartile range) supervision scores between fellows who reported >1 medication error compared to those reporting ≤1 errors (3.4 [3.0-3.7] vs 3.4 [3.1-3.7]; median difference, 0; 99% CI, -0.3 to 0.3; P = .96). Similarly, there were no differences in those who reported >1 mistake with negative patient consequences, 3.3 (3.0-3.7), compared with those who did not report mistakes with negative patient consequences (3.4 [3.3-3.7]; median difference, 0.1; 99% CI, -0.2 to 0.6; P = .35). We detected a high rate of self-reported medication errors in pediatric anesthesiology fellows in the United States

  9. China's Contribution to Anesthesiology Research: A 10-Year Survey of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guohao; Zhang, Kai; Wood, Chris; Hoeft, Andreas; Liu, Jin; Fang, Xiangming

    2016-05-01

    Anesthesiology has advanced in China over the past decade. We compared the trends in publication of anesthesiology articles from China between 2005 and 2014 with the trends in 5 developed countries. We included all journals listed in the ''Anesthesiology'' category of Journal Citation Reports. Anesthesiology-related publications from 2005 to 2014 were retrieved from the PubMed and Web of Knowledge online databases. The total number of articles, publication type categories, number of citations, and citation rate (number of citations/years since publication) were analyzed. The sample size was the n = 10 years for all confidence intervals and P values. We additionally evaluated the total number of articles published in the 10 top-ranking journals. From 2005 to 2014, 41,344 articles were published in anesthesiology journals. Of these, 3.07% were contributed by authors from Chinese institutions. Although this contribution was less than the Unites States, Great Britain, Germany, France, or Japan, publications from Chinese institutions grew at an annual rate of 13% (95% confidence interval: 3.08%-23.38%, P reports than clinical investigations. China ranked before Great Britain (221 articles) and France (245 articles) in basic research, with 448 basic researches publications during the study period. The articles from China averaged 2.24 citations per year, comparable to the articles from the United States (2.71, P = 0.545), Great Britain (2.57, P = 0.999), Germany (2.35, P = 0.999), France (1.50, P = 0.520), and Japan (1.24, P = 0.065). In the 10 highest impact anesthesiology journals, China published 780 articles during the decade. The 3 journals with the most publications from Chinese institutions were Anesthesia & Analgesia, Anesthesiology, and Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica. In the studied decade, anesthesiology research published by Chinese institutions lagged behind publications from developed countries. There was a steady increase in the number of articles

  10. Anesthesiology Journal club assessment by means of semantic changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Edson Vieira

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: the interactive approach of a journal club has been described in the medical education literature. The aim of this investigation is to present an assessment of journal club as a tool to address the question whether residents read more and critically. METHODS: this study reports the performance of medical residents in anesthesiology from the Clinics Hospital - University of São Paulo Medical School. All medical residents were invited to answer five questions derived from discussed papers. The answer sheet consisted of an affirmative statement with a Likert type scale (totally disagree-disagree-not sure-agree-totally agree, each related to one of the chosen articles. The results were evaluated by means of item analysis - difficulty index and discrimination power. RESULTS: residents filled one hundred and seventy three evaluations in the months of December 2011 (n = 51, July 2012 (n = 66 and December 2012 (n = 56. The first exam presented all items with straight statement, second and third exams presented mixed items. Separating "totally agree" from "agree" increased the difficulty indices, but did not improve the discrimination power. CONCLUSIONS: the use of a journal club assessment with straight and inverted statements and by means of five points scale for agreement has been shown to increase its item difficulty and discrimination power. This may reflect involvement either with the reading or the discussion during the journal meeting.

  11. Anesthesiology Journal club assessment by means of semantic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Joaquim Edson; Torres, Marcelo Luís Abramides; Pose, Regina Albanese; Auler, José Otávio Costa Junior

    2014-01-01

    the interactive approach of a journal club has been described in the medical education literature. The aim of this investigation is to present an assessment of journal club as a tool to address the question whether residents read more and critically. this study reports the performance of medical residents in anesthesiology from the Clinics Hospital - University of São Paulo Medical School. All medical residents were invited to answer five questions derived from discussed papers. The answer sheet consisted of an affirmative statement with a Likert type scale (totally disagree-disagree-not sure-agree-totally agree), each related to one of the chosen articles. The results were evaluated by means of item analysis - difficulty index and discrimination power. residents filled one hundred and seventy three evaluations in the months of December 2011 (n=51), July 2012 (n=66) and December 2012 (n=56). The first exam presented all items with straight statement, second and third exams presented mixed items. Separating "totally agree" from "agree" increased the difficulty indices, but did not improve the discrimination power. the use of a journal club assessment with straight and inverted statements and by means of five points scale for agreement has been shown to increase its item difficulty and discrimination power. This may reflect involvement either with the reading or the discussion during the journal meeting. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Incidence and Factors Associated with Burnout in Anesthesiology: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Noto, Alberto; Foresta, Grazia; Santonocito, Cristina; Palumbo, Gaetano J; Arcadipane, Antonio; Maybauer, Dirk M; Maybauer, Marc O

    2017-01-01

    Burnout syndrome has reached epidemic levels among physicians (reported around 50%). Anesthesiology is among the most stressful medical disciplines but there is paucity of literature as compared with others. Analysis of burnout is essential because it is associated with safety and quality of care. We summarize evidence on burnout in anesthesiology. We conducted a systematic review (MEDLINE up to 30.06.2017). We included studies reporting burnout in anesthesiology with no restriction on role or screening test used. Fifteen surveys/studies described burnout in anesthesiology, including different workers profiles (nurses, residents, consultants, and directors). All studies used the Maslach Burnout Inventory test but with significant differences for risk stratification. Burnout prevalence greatly varied across studies (10%-41% high risk, up to 59% at least moderate risk). Factors most consistently associated with burnout were strained working pattern, working as younger consultant, and having children. There was no consistent relationship between burnout and hospital characteristics, gender, or marital status. Burnout prevalence among anesthesiologists is relatively high across career stages, and some risk factors are reported frequently. However, the small number of studies as well as the large differences in their methodology and in reporting approach warrants further research in this field.

  13. Incidence and Factors Associated with Burnout in Anesthesiology: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Noto, Alberto; Foresta, Grazia; Santonocito, Cristina; Palumbo, Gaetano J.; Arcadipane, Antonio; Maybauer, Dirk M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Burnout syndrome has reached epidemic levels among physicians (reported around 50%). Anesthesiology is among the most stressful medical disciplines but there is paucity of literature as compared with others. Analysis of burnout is essential because it is associated with safety and quality of care. We summarize evidence on burnout in anesthesiology. Methods We conducted a systematic review (MEDLINE up to 30.06.2017). We included studies reporting burnout in anesthesiology with no restriction on role or screening test used. Results Fifteen surveys/studies described burnout in anesthesiology, including different workers profiles (nurses, residents, consultants, and directors). All studies used the Maslach Burnout Inventory test but with significant differences for risk stratification. Burnout prevalence greatly varied across studies (10%–41% high risk, up to 59% at least moderate risk). Factors most consistently associated with burnout were strained working pattern, working as younger consultant, and having children. There was no consistent relationship between burnout and hospital characteristics, gender, or marital status. Conclusions Burnout prevalence among anesthesiologists is relatively high across career stages, and some risk factors are reported frequently. However, the small number of studies as well as the large differences in their methodology and in reporting approach warrants further research in this field. PMID:29318155

  14. Incidence and Factors Associated with Burnout in Anesthesiology: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Sanfilippo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Burnout syndrome has reached epidemic levels among physicians (reported around 50%. Anesthesiology is among the most stressful medical disciplines but there is paucity of literature as compared with others. Analysis of burnout is essential because it is associated with safety and quality of care. We summarize evidence on burnout in anesthesiology. Methods. We conducted a systematic review (MEDLINE up to 30.06.2017. We included studies reporting burnout in anesthesiology with no restriction on role or screening test used. Results. Fifteen surveys/studies described burnout in anesthesiology, including different workers profiles (nurses, residents, consultants, and directors. All studies used the Maslach Burnout Inventory test but with significant differences for risk stratification. Burnout prevalence greatly varied across studies (10%–41% high risk, up to 59% at least moderate risk. Factors most consistently associated with burnout were strained working pattern, working as younger consultant, and having children. There was no consistent relationship between burnout and hospital characteristics, gender, or marital status. Conclusions. Burnout prevalence among anesthesiologists is relatively high across career stages, and some risk factors are reported frequently. However, the small number of studies as well as the large differences in their methodology and in reporting approach warrants further research in this field.

  15. Summer anesthesiology externship: Demonstrating the ability of early clinical involvement to educate and increase specialty interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kevin S; Cormican, Daniel; Seidman, Peggy A

    2012-01-01

    We describe the influence of a 6-week "Summer Anesthesiology Externship" featuring didactic, procedure, and simulation education on formation of medical students' specialty choice. Eighteen months after externship completion, externs were sent a questionnaire with Likert scale agreement ratings of subspecialties/simulations and yes/no questions about student career interests before/after the program, stipend importance, and procedural skill performance during/after the program. General anesthesiology had the highest subspecialty approval rating (9.0). Externs strongly agreed that simulations successfully progressed at first year student understanding levels (9.2 mean agreement rating), increased confidence in being part of a care team (9.4 mean agreement rating), and provided personal/interpersonal development. Externs unanimously agreed that the program introduced them to the breadth of anesthesiology, and that practicing clinical/procedural skills improved confidence when performing the procedures later in medical school. Four of 14 students applied for the externship with some focus on anesthesiology as a career choice. After the externship, a significantly higher number of students (12 of 14) were strongly considering applying to the field (ptype of setting. Furthermore, knowledge acquired during the workshop was retained when CA1 residents were re-tested one year after the workshop. The ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia workshop will become part of the didactic series for our CA1 residents and will be a required learning activity. Additional work still needs to be done to find out the best way to test knowledge and skill outcomes in residents learning new technology and techniques.

  16. Atitudes atuais de anestesiologistas e médicos em especialização com relação à anestesia venosa total Actitudes actuales de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización con relación a la anestesia venosa total Current attitude of anesthesiologists and anesthesiology residents regarding total intravenous anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Squeff Nora

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available JUSTIFICATIVA E OBJETIVOS: No passado, tempo, custos, informações, treinamento e avaliação da profundidade da anestesia limitavam a aceitação da anestesia venosa total (TIVA. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar atitudes de anestesiologistas e médicos em especialização com relação à anestesia venosa total. MÉTODO: Um questionário foi enviado a 150 anestesiologistas e 102 residentes. A concordância (C e discordância (D em cada item foram comparadas por testes z (consenso, se p JUSTIFICATIVA Y OBJETIVOS: Antiguamente, tiempo, costes, informaciones, capacitación y evaluación de la profundidad de la anestesia limitaban la aceptación de la anestesia venosa total (TIVA. El objetivo de este estudio fue el de determinar las actitudes de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización con relación a la anestesia venosa total. MÉTODO: Un cuestionario fue enviado a 150 anestesiólogos y 102 residentes. La concordancia (C y discordancia (D en cada ítem se compararon por pruebas z (consenso, si p BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In the past, time, cost, information, training, and the evaluation of the plane of anesthesia limited the acceptance of total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA. The objective of this study was to determine the attitude of anesthesiologists and other anesthesiology residents regarding total intravenous anesthesia. METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to 150 anesthesiologists and 102 residents. The concordance (C and disaccord (D of each item were compared by z tests (consensus if p < 0.05. RESULTS: There were 98 responses. The data represent the number of answers for each category. The majority of the participants agreed that the quality of the awakening stimulates the use of the TIVA (C/D = 86/8; p < 0.05; that the future depends on the development of drugs with a fast onset of action and immediate recovery (C/D = 88/5; p < 0.05; that they would like to use TIVA more often (C/D = 72/21; p < 0.05; and to have more information

  17. Anesthesiological ethics: can informed consent be implied?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spike, Jeffrey R

    2012-01-01

    Surgical ethics is a well-recognized field in clinical ethics, distinct from medical ethics. It includes at least a dozen important issues common to surgery that do not exist in internal medicine simply because of the differences in their practices. But until now there has been a tendency to include ethical issues of anesthesiology as a part of surgical ethics. This may mask the importance of ethical issues in anesthesiology, and even help perpetuate an unfortunate view that surgeons are "captain of the ship" in the operating theater (leaving anesthesiologists in a subservient role). We will have a better ethical understanding if we see surgery and anesthesia as two equal partners, ethically as well as in terms of patient care. Informed consent is one such issue, but it is not limited to that. Even on the topic of what type of anesthesia to use, anesthesiologists have often felt subsumed to the surgeon's preferences. This commentary takes the case study and uses it as a exemplar for this very claim: it is time to give due recognition for a new field in clinical ethics, ethics in anesthesia.

  18. How Social Media is Changing the Practice of Regional Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Eric S; Chu, Larry F; Gupta, Rajnish K; Mariano, Edward R

    2017-06-01

    This review summarizes the current applications of social media in regional anesthesiology, describes ways that specific platforms may promote growth, and briefly discusses limitations and future directions. Although Facebook users outnumber Twitter users, the latter has been better studied in regional anesthesiology and may have the advantages of speed and expansion of reach. Highly tweeted publications are more likely to be cited in the medical literature, and twitter-enhanced journal clubs facilitate communication regarding important articles with international colleagues. In both the United States and internationally, Twitter has been shown to enhance the anesthesiology conference experience, changing communication among attendees and non-attendees. YouTube and podcasts are quickly finding a niche in regional anesthesiology for just-in-time training and continuing professional development. Social media use is rapidly growing in regional anesthesiology, and benefits include global interaction and knowledge translation within the specialty and with the general public.

  19. The impact of new-generation physicians on the function of academic anesthesiology departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, Patricia A

    2007-12-01

    Academic departments of anesthesiology have had to adapt a wide variety of clinical and educational work functions to the viewpoints, values and normative expectations of the newer generations of physicians who now present themselves for training as well as for faculty employment. This commentary will elaborate on key points that academic departments must recognize and incorporate into their functional and organizational imperatives in order to remain successful with regard to physician recruitment and retention. Recognition of differences between newer-generation vs. established physician issues and concerns include differences in: learning style, teaching style, approach to clinical schedules and the concept of life-work balance, academic and personal motivation, desire for control of their work experience, effective productivity incentives, as well as communication style issues and implications thereof. The spectrum of physicians who contribute to the impact of these factors on contemporary academic anesthesiology departments include faculty, nonfaculty staff physicians, residents and medical students. Academic departments of anesthesiology which can successfully incorporate the changes and most importantly the functional and organizational flexibility needed to respond to the newer generations' worldview and so-called balanced goals will be able to best attract high-caliber housestaff and future faculty.

  20. Localised residency and inter-annual fidelity to coastal foraging areas may place sea bass at risk to local depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Thomas K; Haberlin, Damien; Clohessy, Jim; Bennison, Ashley; Jessopp, Mark

    2017-04-04

    For many marine migratory fish, comparatively little is known about the movement of individuals rather than the population. Yet, such individual-based movement data is vitally important to understand variability in migratory strategies and fidelity to foraging locations. A case in point is the economically important European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) that inhabits coastal waters during the summer months before migrating offshore to spawn and overwinter. Beyond this broad generalisation we have very limited information on the movements of individuals at coastal foraging grounds. We used acoustic telemetry to track the summer movements and seasonal migrations of individual sea bass in a large tidally and estuarine influenced coastal environment. We found that the vast majority of tagged sea bass displayed long-term residency (mean, 167 days) and inter-annual fidelity (93% return rate) to specific areas. We describe individual fish home ranges of 3 km or less, and while fish clearly had core resident areas, there was movement of fish between closely located receivers. The combination of inter-annual fidelity to localised foraging areas makes sea bass very susceptible to local depletion; however, the designation of protected areas for sea bass may go a long way to ensuring the sustainability of this species.

  1. [Anesthesiological management of patients with an acute abdomen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Samir G; Wappler, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Patients with an acute abdomen present with marked deterioration in physiological and pathophysiological conditions, which make general anesthesia to a challenging but also potentially dangerous procedure. A broad and fundamental knowledge of the pathophysiologically involved mechanisms of cardiovascular functions during anesthesia and appropriate anesthesiological approach are crucial for a successful peri-operative management. The anesthesiologist's goal is to perform adequate anesthesia while maintaining cardiovascular stability. Monitoring and management of acid-base-status as well as cardiovascular functions are required to maintain sufficient tissue oxygenation during anesthesia. The postoperative anesthesiological management may also crucially influence the further course and therefore should be considered in the anesthesiological planning. Finally, adequate pain management in all these patients is an important and not to underestimate part in the treatment. This article gives an overview on the major aspects in the different fields in the anesthesiological management of patients with an acute abdomen.

  2. Using cognitive modeling for requirements engineering in anesthesiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pott, C; le Feber, J

    2005-01-01

    Cognitive modeling is a complexity reducing method to describe significant cognitive processes under a specified research focus. Here, a cognitive process model for decision making in anesthesiology is presented and applied in requirements engineering. Three decision making situations of

  3. Annual Hematocrit Profiles in Two Subspecies of White-Crowned Sparrow: A Migrant and a Resident Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jesse S; Németh, Zoltán; Pérez, Jonathan H; Chmura, Helen E; Ramenofsky, Marilyn; Wingfield, John C

    2016-01-01

    Hematocrit is an easily measured parameter that can be used to assess changes in oxygen carrying capacity necessitated by fluctuations in metabolic demands. Most hematocrit studies draw conclusions from changes in hematocrit that occur over a small sampling interval without an understanding of the variation that exists across the annual cycle. White-crowned sparrows provide an excellent model system due to the existence of a resident subspecies (Zonotrichia leucophrys nuttalli) that serves as a natural control for a migrant subspecies (Zonotrichia leucophrys gambelii). Comparing these two subspecies allows for the investigation of adaptive physiological changes at each life-history stage (i.e., migration, breeding, molt, etc.) in response to changing metabolic demands. Of particular interest, this subspecies comparison, by both calendar month and life-history stage, allows for the separation of adaptive increases in hematocrit due to migration from the natural seasonal variation in hematocrit. Hematocrit levels for males and females ranged throughout the year between 42%-47% and 40%-47% in the resident and between 45%-58% and 45%-56% in the migrant. In both subspecies, hematocrit levels were elevated during the breeding season compared to the nonbreeding season, and levels were reduced in females during egg laying. When grouped by life-history stage, hematocrit levels were always higher in the migrant compared to the resident. During the months in which migration occurred, hematocrit levels were 10%-12% higher in the migrant compared to the resident subspecies. These data suggest differential regulation of hematocrit between the two subspecies that may be attributed to phenotypic plasticity or genetic differences.

  4. Kalispel Resident Fish Project- Kalispel Tribal Hatchery Operations and Maintenance, 1997 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalispel Tribe, Department of Natural Resources

    1998-01-01

    In 1996, construction activities commenced on a largemouth bass hatchery located on the Kalispel Indian Reservation. The major construction activities were complete as of October 1997. Of the six objectives identified in the 1997 Annual Operating Plan two objectives were fully achieved: the assembly of the life support system, and the preparation of the hatchery Operations and Maintenance Manual. The remaining four objectives were not fully achieved due to the hatchery not being completed before the spawning season (spring).

  5. Job burnout in 159 anesthesiology trainees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesim Cokay Abut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Anesthesiology may be stressful and most anesthesiologists develop mechanisms for coping. However, inexperienced trainee anesthesiologists seem to be vulnerable. We studied stress perception and job burnout in trainee anesthesiologists. Methods: Responses to perceived stress scale (PSS and Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI were evaluated in 159 trainee anesthesiologists. Results: In our results, when perceived stress was increased, emotional exhaustion and depersonalization increased but personal accomplishment decreased, as expected. Perceived stress was very high in the early years of training. There was a negative correlation between age and emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, but positive correlation with personal accomplishment. Female anesthesiologists had higher personal accomplishment, but lower depersonalization points than male anesthesiologists in our study. There was no statistical association between marital status, PSS, and MBI; ≥2 children group had a significant high personal accomplishment but low depersonalization and emotional exhaustion scores. Line regression analysis showed a statistically significant relationship between PSS and emotional exhaustion and between age and depersonalization. Conclusions: Social factors such as gender and number of children affect the work life of our trainees.

  6. Bases teóricas para a implementação do aprendizado orientado por problemas na residência médica em anestesiologia Bases teóricas para la implementación del aprendizaje orientado por problemas en la práctica médica en anestesiología Theoretical basis for the implementation of problem-oriented learning in anesthesiology residency programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getúlio Rodrigues de Oliveira Filho

    2003-04-01

    higher level of students and professors satisfaction, a wider source of queries and search for knowledge and more time spent with individual learning. Since the method has no disadvantages as compared to traditional methods, it could be considered a valid alternative for teaching Anesthesiology in Medical Residency Programs.

  7. Kalispel (i.e. Kalispell) resident fish project; annual report, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    In 1997 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) continued the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat enhancement measures, as outlined in the recommendations from the 1996 annual report, were conducted during field season 1997. Fencing and planting of riparian areas and instream structures were implemented. As a precursor to these enhancement efforts, pre-assessments were conducted to determine the affects of the enhancement. Habitat quality, stream morphology and fish populations were pre-assessed. This season also began the first year of post-assessment monitoring and evaluation of measures implemented during 1996. The largemouth bass hatchery construction was completed in October and the first bass were introduced to the facility that same month. The first round of production is scheduled for 1998

  8. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2000 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, Jr., Neil [Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA (United States); McLellan, Jason G [Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA (United States); Crossley, Brian [Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA (United States); O' Connor, Dick

    2001-01-01

    The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, commonly known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (blocked area). The three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the blocked area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information housed in a central location will allow managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP (NWPPC program measure 10.8B.26) is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the blocked area and the Columbia Basin blocked area management plan (1998). The initial year of the project (1997) identified the need for a central data storage and analysis facility, coordination with the StreamNet project, compilation of blocked area fisheries information, and a report on the ecological condition of the Spokane River System. These needs were addressed in 1998 by acquiring a central location with a data storage and analysis system, coordinating a pilot project with StreamNet, compiling fisheries distribution data throughout the blocked area, identifying data gaps based on compiled information, and researching the ecological condition of the Spokane River. In order to ensure that any additional information collected throughout the life of this project will be easily stored and manipulated by the central storage facility, it was necessary to develop standardized methodologies between the JSAP fisheries managers. The use of common collection and analytical tools is essential to the process of streamlining joint management decisions. In 1999 and 2000 the project

  9. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Department of Natural Resources, Wellpinit, WA)

    2003-09-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area

  10. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2001 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispell Department of Natural Resources, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Spokane, WA); O' Connor, Dick (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA)

    2003-01-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC). The NPPC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPPC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial fish assemblages and native fish in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area and the Columbia Basin Blocked Area Management Plan

  11. Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2006-02-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  12. Resident Fish Stock above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams; 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Connor, Jason M. (Kalispel Tribe of Indians, Usk, WA); McLellan, Jason G. (Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, WA); Butler, Chris (Spokane Tribe of Indians, Wellpinit, WA)

    2005-11-01

    In 1980, the United States Congress enacted the Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act (PL 96-501, 1980), which established the Northwest Power and Conservation Council (NPCC), formerly the Northwest Power Planning Council. The NPCC was directed by Congress to develop a regional Power Plan and also the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (FWP) to restore or replace losses of fish caused by construction and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin. In developing the FWP, Congress specifically directed NPCC to solicit recommendations for measures to be included in the Program from the region's fish and wildlife agencies and Indian tribes. All measures adopted by the Council were also required to be consistent with the management objectives of the agencies and tribes [Section 4.(h)(6)(A)], the legal rights of Indian tribes in the region [Section 4.(h)(6)(D)] and be based upon and supported by the best available scientific knowledge [Section 4.(h)(6)(B)]. The Resident Fish Stock Status above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams Project, also known as the Joint Stock Assessment Project (JSAP) specifically addresses NPPC Council measure 10.8B.26 of the 1994 program. The Joint Stock Assessment Project is a management tool using ecosystem principles to manage artificial and native fish assemblages in altered environments existing in the Columbia River System above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams (Blocked Area). A three-phase approach of this project will enhance the fisheries resources of the Blocked Area by identifying data gaps, filling data gaps with research, and implementing management recommendations based on research results. The Blocked Area fisheries information is housed in a central location, allowing managers to view the entire system while making decisions, rather than basing management decisions on isolated portions of the system. The JSAP is designed and guided jointly by fisheries managers in the Blocked Area. The

  13. Systematic reviews of anesthesiologic interventions reported as statistically significant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imberger, Georgina; Gluud, Christian; Boylan, John

    2015-01-01

    : From 11,870 titles, we found 682 systematic reviews that investigated anesthesiologic interventions. In the 50 sampled meta-analyses, the median number of trials included was 8 (interquartile range [IQR], 5-14), the median number of participants was 964 (IQR, 523-1736), and the median number...

  14. The Resident Academic Project Program: A Structured Approach to Inspiring Academic Development During Residency Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Jill; Vaida, Sonia J; Bezinover, Dmitri; McCloskey, Diane E; Mets, Berend

    2016-02-15

    We report the successful implementation of structured resident academic projects in our Department of Anesthesiology at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center. Beginning with the graduating class of 2010, we adopted an expectation that each resident complete a project that results in a manuscript of publishable quality. Defining a clear timeline for all steps in the project and providing research education, as well as the necessary infrastructure and ongoing support, has helped grow the academic productivity of our anesthesia residents.

  15. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology: a way forward with the European Board and the European Society of Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrini, F; Solca, M; De Robertis, E; Peduto, V A; Pasetto, A; Conti, G; Antonelli, M; Pelosi, P

    2010-11-01

    Anesthesiology, which includes anaesthesia, perioperative care, intensive care medicine, emergency medicine and pain therapy, is acknowledged as the leading medical specialty in addressing issues of patient safety, but there is still a long way to go. Several factors pose hazards in Anesthesiology, like increasingly older and sicker patients, more complex surgical interventions, more pressure on throughput, as well as new drugs and devices. To better design educational and research strategies to improve patient safety, the European Board of Anesthesiology (EBA) and the European Society of Anesthesiology (ESA) have produced a blueprint for patient safety in Anesthesiology. This document, to be known as the Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology, was endorsed together with the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Federation of Societies of Anesthesiologists (WFSA), and the European Patients' Federation (EPF) at the Euroanaesthesia meeting in Helsinki in June 2010. It was signed by several Presidents of National Anesthesiology Societies as well as other stakeholders. The Helsinki Declaration on Patient Safety in Anesthesiology represents a shared European view of what is necessary to improve patient safety, recommending practical steps that all anesthesiologists can include in their own clinical practice. The Italian Society of Anaesthesia, Analgesia, Reanimation and Intensive Care (SIAARTI) is looking forward to continuing work on "patient safety" issues in Europe, and to cooperating with the ESA in the best interest of European patients.

  16. Assessment of annual intake of thorium from animal origin food consumed by population residing in monazite rich area of southern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathyapriya, R.S.; Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai; Prabhath, R.K.; Rao, D.D.; Acharya, R.

    2017-01-01

    Thorium ( 232 Th) concentration was determined by Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) in animal origin food groups widely consumed by population residing in monazite rich area of Tamil Nadu, India. The annual intake was evaluated based on market basket study method for female and male population for different age groups. Annual committed effective dose due to 232 Th intake from the ingestion was evaluated for different age groups of individuals, using the ICRP ingestion dose coefficients and annual consumption rate obtained from National Nutrition Monitoring Bureau (NNMB). Annual intake values of 232 Th for adult members of the population were obtained from food items as, fish from 0.2 to 0.8; flesh food (meat, beef and chicken), from 0.03 to 0.12; and milk from 0.2 to 0.3 Bq year -1 . The total annual internal dose resulting from ingestion of radioisotope in these food groups was 0.2 µSv year -1 for male adult population. (author)

  17. Simulação de bloqueios periféricos guiados por ultra-som: curva de aprendizado dos residentes de anestesiologia do CET-SMA/HSL Simulacro de bloqueos periféricos guiados por ultrasonido: curva de aprendizaje de los residentes de anestesiología del CET-SMA/HSL Simulation of ultrasound-guided peripheral nerve block: learning curve of CET-SMA/HSL anesthesiology residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Bonifácio Baranauskas

    2008-04-01

    por ultrasonido a través de modelo experimental de gelatina. MÉTODO: Fue desarrollado un modelo experimental con un recipiente lleno de gelatina y aceituna sumergida. Nueve residentes se distribuyeron aleatoriamente en tres grupos (G1, G2, G3 compuestos cada uno, por un R1, un R2 y un R3. Los tres grupos recibieron una explicación teórica. El G1 recibió dos horas de entrenamiento práctico, el G2 una hora y el G3 no fue entrenado. Acto seguido, se les solicitó a los participantes que pusiesen la aguja en el punto medio de la pared de la aceituna, cerca del transductor y reposicionar la aguja entre la aceituna y el fondo del recipiente, simulando la inyección perineural del anestésico. Se evaluaron la velocidad y la eficacia de las tareas, además de las fallas técnicas. RESULTADOS: El G1 presentó un promedio de tiempo para la realización de las tareas de 37,63 segundos, sin fallas técnicas; en el G2 se observó un promedio de 64,40 segundos, ocurriendo dos fallas técnicas y el G3 presentó un promedio de 93,83 segundos, con doce fallas técnicas. CONCLUSIONES: El estudio permite concluir que el mayor tiempo de entrenamiento en un modelo experimental de bloqueos periféricos guiados por ultrasonido mejoró la curva de aprendizaje en el simulacro de la técnica.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The use of ultrasound imaging in peripheral nerve block has been increasing. However, there are few reports in the literature on the learning curve of the ultrasound technique. The objective of this report was to evaluate the learning curve of CET-SMA/HSL Anesthesiology residents of ultrasound-guided peripheral block using an experimental agar model. METHODS: An experimental model was developed by filling a bowl with agar and olives. Nine residents were randomly divided in three groups (G1, G2, and G3, each one with a R1, a R2, and a R3. All three groups received theoretical explanation. G1 also had two hours of practical training, G2 had one hour, and G3 had no training

  18. Patient Simulation: A Literary Synthesis of Assessment Tools in Anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alice A. Edler

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available High-fidelity patient simulation (HFPS has been hypothesized as a modality for assessing competency of knowledge and skill in patient simulation, but uniform methods for HFPS performance assessment (PA have not yet been completely achieved. Anesthesiology as a field founded the HFPS discipline and also leads in its PA. This project reviews the types, quality, and designated purpose of HFPS PA tools in anesthesiology. We used the systematic review method and systematically reviewed anesthesiology literature referenced in PubMed to assess the quality and reliability of available PA tools in HFPS. Of 412 articles identified, 50 met our inclusion criteria. Seventy seven percent of studies have been published since 2000; more recent studies demonstrated higher quality. Investigators reported a variety of test construction and validation methods. The most commonly reported test construction methods included “modified Delphi Techniques” for item selection, reliability measurement using inter-rater agreement, and intra-class correlations between test items or subtests. Modern test theory, in particular generalizability theory, was used in nine (18% of studies. Test score validity has been addressed in multiple investigations and shown a significant improvement in reporting accuracy. However the assessment of predicative has been low across the majority of studies. Usability and practicality of testing occasions and tools was only anecdotally reported. To more completely comply with the gold standards for PA design, both shared experience of experts and recognition of test construction standards, including reliability and validity measurements, instrument piloting, rater training, and explicit identification of the purpose and proposed use of the assessment tool, are required.

  19. Program Director as Webmaster? Analysis of 131 Anesthesiology Department Web Sites and Program Director Web Site Involvement and Opinion Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshpayeh, Negin; Lee, Howard; Berger, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The last formal review of academic anesthesiology department Web sites (ADWs) for content was conducted in 2009. ADWs have been rated as very important by medical students in researching residency training programs; however, the rapid evolution of sites require that descriptive statistics must be more current to be considered reliable. We set out to provide an updated overview of ADW content and to better understand residency program directors' (PD) role and comfort with ADWs. Two independent reviewers (ND and HL) analyzed all 131 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) accredited ADWs. A binary system (Yes/No) was used to determine which features were present. Reviewer reliability was confirmed with inter-rater reliability and percentage agreement calculation. Additionally, a blinded electronic survey (Survey Monkey, Portland, OR) was sent to anesthesiology residency PDs via electronic mail investigating the audiences for ADWs, the frequency of updates and the degree of PD involvement. 13% of anesthesiology departments still lack a Web site with a homepage with links to the residency program and educational offerings (18% in 2009). Only half (55%) of Web sites contain information for medical students, including clerkship information. Furthermore, programs rarely contain up-to-date calendars (13%), accreditation cycle lengths (11%), accreditation dates (7%) or board pass rates (6%). The PD survey, completed by 42 of 131 PDs, noted a correlation (r = 0.36) between the number of years as PD and the frequency of Web site updates - less experienced PDs appear to update their sites more frequently (p = 0.03). Although 86% of PDs regarded a Web site as "very" important in recruitment, only 9% felt "very" comfortable with the skills required to advertise and market a Web site. Despite the overall increase in ADW content since 2009, privacy concerns, limited resources and time constraints may prevent PDs from providing the most up-to-date Web sites for

  20. Hundreds of Area Residents Visit the National Lab Booth at the Annual In The Street Festival | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light-up yo-yos, brightly colored portion plates, and a fast spinner game lured hundreds of area residents to the Frederick National Lab booth at this year’s In The Street festival, where they also heard a message from the lab: Stay healthy through healthy habits.

  1. Fifty years of the American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Anesthesiology: a history of our specialty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Rita; Riefe, Jennifer; Houck, Constance S

    2017-06-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics Section on Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine celebrated its 50th Anniversary in 2015. The Section was one of the first and only subspecialty organizations in anesthesiology at the time. This special article will focus on the contributions of the Section to the practice of pediatric anesthesiology in the areas of advocacy, education and member contributions. In 1986, the Section created the Robert M. Smith Award to honor those members who had made significant advances in the practice of pediatric anesthesiology. It is named after one of the Section founders, an influential educator, inventor, and researcher in our field. We will focus the latter part of the article on the Robert M. Smith award winners to illustrate the contributions of the Section and its members to the development of the field of pediatric anesthesiology. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Idaho Water Rental Pilot Project probability/coordination study resident fish and wildlife impacts. Phase 3. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leitzinger, E.

    1997-12-01

    Phase 3 began in 1995 with the overall goal of quantifying changes in resident fish habitat in the Snake River Basin upstream of Brownlee Reservoir resulting from the release of salmon flow augmentation water. Existing data, in the form of weighted usable area versus flow relationships, were used to estimate habitat changes for white sturgeon (Acipenser transinontanus) and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in the Snake River between C.J. Strike Dam and Brownlee pool. The increased flows resulted in increased habitat for adult and juvenile white sturgeon and adult rainbow trout. But, the flows have failed to meet mean monthly flow recommendations for the past three years despite the addition of the flow augmentation releases. It is unlikely that the flow augmentation releases have had any significant long-term benefit for sturgeon and rainbow trout in the Snake River. Flow augmentation releases from the Boise and Payette rivers have in some years helped to meet or exceed minimum flow recommendations in these tributaries. The minimum flows would not have been reached without the flow augmentation releases. But, in some instances, the timing of the releases need to be adjusted in order to maximize benefits to resident fishes in the Boise and Payette rivers

  3. Developing a specialty: J.S. Lundy's three major contributions to anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Terry A; Narr, Bradly J; Bacon, Douglas R

    2004-05-01

    John S. Lundy was able to accomplish three major goals during the early years of his stewardship of the section on anesthesia of the Mayo Clinic. In 1925, Lundy established the first anatomy lab at the Mayo Clinic. He believed that the lab would serve as a useful tool for teaching residents as well as research into regional anesthetic techniques. Second, Lundy desired to advance the science of anesthesiology. Lundy developed the concept of balanced anesthesia, pioneered the introduction of barbiturates to the practice of anesthesia, developed anesthesia section services for the use of ventilators, ventilator vests, oxygen tents, and nasal oxygen supplementation. Lastly, in 1935, he established the nation's first blood bank. Lundy and Ralph Tovell had the opportunity to do pioneering work in transfusion medicine, which led to an improvement in the quality of service, and patient safety. These three major accomplishments provided Lundy with abundant scientific material to present to the American Medical Association (AMA) in Chicago. These trips to Chicago allowed him to gain the ear of Olin West, Morris Fishbien, and James E. Pallin. Lundy was able to successfully lobby in 1939 for the creation of a section of anesthesia within the AMA. In 1940, Lundy's dream came true with the recognition of anesthesia as a specialty by the AMA.

  4. Using the Affective Domain to Enhance Teaching of the ACGME Competencies in Anesthesiology Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanofsky, Samuel D; Nyquist, Julie G

    2010-01-01

    Teaching and assessing the advanced competencies will continue to be a challenge. Incorporating new and nontraditional skills into an already complex and challenging clinical curriculum and practice is not easy. This makes development of methods for curricular design, teaching and assessment of anesthesiology resident and fellow performance essential. The Domains of learning, particularly the Affective Domain can serve as an organizing structure for developing objectives and selecting teaching and assessment techniques. Using the Affective Domain to select targeted teaching techniques might help foster development of key beliefs and values that underlie the advanced competencies (and sub-competencies). Targeted teaching, outside of the patient care arena, when combined with traditional clinical teaching practices, may help to ensure continued performance of desired behaviors. These include acting in a consultative role for other health professionals (ICS), providing culturally responsive care (Professionalism), using evidence to enhance the care of patients (PBLI), and advocating for quality of care and working to enhance patient safety (SBP). As educators, our aim is not only to impact knowledge, attitudes and skills, but to impact the daily behavior of our graduates.

  5. Encouraging Reflexivity in a Residency Leadership Development Program: Expanding Outside the Competency Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clapp, Justin T; Gordon, Emily K B; Baranov, Dimitry Y; Trey, Beulah; Tilin, Felice J; Fleisher, Lee A

    2018-02-01

    While leadership development is increasingly a goal of academic medicine, it is typically framed as competency acquisition, which can limit its focus to a circumscribed set of social behaviors. This orientation may also reinforce the cultural characteristics of academic medicine that can make effective leadership difficult, rather than training leaders capable of examining and changing this culture. Expanding leadership development so it promotes social reflexivity presents a way to bolster some of the weaknesses of the competency paradigm. In 2013-2016, the University of Penn sylvania's Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care (DACC) carried out a leadership development program for residents, which included seminars focused on developing particular leadership skills and annual capstone sessions facilitating discussion between residents and attending physicians about topics chosen by residents. The capstone sessions proved to be most impactful, serving as forums for open conversation about how these groups interact when engaged in social behaviors such as giving/receiving feedback, offering support after an adverse event, and teaching/learning in the clinic. The success of the capstone sessions led to a 2016 DACC-wide initiative to facilitate transparency among all professional roles (faculty, residents, nurse anesthetists, administrative staff) and encourage widespread reflexive examination about how the manner in which these groups interact encourages or impedes leadership and teamwork. Further work is necessary to describe how leadership program formats can be diversified to better encourage reflexivity. There is also a need to develop mechanisms for assessing outcomes of leadership programs that expand outside the competency-based system.

  6. Comparison of web-based and face-to-face interviews for application to an anesthesiology training program: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadi, Marissa G; Malkin, Mathew R; Lenart, John; Stier, Gary R; Gatling, Jason W; Applegate, Richard L

    2016-04-03

    This study compared admission rates to a United States anesthesiology residency program for applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews during the admissions process. We also explored factors driving applicants to select each interview type. The 211 applicants invited to interview for admission to our anesthesiology residency program during the 2014-2015 application cycle were participants in this pilot observational study. Of these, 141 applicants selected face-to-face interviews, 53 applicants selected web-based interviews, and 17 applicants declined to interview. Data regarding applicants' reasons for selecting a particular interview type were gathered using an anonymous online survey after interview completion. Residency program admission rates and survey answers were compared between applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews. One hundred twenty-seven (75.1%) applicants completed face-to-face and 42 (24.9%) completed web-based interviews. The admission rate to our residency program was not significantly different between applicants completing face-to-face versus web-based interviews. One hundred eleven applicants completed post-interview surveys. The most common reasons for selecting web-based interviews were conflict of interview dates between programs, travel concerns, or financial limitations. Applicants selected face-to-face interviews due to a desire to interact with current residents, or geographic proximity to the residency program. These results suggest that completion of web-based interviews is a viable alternative to completion of face-to-face interviews, and that choice of interview type does not affect the rate of applicant admission to the residency program. Web-based interviews may be of particular interest to applicants applying to a large number of programs, or with financial limitations.

  7. Assessing the quality of random clinical anesthesiology trials published on the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology from 2005 to 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Fabiano Timbó; Jucá, Mário Jorge

    2009-01-01

    A random clinical trial (RCT) is defined as a study involving intervention and control groups with random distribution of the participants. The objective of the present study was to assess the quality of RCT in anesthesiology published during a specific time. descriptive. A manual search of the articles published by the Brazilian Journal of Anesthesiology between January 2005 and February 2008 was undertaken to identify studies with characteristics of RCTs. The quality of RCTs was the primary parameter; secondary parameters included: approval by the Ethics on Research Committee (ERC), use of the informed consent (IC), description of the source of the grant, the sample size was calculated, number of authors, place of origin, statistical tests used, level of significance adopted, and classification of the type of study. The quality scale, descriptive statistics, and calculation of the 95% confidence interval were used to evaluate the quality of the RCTs. Out of 114 studies, 42 were identified as RCT. Only 3 (7.1%) of those were classified as having good methodological quality considering the random distribution, double blind, losses, and exclusions. One-hundred and seven out of 114 studies were submitted to the ERC, 67 used IC, none of them described the source of the grant, 17 calculated the size of the sample, the studies had a mean of 4.49 authors; 60 publications were from São Paulo; the Student t test was used more often (47.4%), a level of significance of 5% was adopted by 97 studies; and 42 were RCTs. After the manual search, 7.1% of the random clinical assays were considered of good methodological quality.

  8. [Publication performances of university clinics for anesthesiology: Germany, Austria and Switzerland from 2001 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putzer, G; Ausserer, J; Wenzel, V; Pehböck, D; Widmann, T; Lindner, K; Hamm, P; Paal, P

    2014-04-01

    This study assessed the publication performance of university departments of anesthesiology in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. The number of publications, original articles, impact factors and citations were evaluated. A search was performed in PubMed to identify publications related to anesthesiology from 2001 to 2010. All articles from anesthesiology journals listed in the fields of anesthesia/pain therapy, critical care and emergency medicine by the "journal citation report 2013" in Thomson Reuters ISI web of knowledge were included. Articles from non-anaesthesiology journals, where the stem of the word anesthesia (anes*, anaes*, anäst*, anast*) appears in the affiliation field of PubMed, were included as well. The time periods 2001-2005 and 2006-2010 were compared. Articles were allocated to university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland via the affiliation field. A total of 45 university departments in Austria, Germany and Switzerland and 125,979 publications from 2,863 journals (65 anesthesiology journals, 2,798 non-anesthesiology journals) were analyzed. Of the publications 23 % could not be allocated to a given university department of anesthesiology. In the observation period the university department of anesthesiology in Berlin achieved most publications (n = 479) and impact points (1,384), whereas Vienna accumulated most original articles (n = 156). Austria had the most publications per million inhabitants in 2006-2010 (n=50) followed by Switzerland (n=49) and Germany (n=35). The number of publications during the observation period decreased in Germany (0.5 %), Austria (7 %) and Switzerland (8 %). Tables 2 and 4-8 of this article are available at Springer Link under Supplemental. The research performance varied among the university departments of anesthesiology in Germany, Austria and Switzerland whereby larger university departments, such as Berlin or Vienna published most. Publication output in Germany, Austria and

  9. Atitudes de anestesiologistas e médicos em especialização em anestesiologia dos CET/SBA em relação aos bloqueios nervosos dos membros superior e inferior Actitudes de anestesiólogos y médicos en especialización en anestesiología de los CET/SBA con relación a los bloqueos nerviosos de los miembros superior e inferior The attitude of anesthesiologists and anesthesiology residents of the CET/SBA regarding upper and lower limb nerve blocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Escovedo Helayel

    2009-06-01

    the reduced need to manage the airways, lower cost, and excellent postoperative analgesia. However, its use has restrictions due to the lack of training, that it takes longer to be done, fear of neurological complications, and systemic toxicity. The objective of this study was to measure the attitude of anesthesiologists and anesthesiology residents at Teaching and Training Centers (CET/SBA regarding PNBs. METHODS: A 25-item questionnaire was developed and it was available, via the Internet and by mail, to those responsible for the 80 CETs, their instructors and residents. RESULTS: Forty-two CETs (52.5% returned 188 questionnaires, 62 (32% from anesthesiology residents and 126 (68% from anesthesiologists. The Cronbach's alpha coefficient of the questionnaire was 0.79. Factor analysis revealed six factors that explain 53% of scores variance: factor 1 - positive attitude, responsible for 18.34% of the variance; factor 2 - training/use, responsible for 11.73% of the variance; factor 3 - negative aspects, responsible for 7.11% of the variance; factor 4 - limiting factors, responsible for 6.39% of the variance; and factor 5 - regional block as a competence differential, responsible for 5.79% of the variance; and factor 6 - respect for the patient, responsible for 5.4% of the variance. CONCLUSIONS: The questionnaire proved to be a reliable tool to measure the attitude regarding regional blocks. Anesthesiologists demonstrated greater interest for patient-related aspects, while the main focus of residents was the acquisition of technical abilities.

  10. Serious gaming for orthotopic liver transplant anesthesiology: A randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Daniel; Zerillo, Jeron; Kim, Sang; Hill, Bryan; Wang, Ryan; Goldberg, Andrew; DeMaria, Samuel

    2017-04-01

    Anesthetic management of orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) is complex. Given the unequal distributions of liver transplant surgeries performed at different centers, anesthesiology providers receive relatively uneven OLT training and exposure. One well-suited modality for OLT training is the "serious game," an interactive application created for the purpose of imparting knowledge or skills, while leveraging the self-motivating elements of video games. We therefore developed a serious game designed to teach best practices for the anesthetic management of a standard OLT and determined if the game would improve resident performance in a simulated OLT. Forty-four residents on the liver transplant rotation were randomized to either the gaming group (GG) or the control group (CG) prior to their introductory simulation. Both groups were given access to the same educational materials and literature during their rotation, but the GG also had access to the OLT Trainer. Performance on the simulations were recorded on a standardized grading rubric. Both groups experienced an increase in score relative to baseline that was statistically significant at every stage. The improvements in scores were greater for the GG participants than the CG participants. Overall score improvement between the GG and CG (mean [standard deviation]) was statistically significant (GG, 7.95 [3.65]; CG, 4.8 [4.48]; P = 0.02), as were scores for preoperative assessment (GG, 2.67 [2.09]; CG, 1.17 [1.43]; P = 0.01) and anhepatic phase (GG, 1.62 [1.01]; CG, 0.75 [1.28]; P = 0.02). Of the residents with game access, 81% were "very satisfied" or "satisfied" with the game overall. In conclusion, adding a serious game to an existing educational curriculum for liver transplant anesthesia resulted in significant learning gains for rotating anesthesia residents. The intervention was straightforward to implement and cost-effective. Liver Transplantation 23 430-439 2017 AASLD. © 2017 by the American Association

  11. Current applications of big data in obstetric anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klumpner, Thomas T; Bauer, Melissa E; Kheterpal, Sachin

    2017-06-01

    The narrative review aims to highlight several recently published 'big data' studies pertinent to the field of obstetric anesthesiology. Big data has been used to study rare outcomes, to identify trends within the healthcare system, to identify variations in practice patterns, and to highlight potential inequalities in obstetric anesthesia care. Big data studies have helped define the risk of rare complications of obstetric anesthesia, such as the risk of neuraxial hematoma in thrombocytopenic parturients. Also, large national databases have been used to better understand trends in anesthesia-related adverse events during cesarean delivery as well as outline potential racial/ethnic disparities in obstetric anesthesia care. Finally, real-time analysis of patient data across a number of disparate health information systems through the use of sophisticated clinical decision support and surveillance systems is one promising application of big data technology on the labor and delivery unit. 'Big data' research has important implications for obstetric anesthesia care and warrants continued study. Real-time electronic surveillance is a potentially useful application of big data technology on the labor and delivery unit.

  12. Special article: Francis Hoeffer McMechan, MD: creator of modern anesthesiology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Douglas R

    2012-12-01

    If one person can be credited with the creation of the infrastructure of modern anesthesiology, that individual would be Francis Hoeffer McMechan. He has been largely forgotten since his death in 1939 despite his remarkable and enduring accomplishments. McMechan edited the first national journal devoted to anesthesiology, created and managed almost all of the national and regional societies devoted to the specialty between 1912 and his death, and created the first international physician certification as a specialist in anesthesiology. His accomplishments are even more amazing given the severe arthritis that left him wheelchair-bound for almost his entire professional life and denied him the ability to practice anesthesia. Our specialty owes an incredible debt to this largely unknown and unsung hero.

  13. Anesthesiology teaching during undergraduation through an academic league: what is the impact in students' learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalho, Alan Saito; Silva, Felipe Duarte; Kronemberger, Tatiana Barboza; Pose, Regina Albanese; Torres, Marcelo Luis Abramides; Carmona, Maria José Carvalho; Auler, José Otávio Costa

    2012-01-01

    Academic leagues have been consolidated as instruments of medical teaching and for the introducing of medical students to practice of specialties, including anesthesiology. As the role of leagues in the development process of competencies and learning of their students is not well known, the learning of members of an anesthesiology academic league was evaluated after participating in its activities for one year. Students of an anesthesiology academic league were followed up from March to December 2010 and evaluated through objective cognitive tests of multiple choice applied before the beginning of activities and after their conclusion. Attendance in activities and epidemiologic profile of students were correlated with the tests results. Twenty medical students from 3rd to 6th year were analyzed, with an average age of 22.8 (21-26) years. The average participation in the proposed activities was 10.4/13 (80%). The average of right answers on the first test was 8.1/17 (47.6%), and 3rd year students had lower grades (pgrades of different years of the medical undergraduation. A strong relationship between participation in activities and improved grades was found (r=0.719; p<0.001). Students who participated in the league had improvement in knowledge evaluation tests, suggesting that the league is a useful teaching instrument that can provide improved learning of anesthesiology. Participation in activities was connected with improved performance. Activities developed in leagues may have a positive role in students' academic education, more specifically in this article, in anesthesiology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  14. Genetic and phenotypic catalog of native resident trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin, fiscal year 1998 report: Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1999 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, Patrick C.; McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick; Spruell, Paul; Berkley, Regan

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique

  15. Genetic and Phenotypic Catalog of Native Resident Trout of the Interior Columbia River Basin; Populations of the Upper Yakima Basin, 1997-1998 Annual Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trotter, Patrick C. (Fishery Science Consultant, Seattle, WA); McMillan, Bill; Gayeski, Nick (Washington Trout, Duvall, WA)

    1999-10-01

    The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique.

  16. Assessment of Clinical Education in the Alborz University of Medical Sciences from Surgical Technology and Anesthesiology Students’ Point of View

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bahrami Babaheidary

    2012-07-01

    Conclusion: Because of surgical technology and anesthesiology students needs to acquire clinical skills along with theoretical training, providing suitable clinical environment seems to be critical to achieve essential in-depth experience in professional aspects.

  17. Scientific publications in anesthesiology journals from East Asia: a 10-year survey of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi; Qiu, Li-Xin; Wu, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Li-Qun; Sun, Yu-Ming; Yu, Wei-Feng

    2011-04-01

    The scientific publications in anesthesiology research from East Asian authors have not been reported yet. The present study was designed to analyze the contribution of articles from East Asia to anesthesiology research. Articles published in 17 journals in anesthesiology originating from Japan, China, and South Korea from 2000 to 2009 were retrieved from the PubMed database and Web of Science. From 2000 to 2009, there were 3,076 articles published from East Asia. During this period, there were a notable decrease in publications from Japan and modest increases in publications from both China and South Korea. The average 5-year impact factor of the published articles was similar among the three regions, and China had the highest average number of citations to each article. Anesthesia & Analgesia published more articles than any other journal from all three regions. Our analysis showed that Japan was the most productive region in East Asia, but there was a notable decrease in publications from Japan in 2000-2009. The impact factor of the articles suggests similar levels of scholarship. Anesthesia & Analgesia was the most popular journal in East Asia.

  18. Perspective: Hospital support for anesthesiology departments: aligning incentives and improving productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Laureen L; Evers, Alex S

    2012-03-01

    Anesthesiology groups, particularly academic departments, are increasingly dependent on hospital support for financial viability. Economic stresses are driven by higher patient acuity, by multiple subspecialty service and call demands, by high-risk obstetric services, and by long case durations attributable to both case complexity and time for teaching. An unfavorable payer mix, university taxation, and other costs associated with academic education and research missions further compound these stresses. In addition, the current economic climate and the uncertainty surrounding health care reform measures will continue to increase performance pressures on hospitals and anesthesiology departments.Although many researchers have published on the mechanics of operating room (OR) productivity, their investigations do not usually address the motivational forces that drive individual and group behaviors. Institutional tradition, surgical convenience, and parochial interests continue to play predominant roles in OR governance and scheduling practices. Efforts to redefine traditional relationships, to coordinate operational decision-making processes, and to craft incentives that align individual performance goals with those of the institution are all essential for creating greater economic stability. Using the principles of shared costs, department autonomy, hospital flexibility and control over institutional issues, and alignment between individual and institutional goals, the authors developed a template to redefine the hospital-anesthesiology department relationship. Here, they describe both this contractual template and the results that followed implementation (2007-2009) at one institution.

  19. APEP-Anesthesiology Preceptorship Enrichment Program: A Curriculum for First and Second Year Medical Students…An Early Look.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Amy; Kileny, Joel; LeVan, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this educational innovation was to create a program for first and second year medical students (MS1s and MS2s) that would: (1) Provide students with early clinical exposure to the subspecialty field of anesthesiology, (2) Expose MS1s and MS2s to dedicated anesthesiologists serving as preceptors, (3) Enrich the students' basic science knowledge in a practical way using an integrated curriculum with clinical correlates and (4) Convey an accurate depiction of anesthesiology as a possible career choice. The Anesthesiology Preceptorship Enrichment Program (APEP) was designed for MS1s and MS2s as a seven month curriculum for each level, integrated with basic science course content. APEP students shadowed faculty from the Department of Anesthesiology (APEP preceptors). Guided by handouts, preceptors reviewed basic science concepts with clinical correlates. APEP encounters from October 2006-April 2007, October 2007-April 2008, and October 2008-April 2009 were documented and students completed a questionnaire about their experience. After three years, APEP has become a successful program, as evidenced by the increasing numbers of interested incoming students, active students and returning students. According to the end of program questionnaire, 38-68% of the APEP students used the APEP handouts to guide discussions with their preceptor, enhance intra-operative teaching, and/or refer to while studying for basic science course exams. According to the questionnaire, 71-80% of the APEP students were more interested in the field of anesthesiology after participating in APEP, 10-16% were neither more or less interested, and 4-19% were less interested. Early clinical exposure to anesthesiology with APEP was viewed as a very positive experience, increasing interest in anesthesiology at the MS1 and MS2 level. The APEP handouts were deemed a useful aid for discussion and created opportunities for teaching clinical correlates of basic science knowledge.

  20. Readability evaluation of Internet-based patient education materials related to the anesthesiology field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Oliveira, Gildasio S; Jung, Michael; Mccaffery, Kirsten J; McCarthy, Robert J; Wolf, Michael S

    2015-08-01

    The main objective of the current investigation was to assess the readability of Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology. We hypothesized that the majority of patient education materials would not be written according to current recommended readability grade level. Online patient education materials describing procedures, risks, and management of anesthesia-related topics were identified using the search engine Google (available at www.google.com) using the terms anesthesia, anesthesiology, anesthesia risks, and anesthesia care. Cross-sectional evaluation. None. Assessments of content readability were performed using validated instruments (Flesch-Kincaid Grade Formulae, the Gunning Frequency of Gobbledygook, the New Dale-Chall Test, the Fry graph, and the Flesch Reading Ease score). Ninety-six Web sites containing Internet patient education materials (IPEMs) were evaluated. The median (interquartile range) readability grade level for all evaluated IPEMs was 13.5 (12.0-14.6). All the evaluated documents were classified at a greater readability level than the current recommended readability grade, P < .001. Readability grades were not significantly different among different IPEM sources. Assessment by the Flesch Reading Ease test classified all but 4 IPEMs as at least fairly difficult to read. Internet-based patient education materials related to the field of anesthesiology are currently written far above the recommended readability grade level. High complexity of written education materials likely limits access of information to millions of American patients. Redesign of online content of Web sites that provide patient education material regarding anesthesia could be an important step in improving access to information for patients with poor health literacy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Resident resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, J L; Cleary, B

    1999-01-01

    Clearly, faculty must work hard with residents to explore the nature of their resistance to a program's learning and growth opportunities. Initial steps to a deeper, more effective, and longer-lasting change process must be pursued. If resident resistance is mishandled or misunderstood, then learning and professional growth may be sidetracked and the purposes of residency training defeated. Listening to the whole person of the resident and avoiding the trap of getting caught up in merely responding to select resident behaviors that irritate us is critical. Every faculty member in the family practice residency program must recognize resistance as a form of defense that cannot immediately be torn down or taken away. Resident defenses have important purposes to play in stress reduction even if they are not always healthy. Residents, especially interns, use resistance to avoid a deeper and more truthful look at themselves as physicians. A family practice residency program that sees whole persons in their residents and that respects resident defenses will effectively manage the stress and disharmony inherent to the resistant resident.

  2. Quality Improvement in Anesthesiology - Leveraging Data and Analytics to Optimize Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Elizabeth A; Falk, Scott A

    2018-03-01

    Quality improvement is at the heart of practice of anesthesiology. Objective data are critical for any quality improvement initiative; when possible, a combination of process, outcome, and balancing metrics should be evaluated to gauge the value of an intervention. Quality improvement is an ongoing process; iterative reevaluation of data is required to maintain interventions, ensure continued effectiveness, and continually improve. Dashboards can facilitate rapid analysis of data and drive decision making. Large data sets can be useful to establish benchmarks and compare performance against other providers, practices, or institutions. Audit and feedback strategies are effective in facilitating positive change. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Anesthesiological Management of a Patient with Williams Syndrome Undergoing Spine Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Boncagni

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams Syndrome (WS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder associated with a mutation on chromosome 7. Patients with WS usually display dysmorphic facial and musculoskeletal features, congenital heart diseases, metabolic disturbances and cognitive impairment. Structural cardiovascular abnormalities are present in the majority of the children and may provide a substrate for perioperative Sudden Cardiac Death, as presented by several reports, something that creates a great challenge to the anesthetic conduct. We present the case of a 12-year old girl who required anesthetic care for surgical correction of an acquired kyphoscoliosis. Potential anesthesiological implications of WS are subsequently reviewed.

  4. The Pediatric Anesthesiology Workforce: Projecting Supply and Trends 2015-2035.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffly, Matthew K; Singleton, Mark; Agarwal, Rita; Scheinker, David; Miller, Daniel; Muffly, Tyler M; Honkanen, Anita

    2018-02-01

    A workforce analysis was conducted to predict whether the projected future supply of pediatric anesthesiologists is balanced with the requirements of the inpatient pediatric population. The specific aims of our analysis were to (1) project the number of pediatric anesthesiologists in the future workforce; (2) project pediatric anesthesiologist-to-pediatric population ratios (0-17 years); (3) project the mean number of inpatient pediatric procedures per pediatric anesthesiologist; and (4) evaluate the effect of alternative projections of individual variables on the model projections through 2035. The future number of pediatric anesthesiologists is determined by the current supply, additions to the workforce, and departures from the workforce. We previously compiled a database of US pediatric anesthesiologists in the base year of 2015. The historical linear growth rate for pediatric anesthesiology fellowship positions was determined using the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Data Resource Books from 2002 to 2016. The future number of pediatric anesthesiologists in the workforce was projected given growth of pediatric anesthesiology fellowship positions at the historical linear growth rate, modeling that 75% of graduating fellows remain in the pediatric anesthesiology workforce, and anesthesiologists retire at the current mean retirement age of 64 years old. The baseline model projections were accompanied by age- and gender-adjusted anesthesiologist supply, and sensitivity analyses of potential variations in fellowship position growth, retirement, pediatric population, inpatient surgery, and market share to evaluate the effect of each model variable on the baseline model. The projected ratio of pediatric anesthesiologists to pediatric population was determined using the 2012 US Census pediatric population projections. The projected number of inpatient pediatric procedures per pediatric anesthesiologist was determined using the Kids' Inpatient

  5. [New study on the history of anesthesiology (8)--Etymological consideration on a Japanese word "Masui"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, A

    2001-05-01

    The author briefly describes etymology of a Japanese word "Masui" ([symbol: see text]) and discusses why this word has not been correctly understood by lay people as well as Japanese anesthesiologists. The word "Masui" was coined by Seikei Sugita in 1850 when he translated Dutch edition of Schelesinger's monograph on ether anesthesia into Japanese. Therefore the word is not of Chinese origin and has subsequently been exported to China and the countries of Korean peninsula. Although half a century has elapsed since the first Department of Anesthesiology was established at the Tokyo University Faculty of Medicine, social acceptance for our specialty has not adequately and widely been achieved. The author thinks that one of the causes for this inadequate acceptance is that the correct Japanese words of "Masuika-gaku" and "Masuika-i" for Anesthesiology and Anesthesiologists were not coined and the incorrect words as "Masuigaku" and "Masui-i" have been used. Not a small number of Japanese anesthesiologists still employ the words "Masuigaku" and "Masui-i" without any special reasons.

  6. QUALIS EVALUATION OF MEDICINE III: ANALYSIS OF ANESTHESIOLOGY AND GYNECOLOGY AND OBSTETRICS JOURNALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderon, Iracema de Mattos Paranhos

    2015-01-01

    To know the current publication of Anesthesiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology subareas, to support the updating of Qualis Journals criteria in these specific subareas. Cross-sectional, descriptive study in which was evaluated in quantitatively and qualitatively way the bibliographic production of Anesthesiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology subareas, from January 2010 to December 2012. Were investigated the values ​​of the impact factor; calculated (i) the number (n) and the percentage of journals in each stratum Qualis A1, A2, B1, B2, B3, B4 and B5, and (ii) the median values ​​and their extreme limits (minimum values ​​and maximum) and quartiles (p25; p50; p75; p90) of the impact factors in the different strata. The bibliographic production of the three-year period 2010-2012 was published in 69 journals in Anesthesiology subarea and in 345 in Gynecology and Obstetrics. In Anesthesiology, 44% were within the limits of impact factor of superior A1, A2 and B1; in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 42.4% were in those limits and strata. Despite lagging behind by international standards, publications of Anesthesiology and Obstetrics and Gynecology showed tendency to improve the quality. In these sub-areas, the median of journals impact factor is beyond the limits defined by the area in the last assessment. Therefore, it must be reconsidered new indicators to assess this aspect. Conhecer a publicação atual das subáreas Anestesiologia e Ginecologia e Obstetrícia, para subsidiar a atualização dos critérios Qualis-periódicos, específicos dessas subáreas. Estudo de corte transversal, descritivo, onde avaliou-se, de modo quantitativo e qualitativo, a produção bibliográfica das subáreas Anestesiologia e Ginecologia e Obstetrícia, no período de janeiro de 2010 a dezembro de 2012. Foram definidos os valores do fator de impacto das revistas; foram calculados (i) o número (n) e percentual de periódicos em cada um dos estratos Qualis - A1, A2, B1, B2, B3

  7. Animal Investigation Program 1976 annual report: Nevada test site and vicinity. [Radioanalysis of tissues from animals residing on or near NTS in 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.D.; Giles, K.R.; Bernhardt, D.E.; Brown, K.W.

    1978-11-01

    Data are presented from the radioanalysis of tissues collected from cattle and mule deer, desert bighorn sheep, feral horses, and other wildlife that resided on or near the Nevada Test Site during 1976. Other than the naturally occurring potassium-40, gamma-emitting radionuclides were detected infrequently with the exception of /sup 131/I in animal thyroid samples collected after September 25 (the date of a Chinese nuclear test). Strontium-90 concentrations in bones from deer, cattle, and desert bighorn sheep continued the downward trend of recent years. Tritium concentrations were generally within ambient limits with the exception of animals exposed to sources of contamination; e.g., Sedan Crater, drainage ponds from Area 12 tunnels, etc. Analysis of actinide in tissues was emphasized during 1976. Graphs illustrate the /sup 239/P levels in lungs, livers, and femurs from Nevada Test Site beef cattle for the years 1971 through 1976. Femur and lung residue data are nearly identical for each year with liver concentrations being a factor of 2 or 3 lower. Hypothetical dose estimates to man were calculated on the basis of the daily consumption of 0.5 kilogram of liver or muscle from animals that contained peak actinide levels. The highest postulated dose was 11 millirem from tritium from tissues for a mule deer. This dose is about 2% of the 500 millirems/year guide for radiation doses to an individual in the general public. All other postulated doses for consumption of the tissue containing other radionuclides are less than 0.1% of this guide. The food habits of desert bighorn sheep were discussed according to the geographic locations of the animals at time of collection. Grasses made up approximately 60% of the diet at all locations, with shrubs content approaching 30%, and the remainder consisting of various forbs. The movement of 13 mule deer fitted with collars containing a radiotransmitter unit was monitored on a weekly basis.

  8. Anesthesiology: About the Anesthesiology Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... group invoicing for membership renewals as well as marketing, education, and quality improvement solutions. Learn more About ... 371-0384 Connect with Us Facebook Linkedin Twitter Youtube © 2018 American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA), All Rights ...

  9. [Books on anesthesiology and resuscitation published in Spain. An approach to their study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardiola, E; Baños, J E

    1998-03-01

    Few authors have examined the publication of medical books. Our aim was to analyze the nature of books published in Spain on anesthesiology and recovery. Books listed by the Spanish ISBN agency were selected if they included anestesi* or reanima* in any field. Duplicates were removed. Multiple editions or references were considered single books, with data for the oldest edition entered into analysis. Multiple volume collections were grouped as complete works. Data analyzed for each book were year of publication, language (of publication and the original), subject (according to ISBN classification) and place of publication. Nine subject classifications were applied: general, recovery, anesthetic techniques, pharmacology, obstetrics/gynecology, pediatrics, veterinary anesthesia, dental anesthesia and miscellaneous. We analyzed 216 books. Years that saw publication of the greatest number of books were 1988 (17), 1993 (16) and 1979 (15), and the five-year period in which the most books were published was 1985 to 1989 (48 books, 22.2%). Most books (114, 52.8%) were originally written in English, Spanish being the second most common original language (58, 26.8%). All books were published in Spanish. The Spanish ISBN classification system identified 11 categories: general diseases/clinical medicine/therapy (161, 74.5%); drugs/pharmacology/physical therapy/toxicology (20, 9.3%); gynecology/obstetrics (9, 4.2%), veterinary medicine (9, 4.2%) and medicine (8, 3.7%). Classification by specific subjects showed a predominance of monographs or treatises on general aspects (42, 19.4%) followed by books on recovery (37, 17.1%), anesthetic techniques (25, 11.6%) and pharmacology (17, 7.9%). Most books were published in Barcelona (142, 65.7%), Madrid (36, 16.7%) or Saragossa (10, 4.6%). Spanish publication of books on anesthesiology and recovery has increased in recent years. Most books are translations usually from English. Spanish ISBN agency data, although it has limitations, can

  10. Mobbing Exposure of Anaesthesiology Residents in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aykut, Gülnihal; Efe, Esra Mercanoğlu; Bayraktar, Selcan; Şentürk, Sinem; Başeğmez, İrem; Özkumit, Özlem; Kabak, Elmas; Yavaşçaoğlu, Belgin; Bilgin, Hülya

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, psychological problems that are caused by working conditions, like burn out syndrome, are more commonly observed. In our study, we aimed to evaluate mobbing exposure, factors causing mobbing and precautions for mobbing in residency students who are educated in anaesthesiology and reanimation clinics in Turkey. After obtaining consent from the ethics committee, we sent our questionnaires to the secretariats of the departments by postal mail. Completed questionnaires were collected in our department's secretariat blindly and randomly mixed. One hundred and one participants were returned the questionnaires. Data was statistically analysed in SPSS 21.0 software programme. During residency programme, sated to have experienced mobbing one or more time. Interestingly, 5.9% participants complained of physical mobbing. Mobbing exposure was more common in females. The most serious new onset psychosomatic symptoms stated during residency were committing suicide (2%), addiction (16%), severe depression (18%), panic attack (8%), more accidents (7%) and tendency of violence (15%). In mobbing group there was statistically significant dissatisfaction rate. In professions where mobbing is common, incidences of psychiatric diseases and suicide attempts are high are increased. Who are under risk for experiencing mobbing should be noticed carefully to ensure good judgement and problems should be inspected objectively in a detailed manner. Anesthesiology societies and other medical professional societies should establish mobbing committees. Thus, mobbing problems can be resolved and healthy career oppurtunities can be presented to residents.

  11. Body temperature change during anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy: implications for quality incentives in anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modell, Jerome H; Gravenstein, Nikolaus; Morey, Timothy E

    2008-11-01

    The American Society of Anesthesiologists has announced that perioperative normothermia is a "Quality Incentive in Anesthesiology." We examined whether we could meet this quality incentive in a simple population: patients undergoing anesthesia for electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). We compared infrared-measured ear temperature before anesthesia to temperature upon delivery of patients to the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) after 101 consecutive brief anesthetics to facilitate ECT. For 35 procedures, the patients had an infrared ear thermometer temperature of measures were substandard. Also, current methods of measuring temperature may be inadequate to ascertain if patients are hypothermic after surgery. As the avoidance of hypothermia is a meritorious goal, anesthesia departments need to ensure that their temperature monitoring equipment is adequate to ensure accurate measurement of postanesthetic temperature if this variable is to be used as a quality incentive.

  12. Marketing or strategy? Defining the best approach to expand the anesthesiology workforce in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Michael C; Grant, Gilbert J

    2015-01-01

    There is a chronic shortage of anesthesiologists in Israel. The study by Cohen et al. suggests that a marketing campaign may be one method of addressing this shortage. This commentary argues for a more comprehensive strategy based on the US experience. This would not only involve marketing as suggested by Cohen et al. but would also involve a fundamental change in the Israel anesthesia care model, as well as providing substantial financial incentives to young physicians. We believe that a combination of these approaches will help to alleviate the shortage of anesthesia providers in Israel. Creating a new class of physician extenders, namely, anesthesiologist assistants, would also provide an employment pathway for the skilled medical technicians trained by the Israel Defense Forces, and other non-physicians with an interest in anesthesiology.

  13. Pediatric anesthesiology fellow education: is a simulation-based boot camp feasible and valuable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambardekar, Aditee P; Singh, Devika; Lockman, Justin L; Rodgers, David L; Hales, Roberta L; Gurnaney, Harshad G; Nathan, Aruna; Deutsch, Ellen S

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric anesthesiologists must manage crises in neonates and children with timely responses and limited margin for error. Teaching the range of relevant skills during a 12-month fellowship is challenging. An experiential simulation-based curriculum can augment acquisition of knowledge and skills. To develop a simulation-based boot camp (BC) for novice pediatric anesthesiology fellows and assess learner perceptions of BC activities. We hypothesize that BC is feasible, not too basic, and well received by fellows. Skills stations, team-based in situ simulations, and group discussions of complex cases were designed. Stations were evaluated by anonymous survey; fellows rated usefulness in improving knowledge, self-confidence, technical skill, and clinical performance using a Likert scale (1 strongly disagree to 5 strongly agree). They were also asked if stations were too basic or too short. Median and interquartile range (IQR) data were calculated and noted as median (IQR). Fellows reported the difficult airway station and simulated scenarios improved knowledge, self-confidence, technical skill, and clinical performance. They disagreed that stations were too basic or too short with exception of the difficult airway session, which was too short [4 (4-3)]. Fellows believed the central line station improved knowledge [4 (4-3)], technical skills [4 (4-4)], self-confidence [4 (4-3)], and clinical performance [4 (4-3)]; scores trended toward neutral likely because the station was perceived as too basic [3.5 (4-3)]. An interactive session on epinephrine and intraosseous lines was valued. Complicated case discussion was of educational value [4 (5-4)], the varied opinions of faculty were helpful [4 (5-4)], and the session was neither too basic [2 (2-2)] nor too short [2 (2-2)]. A simulation-based BC for pediatric anesthesiology fellows was feasible, perceived to improve confidence, knowledge, technical skills, and clinical performance, and was not too basic. © 2016 John Wiley

  14. Permanent resident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Fisher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  15. Permanent resident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John F

    2016-01-01

    The training of physicians in the past century was based primarily on responsibility and the chain-of-command. Those with the bulk of that responsibility in the fields of pediatrics and internal medicine were residents. Residents trained the medical students and supervised them carefully in caring for patients. Most attending physicians supervised their teams at arm's length, primarily serving as teachers of the finer points of diagnosis and treatment during set periods of the day or week with a perfunctory signature on write-ups or progress notes. Residents endeavored to protect the attending physician from being heavily involved unless they were unsure about a clinical problem. Before contacting the attending physician, a more senior resident would be called. Responsibility was the ultimate teacher. The introduction of diagnosis-related groups by the federal government dramatically changed the health care delivery system, placing greater emphasis on attending physician visibility in the medical record, ultimately resulting in more attending physician involvement in day-to-day care of patients in academic institutions. Without specified content in attending notes, hospital revenues would decline. Although always in charge technically, attending physicians increasingly have assumed the role once dominated by the resident. Using biographical experiences of more than 40 years, the author acknowledges and praises the educational role of responsibility in his own training and laments its declining role in today's students and house staff.

  16. Nursing Facility Initiative Annual Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — This annual report summarizes impacts from the Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Facility Residents in 2014. This initiative is designed...

  17. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 1995.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroney, Joseph; Donley, Christopher; Scott, Jason; Lockwood, Jr., Neil

    1997-06-01

    In 1995 the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) in conjunction with the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) initiated the implementation of a habitat and population enhancement project for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus), westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides). Habitat and population assessments were conducted in seven tributaries of the Box Canyon reach of the Pend Oreille River. Assessments were used to determine the types and quality of habitat that were limiting to native bull trout and cutthroat trout populations. Assessments were also used to determine the effects of interspecific competition within these streams. A bull trout and brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) hybridization assessment was conducted to determine the degree of hybridization between these two species. Analysis of the habitat data indicated high rates of sediment and lack of wintering habitat. The factors that contribute to these conditions have the greatest impact on habitat quality for the tributaries of concern. Population data suggested that brook trout have less stringent habitat requirements; therefore, they have the potential to outcompete the native salmonids in areas of lower quality habitat. No hybrids were found among the samples, which is most likely attributable to the limited number of bull trout. Data collected from these assessments were compiled to develop recommendations for enhancement measures. Recommendations for restoration include riparian planting and fencing, instream structures, as well as, removal of non-native brook trout to reduce interspecific competition with native salmonids in an isolated reach of Cee Cee Ah Creek.

  18. Kalispel Resident Fish Project : Annual Report, 2008.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Todd [Kalispel Natural Resource Department

    2009-07-08

    In 2008, the Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD) continued to implement its habitat enhancement projects for bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) and westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi). Baseline fish population and habitat assessments were conducted in Upper West Branch Priest River. Additional fish and habitat data were collected for the Granite Creek Watershed Assessment, a cooperative project between KNRD and the U.S. Forest Service Panhandle National Forest (FS) . The watershed assessment, funded primarily by the Salmon Recovery Funding Board of the State of Washington, will be completed in 2009.

  19. Resident Physicians Improve Nontechnical Skills When on Operating Room Management and Leadership Rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Devon C; Giordano, Christopher R; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; Fahy, Brenda G

    2017-01-01

    Anesthesiology residency primarily emphasizes the development of medical knowledge and technical skills. Yet, nontechnical skills (NTS) are also vital to successful clinical practice. Elements of NTS are communication, teamwork, situational awareness, and decision making. The first 10 consecutive senior residents who chose to participate in this 2-week elective rotation of operating room (OR) management and leadership training were enrolled in this study, which spanned from March 2013 to March 2015. Each resident served as the anesthesiology officer of the day (AOD) and was tasked with coordinating OR assignments, managing care for 2 to 4 ORs, and being on call for the trauma OR; all residents were supervised by an attending AOD. Leadership and NTS techniques were taught via a standardized curriculum consisting of leadership and team training articles, crisis management text, and daily debriefings. Resident self-ratings and attending AOD and charge nurse raters used the Anaesthetists' Non-Technical Skills (ANTS) scoring system, which involved task management, situational awareness, teamwork, and decision making. For each of the 10 residents in their third year of clinical anesthesiology training (CA-3) who participated in this elective rotation, there were 14 items that required feedback from resident self-assessment and OR raters, including the daily attending AOD and charge nurse. Results for each of the items on the questionnaire were compared between the beginning and the end of the rotation with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test for matched samples. Comparisons were run separately for attending AOD and charge nurse assessments and resident self-assessments. Scaled rankings were analyzed for the Kendall coefficient of concordance (ω) for rater agreement with associated χ and P value. Common themes identified by the residents during debriefings were recurrence of challenging situations and the skills residents needed to instruct and manage clinical teams. For

  20. A tribute to Dr. Paul A. J. Janssen: entrepreneur extraordinaire, innovative scientist, and significant contributor to anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Theodore H; Egan, Talmage D; Van Aken, Hugo

    2008-02-01

    Dr. Paul Janssen was the founder of Janssen Pharmaceutica and the developer of over 80 pharmaceutical compounds that proved useful in human, botanical, and veterinary medicine. He and his coworkers synthesized the fentanyl family of drugs, many other potent analgesics, droperidol, etomidate, and numerous other important medicines that were extremely useful in psychiatry, parasitology, gastroenterology, cardiology, virology, and immunology. Anesthesiology and medicine as a whole have benefited a great deal from his resourcefulness, creativity, and entrepreneurial spirit.

  1. Migration and Workforce Planning in Medicine with Special Focus on Anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannicke Mellin-Olsen

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Counting health personnel and defining migration is more complicated than one should think at first glance. Migrating health workers are not a homogenous group, and many factors cause people to migrate—not only low wages but also lack of professional development possibilities, poor job satisfaction, outdated equipment, unsafe environment, and more. The opposite factors encourage people to stay. Many countries, including high-income countries benefit from remittances from migrating individuals. The World Health Organization has installed a code of Practice on the international recruitment of health workers. Although member countries have committed to follow this Code, it is not widely adhered to. Planning for the future is difficult, also because there are so many unknown factors related to the development of health-care levels, policies, inflow and outflow and more. Action must be taken in both donor and receiving countries. In anesthesiology, there is a huge workforce deficit globally. The world would need 136,000 additional physician anesthesia providers today to achieve an absolute minimum of five per 100,000 population. This will not happen unless all countries follow those that already have taken proactive steps in leading the direction forward. Anaesthesiology Society involvement is crucial.

  2. [Model to predict staffing for anesthesiology and post-anesthesia intensive care units and pain clinics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canet, J; Moral, V; Villalonga, A; Pelegrí, D; Gomar, C; Montero, A

    2001-01-01

    Human resources account for a large part of the budgets of anesthesia and post-anesthesia intensive care units and pain clinics (A-PICU-PC). Adequate staffing is a key factor in providing for both effective care and professional staff development. Changes in professional responsibilities have rendered obsolete the concept of one anesthesiologist per operating room. Duties must be analyzed objectively to facilitate understanding between hospital administrators and A-PICU-PC chiefs of service when assigning human resources. The Catalan Society of Anesthesiology, Post-anesthesia Intensive Care and Pain Therapy has developed a model for estimating requirements for A-PICU-PC staffing based on three factors: 1) Definition of staff positions that must be filled and criteria for assigning human resources; 2) Estimation of non-care-related time required by the department for training, teaching, research and internal management, and 3) Estimation of staff required to cover absences from work for vacations, personal leave or illness. The model revealed that the ratio of number of staff positions to number of persons employed by an A-PICU-PC is approximately 1.3. Differences in the nature of services managed by an A-PICU-PC or the type of hospital might change the ratio slightly. The model can be applied universally, independently of differences that might exist among departments. Widespread application would allow adoption of a common language to be used by health care managers and A-PICU-PC departments when discussing a basis for consensus about our specialty.

  3. 50th Year Anniversary of Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lertakyamanee, Jariya

    2016-05-01

    Department of Anesthesiology, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, has started to be a formal anesthesia division, divided from division of Surgery in 1965; hence our 50th year anniversary in 2015. Research is now a priority and mandatory mission, according to the vision of Mahidol University. Second mission is to teach and train, and we produce the highest number of states-of-the-art anesthesiologists and anesthetic nurses each year Curriculum and training are being continuously improved. From a small unit, now it is one of the largest departments and extends the service, our third mission, to more than only in the operating theaters. We look after pre-anesthesia assessment, inside and outside operating room anesthesia, post-operative pain relief Intensive Care Unit, and chronic pain management. The number of patients and their diseases increase; so do the complexities of surgeries. There are tremendous changes in drugs and equipment. There is the fourth mission on administration, IT and resource management. And the fifth mission which is corporate social responsibility. However, we still believe that compassion, responsibility and integrity are most important. We have taught and tried to live by the teaching of HRH the King's Father. And these will contribute to our progress and shine in the next 50 years.

  4. Influence of provider type (nurse anesthetist or resident physician), staff assignments, and other covariates on daily evaluations of anesthesiologists' quality of supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexter, Franklin; Ledolter, Johannes; Smith, Thomas C; Griffiths, David; Hindman, Bradley J

    2014-09-01

    At many U.S. healthcare facilities, supervision of anesthesiology residents and/or Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists (CRNAs) is a major daily responsibility of anesthesiologists. Our department implemented a daily process by which the supervision provided by each anesthesiologist working in operating rooms was evaluated by the anesthesiology resident(s) and CRNA(s) with whom they worked the previous day. Requests for evaluation were sent daily via e-mail to each resident and CRNA after working in an operating room. Supervision scores were analyzed after 6 months, and aligned with the cases' American Society of Anesthesiologists Relative Value Guide units. (1) Mean monthly evaluation completion rates exceeded 85% (residents P = 0.0001, CRNAs P = 0.0005). (2) Pairwise by anesthesiologist, residents and CRNAs mean supervision scores were correlated (P supervision scores provided by residents were: (a) greater when a resident had more units of work that day with the rated anesthesiologist (P supervision" significantly share commonalities, supervision scores should be analyzed separately for residents and CRNAs. Although mean supervision scores differ markedly among anesthesiologists, supervision scores are influenced negligibly by staff assignments (e.g., how busy the anesthesiologist is with other operating rooms).

  5. Demand in pediatric dentistry for sedation and general anesthesia by dentist anesthesiologists: a survey of directors of dentist anesthesiologist and pediatric dentistry residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C Gray; Jones, James E; Saxen, Mark A; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J; Walker, Laquia A; Weddell, James A; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade.

  6. Demand in Pediatric Dentistry for Sedation and General Anesthesia by Dentist Anesthesiologists: A Survey of Directors of Dentist Anesthesiologist and Pediatric Dentistry Residencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, C. Gray; Jones, James E.; Saxen, Mark A.; Maupome, Gerardo; Sanders, Brian J.; Walker, LaQuia A.; Weddell, James A.; Tomlin, Angela

    2012-01-01

    This study describes what training programs in pediatric dentistry and dental anesthesiology are doing to meet future needs for deep sedation/general anesthesia services required for pediatric dentistry. Residency directors from 10 dental anesthesiology training programs in North America and 79 directors from pediatric dentistry training programs in North America were asked to answer an 18-item and 22-item online survey, respectively, through an online survey tool. The response rate for the 10 anesthesiology training program directors was 9 of 10 or 90%. The response rate for the 79 pediatric dentistry training program directors was 46 of 79 or 58%. Thirty-seven percent of pediatric dentistry programs use clinic-based deep sedation/general anesthesia for dental treatment in addition to hospital-based deep sedation/general anesthesia. Eighty-eight percent of those programs use dentist anesthesiologists for administration of deep sedation/general anesthesia in a clinic-based setting. Pediatric dentistry residency directors perceive a future change in the need for deep sedation/general anesthesia services provided by dentist anesthesiologists to pediatric dentists: 64% anticipate an increase in need for dentist anesthesiologist services, while 36% anticipate no change. Dental anesthesiology directors compared to 2, 5, and 10 years ago have seen an increase in the requests for dentist anesthesiologist services by pediatric dentists reported by 56% of respondents (past 2 years), 63% of respondents (past 5 years), and 88% of respondents (past 10 years), respectively. Predicting the future need of dentist anesthesiologists is an uncertain task, but these results show pediatric dentistry directors and dental anesthesiology directors are considering the need, and they recognize a trend of increased need for dentist anesthesiologist services over the past decade. PMID:22428968

  7. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background: There is a phobia among doctors for the residency training program, since the establishment of ... Materials and Methods: Structured questionnaires were administered to residents at 3 training institutions in Nigeria. Results: ... Keywords: Decentralization, motivation, perception, remuneration, residents.

  8. Strategies to optimize MEDLINE and EMBASE search strategies for anesthesiology systematic reviews. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volpato, Enilze de Souza Nogueira; Betini, Marluci; Puga, Maria Eduarda; Agarwal, Arnav; Cataneo, Antônio José Maria; Oliveira, Luciane Dias de; Bazan, Rodrigo; Braz, Leandro Gobbo; Pereira, José Eduardo Guimarães; El Dib, Regina

    2018-01-15

    A high-quality electronic search is essential for ensuring accuracy and comprehensiveness among the records retrieved when conducting systematic reviews. Therefore, we aimed to identify the most efficient method for searching in both MEDLINE (through PubMed) and EMBASE, covering search terms with variant spellings, direct and indirect orders, and associations with MeSH and EMTREE terms (or lack thereof). Experimental study. UNESP, Brazil. We selected and analyzed 37 search strategies that had specifically been developed for the field of anesthesiology. These search strategies were adapted in order to cover all potentially relevant search terms, with regard to variant spellings and direct and indirect orders, in the most efficient manner. When the strategies included variant spellings and direct and indirect orders, these adapted versions of the search strategies selected retrieved the same number of search results in MEDLINE (mean of 61.3%) and a higher number in EMBASE (mean of 63.9%) in the sample analyzed. The numbers of results retrieved through the searches analyzed here were not identical with and without associated use of MeSH and EMTREE terms. However, association of these terms from both controlled vocabularies retrieved a larger number of records than did the use of either one of them. In view of these results, we recommend that the search terms used should include both preferred and non-preferred terms (i.e. variant spellings and direct/indirect order of the same term) and associated MeSH and EMTREE terms, in order to develop highly-sensitive search strategies for systematic reviews.

  9. Reporting and Methodology of Multivariable Analyses in Prognostic Observational Studies Published in 4 Anesthesiology Journals: A Methodological Descriptive Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielminotti, Jean; Dechartres, Agnès; Mentré, France; Montravers, Philippe; Longrois, Dan; Laouénan, Cedric

    2015-10-01

    Prognostic research studies in anesthesiology aim to identify risk factors for an outcome (explanatory studies) or calculate the risk of this outcome on the basis of patients' risk factors (predictive studies). Multivariable models express the relationship between predictors and an outcome and are used in both explanatory and predictive studies. Model development demands a strict methodology and a clear reporting to assess its reliability. In this methodological descriptive review, we critically assessed the reporting and methodology of multivariable analysis used in observational prognostic studies published in anesthesiology journals. A systematic search was conducted on Medline through Web of Knowledge, PubMed, and journal websites to identify observational prognostic studies with multivariable analysis published in Anesthesiology, Anesthesia & Analgesia, British Journal of Anaesthesia, and Anaesthesia in 2010 and 2011. Data were extracted by 2 independent readers. First, studies were analyzed with respect to reporting of outcomes, design, size, methods of analysis, model performance (discrimination and calibration), model validation, clinical usefulness, and STROBE (i.e., Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology) checklist. A reporting rate was calculated on the basis of 21 items of the aforementioned points. Second, they were analyzed with respect to some predefined methodological points. Eighty-six studies were included: 87.2% were explanatory and 80.2% investigated a postoperative event. The reporting was fairly good, with a median reporting rate of 79% (75% in explanatory studies and 100% in predictive studies). Six items had a reporting rate reported, a few methodological shortcomings were observed, both in explanatory and predictive studies, such as an insufficient number of events of the outcome (44.6%), exclusion of cases with missing data (93.6%), or categorization of continuous variables (65.1%.). The reporting of

  10. Pediatric Program Leadership's Contribution Toward Resident Wellness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Savanna L; Perkins, Kate; Reilly, Maura R; Sim, Myung-Shin; Li, Su-Ting T

    2018-02-27

    Residency program leaders are required to support resident well-being, but often do not receive training in how to do so. Determine frequency in which program leadership provides support for resident well-being, comfort in supporting resident well-being, and factors associated with need for additional training in supporting resident well-being. National cross-sectional web-based survey of pediatric program directors, associate program directors, and coordinators in June 2015, on their experience supporting resident well-being. Univariate and bivariate descriptive statistics compared responses between groups. Generalized linear modeling, adjusting for program region, size, program leadership role, and number of years in role determined factors associated with need for additional training. 39.3% (322/820) of participants responded. Most respondents strongly agreed that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their role, but few reported supporting resident well-being as part of their job description. Most reported supporting residents' clinical, personal, and health issues at least annually, and in some cases weekly, with 72% spending >10% of their time on resident well-being. Most program leaders desired more training. After adjusting for level of comfort in dealing with resident well-being issues, program leaders more frequently exposed to resident well-being issues were more likely to desire additional training (pProgram leaders spend a significant amount of time supporting resident well-being. While they feel that supporting resident well-being is an important part of their job, opportunities exist for developing program leaders through including resident wellness on job descriptions and training program leaders how to support resident well-being. Copyright © 2018 Academic Pediatric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Internal medicine residency training in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Hatice; Akcicek, Fehmi

    2005-12-01

    Medical school entrance depends on passing a central examination that is given annually by the National Selection and Placement Center. Undergraduate medical education takes 6 years. About 5000 students graduate from medical faculties annually. The central exam necessary for residency training is given by the National Selection and Placement Center. A Specialist Training Regulation regulates residency training. Internal medicine residency training takes 4 years and includes inpatient and outpatient care in wards and rotations. Residents prepare a dissertation that is used in the evaluation of residency competency. At the end of the residency period, residents who have been successful in previous evaluations take an oral exam followed by a written exam, which lead to their certification in internal medicine. Residents' scientific knowledge and skills are assessed by a jury consisting of five people, four from the same department and one from the equivalent department in another training institution. The title of specialist is granted after a certification exam given by training institutions and approved by the Ministry of Health. Internists are mainly employed in state hospitals, which are under the Ministry of Health. Subspecialty areas in internal medicine include gastroenterology, geriatrics, endocrinology, nephrology, hematology, rheumatology, immunology, allergology, and oncology. The training period for a subspecialty is 2 years. A substantial effort is being made all over the country to improve regulations and health care service delivery. These changes will also affect the residency training and manpower planning and employment of internists.

  12. Jumpstarting Academic Careers: A Workshop and Tools for Career Development in Anesthesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanofsky, Samuel D; Voytko, Mary Lou; Tobin, Joseph R; Nyquist, Julie G

    2011-01-01

    Career development is essential and has the potential to assist in building a sustained faculty within academic departments of Anesthesiology. Career development is essential for growth in academic medicine. Close attention to the details involved in career management, goal setting as part of career planning, and professional networking are key elements. This article examines the specific educational strategies involved in a 120 minute workshop divided into four 25 minute segments with 20 minutes at the end for discussion for training junior faculty in career development. The teaching methods include 1) brief didactic presentations, 2) pre-workshop completion of two professional development tools, 3) facilitated small group discussion using trained facilitators and 4) use of a commitment to change format. Three major learning tools were utilized in conjunction with the above methods: a professional network survey, a career planning and development form and a commitment to change form. Forty one participants from 2009 reported 80 projected changes in their practice behaviors in relation to career management: Build or enhance professional network and professional mentoring (36.3%); Set career goals, make a plan, follow though, collaborate, publish (35.1%); Increase visibility locally or nationally (10.0%); Building core skills, such as clinical, teaching, leading (36.3%); Identify the criteria for promotion in own institution (5.0%); Improved methods of documentation (2.5%). Over the past two years, the workshop has been very well received by junior faculty, with over 95% marking each of the following items as excellent or good (presentation, content, audiovisuals and objectives met). The challenge for continuing development and promotion of academic anesthesiologists lies in the explicit training of faculty for career advancement. Designing workshops using educational tools to promote a reflective process of the faculty member is the one method to meet this

  13. Impact of an Innovative Classroom-Based Lecture Series on Residents’ Evaluations of an Anesthesiology Rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Tanaka

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Millennial resident learners may benefit from innovative instructional methods. The goal of this study is to assess the impact of a new daily, 15 minutes on one anesthesia keyword, lecture series given by faculty member each weekday on resident postrotation evaluation scores. Methods. A quasi-experimental study design was implemented with the residents’ rotation evaluations for the 24-month period ending by 7/30/2013 before the new lecture series was implemented which was compared to the 14-month period after the lecture series began on 8/1/2013. The primary endpoint was “overall teaching quality of this rotation.” We also collected survey data from residents at clinical rotations at two other different institutions during the same two evaluation periods that did not have the education intervention. Results. One hundred and thirty-one residents were eligible to participate in the study. Completed surveys ranged from 77 to 87% for the eight-question evaluation instrument. On a 5-point Likert-type scale the mean score on “overall teaching quality of this rotation” increased significantly from 3.9 (SD 0.8 to 4.2 (SD 0.7 after addition of the lecture series, whereas the scores decreased slightly at the comparison sites. Conclusion. Rotation evaluation scores for overall teaching quality improved with implementation of a new structured slide daily lectures series.

  14. Optimization of serious bacterial infections intensive therapy in children in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yu. Kurochkin

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Effective selection of antibiotics in children with severe bacterial infections is often difficult because of microflora resistance. Extracorporeal detoxication methods, particularly discrete plasmapheresis are usually used for septic shock and total organ failure prevention. The aim of research. To conduct microbiological monitoring and to study a dynamics of medium molecular peptides in discrete plasmapheresis for intensive care optimization in children with severe bacterial infections in Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Department (AICU. Materials and methods. We investigated respiratory tract microflora by bacteriological method in 120 newborns and 30 children from 1 month with severe bacterial infections at admission and during prolonged stay in AICU. Discrete plasmapheresis was held in four children. Dynamic of medium molecular peptides was studied at admission, before discrete plasmapheresis and after it. Statistical data processing was performed using the Microsoft Excel software package. Results. It was found that in AICU in older children in admission grampositive and gramnegative flora was defined in equal quantity. The best sensitivity of the respiratory tract microflora was for the glycopeptides, oxazolidinones , II generation cephalosporins and macrolides, more than 60% - for aminoglycosides and lincosamides. However, when children spent more than 7-14 days in the department, nosocomial microflora was represented primarily by gram-negative organisms (80%, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa. It was found to be inappropriate to use cephalosporins and macrolides in AICU for older children after their long stay there; the sensitivity to aminoglycosides was less than 60%, to anti-pseudomonal carbapenems not more than 30%. In AICU of newborns grampositive flora was found in 95%, mostly Staphylococcus haemolyticus. It was entirely sensitive for glycopeptides, oxazolidinones, fluoroquinolones, carbapenems, and also for co-trimoxazole and

  15. [Personnel marketing in anesthesiology. Perception, use and evaluation by the target group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlet, T

    2015-09-01

    The human resources situation in the healthcare system is characterized by a manpower shortage. Recruiting medical staff is of great importance for hospitals and particularly in anesthesiology. Approaching and recruiting staff usually happens through external personnel marketing (PM); however, up until now the efficacy of these PM measures has barely been empirically investigated. The goal of this empirical study was to examine how familiar hospital physicians at varying career levels are with the different tools employed by external PM and how frequently they used as well as rated these tools in terms of benefits. Based on this information, the preferences of medical staff with respect to detailing the workplace of "hospital physician" as well as factors of the hospital's attractiveness as an employer were evaluated. Another aim was to derive recommendations on how to optimize the marketing instruments used for external PM in the healthcare system. In an internet-based survey, 154 female and male physicians were questioned about their knowledge, use and benefit assessment of a total of 43 PM tools. Conventional methods of addressing applicants were commonly used but ranked behind the more personal and direct targeting tools in terms of benefit assessments. Internet-based tools with a conceptual affinity to conventional methods were also highly rated in terms of benefits. In contrast, unconventional methods of addressing applicants were hardly known and were not viewed as being useful. The PM tools from the field of "overall conditions for cooperation in the company" mainly received high to very high benefit assessments. These referred primarily to non-monetary factors, human resource development measures and also to aspects of remuneration. Image-promoting PM tools were rarely assessed as being useful, with the exception of measures aimed at creating personal contact between the hospital or unit/department and applicants or those allowing personal insight into the

  16. Guidelines for Percutaneous Dilatational Tracheostomy (PDT) from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Rørbæk; Guldager, Henrik; Rewers, Mikael

    2011-01-01

    Percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy is a common procedure in intensive care. This guideline from the Danish Society of Intensive Care Medicine (DSIT) and the Danish Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DASAIM) describes indications and contraindications, timing, complications...... compared to surgical tracheostomy, anaesthesia and technique, decannulation strategy, as well as training and education....

  17. Interactions between medical residents and drug companies: a national survey after the Mediator® affair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Montastruc

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The present study aimed to describe exposure and attitudes of French medical residents towards pharmaceutical industry. The study was performed shortly after the Mediator affair which revealed several serious conflicts of interest inside the French health system. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A cross-sectional study was implemented among residents from 6 French medical faculties. Independent education in pharmacology, attitudes towards the practices of pharmaceutical sales representatives, opinions concerning the pharmaceutical industry, quality of information provided by the pharmaceutical industry, and opinions about pharmaceutical company sponsorship were investigated through a web-based questionnaire. We also assessed potential changes in resident attitudes following the Mediator affair. The mean value of exposure to drug companies was 1.9 times per month. Global opinions towards drug company information were negative for 42.7% of the residents and positive for only 8.2%. Surprisingly, 81.6% of residents claimed that they had not changed their practices regarding drug information since the Mediator affair. Multivariate analyses found that residents in anesthesiology were less likely to be exposed than others (OR = 0.17 CI95% [0.05-0.61], exposure was significantly higher at the beginning of residence (p<0.001 and residents who had a more positive opinion were more frequently exposed to drug companies (OR = 2.12 CI95% [1.07-4.22]. CONCLUSIONS: Resident exposure to drug companies is around 1 contact every 2 weeks. Global opinion towards drug information provided by pharmaceutical companies was negative for around 1 out of 2 residents. In contrast, residents tend to consider the influences of the Mediator affair on their practice as relatively low. This survey enabled us to identify profiles of residents who are obviously less exposed to pharmaceutical industry. Current regulatory provisions are not sufficient, indicating that

  18. Residency Allocation Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Residency Allocation Database is used to determine allocation of funds for residency programs offered by Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). Information...

  19. [Stress and job satisfaction in the discipline of inpatient anesthesiology : results of a web-based survey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, J; Groneberg, D A

    2014-01-01

    How do physicians in the specialty of anesthesiology perceive the working conditions regarding stress and job satisfaction? The health system in Germany has been confronted with a rapidly changing framework over the last 20 years: For example, an increased influence of economic patterns on the workflow and the medical decision of physicians has been established forcing them to always take the economic aspects into account. Moreover, a new generation (generation Y) of physicians with other requirements of the work place, meaning mainly a demand for a better work-life balance, has gained a foothold in hospitals. These changes make it very important to investigate the status quo of current working conditions. Working conditions in hospitals in the specialty of anesthesiology is the main issue investigated in this study. For this study 1,321 completed online-questionnaires from physicians in hospitals with the specialty of anesthesiology were analyzed. The questionnaire was based on the stress theory, the effort-reward-imbalance model (ERI) and the job-demand-control model (JDC).The items used in the questionnaire were taken from the ERI questionnaire and the short questionnaire on work analysis (KFZA). By calculating a certain ratio of several items (according to the stress theory), the prevalence of distress could be measured. In addition the overall job satisfaction in the field of anesthesiology was measured and analyzed. In this study 47.0 % (95 %-CI: 44.3-49.7 %) of all respondents showed signs of distress. Simultaneously, 61.8 % (95 %-CI: 59.2-64.5 %) were very satisfied with the job situation. Regarding gender, female physicians perceived a lower control of the work situation whereas male physicians perceived a much higher decision level. This led to a higher prevalence of distress in the group of female physicians regarding the JDC model (odds ratio, OR: 1.54, 95 %-CI: 1.19-2.01). Regarding age, the prevalence of distress increased from 36.5

  20. Using 3D acoustic telemetry to assess the response of resident salmonids to strobe lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington: Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, 2001-2002 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.W.; Farley, M.J.; Hansen, G.S.; Shurtleff, D.J.; Rondorf, D.W.; LeCaire, R.

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse.

  1. [Web-based for preanesthesia evaluation record: a structured, evidence-based patient interview to assess the anesthesiological risk profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Sylvia; Lau, Alexandra; Krämer, Michael; Wendler, Olafur Gunnarsson; Müller-Lobeck, Lutz; Scheding, Christoph; Klarhöfer, Manja; Schaffartzik, Walter; Neumann, Tim; Krampe, Henning; Spies, Claudia

    2011-10-01

    At present, providers at an Anesthesia Preoperative Evaluation Clinic (APEC) may have difficulties in gaining access to relevant clinical information, including external medical records, surgical dictations etc. This common occurence makes obtaining an informed consent by the patient after a complete pre-anesthetic assessment difficult. This form of patient information is subject to wide interindividual variations and, thus, represents a challenge for quality assurance. Insufficient or not completed pre-anesthetic assessments can lead to an untimely termination of an elective procedure.A web-based pre-anesthetic evaluation record moves the time point of the first contact to well before the day of admission. The current pre-anesthesia evaluation record is replaced by a structured interview in the form of a complex of questions in a specific hierarchy taking guidelines, standard operating procedures (SOP) and evidence-based medicine (EBM) into consideration. The answers to the complex of questions are then classified according to agreed criteria and possible scoring systems of relevant classifications. The endpoints result in procedural recommendations not only for the informing anesthesiologist but also for the patient. The standardized risk criteria can be used as core process indicators to check the process quality of the anesthesiological risk evaluation. Short-notice cancellations of elective operations due to incomplete premedication procedures will then be avoided with the help of such structured and evidence-based patient interviews with detailed assessment of the anesthesiological risk profile.The web-based anesthesia evaluation record (WAR) corresponds with the recommendations of the DGAI to carry out the staged information in analogy to the staged information of Weissauer. The basic practice is not changed by WACH. By means of WACH, the time point of the first contact with anesthesia is moved forward and occurs within a different framework. WACH has

  2. The Evaluation of the Distribution and Antimcrobial Susceptibility Profile of the Strains Isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulfem Ece

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hospital infections are important uptodate health problems because of high mortality and increased cost. The increment in antimicrobial resistance is progressing though new antimicrobial agents are arising. This leads to an increase in hospital infections and difficulty in treatment. In our study we aimed to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit. Material and Method: The antimicrobial susceptibility of the strains isolated at Anesthesiology Intensive Care Unit between April 1st 2012- October 25th 2012 were included. The identification and the antimicrobial susceptibility were studied by automatized Vitek version 2.0 (Biomerieux, France. Results: A total of 155 strains isolated from wound, blood, tracheal secretion, sputum and urine samples were included. They are consisted of 40 A. baumannii, 24 E.coli, 25 P. aeruginosa, 20 K.pneumoniae, 12 Methicilin Resistant Coagulase Negative Staphylococci (MRCoNS, nine Methiciline Susceptible S.aureus (MSSA, eight C.albicans, four Methicilin Resistant S.aureus (MRSA, one C.famata, one C.tropicalis, three E.faecalis, two E.faecium, three S.marsecens, two P. mirabilis and one H.influenzae. Clinical samples were 81 tracheal secretions, 25 wound specimen, 23 blood culture, 18 urine, seven sputum, and one BAL. All the Gram positive strains were susceptible to glycopeptides. Enterobacteriaceae members were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. Discussion: Antimicrobial resistance is an important issue worldwide. Multidiciplinary approach is needed as in ICUs where the complicated patients are followed. Monitoring antibiotic resistance profile contributes to treatment and decreasing resistance rates. The resistance profile will guide the antibiotic use policy. Increment in number of isolates in future will help to obtain the antimicrobial resistance profile.

  3. Genetic and phenotype catalog of native resident trout of the interior Columbia River Basin: FY-99 report: populations of the Pend Oreille, Kettle, and Sanpoil River Basins of Colville National Forest/ fiscal year 1999 report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trotter, Patrick C.

    2001-01-01

    The 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council specifies the recovery and preservation of population health of native resident fishes of the Columbia River Basin. Among the native resident species of concern are interior rainbow trout of the Columbia River redband subspecies Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri 1 and westslope cutthroat trout O. clarki lewisi. The westslope cutthroat trout has been petitioned for listing under the U. S. Endangered Species Act (American Wildlands et al. 1997). Before at-risk populations can be protected, their presence and status must be established. Where introgression from introduced species is a concern, as in the case of both westslope cutthroat trout and redband rainbow trout, genetic issues must be addressed as well. As is true with native trout elsewhere in the western United States (Behnke 1992), most of the remaining pure populations of these species in the Columbia River Basin are in relatively remote headwater reaches. The objective of this project is to photo-document upper Columbia Basin native resident trout populations in Washington, and to ascertain their species or subspecies identity and relative genetic purity using a nonlethal DNA technique. FY-99 was year two of a five-year project in which we conducted field visits to remote locations to seek out and catalog these populations. In FY-99 we worked in collaboration with the Colville National Forest and Kalispel Indian Tribe to catalog populations in the northeastern corner of Washington State

  4. Development and implementation of a residency project advisory board.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagam, Julie K; Iglar, Arlene; Kindsfater, Julie; Loeb, Al; Smith, Chad; Spexarth, Frank; Brierton, Dennis; Woller, Thomas

    2017-06-15

    The development and implementation of a residency project advisory board (RPAB) to manage multiple pharmacy residents' yearlong projects across several residency programs are described. Preceptor and resident feedback during our annual residency program review and strategic planning sessions suggested the implementation of a more-coordinated approach to the identification, selection, and oversight of all components of the residency project process. A panel of 7 department leaders actively engaged in residency training and performance improvement was formed to evaluate the residency project process and provide recommendations for change. These 7 individuals would eventually constitute the RPAB. The primary objective of the RPAB at Aurora Health Care is to provide oversight and a structured framework for the selection and execution of multiple residents' yearlong projects across all residency programs within our organization. Key roles of the RPAB include developing expectations, coordinating residency project ideas, and providing oversight and feedback. The development and implementation of the RPAB resulted in a significant overhaul of our entire yearlong resident project process. Trends toward success were realized after the first year of implementation, including consistent expectations, increased clarity and engagement in resident project ideas, and more projects meeting anticipated endpoints. The development and implementation of an RPAB have provided a framework to optimize the organization, progression, and outcomes of multiple pharmacy resident yearlong projects in all residency programs across our pharmacy enterprise. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Burnout in Tunisian medical residents: About 149 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Zid, A; Homri, W; Ben Romdhane, I; Bram, N; Labbane, R

    2017-09-01

    Burnout is a professional psychological chronic stress-induced syndrome defined by three dimensions: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and low personal accomplishment. This syndrome concerns all professions but especially healthcare staff. Numerous studies have attempted to document the impact of work activities on the doctor's mental health. According to the literature, junior doctors are more vulnerable to develop this syndrome. Are to determine the prevalence of severe burnout among residents of different specialties: anesthesiology, general surgery, emergency medicine, psychiatry, basic sciences. The secondary end points are to analyze risk factors, causes and consequences associated with burnout. A cross-sectional study conducted among medical residents working in hospitals located in the governorates of Tunis. Three instruments were used: an anonymous self-administered questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) to assess burnout, and Abstract Beck Depression Inventory to evaluate the intensity of depression. Severe burnout was defined as a severely high level of both emotional exhaustion and depersonalization associated with a severely low level of personal accomplishment. A total of 149 participants (response rate=76.8%) participated in the survey. Among participants, 17.14% (n=26) had a severe burnout. The emergency medicine residents had the highest rate of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization and severe depression. Overall, resident respondents, 31% (n=46), had moderate to severe depression. Among stress factors, those significantly correlated to burnout were: lack of hobbies (Pburnout were: Antecedents of specialty change (P=0.017) and desire for a specialty change (Pburnout was not found. Medical residents in all specialties are at risk of burnout. Nevertheless, this study revealed that some specialties are more exhausting, which is consistent with the results reported in the literature. Moreover, it is shown that several stress factors

  6. Residency training program: Perceptions of residents

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was carried out to ascertain the perception of the residency ... the time of the study. Analysis of the respondents showed similar findings for both senior and junior levels of training. Discussion. The introduction of the residency training program .... Overseas training/ attachment should be re-introduced. 12. (10.1).

  7. Barriers and Facilitators to Effective Feedback: A Qualitative Analysis of Data From Multispecialty Resident Focus Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Shalini T; Zegarek, Matthew H; Fromme, H Barrett; Ryan, Michael S; Schumann, Sarah-Anne; Harris, Ilene B

    2015-06-01

    Despite the importance of feedback, the literature suggests that there is inadequate feedback in graduate medical education. We explored barriers and facilitators that residents in anesthesiology, emergency medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and surgery experience with giving and receiving feedback during their clinical training. Residents from 3 geographically diverse teaching institutions were recruited to participate in focus groups in 2012. Open-ended questions prompted residents to describe their experiences with giving and receiving feedback, and discuss facilitators and barriers. Data were transcribed and analyzed using the constant comparative method associated with a grounded theory approach. A total of 19 residents participated in 1 of 3 focus groups. Five major themes related to feedback were identified: teacher factors, learner factors, feedback process, feedback content, and educational context. Unapproachable attendings, time pressures due to clinical work, and discomfort with giving negative feedback were cited as major barriers in the feedback process. Learner engagement in the process was a major facilitator in the feedback process. Residents provided insights for improving the feedback process based on their dual roles as teachers and learners. Time pressures in the learning environment may be mitigated by efforts to improve the quality of teacher-learner relationships. Forms for collecting written feedback should be augmented by faculty development to ensure meaningful use. Efforts to improve residents' comfort with giving feedback and encouraging learners to engage in the feedback process may foster an environment conducive to increasing feedback.

  8. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verma, Vivek [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Nebraska, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Burt, Lindsay [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Gimotty, Phyllis A. [Department of Biostatistics and Epidemiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ojerholm, Eric, E-mail: eric.ojerholm@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These

  9. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-11-15

    To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (Pcontemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals-most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These contemporary figures may be useful to medical students considering

  10. Contemporary Trends in Radiation Oncology Resident Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Vivek; Burt, Lindsay; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Ojerholm, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that recent resident research productivity might be different than a decade ago, and to provide contemporary information about resident scholarly activity. Methods and Materials: We compiled a list of radiation oncology residents from the 2 most recent graduating classes (June 2014 and 2015) using the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology annual directories. We queried the PubMed database for each resident's first-authored publications from postgraduate years (PGY) 2 through 5, plus a 3-month period after residency completion. We abstracted corresponding historical data for 2002 to 2007 from the benchmark publication by Morgan and colleagues (Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys 2009;74:1567-1572). We tested the null hypothesis that these 2 samples had the same distribution for number of publications using the Wilcoxon rank-sum test. We explored the association of demographic factors and publication number using multivariable zero-inflated Poisson regression. Results: There were 334 residents publishing 659 eligible first-author publications during residency (range 0-17; interquartile range 0-3; mean 2.0; median 1). The contemporary and historical distributions were significantly different (P<.001); contemporary publication rates were higher. Publications accrued late in residency (27% in PGY-4, 59% in PGY-5), and most were original research (75%). In the historical cohort, half of all articles were published in 3 journals; in contrast, the top half of contemporary publications were spread over 10 journals—most commonly International Journal of Radiation Oncology • Biology • Physics (17%), Practical Radiation Oncology (7%), and Radiation Oncology (4%). Male gender, non-PhD status, and larger residency size were associated with higher number of publications in the multivariable analysis. Conclusion: We observed an increase in first-author publications during training compared with historical data from the mid-2000s. These

  11. Using 3D Acoustic Telemetry to Assess the Response of Resident Salmonids to Strobe Lights in Lake Roosevelt, Washington; Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Feasibility Study, Annual Report 2001-2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Russlee; Farley, M.; Hansen, Gabriel

    2003-01-01

    In 1995, the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was established to mitigate the loss of anadromous fish due to the construction of Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams. The objectives of the Chief Joseph Enhancement Project are to determine the status of resident kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) populations above Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee dams and to enhance kokanee and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) populations. Studies conducted at Grand Coulee Dam documented substantial entrainment of kokanee through turbines at the third powerhouse. In response to finding high entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam, the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) recommended investigating the use of strobe lights to repel fish from the forebay of the third powerhouse. Therefore, our study focused on the third powerhouse and how strobe lights affected fish behavior in this area. The primary objective of our study was to assess the behavioral response of kokanee and rainbow trout to strobe lights using 3D acoustic telemetry, which yields explicit spatial locations of fish in three dimensions. Our secondary objectives were to (1) use a 3D acoustic system to mobile track tagged fish in the forebay and upriver of Grand Coulee Dam and (2) determine the feasibility of detecting fish using a hydrophone mounted in the tailrace of the third powerhouse. Within the fixed hydrophone array located in the third powerhouse cul-de-sac, we detected 50 kokanee and 30 rainbow trout, accounting for 47% and 45% respectively, of the fish released. Kokanee had a median residence time of 0.20 h and rainbow trout had a median residence time of 1.07 h. We detected more kokanee in the array at night compared to the day, and we detected more rainbow trout during the day compared to the night. In general, kokanee and rainbow trout approached along the eastern shore and the relative frequency of kokanee and rainbow trout detections was highest along the eastern shoreline of the 3D array. However, because we

  12. Resident Characteristics Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Resident Characteristics Report summarizes general information about households who reside in Public Housing, or who receive Section 8 assistance. The report...

  13. Adverse Event Reporting: Harnessing Residents to Improve Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tevis, Sarah E; Schmocker, Ryan K; Wetterneck, Tosha B

    2017-10-13

    Reporting of adverse and near miss events are essential to identify system level targets to improve patient safety. Resident physicians historically report few events despite their role as front-line patient care providers. We sought to evaluate barriers to adverse event reporting in an effort to improve reporting. Our main outcomes were as follows: resident attitudes about event reporting and the frequency of event reporting before and after interventions to address reporting barriers. We surveyed first year residents regarding barriers to adverse event reporting and used this input to construct a fishbone diagram listing barriers to reporting. Barriers were addressed, and resident event reporting was compared before and after efforts were made to reduce obstacles to reporting. First year residents (97%) recognized the importance of submitting event reports; however, the majority (85%) had not submitted an event report in the first 6 months of residency. Only 7% of residents specified that they had not witnessed an adverse event in 6 months, whereas one third had witnessed 10 or more events. The main barriers were as follows: lack of knowledge about how to submit events (38%) and lack of time to submit reports (35%). After improving resident education around event reporting and simplifying the reporting process, resident event reporting increased 230% (68 to 154 annual reports, P = 0.025). We were able to significantly increase resident event reporting by educating residents about adverse events and near misses and addressing the primary barriers to event reporting. Moving forward, we will continue annual resident education about patient safety, focus on improving feedback to residents who submit reports, and empower senior residents to act as role models to junior residents in patient safety initiatives.

  14. Leadership for All: An Internal Medicine Residency Leadership Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jared M; Wininger, David A; Martin, Bryan

    2016-10-01

    Developing effective leadership skills in physicians is critical for safe patient care. Few residency-based models of leadership training exist. We evaluated residents' readiness to engage in leadership training, feasibility of implementing training for all residents, and residents' acceptance of training. In its fourth year, the Leadership Development Program (LDP) consists of twelve 90-minute modules (eg, Team Decision Making and Bias, Leadership Styles, Authentic Leadership) targeting all categorical postgraduate year (PGY) 1 residents. Modules are taught during regularly scheduled educational time. Focus group surveys and discussions, as well as annual surveys of PGY-1s assessed residents' readiness to engage in training. LDP feasibility was assessed by considering sustainability of program structures and faculty retention, and resident acceptance of training was assessed by measuring attendance, with the attendance goal of 8 of 12 modules. Residents thought leadership training would be valuable if content remained applicable to daily work, and PGY-1 residents expressed high levels of interest in training. The LDP is part of the core educational programming for PGY-1 residents. Except for 2 modules, faculty presenters have remained consistent. During academic year 2014-2015, 45% (13 of 29) of categorical residents participated in at least 8 of 12 modules, and 72% (21 of 29) participated in at least 7 of 12. To date, 125 categorical residents have participated in training. Residents appeared ready to engage in leadership training, and the LDP was feasible to implement. The attendance goal was not met, but attendance was sufficient to justify program continuation.

  15. Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course: A Collaboration between Anatomists and Orthopedic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFriez, Curtis B.; Morton, David A.; Horwitz, Daniel S.; Eckel, Christine M.; Foreman, K. Bo; Albertine, Kurt H.

    2011-01-01

    A challenge for new residents and senior residents preparing for board examinations is refreshing their knowledge of basic science disciplines, such as human gross anatomy. The Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Utah School of Medicine has for many years held an annual Orthopedic Resident Anatomy Review Course during the summer months…

  16. [Burnout in nursing residents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Gianfábio Pimentel; de Barros, Alba Lúcia Bottura Leite; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antônio; Zeitoun, Sandra Salloum

    2011-03-01

    Nursing residents may experience physical and emotional exhaustion from the daily life of attending the Program. The aim of this study was to determine the Burnout incidence among Nursing Residents. An investigative, descriptive, analytical, longitudinal-prospective study was conducted with 16 Residents over two years. The Maslach Burnout Inventory was used, translated and validated for Brazil, as well as a sociodemographic/occupational data tool. Of all residents, 17.2% showed high rates in Emotional Exhaustion and Depersonalization; 18.8% showed impaired commitment in Personal Accomplishment, 75% of which belonged to specialty areas, such as Emergency Nursing, Adult and Pediatric Intensive Care. Age and specialty area were positively correlated with Personal Accomplishment. One of the Residents was identified with changes in three subscales of the Maslach Burnout Inventory, thus characterized as a Burnout Syndrome patient. Nursing Residents have profiles of disease. Knowing these factors can minimize health risks of these workers.

  17. Thoracic surgical resident education: a costly endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clint; Holler, Ben; Hicks, George L; Bove, Ed L; Wright, Cameron D; Merrill, Walter H; Fullerton, Dave A

    2014-12-01

    We sought to define an accurate measure of thoracic surgical education costs. Program directors from six distinct and differently sized and geographically located thoracic surgical training programs used a common template to provide estimates of resident educational costs. These data were reviewed, clarifying questions or discrepancies when noted and using best estimates when exact data were unavailable. Subsequently, a composite of previously published cost-estimation products was used to capture accurate cost data. Data were then compiled and averaged to provide an accurate picture of all costs associated with thoracic surgical education. Before formal accounting was performed, the estimated average for all programs was approximately $250,000 per year per resident. However, when formal evaluations by the six programs were performed, the annual cost of resident education ranged from $330,000 to $667,000 per year per resident. The average cost of $483,000 per year was almost double the initial estimates. Variability was noted by region and size of program. Faculty teaching costs varied from $208,000 to $346,000 per year. Simulation costs ranged from $0 to $80,000 per year. Resident savings to program ranged from $0 to $135,000 per year and averaged $37,000 per year per resident. Thoracic surgical education costs are considerably higher than initial estimates from program directors and probably represent an unappreciated source of financial burden for cardiothoracic surgical educational programs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examined the regularly scheduled, formal teaching sessions in a single anesthesiology residency program to (1) map the most common primary instructional methods, (2) map the use of 10 known teaching techniques, and (3) assess if residents scored sessions that incorporated active......-question written survey rating the session. The most common primary instructional methods were computer slides-based classroom lectures (66%), workshops (15%), simulations (5%), and journal club (5%). The number of teaching techniques used per formal teaching session averaged 5.31 (SD, 1.92; median, 5...... had a mean score of 8.44 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.2) compared with a mean score of 8.63 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.1) for active sessions (P = 0.63). Slides-based classroom lectures were the most common instructional method, and faculty used an average of 5 known teaching techniques per...

  19. [Consensus on Perioperative Transesophageal Echocardiography of the Brazilian Society of Anesthesiology and the Department of Cardiovascular Image of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Filho, Marcello Fonseca; Morhy, Samira Saady; Vasconcelos, Henrique Doria de; Lineburger, Eric Benedet; Papa, Fabio de Vasconcelos; Botelho, Eduardo Souza Leal; Fernandes, Marcelo Ramalho; Daher, Maurício; Bihan, David Le; Gatto, Chiara Scaglioni Tessmer; Fischer, Cláudio Henrique; Silva, Alexander Alves da; Galhardo Júnior, Carlos; Neves, Carolina Baeta; Fernandes, Alexandre; Vieira, Marcelo Luiz Campos

    Through the Life Cycle of Intraoperative Transesophageal Echocardiography (ETTI/SBA) the Brazilian Society of Anesthesiology, together with the Department of Cardiovascular Image of the Brazilian Society of Cardiology (DIC/SBC), createded a task force to standardize the use of intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography by Brazilian anesthesiologists and echocardiographers based on scientific evidence from the Society of Cardiovascular Anesthesiologists/American Society of Echocardiography (SCA/ASE) and the Brazilian Society of Cardiology. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Facility Focus: Residence Halls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    College Planning & Management, 2003

    2003-01-01

    Describes four examples of residence hall design, one renovation and three new residence halls, that exemplify design principles that meet student and institutional requirements. The examples are at (1) the University of Illinois at Chicago; (2) Bowdoin College; (3) Muhlenberg College; and (4) Spring Arbor University. (SLD)

  1. Rain Forest Dance Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Dawn

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the author's experience as a dancer and choreographer artist-in-residence with third graders at a public elementary school, providing a cultural arts experience to tie in with a theme study of the rain forest. Details the residency and the insights she gained working with students, teachers, and theme. (SR)

  2. Psychologic effects of residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, D B

    1983-03-01

    The intense situational and physiologic stresses that accompany postgraduate training may have serious psychosocial ramifications. Although only a small proportion of residents have overt psychiatric illness, virtually all display some psychologic impairment. Contributing factors include life-changes, stresses associated with providing patient care, loss of social support, long working hours, sleep deprivation, and underlying personality traits of residents. The manifestations of this impairment are variable and may be subtle. In response to these problems, residency programs have taken steps to provide psychosocial support. Unfortunately, most programs do not offer formal support groups or seminars to discuss difficulties that accompany residency. Further definition of the psychosocial effects of residency may prompt changes that make the training of physicians a more humane process.

  3. Use of tablet (iPad®) as a tool for teaching anesthesiology in an orthopedic rotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Pedro Paulo; Hawrylyshyn, Kathryn Ashley; Macario, Alex

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare scores on house staff evaluations of "overall teaching quality" during a rotation in anesthesia for orthopedics in the first six months (n=11 residents were provided with curriculum in a printed binder) and in the final six months (n=9 residents were provided with the same curriculum in a tablet computer (iPad, Apple®, Inc, Cupertino, Ca)). At the beginning of the two-week rotation, the resident was given an iPad containing: a syllabus with daily reading assignments, rotation objectives according to the ACGME core competencies, and journal articles. Prior to the study, these curriculum materials had been distributed in a printed binder. The iPad also provided peer reviewed internet sites and direct access to online textbooks, but was not linked to the electronic medical record. At the end of the rotation, residents anonymously answered questions to evaluate the rotation on an ordinal scale from 1 (unsatisfactory) to 5 (outstanding). All residents were unaware that the data would be analyzed retrospectively for this study. The mean global rating of the rotation as assessed by "overall teaching quality of this rotation" increased from 4.09 (N=11 evaluations before intervention, SD 0.83, median 4, range 3-5) to 4.89 (N=9 evaluations after intervention, SD 0.33, median 5, range 4-5) p=0.04. Residents responded favorably to the introduction of an innovative iPad based curriculum for the orthopedic anesthesia rotation. More studies are needed to show how such mobile computing technologies can enhance learning, especially since residents work at multiple locations, have duty hour limits, and the need to document resident learning in six ACGME core competencies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Results of the 1993 Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Stella M.; Flynn, Daniel F.

    1996-01-01

    In 1993, the Association of Residents in Radiation Oncology (ARRO) conducted its tenth annual survey of all residents training in radiation oncology in the United States. The characteristics of current residents are described. Factors influencing the choice of Radiation Oncology as a medical specialty, and posttraining career plans were identified. Residents raised issues on the adequacy of training, problems in work routine, and expressed concerns about board certification and recertification, and about decreased future practice opportunities

  5. Residents in difficulty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mette Krogh; O'Neill, Lotte; Hansen, Dorthe Høgh

    2016-01-01

    Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world such as the Scand......Background The majority of studies on prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty have been conducted in English-speaking countries and the existing literature may not reflect the prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in other parts of the world...... such as the Scandinavian countries, where healthcare systems are slightly different. The aim of this study was to examine prevalence and characteristics of residents in difficulty in one out of three postgraduate medical training regions in Denmark, and to produce both a quantifiable overview and in-depth understanding...... of the topic. Methods We performed a mixed methods study. All regional residency program directors (N = 157) were invited to participate in an e-survey about residents in difficulty. Survey data were combined with database data on demographical characteristics of the background population (N = 2399...

  6. NERSC 2001 Annual Report; ANNUAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hules, John

    2001-01-01

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005

  7. The PRIME curriculum. Clinical research training during residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlwes, R J; Shunk, R L; Avins, A; Garber, J; Bent, S; Shlipak, M G

    2006-05-01

    The Primary Medical Education (PRIME) program is an outpatient-based, internal medicine residency track nested within the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) categorical medicine program. Primary Medical Education is based at the San Francisco Veteran's Affairs Medical Center (VAMC), 1 of 3 teaching hospitals at UCSF. The program accepts 8 UCSF medicine residents annually, who differentiate into PRIME after internship. In 2000, we implemented a novel research methods curriculum with the dual purposes of teaching basic epidemiology skills and providing mentored opportunities for clinical research projects during residency. Single academic internal medicine program. The PRIME curriculum utilizes didactic lecture, frequent journal clubs, work-in-progress sessions, and active mentoring to enable residents to "try out" a clinical research project during residency. Among 32 residents in 4 years, 22 residents have produced 20 papers in peer-reviewed journals, 1 paper under review, and 2 book chapters. Their clinical evaluations are equivalent to other UCSF medicine residents. While learning skills in evidence-based medicine, residents can conduct high-quality research. Utilizing a collaboration of General Internal Medicine researchers and educators, our curriculum affords residents the opportunity to "try-out" clinical research as a potential future career choice.

  8. NRC/AMRMC Resident Research Associateship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    ADDRESS OF POST-TENURE POSITION / JOB 0RGANIZATION University hospital Bonn, Dept. for Anesthesiology and operative Intensive Care medicine, Sigmund ... Freud -Str 25, 53127 Bonn, Germany 16) POST-TENURE POSITION STATUS / CATEGORY Please indicate only one. Permanent position at the NRC host agency

  9. Technology in Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Jordan

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the necessity for incorporating current technology in today's college residence halls to meet the more diverse and continued activities of its students. Technology addressed covers data networking and telecommunications, heating and cooling systems, and fire-safety systems. (GR)

  10. 42 CFR 483.114 - Annual review of NF residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...) An inpatient psychiatric hospital for individuals under age 21, as described in section 1905(h) of the Act; or (iii) An institution for mental diseases providing medical assistance to individuals age...

  11. Satisfaction among residents in ASHP-accredited pharmacy residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDenBerg, C; Murphy, J E

    1997-07-01

    The level of work satisfaction among pharmacists in ASHP-accredited residencies was studied. In March 1996 a questionnaire designed to measure residency satisfaction was mailed to 697 individuals in ASHP-accredited pharmacy practice and specialty practice residencies. Subjects responded to 16 statements relating to intrinsic and extrinsic determinants of work satisfaction on a scale of 1 to 5, where 1 = strongly disagree and 5 = strongly agree. Questionnaires were returned by 413 (59%) of the residents. The respondents were predominantly women (76%), and most (86%) had at least a Pharm. D. degree. Hospitals were the primary work setting (88%). Of the 413 residents, 305 were in pharmacy practice residencies and 108 were in specialized residencies. None of the mean scores indicated disagreement (scores 3) with the negatively worded statements. The median and mode were equal to 2 (disagree) for the three negatively worded items and 4 (agree) for all but three positively worded items. Only 8% of the residents indicated that they would not accept the residency again if given the chance. Specialized residents tended to rate positively worded statements higher and negatively worded statements lower than pharmacy practice residents. Female residents indicated greater satisfaction than male residents. Pay and benefits were rated slightly better than neutral. Pharmacy residents appeared generally satisfied with their residencies. Specialized pharmacy residents were more satisfied than pharmacy practice residents, and women were more satisfied than men.

  12. Burnout Syndrome During Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Namigar; Karacalar, Serap; Polat, Cengiz; Kıran, Özlem; Gültop, Fethi; Kalyon, Seray Türkmen; Sinoğlu, Betül; Zincirci, Mehmet; Kaya, Ender

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is identified the degree of Burnout Syndrome (BOS) and find out its correlation with years of recidency and sociodemograpfic chareacteristics, training, sleeping habits, such as smoking and alcohol consumption. After approval from the Hospital Ethics Committee and obtaining informed consent, First, second, third, fourth and fifth year of recidency staff (n=127) working in our hospital were involved in this study. The standardized Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used in this study. Fifty six male (44.1%) and seventy one female (55.9%) residents were enroled in this study (Coranbach Alfa(α)=0.873). 57% of the first year residents smokes cigaret and 54% of them use alcohol. 2% of them gets one day off after hospital night shift, 61% of them suffers from disturbed sleep. 60% of them had been stated that they willingly selected their profession. 61% of them prefers talking to friends and 32% of them prefers shopping to overcome stress. There were statistical difference acording to years of recidency in MBI, Emotional Burnout (EB) and desensitisation scale (DS) points. EB scale points of the second year of residency group was statisticaly higher than fourth year of residency group. DS points of second year of residency group was also statisticaly higher than the third and fourth year of residency group. There was no statistical difference between any groups in Personal Success. BOS is a frequent problem during residency in anaesthesia. Appropriate definition and awareness are the first important steps to prevent this syndrome. Further administrative approaches should be evaluated with regard to their effects.

  13. 2005 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  14. 2009 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  15. 2013 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  16. 2011 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  17. 2007 Resident Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    City and County of Durham, North Carolina — The purpose of the annual City/County survey: To objectively assess citizen satisfaction with the delivery of City/County servicesTo set a baseline for future...

  18. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    This is the thirty-ninth annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The period covered by this report is the year ending March 31, 1986. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) was established in 1946, by the Atomic Energy Control Act (AEC Act), (Revised Statues of Canada (R.S.C.) 1970 cA19). It is a departmental corporation (Schedule B) within the meaning and purpose of the Financial Administration Act. The AECB controls the development, application and use of atomic energy in Canada, and participates on behalf of Canada in international measures of control. The AECB is also repsonsible for the administration of the Nuclear Liability Act, (R.S.C. 1970 c29 1st Supp) as amended, including the designation of nuclear installations and the prescription of basic insurance to be carried by the operators of such nuclear installations. The AECB reports to Parliament through a designated Minister, currently the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources

  19. Residents as teachers: survey of Canadian family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Victor K; Burke, Clarissa A; Narula, Archna

    2013-09-01

    To examine Canadian family medicine residents' perspectives surrounding teaching opportunities and mentorship in teaching. A 16-question online survey. Canadian family medicine residency programs. Between May and June 2011, all first- and second-year family medicine residents registered in 1 of the 17 Canadian residency programs as of September 2010 were invited to participate. A total of 568 of 2266 residents responded. Demographic characteristics, teaching opportunities during residency, and resident perceptions about teaching. A total of 77.7% of family medicine residents indicated that they were either interested or highly interested in teaching as part of their future careers, and 78.9% of family medicine residents had had opportunities to teach in various settings. However, only 60.1% of respondents were aware of programs within residency intended to support residents as teachers, and 33.0% of residents had been observed during teaching encounters. It appears that most Canadian family medicine residents have the opportunity to teach during their residency training. Many are interested in integrating teaching as part of their future career goals. Family medicine residencies should strongly consider programs to support and further develop resident teaching skills.

  20. Association of General Surgery Resident Remediation and Program Director Attitudes With Resident Attrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwed, Alexander C; Lee, Steven L; Salcedo, Edgardo S; Reeves, Mark E; Inaba, Kenji; Sidwell, Richard A; Amersi, Farin; Are, Chandrakanth; Arnell, Tracey D; Damewood, Richard B; Dent, Daniel L; Donahue, Timothy; Gauvin, Jeffrey; Hartranft, Thomas; Jacobsen, Garth R; Jarman, Benjamin T; Melcher, Marc L; Mellinger, John D; Morris, Jon B; Nehler, Mark; Smith, Brian R; Wolfe, Mary; Kaji, Amy H; de Virgilio, Christian

    2017-12-01

    Previous studies of resident attrition have variably included preliminary residents and likely overestimated categorical resident attrition. Whether program director attitudes affect attrition has been unclear. To determine whether program director attitudes are associated with resident attrition and to measure the categorical resident attrition rate. This multicenter study surveyed 21 US program directors in general surgery about their opinions regarding resident education and attrition. Data on total resident complement, demographic information, and annual attrition were collected from the program directors for the study period of July 1, 2010, to June 30, 2015. The general surgery programs were chosen on the basis of their geographic location, previous collaboration with some coauthors, prior work in surgical education and research, or a program director willing to participate. Only categorical surgical residents were included in the study; thus, program directors were specifically instructed to exclude any preliminary residents in their responses. Five-year attrition rates (2010-2011 to 2014-2015 academic years) as well as first-time pass rates on the General Surgery Qualifying Examination and General Surgery Certifying Examination of the American Board of Surgery (ABS) were collected. High- and low-attrition programs were compared. The 21 programs represented different geographic locations and 12 university-based, 3 university-affiliated, and 6 independent program types. Programs had a median (interquartile range [IQR]) number of 30 (20-48) categorical residents, and few of those residents were women (median [IQR], 12 [5-17]). Overall, 85 of 966 residents (8.8%) left training during the study period: 15 (17.6%) left after postgraduate year 1, 34 (40.0%) after postgraduate year 2, and 36 (42.4%) after postgraduate year 3 or later. Forty-four residents (51.8%) left general surgery for another surgical discipline, 21 (24.7%) transferred to a different surgery

  1. Documenting resident procedure and diagnostic experience: simplifying the process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldor, R A; Broadhurst, J

    1997-10-01

    The Residency Review Committee (RRC) requires documentation of family practice residents' procedural and diagnostic experiences. Further, hospital privileging is frequently based on documentation of prior clinical experience. Residency programs need a user-friendly (ie, resident-friendly) mechanism for collecting data and generating reports to document these experiences. This paper outlines a simplified, user-friendly method of documenting resident procedural and diagnostic experiences. We developed a pocket-sized, optically scannable card for data input. This is coupled with a computerized database with report generation capability. The system is based on diagnostic clusters to further simplify the data input process. The system's setup costs are about $10,000. Annual maintenance and operational fees are about $5,000. After instituting the system, the number of residents submitting documentation information increased substantially. This system meets both RRC and potential clinical privileging requirements and provides a useful tool for guiding resident evaluation and developing appropriate training opportunities during the latter half of the residency. Simplified, accurate documentation may allow for comparisons among residents at various levels--program, state, and national.

  2. Residency and Career Plans and Indebtedness of 1985 Medical School Graduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Thomas H.

    1986-01-01

    Data from an annual national survey of senior medical students regarding their residency plans, postresidency career plans, and level of indebtedness on medical school graduation are reported by specialty, with some narration. (MSE)

  3. Opportunities to Create New General Surgery Residency Programs to Alleviate the Shortage of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Ashley D; Beadles, Christopher A; Sheldon, George F; Charles, Anthony G

    2016-06-01

    To estimate the capacity for supporting new general surgery residency programs among U.S. hospitals that currently do not have such programs. The authors compiled 2011 American Hospital Association data regarding the characteristics of hospitals with and without a general surgery residency program and 2012 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education data regarding existing general surgery residencies. They performed an ordinary least squares regression to model the number of residents who could be trained at existing programs on the basis of residency program-level variables. They identified candidate hospitals on the basis of a priori defined criteria for new general surgery residency programs and an out-of-sample prediction of resident capacity among the candidate hospitals. The authors found that 153 hospitals in 39 states could support a general surgery residency program. The characteristics of these hospitals closely resembled the characteristics of hospitals with existing programs. They identified 435 new residency positions: 40 hospitals could support 2 residents per year, 99 hospitals could support 3 residents, 12 hospitals could support 4 residents, and 2 hospitals could support 5 residents. Accounting for progressive specialization, new residency programs could add 287 additional general surgeons to the workforce annually (after an initial five- to seven-year lead time). By creating new general surgery residency programs, hospitals could increase the number of general surgeons entering the workforce each year by 25%. A challenge to achieving this growth remains finding new funding mechanisms within and outside Medicare. Such changes are needed to mitigate projected workforce shortages.

  4. Resident fatigue in otolaryngology residents: a Web based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nida, Andrew M; Googe, Benjamin J; Lewis, Andrea F; May, Warren L

    2016-01-01

    Resident fatigue has become a point of emphasis in medical education and its effects on otolaryngology residents and their patients require further study. The purpose of our study was to evaluate the prevalence and nature of fatigue in otolaryngology residents, evaluate various quality of life measures, and investigate associations of increased fatigue with resident safety. Anonymous survey. Internet based. United States allopathic otolaryngology residents. None. The survey topics included demographics, residency structure, sleep habits and perceived stress. Responses were correlated with a concurrent Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire to evaluate effects of fatigue on resident training and quality of life. 190 residents responded to the survey with 178 completing the Epworth Sleep Scale questionnaire. Results revealed a mean Epworth Sleep Scale score of 9.9±5.1 with a median of 10.0 indicating a significant number of otolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Statistically significant correlations between Epworth Sleep Scale and sex, region, hours of sleep, and work hours were found. Residents taking in-house call had significantly fewer hours of sleep compared to home call (p=0.01). Residents on "head and neck" (typically consisting of a large proportion of head and neck oncologic surgery) rotations tended to have higher Epworth Sleep Scale and had significantly fewer hours of sleep (p=.003) and greater work hours (potolaryngology residents are excessively sleepy. Our data suggest that the effects of fatigue play a role in resident well-being and resident safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Quarterly, Bi-annual and Annual Reports

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Quarterly, Bi-annual and Annual Reports are periodic reports issued for public release. For the deep set fishery these reports are issued quarterly and anually....

  6. [Association between burnout syndrome and anxiety in residents and anesthesiologists of the Federal District].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govêia, Catia Sousa; Cruz, Tiago Tolentino Mendes da; Miranda, Denismar Borges de; Guimarães, Gabriel Magalhães Nunes; Ladeira, Luís Cláudio Araújo; Tolentino, Fernanda D'Ávila Sampaio; Amorim, Marco Aurélio Soares; Magalhães, Edno

    2018-03-26

    There is a shortage of studies addressing the association between burnout syndrome and anxiety among anesthesiologists. Identifying the relationship between these two conditions is of fundamental importance for the prevention, follow-up, and treatment of the professionals. Thus, we evaluated the association between burnout syndrome and anxiety in anesthesiologists and residents of anesthesiology in the Federal District. A cross-sectional study using a convenience sample of residents and anesthesiologists from the Federal District. The correlation between State Trait Anxiety Inventory and Burnout Syndrome (Maslach Burnout Inventory) was tested using multiple linear regression analysis, considering a significance level of 5%. Of the 78 completed forms, there were predominance of males (57.69%), mean age of 42 ± 9.7 years for anesthesiologists and 30 ± 2.9 years for residents. burnout syndrome had a prevalence of 2.43% among anesthesiologists and 2.70% among resident physicians, while a high risk for its manifestation was 21.95% in anesthesiologists and 29.72% in resident physicians. There was a correlation between state-anxiety and the variables burnout emotional exhaustion, burnout depersonalization, and trait-anxiety. Regarding trace-anxiety, there was no statistically significant correlation with other variables. There is association between state-anxiety and the emotional exhaustion dimensions of burnout, burnout depersonalization, and trait-anxiety. The occurrence of anxiety can negatively influence the way the individual faces daily stressors, which may be related to the use of ineffective strategies to cope with stress. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  7. Factors affecting orthopedic residency selection: a cross-sectional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strelzow, Jason; Petretta, Robert; Broekhuyse, Henry M

    2017-06-01

    Annually, orthopedic residency programs rank and recruit the best possible candidates. Little evidence exists identifying factors that potential candidates use to select their career paths. Recent literature from nonsurgical programs suggests hospital, social and program-based factors influence program selection. We sought to determine what factors influence the choice of an orthopedic career and a candidate's choice of orthopedic residency program. We surveyed medical student applicants to orthopedic programs and current Canadian orthopedic surgery residents (postgraduate year [PGY] 1-5). The confidential online survey focused on 3 broad categories of program selection: educational, program cohesion and noneducation factors. Questions were graded on a Likert Scale and tailed for mean scores. In total, 139 residents from 11 of 17 Canadian orthopedic programs (49% response rate) and 23 medical student applicants (88% response rate) completed our survey. Orthopedic electives and mandatory rotations were reported by 71% of participants as somewhat or very important to their career choice. Collegiality among residents (4.70 ± 0.6), program being the "right fit" (4.65 ± 0.53) and current resident satisfaction with their chosen program (4.63 ±0.66) were ranked with the highest mean scores on a 5-point Likert scale. There are several modifiable factors that residency programs may use to attract applicants, including early availability of clerkship rotations and a strong mentorship environment emphasizing both resident-resident and resident-staff cohesion. Desirable residency programs should develop early access to surgical and operative skills. These must be balanced with a continued emphasis on top-level orthopedic training.

  8. Leadership Training in Otolaryngology Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, John P; Fried, Marvin P; Smith, Richard V; Hsueh, Wayne; Choi, Karen

    2017-06-01

    Although residency training offers numerous leadership opportunities, most residents are not exposed to scripted leadership instruction. To explore one program's attitudes about leadership training, a group of otolaryngology faculty (n = 14) and residents (n = 17) was polled about their attitudes. In terms of self-perception, more faculty (10 of 14, 71.4%) than residents (9 of 17, 52.9%; P = .461) considered themselves good leaders. The majority of faculty and residents (27 of 31) thought that adults could be taught leadership ability. Given attitudes about leadership ability and the potential for improvement through instruction, consideration should be given to including such training in otolaryngology residency.

  9. Preparing Future Leaders: An Integrated Quality Improvement Residency Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, Stacy; Shields, Sara; Upshur, Carole

    2016-06-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recognized the importance of quality improvement (QI) training and requires that accredited residencies in all specialties demonstrate that residents are "integrated and actively participate in interdisciplinary clinical quality improvement and patient safety activities." However, competing demands in residency training may make this difficult to accomplish. The study's objective is to develop and evaluate a longitudinal curriculum that meets the ACGME requirement for QI and patient safety training and links to patient-centered medical home (PCMH) practices. Residents in the Worcester Family Medicine Residency (WFMR) participated in a faculty-developed quality improvement curriculum that included web-based tutorials, quality improvement projects, and small-group sessions across all 3 years of residency. They completed self-evaluations of knowledge and use of curricular activities annually and at graduation, and comparisons were made between two graduating classes, as well as comparison of end of PGY2 to end of PGY3 for one class. Graduating residents who completed the full 3 years of the curriculum rated themselves as significantly more skilled in nine of 15 areas assessed at end of residency compared to after PGY2 and reported confidence in providing future leadership in a focus group. Five areas were also rated significantly higher than prior-year residents. Involving family medicine residents in a longitudinal curriculum with hands-on practice in implementing QI, patient safety, and chronic illness management activities that are inclusive of PCMH goals increased their self-perceived skills and leadership ability to implement these new and emerging evidence-based practices in primary care.

  10. First Author Research Productivity of United States Radiation Oncology Residents: 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morgan, Peter B.; Sopka, Dennis M.; Kathpal, Madeera; Haynes, Jeffrey C.; Lally, Brian E.; Li, Linna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Participation in investigative research is a required element of radiation oncology residency in the United States. Our purpose was to quantify the first author research productivity of recent U.S. radiation oncology residents during their residency training. Methods and Materials: We performed a computer-based search of PubMed and a manual review of the proceedings of the annual meetings of the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology to identify all publications and presented abstracts with a radiation oncology resident as the first author between 2002 and 2007. Results: Of 1,098 residents trained at 81 programs, 50% published ≥1 article (range, 0-9), and 53% presented ≥1 abstract (range, 0-3) at an American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meeting. The national average was 1.01 articles published and 1.09 abstracts presented per resident during 4 years of training. Of 678 articles published, 82% represented original research and 18% were review articles. Residents contributed 15% of all abstracts at American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology annual meetings, and the resident contribution to orally presented abstracts increased from 12% to 21% during the study period. Individuals training at programs with >6 residents produced roughly twice as many articles and abstracts. Holman Research Pathway residents produced double the national average of articles and abstracts. Conclusion: Although variability exists among individuals and among training programs, U.S. radiation oncology residents routinely participate in investigative research suitable for publication or presentation at a scientific meeting. These data provide national research benchmarks that can assist current and future radiation oncology residents and training programs in their self-assessment and research planning.

  11. [Competency-based Neurosurgery Residency Programme].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobato, Ramiro D; Jiménez Roldan, Luis; Alen, José F; Castaño, Ana M; Munarriz, Pablo M; Cepeda, Santiago; Lagares, Alfonso

    2016-01-01

    A programme proposal for competency-based Neurosurgery training adapted to the specialization project is presented. This proposal has been developed by a group of neurosurgeons commissioned by the SENEC (Spanish Society of Neurosurgery) and could be modified to generate a final version that could come into force coinciding with the implementation of the specialization programme. This document aims to facilitate the test of the new programme included in the online version of our journal. Total training period is 6 years; initial 2 years belong to the surgery specialization and remaining 4 years belong to core specialty period. It is a competency-based programmed based on the map used by the US Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) including the following domains of clinical competency: Medical knowledge, patient care, communication skills, professionalism, practice-based learning and improvement, health systems, interprofessional collaboration and professional and personal development. Subcompetencies map in the domains of Knowledge and Patient care (including surgical competencies) was adapted to the one proposed by AANS and CNS (annex 1 of the programme). A subcompetency map was also used for the specialization rotations. Resident's training is based on personal study (self-learning) supported by efficient use of information sources and supervised clinical practice, including bioethical instruction, clinical management, research and learning techniques. Resident evaluation proposal includes, among other instruments, theoretical knowledge tests, objective and structured evaluation of the level of clinical competency with real or standardised patients, global competency scales, 360-degree evaluation, clinical record audits, milestones for residents progress and self-assessment (annex 2). Besides, residents periodically assess the teaching commitment of the department's neurosurgeons and other professors participating in rotations, and annually

  12. An organized, comprehensive, and security-enabled strategic response to the Haiti earthquake: a description of pre-deployment readiness preparation and preliminary experience from an academic anesthesiology department with no preexisting international disaster response program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCunn, Maureen; Ashburn, Michael A; Floyd, Thomas F; Schwab, C William; Harrington, Paul; Hanson, C William; Sarani, Babak; Mehta, Samir; Speck, Rebecca M; Fleisher, Lee A

    2010-12-01

    On Tuesday, January 12, 2010 at 16:53 local time, a magnitude 7.0 M(w) earthquake struck Haiti. The global humanitarian attempt to respond was swift, but poor infrastructure and emergency preparedness limited many efforts. Rapid, successful deployment of emergency medical care teams was accomplished by organizations with experience in mass disaster casualty response. Well-intentioned, but unprepared, medical teams also responded. In this report, we describe the preparation and planning process used at an academic university department of anesthesiology with no preexisting international disaster response program, after a call from an American-based nongovernmental organization operating in Haiti requested medical support. The focus of this article is the pre-deployment readiness process, and is not a post-deployment report describing the medical care provided in Haiti. A real-time qualitative assessment and systematic review of the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania's communications and actions relevant to the Haiti earthquake were performed. Team meetings, conference calls, and electronic mail communication pertaining to planning, decision support, equipment procurement, and actions and steps up to the day of deployment were reviewed and abstracted. Timing of key events was compiled and a response timeline for this process was developed. Interviews with returning anesthesiology members were conducted. Four days after the Haiti earthquake, Partners in Health, a nonprofit, nongovernmental organization based in Boston, Massachusetts, with >20 years of experience providing medical care in Haiti contacted the University of Pennsylvania Health System to request medical team support. The departments of anesthesiology, surgery, orthopedics, and nursing responded to this request with a volunteer selection process, vaccination program, and systematic development of equipment lists. World Health Organization and Centers for Disease Control guidelines, the American

  13. Simulation-based Assessment to Reliably Identify Key Resident Performance Attributes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Richard H; Muret-Wagstaff, Sharon L; Boulet, John R; Cooper, Jeffrey B; Petrusa, Emil R; Baker, Keith H; Davidyuk, Galina; Dearden, Jennifer L; Feinstein, David M; Jones, Stephanie B; Kimball, William R; Mitchell, John D; Nadelberg, Robert L; Wiser, Sarah H; Albrecht, Meredith A; Anastasi, Amanda K; Bose, Ruma R; Chang, Laura Y; Culley, Deborah J; Fisher, Lauren J; Grover, Meera; Klainer, Suzanne B; Kveraga, Rikante; Martel, Jeffrey P; McKenna, Shannon S; Minehart, Rebecca D; Mitchell, John D; Mountjoy, Jeremi R; Pawlowski, John B; Pilon, Robert N; Shook, Douglas C; Silver, David A; Warfield, Carol A; Zaleski, Katherine L

    2018-04-01

    Obtaining reliable and valid information on resident performance is critical to patient safety and training program improvement. The goals were to characterize important anesthesia resident performance gaps that are not typically evaluated, and to further validate scores from a multiscenario simulation-based assessment. Seven high-fidelity scenarios reflecting core anesthesiology skills were administered to 51 first-year residents (CA-1s) and 16 third-year residents (CA-3s) from three residency programs. Twenty trained attending anesthesiologists rated resident performances using a seven-point behaviorally anchored rating scale for five domains: (1) formulate a clear plan, (2) modify the plan under changing conditions, (3) communicate effectively, (4) identify performance improvement opportunities, and (5) recognize limits. A second rater assessed 10% of encounters. Scores and variances for each domain, each scenario, and the total were compared. Low domain ratings (1, 2) were examined in detail. Interrater agreement was 0.76; reliability of the seven-scenario assessment was r = 0.70. CA-3s had a significantly higher average total score (4.9 ± 1.1 vs. 4.6 ± 1.1, P = 0.01, effect size = 0.33). CA-3s significantly outscored CA-1s for five of seven scenarios and domains 1, 2, and 3. CA-1s had a significantly higher proportion of worrisome ratings than CA-3s (chi-square = 24.1, P < 0.01, effect size = 1.50). Ninety-eight percent of residents rated the simulations more educational than an average day in the operating room. Sensitivity of the assessment to CA-1 versus CA-3 performance differences for most scenarios and domains supports validity. No differences, by experience level, were detected for two domains associated with reflective practice. Smaller score variances for CA-3s likely reflect a training effect; however, worrisome performance scores for both CA-1s and CA-3s suggest room for improvement.

  14. Canadian pharmacy practice residents' projects: publication rates and study characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Michelle; Duffett, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Research projects are a key component of pharmacy residents' education. Projects represent both a large investment of effort for each resident (up to 10 weeks over the residency year) and a large body of research (given that there are currently over 150 residency positions in Canada annually). Publication of results is a vital part of the dissemination of information gleaned from these projects. To determine the publication rate for research projects performed under the auspices of accredited English-language hospital pharmacy residency programs in Canada and to describe the study characteristics of residency projects performed in Ontario from 1999/2000 to 2008/2009. Lists of residents and project titles for the period of interest were obtained from residency coordinators. PubMed, CINAHL, the Canadian Journal of Hospital Pharmacy, and Google were searched for evidence of publication of each project identified, as an abstract or presentation at a meeting, a letter to the editor, or a full-text manuscript. The library holdings of the University of Toronto were reviewed to determine study characteristics of the Ontario residency projects. For the objective of this study relating to publication rate, 518 projects were included. The overall publication rate was 32.2% (60 [35.9%] as abstracts and 107 [64.1%] as full-text manuscripts). Publication in pharmacy-specific journals (66 [61.7%] of 107 full-text manuscripts) was more frequent than publication in non-pharmacy-specific journals. The publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts remained stable over time. Of the 202 Ontario residency projects archived in the University of Toronto's library, most were cohort studies (83 [41.1%]), and the most common topic was efficacy and/or safety of a medication (46 [22.8%]). Most hospital pharmacy residents' projects were unpublished, and the publication rate of projects as full-text manuscripts has not increased over time. Most projects were observational studies

  15. Annual Check-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Annual Check-Up Posted under Health Guides . Updated 24 April 2017. + ... I get ready for my annual medical check-up? If this is your first visit to your ...

  16. Association of the 2011 ACGME resident duty hour reform with general surgery patient outcomes and with resident examination performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaram, Ravi; Chung, Jeanette W; Jones, Andrew T; Cohen, Mark E; Dahlke, Allison R; Ko, Clifford Y; Tarpley, John L; Lewis, Frank R; Hoyt, David B; Bilimoria, Karl Y

    2014-12-10

    In 2011, the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) restricted resident duty hour requirements beyond those established in 2003, leading to concerns about the effects on patient care and resident training. To determine if the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform was associated with a change in general surgery patient outcomes or in resident examination performance. Quasi-experimental study of general surgery patient outcomes 2 years before (academic years 2009-2010) and after (academic years 2012-2013) the 2011 duty hour reform. Teaching and nonteaching hospitals were compared using a difference-in-differences approach adjusted for procedural mix, patient comorbidities, and time trends. Teaching hospitals were defined based on the proportion of cases at which residents were present intraoperatively. Patients were those undergoing surgery at hospitals participating in the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP). General surgery resident performance on the annual in-training, written board, and oral board examinations was assessed for this same period. National implementation of revised resident duty hour requirements on July 1, 2011, in all ACGME accredited residency programs. Primary outcome was a composite of death or serious morbidity; secondary outcomes were other postoperative complications and resident examination performance. In the main analysis, 204,641 patients were identified from 23 teaching (n = 102,525) and 31 nonteaching (n = 102,116) hospitals. The unadjusted rate of death or serious morbidity improved during the study period in both teaching (11.6% [95% CI, 11.3%-12.0%] to 9.4% [95% CI, 9.1%-9.8%], P general surgery patient outcomes or differences in resident examination performance. The implications of these findings should be considered when evaluating the merit of the 2011 ACGME duty hour reform and revising related policies in the future.

  17. Survival prediction among nursing home residents: A longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Claudia Kam Yuk; Ho, Lily Yuen Wah; Chin, Kenny Chi Wing; Kwong, Enid Wai Yung

    2018-03-01

    To determine the survival time and predictors of survival of residents in a nursing home. Nursing home residents admitted from June 2008 (when the nursing home started operating) to December 2012 (n = 230) to a new nursing home in Hong Kong were prospectively followed. The predictors of survival in the residents were assessed annually, with the exception of those who did not want to continue with the study, or were hospitalized, discharged from the nursing home or died, to compare changes occurring from 2008 to 2012. Cox's regression analysis was used to examine the predictors of survival. A total of 66 of the nursing home residents (28.7%) died during the study period. The median length of survival was 20.46 months. Sex, the number of diseases, depressive symptoms, cognitive status and nutritional status were found to be significant predictors of survival. It is crucial for healthcare providers to offer quality care to residents in long-term care to enhance their well-being in the final sojourn of their lives. Although there are no consistent reports of predictors in the international literature, it is important to address the modifiable predictors, as this might lead to improvements in the quality of life of the residents. Geriatr Gerontol Int 2018; 18: 428-433. © 2017 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  18. The evolution of racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in US otolaryngology residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Joseph S; Young, Meredith; Velly, Ana M; Nguyen, Lily H P

    2013-07-01

    To examine the evolution of racial, ethnic, and gender diversity in US otolaryngology-head and neck surgery residency programs and compare these figures with other residency programs. Retrospective database review. US residency programs. Information concerning minority and female representation in US residency programs was obtained from annually published graduate medical education reports by the Journal of the American Medical Association from 1975 to 2010. Minority representation among US population and university students was obtained from the US Census Bureau. The racial, ethnic, and gender diversity of otolaryngology residents was then compared with other medical fields (general surgery, family medicine, and internal medicine). Underrepresentation in otolaryngology-head and neck surgery is particularly disconcerting for African Americans (-2.3%/y, P = .09) and Native Americans (1.5%/y, P = .11) given their nonsignificant annual growth rates. Hispanic representation (17.3%/y, P otolaryngology but is half the rate of growth of the Hispanic American population (32.8%/y, P otolaryngology residents. Despite increasing gender, ethnic, and racial diversity among medical residents in general, female and certain minority group representation in US otolaryngology residency programs is lagging. These findings are in contrast to rising trends of diversity within other residency programs including general surgery.

  19. Education Research: Neurology resident education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayans, David; Schneider, Logan; Adams, Nellie; Khawaja, Ayaz M.; Engstrom, John

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To survey US-trained graduating neurology residents who are American Academy of Neurology members, in an effort to trend perceived quality and completeness of graduate neurology education. Methods: An electronic survey was sent to all American Academy of Neurology members graduating from US neurology residency programs in the Spring of 2014. Results: Of 805 eligible respondents, 24% completed the survey. Ninety-three percent of adult neurology residents and 56% of child neurology residents reported plans to pursue fellowship training after residency. Respondents reported a desire for additional training in neurocritical care, neuro-oncology, neuromuscular diseases, botulinum toxin injection, and nerve blocks. There remains a clear deficit in business training of neurology residents, although there was notable improvement in knowledge of coding and office management compared to previous surveys. Discussion: Although there are still areas of perceived weakness in neurology training, graduating neurology residents feel generally well prepared for their chosen careers. However, most still pursue fellowship training for reasons that are little understood. In addition to certain subspecialties and procedures, practice management remains deficient in neurology training and is a point of future insecurity for most residents. Future curriculum changes should consider resident-reported gaps in knowledge, with careful consideration of improving business training. PMID:26976522

  20. Maintaining the Fire but Avoiding Burnout: Implementation and Evaluation of a Resident Well-Being Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riall, Taylor S; Teiman, Joshua; Chang, Michelle; Cole, Denzel; Leighn, Tambre; McClafferty, Hilary; Nfonsam, Valentine N

    2018-04-01

    There have been few programs designed to improve surgical resident well-being, and such efforts often lack formal evaluation. General surgery residents participated in the Energy Leadership Well-Being and Resiliency Program. They were assessed at baseline and 1 year after implementation using the Energy Leadership Index (measures emotional intelligence), Maslach Burnout Inventory General Survey, Perceived Stress Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the annual required ACGME resident survey. Scores before and after implementation were compared using paired t-tests for continuous variables and chi-square tests for categorical variables. Forty-nine general surgery residents participate in the program. One year after implementation, resident score on the Energy Leadership Index improved (from 3.16 ± 0.24 to 3.24 ± 0.32; p = 0.03). Resident perceived stress decreased from baseline (Perceived Stress Scale score, from 17.0 ± 7.2 to 15.7 ± 6.2; p = 0.05). Scores on the emotional exhaustion scale of the Maslach Burnout Inventory decreased (from 16.8 ± 8.4 to 14.4 ± 8.5; p = 0.04). Resident-reported satisfaction improved in many areas; satisfaction with leadership skills, work relationships, communication skills, productivity, time management, personal freedom, and work-life balance, increased during the 1-year intervention (p = NS). On the annual ACGME resident survey, residents' evaluation of the program as positive or very positive increased from 80% to 96%. This study demonstrates that formal implementation of a program to improve resident well-being positively impacted residents' perceived stress, emotional exhaustion, emotional intelligence, life satisfaction, and their perception of the residency program. Formal evaluation and reporting of such efforts allow for reproducibility and scalability, with the potential for widespread impact on resident well-being. Copyright © 2017 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Factors Influencing Resident Choice of Prosthodontic Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojnarwsky, Pandora Keala Lee; Wang, Yan; Shah, Kumar; Koka, Sreenivas

    2017-06-01

    The decision by prosthodontic residency program directors to employ the Match process highlights the need to understand applicant priorities that influence their choice of which programs to rank highly. The purpose of this study is to determine the factors that were most important to residents when choosing from among nonmilitary based prosthodontics dental residency programs in the United States. Following completion of a pilot study, all currently enrolled prosthodontic residents at nonmilitary residency programs were invited to participate via the internet. The study consisted of a survey instrument asking residents to rank 26 possible factors that might impact an applicant's choice of residency program. In addition, the instrument collected other possible influencing variables including gender and debt load. Mean rank scores were compared to determine the most and least important factors. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare specific factors between the possible influencing variables. Two hundred and thirty residents completed the survey instrument, representing a 54.1% response rate of possible participants. With regard to factors influencing program choice, reputation of the residency program was the factor ranked the highest by participants, followed in descending order by the program director's personality, curriculum content, access to use of the latest digital technology, and opportunities for dental implant placement. Quality of schools for children, community outreach opportunities, and the ability to moonlight were ranked as the least important factors. Male and female residents ranked factors such as tuition/stipend, curriculum content, and community outreach opportunities significantly differently. Depending on debt load, residents ranked the factors tuition/stipend, ability to moonlight, curriculum content, and safety of the area where the program is differently. Current prosthodontic residents valued the reputation of the program as the most

  2. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcher, Donald S.; Harrison, James H.; Sinard, John H.; Riben, Michael W.; Boyer, Philip J.; Plath, Sue; Thompson, Arlene; Pantanowitz, Liron

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER) is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016). Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time. PMID:28725772

  3. Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter H. Henricks MD

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Recognition of the importance of informatics to the practice of pathology has surged. Training residents in pathology informatics has been a daunting task for most residency programs in the United States because faculty often lacks experience and training resources. Nevertheless, developing resident competence in informatics is essential for the future of pathology as a specialty. Objective: To develop and deliver a pathology informatics curriculum and instructional framework that guides pathology residency programs in training residents in critical pathology informatics knowledge and skills, and meets Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Informatics Milestones. Design: The College of American Pathologists, Association of Pathology Chairs, and Association for Pathology Informatics formed a partnership and expert work group to identify critical pathology informatics training outcomes and to create a highly adaptable curriculum and instructional approach, supported by a multiyear change management strategy. Results: Pathology Informatics Essentials for Residents (PIER is a rigorous approach for educating all pathology residents in important pathology informatics knowledge and skills. PIER includes an instructional resource guide and toolkit for incorporating informatics training into residency programs that vary in needs, size, settings, and resources. PIER is available at http://www.apcprods.org/PIER (accessed April 6, 2016. Conclusions: PIER is an important contribution to informatics training in pathology residency programs. PIER introduces pathology trainees to broadly useful informatics concepts and tools that are relevant to practice. PIER provides residency program directors with a means to implement a standardized informatics training curriculum, to adapt the approach to local program needs, and to evaluate resident performance and progress over time.

  4. Incorporating resident research into the dermatology residency program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Richard F; Raimer, Sharon S; Kelly, Brent C

    2013-01-01

    Programmatic changes for the dermatology residency program at The University of Texas Medical Branch were first introduced in 2005, with the faculty goal incorporating formal dermatology research projects into the 3-year postgraduate training period. This curriculum initially developed as a recommendation for voluntary scholarly project activity by residents, but it evolved into a program requirement for all residents in 2009. Departmental support for this activity includes assignment of a faculty mentor with similar interest about the research topic, financial support from the department for needed supplies, materials, and statistical consultation with the Office of Biostatistics for study design and data analysis, a 2-week elective that provides protected time from clinical activities for the purpose of preparing research for publication and submission to a peer-reviewed medical journal, and a departmental award in recognition for the best resident scholarly project each year. Since the inception of this program, five classes have graduated a total of 16 residents. Ten residents submitted their research studies for peer review and published their scholarly projects in seven dermatology journals through the current academic year. These articles included three prospective investigations, three surveys, one article related to dermatology education, one retrospective chart review, one case series, and one article about dermatopathology. An additional article from a 2012 graduate about dermatology education has also been submitted to a journal. This new program for residents was adapted from our historically successful Dermatology Honors Research Program for medical students at The University of Texas Medical Branch. Our experience with this academic initiative to promote dermatology research by residents is outlined. It is recommended that additional residency programs should consider adopting similar research programs to enrich resident education. PMID:23901305

  5. Burnout among Dutch medical residents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, J.T.; Hoekstra-Weebers, J.E.; Van De Wiel, H.B.; Gazendam-Donofrio, S.M.; Sprangers, F.; Jaspers, F.C.; van der Heijden, F.M.

    2007-01-01

    We examined levels of burnout and relationships between burnout, gender, age, years in training, and medical specialty in 158 medical residents working at the University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands. Thirteen percent of the residents met the criteria for burnout, with the highest

  6. Surgical residency: A tenant's view

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    'To sleep: perchance to dream', is the frequent mantra of the surgical resident. However, unlike. Hamlet, there is no ensuing speculation as to what dreams may come as there are seldom any!! Surgical residency has been both vilified and immortalized, but the fact remains that it is one of the most challenging, provocative ...

  7. A dedicated scholarly research program in an adult and pediatric neurology residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Matthew S; Haut, Sheryl R; Lipton, Richard B; Milstein, Mark J; Ocava, Lenore C; Ballaban-Gil, Karen; Moshé, Solomon L; Mehler, Mark F

    2017-04-04

    To describe and assess the effectiveness of a formal scholarly activity program for a highly integrated adult and pediatric neurology residency program. Starting in 2011, all graduating residents were required to complete at least one form of scholarly activity broadly defined to include peer-reviewed publications or presentations at scientific meetings of formally mentored projects. The scholarly activity program was administered by the associate residency training director and included an expanded journal club, guided mentorship, a required grand rounds platform presentation, and annual awards for the most scholarly and seminal research findings. We compared scholarly output and mentorship for residents graduating within a 5-year period following program initiation (2011-2015) and during the preceding 5-year preprogram baseline period (2005-2009). Participation in scholarship increased from the preprogram baseline (24 of 53 graduating residents, 45.3%) to the postprogram period (47 of 57 graduating residents, 82.1%, p Neurology.

  8. Experience of health-system pharmacy administration residents in a longitudinal human resource management program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amerine, Lindsey B Poppe; Granko, Robert P; Savage, Scott W; Daniels, Rowell; Eckel, Stephen F

    2014-12-15

    The experience of health-system pharmacy administration (HSPA) residents in a longitudinal human resource (HR) management program is described. The subsequent benefits to the residents, department, and profession are also discussed. Postgraduate year 2 HSPA residents at an academic medical center desired more responsibility for managing an operational area. To this end, a program was created in which these residents directly manage a small group of pharmacy technicians and report to a clinical manager or assistant director with oversight responsibility. These "resident managers" are responsible, under the direction of the area's clinical manager, for the personnel, schedule, time and attendance, and HR activities of the area. Resident managers have led and sustained operational improvement projects in their areas. In addition to providing learning experiences to residents, the HSPA residency program has also improved the operations of the areas in which these residents work. Benefits to the residents include conducting annual performance evaluations for employees with whom they have a relationship as it is a task every administrator completes. Resident managers at UNC have consistently stated that this longitudinal HR experience is one of the most rewarding and most challenging experiences offered in the two-year HSPA residency. The involvement of HSPA residents in longitudinal management responsibilities furthers residents' leadership success by providing trained managers who are ready to immerse themselves into practice postresidency, having employee engagement and HR skills as well as experiences with leading operational improvements. A longitudinal HR management experience was successfully incorporated into an HSPA residency combined Master of Science degree program. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Early resident-to-resident physics education in diagnostic radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansagra, Akash P

    2014-01-01

    The revised ABR board certification process has updated the method by which diagnostic radiology residents are evaluated for competency in clinical radiologic physics. In this work, the author reports the successful design and implementation of a resident-taught physics course consisting of 5 weekly, hour-long lectures intended for incoming first-year radiology residents in their first month of training. To the author's knowledge, this is the first description of a course designed to provide a very early framework for ongoing physics education throughout residency without increasing the didactic burden on faculty members. Twenty-six first-year residents spanning 2 academic years took the course and reported subjective improvement in their knowledge (90%) and interest (75%) in imaging physics and a high level of satisfaction with the use of senior residents as physics educators. Based on the success of this course and the minimal resources required for implementation, this work may serve as a blueprint for other radiology residency programs seeking to develop revised physics curricula. Copyright © 2014 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Needs Assessment for Incoming PGY-1 Residents in Neurosurgical Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandman, David M; Haji, Faizal A; Matte, Marie C; Clarke, David B

    2015-01-01

    Residents must develop a diverse range of skills in order to practice neurosurgery safely and effectively. The purpose of this study was to identify the foundational skills required for neurosurgical trainees as they transition from medical school to residency. Based on the CanMEDS competency framework, a web-based survey was distributed to all Canadian academic neurosurgical centers, targeting incoming and current PGY-1 neurosurgical residents as well as program directors. Using Likert scale and free-text responses, respondents rated the importance of various cognitive (e.g. management of raised intracranial pressure), technical (e.g. performing a lumbar puncture) and behavioral skills (e.g. obtaining informed consent) required for a PGY-1 neurosurgical resident. Of 52 individuals contacted, 38 responses were received. Of these, 10 were from program directors (71%), 11 from current PGY-1 residents (58%) and 17 from incoming PGY-1 residents (89%). Respondents emphasized operative skills such as proper sterile technique and patient positioning; clinical skills such as lesion localization and interpreting neuro-imaging; management skills for common scenarios such as raised intracranial pressure and status epilepticus; and technical skills such as lumbar puncture and external ventricular drain placement. Free text answers were concordant with the Likert scale results. We surveyed Canadian neurosurgical program directors and PGY-1 residents to identify areas perceived as foundational to neurosurgical residency education and training. This information is valuable for evaluating the appropriateness of a training program's goals and objectives, as well as for generating a national educational curriculum for incoming PGY-1 residents.

  11. The professionalism curriculum as a cultural change agent in surgical residency education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Mark S; Berman, Russell S; Kalet, Adina L; Zabar, Sondra R; Gillespie, Colleen; Pachter, H Leon

    2012-01-01

    Teaching professionalism effectively to fully engaged residents is a significant challenge. A key question is whether the integration of professionalism into residency education leads to a change in resident culture. The goal of this study was to assess whether professionalism has taken root in the surgical resident culture 3 years after implementing our professionalism curriculum. Evidence was derived from 3 studies: (1) annual self-assessments of the residents' perceived professionalism abilities to perform 20 defined tasks representing core Accrediting Council on Graduate Medical Education professionalism domains, (2) objective metrics of their demonstrated professionalism skills as rated by standardized patients annually using the objective structure clinical examination tool, and (3) a national survey of the Surgical Professionalism and Interpersonal Communications Education Study Group. Study 1: aggregate perceived professionalism among surgical residents shows a statistically significant positive trend over time (P = .016). Improvements were seen in all 6 domains: accountability, ethics, altruism, excellence, patient sensitivity, and respect. Study 2: the cohort of residents followed up over 3 years showed a marked improvement in their professionalism skills as rated by standardized patients using the objective structure clinical examination tool. Study 3: 41 members of the national Surgical Professionalism and Interpersonal Communications Education Study Group rated their residents' skills in admitting mistakes, delivering bad news, communication, interdisciplinary respect, cultural competence, and handling stress. Twenty-nine of the 41 responses rated their residents as "slightly better" or "much better" compared with 5 years ago (P = .001). Thirty-four of the 41 programs characterized their department's leadership view toward professionalism as "much better" compared with 5 years ago. All 3 assessment methods suggest that residents feel increasingly

  12. Emergency Department Visits by Nursing Home Residents in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Henry E.; Shah, Manish N.; Allman, Richard M.; Kilgore, Meredith

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The Emergency Department (ED) is an important source of health care for nursing home residents. The objective of this study was to characterize ED use by nursing home residents in the United States (US). DESIGN Analysis of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey SETTING US Emergency Departments, 2005-2008 PARTICIPANTS Individuals visiting US EDs, stratified by nursing home and non-nursing home residents. INTERVENTIONS None MEASUREMENTS We identified all ED visits by nursing home residents. We contrasted the demographic and clinical characteristics between nursing home residents and non-nursing home residents. We also compared ED resource utilization, length of stay and outcomes. RESULTS During 2005-2008, nursing home residents accounted for 9,104,735 of 475,077,828 US ED visits (1.9%; 95% CI: 1.8-2.1%). The annualized number of ED visits by nursing home residents was 2,276,184. Most nursing home residents were elderly (mean 76.7 years, 95% CI: 75.8-77.5), female (63.3%), and non-Hispanic White (74.8%). Compared with non-nursing home residents, nursing home residents were more likely have been discharged from the hospital in the prior seven days (adjusted OR 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.9). Nursing home residents were more likely to present with fever (adjusted OR 1.9; 95% CI: 1.5-2.4) or hypotension (systolic blood pressure ≤90 mm Hg, OR 1.8; 95% CI: 1.5-2.2). Nursing home patients were more likely to receive diagnostic test, imaging and procedures in the ED. Almost half of nursing home residents visiting the ED were admitted to the hospital. Compared with non-nursing home residents, nursing home residents were more likely to be admitted to the hospital (adjusted OR 1.8; 95% CI 1.6-2.1) and to die (adjusted OR 2.3; 95% CI 1.6-3.3). CONCLUSIONS Nursing home residents account for over 2.2 million ED visits annually in the US. Compared with other ED patients, nursing home residents have higher medical acuity and complexity. These

  13. Comparison of 2 resident learning tools-interactive screen-based simulated case scenarios versus problem-based learning discussions: a prospective quasi-crossover cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Shobana; Khanna, Ashish; Argalious, Maged; Kimatian, Stephen J; Mascha, Edward J; Makarova, Natalya; Nada, Eman M; Elsharkawy, Hesham; Firoozbakhsh, Farhad; Avitsian, Rafi

    2016-02-01

    Simulation-based learning is emerging as an alternative educational tool in this era of a relative shortfall of teaching anesthesiologists. The objective of the study is to assess whether screen-based (interactive computer simulated) case scenarios are more effective than problem-based learning discussions (PBLDs) in improving test scores 4 and 8 weeks after these interventions in anesthesia residents during their first neuroanesthesia rotation. Prospective, nonblinded quasi-crossover study. Cleveland Clinic. Anesthesiology residents. Two case scenarios were delivered from the Anesoft software as screen-based sessions, and parallel scripts were developed for 2 PBLDs. Each resident underwent both types of training sessions, starting with the PBLD session, and the 2 cases were alternated each month (ie, in 1 month, the screen-based intervention used case 1 and the PBLD used case 2, and vice versa for the next month). Test scores before the rotation (baseline), immediately after the rotation (4 weeks after the start of the rotation), and 8 weeks after the start of rotation were collected on each topic from each resident. The effect of training method on improvement in test scores was assessed using a linear mixed-effects model. Compared to the departmental standard of PBLD, the simulation method did not improve either the 4- or 8-week mean test scores (P = .41 and P = .40 for training method effect on 4- and 8-week scores, respectively). Resident satisfaction with the simulation module on a 5-point Likert scale showed subjective evidence of a positive impact on resident education. Screen-based simulators were not more effective than PBLD for education during the neuroanesthesia rotation in anesthesia residency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Annual report 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The GKSS scientific annual report summarizes the problems and results of the research and development projects of 1973. In contrast to earlier annual reports, a comprehensive description of the research facilities is not included. The annual report was extended by the paragraph 'Financial Report 1973' in the chapter 'Development of Geesthacht Research Centre'. The financial report gives a survey of the financial transactions and the major operations of the year under review. (orig./AK) [de

  15. Residents' Class Status and Social Political Attitude: Two Cases of Middle-Class Community in Beijing

    OpenAIRE

    Lipeng  ZHAO

    2016-01-01

    According to the data in two type of middle class community, this paper finds out that differences on residents' objective class status exist, so does subjective class status. The type of the community, occupation, and annual household income influences residents' subjective class status. This paper also compares people's social political attitude in two types of communities. People value some social political issues according to their subjective class status.

  16. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  17. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  18. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  19. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  20. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  1. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  2. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  3. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  4. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2017 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  5. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  6. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  7. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2016 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  8. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  9. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  10. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  11. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  12. Helping Residents Protect Water Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building on the successful early engagement of the Plain Sect agricultural community, the Eastern Lancaster County Source Water Protection Collaborative is expanding its efforts to involve local residents in the work of protecting drinking water sources.

  13. the contribution of resident physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Trusch, Klaus

    2011-01-01

    A telephone survey of resident physicians to the basic conditions in which they work has been conducted in 14 of the 16 federal states. In the center of the survey stood the general medicine within the prisons. This limitation was necessary in order to achieve comparability to primary medical care outside of correctional services. There are 140 salaried and tenured resident pysicians and 97 contract doctors in the general medical care of approx. 70000 prisoners in 185 independent prisons ...

  14. Minimum Data Set Active Resident Information Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The MDS Active Resident Report summarizes information for residents currently in nursing homes. The source of these counts is the residents MDS assessment record....

  15. Sleep Quality Among Psychiatry Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho Aguiar Melo, Matias; das Chagas Medeiros, Francisco; Meireles Sales de Bruin, Veralice; Pinheiro Santana, José Abraão; Bastos Lima, Alexandre; De Francesco Daher, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Medical residency programs are traditionally known for long working hours, which can be associated with a poor quality of sleep and daytime sleepiness. However, few studies have focused on this theme. Our objective was to investigate sleep quality, daytime sleepiness, and their relation with anxiety, social phobia, and depressive symptoms. This cross-sectional observational study involved 59 psychiatry residents. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) were used to measure the quality of sleep and excessive daytime sleepiness ([EDS] and ESS > 10), respectively. Among the 59 psychiatry residents, 59.3% had poor sleep quality (PSQI > 5) and 28.8% had EDS. Poor sleep quality was associated with higher EDS (P = 0.03) and the year of residency program (P = 0.03). Only 20% of residents with poor sleep had consulted at least once for sleep problems; 54.2% had used medications for sleep; and 16.9% were using medications at the time of interview. Only 30% obtained medication during medical consultations. Poor sleep was associated with irregular sleep hours (P = 0.001) and long periods lying down without sleep (P = 0.03). Poor sleep quality was also associated with high scores of anxiety symptoms (P Psychiatry residents frequently have poor sleep quality and EDS. Considering that sleep disorders can affect quality of life, predispose to metabolic syndrome, and be associated with worse performance at work, attention to this clinical problem is needed. © The Author(s) 2016.

  16. Mapping of Primary Instructional Methods and Teaching Techniques for Regularly Scheduled, Formal Teaching Sessions in an Anesthesia Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vested Madsen, Matias; Macario, Alex; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Tanaka, Pedro

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we examined the regularly scheduled, formal teaching sessions in a single anesthesiology residency program to (1) map the most common primary instructional methods, (2) map the use of 10 known teaching techniques, and (3) assess if residents scored sessions that incorporated active learning as higher quality than sessions with little or no verbal interaction between teacher and learner. A modified Delphi process was used to identify useful teaching techniques. A representative sample of each of the formal teaching session types was mapped, and residents anonymously completed a 5-question written survey rating the session. The most common primary instructional methods were computer slides-based classroom lectures (66%), workshops (15%), simulations (5%), and journal club (5%). The number of teaching techniques used per formal teaching session averaged 5.31 (SD, 1.92; median, 5; range, 0-9). Clinical applicability (85%) and attention grabbers (85%) were the 2 most common teaching techniques. Thirty-eight percent of the sessions defined learning objectives, and one-third of sessions engaged in active learning. The overall survey response rate equaled 42%, and passive sessions had a mean score of 8.44 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.2) compared with a mean score of 8.63 (range, 5-10; median, 9; SD, 1.1) for active sessions (P = 0.63). Slides-based classroom lectures were the most common instructional method, and faculty used an average of 5 known teaching techniques per formal teaching session. The overall education scores of the sessions as rated by the residents were high.

  17. Selection criteria of residents for residency programs in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, Yousef; Ayed, Adel

    2013-01-19

    In Kuwait, 21 residency training programs were offered in the year 2011; however, no data is available regarding the criteria of selecting residents for these programs. This study aims to provide information about the importance of these criteria. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data from members (e.g. chairmen, directors, assistants …etc.) of residency programs in Kuwait. A total of 108 members were invited to participate. They were asked to rate the importance level (scale from 1 to 5) of criteria that may affect the acceptance of an applicant to their residency programs. Average scores were calculated for each criterion. Of the 108 members invited to participate, only 12 (11.1%) declined to participate. Interview performance was ranked as the most important criteria for selecting residents (average score: 4.63/5.00), followed by grade point average (average score: 3.78/5.00) and honors during medical school (average score: 3.67/5.00). On the other hand, receiving disciplinary action during medical school and failure in a required clerkship were considered as the most concerning among other criteria used to reject applicants (average scores: 3.83/5.00 and 3.54/5.00 respectively). Minor differences regarding the importance level of each criterion were noted across different programs. This study provided general information about the criteria that are used to accept/reject applicants to residency programs in Kuwait. Future studies should be conducted to investigate each criterion individually, and to assess if these criteria are related to residents' success during their training.

  18. Association of reproductive health training on intention to provide services after residency: the family physician resident survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Diana; Maldonado, Lisa; Fuentes, Liza; Prine, Linda

    2015-01-01

    High rates of unintended pregnancy and need for reproductive health services (RHS), including abortion, require continued efforts to train medical professionals and increase availability of these services. With US approval 12 years ago of Mifepristone, a medication abortion pill, abortion services are additionally amenable to primary care. Family physicians are a logical group to focus on given that they provide the bulk of primary care. We analyzed data from an annual survey (2007--2010) of third-year family medicine residents (n=284, response rate=48%--64%) in programs offering abortion training to examine the association between such training and self-reported competence and intentions to provide RHS (with a particular focus on abortion) upon graduation from residency. The majority of residents (75% in most cases) were trained in each of the RHS we asked about; relatively fewer trained in implant insertion (39%), electric vacuum aspiration (EVA) (58%), and manual vacuum aspiration (MVA) (69%). Perceived competence on the part of the graduating residents ranged from high levels in pregnancy options counseling (89%) and IUD insertion (85%) to lows in ultrasound and EVA (both 34%). Bivariate analysis revealed significant associations between number of procedures performed and future intentions to provide them. The association between competence and intentions persisted for all procedures in multivariate analysis, adjusting for number of procedures. Further, the total number of abortions performed during residency increased the odds of intending to provide MVA and medication abortion by 3% and 2%, respectively. Findings support augmenting training in RHS for family medicine residents, given that almost half (45%) of those trained intended to provide abortions. The volume of training should be increased so more residents feel competent, particularly in light of the fact that combined exposure to different abortion procedures has a cumulative impact on intention to

  19. Annual report to Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This is the ninth Annual Report to Congress of the United States Department of Energy. It covers the activities of all elements of the Department except the independent Federal Regulatory Commission, which issues its own annual report. 88 refs., 43 tabs

  20. Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2002-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 2001. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  1. Annual Report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golnik, N.; Mika, J.R.; Wieteska, K. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  2. CSIR Annual report 1990

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_ 1990.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 26 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_ 1990.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  3. Natural gas annual 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Natural Gas Annual 1991 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1991 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of selected companies

  4. CSIR Annual report 1995

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info CSIR Annual report_1995.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 33 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name CSIR Annual report_1995.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  5. CSIR Annual report 1992

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Annual Report_ 1992.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 39 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Annual Report_ 1992.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  6. Annual Partnership Report, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. This partnership report fulfills statutory reporting requirement W.S. 21-18-202(e)(iv) which mandates the development of annual reports to the legislature on the outcomes of partnerships between colleges…

  7. Annual Report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golnik, N.; Mika, J.R.; Wieteska, K.

    1998-01-01

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  8. 55th Annual

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1990-01-01

    Jan 1, 1990 ... At the invitation of the Madhya Pradesh. Council of Science and Technology, the. Barkatullah University and the Regional. Research laboratory, Bhopal, the 55th Annual. Meeting of the Academy was held at the. Tagore Bhawan, Bhopal from 10 to 13. November 1989. One of the best organized Annual.

  9. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  10. A serendipidade na medicina e na anestesiologia A serendipidade en la medicina y en la anestesiologia Serendipity in medicine and anesthesiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilton Bezerra do Vale

    2005-04-01

    biología, anatomía, física, química, fisiología, farmacología, astronomía, arqueología y... mucha suerte. CONCLUSIONES: Aunque accidentes en la pesquisa y en la sala de operación sean lamentables, hay aquéllos que acontecen y, a veces, pueden llevar a avances espectaculares, como tratamientos heroicos y hasta Premios Nobel. Mantener la mente abierta es un trazo común a aquellos que desean contar con la gran suerte, como afirmaba el físico americano Henry (1842: "Las semillas del hallazgo flotan constantemente alrededor nuestro, pero apenas lanzan raíces en las mentes bien preparadas para recibirlas".BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: This study has evaluated more than a hundred of the most fortunate couplings of a brilliant mind with fortunate luck (serendipity, through the re-reading of most relevant histories on science-related (n = 46 and anesthesiology-related (n = 16 inventions and discoveries. CONTENTS: This educational article encourages anesthesiologists to appreciate events related to scientific inventions and discoveries, showing that serendipity is possible, provided it is expected. Each discovery or invention includes history, references and scientific or anecdotal explanation. In addition to traditional discoveries, such as wine, gravity, photograph, Velcro, airbag, etc., there are other Medicine-related (microscope, X-rays, vaccine, penicillin, insulin, laser, Paps smear, etc. and Anesthesiology-related (isometry, gloves, N2O, ether, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, blood patch, etc. discoveries. Creativity and serendipity may act as cornerstones for clinical and basic research of pioneer inventions for medical and anesthesiologic advances. In fact, topics related to biology, anatomy, physics, chemistry, physiology, pharmacology, astronomy and archeology should be master and … lots of luck. CONCLUSIONS: Although research and operating room accidents are regrettable, some of them happen and may sometimes lead to spectacular advances, such as heroic

  11. Effecting Change in an Evidence-Based Medicine Curriculum: Librarians' Role in a Pediatric Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeblisky, Kathy; Birr, Rebecca A; Sjursen Guerrero, Anne Marie

    2015-01-01

    Librarians for the joint Phoenix Children's Hospital/Maricopa Medical Center Pediatric Residency Program were asked to assist on the Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) Subcommittee for the program. Faculty was open to recommendations for revising and improving the curriculum and desired librarian assistance in completing the task. The annual program review and conference evaluations revealed a gap between the objectives of the EBM curriculum and the residents' perceived abilities to integrate knowledge into meaningful literature searches. This column demonstrates how librarians can collaborate with their residency programs to revise and improve processes to effect change in their program's EBM curriculum.

  12. Applying Expectancy Theory to residency training: proposing opportunities to understand resident motivation and enhance residency training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweiki E

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ehyal Shweiki,1 Niels D Martin,2 Alec C Beekley,1 Jay S Jenoff,1 George J Koenig,1 Kris R Kaulback,1 Gary A Lindenbaum,1 Pankaj H Patel,1 Matthew M Rosen,1 Michael S Weinstein,1 Muhammad H Zubair,2 Murray J Cohen1 1Department of Surgery, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Surgery, Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Medical resident education in the United States has been a matter of national priority for decades, exemplified initially through the Liaison Committee for Graduate Medical Education and then superseded by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. A recent Special Report in the New England Journal of Medicine, however, has described resident educational programs to date as prescriptive, noting an absence of innovation in education. Current aims of contemporary medical resident education are thus being directed at ensuring quality in learning as well as in patient care. Achievement and work-motivation theories attempt to explain people's choice, performance, and persistence in tasks. Expectancy Theory as one such theory was reviewed in detail, appearing particularly applicable to surgical residency training. Correlations between Expectancy Theory as a work-motivation theory and residency education were explored. Understanding achievement and work-motivation theories affords an opportunity to gain insight into resident motivation in training. The application of Expectancy Theory in particular provides an innovative perspective into residency education. Afforded are opportunities to promote the development of programmatic methods facilitating surgical resident motivation in education. Keywords: learning, education, achievement

  13. Financial Contribution of Residents When Billing as "Junior Associates" in the "Surgical Firm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, Jeremy; Pratt, Sarah; Stanek, Stephen; Zelenock, Gerald; Nazzal, Munier

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing number of proposals to change the way Graduate Medical Education is funded. This study attempts to estimate the potential financial contribution of surgical residents using an alternative funding mechanism similar to that used by law firms, which would allow surgery departments to bill for resident activity as "junior associates." Following 24 residents over a period of 12 weeks, we were able to estimate the annual revenue that they generated from operating room procedures, independent consultations, patient management, and minor procedures using Medicare reimbursement rates. The appropriate first assistant modifier was used to calculate the operating room procedure fees, but full price was used to calculate the revenue for minor procedures, patient management, and consultations done independently. We adjusted for vacation time and academic activities. Including postgraduate year 1 residents, the estimated yearly revenue generated per resident in first assistant operative services was $33,305.67. For minor procedures, patient management, and independent consultations, the estimated yearly revenue per resident was $37,350.66. The total estimated financial contribution per resident per year was $70,656.33. Excluding postgraduate year 1 residents, as most states require completion of the intern year before full licensure, the estimated yearly revenue generated per resident in first assistant operative services was $38,914.56. For minor procedures, patient management, and independent consultations, the estimated yearly revenue per resident was $55,957.33. The total estimated financial contribution per resident per year was $94,871.89. Residents provide a significant service to hospitals. If resident activity was compensated at the level of supervised "junior associates" of a surgery department, more than 75% of the direct educational costs of training could be offset. Furthermore, we believe this value is underestimated. Given the foreseeable

  14. A case-based approach for teaching professionalism to residents with online discussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARK T. NADEAU

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Programs must demonstrate that their residents are taught and assessed in professionalism. Most programs struggle with finding viable ways to teach and assess this critical competency. UTHSCSA Family and Community Medicine Residency developed an innovative option for interactive learning and assessment of residents in this competency which would be transferrable to other programs and specialties. Methods: The innovative approach uses an asynchronous online format on Blackboard. Threaded discussions on Blackboard require thoughtful reflective writing after case assessment and critical evaluation of other resident posts. Participation, content and progress of all resident postings are monitored by administrative staff and faculty. Faculty can further engage the residents at any point to deepen the discussion and learning. Results: 100% of all senior residents attained the required learning objectives. All were actively engaged in the assignments. Six cases have been developed using a Learning Matrix to demonstrate evaluation areas from the specialty specific competencies. Written feedback from residents verified the validity of case content in context of their current clinical practice. Postings by residents have provided value and insight for the faculty to access the professional development of our Family Medicine residents. The Clinical Competency Committee evaluates all third year residents using this information specific to the professionalism milestones. By using an asynchronous online approach to case discussion, all residents are involved with all aspects of this curriculum. Conclusions: More specific measurable learning outcomes are possible using this approach. Resident participation and engagement is easier to track and monitor than a lecture-based format and easier to capture valuable data than relying on evaluation feedback. Our Annual Review process will identify areas for improvement in the existing cases and help

  15. Evaluating Dermatology Residency Program Websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashack, Kurt A; Burton, Kyle A; Soh, Jonathan M; Lanoue, Julien; Boyd, Anne H; Milford, Emily E; Dunnick, Cory; Dellavalle, Robert P

    2016-03-16

    Internet resources play an important role in how medical students access information related to residency programs.Evaluating program websites is necessary in order to provide accurate information for applicants and provide information regarding areas of website improvement for programs. To date, dermatology residency websites (D  WS) have not been evaluated.This paper evaluates dermatology residency websites based on availability of predefined measures. Using the FREIDA (Fellowship and Residency Electronic Interactive Database) Online database, authors searched forall accredited dermatology program websites. Eligible programs were identified through the FREIDA Online database and had a functioning website. Two authors independently extracted data with consensus or third researcher resolution of differences. This data was accessed and archived from July 15th to July 17th, 2015.Primary outcomes measured were presence of content on education, resident and faculty information, program environment, applicant recruitment, schedule, salary, and website quality evaluated using an online tool (WooRank.com). Out of 117 accredited dermatology residencies, 115 had functioning webpages. Of these, 76.5% (75) had direct links found on the FRIEDA Online database. Most programs contained information on education, faculty, program environment, and applicant recruitment. However, website quality and marketing effectiveness were highly variable; most programs were deemed to need improvements in the functioning of their webpages. Also, additional information on current residents and about potential away rotations were lacking from most websites with only 52.2% (60) and 41.7% (48) of programs providing this content, respectively. A majority of dermatology residency websites contained adequate information on many of the factors we evaluated. However, many were lacking in areas that matter to applicants. We hope this report will encourage dermatology residencyprograms

  16. Simulation Activity in Otolaryngology Residencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Ellen S; Wiet, Gregory J; Seidman, Michael; Hussey, Heather M; Malekzadeh, Sonya; Fried, Marvin P

    2015-08-01

    Simulation has become a valuable tool in medical education, and several specialties accept or require simulation as a resource for resident training or assessment as well as for board certification or maintenance of certification. This study investigates current simulation resources and activities in US otolaryngology residency programs and examines interest in advancing simulation training and assessment within the specialty. Web-based survey. US otolaryngology residency training programs. An electronic web-based survey was disseminated to all US otolaryngology program directors to determine their respective institutional and departmental simulation resources, existing simulation activities, and interest in further simulation initiatives. Descriptive results are reported. Responses were received from 43 of 104 (43%) residency programs. Simulation capabilities and resources are available in most respondents' institutions (78.6% report onsite resources; 73.8% report availability of models, manikins, and devices). Most respondents (61%) report limited simulation activity within otolaryngology. Areas of simulation are broad, addressing technical and nontechnical skills related to clinical training (94%). Simulation is infrequently used for research, credentialing, or systems improvement. The majority of respondents (83.8%) expressed interest in participating in multicenter trials of simulation initiatives. Most respondents from otolaryngology residency programs have incorporated some simulation into their curriculum. Interest among program directors to participate in future multicenter trials appears high. Future research efforts in this area should aim to determine optimal simulators and simulation activities for training and assessment as well as how to best incorporate simulation into otolaryngology residency training programs. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  17. Plagiarism in residency application essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Scott; Gelfand, Brian J; Hurwitz, Shelley; Berkowitz, Lori; Ashley, Stanley W; Nadel, Eric S; Katz, Joel T

    2010-07-20

    Anecdotal reports suggest that some residency application essays contain plagiarized content. To determine the prevalence of plagiarism in a large cohort of residency application essays. Retrospective cohort study. 4975 application essays submitted to residency programs at a single large academic medical center between 1 September 2005 and 22 March 2007. Specialized software was used to compare residency application essays with a database of Internet pages, published works, and previously submitted essays and the percentage of the submission matching another source was calculated. A match of more than 10% to an existing work was defined as evidence of plagiarism. Evidence of plagiarism was found in 5.2% (95% CI, 4.6% to 5.9%) of essays. The essays of non-U.S. citizens were more likely to demonstrate evidence of plagiarism. Other characteristics associated with the prevalence of plagiarism included medical school location outside the United States and Canada; previous residency or fellowship; lack of research experience, volunteer experience, or publications; a low United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 score; and non-membership in the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. The software database is probably incomplete, the 10%-match threshold for defining plagiarism has not been statistically validated, and the study was confined to applicants to 1 institution. Evidence of matching content in an essay cannot be used to infer the applicant's intent and is not sensitive to variations in the cultural context of copying in some societies. Evidence of plagiarism in residency application essays is more common in international applicants but was found in those by applicants to all specialty programs, from all medical school types, and even among applicants with significant academic honors. No external funding.

  18. 38 CFR 51.70 - Resident rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.70 Resident rights. The resident has a... legal representative. (5) Conveyance upon death. Upon the death of a resident with a personal fund...; (iii) Physicians of the resident's choice (to provide care in the nursing home, physicians must meet...

  19. Mentorship in orthopaedic and trauma residency training ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mentorship is important in residency training as it is necessary for personal and professional development of the resident trainees. Objectives: This study documents mentorship in orthopaedic residency training programme in Nigeria by assessing the awareness of orthopaedic residents on the role of a mentor, ...

  20. Surgery resident learning styles and academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contessa, Jack; Ciardiello, Kenneth A; Perlman, Stacie

    2005-01-01

    To determine if surgical residents share a preferred learning style as measured by Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI) and if a relationship exists between resident learning style and achievement as measured by a standardized examination (AME). Also, core faculty learning styles were assessed to determine if faculty and residents share a preferred learning style. Kolb's LSI, Version 3, was administered to 16 surgical residents and the residency program's core faculty of 6 attending physicians. To measure academic achievement, the American Medical Education (AME) examination was administered to residents. The Hospital of Saint Raphael, General Surgery Residency Program, New Haven, Connecticut. Both instruments were administered to residents during protected core curriculum time. Core faculty were administered the LSI on an individual basis. Surgical residents of the Hospital of Saint Raphael's General Surgery Residency Program and 6 core faculty members Analysis of resident learning style preference revealed Converging as the most commonly occurring style for residents (7) followed by Accommodating (5), Assimilating (3), and Diverging (1). The predominant learning style for core faculty was also Converging (4) with 2 Divergers. The average score for the Convergers on the AME was 62.6 compared with 42 for the next most frequently occurring learning style, Accommodators. In this surgical residency program, a preferred learning style for residents seems to exist (Converging), which confirms what previous studies have found. Additionally, residents with this learning style attained a higher average achievement score as measured by the AME. Also, core faculty share the same preferential learning style as this subset of residents.

  1. The resident's view of residency training in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fish, D G

    1966-04-09

    In the view of residents in their last year of specialty training, the Fellowship is now becoming the operative standard for obtaining hospital privileges in urban centres and they felt that this implied that the two standards, the Certificate and the Fellowship of the Royal College, were not achieving the purpose for which they were designed. Although 80% of the residents intended to write the Fellowship, few viewed a year in a basic science department or in research as of intrinsic value in terms of their future practice.The examinations of the Royal College were the subject of criticism, most residents feeling that the examinations did not test the knowledge and ability gained in training. Most expressed a desire for ongoing evaluation during the training period.Service responsibilities were generally regarded as too heavy.Despite the criticism of both training and examination, most residents felt that their training had provided them with the experience and background they needed to practise as specialists.

  2. Conversations with Holocaust survivor residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Sandra P; LeNavenec, Carole Lynne; Aldiabat, Khaldoun

    2011-03-01

    Traumatic events in one's younger years can have an impact on how an individual copes with later life. One traumatic experience for Jewish individuals was the Holocaust. Some of these people are moving into long-term care facilities. It was within this context that the research question emerged: What are Holocaust survivor residents' perceptions of a life lived as they move into a long-term care facility? For this qualitative study, Holocaust survivors were individually interviewed. Findings emphasize that nursing care needs to ensure that Holocaust survivor residents participate in activities, receive timely health care, and receive recognition of their life experiences. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. ESR measurements of background doses in teeth of Japanese residents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toyoda, S., E-mail: toyoda@dap.ous.ac.jp [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, Okayama (Japan); Kondo, A. [Department of Applied Physics, Okayama University of Science, Okayama (Japan); Zumadilov, K.; Hoshi, M. [Research Institute of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Miyazawa, C. [Deparment of Dentistry, Ohu University, Fukushima (Japan); Ivannikov, A. [Medical Radiological Research Center, Obninsk (Russian Federation)

    2011-09-15

    The background doses for the teeth of Japanese residents were obtained by electron spin resonance (ESR) method. The doses obtained from 77 of 92 samples are less than 100 mGy while the doses of the other samples are high up to 250 mGy. The doses for buccal part of the teeth are higher than lingual part possibly due to contributions from dental X ray examination. A positive correlation was found between the ages of the donors and the obtained doses. The averaged annual ESR dose was calculated to be 0.87 mGy/y. These doses have to be considered in actual retrospective dosimetry studies for possible radiation accidents. The statistically significant critical level for Japanese residents would be about 200 mGy for individual doses and about 100 mGy for averaged group doses for {alpha} = 5% for those with ages older than 50.

  4. Scientific annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This annual report contains a collection of the abstracts of the publications concerning research and development in the named institute together with a bibliography about further publications, contributions to conferences and speeches. (HSI) [de

  5. IKO Annual Report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The IKO Annual Report of 1976 relates their progress in different projects and project fields. The fields covered include electron scattering, pion and muon physics, theory, radio- and nuclear chemistry, technical department, MEA, nuclear reactions and nuclear spectroscopy

  6. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaeggeler, H.W.; Lorenzen, R.

    1991-04-01

    This annual report of the chemistry laboratory gives an overview of research performed during 1990 in the field of geochemistry, trace analysis, aerosol chemistry, heavy elements, cement chemistry and analytical chemistry. figs., tabs., refs

  7. 2002 Annual report: synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This synthesis of the Annual Report 2002 presents information of the main activities on the scope of the radiation protection and nuclear safety of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of the Argentina during 2002

  8. 2001 Annual report: synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This synthesis of the Annual Report 2001 presents information of the main activities on the scope of the radiation protection and nuclear safety of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of the Argentina during 2001

  9. 2000 Annual report: synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    This synthesis of the Annual Report 2000 present information of the main activities on the scope of the radiation protection and nuclear safety of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentina during 2000

  10. Annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This annual report contains a description of the named institute, the research programm, reports from the scientific establishments, a description of different cooperations, and a list of scientific publications. (HSI) [de

  11. Annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toncik, M.

    2006-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2005 is reported. The structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  12. 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2010-01-01

    This annual report includes: an overview of Western; approaches for future hydropower and transmission service; major achievements in FY 2010; FY 2010 customer Integrated Resource Planning, or IRP, survey; and financial data.

  13. SIS - Annual Catch Limit

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Annual Catch Limit (ACL) dataset within the Species Information System (SIS) contains information and data related to management reference points and catch data.

  14. Annual Report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    This annual report supersedes the work done in the nuclear physics institute at Lyon. The studied matters are the following: nuclear theory, nuclear reactions, nuclear spectroscopy and nuclear chemistry [fr

  15. Annual report - LNLS - 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    This is the 1990 Annual Report of the LNLS, the upcoming Brazilian Synchrotron Light Source. It discusses its projects, organization as well as the proposed experimental stations. It presents also a list of publications. (A.C.A.S.)

  16. USRDS - Annual Data Report

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — United States Renal Data System (USRDS) Annual Data Report Comprehensive statistics on chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal diseases in the United States...

  17. ASIST 2002 annual meeting

    CERN Document Server

    Peek, R

    2003-01-01

    Review of discussions and presentations at the American Society for Information Science and Technology 2002 annual meeting. Topics covered included new models of scholarly publishing and the development of the semantic web (1 page).

  18. Annual Adjustment Factors

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — The Department of Housing and Urban Development establishes the rent adjustment factors - called Annual Adjustment Factors (AAFs) - on the basis of Consumer Price...

  19. Annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon

    2007-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2006 is reported. The structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  20. Annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toncik, M.

    2005-04-01

    In this Annual report the operating of the Slovak Environmental Agency in 2004 is reported. The structure of the Agency, mission, personnel structure, financing, monitoring of the environment, international cooperation and coordination of research programmes are reviewed

  1. Assessing Interpersonal and Communication Skills in Radiation Oncology Residents: A Pilot Standardized Patient Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Melody; Berman, Abigail T.; Hwang, Wei-Ting; LaMarra, Denise; Baffic, Cordelia; Suneja, Gita; Vapiwala, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: There is a lack of data for the structured development and evaluation of communication skills in radiation oncology residency training programs. Effective communication skills are increasingly emphasized by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and are critical for a successful clinical practice. We present the design of a novel, pilot standardized patient (SP) program and the evaluation of communication skills among radiation oncology residents. Methods and Materials: Two case scenarios were developed to challenge residents in the delivery of “bad news” to patients: one scenario regarding treatment failure and the other regarding change in treatment plan. Eleven radiation oncology residents paired with 6 faculty participated in this pilot program. Each encounter was scored by the SPs, observing faculty, and residents themselves based on the Kalamazoo guidelines. Results: Overall resident performance ratings were “good” to “excellent,” with faculty assigning statistically significant higher scores and residents assigning lower scores. We found inconsistent inter rater agreement among faculty, residents, and SPs. SP feedback was also valuable in identifying areas of improvement, including more collaborative decision making and less use of medical jargon. Conclusions: The program was well received by residents and faculty and regarded as a valuable educational experience that could be used as an annual feedback tool. Poor inter rater agreement suggests a need for residents and faculty physicians to better calibrate their evaluations to true patient perceptions. High scores from faculty members substantiate the concern that resident evaluations are generally positive and nondiscriminating. Faculty should be encouraged to provide honest and critical feedback to hone residents' interpersonal skills

  2. Annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Delivering products and services to nuclear power plants operators, AREVA operates in every sector of the civilian nuclear power and fuel cycle industry. This annual report 2003 provides, in seven chapters, information on persons responsible for the annual report and for auditing the financial statements, general information on the company and share capital (statute, capital, share trading, dividends), information on company operations, changes and future prospects, assets, financial position and financial performance, corporate governance, recent developments and future prospects. (A.L.B.)

  3. Natural gas annual 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1993 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1989 to 1993 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  4. Natural gas annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-17

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1994 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1990 to 1994 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level.

  5. Natural gas annual 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-11-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1995 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1991 to 1995 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  6. Annual report June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This annual report reviews the activities of the National Accelerator Centre until June 1988. The 200 MeV cyclotron facility, the Pretoria cyclotron facility and the Van De Graaff facility are discussed in detail. Aspects of the 200 MeV cyclotron facility examined are, inter alia: the injector cyclotrons, the separated-sector cyclotron, the control system, the beam transport system and radioisotope production. Separate abstracts were prepared for the various subdivisions contained in this annual report

  7. Natural gas annual 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1991 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. Tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition form 1987 to 1991 are given for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level

  8. Annual Market Intelligence Report

    OpenAIRE

    Johan, Novie; Jones, Peter

    2009-01-01

    This report is the first Annual Market Intelligence Report (AMIR) produced by TCRC. Since 2005, TCRC has produced Quarterly Market Intelligence Report (QMIR). These reports provided estimated meal numbers on board based on forecasted passenger numbers. Due to changes in the way in which some data is reported, it was no longer possible to produce reports quarterly, hence the development of this annual report. Past reports and other TCRC Publications could be accessed online at http://epubs.s...

  9. Model Legislation on Student Residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education in the States, 1971

    1971-01-01

    Because of the radical variance in residency requirements from state to state and sometimes from institution to institution, and because of several court cases involving this issue, the Education Commission of the States appointed a Committee to develop (1) a statement of principles for consideration in drafting legislation in connection with…

  10. From Residency to Lifelong Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Keith

    2015-11-01

    The residency training experience is the perfect environment for learning. The university/institution patient population provides a never-ending supply of patients with unique management challenges. Resources abound that allow the discovery of knowledge about similar situations. Senior teachers provide counseling and help direct appropriate care. Periodic testing and evaluations identify deficiencies, which can be corrected with future study. What happens, however, when the resident graduates? Do they possess all the knowledge they'll need for the rest of their career? Will medical discovery stand still limiting the need for future study? If initial certification establishes that the physician has the skills and knowledge to function as an independent physician and surgeon, how do we assure the public that plastic surgeons will practice lifelong learning and remain safe throughout their career? Enter Maintenance of Certification (MOC). In an ideal world, MOC would provide many of the same tools as residency training: identification of gaps in knowledge, resources to correct those deficiencies, overall assessment of knowledge, feedback about communication skills and professionalism, and methods to evaluate and improve one's practice. This article discusses the need; for education and self-assessment that extends beyond residency training and a commitment to lifelong learning. The American Board of Plastic Surgery MOC program is described to demonstrate how it helps the diplomate reach the goal of continuous practice improvement.

  11. Knowledge, attitudes, and intentions toward fertility awareness and oocyte cryopreservation among obstetrics and gynecology resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, L; Peterson, B; Inhorn, M C; Boehm, J K; Patrizio, P

    2016-02-01

    What knowledge, attitudes and intentions do US obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents have toward discussing age-related fertility decline and oocyte cryopreservation with their patients? Most OB/GYN residents believe that age-related fertility decline, but not oocyte cryopreservation, should be discussed during well-woman annual exams; furthermore, nearly half of residents overestimated the age at which female fertility markedly declines. Oocyte cryopreservation can be utilized to preserve fertility potential. Currently, no studies of US OB/GYN residents exist that question their knowledge, attitudes, and intentions toward discussing age-related fertility decline and oocyte cryopreservation with patients. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted during the fall of 2014 among residents in American Council for Graduate (ACOG) Medical Education-approved OB/GYN residency programs. Program directors were emailed via the ACOG Council on Resident Education in Obstetrics and Gynecology server listing and asked to solicit resident participation. Participants included 238 residents evenly distributed between post-graduate years 1-4 with varied post-residency plans; 90% of residents were women and 75% were 26-30 years old. The survey was divided into three sections: demographics, fertility awareness, and attitudes toward discussing fertility preservation options with patients. Descriptive and inferential statistics were conducted. A strong majority of residents (83%) believed an OB/GYN should initiate discussions about age-related fertility decline with patients (mean patient age 31.8), and 73% percent believed these discussions should be part of an annual exam. One third of residents overestimated the age at which there is a slight decline in female fertility, while nearly half of residents overestimated the age at which female fertility markedly declines. Over three-quarters of residents (78.4%) also overestimated the likelihood of success using assisted

  12. Potassium concentration in bone of Beijing residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Lianqing

    1994-01-01

    The author presents the measuring results of K concentration in bone ash samples of 65 residents in Beijing area by atomic absorption spectrum. The results indicate that the K concentrations in bone ash is logarithmic normal distribution, ranging level is 0.75-8.44 g/kg ash, the average and standard deviation is respectively 2.40 and 1.52 g/kg ash. The highest concentration (4.88 g/kg ash) appears in infantile stage (< 1y), the lowest concentration (1.59 g/kg ash) appears in young stage (2-5 y). The lower concentration (1.88 g/kg ash) appears in adolescence (11-20 y). The K concentration in wet bone as a percentage of weight is 0.067%. The specific activities of K-40 in bone is about 22 mBq/g wet bone. The total radioactivity of K-40 in whole bone is 220 Bq. The annual absorbed dose is received in adult bone from K-40 is estimated to be 95 μGy

  13. Student Expenses in Residency Interviewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walling, Anne; Nilsen, Kari; Callaway, Paul; Grothusen, Jill; Gillenwater, Cole; King, Samantha; Unruh, Gregory

    2017-08-01

    The student costs of residency interviewing are of increasing concern but limited current information is available. Updated, more detailed information would assist students and residency programs in decisions about residency selection. The study objective was to measure the expenses and time spent in residency interviewing by the 2016 graduating class of the University of Kansas School of Medicine and assess the impact of gender, regional campus location, and primary care application. All 195 students who participated in the 2016 National Residency Matching Program (NRMP) received a 33 item questionnaire addressing interviewing activity, expenses incurred, time invested and related factors. Main measures were self-reported estimates of expenses and time spent interviewing. Descriptive analyses were applied to participant characteristics and responses. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and chi-square tests compared students by gender, campus (main/regional), and primary care/other specialties. Analyses of variance (ANOVA) on the dependent variables provided follow-up tests on significant MANOVA results. A total of 163 students (84%) completed the survey. The average student reported 38 (1-124) applications, 16 (1-54) invitations, 11 (1-28) completed interviews, and spent $3,500 ($20-$12,000) and 26 (1-90) days interviewing. No significant differences were found by gender. After MANOVA and ANOVA analyses, non-primary care applicants reported significantly more applications, interviews, and expenditures, but less program financial support. Regional campus students reported significantly fewer invitations, interviews, and days interviewing, but equivalent costs when controlled for primary care application. Cost was a limiting factor in accepting interviews for 63% and time for 53% of study respondents. Students reported investing significant time and money in interviewing. After controlling for other variables, primary care was associated with significantly

  14. Results of the 2014 survey of the American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Anup; Hammer, Mark; Gould, Jennifer; Evens, Ronald

    2014-10-01

    The American Alliance of Academic Chief Residents in Radiology (A³CR²) conducts an annual survey of chief residents in accredited radiology programs in North America. The survey serves as a tool for observing trends and disseminating ideas among radiology programs. An online survey conducted through the SurveyMonkey Web site was distributed to chief residents from 187 Accreditation Council on Graduate Medical Education (ACGME)-accredited radiology training programs. A variety of multiple-choice and free-response questions were designed to gather information about residency program details, benefits, chief resident responsibilities, call, preparations for the recent American Board of Radiology Core Examination, implementation of selectives (mini-fellowships), fellowships, health care economics and the job market, and ACGME milestones. Among those surveyed, 212 unique responses from 136 programs were provided, yielding a 73% response rate. Data were compared to historical data from prior surveys dating back through 2002. Programs are increasingly providing 24-hour sonographer coverage, full day routine services on weekends, and 24-hour attending radiologist coverage. The new American Board of Radiology examination format and schedule has driven many changes, including when chief residents serve, board preparation and review, and how the final year of residency training is structured. Despite facing many changes, there is slightly more optimism among chief residents regarding their future job prospects. Copyright © 2014 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Development and Implementation of a Novel HIV Primary Care Track for Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessler, David A; Huang, Grace C; Potter, Jennifer; Baker, Joseph J; Libman, Howard

    2017-03-01

    Declining mortality has led to a rising number of persons living with HIV (PLWH) and concerns about a future shortage of HIV practitioners. To develop an HIV Primary Care Track for internal medicine residents. Academic hospital and community health center with a history of caring for PLWH and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) patients. Internal medicine residents. We enrolled four residents annually in a 3-year track with the goal of having each provide continuity care to at least 20 PLWH. The curriculum included small group learning sessions, outpatient electives, a global health opportunity, and the development of a scholarly project. All residents successfully accrued 20 or more PLWH as continuity patients. Senior residents passed the American Academy of HIV Medicine certification exam, and 75 % of graduates took positions in primary care involving PLWH. Clinical performance of residents in HIV care quality measures was comparable to those reported in published cohorts. We developed and implemented a novel track to train medical residents in the care of PLWH and LGBT patients. Our results suggest that a designated residency track can serve as a model for training the next generation of HIV practitioners.

  16. Rural Residence and COPD Exacerbations: Analysis of the SPIROMICS Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkes, Robert M; Gassett, Amanda J; Ceppe, Agathe S; Anderson, Wayne; O'Neal, Wanda K; Woodruff, Prescott G; Krishnan, Jerry A; Barr, R Graham; Han, MeiLan K; Martinez, Fernando J; Comellas, Alejandro P; Lambert, Allison A; Kaufman, Joel D; Dransfield, Mark T; Wells, J Michael; Kanner, Richard E; Paine, Robert; Bleecker, Eugene R; Paulin, Laura M; Hansel, Nadia N; Drummond, M Bradley

    2018-03-27

    Rural residence is associated with poor outcomes in several chronic diseases. The association between rural residence and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations remains unclear. To determine the independent association between rural residence and COPD-related outcomes including COPD exacerbations, airflow obstruction and symptom burden. A total of 1684 Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study (SPIROMICS) participants with FEV1/FVCresidence status determined (N=204 rural and N=1480 urban). Univariate and multivariate logistic and negative binomial regressions were performed to assess the independent association between rurality and COPD outcomes including exacerbations, lung function, and symptom burden. The primary exposure of interest was rural residence, determined by geocoding of home address to the block level at time of study enrollment. Additional covariates of interest included demographic and clinical characteristics, occupation, and occupational exposures.The primary outcome measures were exacerbations determined over the one-year course after enrollment by quarterly telephone calls and at an annual research clinic visit. Odds ratio and incidence rate of exacerbations that required treatment with medications including steroids or antibiotics (total exacerbations), and exacerbations leading to hospitalization (severe exacerbations) were determined after adjusting for relevant covariates. Rural residence was independently associated with 70% increase in odds of total exacerbations [OR 1.70 (95% CI 1.13-2.56); p=0.012] and 46% higher incidence rate of total exacerbations [IRR 1.46 (95% CI 1.02-2.10); p=0.039]. There was no association between rural residence and severe exacerbations. Agricultural occupation was independently associated with increased odds and incidence of total and severe exacerbations. Inclusion of agricultural occupation to analysis attenuated the association between rural residence and odds and

  17. Teaching residents to write a research paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, S T

    1993-09-01

    Medical writing and publications are important in developing a scholarly basis for residency programs and in providing a learning experience for both resident and faculty mentors. Residency directors must provide the stimulus and support for both faculty and residents' varied creative activities. This support manifests itself in a commitment to scholarly activity (including a dedicated research person), the procurement of available research materials, the establishment of a process or plan for beginning a research project, and the development of a method for rewarding or recognizing faculty and residents who produce scholarly works. Some osteopathic residency programs may need to train faculty in research skills at the same time that residents are learning to write. Trained faculty are better models and coaches for residents engaged in research. Beginning with a fundamental, but disciplined, writing program, both faculty and residents may learn methods for sharing new knowledge or acquiring those skills necessary to critically analyze the medical literature.

  18. Biological and chemical technologies research. FY 1995 annual summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-03-01

    The annual summary report presents the fiscal year (FY) 1995 research activities and accomplishments for the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Biological and Chemical Technologies Research (BCTR) Program. This BCTR program resides within the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). The annual summary report for 1995 (ASR 95) contains the following: program description (including BCTR program mission statement, historical background, relevance, goals and objectives); program structure and organization, selected technical and programmatic highlights for 1995; detailed descriptions of individual projects; a listing of program output, including a bibliography of published work; patents; and awards arising from work supported by the BCTR.

  19. A patient safety curriculum for medical residents based on the perspectives of residents and supervisors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansma, J.D.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To develop a patient safety course for medical residents based on the views of medical residents and their supervisors. Methods: In 2007, questionnaires were distributed to investigate residents' and supervisors' perspectives on the current patient safety performance and educational

  20. Radiology Resident Supply and Demand: A Regional Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, Cory M

    2017-09-01

    Radiology was subject to crippling deficits in the number of jobs available to graduates of training programs from 2012 through 2015. As the specialty transitions to the assimilation of osteopathic training programs and the welcoming of direct competition from new integrated interventional radiology programs, the assessment of growth in radiology training positions over the 10 years preceding this pivotal time will serve to characterize the genesis of the crisis while inspiring stakeholders to avoid similar negative fluctuations in the future. The number of per capita radiology trainees in each region was derived from data published by the National Resident Matching Program, as were annual match statistics over the years 2012 through 2016. Data regarding new interventional radiology and diagnostic radiology enrollees were also obtained from the National Resident Matching Program. The seven states with the most per capita radiology residents were in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern United States in both 2006 and 2016, and three of these seven also showed the greatest per capita growth over the course of the 10 years studied. New radiology programs were accredited during the peak of the job shortage. Integrated interventional radiology training created 24 de novo radiology residents in the 2017 match. Fill rates are weakly positively correlated with program size. Unregulated radiology program growth persisted during the decade leading up to 2016. The region with the fewest jobs available since 2012 is also home to the greatest number of per capita radiology residents. Numerous published opinions during the crisis did not result in enforced policy change. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Impact of night shifts on emergency medicine resident resuscitation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerley, Sarah; McKaigney, Conor; Boyne, Devon; Ginsberg, Darrell; Dagnone, J Damon; Hall, Andrew K

    2018-03-12

    Emergency medicine (EM) trainees often work nightshifts. We sought to measure how this circadian disruption affects EM resident performance during simulated resuscitations. This retrospective cohort study enrolled EM residents at a single Canadian academic centre over a six-year period. Residents completed twice-annual simulation-based resuscitation-focused objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) with assessment in four domains (primary assessment, diagnostic actions, therapeutic actions and communication), and a global assessment score (GAS). Primary and secondary exposures of interest were the presence of a nightshift (late-evening shifts ending between midnight and 03h00 or overnight shifts ending after 06h00) the day before or within three days before an OSCE. A random effects linear regression model was used to quantify the association between nightshifts and OSCE scores. From 57 residents, 136 OSCE scores were collected. Working a nightshift the day before an OSCE did not affect male trainee scores but was associated with a significant absolute decrease in mean total scores (-6% [95% CI -12% to 0%]), GAS (-7% [-13% to 0%]), and communication (-9% [-16% to -2%]) scores among women. Working any nightshift within three days before an OSCE lowered absolute mean total scores by 4% [-7% to 0%] and communication scores by 5% [-5% to 0%] irrespective of gender. Our results suggest that shift work may impact EM resident resuscitation performance, particularly in the communication domain. This impact may be more significant in women than men, suggesting a need for further investigation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Petroleum supply annual 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) contains information on the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products. The publication reflects data that were collected from the petroleum industry during 1992 through annual and monthly surveys. The PSA is divided into two volumes. The first volume contains four sections: Summary Statistics, Detailed Statistics, Refinery Capacity, and Oxygenate Capacity each with final annual data. This second volume contains final statistics for each month of 1992, and replaces data previously published in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM). The tables in Volumes 1 and 2 are similarly numbered to facilitate comparison between them. Explanatory Notes, located at the end of this publication, present information describing data collection, sources, estimation methodology, data quality control procedures, modifications to reporting requirements and interpretation of tables. Industry terminology and product definitions are listed alphabetically in the Glossary

  3. Natural gas annual 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-10-01

    The Natural Gas Annual provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers, Federal and State agencies, and educational institutions. The 1997 data are presented in a sequence that follows natural gas (including supplemental supplies) from its production to its end use. This is followed by tables summarizing natural gas supply and disposition from 1993 to 1997 for each Census Division and each State. Annual historical data are shown at the national level. 27 figs., 109 tabs

  4. International energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  5. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolade, Victor O; Staton, Lisa J; Jayarajan, Ramesh; Bentley, Nanette K; Huang, Xiangke

    2014-01-01

    The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Thirteen junior (first- or second-year) resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8), were committed to the team (6.8), resolved conflict (6.7), ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7), participated actively (7.0), and managed resources (6.6). Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4) than with being chief resident (5.8). The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year) chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  6. Fourteen years of progress testing in radiology residency training: experiences from The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutgers, D R; van Raamt, F; van Lankeren, W; Ravesloot, C J; van der Gijp, A; Ten Cate, Th J; van Schaik, J P J

    2017-12-01

    To describe the development of the Dutch Radiology Progress Test (DRPT) for knowledge testing in radiology residency training in The Netherlands from its start in 2003 up to 2016. We reviewed all DRPTs conducted since 2003. We assessed key changes and events in the test throughout the years, as well as resident participation and dispensation for the DRPT, test reliability and discriminative power of test items. The DRPT has been conducted semi-annually since 2003, except for 2015 when one digital DRPT failed. Key changes in these years were improvements in test analysis and feedback, test digitalization (2013) and inclusion of test items on nuclear medicine (2016). From 2003 to 2016, resident dispensation rates increased (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.74, P-value development from novice to senior trainee. • In postgraduate medical training, progress testing is used infrequently. • Progress testing is feasible and sustainable in radiology residency training.

  7. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanet residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been gratned the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  8. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  9. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  10. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2014 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  11. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2011 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  12. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2016 State

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  13. Lawful Permanent Residents Fiscal Year 2015 Country

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — Lawful permanent residents (LPRs) are foreign nationals who have been granted the right to reside permanently in the United States. LPRs are also known as 'permanent...

  14. The Chief Resident Role in Emergency Medicine Residency Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner, John W. Jr., MD, MPH

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Study Objectives: Although other specialties have examined the role of the chief resident (CR, the role and training of the emergency medicine (EM CR has largely been undefined.Methods: A survey was mailed to all EM CRs and their respective program directors (PD in 124 EM residency programs. The survey consisted of questions defining demographics, duties of the typical CR, and opinions regarding the level of support and training received. Multiple choice, Likert scale (1 strong agreement, 5 strong disagreement and short-answer responses were used. We analyzed associations between CR and PD responses using Chi-square, Student’s T and Mann-Whitney U tests.Results: Seventy-six percent of CRs and 65% of PDs responded and were similar except for age (31 vs. 42 years; p<0.001. CR respondents were most often male, in year 3 of training and held the position for 12 months. CRs and PDs agreed that the assigned level of responsibility is appropriate (2.63 vs. 2.73, p=0.15; but CRs underestimate their influence in the residency program (1.94 vs. 2.34, p=0.002 and the emergency department (2.61 vs. 3.03, p=0.002. The majority of CRs (70% and PDs (77% report participating in an extramural training program, and those CRs who participated in training felt more prepared for their job duties (2.26 vs. 2.73; p=0.03.Conclusion: EM CRs feel they have appropriate job responsibility but believe they are less influential in program and department administration than PD respondents. Extramural training programs for incoming CRs are widely used and felt to be helpful. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:120-125.

  15. CSIR Annual report 1981

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty seventh annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1981 to 31 December 1981. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1981, certified...

  16. CSIR Annual report 1982

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1982-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty eighth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1982 to 31 December 1982. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1982, certified...

  17. 2001 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is the 2001 annual report of the French union of the petroleum industry (UFIP). It summarizes the highlights of the petroleum industry activity in France in 2001 and gives some additional information about the production, refining and distribution of petroleum products in the rest of the world. (J.S.)

  18. TIARA annual report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshihiro; Arakawa, Kazuo; Tanaka, Shigeru; Narumi, Kazumasa; Yoshida, Masaru; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Yoshikawa, Masato; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Otsubo, Michiro; Yokota, Watalu; Nakamura, Yoshiteru

    2006-01-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2004 to March 31, 2005. The 126 of the presented papers are indexed individually. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (J.P.N.)

  19. OMS 1987 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Research Libraries, Washington, DC. Office of Management Studies.

    Designed to serve both as an activity report on Office of Management Studies (OMS) progress during 1987 and a catalog of OMS services and products, this annual report focuses on the management of technology in a scholarly environment. Programs and services are reported in five sections: (1) Applied Research and Development (the Institute on…

  20. Folklife Annual, 1987.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbour, Alan, Ed.; Hardin, James, Ed.

    This annual publication is intended to promote the documentation and study of the folklife of the United States, to share the traditions, values, and activities of U.S. folk culture, and to serve as a national forum for the discussion of ideas and issues in folklore and folklife. The articles in this collection are: (1) "Eating in the Belly…

  1. NERSC Annual Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules (Ed.), John

    2006-07-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  2. NERSC Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John

    2003-01-31

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2002 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects), and information about NERSC's current and planned systems and service

  3. Annual Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) is an international research center using neutrons to probe the microscopic structure and dynamics of a broad range of materials. This annual report presents the ILL activities in 2000: the scientific highlights, the Millennium programme and the new developments, the workshops organized by the ILL, the experimental programme and the publications. (A.L.B.)

  4. IRI annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In this annual report of the Dutch Interfacultary Reactor Institute, summary reports are presented of current research and teaching activities during 1989 of the departments radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation physics and reactor physics, operation and maintenance of, and experiments with the Delft Hoger Onderwijs reactor, nuclear instrumentation projects and supporting services. (H.W.). 145 refs.; 20 figs.; 4 fotos; 2 tabs

  5. CSIR Annual report 1966

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1966-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty second annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1966, to the 31st December 1966. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  6. KTA annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report gives an overview of the rulemaking work in the individual fields as well as other activities, such as meetings, international codes of rules, and publications. KTA organization, including its administration and funds is listed. (orig./HP) [de

  7. NERSC Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John; Bashor, Jon; Yarris, Lynn; McCullough, Julie; Preuss, Paul; Bethel, Wes

    2005-04-15

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the premier computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report includes summaries of recent significant and representative computational science projects conducted on NERSC systems as well as information about NERSC's current and planned systems and services.

  8. Annual report - ENERSUL - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The annual report of ENERSUL - Brazilian electric power distribution company - introduces the following main topics: Outlook for the State of Mato Grosso do Sul; strategic focus; financial performance; relation with investors; energy sold; capacity increases; customers; customers; energy balance; performance and quality; electric system; investments; people; human resources; synergies; awards; workplace safety; social balance; and patrimonial balance

  9. ELETRONUCLEAR - Annual report - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The annual activities report of 1997 of ELETRONUCLEAR - Brazilian company responsible by the electric power generation from the nuclear technology - introduces the next main topics: company vision and mission; energy production and commercialization; investments in the electric power generation; economic and financial situation; social balancing; and patrimonial balancing

  10. 52nd Annual Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1987-01-01

    Jan 1, 1987 ... At the invitation of the Banaras Hindu. University, Varanasi, the 52nd Annual Meeting of the Academy was held in the BHU campus from Friday 7 to Monday 10 November 1986. The Meeting began with the inaugural function in the newly completed University. Auditorium, Swatantrata Bhavan, at 6 p.m. on.

  11. Annual Report - ESCELSA - 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The annual report of ESCELSA - Brazilian electric power distribution company - introduces the following main topics: state of Espirito Santo; strategic focus; financial performance; relation with investors; energy sales; market overview; market expansion; customers; technological stream; measuring quality; electric system; investments; protecting the environment; and resource allocation

  12. CSIR Annual report 1980

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the thirty-sixth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1980 to 31 December 1980. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1980, certified...

  13. CSIR Annual report 1970

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1970-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty sixth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1970, to the 31st December 1970. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  14. CSIR Annual report 1967

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1967-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty third annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1967, to the 31st December 1967. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  15. BAM - Annual report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    The annual report contains progress and activity reports of the presidential department, the departments metals and metal construction, civil engineering and building activities, organic matter, chemical safety engineering, special fields of materials testing, techniques independent of the type of material, an index, as well as general and statistic statements. (HK) [de

  16. IRI annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    In this annual report of the Dutch Interfacultary Reactor Institute, summary reports are presented of current research and teaching activities during 1989 of the departments radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation physics and reactor physics, operation and maintenance of, and experiments with the Delft Hoger Onderwijs reactor, nuclear instrumentation projects and supporting services. (H.W.). 299 refs.; 2 figs.; 7 tabs

  17. Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) is an international research center using neutrons to probe the microscopic structure and dynamics of a broad range of materials. This annual report presents the ILL activities in 2000: the scientific highlights, the Millennium programme and the new developments, the workshops organized by the ILL, the experimental programme and the publications. (A.L.B.)

  18. IKF annual report 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    The annual report of 1988 gives a survey of the following category of themes: nuclear physics, atom physics, nuclear methods, nuclear solid-state physics and developments of machines. Apart from the use of its own Van de Graaff accelerators the institute takes part in joint ventures in research, for example with the GSI (Association for Heavy-Ion Research) in Darmstadt. (DG) [de

  19. ANCLI annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The National Association for the Information Local Commissions (ANCLI) was created in september 1999. This association aims to develop an exchange and information network for the information local commissions. In this framework it develops information sheets, Internet site, nuclear centers visits, colloquium and formations organizations. This report presents the annual activities for the year 2002. (A.L.B.)

  20. CSIR Annual report 1971

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1971-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty seventh annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1971, to the 31st December 1971. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  1. NRCC annual report, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-11-01

    This annual report of the National Research for Computation in Chemistry (NRCC) Division describes the program of research workshops, software development, and scientific research of the Division in 1979. This year marked the first full calendar year of activity of the Division. Initial staffing in the core scientific areas was completed by the addition of a crystallographer

  2. Annual report - ESCELSA - 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The annual report of 1999 of ESCELSA - Brazilian electric power company - introduces the next main topics: state of Espirito Santo; strategic focus; financial performance; relation with investors; energy sales; customers; quality; electric system; investments; people; resources; synergies; awards; outlook; social balancing; and patrimonial balancing

  3. Environment annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    In the 1993 Environment Annual Report for BNFL, data are presented for radioactive discharges to the environment and their associated doses to the criteria group members of the public in the vicinity of Sellafield, Drigg, Chapelcross, Springfields and Capenhurst. Similarly, data are also presented for non-radioactive discharges to water and air for each site. (UK)

  4. Annual report SNET 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This annual report of the SNET (National Society of Electricity and thermic) presents the society activities and the financial report for the year 2003. The society position in the market, the environmental policy, the performance, the workers and financial data are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  5. Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, M.; Gawlikowicz, W.

    2008-03-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University describes the activities of Laboratory in 2007. The document consist of four parts: '' Laboratory Overview '', '' Experiments and Experimental Set-ups '', '' Experiments Using the Outside Facilities '' and '' General Information on HIL Activities ''. An '' Introduction '' written by director of the Department prof. J. Jastrzebski is also given

  6. Annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This annual report presents an evaluation of activities of the Entomology Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. The major themes of the report include mass rearing and quality control in Tsetse fly and research on Medfly genetic sexing strains

  7. NIKHEF Annual Report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    In this annual report 1982, the NIKHEF research programs of high-energy physics, nuclear physics and radiochemistry is described in a wide context. Next, the reports of the individual projects of section-H and section-K are described in detail. Finally, the report gives some statistical information of publications, colloquia and co-workers. (Auth.)

  8. Sustainability Annual Report 2014

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  9. Sustainability Annual Report 2015

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  10. NUFFIC Annual Report, 1977.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netherlands Universities Foundation for International Co-operation, The Hague.

    The 1977 annual report of the Netherlands Universities Foundation for International Cooperation (NUFFIC) considers the following topics: major developments in work and policy; relationships NUFFIC has with other organizations; University Development Cooperation; developments in international education; the functioning of the Consultative Structure…

  11. CSIR Annual report 1968

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1968-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty fourth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1968, to the 31st December 1968. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  12. CSIR Annual report 1969

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the twenty fifth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1969, to the 31st December 1969. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  13. Uranium industry annual 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1998 (UIA 1998) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing. It contains data for the period 1989 through 2008 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data provides a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Data on uranium raw materials activities for 1989 through 1998, including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment, are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities for 1994 through 2008, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, enrichment feed deliveries, uranium fuel assemblies, filled and unfilled market requirements, and uranium inventories, are shown in Chapter 2. The methodology used in the 1998 survey, including data edit and analysis, is described in Appendix A. The methodologies for estimation of resources and reserves are described in Appendix B. A list of respondents to the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is provided in Appendix C. The Form EIA-858 ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' is shown in Appendix D. For the readers convenience, metric versions of selected tables from Chapters 1 and 2 are presented in Appendix E along with the standard conversion factors used. A glossary of technical terms is at the end of the report. 24 figs., 56 tabs

  14. Annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    In this annual report of the Dutch Interfacultary Reactor Institute, summary and detailed reports are presented of current research during 1987 of the departments radiochemistry, radiation chemistry, radiation physics and reactor physics. (H.W.). 61 refs.; 13 figs.; 14 tabs

  15. PTB annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-02-01

    The annual report presents general information on the institution's activities and the various departments, and reports on scientific work in the field of metrology and safety engineering. Brief scientific accounts refer to work in the domains of mechanics and acoustics, electricity, heat, optics, industrial metrology, atomic physics, technical and scientific services, collection and disposal of radioactive waste. (DG) [de

  16. Annual report 1981, annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This volume entitled ''Annex to the annual report'' deals in more detail with the scientific works of the I.L.L.: the scientific activity of theoricians; experimental reports on inelastic scattering in simple solids, crystallographic and magnetic structures, fluids and amorphous substances, imperfections, biology, chemistry

  17. HASYLAB annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the work performed at HASYLAB together with a list of publications, speeches, and theses. The work concerns technical developments, the study of the electronic structure of atoms, molecules, solids, surfaces, and liquids, X-ray structure studies of solids and interfaces, molecular biology, further applications of synchrotron radiation, and experimental developments. (HSI)

  18. RTE annual results 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This annual report presents the results of the RTE (Electric power Transport Network). The year 2005 is marked by the new status of RTE, as a limited company. The financial good performances, the market, the open network, the environmental policy, the human resources and the european and international relations are discussed. (A.L.B.)

  19. CSIR Annual report 1962

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1962-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the eighteenth annual report of the CSIR. The report covers the period 1 January, 1962 to 31 December 1962. A balance sheet and statements of income and expenditure for the financial year ended 31st March 1962, certified...

  20. Sustainability Annual Report 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  1. 2010 AAUW Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association of University Women, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report highlights some of the outstanding accomplishments of AAUW (American Association of University Women) for fiscal year 2010. This year's annual report also features stories of remarkable women who are leading the charge to break through barriers and ensure that all women have a fair chance. Sharon is working to reduce the pay gap…

  2. Annual Report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacz, M.; Zielinska, M.

    2011-06-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw describes the activities of Laboratory in 2010. The document consist of four parts: '' Laboratory Overview '', '' Experiments at HIL '', '' Experiments Using the Outside Facilities '' and '' Appendices '' where general information on HIL activities are described. An '' Introduction '' written by director of the Heavy Ion Laboratory prof. K. Rusek is also given.

  3. Carolinas Communication Annual, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLennan, David B.

    1998-01-01

    This 1998 issue of "Carolinas Communication Annual" contains the following articles: "Give Me That Old Time Religion?: A Study of Religious Themes in the Rhetoric of the Ku Klux Klan" (John S. Seiter); "The Three Stooges versus the Third Reich" (Roy Schwartzman); "Interdisciplinary Team Teaching: Implementing…

  4. Mail Office annual closure

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On the occasion of the annual closure of CERN, there will be no mail distributed on Friday 20 December 2013 but mail will be collected in the morning. Nevertheless, you will still be able to bring your outgoing mail to Building 555-R-002 until 12 noon.  

  5. International Energy Annual, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules

  6. International energy annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules

  7. Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeley, N.; Skalski, J.

    2009-01-01

    The ''Annual Report 2008'' describes activities of Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in 2008. Report consists of two parts. First one consists of general information about location, management, scientific council, personnel, financial support and conferences while the second one describes the scientific activity of Institute. A Foreword to all report written by Director of the Institute prof. Grzegorz Wrochna is also given

  8. Annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This annual report presents an evaluation of activities of the Entomology Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. The major themes of the report include mass rearing and quality control in Tsetse fly and research on Medfly genetic sexing strains

  9. Annual report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This annual report presents an evaluation of activities of the Entomology Unit of the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory, Seibersdorf. The major themes of the report include mass rearing and quality control in Tsetse fly and research on Medfly genetic sexing strains

  10. Annual report 1982. Annex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the scientific annual report 1982 of the ILL on R and D activities of the different colleges: fundamental and nuclear physics, inelastic scattering in simple solids, crystallographic and magnetic structures, fluids and amorphous substances, imperfections, biology, chemistry, theory. Abstracts of the publications published during the year are presented

  11. International Energy Annual, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-01-14

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Prices are included for selected petroleum products. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu) and joules.

  12. NIKHEF Annual Report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This annual report presents the activities of the Dutch National Institute for Nuclear and High Energy Physics (NIKHEF) during its first year. Following a general introduction to the research areas in which NIKHEF is involved, 29 brief reports from the project groups are presented. Details concerning personnel, participation in councils and committees, finances, publications, colloquia and participation in congresses and schools are included. (Auth.)

  13. Annual Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2005-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2004. The document consist of seven parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiological protection and monitoring of environment; Nuclear techniques in health and environment protection and in last section the list of published in 2004 papers is presented

  14. Sustainability Annual Report 2011

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  15. Sustainability Annual Report 2013

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  16. Sustainability Annual Report 2012

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  17. Sustainability Annual Report 2017

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Every year, Virginia Tech releases a sustainability annual report to show the university’s progress in meeting the sustainability goals. The key sustainability metrics these reports cover include: greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, energy use intensity, alternative transportation use, recycling, and water consumption.

  18. Annual results 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This 2004 annual evaluation of the french RTE company (electric power transport network) provides information on the 2004 results on: institutional information, financial results, customers and market, industrial resources, environment and consultation, human resources and international aspects. (A.L.B.)

  19. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2000

  20. 57th Annual Meeting

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1992-01-01

    Jan 1, 1992 ... At the invitation of the National Chemical. Laboratory, Pune, the 57th Annual Meeting of the Academy was held at Pune ftom 8 to 11. November 1991. The Meeting began with the inaugural session on the morning of Friday, 8 November at the National Chemical laboratory (NCl). Auditorium. Dr R A ...

  1. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, M.; Gawlikowicz, W.; Pienkowski, L.

    2006-05-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, Warsaw University describes the activities of Laboratory in 2005. The document consist of four parts: Laboratory Overview, Experiments and Experimental Set-ups, Experiments Using the Outside Facilities and General Information on HIL Activities. An Introduction written by director of the Department prof. J. Jastrzebski is also given

  2. GKSS annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This annual report reviews the structure and activities of the GKSS in 1983. R and D work was done on reactor safety engineering, environmental research/environmental engineering and underwater technology. It also reports on cooperation with outside partners, the organization, financing, and developments in the staff structure as well as on publications, lectures, applications for patents, etc. (UA) [de

  3. Total 2004 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This annual report of the Group Total brings information and economic data on the following topics, for the year 2004: the corporate governance, the corporate social responsibility, the shareholder notebook, the management report, the activities, the upstream (exploration and production) and downstream (refining and marketing) operating, chemicals and other matters. (A.L.B.)

  4. CSIR Annual report 1963

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    CSIR

    1963-01-01

    Full Text Available This report presents the nineteenth annual report of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research. The report covers the period from the 1st January, 1963, to the 31st December 1963. Balance sheets and statements of income and expenditure...

  5. 45 CFR 233.40 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... For purposes of this section: (1) A resident of a State is one: (i) Who is living in the State... resident of the State in which he or she is living other than on a temporary basis. Residence may not depend upon the reason for which the individual entered the State, except insofar as it may bear upon...

  6. Breaking Bad News - Perceptions of Pediatric Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeta, M G; Krishnakumar, P

    2017-08-15

    The present study evaluated the perceptions and practice of 92 final year pediatric residents with regard to breaking bad news. Only 16% of residents had received any training in communication skills. Majority (65%) of the residents were not comfortable while breaking bad news.

  7. 8 CFR 325.3 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Residence. 325.3 Section 325.3 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY NATIONALITY REGULATIONS NATIONALS BUT NOT CITIZENS OF THE UNITED STATES; RESIDENCE WITHIN OUTLYING POSSESSIONS § 325.3 Residence. (a) For purposes of applying the...

  8. Sexual Health Education: A Psychiatric Resident's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waineo, Eva; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Morreale, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This report discusses psychiatric residents' perceptions of sexual health education and their opinions regarding curricular improvements. Methods: An anonymous, web-based survey was sent to residents in one general psychiatry program (N = 33). The response rate was 69.7%. Results: Residents reported inadequate experience in multiple…

  9. Pioneering partnerships: Resident involvement from multiple perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baur, V.E.; Abma, T.A.; Boelsma, F.; Woelders, S.

    2013-01-01

    Resident involvement in residential care homes is a challenge due to shortcomings of consumerist and formal approaches such as resident councils. The PARTNER approach aims to involve residents through collective action to improve their community life and wellbeing. The purpose of this article is to

  10. 24 CFR 206.39 - Principal residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Principal residence. 206.39 Section... CONVERSION MORTGAGE INSURANCE Eligibility; Endorsement Eligible Mortgagors § 206.39 Principal residence. The property must be the principal residence of each mortgagor at closing. For purposes of this section, the...

  11. 25 CFR 700.97 - Residence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Residence. 700.97 Section 700.97 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES General Policies and Instructions Definitions § 700.97 Residence. (a) Residence is established by proving that the head of household...

  12. Suicidal Thoughts Among Medical Residents with Burnout

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Frank; Dillingh, Gea; Bakker, Arnold; Prins, Jelle

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Recent research showed that medical residents have a high risk for developing burnout. The present study investigates the prevalence of burnout and its relationship with suicidal thoughts among medical residents. Methods: All Dutch medical residents (n = 5126) received a self-report

  13. Does Targeted Training Improve Residents' Teaching Skills?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polreis, Sean; D'Eon, Marcel F.; Premkumar, Kalyani; Trinder, Krista; Bonnycastle, Deirdre

    2015-01-01

    Resident doctors have an important and integral responsibility of teaching a number of individuals. The purpose of this study was to measure the effectiveness of the University of Saskatchewan's resident-as-teacher training course--Teaching Improvement Project Systems (TIPS). Residents who attended the TIPS course from January, 2010 through June,…

  14. Negotiations of Acknowledgement among Middle Class Residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Nina Blom

    2013-01-01

    The article presents an analysis of communication processes between residents, between residents and people in the broader societal context as well as of media coverage of a fireworks disaster in a Danish suburb. It demonstrates how residents (all members of the Danish middle class) were able...

  15. Effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for obstetrics and gynecology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christianson, Mindy S; Washington, Chantel I; Stewart, Katherine I; Shen, Wen

    2016-03-01

    Previous work has shown American obstetrics and gynecology (OB/GYN) residents are lacking in menopause training. Our objective was to assess the effectiveness of a 2-year menopause medicine curriculum in improving OB/GYN residents' knowledge and self-assessed competency in menopause topics. We developed a menopause medicine-teaching curriculum for OB/GYN residents at our academic hospital-based residency program. The 2-year curriculum was composed of year 1: four 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab with cases presentations, and year 2: three 1-hour lectures and one 2-hour lab. Core topics included menopause physiology, hormone therapy, breast health, bone health, cardiovascular disease, and autoimmune disease. Pre- and posttests assessed resident knowledge and comfort in core topics, and a pre- and postcurriculum survey assessed utility and learning satisfaction. From July 2011 to June 2013, 34 OB/GYN residents completed the menopause curriculum annually with an average attendance at each module of 23 residents. Pre-/posttest scores improved from a mean pretest score of 57.3% to a mean posttest score of 78.7% (P menopause patients with 75.8% reporting feeling "barely comfortable" and 8.4% feeling "not at all comfortable." After the 2-year curriculum, 85.7% reported feeling "comfortable/very comfortable" taking care of menopause patients. The majority of residents (95.2%) reported the menopause curriculum was "extremely useful." A 2-year menopause medicine curriculum for OB/GYN residents utilizing lectures and a lab with case studies is an effective modality to improve resident knowledge required to manage menopause patients.

  16. PERCEIVED NEED FOR AN INTERNATIONAL ELECTIVE EXPERIENCE AMONG ITALIAN MEDICAL RESIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the contemporary society an International Health Elective (IHE represents a strategic tool in order to implement future medical doctor’s education. In Italy, in the last decade, an increasing interest of trainees and residents to IHE and opportunities was documented and supported by the reorganization of the Italian residency programs, provided by the Ministry for Education, University and Research (MIUR. Aim of the present study was to collect data on perceived need of medical residents for an IHE. A structured questionnaire was developed and administered to medical residents of Palermo’s University who underwent their annual visit to the Occupational Health Physician Ambulatory (OHPA of Palermo’s University Hospital, in the period between March and October 2011. Medical residents more prone to undergo an IHE were, younger than 29 years old (p <0.01, attending the new educational system (p 0.02 and surgical residents (p= 0.0001. A negative opinion about the formative quality performances of the residency program was significantly associated with surgical residencies (p= 0.002. Future Italian surgeons are more prone to undergo an IHE and this statement is probably related to the not satisfying residency program. Residents attending the old educational system consider the IHE as a way to implement their professional perspectives possibly for their more realistic professional perspective facing an approaching future full of work uncertainties. Considering the future competition between medical professionals working in different EU contexts, the Italian Government should implement future medical education policy in order to provide for a Healthcare “without Border” in the EU.

  17. Trends in Resident Operative Teaching Opportunities for Treatment of Intracranial Aneurysms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piazza, Matthew; Nayak, Nikhil; Ali, Zarina; Heuer, Gregory; Sanborn, Matthew; Stein, Sherman; Schuster, James; Grady, M Sean; Malhotra, Neil R

    2017-07-01

    The International Subarachnoid Aneurysm Trial heralded a paradigm shift in the treatment of intracranial aneurysms. During this same time frame, neurosurgical training programs increased in size and scope. The present study examines the impact of trends in surgical clipping and the endovascular treatment of intracranial aneurysms, over one decade, and the neurosurgical resident complement on the resident teaching environment using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS). The NIS was used to estimate the number of aneurysms treated with either surgical clipping and endovascular methods from 2002 through 2011 at teaching institutions. Teaching opportunities per year per resident or chief resident were calculated as the ratio of the number of specified cases to the average number of neurosurgical trainees by year. Annualized trends were assessed. Over the study period, the percent change in odds of occurrence of a clipped ruptured aneurysm was -15.6% per year (P institutions. This corresponded to a decline in teaching opportunities for clipped ruptured aneurysms for both residents and chief residents (P < 0.001). In contrast, teaching opportunities for endovascular treatment of both ruptured and unruptured aneurysms increased dramatically over the study period. There has been a significant decrease in opportunity for operative exposure to craniotomy for ruptured aneurysm clipping over the past decade, whereas the volume of endovascular procedures for aneurysms has dramatically increased, highlighting the need for a shift in training strategy for those neurosurgeons graduating from residency desiring to subspecialize in neurovascular neurosurgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 2003 survey of Canadian radiation oncology residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, Don; Fairchild, Alysa; Keyes, Mira; Butler, Jim; Dundas, George

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation oncology's popularity as a career in Canada has surged in the past 5 years. Consequently, resident numbers in Canadian radiation oncology residencies are at all-time highs. This study aimed to survey Canadian radiation oncology residents about their opinions of their specialty and training experiences. Methods and Materials: Residents of Canadian radiation oncology residencies that enroll trainees through the Canadian Resident Matching Service were identified from a national database. Residents were mailed an anonymous survey. Results: Eight of 101 (7.9%) potential respondents were foreign funded. Fifty-two of 101 (51.5%) residents responded. A strong record of graduating its residents was the most important factor residents considered when choosing programs. Satisfaction with their program was expressed by 92.3% of respondents, and 94.3% expressed satisfaction with their specialty. Respondents planning to practice in Canada totaled 80.8%, and 76.9% plan to have academic careers. Respondents identified job availability and receiving adequate teaching from preceptors during residency as their most important concerns. Conclusions: Though most respondents are satisfied with their programs and specialty, job availability and adequate teaching are concerns. In the future, limited time and resources and the continued popularity of radiation oncology as a career will magnify the challenge of training competent radiation oncologists in Canada

  19. Operative Landscape at Canadian Neurosurgery Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Michael K; Dakson, Ayoub; Ahmed, Syed Uzair; Bigder, Mark; Elliott, Cameron; Guha, Daipayan; Iorio-Morin, Christian; Kameda-Smith, Michelle; Lavergne, Pascal; Makarenko, Serge; Taccone, Michael S; Wang, Bill; Winkler-Schwartz, Alexander; Sankar, Tejas; Christie, Sean D

    2017-07-01

    Background Currently, the literature lacks reliable data regarding operative case volumes at Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. Our objective was to provide a snapshot of the operative landscape in Canadian neurosurgical training using the trainee-led Canadian Neurosurgery Research Collaborative. Anonymized administrative operative data were gathered from each neurosurgery residency program from January 1, 2014, to December 31, 2014. Procedures were broadly classified into cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures. A number of prespecified subspecialty procedures were recorded. We defined the resident case index as the ratio of the total number of operations to the total number of neurosurgery residents in that program. Resident number included both Canadian medical and international medical graduates, and included residents on the neurosurgery service, off-service, or on leave for research or other personal reasons. Overall, there was an average of 1845 operative cases per neurosurgery residency program. The mean numbers of cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and miscellaneous procedures were 725, 466, 48, and 193, respectively. The nationwide mean resident case indices for cranial, spine, peripheral nerve, and total procedures were 90, 58, 5, and 196, respectively. There was some variation in the resident case indices for specific subspecialty procedures, with some training programs not performing carotid endarterectomy or endoscopic transsphenoidal procedures. This study presents the breadth of neurosurgical training within Canadian neurosurgery residency programs. These results may help inform the implementation of neurosurgery training as the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons residency training transitions to a competence-by-design curriculum.

  20. Resident-Led Palliative Care Education Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlen, Naomi; Cruz, Brian; Leigh, A E

    2016-04-01

    Despite the growth of palliative medicine, 39% of hospitals do not have palliative care teams for consultation or to provide resident education. We examined the impact of resident-led education in palliative care principles on attitudes toward and comfort with palliative medicine and end-of-life care among internal medicine residents. An educational module designed by the authors was presented to other internal medicine residents in the program. Pre- and post-intervention survey data measuring residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care were analyzed. Residents' agreement with various statements regarding palliative medicine and end-of-life care on a 5-point Likert scale was analyzed. Following the intervention, participants reported improved comfort with general knowledge of palliative medicine (p palliative care and end-of-life care (p curriculum in palliative medicine can improve resident comfort within this still-under-represented area of medicine.

  1. NAGRA Annual report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-04-01

    This annual report presents the highlights of the activities carried out by the Swiss National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes NAGRA during the year 2010. These include reviews by various commissions of the NAGRA co-operative's proposals for possible sites for nuclear waste repositories. Also, the enhancements made concerning information facilities for the general public at the co-operative's rock laboratories are mentioned. The operation of initial satellite-based precision measurement systems for movements in the earth's crust is noted. Organisational aspects and international co-operation are discussed. This annual report also looks at NAGRA's organisational structures and its commercial accounts. Appendices provide details on waste inventories and volumes and publications made in 2010. A selection of relevant internet addresses is also provided

  2. Nagra annual report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    This annual report made by the Swiss National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (NAGRA) takes a look at the cooperative’s activities and work done in 2013. Nagra’s task is recapitulated. Developments in 2013 concerning legislation, inventories of radioactive materials, sectorial planning and scientific and technical aspects are examined. Work done in the rock laboratories, in the public relations sector and consulting areas is looked at. Nagra’s organizational structure with its management, commissions and auditors is commented on and an organigram of the head office is presented. On the financial side of things, the annual financial statement with incomes, cash flow and accumulated accounts is presented as is the report made by the statutory auditors. An appendix to the report contains details on waste inventories and volumes, a list publications made in 2012 as well as Internet addresses and a glossary

  3. Renewable energy annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Annual 1995 is the first in an expected series of annual reports the Energy Information Administration (EIA) intends to publish to provide a comprehensive assessment of renewable energy. This report presents the following information on the history, status, and prospects of renewable energy data: estimates of renewable resources; characterizations of renewable energy technologies; descriptions of industry infrastructures for individual technologies; evaluations of current market status; and assessments of near-term prospects for market growth. An international section is included, as well as two feature articles that discuss issues of importance for renewable energy as a whole. The report also contains a number of technical appendices and a glossary. The renewable energy sources included are biomass (wood), municipal solid waste, biomass-derived liquid fuels, geothermal, wind, and solar and photovoltaic.

  4. Annual recertification: fun? Wow!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, A

    1994-01-01

    Learning is critical to fostering a knowledge base required for maintaining currency and furthering professional development. In the ever-changing field of nephrology, most skills practised in nursing are considered to be sanctioned medical acts or added nursing skills. Therefore, annual recertification of the skills designated as sanctioned medical acts is an expectation of the College of Nurses of Ontario. The Wellesley Hospital policy indicates one time only or annual approval of the added nursing skills. The article will discuss the use of games as a creative, non-threatening educational tool in the recertification/re-approval process currently in place at The Wellesley Hospital, renal programs. In the past two years, several games or alternative teaching strategies have been utilized to assist the staff in preparing for recertification. This paper will examine the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing alternative teaching formats. Commentary regarding the response of staff nurses, nursing management and education will be highlighted.

  5. 1986 Annual Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This annual report describes the reasearch activity carried out during 1986 by the Fusion Department of the Italian Commision for Nuclear and Alternative Energy Sources (ENEA). The report outlines the main results obtained by the three major projects of the Fusion Department (Fusion Physics, Frascati Tokamak Upgrade, and Fusion Reactor Engineering), plus the divisional project Inertial Confinement mentioned separately because of its particular scientific content. Most of the research work was performed by the Fusion Department at its location at the ENEA Frascati Energy Research Center, but some work was also done elsewhere, or with recourse to other ENEA departments. The research activity described in this annual report was carried out with the frame of the Association Euratom-ENEA on Fusion, with the exception of some minor activities

  6. Annual General Asssembly

    CERN Multimedia

    Pension Fund

    2005-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Thursday 13 October 2005 at 14:30 The Agenda comprises: Opening Remarks (J. Bezemer) Results and presentation of the Annual Report 2004 - Role of asset classes in pension funds (C. Cuénoud). Copies of the 2004 Report are available from departmental secretariats. Package of measures aiming at equilibrating the Fund - Proposals by the Governing Board (J.-P. Matheys). Questions from members and beneficiaries. Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (J. Bezemer). As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2004 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel.(+4122)767 27 42; e-mail Sophia.Revol@cern.ch)

  7. Annual General Asssembly

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    All members and beneficiaries of the Pension Fund are invited to attend the Annual General Asssembly to be held in the CERN Council Chamber on Thursday 13 October 2005 at 14:30 The Agenda comprises: Opening Remarks (J. Bezemer) Results and presentation of the Annual Report 2004 - Role of asset classes in pension funds (C. Cuénoud) Copies of the 2004 Report are available from departmental secretariats. Package of measures aiming at equilibrating the Fund - Proposals by the Governing Board (J.-P. Matheys) Questions from members and beneficiaries Persons wishing to ask questions are encouraged to submit them, where possible, in writing in advance, addressed to Mr C. Cuénoud, Administrator of the Fund. Conclusions (J. Bezemer) As usual, participants are invited to drinks after the assembly. NB The minutes of the 2004 General Assembly are available from the Administration of the Fund (tel.(+4122)767 27 42; e-mail Sophia.Revol@cern.ch)

  8. Coal industry annual 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs

  9. Renewable energy annual 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-12-01

    The Renewable Energy Annual 1995 is the first in an expected series of annual reports the Energy Information Administration (EIA) intends to publish to provide a comprehensive assessment of renewable energy. This report presents the following information on the history, status, and prospects of renewable energy data: estimates of renewable resources; characterizations of renewable energy technologies; descriptions of industry infrastructures for individual technologies; evaluations of current market status; and assessments of near-term prospects for market growth. An international section is included, as well as two feature articles that discuss issues of importance for renewable energy as a whole. The report also contains a number of technical appendices and a glossary. The renewable energy sources included are biomass (wood), municipal solid waste, biomass-derived liquid fuels, geothermal, wind, and solar and photovoltaic

  10. International energy annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  11. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-24

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners` acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date.

  12. Coal industry annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    Coal Industry Annual 1997 provides comprehensive information about US coal production, number of mines, prices, productivity, employment, productive capacity, and recoverable reserves. US Coal production for 1997 and previous years is based on the annual survey EIA-7A, Coal Production Report. This report presents data on coal consumption, coal distribution, coal stocks, coal prices, and coal quality for Congress, Federal and State agencies, the coal industry, and the general public. Appendix A contains a compilation of coal statistics for the major coal-producing States. This report includes a national total coal consumption for nonutility power producers that are not in the manufacturing, agriculture, mining, construction, or commercial sectors. 14 figs., 145 tabs.

  13. 2017 Annual Technology Baseline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, Wesley J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hand, M. M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Eberle, Annika [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Beiter, Philipp C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurup, Parthiv [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Turchi, Craig S [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Feldman, David J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Margolis, Robert M [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Augustine, Chad R [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Maness, Michael [Formerly NREL; O' Connor, Patrick [Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    2018-03-26

    Consistent cost and performance data for various electricity generation technologies can be difficult to find and may change frequently for certain technologies. With the Annual Technology Baseline (ATB), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory annually provides an organized and centralized set of such cost and performance data. The ATB uses the best information from the Department of Energy national laboratories' renewable energy analysts as well as information from the Energy Information Administration for fuel-based technologies. The ATB has been reviewed by experts and it includes the following electricity generation technologies: land-based wind, offshore wind, utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PV), commercial-scale solar PV, residential-scale solar PV, concentrating solar power, geothermal power, hydropower, coal, natural gas, nuclear, and conventional biopower. This webinar presentation introduces the 2017 ATB.

  14. Petroleum marketing annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Petroleum Marketing Annual (PMA) provides information and statistical data on a variety of crude oils and refined petroleum products. The publication presents statistics on crude oil costs and refined petroleum products sales for use by industry, government, private sector analysis, educational institutions, and consumers. Data on crude oil include the domestic first purchase price, the fob and landed cost of imported crude oil, and the refiners' acquisition cost of crude oil. Refined petroleum product sales data include motor gasoline, distillates, residuals, aviation fuels, kerosene, and propane. The Petroleum Marketing Division, Office of Oil and Gas, Energy Information Administration ensures the accuracy, quality, and confidentiality of the published data in the Petroleum Marketing Annual. For this production, all estimates have been recalculated since their earlier publication in the Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM). These calculations made use of additional data and corrections that were received after the PMM publication date

  15. Annual Energy Review 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seiferlein, Katherine E. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are data on total energy production, consumption, and trade; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, international energy, as well as financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversion tables. Publication of this report is required under Public Law 95–91 (Department of Energy Organization Act), Section 205(c), and is in keeping with responsibilities given to the EIA under Section 205(a)(2), which states: “The Administrator shall be responsible for carrying out a central, comprehensive, and unified energy data and information program which will collect, evaluate, assemble, analyze, and disseminate data and information....”

  16. NAGRA Annual report 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-04-15

    This annual report presents the highlights of the activities carried out by the Swiss National Co-operative for the Disposal of Radioactive Wastes NAGRA during the year 2010. These include reviews by various commissions of the NAGRA co-operative's proposals for possible sites for nuclear waste repositories. Also, the enhancements made concerning information facilities for the general public at the co-operative's rock laboratories are mentioned. The operation of initial satellite-based precision measurement systems for movements in the earth's crust is noted. Organisational aspects and international co-operation are discussed. This annual report also looks at NAGRA's organisational structures and its commercial accounts. Appendices provide details on waste inventories and volumes and publications made in 2010. A selection of relevant internet addresses is also provided

  17. IKF - annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Boecking, H.; Steuer, E.

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the work performed in the named institute during 1982 together with a list of publications. The work concerns nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, high-energetic heavy ion physics, heavy ion-atom collisions, nuclear solidstate physics, solid-state particle detectors, the application of nuclear methods and mass spectroscopy, ion source development, instrumental development and data processing, interdisciplinary cooperation, as well as the Van de Graaf accelerator facilities. (HSI) [de

  18. NSLS annual report 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klaffky, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1984-01-01

    The first comprehensive Annual Report of the National Synchrotron Light Source comes at a time of great activity and forward motion for the facility. In the following pages we outline the management changes that have taken place in the past year, the progress that has been made in the commissioning of the x-ray ring and in the enhanced utilization of the uv ring, together with an extensive discussion of the interesting scientific experiments that have been carried out

  19. NSLS annual report 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaffky, R.; Thomlinson, W. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The first comprehensive Annual Report of the National Synchrotron Light Source comes at a time of great activity and forward motion for the facility. In the following pages we outline the management changes that have taken place in the past year, the progress that has been made in the commissioning of the x-ray ring and in the enhanced utilization of the uv ring, together with an extensive discussion of the interesting scientific experiments that have been carried out.

  20. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    The 1979 annual report of HMI presents information on the major scientific findings of this year in the fields of nuclear and radiation physics, radiation chemistry, radiochemistry, data processing and electronics as well as on the scientific cooperation with universities, institutions, and the industry. The general development of HMI, its structure and organisation are reviewed. A detailed list of publications and lectures (also by foreign guests of HMI) in the various fields of research is given. (RB) [de

  1. Annual report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-02-01

    In part 1, the annual report informs of the organizational and administrative development of the Bundesanstalt, in its 2nd part it presents a survey of scientific activities in 1976, examinations carried out, measuring devices and operational equipment given permission to, and cooperation in national and international bodies. The 3rd part contains scientific summaries of activities published and not published, which were either concluded in the year under review or which came to some interim results. (orig.) [de

  2. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2006-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2005. The document consist of seven parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiological protection and dosimetry; Nuclear Technology in Energy Generation; Solid State Physics; Nuclear techniques in Health and Environment Protection management of Hazards and in last section the list of published in 2004 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented

  3. TIARA annual report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-10-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1998 to March 31, 1999. Summary reports of 95 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  4. TIARA annual report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Namba, Hideki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2002-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2001 to March 31, 2002. Summary reports of 109 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  5. Annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broda, R.; Lesniak, L.; Malecki, P.; Stachura, Z.; Wojciechowski, H.

    1992-01-01

    The material presented describing the scientific activities of the Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics in 1991 is the first annual report in several years.The arrangement of the report from various departments reflect the present structure of the Institute and is meant to help in the future task of reconstructing the Institute. Few guidelines proposed by the editorial board gave the individual departments much freedom in selecting the material and choosing the volume and format of presentation. (author)

  6. Risoe annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    An explanation of Risoe National Laboratory's function within the Danish research system is followed by brief accounts of research activities at Risoe during 1987. Energy resources, technology and policy are discussed, the annual accounts are presented, a guide to the National Laboratory and a list of its publications are given. Some of the research activities that took place in 1987 described in more detail are within the fields of chemistry and the environment, superconductivity, new aspects of powdery mildew, polymers and robotics. (AB)

  7. Annual Report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This annual report from the Netherlands Centre for Energy Research, includes the progress made in the five main research areas: fission energy, nuclear fusion and superconductivity, combustion energy (including environmental research), current energy and non-energetic applications of nuclear fission. Studies performed by the Energy Study Centrum, a department within ECN, and the Bureau for Energy Research Projects are described. A financial report is presented and a list of publications included. (C.F.)

  8. Uranium industry annual, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report presents data on US uranium raw materials and marketing activities of the domestic uranium industry. It contains aggregated data reported by US companies on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (1988), Form EIA-858, and historical data from prior data collections and other pertinent sources. The report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the independent agency for data collection and analysis with the US Department of Energy

  9. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Smulek, W.; Godlewska-Para, E.

    2006-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland) describes the activities of the Institute in 2005. The document consist of four parts: (1) Radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies; (2) Radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, general chemistry; (3) Radiobiology; (4) Nuclear technologies and methods. In total - 73 detailed papers prepared by the Institute workers and collaborating scientists are presented. General information on the Institute status, personnel activity and the international cooperation is also listed

  10. 2008 annual merit review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The 2008 DOE Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review was held February 25-28, 2008 in Bethesda, Maryland. The review encompassed all of the work done by the Vehicle Technologies Program: a total of 280 individual activities were reviewed, by a total of just over 100 reviewers. A total of 1,908 individual review responses were received for the technical reviews, and an additional 29 individual review responses were received for the plenary session review.

  11. Annual report ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biggin, S.

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents the 1988 Annual Report for ISIS (United Kingdom). A description is given of the accelerator and target station. The capability of ISIS is described including the facilities available and the type of science carried out using the instruments. The development and support activities are outlined, along with the ISIS organisation and user interaction. The appendix contains experimental reports on research work conducted at ISIS. (U.K.)

  12. TIARA annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Ryuichi; Saido, Masahiro; Nashiyama, Isamu [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    1998-10-01

    This annual report describes research activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1997 to March 31, 1998. Summary reports of 90 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  13. TIARA annual report 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Toraishi, Akio; Itoh, Hisayoshi [eds.] [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-10-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2000. Summary reports of 106 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  14. Annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Vyver, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    In 1983, the various research projects in which the nuclear physics laboratory of Ghent State University is involved, were continued. In the present Annual Report, the results obtained in the field of photofission, photonuclear reactions positron annihilation, dosimetry and nuclear theory are summarized. The new 10 MeV high duty factor linear electron accelerator is presently being installed: performance tests will be carried out until July 1984; after which this facility will gradually become available for nuclear research purposes. (AF)

  15. Annual exposure report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, B.L.; Mann, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    All DOE facilities annually submit occupational radiation exposure data to a central repository. The data include a summary of whole-body exposures, a summary of internal depositions of radioactive materials above specified limits, and occupational exposure reports for termination employees. The 1981 data were received in August 1982 and have been incorporated into a report format, established in 1980, that includes technical discussions and data illustrations

  16. Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This annual report gives the activities during the year 2000 and information about the General Direction of the Energy and Raw Materials (DGEMP) in France. The highlights of the year are discussed in the main following topics: public utilities, the Erika oil slick, the petroleum products prices increase, the energy efficiency national program, Eole 2005, the nuclear industry management. The french energy accounting, the publications and the organization of the DGEMP are also provided. (A.L.B.)

  17. Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2008-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2007. The document consist of eight parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiation protection and dosimetry; Nuclear technology in energy generation; Condensed matter physics; Nuclear techniques in health and environment protection management of hazards; Radioisotope center POLATOM and in last section in which the lists of published in 2007 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented

  18. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    This year 2000 annual report of the CEA (atomic energy commissariat) gives a general overview of the CEA activities and organization in the domains of the defence, the nuclear energy the technological research and the fundamental research. It is presented in seven main parts: contribution to national defence, civil nuclear research, technological research for the industry, pushing back the frontiers of scientific knowledge in physics and life science, mastery of installations; institute for protection and nuclear safety, research resources. (A.L.B.)

  19. ILL Annual Report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    This annual report provides a general view of the activities of the different sections of the ILL. In 1974, twenty-two different neutron spectrometers with different characteristics were available on a regular basis. Moreover, a number of special neutron sources were employed for on-line experiments. The major effort was devoted to an increase in experimental systems and to the development of new measurement techniques [fr

  20. Annual report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-12-01

    In this annual report a survey is given about the research programs of the named institute during 1980. The research concerns experiments with synchrotron radiation, hyperfine structure studies, experiments with the DORIS and PETRA storage rings, and experiments at the CERN accelerators. Furthermore the development of instruments in this institute is described. In addition a list of publications, contributions to conferences, and theses of this institute is given. (HSI)

  1. Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinska, M.; Gawlikowicz, W.

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Report of the Heavy Ion Laboratory, University of Warsaw describes the activities of Laboratory in 2008. The document consist of four parts: '' Laboratory Overview '', '' Experiments and Experimental Set-ups '', '' Experiments Using the Outside Facilities '' and '' General Information on HIL Activities ''. An '' Introduction '' written by directors of the Heavy Ion Laboratory: prof. J. Jastrzebski, prof. J. Kownacki and prof. K. Rusek is also given

  2. TIARA annual report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-11-01

    This annual report describes research activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1996 to March 31, 1997. Summary reports of 88 papers and 4 brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (J.P.N.)

  3. NERSC 1998 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John (ed.)

    1999-03-01

    This 1998 annual report from the National Scientific Energy Research Computing Center (NERSC) presents the year in review of the following categories: Computational Science; Computer Science and Applied Mathematics; and Systems and Services. Also presented are science highlights in the following categories: Basic Energy Sciences; Biological and Environmental Research; Fusion Energy Sciences; High Energy and Nuclear Physics; and Advanced Scientific Computing Research and Other Projects.

  4. Annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broda, R.; Lesniak, L.; Malecki, P.; Stachura, Z.; Wojciechowski, H. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    The material presented describing the scientific activities of the Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics in 1991 is the first annual report in several years.The arrangement of the report from various departments reflect the present structure of the Institute and is meant to help in the future task of reconstructing the Institute. Few guidelines proposed by the editorial board gave the individual departments much freedom in selecting the material and choosing the volume and format of presentation. (author).

  5. Annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This annual report of the Group Gaz de France presents the activities for the year 2005 in four main chapters: the group profile, the governance and the challenges; the energy and services display and the infrastructures; the capital opening and some key data; the group collaborators, the energy conservation, the research programs and the future of the gas and the electricity. (A.L.B.)

  6. Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, D.; Infeld, E.; Zupranski, P.

    2008-01-01

    The ''Annual Report 2007'' describes activities of Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in 2007. Report consists of two parts. First one consist of of general information about location, management, scientific council, personnel, financial support and conferences while the second one describes the scientific activity of Institute. This part is divided into subsections which present progress in research of the Institut Departments and Establishments. A Foreword to all report written by Director of the Institute prof. Grzegorz Wrochna is also given

  7. Total - annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This annual report presents the activities and results of TOTAL S.A., french society on oil and gas. It deals with statistics, the managers, key information on financial data and risk factors, information on the Company, unresolved Staff Comments, employees, major Shareholders, consolidated statements, markets, security, financial risks, defaults dividend arrearages and delinquencies, controls and procedures, code of ethics and financial statements. (A.L.B.)

  8. Annual report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, A.

    1976-01-01

    This annual report contains research reports from the various groups of the Research Institute of Physics, Stockholm. Reports are made by workers in the Atomic and Molecular Physics group, the Surface Physics group, the Nuclear Physics group, the group researching into High Energy Physics and related topics and the Instrumentation and Methods group. The report also contains a list of the papers published by members of the Institute during the year and a list of the theses which were presented. (B.D.)

  9. Annual Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swiboda, G.

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research activities carried out in 2006. The document consist of seven parts: General Information; Operation and safety of MARIA reactor; Radiation protection and dosimetry; Nuclear Technology in Energy Generation; Solid State Physics; Nuclear techniques in Health and Environment Protection management of Hazards and in last section the list of published in 2006 papers, conferences, seminars, workshops, research projects and educational activities are presented

  10. Annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Areva is a world energy expert on technological solutions for nuclear power generation and electricity transmission and distribution. This 2005 annual report provides information on the Group results in the following domains: information pertaining to the transaction, general information on the company and share capital, information on company operations, new developments and future prospects, assets, financial position, financial performance, corporate governance, recent developments and outlook. (A.L.B.)

  11. Annual Report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, D.; Infeld, E.; Zupranski, P.

    2006-06-01

    The ''Annual Report 2005'' describes activities of Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in 2005. Report consists in general two parts. First consists of general information about location, management, scientific council, personnel financial support and conferences while the second one the scientific activity of Institute. This part is divided into subsections which present progress in research of the Institut Departments and Establishments. A Foreword to report written by Director of the Institute prof. Ziemowit Sujkowski is also given

  12. Annual Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmielewska, D.; Infeld, E.; Zupranski, P.

    2007-06-01

    The ''Annual Report 2006'' describes activities of Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies in 2006. Report consists in general two parts. First consists of general information about location, management, scientific council, personnel, financial support and conferences while the second one the scientific activity of Institute. This part is divided into subsections which present progress in research of the Institut Departments and Establishments. A Foreword to report written by Director of the Institute Grzegorz Wrochna is also given

  13. NIKHEF annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    This annual report of NIKHEF, Amsterdam (Netherlands) describes experiments carried out at CERN (Geneve), DESY (Hamburg) viz. WA25; CHARM-collaboration; ACCMOR experiments; proton-antiproton collision; LEAR; MARK-J; Crystal Ball experiment; HERA. For the nuclear physics section, experiments are described on electro-excitation of nuclei; pion and muon physics. Theoretical studies are listed concerning electromagnetic interactions in the sigma-omega model and delta-nuclei dynamics. A radiochemical and technical part concludes the report. (Auth.)

  14. 2002 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Delivering products and services to nuclear power plants operators, AREVA operates in every sector of the civilian nuclear power and fuel cycle industry. This annual report 2002 provides information on financial highlights, corporate governance, organization of the Group, share, sustainable development policy (integration into the management practices, financial and environmental responsibility, responsibility to the employees and to the society), nuclear power (front end division, reactors and services division, back end division), connectors division, equity interests and financial report. (A.L.B.)

  15. TIARA annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2003. Summary reports of 113 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  16. TIARA annual report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saidoh, Masahiro; Toraishi, Akio; Namba, Hideki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2000 to March 31, 2001. Summary reports of 103 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  17. TIARA annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohara, Yoshiro; Arakawa, Kazuo; Tanaka, Shigeru; Naramoto, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Itoh, Hisayosi; Yoshikawa, Masato; Tanaka, Atsushi; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Otsubo, Michiaki; Tajima, Satoshi; Tanaka, Susumu

    2004-11-01

    This annual report describes research and development activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004. Summary reports of 115 papers and brief descriptions on the status of TIARA in the period are contained. A list of publications, the type of research collaborations and organization of TIARA are also given as appendices. (author)

  18. Uranium industry annual 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Uranium Industry Annual 1994 (UIA 1994) provides current statistical data on the US uranium industry's activities relating to uranium raw materials and uranium marketing during that survey year. The UIA 1994 is prepared for use by the Congress, Federal and State agencies, the uranium and nuclear electric utility industries, and the public. It contains data for the 10-year period 1985 through 1994 as collected on the Form EIA-858, ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey.'' Data collected on the ''Uranium Industry Annual Survey'' (UIAS) provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of the industry's activities for the survey year and also include some information about industry's plans and commitments for the near-term future. Where aggregate data are presented in the UIA 1994, care has been taken to protect the confidentiality of company-specific information while still conveying accurate and complete statistical data. A feature article, ''Comparison of Uranium Mill Tailings Reclamation in the United States and Canada,'' is included in the UIA 1994. Data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, EIA-estimated resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities, including purchases of uranium and enrichment services, and uranium inventories, enrichment feed deliveries (actual and projected), and unfilled market requirements are shown in Chapter 2

  19. Areva 2005 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    This annual report contains information on AREVA's objectives, prospects and strategies, particularly in Chapters 4 and 7, as well as contains information on the markets, market shares and competitive position of the AREVA group. Content: 1 - Person responsible for the annual report and persons responsible for auditing the financial statements; 2 - Information pertaining to the transaction; 3 - General information on the company and share capital: Information on AREVA, Information on share capital and voting rights, Investment certificate trading, Dividends, Organizational chart of the AREVA group, Equity interests, Shareholders' agreements; 4 - Information on company operations, 5 - New developments and future prospects: Overview and strategy of the AREVA group, The Nuclear Power and Transmission and Distribution markets, AREVA group energy businesses, Front End Division, Reactors and Services Division, Back End Division, Transmission and Distribution Division, Major Contracts, The Group's principal sites, AREVA's customers and suppliers, Human resources, Sustainable Development and Continuous Improvement, Capital spending programs, Research and development, intellectual property and brand name programs, Risk and insurance; 6 - Assets - Financial position - financial performance: Analysis of and comments on the Group's financial position and performance, Human Resources report 2005, Environmental report, Consolidated financial statements, Notes to the consolidated financial statements, AREVA SA Financial statements 2005, Notes to the corporate financial statements; 7 - Corporate governance: Composition and functioning of administrative bodies, Executive compensation, Profit-sharing plans, AREVA Values Charter, Annual General Meeting of Shareholders of May 2, 2006; 8 - Recent developments and outlook: Events subsequent to year-end closing for 2005, Outlook

  20. Annual Report 2010-2011

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... 2013-2014 Annual Report 2013-2014 Rapport annuel 2013-2014 Annual Report 2014-2015 Annual Report 2014-2015 Rapport annuel 2014-2015 Investing in Solutions Strategic Plan 2015-2020 Investing in Solutions Strategic Plan 2015-2020 Investir dans des solutions Plan stratégique 2015-2020 Financial statements ...

  1. Modeling the Residence Time of Mobile Bay in Alabama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, M. M.; Park, K.

    2016-02-01

    The Three-dimensional Hydrodynamic-Eutrophication Model/Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (HEM3D/EFDC) was used to calculate the residence time of Mobile Bay in Alabama using Eulerian passive tracer method. Mobile Bay is about 50 km long and 20 km wide, so it can be divided into several sections which may have different residence times. Three typical boundary conditions that affect residence time are tide, river discharge, and wind. Mobile Bay is located in the northern Gulf of Mexico and is a micro-tidal region. Two most important tidal components here are K1 and O1, and the maximum tidal range of tropic (spring) tide is less than 0.6 m. There is a difference between the simulation results with and without tidal condition (K1+O1) even though the tidal range is relatively smaller than that in macro-tidal regions. Also the minimum, mean, and maximum of daily mean river discharge for 38 years (1976-2013) in Mobile and Tensaw River are 80.7 m3/s, 1700.8 m3/s, and 14186.7 m3/s respectively, and there are daily, monthly, seasonal, and annual variations. The residence time can be largely affected by the river discharge because of its large deviation. Even though the dominant wind here is southerly in the spring and summer and is northerly in the fall and winter, the wind speed and direction change over time. Continuous winds from similar directions can reduce and increase the residence time such as the southerly, southwesterly, northerly, and northeasterly winds in alignment with the direction of the inlet and outlet of Mobile Bay. Also the short term changes of wind direction and speed can affect it complicatedly. Therefore, the simulations with the combinations of three boundary conditions allow us to understand the water circulation in Mobile Bay well and to predict the residence time when some accidents happen such as contaminations by factories, sewage plants, ships and oil spills.

  2. A Time Study of Plastic Surgery Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Frank H; Sinha, Indranil; Jiang, Wei; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Eriksson, Elof

    2016-05-01

    Resident work hours are under scrutiny and have been subject to multiple restrictions. The studies supporting these changes have not included data on surgical residents. We studied the workday of a team of plastic surgery residents to establish prospective time-study data of plastic surgery (PRS) residents at a single tertiary-care academic medical center. Five trained research assistants observed all residents (n = 8) on a PRS service for 10 weeks and produced minute-by-minute activity logs. Data collection began when the team first met in the morning and continued until the resident being followed completed all non-call activities. We analyzed our data from 3 perspectives: 1) time spent in direct patient care (DPC), indirect patient care, and didactic activities; 2) time spent in high education-value activities (HEAs) versus low education-value activities; and 3) resident efficiency. We defined HEAs as activities that surgeons must master; other activities were LEAs. We quantified resident efficiency in terms of time fragmentation and time spent waiting. A total of 642.4 hours of data across 50 workdays were collected. Excluding call, residents worked an average of 64.2 hours per week. Approximately 50.7% of surgical resident time was allotted to DPC, with surgery accounting for the largest segment of this time (34.8%). Time spent on HEAs demonstrated trended upward with higher resident level (P = 0.086). Time in spent in surgery was significantly associated with higher resident levels (P time study of PRS residents, we found that compared with medicine trainees, surgical residents spent 3.23 times more time on DPC. High education-value activities comprised most of our residents' workdays. Surgery was the leading component of both DPC and HEAs. Our residents were highly efficient and fragmented, with the majority of all activities requiring 4 minutes or less. Residents spent a large portion of their time waiting for other services. In light of these data, we

  3. Neurocritical care education during neurology residency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drogan, O.; Manno, E.; Geocadin, R.G.; Ziai, W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Limited information is available regarding the current state of neurocritical care education for neurology residents. The goal of our survey was to assess the need and current state of neurocritical care training for neurology residents. Methods: A survey instrument was developed and, with the support of the American Academy of Neurology, distributed to residency program directors of 132 accredited neurology programs in the United States in 2011. Results: A response rate of 74% (98 of 132) was achieved. A dedicated neuroscience intensive care unit (neuro-ICU) existed in 64%. Fifty-six percent of residency programs offer a dedicated rotation in the neuro-ICU, lasting 4 weeks on average. Where available, the neuro-ICU rotation was required in the vast majority (91%) of programs. Neurology residents' exposure to the fundamental principles of neurocritical care was obtained through a variety of mechanisms. Of program directors, 37% indicated that residents would be interested in performing away rotations in a neuro-ICU. From 2005 to 2010, the number of programs sending at least one resident into a neuro-ICU fellowship increased from 14% to 35%. Conclusions: Despite the expansion of neurocritical care, large proportions of US neurology residents have limited exposure to a neuro-ICU and neurointensivists. Formal training in the principles of neurocritical care may be highly variable. The results of this survey suggest a charge to address the variability of resident education and to develop standardized curricula in neurocritical care for neurology residents. PMID:22573636

  4. Effectiveness of Resident Physicians as Triage Liaison Providers in an Academic Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Weston

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emergency department (ED crowding is associated with detrimental effects on ED quality of care. Triage liaison providers (TLP have been used to mitigate the effects of crowding. Prior studies have evaluated attending physicians and advanced practice providers as TLPs, with limited data evaluating resident physicians as TLPs. This study compares operational performance outcomes between resident and attending physicians as TLPs. Methods: This retrospective cohort study compared aggregate operational performance at an urban, academic ED during pre- and post-TLP periods. The primary outcome was defined as cost-effectiveness based upon return on investment (ROI. Secondary outcomes were defined as differences in median ED length of stay (LOS, median door-to-provider (DTP time, proportion of left without being seen (LWBS, and proportion of “very good” overall patient satisfaction scores. Results: Annual profit generated for physician-based collections through LWBS capture (after deducting respective salary costs equated to a gain (ROI: 54% for resident TLPs and a loss (ROI: −31% for attending TLPs. Accounting for hospital-based collections made both profitable, with gains for resident TLPs (ROI: 317% and for attending TLPs (ROI: 86%. Median DTP time for resident TLPs was significantly lower (p<0.0001 than attending or historical control. Proportion of “very good” patient satisfaction scores and LWBS was improved for both resident and attending TLPs over historical control. Overall median LOS was not significantly different. Conclusion: Resident and attending TLPs improved DTP time, patient satisfaction, and LWBS rates. Both resident and attending TLPs are cost effective, with residents having a more favorable financial profile.

  5. Professionalism Training For Surgical Residents: Documenting the Advantages of a Professionalism Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochberg, Mark S; Berman, Russell S; Kalet, Adina L; Zabar, Sondra; Gillespie, Colleen; Pachter, H Leon

    2016-09-01

    Professionalism education is a vital component of surgical training. This research attempts to determine whether an annual, year-long professionalism curriculum in a large surgical residency can effectively change professionalism attitudes. The ACGME mandated 6 competencies in 2003. The competencies of Professionalism and Interpersonal/Professional Communication Skills had never been formally addressed in surgical resident education in the past. A professionalism curriculum was developed focusing on specific resident professionalism challenges: admitting mistakes, effective communication with colleagues at all levels, delivering the news of an unexpected death, interdisciplinary challenges of working as a team, the cultural challenge of obtaining informed consent through an interpreter, and the stress of surgical practice on you and your family. These professionalism skills were then evaluated with a 6-station Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Identical OSCE scenarios were administered to 2 cohorts of surgical residents: in 2007 (before instituting the professionalism curriculum in 2008) and again in 2014. Surgical residents were rated by trained Standardized Patients according to a behaviorally anchored professionalism criteria checklist. An analysis of variance was conducted of overall OSCE professionalism scores (% well done) as the dependent variable for the 2 resident cohorts (2007 vs 2014). The 2007 residents received a mean score of 38% of professionalism items "well done" (SD 9%) and the 2014 residents received a mean 59% "well done" (SD 8%). This difference is significant (F = 49.01, P Professionalism education has improved surgical resident understanding, awareness, and practice of professionalism in a statistically significant manner from 2007 to 2014. This documented improvement in OSCE performance reflects the value of a professionalism curriculum in the care of the patients we seek to serve.

  6. PNEUMONIA IN NURSING HOME RESIDENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Eržen

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pneumonia remains one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, especially in advanced age. Prognosis of the disease depends on premorbid condition and immune competence of the patient, severity of the disease and causative microorganism. In our analysis we wanted to establish clinical, x-ray and microbiological characteristics of pneumonia in nursing home residents, estimate suitability of therapeutic measures and find out risk factors for adverse outcome in this group of patients.Material and methods. This retrospective study includes all nursing home residents hospitalised due to CAP in Hospital Golnik in 2000. Clinical data was/were evaluated according to case history. Microbiological data and laboratory results were gathered from the patients files. Chi-square test was used for statistical analysis.Results. 30 patients, 17 women were included, aged 82.5 ± 11.7 years. 60% of patients had at least 2 accompanying diseases, most frequently cardiovascular and neurologic diseases. At admittance 83% of patients presented with severe form of the disease. Dispnea (93%, tachypnea, cough (67% and confusion (47% dominate clinical picture. Patients rarely expectorate, are frequently hypoxemic (93%, have leucocytosis (63%, electrolyte disturbances and elevated urea (67%. According to the microbiologic results most frequent causative agents are Enterobacteriae, S. pneumoniae, H. influenzae and also some multiresistant bacteria. Amoxycillin with clavulanic acid was the most frequently used antibiotic, followed by macrolides and 3rd generation cephalosporines.9 patients died, mortality rate was 30%. Their average age was 83,4 years, 67% of them had more than 2 accompanying diseases, all of them severe form of the disease, 89% severe respiratory insufficiency and 22% positive hemoculture.Conclusions. Patients are characterised with numerous comorbidities and advanced age. Clinical presentation is unspecific. Mortality is high

  7. Learning environment: assessing resident experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byszewski, Anna; Lochnan, Heather; Johnston, Donna; Seabrook, Christine; Wood, Timothy

    2017-06-01

    Given their essential role in developing professional identity, academic institutions now require formal assessment of the learning environment (LE). We describe the experience of introducing a novel and practical tool in postgraduate programmes. The Learning Environment for Professionalism (LEP) survey, validated in the undergraduate setting, is relatively short, with 11 questions balanced for positive and negative professionalism behaviours. LEP is anonymous and focused on rotation setting, not an individual, and can be used on an iterative basis. We describe how we implemented the LEP, preliminary results, challenges encountered and suggestions for future application. Academic institutions now require formal assessment of the learning environment METHODS: The study was designed to test the feasibility of introducing the LEP in the postgraduate setting, and to establish the validity and the reliability of the survey. Residents in four programmes completed 187 ratings using LEP at the end of one of 11 rotations. The resident response rate was 87 per cent. Programme and rotation ratings were similar but not identical. All items rated positively (favourably), but displays of altruism tended to have lower ratings (meaning less desirable behaviour was witnessed), as were ratings for derogatory comments (again meaning that less desirable behaviour was witnessed). We have shown that the LEP is a feasible and valid tool that can be implemented on an iterative basis to examine the LE. Two LEP questions in particular, regarding derogatory remarks and demonstrating altruism, recorded the lowest scores, and these areas deserve attention at our institution. Implementation in diverse programmes is planned at our teaching hospitals to further assess reliability. This work may influence other postgraduate programmes to introduce this assessment tool. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  8. Case-Logging Practices in Otolaryngology Residency Training: National Survey of Residents and Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermody, Sarah M; Gao, William; McGinn, Johnathan D; Malekzadeh, Sonya

    2017-06-01

    Objective (1) Evaluate the consistency and manner in which otolaryngology residents log surgical cases. (2) Assess the extent of instruction and guidance provided by program directors on case-logging practices. Study Design Cross-sectional national survey. Setting Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education otolaryngology residency programs in the United States. Subjects and Methods US otolaryngology residents, postgraduate year 2 through graduating chiefs as of July 2016, were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire designed to characterize surgical case-logging practices. Program directors of US otolaryngology residency programs were recruited to respond to an anonymous questionnaire to elucidate how residents are instructed to log cases. Results A total of 272 residents and 53 program directors completed the survey, yielding response rates of 40.6% and 49.5%, respectively. Perceived accuracy of case logs is low among residents and program directors. Nearly 40% of residents purposely choose not to log certain cases, and 65.1% of residents underreport cases performed. More than 80% of program directors advise residents to log procedures performed outside the operating room, yet only 16% of residents consistently log such cases. Conclusion Variability in surgical case-logging behaviors and differences in provided instruction highlight the need for methods to improve consistency of logging practices. It is imperative to standardize practices across otolaryngology residency programs for case logs to serve as an accurate measure of surgical competency. This study provides a foundation for reform efforts within residency programs and for the Resident Case Log System.

  9. Understanding how residents' preferences for supervisory methods change throughout residency training: a mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos-Vega, Francisco; Dolmans, Diana; Donkers, Jeroen; Stalmeijer, Renée E

    2015-10-16

    A major challenge for clinical supervisors is to encourage their residents to be independent without jeopardising patient safety. Residents' preferences according to level of training on this regard have not been completely explored. This study has sought to investigate which teaching methods of the Cognitive Apprenticeship (CA) model junior, intermediate and senior residents preferred and why, and how these preferences differed between groups. We invited 301 residents of all residency programmes of Javeriana University, Bogotá, Colombia, to participate. Each resident was asked to complete a Maastricht Clinical Teaching Questionnaire (MCTQ), which, being based on the teaching methods of CA, asked residents to rate the importance to their learning of each teaching method and to indicate which of these they preferred the most and why. A total of 215 residents (71 %) completed the questionnaire. All concurred that all CA teaching methods were important or very important to their learning, regardless of their level of training. However, the reasons for their preferences clearly differed between groups: junior and intermediate residents preferred teaching methods that were more supervisor-directed, such as modelling and coaching, whereas senior residents preferred teaching methods that were more resident-directed, such as exploration and articulation. The results indicate that clinical supervision (CS) should accommodate to residents' varying degrees of development by attuning the configuration of CA teaching methods to each level of residency training. This configuration should initially vest more power in the supervisor, and gradually let the resident take charge, without ever discontinuing CS.

  10. Feasibility of an innovative third-year chief resident system: an internal medicine residency leadership study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor O. Kolade

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The role of the internal medicine chief resident includes various administrative, academic, social, and educational responsibilities, fulfillment of which prepares residents for further leadership tasks. However, the chief resident position has historically only been held by a few residents. As fourth-year chief residents are becoming less common, we considered a new model for rotating third-year residents as the chief resident. Methods: Online surveys were given to all 29 internal medicine residents in a single university-based program after implementation of a leadership curriculum and specific job description for the third-year chief resident. Chief residents evaluated themselves on various aspects of leadership. Participation was voluntary. Descriptive statistics were generated using SPSS version 21. Results: Thirteen junior (first- or second-year resident responses reported that the chief residents elicited input from others (mean rating 6.8, were committed to the team (6.8, resolved conflict (6.7, ensured efficiency, organization and productivity of the team (6.7, participated actively (7.0, and managed resources (6.6. Responses from senior residents averaged 1 point higher for each item; this pattern repeated itself in teaching evaluations. Chief resident self-evaluators were more comfortable running a morning report (8.4 than with being chief resident (5.8. Conclusion: The feasibility of preparing internal medicine residents for leadership roles through a rotating PGY-3 (postgraduate year chief residency curriculum was explored at a small internal medicine residency, and we suggest extending the study to include other programs.

  11. TOTAL annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This 2003 annual report of the Group Total provides economical results and information of the society on the following topics: keys data, the corporate governance (Directors charter, board of directors, audit committee, nomination and remuneration committee, internal control procedures, compensation of directors and executive officers), the corporate social responsibility (environmental stewardship, the future of energy management, the safety enhancement, the human resources, ethics and local development), the investor relations, the management report, the upstream exploration and production, the downstream refining, marketing, trading and shipping, the chemicals and financial and legal information. (A.L.B.)

  12. NERSC 2001 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hules, John (editor)

    2001-12-12

    The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computational resource for scientific research funded by the DOE Office of Science. The Annual Report for FY2001 includes a summary of recent computational science conducted on NERSC systems (with abstracts of significant and representative projects); information about NERSC's current systems and services; descriptions of Berkeley Lab's current research and development projects in applied mathematics, computer science, and computational science; and a brief summary of NERSC's Strategic Plan for 2002-2005.

  13. 1992 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Annual report of the Institut de Physique Nucleaire at Orsay (France). The main themes are presented. Concerning experimental research: nuclear structure, ground states and low energy excited states, high excitation energy nuclear states, nuclear matter and nucleus-nucleus collision, intermediate energy nuclear physics, radiochemistry, inter-disciplinary research, scientific information and communication; concerning theoretical physics: particles and fields (formal aspects and hadronic physics), chaotic systems and semi-classical methods, few body problems, nucleus-nucleus scattering, nucleus spectroscopy and clusters, statistical physics and condensed matter; concerning general activities and technological research: accelerators, detectors, applications in cryogenics, data processing, Isolde and Orion equipment

  14. Annual report 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindh, U.; Sundberg, O.

    1977-01-01

    The Gustaf Werner Institute (GWI) annual report for the year 1976 presents in a condensed form the scientific activities in the disciplines High Energy Physics and Physical Biology at Uppsala University. The activities in High Energy Physics fall into three domains: Research with the local accelerator, participation in collaborations at international centers and work on the rebuilding of the Uppsala synchrocyclotron. A major subject of research in Physical Biology is control of growth and differentiation, as reflected in the kinetics of biochemical reactions or in the behaviour of healthy or malignant cells at various levels of organization. (Auth.)

  15. Annual Report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Smulek, W.; Godlewska-Para, E.

    2008-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland) describes achievements of the Institute in 2007 obtained in seven fields: (1) radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies; (2) radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, general chemistry; (3) radiobiology; (4) nuclear technologies and methods: process engineering; (5) nuclear technologies and methods: material engineering, structural studies, diagnostics; (6) nuclear technologies and methods: nucleonic control systems and accelerators. In total - 76 detailed papers prepared by the Institute workers and collaborating scientists are presented. General information on the Institute status, personnel activity, international cooperation and publications are also given

  16. International energy annual 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided

  17. IPP annual report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    In part A of this annual report the tokamak and stellarator projects at the IPP are reported: ASDEX, ASDEX upgrade, JET collaboration, NET collaboration, Wendelstein VII-7, Wendelstein VII-AS, Wendelstein VII-X and stellarator reactor system studies. In part B the departments and research groups give a brief, but detailed report of the results in the field of research and development. In part C a review is presented of the IPP organisation. Part D includes the papers and conference reports published in 1981. Finally a brief description of the IPP projects at German universities is presented. (GG) [de

  18. Renewable energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report presents summary data on renewable energy consumption, the status of each of the primary renewable technologies, a profile of each of the associated industries, an analysis of topical issues related to renewable energy, and information on renewable energy projects worldwide. It is the second in a series of annual reports on renewable energy. The renewable energy resources included in the report are biomass (wood and ethanol); municipal solid waste, including waste-to-energy and landfill gas; geothermal; wind; and solar energy, including solar thermal and photovoltaic. The report also includes various appendices and a glossary.

  19. GKSS annual report 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH, one of the national research centers, carries out R and D work on conservation of resources and environment, improvement of working conditions and on increase of economic competitiveness. The activities fall into the fields energy research and technology, basic technologies, marine research and techniques, health-environment-biotechnology. The annual report contains selected research work in summaries, the report on R and D work in reactor safety, materials research, environmental and climate research as well as environmental, and underwater techniques, describes the research institutes, cooperation with external partners, the organization, the budget, personnel, publications, including patent applications, and lectures. (HK) [de

  20. Institute annual report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The mission of the ITU (Institute for Transuranium Elements) is to protect the European citizen against risk associated with the handling and storage of highly radioactive elements. The JRC (Joint Research Center) provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of EU policies. In this framework this annual report presents the TU actions in: basic actinide research, spent fuel characterization, safety of nuclear fuels, partitioning and transmutation, alpha-immunotherapy/radiobiology, measurement of radioactivity in the environment, safeguards research and development. (A.L.B.)

  1. GKSS 1978 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    In its annual reports, the GKSS gives a detailed survey of its R+D activities in the year under report as well as of its organisation and social situation. These sections are supplemented by some detailed reports on selected research activities. In the year under report, techniques for the irradiation of pressure vessel steels in research reactors, the determination of the critical heat flux on LWR fuel rods, a GKSS contribution to the production of manganese modules in the Pacific Ocean, the corrosion behaviour of structural steels under seawater conditions, and remote aerosol monitoring by means of laser technology are dealt with. (orig.) [de

  2. Nordel annual report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    Nordel is a body for co-operation between the transmission system operators (TSO's) in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden with the primary objective to create conditions for and develop an efficient and harmonised Nordic electricity market, regardless of national borders. Furthermore, Nordel serves as forum for contact between the TSOs and representatives of the market players in the Nordic countries. The statistical part of Nordel's annual report includes data about: Exchange of electricity; Gross consumption; Electricity generation; Installed capacity; Generation of condensing power; Net consumption; Transmission capacity; Pumped storage power; Losses; Occasional power to electric boilers; Total consumption; CHP generation. (BA)

  3. Uranium industry annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Uranium industry data collected in the EIA-858 survey provide a comprehensive statistical characterization of annual activities of the industry and include some information about industry plans over the next several years. This report consists of two major sections. The first addresses uranium raw materials activities and covers the following topics: exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment. The second major section is concerned with the following uranium marketing activities: uranium purchase commitments, uranium prices, procurement arrangements, uranium imports and exports, enrichment services, inventories, secondary market activities utility market requirements and related topics

  4. Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freeman, L.M.; Weissmann, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Among the highlights of Nuclear Medicine Annual, 1989 are a status report on the thyroid scan in clinical practice, a review of functional and structural brain imaging in dementia, an update on radionuclide renal imaging in children, and an article outlining a quality assurance program for SPECT instrumentation. Also included are discussions on current concepts in osseous sports and stress injury scintigraphy and on correlative magnetic resonance and radionuclide imaging of bone. Other contributors assess the role of nuclear medicine in clinical decision making and examine medicolegal and regulatory aspects of nuclear medicine

  5. Annual Report 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Smulek, W.; Godlewska-Para, E.

    2009-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland) describes achievements of the Institute in 2008 obtained in six fields: (1) radiation chemistry and physics, radiation technologies, (2) radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, general chemistry, (3) radiobiology, (4) nuclear technologies and methods: process engineering, (5) nuclear technologies and methods: material engineering, structural studies, diagnostics, (6) nucleonic control systems and accelerators. In total - 76 detailed papers prepared by the Institute workers and collaborating scientists are presented. General information on the Institute status, personnel activity, international cooperation and publications are also given

  6. International energy annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The International Energy Annual presents current data and trends for production, consumption, stocks, imports, and exports for primary energy commodities in more than 190 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are prices on crude petroleum and petroleum products in selected countries. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed with respect to primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources and from United States Embassy personnel in foreign posts. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values familiar to the American public

  7. Annual Report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michalik, J.; Smulek, W.; Godlewska-Para, E.

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland) describes achievements of the Institute in 2006 obtained in seven fields: (1) radiation chemistry and technology, (2) radiochemistry and coordination chemistry, (3) radiobiology, (4) application of nuclear methods in material and process engineering, (5) design of instruments based on nuclear techniques, (6) trace analysis and radioanalytical techniques, (7) environmental research. In total - 83 detailed papers prepared by the Institute workers and collaborating scientists are presented. General information on the Institute status, personnel activity, international cooperation and publications are presented

  8. International energy annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

  9. Annual report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    A survey is presented of: a) Research activities carried out during 1975 within the framework of the scientific sections of the Institute, b) the central technical seπtions and their services, and c) the organizational structure. Enclosed are: 1) Report on the activities of the administrative management, the administration, and general services, 2) a list of all publications and conference reports issued by IPP Garching during 1975, and an annual report by the Institut fuer Plasmaphysik of the University of Stuttgart, an institute financed by IPP Garching. (GG) [de

  10. Annual Report 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This Annual Report covers the activities at the Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) during the year 1981. It contains 74 short reports grouped under the headings: inelastic scattering studies, transfer and charge-exchange reactions, breakup reactions and fission studies, heavy-ion reactions, gamma, electron and X-ray spectroscopy, hyperfine interactions and nuclear orientation, weak interactions, IBA related studies, other theoretical studies, cyclotron and beam lines, data acquisition and data analysis, instrumentation and electronics and medical physics. Details are also presented of the personnel, scientific publications, internal reports, and attended and internal conferences and seminars. (C.F.)

  11. NPL 1999 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-01-01

    OAK-B135 NPL 1999 Annual Report. The Nuclear Physics Laboratory at the University of Washington in Seattle pursues a broad program of nuclear physics research. Research activities are conducted locally and at remote sites. The current program includes ''in-house'' research on nuclear collisions using the local tandem Van de Graaff and superconducting linac accelerators as well as local and remote non-accelerator research on fundamental symmetries and weak interactions and user-mode research on relativistic heavy ions at large accelerator facilities around the world.

  12. Annual report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1974-01-01

    In this annual report, the Institut fuer Kernphysik of the university of Frankfurt/Main gives a survey on its scientific activities in the year 1974. Research activities in this period comprised the following fields: nuclear reactions and nuclear structure, heavy ion physics, atomic collision processes, neutron diffractometry and spectroscopy, solid state particle trace detectors, methods of nuclear analysis and mass spectroscopy, ion source development, electronics and data processing, and radiation protection. Furthermore, some application-oriented interdisciplinary research projects were started. (orig./AK) [de

  13. Annual report 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-02-01

    The annual report of the PTB for 1975 deals in part 1 with organization and activities of the executive committee and the administration, in the second part with work carried out by the departments mechanics, electric power, heat, optics, acoustics, nuclear physics, reactor radiation, general technical-scientific services, and the institute in Berlin. The second part deals with examinations, authorizations, permits, cooperation, advisory activities and scientific services. Part three presents R and D activities carried out in the nine departments in the form of scientific summaries. (HK) [de

  14. Annual report 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report describes the work during 1982 of the Nuclear Physics Institute of Lyon. The achievement of SARA postaccelerator in Grenoble, realized in collaboration with the Nuclear Science Institute, permits to pursue new lines of research in heavy ion physics. A new isotope separator was realized by the nuclear spectroscopy group and the high energy experimental group cooperates with the LAPP to build in international collaboration the L3 detector for LEP. The topics covered include theoretical physics, high energy and intermediate energy physics, nuclear physics and interdisciplinary physics, such as solid state physics and neutronics [fr

  15. IKF annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Boecking, H.

    1983-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the scientific work performed at the named institute descriptions of the operation of the Van-de-Graaf accelerator facilities of this institute and the work of the technical establishments, as well as a list of publications. The scientific work concerns nuclear structure and nuclear reactions, high energy heavy ion physics, atomic physics with fast ions, nuclear solid state physics, solid-state track detectors, applications of nuclear methods in solid state physics, ion source developments, apparative developments and data processing, as well as interdisciplinary collaborations. See hints under the relevant topics. (HSI) [de

  16. Uranium industry annual, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-10-01

    In the Uranium Industry Annual 1991, data on uranium raw materials activities including exploration activities and expenditures, resources and reserves, mine production of uranium, production of uranium concentrate, and industry employment are presented in Chapter 1. Data on uranium marketing activities including domestic uranium purchases, commitments by utilities, procurement arrangements, uranium imports under purchase contracts and exports, deliveries to enrichment suppliers, inventories, secondary market activities, utility market requirements, and uranium for sale by domestic suppliers are presented in Chapter 2. A feature article entitled ''The Uranium Industry of the Commonwealth of Independent States'' is included in this report

  17. CEA Annual report 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The CEA, a prominent player in research development and innovation, is active in three main domains: energy, health care and information technology, defense and security. This annual report presents the CEA activities for the year 2007 in these three main areas: science and technology working for nuclear deterrence and global security, the energies without greenhouse effect gases emission against the climatic change, researches in the information sciences and technologies for a better communication and health. The CEA safety, organization, communication and international relations are also presented. (A.L.B.)

  18. Annual report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This annual report presents the CEA (Atomic Energy Research Center) activities and research programs during the year 2002. the first part is devoted to the scientific development in the defense, nuclear energy, technology, fundamental research and valuation domains. The second and third parts present respectively the development conditions with the environment safety and the means of development with the human resources, the information technology, the training and the public relations. The fourth part situates the Cea enterprise in the economy and the fifth part the Cea development in the Europe and the world. The last part is the financial accounting. (A.L.B.)

  19. Nordel annual report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    Nordel is a body for co-operation between the transmission system operators (TSO's) in Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden with the primary objective to create conditions for and develop an efficient and harmonised Nordic electricity market, regardless of national borders. Furthermore, Nordel serves as forum for contact between the TSOs and representatives of the market players in the Nordic countries. The statistical part of Nordel's annual report includes data about: Exchange of electricity; Gross consumption; Electricity generation; Installed capacity; Generation of condensing power; Net consumption; Transmission capacity; Pumped storage power; Losses; Occasional power to electric boilers; Total consumption; CHP generation. (BA)

  20. Annual report 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    This annual report contains extended abstracts about the research done at the named institute. These abstracts concern the development of accelerators and ion sources, the construction of the magnetic spectrograph and radiation detectors, the investigation of solids and microstructures by nuclear methods, the development of electronic circuits, the advances in data processing, the study of heavy ion reactions, nuclear structure, and reaction mechanisms, the research on atomic physics and the interaction of charged particles with matter, the studies in medium and high energy physics, the theoretical studies of nuclear structure, and the research in cosmochemistry. Furthermore a list of publications is added. (orig./HSI) [de