WorldWideScience

Sample records for announce accelerator prizes

  1. ACFA and IPAC announce accelerator prizes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Steve Myers, CERN's Director for Accelerators and Technology. The Asian Committee for Future Accelerators (ACFA) has joined forces with the first International Particle Accelerator Conference, IPAC’10, to award prizes for outstanding work in the field of accelerators. The conference replaces the regional conferences of the Americas, Europe and Asia and will be hosted by the three regions on a rotational basis (see CERN Courier). The ACFA/IPAC’10 Prizes Selection Committee, chaired by Won Namkung of Pohang Accelerator Laboratory, decided on the prizes and the names of the winners at a meeting on 20 January. The awards will be made during IPAC’10, which will be held in Kyoto on 23-28 May. Jie Wei. (Courtesy Tsinghua University.) Steve Myers, Director for Accelerators and Technology at CERN, receives an Achievement Prize for Outstanding Work in the Accelerator Field with no Age Limit “for his numerous outstanding contributions to the design, construction, commissio...

  2. Lotus Prize" Announced In Shanghai

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    <正>The national historic dance drama "Farewell, my concubine" and the dance poetry "Dynamic Yunnan" were awarded the golden prizes at the fourth China dance "Lotus Prize" respectively on March 8."Farewell, my concubine," produced by the Shanghai

  3. ACCELERATORS: School prizes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dedicated to its goal of encouraging scientists and students to work in the field of particle accelerators, the US Particle Accelerator School (operating since 1981) has switched to a new format. Starting this year, it will offer in alternate years basic accelerator physics plus advanced subjects in both university and symposium styles over four weeks. Expanding the school from two to four weeks gives additional flexibility, and undergraduate participation should be encouraged by university credits being offered for particular courses. In the intervening years, the school will organize six-day topical courses

  4. ATLAS Collaboration Reaction to 2013 Physics Nobel Prize Announcement

    CERN Multimedia

    Abdeslam Hoummada

    2013-01-01

    Physicists from ATLAS took a brief time out from their collaboration week in Marrakech, Morocco to watch the announcement of the Nobel Prize in Physics for 2013. To their delight, it was awarded to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs for their pioneering work on the electroweak-symmetry-breaking mechanism in 1964.

  5. Virginia Tech's International Archive for Women in Architecture announces call for Milka Bliznakov Prize proposals

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2007-01-01

    Virginia Tech's International Archive for Women in Architecture (IAWA), a departmental research and outreach center in the School of Architecture + Design, College of Architecture and Urban Studies, announces a call for Milka Bliznakov Prize proposals.

  6. International Archive for Women in Architecture announces call for Milka Bliznakov Prize proposals

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech's International Archive for Women in Architecture (IAWA), a departmental research and outreach center in the School of Architecture + Design, College of Architecture and Urban Studies, announces a call for Milka Bliznakov Prize proposals.

  7. Announcing the winner of the John J. Sciarra IJGO Prize Paper Award for 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adanu, Richard M K

    2015-06-01

    The editors of the International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics (IJGO) are pleased to announce the winner of the prize paper award for the best clinical research paper from a low- or middle-income country published in the IJGO during 2014. The winning paper is: Dan K. Kaye, Othman Kakaire, Annettee Nakimuli, Scovia N. Mbalinda,Michael O. Osinde, Nelson Kakande. Survivors' understanding of vulnerability and resilience to maternal near-miss obstetric events in Uganda. Int J Gynecol Obstet 2014;127(3):265–8. It was published in the December 2014 issue of the IJGO. PMID:25920580

  8. New Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize announced for 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Victoria

    2012-01-01

    At the 2011 Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif., AGU announced the creation of a new award: the Space Weather and Nonlinear Waves and Processes Prize. The prize, which is being made possible by a generous contribution from longtime AGU members and NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), California Institute of Technology, scientists Bruce Tsurutani and Olga Verkhoglyadova, will recognize an AGU member scientist and will come with a $10,000 award. Tsurutani has served as a researcher with JPL since 1972 and is currently a senior research scientist. He was also the president of AGU's Space Physics and Aeronomy section from 1990 to 1992 and is a recipient of AGU's John Adam Fleming Medal, given “for original research and technical leadership in geomagnetism, atmospheric electricity, aeronomy, space physics, and related sciences.” Verkhoglyadova served as a professor of space physics in the Department of Astrophysics and Space Physics at Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, in the Ukraine, prior to coming to the United States. Their leadership and dedication to AGU and to their field are apparent in their passion for this prize.

  9. Two members of the CERN personnel receive the 2002 Accelerator Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Kurt H bner and Frank Zimmermann have been awarded the 2002 Accelerator Prize by the Interdivisional Group on Accelerators of the European Physical Society (EPS-IGA).   Kurt H bner Frank Zimmermann Kurt H bner is well known to CERN, as he was Director of Accelerators from 1994 to 2001, after having been PS Division Leader. A member of the CERN personnel since 1966, Kurt H bner, who is of Austrian nationality, has taken part in the design and operation of many accelerators including the PS, the ISR and LEP. He has received the award for his major contributions to accelerator physics and for his excellent leadership in this field. In its citation, the Prize Selection Committee stated that «he has provided guidance for generations of accelerator physicists and engineers, thereby contributing immensely to the prosperity of accelerators at CERN and many other laboratories around the world.» Frank Zimmermann has been awarded the prize for an individual in the early part of his or her career who has made a rece...

  10. Accelerating innovation with prize rewards: History and typology of technology prizes and a new contest design for innovation in African agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, William A.; Delbecq, Benoit

    2008-01-01

    "This paper describes how governments and philanthropic donors could drive innovation through a new kind of technology contest. We begin by reviewing the history of technology prizes, which operate alongside private intellectual property rights and public R&D to accelerate and guide productivity growth towards otherwise-neglected social goals. Proportional “prize rewards” would modify the traditional winner-take-all approach, by dividing available funds among multiple winners in proportion to...

  11. Announcing the 2015 Viruses Young Investigator Prize and Graduate Student/Postdoctoral Fellow Travel Awards

    OpenAIRE

    Freed, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    With the goal of recognizing outstanding contributions to the field of virology by early-career investigators, last year Viruses accepted nominations for a 2015 Young Investigator Prize in Virology. The target age was set at 40 and under. Over 50 nominations were received and were evaluated by a panel of judges comprised of Viruses editorial board members.[...

  12. 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics Supernovae explosions and the Accelerating Universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year, 2011, the nobel prize in physics is given to three astronomers (Perlmutter, Schmidt, Riess) 'for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae'. In my seminar talk, I will thus present first some basic astrophysics on supernovae star explosions and the cosmological principle of an expanding Universe. Next, I will summarize the observations and measurements of the two teams behind the noble prize winners and show how the simplest explanations of the unexpected findings lead to the concept of an accelerating Universe. I will end my talk with an outlook on ongoing and future efforts to measure the equation-of-state of the Dark Energy postulated to explain the observations. (author)

  13. Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlmutter, Saul

    2012-01-13

    The Department of Energy (DOE) hosted an event Friday, January 13, with 2011 Physics Nobel Laureate Saul Perlmutter. Dr. Perlmutter, a physicist at the Department’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and a professor of physics at the University of California at Berkeley, won the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics “for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae.” DOE’s Office of Science has supported Dr. Perlmutter’s research at Berkeley Lab since 1983. After the introduction from Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, Dr. Perlmutter delivered a presentation entitled "Supernovae, Dark Energy and the Accelerating Universe: How DOE Helped to Win (yet another) Nobel Prize." [Copied with editing from DOE Media Advisory issued January 10th, found at http://energy.gov/articles/energy-department-host-event-2011-physics-nobel-laureate-saul-perlmutter

  14. Nobel Prize for work on broken symmetries

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 Nobel Prize for Physics goes to three physicists who have worked on broken symmetries in particle physics. The announcement of the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics was transmitted to the Globe of Science and Innovation via webcast on the occasion of the preview of the Nobel Accelerator exhibition.On 7 October it was announced that the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences had awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize for physics to three particle physicists for their fundamental work on the mechanisms of broken symmetries. Half the prize was awarded to Yoichiro Nambu of Fermilab for "the discovery of the mechanism of spontaneous broken symmetry in subatomic physics". The other half is shared by Makato Kobayashi of Japan’s KEK Institute and Toshihide Maskawa of the Yukawa Institute at the University of Kyoto "for the discovery of the origin of the broken symmetry which predicts the existence of at least three families of quarks in Nature". At th...

  15. Telegramme sent on June 14 1956 from physicists Fred Reines and Clyde Cowan to Wolfgang Pauli announcing the detection, for the first time, of neutrinos. The Physics Nobel Prize in 1995 was awarded to Reines for this discovery.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximiliem Brice

    2006-01-01

    Telegramme sent on June 14 1956 from physicists Fred Reines and Clyde Cowan to Wolfgang Pauli announcing the detection, for the first time, of neutrinos. The Physics Nobel Prize in 1995 was awarded to Reines for this discovery.

  16. The Woolmark Company Announces Global Prize Awarding Excellence in Merino Wool Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The international Woolmark Prize crosses borders and cultures by seeking outstanding and emerging talent from around the world, aligning the support of emerging designers with the evolution of emerging countries. It is an award for the young generation, shifting the focus from glamour to true talent as a way to highlight wool's eco credentials. It is Woolmark's social commitment, a sharing of resources to support local artisans.

  17. R.R. Wilson prize lecture: Adventures with accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a very concise history of the authors experiences with particle accelerators, spanning his first experiences as a graduate student, through his professional career. His first experiences were visiting labs in Washington DC, and seeing equipment delivered to his school so large walls had to be moved for access. He saw larger machines in England, and was at GE when early betatrons were built, and when the first functional synchrotron was built

  18. IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, I. J. Douglas

    2014-03-01

    The Nuclear Physics Board of the European Physical Society is pleased to announce that the 2013 IBA-Europhysics Prize in Applied Nuclear Science and Nuclear Methods in Medicine is awarded to Prof. Marco Durante, Director of the Biophysics Department at GSI Helmholtz Center (Darmstadt, Germany); Professor at the Technical University of Darmstadt (Germany) and Adjunct Professor at the Temple University, Philadelphia, USA. The prize was presented in the closing Session of the INPC 2013 conference by Mr. Thomas Servais, R&D Manager for Accelerator Development at the IBA group, who sponsor the IBA Europhysics Prize. The Prize Diploma was presented by Dr. I J Douglas MacGregor, Chair-elect of the EPS Nuclear Physics Division and Chair of the IBA Prize committee.

  19. Haagen-Smit Prize 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Executive Editors and the Publisher of Atmospheric Environment take great pleasure in announcing the 2015 ''Haagen-Smit Prize", designed to recognize outstanding papers published in Atmospheric Environment. The Prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution and one of the first editors of the International Journal of Air Pollution, a predecessor to Atmospheric Environment.

  20. George E. Pake Prize Lecture: Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics: Accelerating to Grid Parity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mark

    2013-03-01

    Lost in recent headlines about solar company failures, reduced government support and depressed stock valuations is the fact that photovoltaic (PV) systems continue to be installed at an extremely healthy rate - a ten-fold increase between 2007 and 2012, to a cumulative 100GWp of installations worldwide. The primary factor behind this remarkable growth has been cost reduction at the installed system level afforded by manufacturing and technology improvements to the crystalline silicon (c-Si) PV cell. In fact in the past 2 years, c-Si module cost learning curves have accelerated over their historical norms as a function of both volume and time, and as a result c-Si PV has reached parity with conventional forms of electricity in 20 + countries worldwide. In this presentation future c-Si technology paths will be reviewed along with market implications, leading to the projection that between 2015 and 2020, c-Si based PV electricity will be cost-effectively delivered to >95% of the world's population.

  1. James Clerk Maxwell Prize for Plasma Physics: The Physics of Magnetic Reconnection and Associated Particle Acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, James

    2010-11-01

    Solar and stellar flares, substorms in the Earth's magnetosphere, and disruptions in laboratory fusion experiments are driven by the explosive release of magnetic energy through the process of magnetic reconnection. During reconnection oppositely directed magnetic fields break and cross-connect. The resulting magnetic slingshots convert magnetic energy into high velocity flows, thermal energy and energetic particles. A major scientific challenge has been the multi-scale nature of the problem: a narrow boundary layer, ``the dissipation region,'' breaks field lines and controls the release of energy in a macroscale system. Significant progress has been made on fundamental questions such as how magnetic energy is released so quickly and why the release occurs as an explosion. At the small spatial scales of the dissipation region the motion of electrons and ions decouples, the MHD description breaks down and whistler and kinetic Alfven dynamics drives reconnection. The dispersive property of these waves leads to fast reconnection, insensitive to system size and weakly dependent on dissipation, consistent with observations. The evidence for these waves during reconnection in the magnetosphere and the laboratory is compelling. The role of turbulence within the dissipation region in the form of ``secondary islands'' or as a source of anomalous resistivity continues to be explored. A large fraction of the magnetic energy released during reconnection appears in the form of energetic electrons and protons -- up to 50% or more during solar flares. The mechanism for energetic particle production during magnetic reconnection has remained a mystery. Models based on reconnection at a single large x-line are incapable of producing the large numbers of energetic electrons seen in observations. Scenarios based on particle acceleration in a multi-x-line environment are more promising. In such models a link between the energy gain of electrons and the magnetic energy released, a

  2. 77 FR 58114 - SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ..., education, and science. The $10 million SunShot Prize: Race to the Rooftop competition challenges the..., the Secretary of Energy has approved this competition. Today's notice announces the SunShot Prize...

  3. Prize Draw

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      Prize draw Go Sport vouchers 393 members of the Staff Association participated in our free prize draw in July where they could win one of the thirty Go Sport vouchers of 50 euros. The thirty winners have been contacted and can come and collect their voucher from the Staff Association Secretariat.

  4. New AGU Climate Communication Prize: Call for nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2011-08-01

    AGU is pleased to announce the newly launched AGU Climate Communication Prize. This new Union prize, generously funded by Nature's Own, a purveyor of fossils, minerals, and handcrafted jewelry in Boulder, Colo., will honor an AGU member-scientist for the communication of climate science. The prize highlights the importance of promoting scientific literacy, clarity of message, and efforts to foster respect and understanding of science-based values as they relate to the implications of climate change. The prize will be awarded annually and will be presented at AGU's Fall Meeting. It will carry a cash award of $25,000.

  5. Nobel Prize 2011: Perlmutter, Schmidt & Riess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alison

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter, Brian Schmidt and Adam Riess, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  6. Cosmic pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2011-11-01

    The 2011 Nobel Prize for Physics has been awarded to Saul Perlmutter from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, US, Adam Riess at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and Brian Schmidt from the Australian National University, Weston Creek, "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the universe through observations of distant supernovae".

  7. The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    VANE, Howard R.; Chris Mulhearn

    2004-01-01

    In October 2003 the latest recipients of the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics were announced. Since its inception in 1969, 53 economists have been awarded the Prize. A closer look at the biographical details of the Nobel Memorial Laureates—including their broad field of study, citizenship, university affiliation and place of doctoral training—provides some interesting insights into likely future winners. This paper offers a set of criteria which, to date, the overwhelming majority of rec...

  8. 78 FR 40132 - Wave Energy Converter Prize Administration Webinar

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... (WWPTO) is considering releasing a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), tentatively titled, ``Wave Energy Converter Prize Administration''. The Office is planning a webinar in advance of any potential FOA... of a FOA. The webinar is open to all interested parties. All interested parties are encouraged...

  9. CAS Researchers Honored by Hua Loo-Keng Mathematics Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Two mathematicians of the CAS Academy of Mathematics and System Sciences have received the 2003 Hua LooKeng Mathematics Prize. This was announced by Prof. Ma Zhiming,president of the Chinese Mathematics Society (CMS), at the Ninth CMS Congress inaugurated on October 31 at Wuhan University in central China's Hubei Province.

  10. EU wins Nobel Peace Prize- reactions from EUROPP experts

    OpenAIRE

    Ker-Lindsay, James; Featherstone, Kevin; Brown, Chris; Thomas, Daniel; Cherrier, Nick; Pastrorella, Giulia; Besliu, Raluca

    2012-01-01

    Today it was announced that the European Union has been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize “f or over six decades contributed to the advancement of peace and reconciliation, democracy and human rights in Europe”. We asked EUROPP’s expert contributors for their immediate reactions.

  11. Beautiful Minds: The Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Saibal

    2014-01-01

    This is the time of the year when the decisions relating to the Nobel memorial prize in economics are announced. The study lists the earlier recipients and highlights certain interesting facets that could act as a guide for selecting potential recipients.

  12. W K H Panofsky prize awarded for CP violation

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Italo Mannelli (left) et Heinrich Wahl (right) at CERN after the announcement of the prize. The American Physical Society has recently announced its 2007 winners of the W K H Panofsky prize to CERN's Heinrich Wahl (now at the University of Ferrara), Italo Mannelli from Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa and Bruce Winstein of University of Chicago. These three physicists led experiments that resulted in a multitude of precision measurements of properties of neutral kaons, most notably the discovery of direct CP violation. The W K H Panofsky prize recognizes outstanding achievements in experimental particle physics. Wahl and Mannelli's important work at CERN with CP violation and neutral kaons in the 1970s paved the way for the NA31 experiment in the 1980s. This experiment, of which Wahl was the spokesperson, focused on and found the first evidence for direct CP violation. Mannelli played a leading role, particularly in implementing his knowledge of calorimetry using liquefied noble gases, a technique originally...

  13. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-08-01

    News from Journal House National Chemistry Week (NCW) Celebrating Chemistry and Art is the theme of NCW 2001, to be held November 4-10, 2001. As you make plans for participating in the celebrations in your area, keep in mind that JCE is developing special materials on this theme, which will appear in our October issue: Classroom Activities, a comprehensive Illustrated Resource Paper, Report from Online, specially written brief articles illustrated in color, articles related to the theme, and CLIPs (Chemical Laboratory Information Profiles). Awards Announced Passer Award Passer Award recipients from the April 1 closing date are: George Bennett, Millikin University, Decatur, IL Daniel Berger, Bluffton College, Bluffton, OH Karen Dunlap, Sierra College, Rocklin, CA Myung-Hoon Kim, Georgia Perimeter College, Dunwoody, GA Cheryl Longfellow, Philadelphia University, Philadelphia, PA Jerry Maas, Oakton Community College, Des Plaines, IL Tim Royappa, University of West Florida, Pensacola, FL Visiting Scientist Award, Western Connecticut Section Diane Bunce, The Catholic University of America, has been selected as the 2001 Visiting Scientist of the Western Connecticut Section of the ACS. The award, presented annually since 1967, brings an outstanding chemical educator to visit high schools in Fairfield County, CT. In May, Bunce visited three high schools, Christian Heritage School, Fairfield High School, and Greenwich High School, where she interacted with teachers and students and presented lectures and demonstrations to several chemistry classes. She was also keynote speaker at the ACS local section's Education Night. The awardee is selected by a committee of university and high school teachers, industrial chemists, and the previous Visiting Scientist; there is an honorarium of 1500 plus expenses. Welch Award Roger D. Kornberg, a professor of structural biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine, received the 2001 Welch Award for his discovery of the nucleosome

  14. Affirmative Action through Extra Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Dahm, Matthias; Esteve, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Some affirmative action policies establish that a set of disadvantaged competitors has access to an extra prize. We analyse the effects of creating an extra prize by reducing the prize in the main competition. Contestants differ in ability and agents with relatively low ability belong to a disadvantaged minority. All contestants compete for the main prize, but only disadvantaged agents can win the extra prize. We show that an extra prize is a powerful tool to ensure participation of disadvant...

  15. Inducement prizes and innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Brunt, Liam; Lerner, Josh; Nicholas, Tom

    2011-01-01

    We examine prizes as an inducement for innovation using a novel dataset of awards for inventiveness offered by the Royal Agricultural Society of England from 1839 to 1939. At annual shows the RASE held competitive trials and awarded medals and monetary prizes (exceeding one million pounds in current prices) to spur technological development. We find large effects of the prizes on contest entries, especially for the Society’s gold medal. Matching award and patent data, we also detect large eff...

  16. The Economic Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Nikolay Gertchev

    2011-01-01

    This paper raises the question whether the Economic Nobel Prize is ideologically biased. Based on a review of a significant number of the Prize Committee’s award justifications, the article concludes at a persistent bias against private property and the free market and in favour of collectivism and state interventionism. From a methodological point of view, the Prize has contributed to the widespread use by professional economists of formal mathematics within the positivistic approach. With r...

  17. Promising the right prize

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Emeric

    2010-01-01

    Prizes are often awarded to encourage research on products deemed of vital importance. We present a mechanism which can, in situations where the innovators are better informed about the difficulty of the research, tailor perfectly the expected reward to the expected research costs. The idea is to let the first successful inventor trade off the risk of having a competitor share the reward in exchange for a higher prize. If the goal of the designer is to minimize the prize awarded whilst encour...

  18. Competition for a Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Van Der Noll, R.

    2006-01-01

    I present a model in which individuals compete for a prize by choosing to apply or not. Abilities are private information and in attempt to select the best candidate, the committee compares applicants with an imperfect technology. The choice of application cost, size of the prize and use of information technology are being characterized. In equilibrium, the number of applicants is stochastic and may overload the committee. I show that in spite of overload, the optimal cost (size of the prize)...

  19. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    /TD/TDhome.html. This site also has links to JCE guidelines for prospective authors. Volunteers should contact Vitz by the medium of their preference: Ed Vitz, Editor, Tested Demonstrations, Journal of Chemical Education, Department of Chemistry, Kutztown University, Kutztown, PA 19530; phone: 610/683-4443; fax: 610/683-1352; email: vitz@kutztown.edu. Awards Announced ACS Regional Awards in High School Chemistry Teaching The American Chemical Society has announced winners of regional awards in high school chemistry teaching for 1999. Winners have demonstrated excellence in teaching, exceptional ability to challenge and inspire students, extracurricular work, and willingness to keep up to date in the field. The award consists of two certificates (one for the recipient, the other for display at the recipient's school) and a cash prize of 1,000. Thomas W. Adams, Indiana Academy for Science, Mathematics & Humanities at Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana: Central Region Arthur J. Crumm, Barstow School, Kansas City, Missouri: Midwest Region Esther H. Freeman, Tabb High School, Yorktown, Virginia: Southeast Region Joan A. Laredo-Liddell, St. Barnabas High School, Bronx, New York: Middle Atlantic Region, 1998 David T. Lee, Mountain Lakes High School, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey: Middle Atlantic Region, 1999 Diane Coley McGann, Santa Ana High School, Santa Ana, California: Western Region William J. Pilotte, Newington High School, Newington, Connecticut: Northeast Region Judith C. Seydel, Idaho Falls High School, Idaho Falls, Idaho: Northwest Region Brenda A. Wolpa, Canyon Del Oro High School, Tucson, Arizona: Southwest/Rocky Mountain Region NSF Distinguished Public Service Award As a part of its celebration in 2000 of its half-century in existence, the National Science Foundation has announced the recipient of its Distinguished Public Service Award. Samuel P. Massie, U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland (Emeritus) 1999 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Academies have announced the

  20. Two Nobel Prizes connected to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 2003 Nobel Prizes in Physics and in Physiology or Medicine, announced last week, both have connections with particle physics and CERN. Alexei Abrikosov, Vitaly Ginzburg and Anthony Leggett have received the prize in physics for their "pioneering contributions to the theory of superconductors and superfluids". The most important superconducting materials technically have proved to be those known as type II superconductors, which allow superconductivity and magnetism to exist at the same time and remain superconductive in high magnetic fields. The coils for the superconducting magnets in CERN's Large Hadron Collider are made from niobium-titanium alloy - a type II superconductor. The LHC will operate thanks to magnets made of type II superconductors. Here, superconducting cables for the LHC are on display during a VIP visit.Abrikosov, who is now at the Argonne National Laboratory, was working at the Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems in his native Moscow when he succeeded in formula...

  1. The Economic Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay Gertchev

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper raises the question whether the Economic Nobel Prize is ideologically biased. Based on a review of a significant number of the Prize Committee’s award justifications, the article concludes at a persistent bias against private property and the free market and in favour of collectivism and state interventionism. From a methodological point of view, the Prize has contributed to the widespread use by professional economists of formal mathematics within the positivistic approach. With respect to research findings, the Prize has favoured the doctrine that market processes are faulty, while government policies are an appropriate fix. Additionally, the paper casts doubts on the scientific integrity of the Prize, given the Committee’s acknowledged lack of concern for fundamental revisionism and outright dismissal of possible criticisms.

  2. Sequential Two-Prize Contests

    OpenAIRE

    Sela, Aner

    2008-01-01

    We study two-stage all-pay auctions with two identical prizes. In each stage, players compete for one prize. Each player may win either one or two prizes. We analyze the equilibrium strategies where players' marginal values for the prizes are either declining or inclining.

  3. Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention claims equipment for stabilizing the position of the front covers of the accelerator chamber in cyclic accelerators which significantly increases accelerator reliability. For stabilizing, it uses hydraulic cushions placed between the electromagnet pole pieces and the front chamber covers. The top and the bottom cushions are hydraulically connected. The cushions are disconnected and removed from the hydraulic line using valves. (J.P.)

  4. Hubble's Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Soares, Domingos

    2001-01-01

    Astronomy is not in the list of natural sciences aimed at by the Nobel awards. In spite of that, there were, throughout the 1930s until the early 1950s, effective moves by important scientists to distinguish Hubble with the Prize. A short report on these attempts is made as well as speculation on what would be the citation for the prize in view of the broad range of Hubble's scientific achievements. Within this context, the opportunity is also taken for publicizing the Crafoord Prize which do...

  5. Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Events Calendar Podcast About Us Lists of Nobel Prizes and Laureates All Educational Productions Physics Prize Related Chemistry Prize Related Medicine Prize Related Blood Typing Control of the Cell ...

  6. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-02-01

    . Works well. Activity:CD Light: An Introduction to Spectroscopy. J. Chem. Educ. 1998, 75, 1568A (December 1998). Workshop?yes Booth?yes, with colored plastic onlynot solutions Notes:Can be difficult to measure and cut cardboard for spectroscope. Pre-made spectroscopes and partially constructed ones to show method could be provided. Needs good light source to work well. Activity:Cleaning Up with Chemistry: Investigating the Action of Zeolite in Laundry Detergent. J. Chem. Educ. 1999, 76, 1461A (October 1999). Workshop?yes Booth?could demonstrate tubes of soapy water with and without zeolite Notes:Need access to water. Quick and easy. More information about JCE Classroom Activities is available on JCE Online at: http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/AboutJCE/Features/JCE_CA/. Here you will find the notes described above and a list of all published Classroom Activities. The site is updated regularly. Awards Announced United Nations Environment Program The United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) has selected Mario J. Molina, professor of earth, atmosphere, and planetary sciences at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, as the winner of the 1999 UNEP Sasakawa Environment Prize. The prize, worth $200,000, is for his outstanding global contributions in the field of atmospheric chemistry. ACS Northeastern Section The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society has awarded the Henry A. Hill Award to Morton Z. Hoffman, professor of chemistry at Boston University. The award is given annually to a member of the section for outstanding service. Award Deadlines Mettler-Toledo Thermal Analysis Education Grant Mettler-Toledo has established a grant to honor Edith A. Turi of the Polymer Research Institute, Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY, for her lifelong contribution to the cause of thermal analysis education. The grant will be awarded on an annual basis to not-for-profit organizations in North America that confer degrees up to the Ph. D. level and provide or intend to provide

  7. Club of Bologna International Best PhD Prize 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Fiala

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The Club of Bologna, in collaboration with UNACOMA, will be awarding a prize for the best PhD theses on subjects related to agricultural machinery design and development. Up to ten theses will be selected and the best five of these will have the chance of being presented during the annual Club of Bologna meeting that will be held from 9 to 10 November 2012, on occasion of the EIMA. The authors of the best three PhD theses will also receive a cash prize. The winners will be guests in Bologna of UNACOMA who will cover travelling expenses and hotel accommodation for 2 nights. They will also meet farm machinery manufacturers attending the international trade fair. The winners of the Club of Bologna Prize 2012 will be announced here. Application forms and further information can be downloaded from the Club of Bologna website (http://www.clubofbologna.org/.

  8. Wolf prize in mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirzebruch, Friedrich; Sinai, Y; Stein, E

    The Wolf Prize, awarded by the Wolf Foundation in Israel, often goes to mathematicians who are in their sixties or older. That is to say, the Prize honours the achievements of a lifetime. T This valuable work features bibliographies, important papers, and speeches (for example at international congresses) of Wolf Prize winners, s uch as R. Bott, A.P. Calderon, A.N. Kolmogorov, M.G. Krein, P. Lax, H. Lewy, L. Lovasz, J. Milnor, J. Moser, I. Piatetski-Shapiro, J.P. Serre, C.L. Siegel, Y. Sinai, E.M. Stein, J. Tits, A. Weil, H. Whitney, A. Wiles and O. Zariski. This is the first time that documents on Wolf Prize winners have been published together. Since the work of the Wolf laureates covers a wide spectrum, much of the mathematics of the 20th century comes to life in this book.

  9. Breakthrough Prize for LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    A special Breakthrough Prize has been awarded to the 1000 scientists and engineers working on the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (aLIGO) for the discovery of gravitational waves.

  10. Words for Nobel prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Moran-Mirabal, J. M.; H. C. Rosu

    2002-01-01

    We present the statistics of the significant nouns and adjectives of social impact figuring in the nominations of the Nobel prizes in Physics and Chemistry over the period of the awards from 1901 to 2001

  11. The Nobel Prize delay

    OpenAIRE

    Becattini, Francesco; Chatterjee, Arnab; Fortunato, Santo; Mitrović, Marija; Pan, Raj Kumar; Parolo, Pietro Della Briotta

    2014-01-01

    The time lag between the publication of a Nobel discovery and the conferment of the prize has been rapidly increasing for all disciplines, especially for Physics. Does this mean that fundamental science is running out of groundbreaking discoveries?

  12. Words for Nobel prizes

    CERN Document Server

    Moran-Mirabal, J M

    2003-01-01

    We present the statistics of the significant nouns and adjectives of social impact figuring in the nominations of the Nobel prizes in Physics and Chemistry over the period of the awards from 1901 to 2001

  13. Nobel prizes 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1975 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to A. Bohr, B. Mottelson and J. Rainwater for their new ideas about the structure of the heavier atomic nuclei and the foundation of the 'unified model' of these nuclei. (orig.)

  14. Awarding a Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moeran, Brian

    2013-01-01

    This article describes and analyses the selection and prize awarding processes for a biennial ceramics exhibition in Japan. Based on long-term fieldwork in the “art world” (Becker 1982) of contemporary Japanese ceramics, as well as on participant observation of the processes concerned, the article...... addresses and draws upon two sets of sociological writings: one concerned with prizes and awards; the other with evaluative practices....

  15. W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics: The design, construction and performance of the B Factory accelerator facilities, PEP-II and KEKB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfan, Jonathan

    2016-03-01

    The discovery and elucidation of CP violation in the B-meson system presented daunting challenges for the accelerator and detector facilities. This talk discusses how these challenges were met and overcome in the electron-positron colliding-beam accelerator facilities PEP-II (at SLAC) and KEKB (at KEK). The key challenge was to produce unprecedentedly large numbers of B-mesons in a geometry that provided high-statistics, low-background samples of decays to CP eigenstates. This was realized with asymmetric collisions at the Γ(4S) at peak luminosities in excess of 3 ×1033 /sq. cm/sec. Specialized optics were developed to generate efficient, low background, multi-bunch collisions in an energy-asymmetric collision geometry. Novel technologies for the RF, vacuum and feedback systems permitted the storage of multi-amp, multi-bunch beams of electrons and positrons, thereby generating high peak luminosities. Accelerator uptimes greater than 95 percent, combined with high-intensity injection systems, ensured large integrated luminosity. Both facilities rapidly attained their design specifications and ultimately far exceeded the projected performance expectations for both peak and integrated luminosity.

  16. News & Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    provided as a part of the telephone order; when the new account is active, the account information will be emailed. Remember to Provide Your Email Address Knowing your email address has become important for Journal communication. In addition to account information, we will send an order confirmation to each subscriber who provides an email address. For those who want it, we intend, in the near future, to send an email message announcing when each month's issue goes online. We do not sell or give email addresses to anyone else. Keeping Up to Date with JCE Online JCE Online will continue to change and expand, as the technology around us changes and as new features and columns are added. The best way to keep abreast of new developments is to look for the JCE Online column in both print and online. Jon Holmes, editor of JCE Online, uses this column to keep readers in touch with the latest happenings: JCE Online FAQs (March 1999, p 446) JCE Online 99 (April 1999, p 584) JCE Feature Columns (May 1999, p 718) Molecular Modeling (June 1999, p 871) JCE: A Good Deal That Keeps Getting Better If you carry copies of JCE around in hopes of finding time to read them, you may think they are getting heavierand they are. Your Journal was more than a third bigger in 1998 than it was in 1995! We have printed more pages every year since 1996 (see graph for the past 25 years). We estimate that you will receive more than 2000 pages this year and even more next year. This is more pages than at any time in the Journal 's history, excepting the four years 1929-1932, when the pages were smaller. We are printing more pages because we need to. We have many good manuscripts that have been peer reviewed and accepted and now are awaiting publication in print. The time between acceptance of a manuscript and its publication is already too long. Unless we print more pages, it will grow longer. For the past three years we have been slowly but steadily reducing this publication lag, and we don't want to stop

  17. The Nobel Prize in Physics 1999

    CERN Document Server

    Godbole, Rohini M

    2000-01-01

    The last Nobel Prize of the Millenium in Physics has been awarded jointly to Professor Gerardus 't Hooft of the University of Utrecht in Holland and his thesis advisor Professor Emeritus Martinus J.G. Veltman of Holland. According to the Academy's citation, the Nobel Prize has been awarded for 'elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interaction in Physics'. It further goes on to say that they have placed particle physics theory on a firmer mathematical foundation. In this short note, we will try to understand both these aspects of the award. The work for which they have been awarded the Nobel Prize was done in 1971. However, the precise predictions of properties of particles that were made possible as a result of their work, were tested to a very high degree of accuracy only in this last decade. This was done in a series of measurements in the experiments in the accelerator laboratories at CERN (Geneva) and Fermilab. To understand the full significance of this Nobel Prize, we will have to summarise ...

  18. Editorial announcement

    OpenAIRE

    Parks, William

    2014-01-01

    William C Parks Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA, USAI would like to announce the arrival of Metalloproteinases in Medicine, a new open access peer-reviewed journal published by Dove Medical Press. Metalloproteinases In Medicine is an international journal that provides a platform for discussion and dissemination of new knowledge about the role that metalloproteinases (inclusive of matrix metalloproteinases, the ADAM [A Disintegrin And Metalloproteinase] family, the ADAMTS [A Disi...

  19. ISSLS PRIZE WINNER: INHIBITION OF NF-κB ACTIVITY AMELIORATES AGE-ASSOCIATED DISC DEGENERATION IN A MOUSE MODEL OF ACCELERATED AGING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasto, Luigi A.; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Robinson, Andria R.; Tilstra, Jeremy S.; Clauson, Cheryl L.; Sowa, Gwendolyn A.; Ngo, Kevin; Dong, Qing; Pola, Enrico; Lee, Joon Y.; Niedernhofer, Laura J.; Kang, James D.; Robbins, Paul D.; Vo, Nam V.

    2012-01-01

    Study Design NF-κB activity was pharmacologically and genetically blocked in an accelerated aging mouse model to mitigate age-related disc degenerative changes. Objective To study the mediatory role of NF-κB signaling pathway in age-dependent intervertebral disc degeneration. Summary of Background Data Aging is a major contributor to intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD), but the molecular mechanism behind this process is poorly understood. NF-κB is a family of transcription factors which play a central role in mediating cellular response to damage, stress, and inflammation. Growing evidence implicates chronic NF-κB activation as a culprit in many aging-related diseases, but its role in aging-related IDD has not been adequately explored. We studied the effects of NF-κB inhibition on IDD using a DNA repair-deficient mouse model of accelerated aging (Ercc1-/Δ mice) previously been reported to exhibit age-related IDD. Methods Systemic inhibition of NF-κB activation was achieved either genetically by deletion of one allele of the NF-κB subunit p65 (Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice) or pharmacologically by chronic intra-peritoneal administration of the Nemo Binding Domain (8K-NBD) peptide to block the formation of the upstream activator of NF-κB, IκB Inducible Kinase (IKK), in Ercc1-/Δ mice. Disc cellularity, total proteoglycan content and proteoglycan synthesis of treated mice and untreated controls were assessed. Results Decreased disc matrix proteoglycan content, a hallmark feature of IDD, and elevated disc NF-κB activity were observed in discs of progeroid Ercc1-/Δ mice and naturally aged wild-type compared to young WT mice. Systemic inhibition of NF-κB by the 8K-NBD peptide in Ercc1-/Δ mice increased disc proteoglycan synthesis and ameriolated loss disc cellularity and matrix proteoglycan. These results were confirmed genetically by using the p65 haploinsufficient Ercc1-/Δp65+/- mice. Conclusion These findings demonstrate that the IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway

  20. Wolf prize in physics

    CERN Document Server

    Piran, Tsvi

    2016-01-01

    The Wolf Foundation began its activities in 1976, with an initial endowment donated by the Wolf family. Within a very short period of time after its initiation, the Wolf prize has become one of the major signs for recognition of scientific achievements and excellence. This volume is devoted to a selection of Wolf Prize laureates in Physics and each has included two respective major publications as well as a commentary written by the laureate describing his scientific career. Readers around the world are provided a unique opportunity to get a glimpse of how scientific processes work in physics, and to comprehend how these laureates have left an indelible imprint on scientific history.

  1. Asia honours accelerator physicists

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    "Steve Meyers of Cern and Jie Wei of Beijing's Tsinghua University are the first recipients of a new prize for particle physics. The pair were honoured for their contributions to numerous particle-accelerator projects - including Cern's Large Hadron Collider - by the Asian Committee for Future Accelerators (ACFA)..." (1 paragraph)

  2. 77 FR 36272 - SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... areas of technology, education and science. The $10 million SunShot Prize: America's Most Affordable Rooftop Solar challenges the ingenuity of America's businesses and communities to make it faster, easier... using innovative, verifiable processes and business practices. Today's notice announces the...

  3. Citations Prize 2011 Citations Prize 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Steve; Harris, Simon

    2011-12-01

    Physics in Medicine & Biology (PMB) awards its 'Citations Prize' to the authors of the original research paper that has received the most citations in the preceding five years (according to the Institute for Scientific Information (ISI)). The lead author of the winning paper is presented with the Rotblat Medal (named in honour of Professor Sir Joseph Rotblat who was the second—and longest serving—Editor of PMB, from 1961-1972). The winning co-authors each receive a certificate. Susan Hagness (left) receiving the Rotblat Medal from Robert Jeraj of PMB's Editorial Board (right) on behalf of Mariya Lazebnik. The winner of the 2011 Citations Prize for the paper which has received the most citations in the previous 5 years (2006-2010) is A large-scale study of the ultrawideband microwave dielectric properties of normal, benign and malignant breast tissues obtained from cancer surgeries Authors: Mariya Lazebnik, Dijana Popovic, Leah McCartney, Cynthia B Watkins, Mary J Lindstrom, Josephine Harter, Sarah Sewall, Travis Ogilvie, Anthony Magliocco, Tara M Breslin, Walley Temple, Daphne Mew, John H Booske, Michal Okoniewski and Susan C Hagness Reference: Mariya Lazebnik et al 2007 Phys. Med. Biol. 52 6093-115 Discussion of the significance of the winning paper can be found on medicalphysicsweb (medicalphysicsweb.org/cws/article/research/47814). Our congratulations go to the winning authors. Steve Webb Editor-in-Chief Simon Harris Publisher

  4. Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy has awarded the 1999 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Ahmed H. Zewail (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA) "for his studies of the transition states of chemical reactions using femtosecond spectroscopy". Zewail's work has taken the study of the rates and mechanisms of chemical reactions to the ultimate degree of detail - the time scale of bond making and bond breaking.

  5. Nobel Prize ceremony 2013

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    On 10 December 2013 particle physics took central stage at the Nobel ceremony in Stockholm. Among the invitees were Fabiola Gianotti, former ATLAS spokesperson, Joseph Incandela, CMS Spokesperson, and CERN theorist Luis Alvarez-Gaume. They share their feelings of the memorable day with us.   Overview of the 2013 Nobel Prize Award Ceremony at the Stockholm Concert Hall. © Nobel Media AB 2013. Photo: Alex Ljungdahl. Fabiola Gianotti and Joe Incandela, at the Nobel Banquet in the Stockholm City Hall.   "It was an honour and a thrill for us to attend such a memorable Nobel prize ceremony and we are very grateful to Peter Higgs for having included us among his invited guests. The ceremony held some special moments for the LHC. In his speech prior to the award of the Nobel prize to Francois Englert and Peter Higgs by King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, Lars Brink (Chair of the Physics Nobel Prize Committee) stressed the importance of the results from the LHC exper...

  6. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  7. Nobel Prize in 2004

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐佳梅

    2004-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ The Founder-Alfred Nobel The ManBehind the Prize Alfred Nobel was born in 1833 in Stockholm, Sweden. His family was descended from Olof Rudbeck, the best-known technical genius of Sweden's 17th century era as a great power in northern Europe.

  8. The Abel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Holden, Helge

    2010-01-01

    Presents the winners of the first five Abel Prizes in mathematics: 2003 - Jean-Pierre Serre; 2004 - Sir Michael Atiyah and Isadore Singer; 2005 - Peter D Lax; 2006 - Lennart Carleson; and 2007 - S R Srinivasa Varadhan. This book provides an autobiography or an interview, a curriculum vitae, and a complete bibliography of each laureate

  9. Cockcroft and Walton. Nobel Prize for Physics (1951)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1951, the Nobel Prize for Physics was shared by researchers John Douglas Cockcroft (1897-1969) and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (1903-1995), for their pioneer work on the transmutation of the atomic nuclei by artificial acceleration of atomic particles. (Author)

  10. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    OpenAIRE

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita; Luana de Decco Marchese; Danielle Warol Dias; Andressa Brasil Barbeito; Jonathan Costa Gomes; Maria Clara Soares Muradas; Pedro Gemal Lanzieri; Ronaldo Altenburg Gismondi

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiolo...

  11. EPS Young Physicist Prize - CORRECTION

    CERN Document Server

    2009-01-01

    The original text for the article 'Prizes aplenty in Krakow' in Bulletin 30-31 assigned the award of the EPS HEPP Young Physicist Prize to Maurizio Pierini. In fact he shared the prize with Niki Saoulidou of Fermilab, who was rewarded for her contribution to neutrino physics, as the article now correctly indicates. We apologise for not having named Niki Saoulidou in the original article.

  12. IEEE Prize for Lucio Rossi

    CERN Multimedia

    IEEE Council on Superconductivity

    2007-01-01

    Lucio Rossi receives his prize from John Spargo, Chairman of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity (left), and Martin Nisenoff, Chairman of the Council on Superconductivity's Awards Committee (right).

  13. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  14. Nobel prizes: contributions to cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-08-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize's history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  15. Jerwood Drawing Prize 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Surti, Srin

    2010-01-01

    This drawing 'Joss stick billboard' was selected by Charles Darwent, Art Critic of the Independent on Sunday; Jenni Lomax, Director, Camden Arts Centre; Emma Talbot, Artist as a part of the Jerwood Drawing Prize exhibition in 2010. 'Joss Stick Billboard' is from a new series of drawings made by the duplicity of intuitive action and the technologically controlled procedure of laser cutting. The subject matter is gleaned from the disarray of architectural entropy at rapid economic growth. U...

  16. Practice Prize Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Ashish Sinha; J. Jeffrey Inman; Yantao Wang; Joonwook Park; Gerard J. Tellis; Chandy, Rajesh K.; Deborah MacInnis; Pattana Thaivanich

    2005-01-01

    The Practice Prize Reports consist of one article with two parts as follows: “Sinha, Ashish, J. Jeffrey Inman, Yantao Wang, Joonwook Park. Attribute drivers: A factor analytic choice map approach for understanding choices among SKUs” and “Tellis, Gerard J., Rajesh K. Chandy, Deborah MacInnis, Pattana Thaivanich. “Modeling the microeffects of television advertising: Which ad works, when, where, for how long, and why?”

  17. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg, E-mail: ronaldo@floralia.com.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense, Niterói, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-08-15

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  18. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  19. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Tinoco Mesquita

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15% studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16% laureates, and two (6% were women. Fourteen (42% were American, 15 (45% Europeans and four (13% were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male.

  20. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male

  1. Nobel Prizes: Contributions to Cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Marchese, Luana de Decco; Dias, Danielle Warol; Barbeito, Andressa Brasil; Gomes, Jonathan Costa; Muradas, Maria Clara Soares; Lanzieri, Pedro Gemal; Gismondi, Ronaldo Altenburg

    2015-01-01

    The Nobel Prize was created by Alfred Nobel. The first prize was awarded in 1901 and Emil Adolf von Behring was the first laureate in medicine due to his research in diphtheria serum. Regarding cardiology, Nobel Prize’s history permits a global comprehension of progress in pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapeutics of various cardiac diseases in last 120 years. The objective of this study was to review the major scientific discoveries contemplated by Nobel Prizes that contributed to cardiology. In addition, we also hypothesized why Carlos Chagas, one of our most important scientists, did not win the prize in two occasions. We carried out a non-systematic review of Nobel Prize winners, selecting the main studies relevant to heart diseaseamong the laureates. In the period between 1901 and 2013, 204 researches and 104 prizes were awarded in Nobel Prize, of which 16 (15%) studies were important for cardiovascular area. There were 33 (16%) laureates, and two (6%) were women. Fourteen (42%) were American, 15 (45%) Europeans and four (13%) were from other countries. There was only one winner born in Brazil, Peter Medawar, whose career was all in England. Reviewing the history of the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine area made possible to identify which researchers and studies had contributed to advances in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Most winners were North Americans and Europeans, and male. PMID:25945466

  2. The Brain Prize 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltesz, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    The Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation awarded the inaugural Brain Prize 2011 to Péter Somogyi, Tamás Freund and György Buzsáki ‘for their wide-ranging, technically and conceptually brilliant research on the functional organization of neuronal circuits in the cerebral cortex, especially in the hippocampus, a region that is crucial for certain forms of memory’. The present article highlights key findings and major conceptual contributions by these three scientists that were recognized by the award. PMID:21917323

  3. CERN Accelerator School & ELETTRA Synchrotron Light Laboratory announce a course on "Accelerator Physics" (Intermediate level), at the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics, Adriatico Guesthouse, Trieste, Italy, 2 - 14 October 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    The Intermediate level course is clearly conceived as the logical continuation of the Introductory level course for those being active in the field of Accelerator Physics. However, it is also often considered as an excellent opportunity to either discover and receive a basic training in a new field, or for refreshing or keeping up-to-date people's expertise in the field.

  4. Optics pioneers scoop Nobel prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    Three physicists who carried out pioneering work in former industrial research labs have picked up this year's Nobel Prize for Physics. One half of the SEK 10m prize has been awarded to Charles Kao, 75, for his work at the UK-based Standard Telephones and Cables (STC) on the transmission of light in optical fibres, which underpinned the telecommunications revolution. The other half of the prize is shared between Willard Boyle, 85, and George Smith, 79, of Bell Laboratories in New Jersey, US, for inventing the charge-coupled device (CCD) - an imaging semiconductor circuit that forms the basis of most digital cameras.

  5. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards.

  6. Andrea Ghez Receives Crafoord Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Sher, Ben

    2012-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Scienceshas selected Andrea Ghez, a professor of physics and astronomy at UCLA, to receive the 2012 Crafoord Prize in Astronomy. She is being honored by the Academy for “observations of stars orbiting the Galactic center, indicating the presence of a supermassive black hole.” The Crafoord Prize, which includes an accompanying award of 4 million Swedish krona, is considered one of the world’s largest scientific prizes. Ghez is the first woman to win the award since...

  7. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  8. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-09-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Macleod, Tadeus Reichstein, Andrew V Schally, Earl W Sutherland, Jr and Rosalyn Yalow. All were eminent scientists, distinguished lecturers and winners of many prizes and awards. PMID:25055817

  9. Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry 2014: Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015, commemorating the Old Quantum Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yu

    2015-01-01

    2015 is the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL), while the physics and chemistry Nobel Prizes 2014 are both about light. The work leading to the two prizes share the same basic theoretical foundation: when an electron jumps from a higher energy level to a lower energy level, the energy difference is transformed into a photon. This basic way of light generation is a key part of the Old Quantum Theory. Interestingly, the date of announcing the 2014 Nobel Prize for physics coincided with the birthdays of Niels Bohr and, especially, of Planck's blackbody radiation formula. In connection with the two 2014 Nobel Prizes, we recall the development of the Old Quantum Theory by Planck, Einstein and Bohr.

  10. EDITORIAL: The FDR Prize The FDR Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Shigeo

    2009-06-01

    From the 45 papers published in the year 2008 in Fluid Dynamics Research the following paper has been selected for the second FDR prize: 'Propagation of very long water waves, with vorticity, over variable depth, with applications to tsunamis' by Adrian Constantin and Robin S Johnson, published in volume 40 (March 2008) pp 175-211. This paper takes, as its main theme, the analysis of the propagation of very long gravity waves in the ocean environment, with the possibility of applying the results to tsunamis. Both variable depth and some pre-existing vorticity are allowed in the model, but under the over-arching assumption of long waves; indeed, it is argued, the waves are so long that it is impossible for classical soliton theory to be the appropriate description of a developing tsunami. This aspect is supported by some simple scaling arguments, together with some observations associated with the tsunami of Boxing Day 2004. The formulation is based on two small scales: the slow scale on which the depth varies and the small amplitude of the wave (as initially generated in deep water). The technique adopted is that of matched asymptotic expansions. The solution, constructed for deep water, is not valid in suitably reduced depth of water; the solution in this shallow region (close inshore) is then matched to the deep-water solution. A novel feature of this work is the inclusion of a general distribution of vorticity in the absence of waves—intended to model the realistic ocean—which is based on the slow evolution scale for the bottom topography. Some general properties of such background flows are proved, and two specific examples have been obtained: constant vorticity everywhere (as far as the shoreline), and regions of isolated vorticity (for appropriate bottom profiles). The way in which the wave properties are modified in the presence of vorticity is described. The significant overall proposal in this theory, specifically applicable to tsunamis, is that it is

  11. Highlights from e-EPS: the 2015 EPS High Energy Physics Prize winners

    CERN Multimedia

    Thomas Lohse, e-EPS News

    2015-01-01

    The EPS High Energy Physics Division announces the winners of its 2015 prizes, which will be awarded at the Europhysics Conference on High-Energy Physics (EPS-HEP 2015), Vienna (Austria) 22−29 July. Many people from CERN were among the winners.   The 2015 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to James D. Bjorken “for his prediction of scaling behaviour in the structure of the proton that led to a new understanding of the b interaction”, and to Guido Altarelli, Yuri L. Dokshitzer, Lev Lipatov, and Giorgio Parisi “for developing a probabilistic field theory framework for the dynamics of quarks and gluons, enabling a quantitative understanding of high-energy collisions involving hadrons”. The 2015 Giuseppe and Vanna Cocconi Prize, for an outstanding contribution to Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology in the past 15 years, is awarded to Francis Halzen “for his visiona...

  12. Nobel Prize 2012: Haroche & Wineland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgescu, Iulia

    2012-11-01

    The 2012 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Serge Haroche and David J. Wineland "for ground-breaking experimental methods that enable measuring and manipulation of individual quantum systems".

  13. CAS Mathematician Receives Shaw Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ WU Wentsun (WU Wenjun), a CAS Member from the Academy of Mathematics and System Sciences, has been honored with the 2006 Shaw Prize in Mathematical Sciences for his contributions to the new interdisciplinary field of mathematics and mechanization.

  14. QIN Dahe wins IMO prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Prof.QIN Dahe,a glaciologist and climatologist from the CAS Cold and Arid Regions Environmental and Engineering Research,has been elected to win the prestigious Prize of the International Meteorology Organization (IMO) in 2008.

  15. Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouchet, Thierry

    2016-10-01

    The Europlanet Prize for Public Engagement with Planetary Science is awarded annually. Through the Prize, Europlanet aims to recognise achievements in engaging European citizens with planetary science and to raise the profile of outreach within the scientific community. It is awarded to individuals or groups who have developed innovative practices in planetary science communication and whose efforts have significantly contributed to a wider public engagement with planetary science.

  16. Heroes in endocrinology: Nobel Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    de Herder, Wouter W

    2014-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was first awarded in 1901. Since then, the Nobel Prizes in Physiology or Medicine, Chemistry and Physics have been awarded to at least 33 distinguished researchers who were directly or indirectly involved in research into the field of endocrinology. This paper reflects on the life histories, careers and achievements of 11 of them: Frederick G Banting, Roger Guillemin, Philip S Hench, Bernardo A Houssay, Edward C Kendall, E Theodor Kocher, John J R Mac...

  17. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50th anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  18. 2014 Lush Science Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Terry

    2015-11-01

    The Lush Prize supports animal-free testing by rewarding the most effective projects and individuals who have been working toward the goal of replacing animals in product or ingredient safety testing. A Background Paper is prepared each year, prior to the judging process, to provide the panel with a brief overview of current developments in the field of Replacement alternatives, particularly those relevant to the concept of toxicity pathways. This Background Paper includes information on recent work by the relevant scientific institutions and projects in this area, including AXLR8, OECD, CAAT, The Hamner Institutes, the Human Toxome Project, EURL ECVAM, ICCVAM, the US Tox21 Programme, the ToxCast programme, and the Human Toxicology Project Consortium. Recent developments in toxicity pathway research are also assessed by reviewing the relevant literature, with a view to presenting the two papers receiving the highest score to the judges for consideration. PMID:26551288

  19. 2013 Physics Nobel Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2013 Physics Nobel Prize was awarded conjointly to Englert F. and Higgs, P.W. for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contribute to our understanding of the origin of the mass of subatomic particles and which was recently confirmed by the discovery of the predicted Higgs boson in the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The Brout-Englert-Higgs (BEH) mechanism allows the conciliation of finite range interaction and then non-null mass with symmetry through the concept of spontaneous symmetry breaking. As mass and couplings are relativist invariants, they stay unchanged in the rotation of the space for instance, the BEH field must be too and as a consequence must be a scalar field associated with a null spin particle called the Higgs boson. As the BEH mechanism explains the mass of elementary particles, it gives no hint about the reason of the broad range of particle masses we observe. (A.C.)

  20. The Nobel on First Page : The Nobel Physics Prizes in French Newspapers

    OpenAIRE

    De Cheveigné, Suzanne; Veron, Eliseo

    1994-01-01

    International audience We have examined the manner in which the main French daily newspapers reported the announcement of the Nobel Physics Prizes given to P. G. de Gennes in 1991 then to G. Charpak in 1992. We found that their enunciative strategies could be distinguished according to two independent criteria : whether the enunciator presents himself as familiar or not with scientific matters, and whether or not he attempts to explain the scientific content of the discovery. The different...

  1. MIT Clean Energy Prize: Final Technical Report May 12, 2010 - May 11, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, Chris [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Campbell, Georgina [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Salony, Jason [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Aulet, Bill [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2011-08-09

    The MIT Clean Energy Prize (MIT CEP) is a venture creation and innovation competition to encourage innovation in the energy space, specifically with regard to clean energy. The Competition invited student teams from any US university to submit student-led ventures that demonstrate a high potential of successfully making clean energy more affordable, with a positive impact on the environment. By focusing on student ventures, the MIT CEP aims to educate the next generation of clean energy entrepreneurs. Teams receive valuable mentoring and hard deadlines that complement the cash prize to accelerate development of ventures. The competition is a year-long educational process that culminates in the selection of five category finalists and a Grand Prize winner and the distribution of cash prizes to each of those teams. Each entry was submitted in one of five clean energy categories: Renewables, Clean Non-Renewables, Energy Efficiency, Transportation, and Deployment.

  2. Safety Day Prize Competition: results and answers

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2014-01-01

    The three winners of the Safety Day Prize Competition are...   • 1st Prize: Fernando LEITE PEREIRA – smoke detector • 2nd Prize: Thomas DE BORTOLI – water filter jug • 3rd Prize: Matti KALLIOKOSKI – safety goggles Please see the image below for the answers to the questionnaire. If you have any questions regarding the Safety Day, please contact: safety.communication@cern.ch. And again, thank you to all the participants!

  3. The Optimal Allocation of Prizes in Contests

    OpenAIRE

    Moldovanu, Benny; Sela, Aner

    2001-01-01

    We study a contest with multiple (not necessarily equal) prizes. Contestants have private information about an ability parameter that affects their costs of bidding. The contestant with the highest bid wins the first prize, the contestant with the second-highest bid wins the second prize, and so on until all the prizes are allocated. All contestants incur their respective costs of bidding. The contest's designer maximizes the expected sum of bids. Our main results are: 1) We display bidding e...

  4. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    OpenAIRE

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Heidi L. Williams

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change—the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010—clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design and apply such prizes. This paper aims to review and synthesize the academic literature on innovation inducement prizes, to clarify what has been learne...

  5. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television.......Lennart Carleson was the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration in Oslo, Carleson was interviewed. The interview was later shown on Norwegian television....

  6. Particle theorists scoop Nobel prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-11-01

    Every year the award of the Nobel Prize for Physics goes through a familiar pattern - a few days' heightened speculation, a warm congratulation and, more often than not, a trailing dispute. This year has been no exception. The three new laureates, whose predictions and concepts on symmetry breaking have become cornerstones of the Standard Model, had long been tipped to win at some point. Makoto Kobayashi, 64, of the KEK lab, and Toshihide Maskawa, 68, of the University of Kyoto, both in Japan, share one half of the SwKr 10m (about £800 000) prize for their work in 1972 on the mechanism of broken symmetry, which led to the prediction of a new family of quarks. Yoichiro Nambu, 87, of the University of Chicago in the US, wins the other half of the prize for realizing in 1960 how to apply spontaneous symmetry breaking to particle physics.

  7. Nobel prize awards in radiochemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adloff, J.P. [Strasbourg Univ. (France)

    2012-07-01

    In 1996 the Editors of Radiochimica Acta brought out a special volume of the journal to celebrate the hundredth anniversary of the discovery of radioactivity. On the occasion of the 50{sup th} anniversary of Radiochimica Acta, which follows closely upon the centenary of Marie Curie's second Nobel Prize in 1911, the author has the privilege to informally review 'Radiochemistry and Nobel Prize Awards', including discoveries of radioelements and new fields in chemistry based on radiochemical methods. (orig.)

  8. "small ACCELERATORS" 24 May - 2 June 2005

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    CERN Accelerator School and Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI) Groningen, the Netherlands announce a course on "Small Accelerators", Hotel Golden Tulip Drenthe, Zeegse, the Netherlands, 24 May - 2 June 2005. This specialised course is dedicated to the physics and the main applications of small accelerators. The course will review the different accelerator types as well as their specificities in terms of accelerator physics.

  9. Pierre Darriulat is awarded the André Lagarrigue Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    Pierre Darriulat at the VATLY Laboratory in Hanoï. Former CERN Research Director, Pierre Darriulat, who is now Professor of Physics at VATLY in Hanoi (Vietnam), has won the 2008 André Lagarrigue Prize. This prize, instituted by the Linear Accelerator Laboratory (LAL) at Orsay under the aegis of the French Physical Society, is awarded to front-line researchers who have had responsibility for machine/detector construction and derived maximum scientific benefit from such projects, performed in a French laboratory or in close collaboration with French groups. Pierre Darriulat has received the award in recognition of his outstanding career at the CEA, at LBL (Berkeley) and at CERN from 1964 onwards. At CERN he managed the experiments at the Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) before taking charge of the UA2 collaboration from 1980 to 1986, which participated in decisive discoveries at the ppbar collider. In particular, in 1982, the UA2 experiment began observing high trans...

  10. A Prize for Membrane Magic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2016-01-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells”. I present a personal view of the membrane trafficking field, highlighting the contributions of these three Nobel laureates in a historical context. PMID:24315088

  11. A Prize for Membrane Magic

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R.

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine has been awarded to James Rothman, Randy Schekman, and Thomas Südhof “for their discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells”. I present a personal view of the membrane trafficking field, highlighting the contributions of these three Nobel laureates in a historical context.

  12. Panofsky Prize Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwitters, R. F.

    1996-05-01

    Spontaneous polarization of high energy beams in electron- positron storage rings provides beautiful connections between special relativity, classical electromagnetism, fundamental properties of the electron, accelerator physics, and forefront questions in particle physics. Some of these connections, along with recent developments in the use of polarized beams in high energy electron-positron colliders will be discussed.

  13. Keeping an Eye on the Prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazi, A U

    2007-02-06

    Setting performance goals is part of the business plan for almost every company. The same is true in the world of supercomputers. Ten years ago, the Department of Energy (DOE) launched the Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI) to help ensure the safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile without nuclear testing. ASCI, which is now called the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Program and is managed by DOE's National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), set an initial 10-year goal to obtain computers that could process up to 100 trillion floating-point operations per second (teraflops). Many computer experts thought the goal was overly ambitious, but the program's results have proved them wrong. Last November, a Livermore-IBM team received the 2005 Gordon Bell Prize for achieving more than 100 teraflops while modeling the pressure-induced solidification of molten metal. The prestigious prize, which is named for a founding father of supercomputing, is awarded each year at the Supercomputing Conference to innovators who advance high-performance computing. Recipients for the 2005 prize included six Livermore scientists--physicists Fred Streitz, James Glosli, and Mehul Patel and computer scientists Bor Chan, Robert Yates, and Bronis de Supinski--as well as IBM researchers James Sexton and John Gunnels. This team produced the first atomic-scale model of metal solidification from the liquid phase with results that were independent of system size. The record-setting calculation used Livermore's domain decomposition molecular-dynamics (ddcMD) code running on BlueGene/L, a supercomputer developed by IBM in partnership with the ASC Program. BlueGene/L reached 280.6 teraflops on the Linpack benchmark, the industry standard used to measure computing speed. As a result, it ranks first on the list of Top500 Supercomputer Sites released in November 2005. To evaluate the performance of nuclear weapons systems, scientists

  14. Fermilab's Helen Edwards receives prestigious 2003 Robert R. Wilson prize from the American Physical Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Helen Edwards has been awarded the 2003 Robert R. Wilson prize. She was cited for "her pivotal achievement and critical contribution as the leader in the design, construction, commissioning and operation of the Tevatron, and for her continued contributions to the development of high gradient superconducting linear accelerators as well as bright and intense electron sources." (1/2 page).

  15. Cockcroft and Walton. Nobel Prize for Physics (1951); Cockcroft y Walton. Premio Nobel de Fisica (1951)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    In 1951, the Nobel Prize for Physics was shared by researchers John Douglas Cockcroft (1897-1969) and Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (1903-1995), for their pioneer work on the transmutation of the atomic nuclei by artificial acceleration of atomic particles. (Author)

  16. Optimal prizes in dynamic elimination contests: Theory and experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Stracke, Rudi; Höchtl, Wolfgang; Kerschbamer, Rudolf; Sunde, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the implications of different prize structures on effort provision in dynamic (two-stage) elimination contests. Theoretical results show that, for risk-neutral participants, a structure with a single prize for the winner of the contest maximizes total effort, while a structure with two appropriately chosen prizes (a runner-up prize and a final prize) ensures incentive maintenance across stages. In contrast, a structure with two prizes may dominate a winner-takes-all co...

  17. Patents, Inducement Prizes, and Contestant Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Jerome; Davis, Lee N.

    2006-01-01

    Debate over the merits of patents versus inducement prizes has tended to ignore the signaling roles of patents, and totally ignores the impact of patent signaling on prize contests. This paper asks: How does patent signaling affect the strategic choices of firms considering entering prize contests......? First, we consider contests that do not allow patenting, then contests that do. If patenting is not allowed, we argue, patent-holders, both internal and external to the contest, can adversely impact prize contests by claiming prize winner violation of their patents, and suing for damages. The likelihood...... of such challenges being made can deter entry, particularly in contests requiring large sunk costs. Furthermore, the firm's decisionmaking process will discriminate against entering prize contests and favor R&D projects with patentable outcomes. Together, these problems may circumscribe any future wider role...

  18. Technology Prizes for Climate Change Mitigation

    OpenAIRE

    Newell, Richard; Wilson, Nathan

    2005-01-01

    We analyze whether technology inducement prizes could be a useful complement to standard research grants and contracts in developing climate change mitigation technologies. We find that there are important conceptual advantages to using inducement prizes in certain circumstances. These conceptual inferences are borne out by an examination of the track record of prizes inducing research into public goods, including relevant energy technologies. However, we also find that the prizes’ successes ...

  19. Full Implementation of Rank Dependent Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Midjord, Rune

    2012-01-01

    A manager/mechanism designer must allocate a set of money prizes ($1, $2, .., $n) between n agents working in a team. The agents know the state i.e. who contributed most, second most, etc. The agents' prefer- ences over prizes are state independent. We incorporate the possibility that the manager knows the state with a tiny probability and present a simple mechanism that uniquely implement prizes that respects the true state.

  20. Characterizing minimal impartial rules for awarding prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Tamura, Shohei

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of choosing prize winners from among a group of experts when each expert nominates another expert for the prize. A nomination rule determines the set of winners on the basis of the profile of nominations; the rule is impartial if one's nomination never influences one's own chance of winning the prize. In this paper, we consider impartial, anonymous, symmetric, and monotonic nomination rules and characterize the set of all minimal such ones. We show that the set consists o...

  1. Patents, Inducement Prizes, and Contestant Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Jerome; Davis, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Debate over the merits of patents versus inducement prizes has tended to ignore the signaling roles of patents, and totally ignores the impact of patent signaling on prize contests. This paper asks: How does patent signaling affect the strategic choices of firms considering entering prize contests? First, we consider contests that do not allow patenting, then contests that do. If patenting is not allowed, we argue, patent-holders, both internal and external to the contest, can adversely impac...

  2. Improbable Research and the Ig Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrahams, Marc

    2008-10-01

    The Ig Nobel Prizes honor achievements that first make people laugh, then make them think. Marc Abrahams, father of the Ig Nobel Prize ceremony and editor of the magazine Annals of Improbable Research, will show us some of the most outstanding Ig Nobel winners. He will also discuss why Ohio has been such a good producer of Ig Nobel Prize winners, and of improbable research.

  3. Full implementation of rank-dependent prizes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midjord, Rune

    2013-01-01

    A manager/mechanism designer must allocate a set of money prizes ($1,$2,…,$n) between n agents working in a team. The agents know the state, i.e., who contributed most, second most, etc. The agents’ preferences over prizes are state independent. We incorporate the possibility that the manager knows...... the state with a tiny probability and present a simple mechanism that uniquely awards prizes that respect the true state....

  4. Tournaments with prize-setting agents

    OpenAIRE

    Eriksen, Kristoffer W; Kvaløy, Ola; Olsen, Trond E.

    2008-01-01

    In many tournaments it is the contestants themselves who determine reward allocation. Labor-union members bargain over wage distribution, and many firms allow self-managed teams to freely determine internal resource allocation, incentive structure, and division of labour. We analyze, and test experimentally, a rank-order tournament where heterogenous agents determine the spread between winner prize and looser prize. We investigate the relationship between prize spread, uncertainty (i.e. noise...

  5. The Allocation of a Prize (Expanded)

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep Dubey; Siddhartha Sah

    2012-01-01

    Consider agents who undertake costly effort to produce stochastic outputs observable by a principal. The principal can award a prize deterministically to the agent with the highest output, or to all of them with probabilities that are proportional to their outputs. We show that, if there is sufficient diversity in agents' skills relative to the noise on output, then the proportional prize will, in a precise sense, elicit more output on average, than the deterministic prize. Indeed, assuming a...

  6. Start-up date announced

    CERN Multimedia

    7th August 2008. CERN has announced that the first attempt to circulate the beam in the LHC will be made on the 10th September. This news comes as the cool down phase of commissioning the accelerator reaches a successful conclusion.The next phase is the synchronization of the LHC with the SPS accelerator, the last link in the LHC’s injector chain. A first synchronization test is scheduled for the 9th August, for the clockwise circulating beam, with the second to follow over the coming weeks.Once stable circulating beams have been established in September they will be brought to collision, and the final step will be to commission the LHC’s acceleration system to boost the energy to 5 TeV, the target energy for 2008.“We’re finishing a marathon with a sprint”, said LHC project leader Lyn Evans. “It’s been a long haul, and we’re all eager to get the LHC research programme underway.”For more information, please see the recent press release at: http://press.web.cern.ch/press/PressReleases/Rele...

  7. Is the Nobel Prize good for science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2013-12-01

    The Nobel Prize is arguably the best known and most prestigious award in science. Here we review the effect of the Nobel Prize and acknowledge that it has had many beneficial effects on science. However, ever since its inaugural year in 1901, the Nobel Prize has also been beset by controversy, mostly involving the selection of certain individuals and the exclusion of others. In this regard, the Nobel Prize epitomizes the winner-takes-all economics of credit allocation and distorts the history of science by personalizing discoveries that are truly made by groups of individuals. The limitation of the prize to only 3 individuals at a time when most scientific discovery is the result of collaborative and cooperative research is arguably the major cause of Nobel Prize controversies. A simple solution to this problem would be to eliminate the restriction on the number of individuals who could be awarded the prize, a measure that would recognize all who contribute, from students to senior investigators. There is precedent for such a change in the Nobel Peace Prize, which has often gone to organizations. Changing the Nobel Prize to more fairly allocate credit would reduce the potential for controversy and directly benefit the scientific enterprise by promoting cooperation and collaboration of scientists within a field to reduce the negative consequences of competition between individual scientists.

  8. IEEE Prize for Lucio Rossi

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Lucio Rossi receives his prize from John Spargo, Chairman of the IEEE Council on Superconductivity (left), and Martin Nisenoff, Chairman of the Council on Superconductivity’s Awards Committee (right). (Photo: IEEE Council on Superconductivity)With the magnets installed in the tunnel and work on the interconnections almost completed, Lucio Rossi has reaped the rewards of fifteen years of work. And yet, when the physicist from Milan arrived to take charge of the group responsible for the superconducting magnets in 2001, success seemed far from assured. Endowed with surprising levels of energy, Lucio Rossi, together with his team, ensured that production of these highly complex magnets got underway. Today, that achievement earns them the recognition not only of CERN but also of the international superconducting community. It is for this achievement that Lucio Rossi was awarded the prize by the IEEE’s (Institute of Electrical an...

  9. Nobel prizes that changed medicine

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    This book brings together in one volume fifteen Nobel Prize-winning discoveries that have had the greatest impact upon medical science and the practice of medicine during the 20th century and up to the present time. Its overall aim is to enlighten, entertain and stimulate. This is especially so for those who are involved in or contemplating a career in medical research. Anyone interested in the particulars of a specific award or Laureate can obtain detailed information on the topic by accessing the Nobel Foundation's website. In contrast, this book aims to provide a less formal and more personal view of the science and scientists involved, by having prominent academics write a chapter each about a Nobel Prize-winning discovery in their own areas of interest and expertise.

  10. JPA Prize in 2 011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The six excellent papers awarded the 2011 JPA Prize were as follows: 1. Hui Liu, Juan Su*, Xu Liang, Xi Zhang, Ya-Jurl He, Hai-Qiang Huang, Ji Ye, Wei-Dong Zhang*. Identification and determination of the major constituents in traditional Chinese medicine Longdan Xiegan Pill by HPLC-DAD- ESI-MS. Journal of Pharmaceutical Analysis, 2 011,1 (1): 1 - 7.

  11. Prize Sharing in Collective Contests

    OpenAIRE

    Nitzan, Shmuel; Ueda, Kaoru

    2010-01-01

    The characteristics of endogenously determined sharing rules and the group-size paradox are studied in a model of group contest with the following features: (i) The prize has mixed private-public good characteristics. (ii) Groups can differ in marginal cost of effort and their membership size. (iii) In each group the members decide how much effort to put without observing the sharing rules of the other groups. It is shown that endogenous determination of group sharing rules completely elimina...

  12. Landau's Nobel Prize in Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsson, M.; Balatsky, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Work of Lev Landau had a profound impact on the physics in 20th century. Landau had created the paradigms that had framed the conversations on the outstanding problems in physics for decades. He had laid foundations for our understanding of quantum matter like superfluidity, superconductivity and the theory of Fermi liquid. Here we present some Nobel Archive data on the winning nomination that led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1962.

  13. Landau's Nobel Prize in Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Larsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Work of Lev Landau had a profound impact on the physics in 20th century. Landau had created the paradigms that had framed the conversations on the outstanding problems in physics for decades. He has laid the foundations for our understanding of quantum matter such as superfluidity, superconductivity and the theory of Fermi Liquid. Here we present sampled Nobel Archive data on the winning nomination that led to the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1962.

  14. Nanoscopy—imaging life at the nanoscale: a Nobel Prize achievement with a bright future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Hans; Bates, Mark

    2015-10-01

    A grand scientific prize was awarded last year to three pioneering scientists, for their discovery and development of molecular ‘ON-OFF’ switching which, when combined with optical imaging, can be used to see the previously invisible with light microscopy. The Royal Swedish Academy of Science announced on October 8th their decision and explained that this achievement—rooted in physics and applied in biology and medicine—was awarded with the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for controlling fluorescent molecules to create images of specimens smaller than anything previously observed with light. The story of how this noble switch in optical microscopy was achieved and how it was engineered to visualize life at the nanoscale is highlighted in this invited comment.

  15. Prizes versus Wages with Envy and Pride

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep K. Dubey; John Geanakoplos; Ori Haimanko

    2005-01-01

    We show that if agents are risk neutral, prizes outperform wages if and only if there is sufficient pride and envy relative to the noisiness of performance. If agents are risk averse, prizes are a necessary supplement to wages (as bonuses).

  16. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006  prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  17. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    Lennart Carleson is the recipient of the 2006 Abel Prize of the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters. On May 22, 2006, prior to the Abel Prize celebration i Oslo, Carleson was interviewed by Martin Raussen of Aalborg University and Christian Skau of the Norwegian University of Science...

  18. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  19. Innovation Inducement Prizes: Connecting Research to Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharov, Douglas J.; Williams, Heidi

    2012-01-01

    Innovation inducement prizes have been used for centuries. In the United States, a recent federal policy change--the America COMPETES Reauthorization Act of 2010--clarified and simplified a path by which all federal agencies can offer innovation inducement prizes, thus intensifying interest in how government agencies can most effectively design…

  20. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Lennart Carleson

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2006-01-01

    The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV.......The interview was conducted in Oslo on May 22nd 2006 prior to the Abel prize celebration and was later shown on Norwegian TV....

  1. MIT professor wins major international math prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Allen, S

    2004-01-01

    Mathematicians Isadore Singer of MIT and Sir Michael Francis Atiyah of the University of Edinburgh will share an $875,000 award as winners of the second Abel Prize, which some hope will come to be seen as a Nobel Prize for math.

  2. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  3. Slovak National Prize for Quality 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Competition for the Slovak National Prize for Quality is a milestone in the history of the Mochovce NPP. The Mochovce NPP won the prize in 2004. The article describes in detail the preparatory efforts including not only technological issues but also various administrative challenges. The impacts of this achievement on the plant's subsequent development are also highlighted. (orig.)

  4. Ginzburg deserved Nobel prize 50 years back

    CERN Multimedia

    Golovchansky, V

    2003-01-01

    "Vitali Ginzburg deserved a Nobel prize fifty years back, Leonid Keldysh, academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences, who was Ginzburg's disciple, told Tass. "The Ginzburg-Landau phenomenal theory of superconductivity deserved a Nobel prize right upon being produced. It was a work of intransient importance" (1/2 page).

  5. Processing Trade Banned Commodities announced

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ The new catalogue of processing trade-banned commodities was announced recently. The announcement was executed since November 22 of 2006. The Catalogue will be adjusted according to related policies of the state.

  6. CAS announces new academicians

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Twenty-nine prominent Chinese scientists have been elected as CAS Members and five of their colleagues from US, France and Russia as CAS Foreign Members in 2007. The announcement was made by CAS Vice President LI Jinghai at a press conference held on 27 December, 2007 in Beijing. CAS President LU Yongxiang was present at the meeting.

  7. The Nobel Prize Laureates, 2003

    OpenAIRE

    Luboš Komárek

    2004-01-01

    The article summarizes the main points discussed at the seminar on The Nobel Prize Laureates, 2003, held by the Czech Economic Association in March 2004. The seminar featured two main speakers: Josef Arlt (University of Economics, Prague, and Charles University, Prague), who lectured on the work of Clive Granger; and Miloslav Vošvrda (Charles University and UTI A Prague), who summarized the main ideas of the work of Nobel laureate Robert Engle. Both of the papers are available on the Czech Ec...

  8. Prizes, Patents, and Technology Procurement: A Proposed Analytical Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Brennan, Timothy J.; Macauley, Molly; Whitefoot, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Policy and entrepreneurial communities are increasingly promoting innovation by using prizes but their distinguishing features remain inadequately understood. Models of patents treat winning a patent as winning a prize; other models distinguish prizes primarily as public lump-sum (re)purchase of a patent. We examine advantages of prizes based on the ability to customize rewards, manage competition, generate publicity, and cover achievements otherwise not patentable. We compare prizes to paten...

  9. Why the Olympics have three prizes and not just one

    OpenAIRE

    Pavlo Blavatskyy

    2004-01-01

    There are at least two reasons why multiple prizes can be optimal in symmetric imperfectly discriminating contests. First, the introduction of multiple prizes reduces the standard deviation of contestants� effort in asymmetric equilibria, when the majority of contestants actively participate in competition. Second, the introduction of multiple prizes may increase the aggregate (average) effort contributed in the contest. When more of a total prize fund is shifted away from the first prize, ...

  10. CERNois wins prestigious accelerator award

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    During the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference, CERN’s Rogelio Tomás García became the first Spaniard to receive the Frank Sacherer Prize for his work in particle beam optics.   Rogelio Tomás García at the 2nd International Particle Accelerator Conference. The Frank Sacherer Prize is awarded to physicists who have made a “significant, original contribution to the accelerator field" early on in their career. This year the prize was given to Rogelio Tomás García who, at only 35 years of age, has made important contributions to the optics design, optics measurement, and correction techniques applied at both the LHC and Brookhaven’s RHIC. “Tomás has had a vital impact on CERN’s beam optics studies and has made very impressive achievements in the field of beam optics,” says Oliver Brüning, Head of the Accelerators and Beam Physics...

  11. The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ault, Addison

    2002-05-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded shares of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the year 2001 to three scientists for their development of methods for the efficient catalytic production of just one member of a pair of enantiomers. One-half of the prize was divided equally between William S. Knowles and Ryoji Noyori. The other half of the prize was awarded to K. Barry Sharpless. This paper briefly discusses their discoveries and the significance of the discoveries. It includes an annotated bibliography of their most relevant and easily obtained publications.

  12. Accelerated Innovation Pilot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey

    2012-01-01

    Opportunities: I. Engage NASA team (examples) a) Research and technology calls . provide suggestions to AES, HRP, OCT. b) Use NASA@Work to solicit other ideas; (possibly before R+D calls). II. Stimulate collaboration (examples) a) NHHPC. b) Wharton Mack Center for Technological Innovation (Feb 2013). c) International ] DLR ] :envihab (July 2013). d) Accelerated research models . NSF, Myelin Repair Foundation. III. Engage public Prizes (open platform: InnoCentive, yet2.com, NTL; Rice Business Plan, etc.) IV. Use same methods to engage STEM.

  13. Strong-force theorists scoop Noble Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Durrani, Matin

    2004-01-01

    Three US theorists have shared the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics "for the discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of the strong interaction". Their theoretical work explains why quarks behave almost as free particles at high energies (½ page)

  14. Nobel Prize in Chemistry: Celebrating optical nanoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orrit, Michel

    2014-12-01

    The award of this year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry to the pioneers of various optical schemes capable of achieving super-resolution and single-molecule detection is recognition of a revolution in optical imaging.

  15. Fifth annual Milka Bliznakov Research Prizes awarded

    OpenAIRE

    Chadwick, Heather Riley

    2006-01-01

    The International Archive of Women in Architecture (IAWA), a center of Virginia Tech's College of Architecture and Urban Studies, has awarded an unprecedented three first-place Milka Bliznakov Research Prizes due to the exceptional level of the projects submitted.

  16. Nobel Prize 2014: Akasaki, Amano & Nakamura

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heber, Joerg

    2014-11-01

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano and Shuji Nakamura "for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources."

  17. Big Fish and Prized Trees Gain Protection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fred Pearce; 吴敏

    2004-01-01

    @@ Decisions made at a key conservation① meeting are good news for big and quirky② fish and commercially prized trees. Several species will enjoy extra protection against trade following rulings made at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

  18. CAS Scientist Receives Trieste Science Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ RAO Zihe, director of the CAS Institute of Biophysics and CAS Member, has been awarded the 2006Trieste Science Prize for "his worldclass contributions to structural biology and his studies of viruses responsible for human diseases."

  19. CAS physicist receives Richard Geller Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ Dr. SUN Liangting from the CAS Institute of Modern Physics has been awarded the Richard Geller Prize for his outstanding contributions to the development of Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources, especially an all-permanent magnetic one.

  20. Templeton Prize again goes to physicist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeandron, Michelle

    2008-04-01

    The Polish mathematical physicist and former priest Michael Heller has been awarded this year's Templeton Prize. Heller, whose more than 40-year-long career has encompassed research in theology, philosophy, mathematics and cosmology, intends to use the £820 000 prize to found an interuniversity institute in Poland to investigate questions in science, theology and philosophy. Dubbed the "Copernicus Centre", the institute will be affiliated to the Jagiellonian University and the Pontifical Academy of Theology in Cracow.

  1. Who will win the Nobel Prize?

    OpenAIRE

    Terence tai-leung Chong; Cally Choi; Benjamin Everard

    2009-01-01

    This paper identifies the determinants of the Nobel Prize Award. The analysis is analogous in spirit to Hamermesh and Schmidt (Econometrica, 2003) on the election of Econometric Society fellows. It is found that the number of citations, age and nationality have significant impacts on the odds of winning the Nobel. We provide the first statistical evidence that John Bates Clark medalists and individuals affiliated with the University of Chicago have a higher chance of winning the Prize.

  2. The Nobel Prize in Physics 1999

    OpenAIRE

    Godbole, RM

    2000-01-01

    The last Nobel Prize of the Millenium in Physics has been awarded jointly to Professor Gerardus 't Hooft of the University of Utrecht in Holland and his thesis advisor Professor Emeritus Martinus J.G. Veltman of Holland. According to the Academy's citation, the Nobel Prize has been awarded for 'elucidating the quantum structure of electroweak interaction in Physics'. It further goes on to say that they have placed particle physics theory on a firmer mathematical foundation. In this short note...

  3. Interview with Abel Prize recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2007-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  4. Interview with Abel Prize Recipient Srinivasa Varadhan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raussen, Martin; Skau, Christian

    2008-01-01

    His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony.......His Majesty King Harald presented the Abel Prize for 2007 to Srinivasa Varadhan at an award ceremony in the University Aula in Oslo on the 22nd May, 2007. The interview was conducted the day before the ceremony....

  5. Dannie Heineman Prize for CERN theorist

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN's Gabriele Veneziano, is the recipient of the Dannie Heineman Prize for Mathematical Physics 2004, which he receives "for his pioneering discoveries in dual resonance models which, partly through his own efforts, have developed into string theory and a basis for the quantum theory of gravity". The prize was established in 1959 by the Heineman Foundation for Research, Educational, Charitable, and Scientific Purposes, and is administered jointly by the American Physical Society and the American Institute of Physics.

  6. Science Underlying 2008 Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Bernadette A.

    2009-01-01

    JCE offers a wealth of materials for teaching and learning chemistry that you can explore online. In the list below, Bernadette Caldwell of the Editorial Staff suggests additional resources that are available through JCE for teaching the science behind some of the 2008 Nobel Prizes . Discovering and Applying the Chemistry of GFP The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein, GFP to three scientists: Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie, and Roger Y. Tsien. These scientists led the field in discovering and introducing a fluorescing protein from jellyfish into cells and genes under study, which allows researchers to witness biochemistry in action. Now tags are available that emit light in different colors, revealing myriad biological processes and their interactions simultaneously. Identifying HPV and HIV, HIV's Replication Cycle, and HIV Virus-Host Interactions The Nobel Assembly at Karolinska Institutet awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology for their discovery of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) to two scientists: Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier; and for his discovery of human papilloma viruses [HPV] causing cervical cancer to one scientist, Harald zur Hausen. Diseases caused by these infectious agents significantly affect global health. While isolating and studying the virus, researchers discovered HIV is an uncommon retrovirus that infects humans and relies on the host to make its viral DNA, infecting and killing the host's white blood cells, ultimately destroying the immune systems of infected humans. Related Resources at JCE Online The Journal has published articles relating to GFP specifically, and more generally to fluorescing compounds applied to biochemistry. The Journal has also published an article and a video on protease inhibition—a strategy to suppress HIV's biological processes. With the video clips, an accompanying guide

  7. Fullerene discoverers win nobel prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rotman, D.

    1996-10-16

    Two Rice University (Houston) chemists, Robert F. Curl and Richard E. Smalley, and a scientist at the University of Sussex (Brighton, U.K.), Harold W. Kroto, have won the 1996 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the joint discovery of buckminsterfullerenes - soccer ball-shaped carbon molecules. The novel form of carbon, which was initially synthesized by the scientists in 1985 as C{sub 60} and C{sub 70} has led to the development of {open_quotes}an entirely new branch of chemistry... with consequences in such diverse areas as astrochemistry, superconductivity, and material chemistry/physics,{close_quotes} according to the Swedish Academy of Sciences (Stockholm). For chemists, the structure is {open_quotes}uniquely beautiful and satisfying,{close_quotes} the academy says.

  8. All-pay auctions with certain and uncertain prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Minchuk, Yizhaq; Sela, Aner

    2014-01-01

    We study all-pay auctions with multiple prizes. The players have the same value for all the certain prizes except for one uncertain prize for which each player has a private value. We characterize the equilibrium strategy and show that if the number of prizes is smaller than the number of players, independent of the ranking of the uncertain prize, a player's probability to win as well as his expected utility increases in his value for this prize. We demonstrate that a stochastic dominance rel...

  9. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character. PMID:27256150

  10. [Surgeons and Neurosurgeons as Nobel Prize Winners].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrastina, Jan; Jančálek, Radim; Hrabovský, Dušan; Novák, Zdeněk

    2016-01-01

    Since 1901 Nobel Prize is awarded for exceptional achievements in physics, chemistry, literature, peace, economy (since 1968) and medicine or physiology. The first aim of the paper is to provide an overview of surgeons - winners of Nobel Prize for medicine or physiology. Although the prominent neurosurgeons were frequently nominated as Nobel Prize candidates, surprisingly no neurosurgeon received this prestigious award so far despite that the results of their research transgressed the relatively narrow limits of neurosurgical speciality.The most prominent leaders in the field of neurosurgery, such as Victor Horsley, Otfrid Foerster, Walter Dandy and Harvey Cushing are discussed from the point of their nominations. The overview of the activity of the Portuguese neurologists and Nobel Prize Winter in 1949 Egas Moniz (occasionally erroneously reported as neurosurgeon) is also provided. Although his work on brain angiography has fundamentally changed the diagnostic possibilities in neurology and neurosurgery, he was eventually awarded Nobel Prize for the introduction of the currently outdated frontal lobotomy.The fact that none of the above mentioned prominent neurosurgeons has not been recognised by Nobel Prize, may be attributed to the fact that their extensive work cannot be captured in a short summary pinpointing its groundbreaking character.

  11. The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry: a large-scale prize for achievements on the nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, Daniel

    2014-12-17

    The 2014 Nobel Prize in Chemistry awarded to Eric Betzig, Stefan W. Hell, and William E. Moerner "for the development of superresolved fluorescence microscopy" can be seen as a combined prize for single-molecule detection and superresolution imaging. Neurons, arguably the most morphologically complex cell type, are the subject of choice for this application, now generically called "nanoscopy."

  12. The failed attribution of the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology to Viktor Hamburger for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    The announcement in October 1986 that the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was to awarded to Rita Levi Montalcini and Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor, respectively, caused many to wonder why Viktor Hamburger in whose laboratory the initial work was done had not been included in the award. This article try to reconstruct the history of the discovery of NGF with the aim to re-establish a correct dynamic of the events.

  13. Mega-prizes in medicine: big cash awards may stimulate useful and rapid therapeutic innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton, Bruce G

    2007-01-01

    Following Horrobin's suggestion of 1986, I argue that offering very large prizes (tens of millions of US dollars, or more) for solving specific therapeutic problems, would be an excellent strategy for promoting the rapid development of effective new treatments. The two mainstream ways of paying for medical research are funding the process with grants or funding the outcome via patent protection. When grants are used to fund the process of research the result tends to be 'pure' science, guided by intrinsic scientific objectives. Practical results, such as useful therapeutic advances, are a by-product. Patent-seeking research, by contrast, is more focused on technology than science. It seeks practical results; and aims to pay for itself (and make a profit) in the long term by generating a patentable product or procedure. Prize-seeking research is subject to different incentives and applicable to different situations than either process-funded or patent-seeking research. Prize seeking researchers have a strong incentive to solve the specified problem as rapidly as possible, but the problem may be solved using old ideas that are scientifically mundane or unpatentable technologies and methods. Prizes therefore seem to generate solutions which are incremental extensions, new applications or novel combinations of already-existing technologies. The main use of mega-prizes in medicine would be to accelerate therapeutic progress in stagnant fields of research and to address urgent problems. For example, medical charities focused on specific diseases should consider accumulating their resources until they can offer a mega-prize for solving a clinical problem of special concern to their patients. Prize money should be big enough to pay for the research and development, the evaluation of the new treatment in a clinical trial, and with a large profit left-over to compensate for the intrinsic risk of competing. Sufficiently large amounts of money, and the prestige and publicity

  14. The Change Announcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broillet, Alexandra; Barchilon, Marian; Kampf, Constance Elizabeth

    Shifting the focus in Change Management as a Field from the best way to send messages to the experience and understanding of the receivers offers a new direction that goes beyond a Management-centric perspective on Change Management Communication. To do this, we examine 61 interviews with employees...... experiencing change about a key communication aspect in Change Management, the Change announcement. These interviews were gathered by professional students as part of the Change Management Course in the MBA program. We use patterns of change communication discussed in the interviews to offer a basis...... for a broader perspective on experiencing change, which includes interaction between the Change Managers and employees in the organization....

  15. Geometric integration for particle accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a very personal view of the field of geometric integration in accelerator physics-a field where often work of the highest quality is buried in lost technical notes or even not published; one has only to think of Simon van der Meer Nobel prize work on stochastic cooling-unpublished in any refereed journal. So I reconstructed the relevant history of geometrical integration in accelerator physics as much as I could by talking to collaborators and using my own understanding of the field. The reader should not be too surprised if this account is somewhere between history, science and perhaps even fiction

  16. First and Second Prizes in Imperfectly Discriminating Contests

    OpenAIRE

    Szymanski, Stefan; Valletti, Tommaso

    2004-01-01

    Most of the contest literature deals with first prizes; this Paper deals with the optimality of second prizes. We show that in a three-person contest where one contestant is very strong a second prize can be optimal from the point of view of eliciting maximum effort from every contestant. Moreover, we consider the desirability of second prizes from the point of view of competitive balance, which matters for contests such as sports competitions.

  17. The Stability of Dynamic Contests with Asymmetric and Endogenous Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Frederik Schmidt

    2008-01-01

    The paper develops a simple theoretical framework for analyzing repeated contests. At each stage of the infinitely repeated game, a Tullock contest is played by two players. We consider local stability of the Nash equilibrium with respect to adjustment speed and the level of the prize. The model is extended to an asymmetric valuation of the prize and to the case with an endogenous prize, where the level of the prize is influenced by the investments of the players.

  18. The State Prize for 1991 Science and Technology Advance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LINantion; FENGYilun

    1992-01-01

    According to the report in Science and Technology Daily on 10 July 1991, prize winners for the State Prize for 1991 Science and Technology Advance in China have been selected by the Evaluation Committee of the State Prize for 1991 Science and Technology Advance. Among the prizes, eight programs were concerned with rice research: Pathogenetic Types of Rice Bacterial Leaf Blight in China and the Application in Disease-resistant Breeding, by FANG Zhongda,

  19. Market liquidity around earnings announcements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pronk, M.

    2002-01-01

    Prior literature indicates that bid-ask spreads are higher and depths are lower around earnings announcements than during non-announcement periods. This thesis investigates two important aspects of this drop in market liquidity, namely (a) the ability of management to mitigate the drop in market liq

  20. CERN's LHC is awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize

    CERN Document Server

    CERN Bulletin

    2012-01-01

    The European Physical Society (EPS), the Centro di Cultura Scientifica “Alessandro Volta” and Edison S.p.A. have awarded the 2012 EPS Edison Volta Prize for outstanding contributions to physics to three CERN physicists.   The award was given to: • Rolf-Dieter Heuer, CERN Director-General, • Sergio Bertolucci, CERN Director for Research and Computing, • Stephen Myers, CERN Director for Accelerators and Technology, for having led - building on decades of dedicated work by their predecessors - the culminating efforts in the direction, research and operation of the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), which resulted in many significant advances in high energy particle physics, in particular, the first evidence of a Higgs-like boson in July 2012. To learn more, check out e-EPS News.

  1. CAS Scientist Awarded Tyler Prize for Environment Achievement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Haiyan; Zhao Baohua

    2002-01-01

    @@ Prof. Liu Dongsheng (Tungsheng Liu), a CAS member and professor at CAS Institute of Geology and Geophysics, has been awarded the 2002 Tyler Prize for Environment Achievement. He shared a cash prize of $200,000 with the other laureate, Dr. Wallace S. Broecker from Columbia University, the US, and received a gold Tyler Prize medallion on April 12.

  2. CNPC Wins "World Oil Prize" for First Time

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Wei

    2006-01-01

    @@ The 2006 winners of "World Oil Prize" in 2006 were released on October 19. "Flue-gas Injection EOR"technology from Liaohe Oil Field of China National Petroleum Corporation (CNPC) was selected for the best recovery prize. This is the first time CNPC has won this kind of prize, marking its production technology inparallel with that of the big-name oil companies.

  3. Stephen Hawking bags big new 3m physics prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2013-01-01

    A massive 3m in prize money has gone to the British cosmologist Stephen Hawking for his work on black holes, quantum gravity and the early universe. The award is one of two "special fundamental physics prizes" from the Fundamental Physics Prize Foundation, which was set up earlier this year by the Russian physicist-turned-entrepreneur Yuri Milner.

  4. Nobel prize winners from Siemens company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the history of discoveries and scientists which worked in the Siemens company. First Nobel prize winners from Siemens company was Gustav Ludwig Hertz from Hamburg. In his doctoral dissertation he deals with the study of collisions of electrons with molecules of gases. In the physics this experiment is known as 'Franc and Hertz experiment', which confirmed state of energy in Bohr theory and in 1925 he obtained Nobel prize. In 1945, as a director of the Department of physics in the research laboratories of Siemens, he constructed cyclotron kernel - magnet with mass of 80 tonnes. The second Nobel prize winner was Dennis Gabor worked in the Laboratory for measurement and medicinal technology in Siemensstadt (Berlin). When he tried to increase the resolution of electron microscopy he discovered the holography (method of 3-dimensional imaging). In 1971 he obtained the Nobel prize. The third scientist - Ernst Ruska discovered electron microscope. At Siemens, he was involved in developing the first commercially-produced electron microscope in 1939. In 1986, Ernst Ruska was awarded half of the Nobel Prize in Physics for his many achievements in electron optics.

  5. Nobel Prize for blue LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of lighting technologies is presented. Unavoidable restrictions for incandescent light bulbs caused by the Planck distribution and properties of the human eye are illustrated. The efficiency and luminous efficacy of thermal radiation are calculated for various temperatures; the results clearly show the limitations for thermal radiators. The only way to overcome these limitations is using non-thermal radiators, such as fluorescent lamps and light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Unique advantages of LEDs undoubtedly made a revolution in this field. A crucial element of this progress is the blue LEDs (Nobel Prize 2014). Some experiments with a blue and a green LED are described: (i) the luminescence triggered in a green-yellow phosphor inside a white LED by the blue LED; (ii) radiant spectra and ‘efficiency droop’ in the LEDs; (iii) modulation of the blue LED up to 4 MHz; and (iv) the h/e ratio from the turn-on voltage of the green LED. The experiments are suitable for undergraduate laboratories and usable as classroom demonstrations.

  6. Eugene Paul Wigner's Nobel Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Y S

    2016-01-01

    In 1963, Eugene Paul Wigner was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his contributions to the theory of the atomic nucleus and the elementary particles, particularly through the discovery and application of fundamental symmetry principles. There are no disputes about this statement. On the other hand, there still is a question of why the statement did not mention Wigner's 1939 paper on the Lorentz group, which was regarded by Wigner and many others as his most important contribution in physics. By many physicists, this paper was regarded as a mathematical exposition having nothing to do with physics. However, it has been more than one half century since 1963, and it is of interest to see what progress has been made toward understanding physical implications of this paper and its historical role in physics. Wigner in his 1963 paper defined the subgroups of the Lorentz group whose transformations do not change the four-momentum of a given particle, and he called them the little groups. Thus, Wigner's little g...

  7. James P. Allison received the 2014 Szent-Györgi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Zhao,Peter Scully; Sujuan Ba

    2014-01-01

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientific award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)-a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting innovative cancer research on the global scale that aims to cure cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher whose original discoveries have expanded our understanding of cancer and resulted in notable advances in cancer prevention, diagnosis, or treatment. The prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the history and mission of the Szent-Györgyi Prize, its role in promoting discovery-oriented cancer research, and the pioneering work led by the 2014 prize winner, Dr. James Alison. Dr. Alison’s work in the area of cancer immunotherapy led to the successful development of immune checkpoint therapy, and the first drug approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of metastatic melanoma.

  8. Declaration and Announcement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Declaration To meet the needs of the national information development and widen the academic exchange channel of the authors, we declare that the journal, PEDOSPHERF,, has joined the databases of Chinese Academic Journal (CD), China Journal Net, and Chinainfo Digital Periodicals. If an author does not agree to include his article in the databases,please make a declaration at the time of contribution. Announcement Since the year 2001, the domestic distributor of PEDOSPHERE will change to the Beijing Bureau for Distribution of Newspapers and Journals, China. The domestic post office distribution No. of PEDOSPHERE is 2-576. For domestic subscribers to PEDOSPHERE,please send your orders to the local post offices in China.

  9. Quark Forces Attract Nobel Prize in Physics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jenny Hogan; 滕晓燕

    2004-01-01

    @@ The force that holds together the tiniest particles① of matter has pulled in the Nobel Prize in Physics for the three US physicists who unraveled② its workings. David Gross, David Politzer and Frank Wilczek have each been awarded a third of the 2004 prize for explaining how quarks-sub-atomic③particles which make up the protons④ and neutrons⑤ in the nuclei⑥ of atomsstick together. Protons and neutrons consist of three quarks each, and there are six different types of quarks, such as "up" and "down" quarks. The trio⑦ of scientists were awarded the $1.3 million prize for work explaining the so-called "strong" or "color" force prevalent⑧ in the atomic nucleus. The strong force is one of the fundamental forces of nature, and their breakthrough "brought physics one step closer to fulfilling a grand dream... A theory for everything" according to the Royal Swedish.

  10. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    On Wednesday, 3 September, four ALICE physicists were presented with the European Physical Society's 2014 Lise Meitner Prize for their outstanding contributions to nuclear physics (see here).   ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented with their awards at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation. In addition to members of the ALICE collaboration, the ceremony was attended by members of the CERN Management including the Director-General, Rolf Heuer, as well as the EPS Nuclear Physics Board Chair, Douglas MacGregor, and the EPS Lise Meitner Prize Committee Chair, Victor Zamfir. For more information, please see "EPS honours CERN's heavy-ion researchers".  From left to right: Douglas MacGregor (EPS); Prize recipients Jürgen Schukraft,&a...

  11. Allocation of Prizes in Asymmetric All-Pay Auctions

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Chen; Sela, Aner

    2005-01-01

    We study asymmetric all-pay auctions with multiple objects where players’ values for the objects are common knowledge. The players have different values for the objects but they have the same ranking. The contest designer may award one prize including all the objects to the player with the highest bid, or, alternatively, they may allocate several prizes, each prize including one object such that the first prize is awarded to the player with the highest bid, the second prize to the player with...

  12. The Nobel Memorial Prize Laureats 2002

    OpenAIRE

    Luboš Komárek

    2003-01-01

    The article summarizes the main points discussed at the seminar on The Nobel Memorial Prize Laureates 2002, held by the Czech Economic Association (CEA) in March 2002. There were two main speakers at the seminar: The first was Michal Skoøepa (Czech National Bank and Charles University), who presented a lecture on the work of 2002 Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Science co-winner Daniel Kahneman, and the second speaker was Ondøej Rydval (CERGE-EI), who summarized the main ideas of the work of...

  13. Two Nobel Prize winners in two days

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Living legend of physics, Professor Chen Ning Yang, delivered his CERN Colloquium in the Main Auditorium on 12th October (see photo). His numerous contributions to physics include the famous Yang-Mills theory, which underlies the Standard Model of particle physics, and the prediction of parity violation in weak interactions, for which he shared the Nobel prize with T. D. Lee in 1957. The day before, another Nobel laureate, Norman Ramsey, gave a TH Exceptional Seminar in the same auditorium. Ramsey shared the Nobel Prize with Hans G. Dehmelt and Wolfgang Paul in 1989 for developments in atomic precision spectroscopy.

  14. And the Journey Prize goes to ---

    OpenAIRE

    Mohar, Tjaša

    2015-01-01

    Kratka zgodba je priljubljena literarna zvrst v Kanadi. Njeni začetki segajo v prvo polovico 19. stoletja. Danes k njeni razširjenosti pripomorejo številne literarne revije in natečaji, ki spodbujajo mlade obetajoče pisatelje. Eden takšnih natečajev je natečaj za nagrado Journey Prize, ki jo podeljujejo od leta 1989. Založniška hiša McClelland & Stewart vsako leto izda antologijo kratkih zgodb Journey Prize Stories, med katerimi je najboljša nagrajena. Članek ponuja vpogled v kratke zgodbe, k...

  15. Row bubbles up over particle prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Chalmers, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    "The European Physical Society (EPS) has defended its handling of the 2009 prize for high-energy and particle physics despite complaints that the awarding committee overlooked a vital scientific contribution to the prize-winning work. The biennial award, worth SwFr 5000, was given to collaborators on the Gargamelle bubble-chamber experiment at Cern for their descovery in 1973 of the "weak neutral current" - one of the ways in which the weak nuclear force is mediated between fundamental particles" (0.75 page)

  16. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Supplementary Materials The number of supplementary materials that accompany print articles has grown and also become more varied. The new guidelines for lab experiments call for supplementary materials in most cases, so that the actual materials used in lab can be made available. The From Past Issues column edited by Kathryn Williams and many of the technology columns frequently have supplements for JCE Online. An especially interesting supplement that we would like to call to the attention of readers is a collection of videos from the E. O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, based on interviews with nuclear chemists who have discovered and studied the heaviest elements. These movies accompany the Viewpoints article, "Chemistry of the Heaviest Elements-One Atom at a Time" by Darleane C. Hoffman and Diana M. Lee. The titles of the movies are listed below; illustrative stills are shown at the bottom of the page. Researchers involved with the segments about Lawrencium include Robert Silva, Torbjorn Sikkeland, Matti Nurmia, Robert Latimer, and Albert Ghiorso, all of whom are from the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. (QuickTime 3 is needed in order to view the videos; it can be downloaded free from http://www.apple.com.) A Brief Note about Plutonium, by Glenn Seaborg Plutonium and Why It Was Kept a Secret The Prediction of the Actinide Series, by Glenn Seaborg First Chemical Separation of Lawrencium at Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in 1970 The HILAC or Heavy-Ion Linear Accelerator Discovery of Lawrencium How To Collect Lawrencium Atoms The Discovery of Element 106-Finally The Naming of Element 106 The Limits of Discovering the Heavy Elements What Good Is a Heavy Element? To see these videos, view the Supplements of http://JChemEd.chem.wisc.edu/Journal/Issues/1999/Mar/abs331.html. People: Glenn Seaborg Glenn Seaborg, frequent contributor and faithful supporter of this Journal, died February 25, 1999, at his home in Lafayette, California, at the age of 86. At the Fall

  17. An Operational Event Announcer for the LHC Control Centre Using Speech Synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Page, S

    2011-01-01

    The LHC Island of the CERN Control Centre is a busy working environment with many status displays and running software applications. An audible event announcer was developed in order to provide a simple and efficient method to notify the operations team of events occurring within the many subsystems of the accelerator. The LHC Announcer uses speech synthesis to report messages based upon data received from multiple sources. General accelerator information such as injections, beam energies and beam dumps are derived from data received from the LHC Timing System. Additionally, a software interface is provided that allows other surveillance processes to send messages to the Announcer using the standard control system middleware. Events are divided into categories which the user can enable or disable depending upon their interest. Use of the LHC Announcer is not limited to the Control Centre and is intended to be available to a wide audience, both inside and outside CERN. To accommodate this, it...

  18. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wall, E E

    2016-05-01

    At the annual 2016 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original articles published in the year 2015, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:27040677

  19. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, E E van der; Umans, V A W M

    2015-06-01

    At the annual 2015 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2014, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This has been an annual tradition since the year 2006. PMID:25894471

  20. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  1. NVVC/NHJ Durrer Prizes 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, E.E. van der; Schalij, M J; Umans, V.A.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of the best original/review articles published in the year 2012, one paper being more basically-oriented and one paper being more clinically-oriented. This annual tradition exists already since the year 2006.

  2. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, E.E. van der

    2016-01-01

    At the annual 2016 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original articles published in the year 2015, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006.

  3. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, E.E. van der; Umans, V.A.W.M.

    2015-01-01

    At the annual 2015 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2014, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This has been an annual tradition since the year 2006.

  4. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, E.E. van der; Umans, V.A.W.M.

    2014-01-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2013, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006.

  5. Nobel Prize 2013: Englert and Higgs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alison

    2013-11-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physics 2013 has been awarded to François Englert and Peter Higgs "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider".

  6. LI Ligang honored with Doornbos prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Together with two colleagues from Europe and US,Dr.LI Ligang from the CAS Shanghai Astronomical Observatory has been awarded the Doornbos Memorial Prize for his outstanding contributions to the studies of thermal convection inside the earth and a planet,dynamo theory,and simulation.

  7. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wall, E E; Umans, V A W M

    2014-05-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2013, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006.

  8. ALICE physicists receive 2014 Lise Meitner Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Jeanneret, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    September 3rd, 2014: ALICE collaboration members Johanna Stachel (Heidelberg University, Germany), Peter Braun-Munzinger (GSI, Germany), Paolo Giubellino (INFN Turin, Italy, and CERN) and Jürgen Schukraft (CERN) were presented the 2014 Lise Meitner Prize at a private ceremony held in the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  9. NVVC/NHJ Durrer Prizes 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wall, E E; Schalij, M J; Umans, V A W M

    2013-06-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of the best original/review articles published in the year 2012, one paper being more basically-oriented and one paper being more clinically-oriented. This annual tradition exists already since the year 2006.

  10. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, E E van der; Umans, V A W M

    2015-06-01

    At the annual 2015 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2014, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This has been an annual tradition since the year 2006.

  11. LIU Chuang receives 2008 CODATA Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    @@ To acknowledge her outstanding achievements in the world of scientific and technical data,Prof. LIU Chuang with the CAS Institute of Geographical Sciences and Natural Resources Research has been elected by the Committee on Data for Science and Technology (CODATA) to win the 2008 CODATA Prize.

  12. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wall, E E

    2016-05-01

    At the annual 2016 Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original articles published in the year 2015, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006.

  13. Venture Leaders Prize for innovative technology projects

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    In co-operation with the GEBERT RÜF FOUNDATION and the Ernest & Young Entrepreneur of the Year Award, venturelab will be presenting the Venture Leaders Prize. The Venture Leaders Prize, which is the new guise of the NETS (New Entrepreneurs in Technology and Science) Prize, will give twenty research entrepreneurs with projects to develop innovative technologies the opportunity to win the chance of participating in a programme to assist them in starting up their companies. The winners will go to spend 10 days in the Boston area (United States) where they will take part in a development programme for their project, which will include an entrepreneurship course, opportunities to meet start-up companies and financing experts, etc. This prize has already spawned many companies such as id Quantique, Selexis or ABMI which have contributed to the economic development of regions, particularly in French-speaking Switzerland. The competition is open to students and scientists from all fields, who would like to s...

  14. Prof. Pan Jianwei Honored with Fresnel Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ Prof. Pan Jianwei (J. W. Pan),a physicist of the CAS-affiliated University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), has received the 2005 Fresnel Prize of the European Physical Society. The awarding ceremony was held on June 14 at the European Conference on Lasers and Electro-Optics in Munich.

  15. Research group honored with Qiu Shi Prize

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A research team, headed by CHEN Chuangtian from the CAS Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, XU Zuyan from the CAS Institute of Physics, and JIANG Minhua from Shandong University, has received the Qiu Shi Prize for Outstanding Science & Technology Team Achievement in 2007.

  16. NVVC/NHJ Durrer Prizes 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wall, E E; Schalij, M J; Umans, V A W M

    2013-06-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of the best original/review articles published in the year 2012, one paper being more basically-oriented and one paper being more clinically-oriented. This annual tradition exists already since the year 2006. PMID:23579987

  17. NVVC/NHJ Durrer prizes 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wall, E E; Umans, V A W M

    2014-05-01

    At the annual Spring Congress of the NVVC, the Durrer prizes were awarded to the authors of two of the best original/review articles published in the year 2013, one paper being more basically oriented and one paper being more clinically oriented. This annual tradition has existed since the year 2006. PMID:24668222

  18. The Brain Prize 2013: the optogenetics revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiner, Andreas; Isacoff, Ehud Y

    2013-10-01

    The 2013 Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Prize was awarded to Ernst Bamberg, Edward Boyden, Karl Deisseroth, Peter Hegemann, Gero Miesenböck, and Georg Nagel 'for their invention and refinement of optogenetics'. Why optogenetics? And why this sextet? To appreciate why, we turn first to some of the core questions of neuroscience and the technical difficulties that long obstructed their resolution.

  19. George E. Pake Prize Lecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Cherry

    2005-03-01

    Over the past decade, a combination of the changes in the regulatory environment coupled with accelerating advances in technology caused the telecommunications industry to experience first an accelerated growth `boom' followed by a major `bust' - perhaps corresponding to the worst downturn in its history. Throughout this turbulent time, Bell Lab’s parent company, Lucent, has transformed itself from a vertically integrated 38B telecomm systems company with 157k employees in 11 separate businesses into a horizontally layered, 9B network infrastructure systems integrator with 32K employees and 100 major customers. My talk will relate to how Bell Labs Research has weathered the `perfect storm', survived, and still maintains its focus on the future of telecommunications science and technology.

  20. Don't miss the Announcements and Events sections of the Bulletin!

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    There you'll find information on Safety Training and the team in charge, the OHS-0-0-3 Safety Form, the posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics, the 2014 CERN Accelerator Schools, the 2014 European School of High-Energy Physics, the Future Circular Collider (FCC) study kick-off meeting, Ugo Amaldi’s public talk on 11 February, the Lift Conference... this information is FOR YOU!

  1. Prizes for innovation of new medicines and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, James; Hubbard, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that prizes can help stimulate medical innovation, control costs and ensure greater access to new medicines and vaccines. The authors explore four increasingly ambitious prize options to reward medical innovation, each addressing flaws in the current patent system. The first option promotes innovation through a large prize fund linked to the impact on health outcomes; the second option rewards the sharing of knowledge, data, and technology with open source dividends; the third option awards prizes for interim benchmarks and discrete technical problems; and the final option removes the exclusive right to use patented inventions in upstream research in favor of prizes. The authors conclude that a system of prizes to reward drug development would break the link between R&D incentives and product prices, and that such a reform is needed to improve innovation and access to new medicines and vaccines.

  2. Prizes for innovation of new medicines and vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, James; Hubbard, Tim

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that prizes can help stimulate medical innovation, control costs and ensure greater access to new medicines and vaccines. The authors explore four increasingly ambitious prize options to reward medical innovation, each addressing flaws in the current patent system. The first option promotes innovation through a large prize fund linked to the impact on health outcomes; the second option rewards the sharing of knowledge, data, and technology with open source dividends; the third option awards prizes for interim benchmarks and discrete technical problems; and the final option removes the exclusive right to use patented inventions in upstream research in favor of prizes. The authors conclude that a system of prizes to reward drug development would break the link between R&D incentives and product prices, and that such a reform is needed to improve innovation and access to new medicines and vaccines. PMID:21950238

  3. First Calderón Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, William; Somersalo, Erkki

    2008-07-01

    The Inverse Problems International Association (IPIA) awarded the first Calderón Prize to Matti Lassas for his outstanding contributions to the field of inverse problems, especially in geometric inverse problems. The Calderón Prize is given to a researcher under the age of 40 who has made distinguished contributions to the field of inverse problems broadly defined. The first Calderón Prize Committee consisted of Professors Adrian Nachman, Lassi Päivärinta, William Rundell (chair), and Michael Vogelius. William Rundell For the Calderón Prize Committee Prize ceremony The ceremony awarding the Calderón Prize. Matti Lassas is on the left. He and William Rundell are on the right. Photos by P Stefanov. Brief Biography of Matti Lassas Matti Lassas was born in 1969 in Helsinki, Finland, and studied at the University of Helsinki. He finished his Master's studies in 1992 in three years and earned his PhD in 1996. His PhD thesis, written under the supervision of Professor Erkki Somersalo was entitled `Non-selfadjoint inverse spectral problems and their applications to random bodies'. Already in his thesis, Matti demonstrated a remarkable command of different fields of mathematics, bringing together the spectral theory of operators, geometry of Riemannian surfaces, Maxwell's equations and stochastic analysis. He has continued to develop all of these branches in the framework of inverse problems, the most remarkable results perhaps being in the field of differential geometry and inverse problems. Matti has always been a very generous researcher, sharing his ideas with his numerous collaborators. He has authored over sixty scientific articles, among which a monograph on inverse boundary spectral problems with Alexander Kachalov and Yaroslav Kurylev and over forty articles in peer reviewed journals of the highest standards. To get an idea of the wide range of Matti's interests, it is enough to say that he also has three US patents on medical imaging applications. Matti is

  4. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-06-01

    1999 EAS Awards The Eastern Analytical Symposium (EAS) announces the winners of their 1999 awards, which will be presented during their annual meeting, to be held November 14-19, 1999, at the Garden State Convention Center in Somerset, NJ. ACS Analytical Chemistry Division, Findeis Young Investigator Award David Clemmer, Indiana University EAS Award for Achievements in Separation Science Milton L. Lee, Brigham Young University EAS Award for Achievements in Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Phil Williams, Grain Research Laboratory, Winnipeg, Canada EAS Award for Achievements in Magnetic Resonance Frank A. L. Anet, University of California, Los Angeles (Emeritus) EAS Award for Outstanding Achievements in the Fields of Analytical Chemistry Catherine Fenselau, University of Maryland at College Park Galactic Industries Award for Achievements in Chemometrics Harald Martens, Norwegian University of Science and Technology Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) June 7, 1999 NSF Collaboratives for Excellence in Teacher Preparation (CETP) Preliminary proposals, Track 1 May 1, 1999 Formal proposals, Track 1 September 1, 1999 DUE online 1999 guidelines, NSF 99-53 available at http://www.nsf.gov/cgi-bin/getpub?nsf9953 For further information about NSF DUE programs consult the DUE Web site, http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/start.htm. Program deadlines are at http://www.ehr.nsf.gov/EHR/DUE/programs/programs.htm . To contact the DUE Information Center, phone: 703/306-1666; email: undergrad@nsf.gov. The Camille and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998 Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: July 1, 1999 New Faculty Awards Program: May 14, 1999 Faculty Start-up Grants for Undergraduate Institutions: May 14, 1999 Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1999 Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences

  5. [The 2008 Nobel Prizes in medicine and physiology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdespino, José Luis; Ponce-de-León, Samuel; de Lourdes Garcia, María

    2009-01-01

    For the last century, the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine has been awarded worldwide to significant discoveries. The prize allows the dissemination of information on the achievements of recipients, promotes understanding of scientific knowledge among the public and attracts young students to biomedical research. This paper briefly describes the prizes granted to the fields of physiology and medicine, emphasizing those that related to development of vaccines. PMID:19685833

  6. All pay auctions with certain and uncertain prizes - a comment

    OpenAIRE

    Riis, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In the important contribution "All pay auctions with certain and uncertain prizes" published in Games and Economic Behavior May 2014, Minchuk and and Sela analyze an all pay auction with multiple prizes. The specific feature of the model is that all valuations are common except for the valuation of one of the prizes, for which contestants have private valuations. However, the equilibrium characterization derived in the paper is incorrect. This note derives the correct equilibri...

  7. RESEARCH PRIZES: A MECHANISM TO REWARD INNOVATION IN AFRICAN AGRICULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Masters, William J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper identifies market failures that limit agricultural R&D for Africa and other resource-poor environments, and proposes a mechanism to help circumvent them with cash prizes for the dissemination of successful innovations. The proposed prize institution would use ex-post experiments and farm surveys to document the value of innovations after their initial diffusion, to avoid pre-specification of technologies. Prizes would be offered in proportion to estimated social benefits, and would...

  8. Carrots and Sticks: Prizes and Punishments in Contests

    OpenAIRE

    Benny Modovanu; Aner Sela; Xianwen Shi

    2008-01-01

    We study optimal contest design in situations where the designer can reward high performance agents with positive prizes and punish low performance agents with negative prizes. We link the optimal prize structure to the curvature of distribution of abilities in the population. In particular, we identify conditions under which, even if punishment is costly, punishing the bottom is more effective than rewarding the top in eliciting effort input . If punishment is costless, we study the optimal ...

  9. Optimal Prizes in Dynamic Elimination Contests: An Experimental Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Stracke, Rudi; Höchtl, Wolfgang; Kerschbamer, Rudolf; Sunde, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of different prize structures on the effort choices of participants in two-stage elimination contests. A format with a single prize is shown to maximize total effort over both stages, but induces low effort in stage 1 and high effort in stage 2. By contrast, a format that allocates the same total amount to multiple prizes in such a way that the predicted effort remains constant across stages yields lower total effort provision. Experimental evidence suggest...

  10. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-07-01

    New Source of Information from Advertisers The Journal has a new feature effective with the June 1999 issue. If you would like additional information about our advertisers or their products, the quickest and easiest way to get it is via JCE Online: go to http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu click on Ad Index This will take you to the list of advertisers, each conveniently linked to their home page. When you do contact our advertisers, be sure to tell them that you saw their ad in the Journal of Chemical Education. This is important to them, and to us. JCE Software Receives Award The Journal recently received notice that JCE Software portion of JCE Online has been selected as a Links2Go Key Resource for the topic of chemistry software. According to Links2Go (www.links2go.com), JCE Software's home page is one of the top fifty most accessed online resources in the area of chemistry software (currently ranked 45). Thanks to all of you who have visited JCE Online and the JCE Software area to make this possible. If you haven't visited the site yet, you can go there directly (http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/index.html ) as well as via our JCE Online home page. You will be greeted with a short video of nitrogen triiodide exploding and be able to get a wealth of information about our latest releases, software, CD-ROMs/Video, student resources, materials for authors and software developers. You can see color graphics from our CD-ROMs, video, and software,... Actually, if you are familiar with our Catalog, this is much better. 1999 Welch Chemistry Prize Richard N. Zare, the Marguerite Blake Wilbur Professor of Natural Science at Stanford University, has been named the 1999 recipient of the Welch Award in Chemistry for his lifetime achievements in physical and analytical chemistry. Zare's interests focus on the development and application of lasers and other novel instruments to explore chemical frontiers, ranging from molecules to chemical processes, from the inside of cells to

  11. Peer Review versus Citations - An Analysis of Best Paper Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Tom Coupe

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, I analyze the ‘best paper’ prizes given by economics and finance journals to the best article published in their journal in a given year. More specifically, I compare the citations received by best paper prize-winning papers to citations received by papers that are awarded runner up prizes and to citations received by non-winning papers. In this way, I evaluate to what extent the prize jury members are able to pick the papers that are ‘best’ in terms of citations. The data show...

  12. Retrospectives: Léon Walras and the Nobel Peace Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Agnar Sandmo

    2007-01-01

    This paper is an account of the history of Léon Walras's attempt to be awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for 1906. It describes Walras's moves to get three of his Lausanne colleagues to nominate him for the prize, the arguments advanced in the proposal, and the reception that it received by the Norwegian Peace Prize Committee in Kristiania (Oslo). It discusses whether Walras had realistic reasons to believe that he stood a chance of winning the prize, and it evaluates the validity of the argument...

  13. PRIze{sup TM} 1.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    PRIze{sup TM} 1.2 is a computer program that evaluates the improved oil recovery (IOR) potential of petroleum reservoirs including the use of horizontal wells. It was created in 1992 and has since been used in over 800 reservoir evaluations. The tool provides information on the feasibility of IOR processes based on reservoir parameters. PRIze{sup TM} makes predictions for chemical, gas injection and thermal IOR processes based on both vertical and horizontal wells. The program provides a uniform data entry screen that allows the user to input 42 average values of geological parameters, fluid properties and oil production mechanism information into a data file. The data can be used to provide a production forecast, and enable the user to establish, to a first order approximation, the economic viability of a given process.

  14. A new prize system for drug innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandjour, Afschin; Chernyak, Nadja

    2011-10-01

    We propose a new prize (reward) system for drug innovation which pays a price based on the value of health benefits accrued over time. Willingness to pay for a unit of health benefit is determined based on the cost-effectiveness ratio of palliative/nursing care. We solve the problem of limited information on the value of health benefits by mathematically relating reward size to the uncertainty of information including information on potential drug overuse. The proposed prize system offers optimal incentives to invest in research and development because it rewards the innovator for the social value of drug innovation. The proposal is envisaged as a non-voluntary alternative to the current patent system and reduces excessive marketing of innovators and generic drug producers. PMID:21724290

  15. Gustav-Hertz-Prize for CERN Physicist

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Klaus Blaum, of GSI Darmstadt and project leader of the ISOLTRAP experiment at CERN, will receive the 2004 Gustav-Hertz-Prize for his outstanding work on the mass determination of unstable atomic nuclei. Blaum extended the measuring capability of the ISOLTRAP experiment at the ISOLDE facility, which studies short-lived isotopes, by installing a source of carbon clusters. Using these carbon clusters as mass reference allows researchers to obtain higher-precision and absolute atomic mass measurements which are important to understand the weak interaction and the synthesis of chemical elements. The Gustav-Hertz-Prize is awarded to outstanding young physicists and is endowed with 7500 euro. It will be awarded at the Spring Conference of the German Physical Society in Munich on 24 March.

  16. Push or pull? Grants, prizes and information

    OpenAIRE

    David Rietzke

    2015-01-01

    In the funding of R&D, push mechanisms, such as research grants, subsidize research input, while pull mechanisms, such as innovation prizes, reward research output. By rewarding research output, pull mechanisms create strong incentives for researchers to devote non observable inputs to R&D. Push mechanisms, in contrast, may reward a researcher independently of her output. In the presence of moral hazard, it might seem that push mechanisms generate weak incentives for non observable inputs fro...

  17. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies. PMID:26850617

  18. EPS HEPP Prize 2013: Certificate and Medal

    CERN Multimedia

    Rao, Achintya

    2013-01-01

    The 2013 High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to High Energy Physics, is awarded to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations, "for the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism", and to Michel Della Negra, Peter Jenni, and Tejinder Virdee, "for their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments".

  19. Open Economy Macroeconomics: 1999 Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Èihák

    2000-01-01

    The article summarizes the seminar ""Open Economy Macroeconomics: 1999 Nobel Prize"" held by the Czech Economic Association in March 2000. The seminar was devoted to the work of Professor Robert A. Mundell, the 1999 Nobel laureate in economics. There were three main speakers at the seminar: first was Jiøí Jonáš (International Monetary Fund, Washington), who lectured on the impact of Prof. Mundell's work on the IMF's approach to macroeconomic stabilization. Martin Mandel (University of Economi...

  20. Conducting polymers: nobel prize in chemistry, 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Menon, Reghu

    2000-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2000 has been awarded to Alan J. Heeger (University of California at Santa Barbara, USA), Alan G. MacDiarmid (University of Pennsylvania, USA) and Hideki Shirakawa4 (University of Tsukuba, Japan). The citation for the reward – ‘for the discovery and development of electrically conductive polymers’. Moreover, The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences pointed out that the award is being motivated by the ‘important scientific position that the field has achieved and the...

  1. Graphene, Nobel Prize and All that Jazz

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, Tapash

    2010-01-01

    Graphene, a single atomic layer of graphite, first isolated in 2004, has made a quantum leap in the exploration of the physics of two-dimensional electron systems. Since the initial report of its discovery, many thousands of papers have been published, attempting to explain every aspect of the exotic electronic properties of this system. The graphene euphoria has culminated with the 2010 Nobel Prize in physics being awarded jointly to Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov of the University of M...

  2. Arthroscopy Journal Prizes Are Major Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    According to the Harvard Business Review, the optimal number of people in a decision-making group is no more than 8. Thus, it is no surprise that 18 Arthroscopy journal associate editors had difficulty making a major decision. In the end, 18 editors did successfully select the 2015 winner of the Best Comparative Study Prize. All studies have limitations, but from a statistical standpoint, the editors believe that the conclusions of the winning study are likely correct.

  3. Euclidean Prize-collecting Steiner Forest

    OpenAIRE

    Bateni, MohammadHossein; Hajiaghayi, Mohammadtaghi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we consider Steiner forest and its generalizations, prize-collecting Steiner forest and k-Steiner forest, when the vertices of the input graph are points in the Euclidean plane and the lengths are Euclidean distances. First, we present a simpler analysis of the polynomial-time approximation scheme (PTAS) of Borradaile et al. [12] for the Euclidean Steiner forest problem. This is done by proving a new structural property and modifying the dynamic programming by adding a new piec...

  4. Savings and prize-linked savings accounts

    OpenAIRE

    Atalay, Kadir; Bakhtiar, Fayzan; Cheung, Stephen L.; Slonim, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Many households have insufficient savings to handle moderate and routine consumption shocks. Many of these financially fragile households also have the highest lottery expenditures as a proportion of income. This combination suggests that Prize-Linked Savings (PLS) accounts, that combine principal-security with lottery-type jackpots, can increase savings among these at-risk households. Results from an online experiment show that the introduction of PLS accounts increase total savings and redu...

  5. Arthroscopy Journal Prizes Are Major Decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubowitz, James H; Brand, Jefferson C; Provencher, Matthew T; Rossi, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    According to the Harvard Business Review, the optimal number of people in a decision-making group is no more than 8. Thus, it is no surprise that 18 Arthroscopy journal associate editors had difficulty making a major decision. In the end, 18 editors did successfully select the 2015 winner of the Best Comparative Study Prize. All studies have limitations, but from a statistical standpoint, the editors believe that the conclusions of the winning study are likely correct. PMID:26743401

  6. [A Nobel Prize for DNA repair].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-01-01

    This year's Nobel Prize for chemistry recognizes the seminal contributions of three researchers who discovered the existence and the basic mechanisms of DNA repair: base excision repair, mismatch repair, and nucleotide excision repair. They have since been joined by many scientists elucidating diverse aspects of these complex mechanisms that now constitute a thriving research field with many applications, notably for understanding oncogenesis and devising more effective therapies.

  7. Frederick W. Alt received the 2015 Szent-Györgi Prize forProgress inCancer Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PeterScully; JieZhao; SujuanBa

    2016-01-01

    The Szent-Györgyi Prize for Progress in Cancer Research is a prestigious scientiifc award established by the National Foundation for Cancer Research (NFCR)—a leading cancer research charitable organization in the United States that is committed to supporting scientiifc research and public education relating to the prevention, early diagnosis, better treatments, and ultimately, a cure for cancer. Each year, the Szent-Györgyi Prize honors an outstanding researcher, nominated by colleagues or peers, who has contributed outstanding, signiifcant research to the ifght against cancer, and whose accomplishments have helped improve treatment options for cancer patients. The Prize also promotes public awareness of the importance of basic cancer research and encourages the sustained investment needed to accelerate the translation of these research discoveries into new cancer treatments. This report highlights the pio-neering work led by the 2015 Prize winner, Dr. Frederick Alt. Dr. Alt’s work in the area of cancer genetics over four decades has helped to shape the very roots of modern cancer research. His work continues to profoundly impact the approaches that doctors around the globe use to diagnose and treat cancer. In particular, his seminal discoveries of gene ampliifcation and his pioneering work on molecular mechanisms of DNA damage repair have helped to usher in the era of genetically targeted therapy and personalized medicine.

  8. The Abel Prize 2008-2012

    CERN Document Server

    Piene, Ragni

    2014-01-01

    Covering the years 2008-2012, this book profiles the life and work of recent winners of the Abel Prize:   ·         John G. Thompson and Jacques Tits, 2008 ·         Mikhail Gromov, 2009 ·         John T. Tate Jr., 2010 ·         John W. Milnor, 2011 ·         Endre Szemerédi, 2012. The profiles feature autobiographical information as well as a description of each mathematician's work. In addition, each profile contains a complete bibliography, a curriculum vitae, as well as photos — old and new. As an added feature, interviews with the Laureates are presented on an accompanying web site (http://extras.springer.com/).   The book also presents a  history of the Abel Prize written by the historian Kim Helsvig, and includes a facsimile of a letter from Niels Henrik Abel, which is transcribed, translated into English, and placed into historical perspective by Christian Skau.    This book follows on The Abel Prize: 2003-2007, The First Five Years (Springer, 2010),...

  9. Maria Goeppert Mayer and the Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Karen E.

    2013-04-01

    When Maria Goeppert Mayer was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1963, she was only the second woman to receive that award and there have been no additional female physics laureates since. Mayer was uniquely prepared to carry out her prize-winning work on the nuclear shell model. Furthermore, she worked with some of the most well-known figures in mid-twentieth century physics, and her award came at a time when American science was in ascendance. Why, then, is her name so little known beyond the physics community? There are several possible answers to this question, ranging from the personal (her modest reaction to public acclaim) and the scientific (the mathematically abstract nature of her prize-winning work), to the national (the nature of the issues commanding public attention in the 1960s). In this talk I will present an overview of the circumstances that enabled Mayer to make exceptional contributions to nuclear physics, and then examine some of the possible reasons why her exceptional status is not more widely known.

  10. First AGU Climate Communication Prize awarded

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, Christine

    2012-02-01

    Gavin Schmidt, a climate scientist at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and cofounder of the RealClimate blog (http://www.realclimate.org/), received the first AGU Climate Communication Prize at the honors ceremony. The prize recognizes excellence in climate communication as well as the promotion of scientific literacy, clarity of messaging, and efforts to foster respect and understanding for science-based values related to climate change. Sponsored by Nature's Own—a Boulder, Colo.-based company specializing in the sale of minerals, fossils, and decorative stone specimens—the prize comes with a $25,000 cash award. "AGU created this award to raise the visibility of climate change as a critical issue facing the world today, to demonstrate our support for scientists who commit themselves to the effective communication of climate change science, and to encourage more scientists to engage with the public and policy makers on how climate research can contribute to the sustainability of our planet," said AGU president Michael Mc Phaden. "That's why we are so pleased to recognize Gavin for his dedicated leadership and outstanding scientific achievements. We hope that his work will serve as an inspiration for others."

  11. Swedish Poet Wins 2011 Nobel Prize for Literature%Swedish Poet Wins 2011 Nobel Prize for Literature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王志伟

    2011-01-01

    Through his condensed( 凝练的), translucent( 透彻的) images he gives us fresh access to reality. --The Swedish Academy The Swedish Academy awarded a Swedish poet, Tomas Transtromer, the 2011 Nobel Prize for Literature, making him the 107th recipient of the Nobel Prize for literature. Transtromer, who has appeared among the list of nominees(被提名者)for the prize for many years, finally won this prize for his famous works Windows and Stones (1966) and The Great En/gma (2004).

  12. Does timing and announcement matter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adams, Philip D; Andersen, Lill Thanning; Jacobsen, Lars Bo

    We address the issue of timing and announcement within a dynamic applied general equilibrium model of the Danish economy. Specifically we analyse the introduction of a quota on the production of pigs. Two scenarios are analysed, namely the introduction of a once-off quota without any previous ann...

  13. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-02-01

    News from Journal House Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Many readers are trying to modify the way they teach and in so doing are trying to write new types of questions and problems. The Journal has a new online resource, the JCE Internet Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems Web site, http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCEWWW/Resources/CQandChP/index.html . The site is a source of questions and problems that can be used in teaching and assessing conceptual understanding and problem solving in chemistry. Here you can find a library of free-response and multiple-choice conceptual questions and challenge problems, tips for writing these questions and problems, and a discussion of types of concept questions. This site is intended to be a means of sharing conceptual questions and challenge problems among chemical educators. It will be as inclusive as possible, and to achieve this readers need to share their questions and alert the authors to references or Web sites. The screen captures shown below should provide a feeling for what you will find when you visit the site. The authors, William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, welcome additions to the library of conceptual questions or other comments or suggestions. Contact them by email, fax, or regular mail. William R. Robinson and Susan C. Nurrenbern, Department of Chemistry, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1393. Bill: phone: 765/494-5453; fax: 765/494-0239; email: wrrobin@purdue.edu. Sue: phone: 765/494-0823; fax: 765/494-0239; email: nurrenbe@purdue.edu. fax: 765/494-0239. 1998 Ford Foundation Fellowships The National Research Council has announced the recipients of the 1998 fellowships for minority scholars. Three categories of fellowships were awarded: 50 to beginning graduate students, 33 to students writing their dissertations, and 28 to recent Ph.D. recipients. There were about 1,000 applicants. For information about the next competition contact the Fellowship Office of the National

  14. Is the Nobel Prize in chemistry still relevant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Rajendrani

    2009-10-01

    No other prize in science matches the iconic stature of the Nobels. But they only recognize individuals in the categories of physics, chemistry, and physiology/medicine. In the modern era of multidisciplinary, multiple-team endeavors, are the Nobel Prizes outdated?

  15. Note—An Economic Rationale for Door Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Allan Richard Young

    1989-01-01

    If buyers face transaction costs, a workable pricing scheme might require door prizes in addition to a per-unit price. The door prize compensates customers for the transaction expense, and the seller earns positive profit because the price exceeds the cost of inframarginal units.

  16. Size and distribution of prizes and efforts in contests

    OpenAIRE

    Gil S. Epstein; Shmuel Nitzan

    2005-01-01

    The intensity of competition in contests is affected by the sum of the awarded prizes and by the prize distribution among the contestants. The current paper examines which of these two parameters has a larger effect on the players' extent of participation in the contest.

  17. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lever, Andrew ML; Berkhout, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma. PMID:18854052

  18. Researcher for Virginia Tech program wins Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech News

    2009-01-01

    The first woman to win a Nobel Prize in economics is a researcher for a Virginia Tech-managed international program. Elinor Ostrom has won a share of the 2009 prize based on her work on how community institutions can prevent conflict.

  19. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Berkhout Ben; Lever Andrew ML

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma.

  20. Nobel prize awarded to pioneers in ozone research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    This article details the achievements of the three individuals who shared the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Paul Crutzen, Mario Molina, and F. Sherwood Rowland - for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly the chemical processes that deplete the ozone layer. Background information about the ozone layer is presented as well as highlights of the ozone research done by the prize winners.

  1. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzschild, B.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak [open quotes]for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.[close quotes] Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given.

  2. 29 CFR 778.330 - Prizes or contest awards generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prizes or contest awards generally. 778.330 Section 778.330 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) WAGE AND HOUR DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY OR INTERPRETATION NOT DIRECTLY RELATED TO REGULATIONS OVERTIME COMPENSATION Special Problems Prizes As Bonuses § 778.330...

  3. Nominations sought for the 2016 Haagen-Smit Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    We, the editors and publishers of Atmospheric Environment invite our readers to nominate papers for the 2016 "Haagen-Smit Prize". The prize is named in honor of Prof. Arie Jan Haagen-Smit, a pioneer in the field of air pollution.

  4. 26 CFR 1.74-1 - Prizes and awards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Prizes and awards. 1.74-1 Section 1.74-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Items Specifically Included in Gross Income § 1.74-1 Prizes and awards. (a) Inclusion in gross income. (1) Section...

  5. Briton wins Nobel physics prize for work on superfluids

    CERN Multimedia

    Connor, S

    2003-01-01

    A British born scientist, Anthony Leggett, 65, has jointly won this year's Nobel prize in physics for research into the arcane area of superfluids - when matter behaves in its lowest and most ordered state. He shares the 800,000 pounds prize with two Russian physicists who have worked in the field of superconductivity - when electrical conductors lose resistance (1/2 page).

  6. Nobel physics prize to Charpak for inventing particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the work of Georges Charpak of France leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Physics. The Nobel Prize was awarded to Charpak open-quotes for his invention and development of particle detectors, in particular the multiwire proportional chamber.close quotes Historical aspects of Charpak's life and research are given

  7. 2008 Nobel prize in Medicine for discoverers of HIV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berkhout Ben

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Françoise Barré-Sinoussi and Luc Montagnier, codiscoverers of HIV, the causative agent of AIDS, have been awarded the 2008 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. They share this prize with Harald zur Hausen who was responsible for establishing the link between human papilloma virus infection and cervical carcinoma.

  8. The failed attribution of the Nobel Prize for Medicine or Physiology to Viktor Hamburger for the discovery of Nerve Growth Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribatti, Domenico

    2016-06-01

    The announcement in October 1986 that the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine was to awarded to Rita Levi Montalcini and Stanley Cohen for the discovery of nerve growth factor (NGF) and epidermal growth factor, respectively, caused many to wonder why Viktor Hamburger in whose laboratory the initial work was done had not been included in the award. This article try to reconstruct the history of the discovery of NGF with the aim to re-establish a correct dynamic of the events. PMID:26930162

  9. EDITORIAL: Annual prizes for best papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    2005 Roberts Prize The publishers of Physics in Medicine and Biology (PMB) in association with the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM) jointly award an annual prize for an article published in PMB during the previous year. The following 14 articles, listed below in chronological order, were rated the best of 2005 based on the (two or three) referees' assessments: P Kundrát et al 2005 Probabilistic two-stage model of cell inactivation by ionizing particles Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1433-47 D Arora et al 2005 Direct thermal dose control of constrained focused ultrasound treatments: phantom and in vivo evaluation Phys. Med. Biol. 50 1919-35 J S Dysart et al 2005 Characterization of Photofrin photobleaching for singlet oxygen dose estimation during photodynamic therapy of MLL cells in vitro Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2597-616 M Defrise et al 2005 Fourier rebinning of time-of-flight PET data Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2749-63 Z Su et al 2005 Systematic investigation of the signal properties of polycrystalline HgI2 detectors under mammographic, radiographic, fluoroscopic and radiotherapy irradiation conditions Phys. Med. Biol. 50 2907-28 E Bräuer-Krisch et al 2005 New irradiation geometry for microbeam radiation therapy Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3103-11 H C Pyo et al 2005 Identification of current density distribution in electrically conducting subject with anisotropic conductivity distribution Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3183-96 R P Findlay et al 2005 Effects of posture on FDTD calculations of specific absorption rate in a voxel model of the human body Phys. Med. Biol. 50 3825-35 G Alexandrakis et al 2005 Tomographic bioluminescence imaging by use of a combined optical-PET (OPET) system: a computer simulation feasibility study Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4225-41 J Keshvari et al 2005 Comparison of radio frequency energy absorption in ear and eye region of children and adults at 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz Phys. Med. Biol. 50 4355-69 J Laufer et al 2005 In vitro measurements of absolute blood

  10. News and Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-04-01

    Biochemistry at the University of Colorado at Boulder are offering a three-day symposium on natural products which include pharmaceuticals, nutraceuticals, and consumer products, to be held May 19-21, 1999. For further information or to make arrangements to attend, contact University of Colorado at Boulder, Attn: Rosemary Trujillo, Campus Box 215, Boulder, CO 80309-0215; email: rosemary.trujillo@colorado.edu; fax: 303/492-0439. Workshops for Small-Scale Chemistry The Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology Education at Colorado State University announces two workshop programs for summer 1999. Interested community college faculty are invited to apply for the Small-Scale Chemistry for Pollution Prevention Summer Institute, June 7-18, 1999. The Institute features hands-on training in small-scale chemistry laboratory techniques. Travel to Fort Collins, CO, lodging, per diem, and classroom/laboratory materials are funded for selected participants with a grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in collaboration with the Partnership for Environmental Technology Education (PETE). For more information contact Barry Carroll by email: barry_carroll@csmate.colostate.edu; phone: 970/491-1700, or access http://www.csmate.colostate.edu/Programs/PETE_Page.html. Interested high school teachers are invited to apply for two one-week workshops in Small-Scale Chemistry Laboratory for the Regular Chemistry Course (June 21-25, 1999) and Small-Scale Chemistry Laboratory for Advanced Placement Chemistry (June 28-July 2, 1999). The workshops feature hands-on training in small-scale chemistry laboratory techniques. Classroom/laboratory materials, books, and two graduate credits are included in the $395 fee for each course. For more information contact Courtney Butler by email: courtney@ csmate.colostate.edu, phone: 970/491-1700, or access http://www.csmate.colostate.edu/. 16th BCCE: Call for Suggestions The 16th Biennial Conference on Chemical Education will be held at the University

  11. A Nobel Prize winner visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Nobel Prize-winning astrophysicist George Smoot visited CERN on 2 February with a message for particle physicists and cosmologists alike. After a tour of ATLAS and CMS, Smoot gave a talk to a packed Council Chamber about the connections between particle physics and cosmology, and how the two disciplines can help each other to find answers to their cosmic questions. Smoot's group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is currently working on the development of the Max Planck Surveyor, the next generation of satellite to study cosmic microwave background anisotropy, which will teach us about how our universe was formed.

  12. Society News: Welcome to Griffiths Bay; RAS Associate wins Shaw Prize; Postgraduate prize preparations; Council minutes on-line; Birthday Honours; Kavli Prize; New Fellows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    The late Donald Griffiths will be commemorated in the name of a bay on the Antarctic Peninsula. Prof. Reinhard Genzel, Associate of the Society since 1994, Darwin Lecturer in 2007, and Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics has been awarded the Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008. While postgrad students complete their PhD theses, supervisors should note the deadline for submissions to the annual Michael Penston and Keith Runcorn Prizes.

  13. A lecture by Saul Perlmutter, winner of the 2011 Nobel prize in physics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    The CNRS National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Particle Physics (IN2P3), Pierre et Marie Curie University and the Laboratory of Nuclear and High-energy Physics (LPNHE) are happy to invite you to a talk by Nobel laureate Saul Perlmutter.   Perlmutter shared the 2011 Nobel prize in physics "for the discovery of the accelerating expansion of the Universe through observations of distant supernovae." He will give a public talk in Paris on 17 December at 5pm: "Supernovae, Dark Energy, and the Accelerating Universe" Amphithéâtre Farabeuf des Cordeliers 21, rue de l’école de Médecine 75006 Paris Free entrance (places are limited) and live translation available.

  14. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergonul, Onder; Yalcin, Can Ege; Erkent, Mahmut Alp; Demirci, Mert; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Ay, Nur Zeynep; Omeroglu, Asena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p<0.001). Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%); however before 1945, German scientists did so (p=0.005). The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage. PMID:26945715

  15. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onder Ergonul

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31% in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (p < 0.001. Since the Second World War, US-affiliated scientists have dominated the Nobel prizes (53%; however before 1945, German scientists did so (p = 0.005. The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage.

  16. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergonul, Onder; Yalcin, Can Ege; Erkent, Mahmut Alp; Demirci, Mert; Uysal, Sanem Pinar; Ay, Nur Zeynep; Omeroglu, Asena

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of laureates in Literature (pNobel prizes (53%); however before 1945, German scientists did so (p=0.005). The new antimicrobials received Nobel prizes until 1960; however no treatment study was awarded the Prize until the discovery of artemisinin and ivermectin, for which the Nobel Prize was awarded in 2015. Collaborative works have increasingly been appreciated. In the future, more female laureates would be expected in the IDR field. Medical graduates and scientists involved in multi-institutional and multidisciplinary collaborative efforts seem to have an advantage.

  17. Robert Aymar awarded Global Energy prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    CERN Director-General Robert Aymar was recently named one of three laureates of the 2006 Global Energy International Prize for 'the development of scientific and engineering foundation for the ITER project.' ITER is an experiment planned to be built in Europe at Cadarache (South of France) and designed to show the scientific and technological feasibility of a full-scale fusion power reactor. The other two laureates, who worked with Aymar on the project, are former President of the ITER Council, Russian Academician Evgeny Velikhov, and Japan's Dr Masaji Yoshikawa, ITER's former Vice President. Aymar headed ITER from 1994 to 2003. 'This prize is not only a great honour for me and my friends and colleagues of many years at ITER, Evgeny Velikhov and Masaji Yoshikawa,' Aymar said. 'It is above all a recognition of the effort of all those who have been involved with the ITER project and worked over the years to ensure the first step in proving that fusion will provide a new sustainable energy source for the plane...

  18. CERN exhibition wins yet another design prize

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    The “Universe of Particles” exhibition in CERN’s Globe wins the silver design prize from the German direct business communications association FAMAB.   Not only do tens of thousands of people visit the “Universe of Particles” exhibition each year, but juries for design prizes are crossing its threshold more and more frequently too. In 2011 alone it claimed 8 awards, including winning outright the 2011 Annual Multimedia award, the iF Communication Design for Corporate Architecture award and the Modern Decoration Media award (the Bulletin already reported on some of these in July 2011). The FAMAB award is the latest to join the prestigious list. The jury of FAMAB’s “ADAM 2011” award was particularly impressed by the hands-on nature of the exhibition, which encourages visitors to get interested in science. They also appreciated the way that the space in the Globe is not just a container for the exhibits, but itself ...

  19. Linear Accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, M

    2014-01-01

    The main features of radio-frequency linear accelerators are introduced, reviewing the different types of accelerating structures and presenting the main characteristics aspects of linac beam dynamics.

  20. Bernard Lerer: Recipient of the 2014 Inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine (Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aynacıoğlu, Şükrü; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Dandara, Collet; Dove, Edward S.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.; Geraci, Christy Jo; Hafen, Ernst; Kesim, Belgin Eroğlu; Kolker, Eugene; Lee, Edmund J.D.; LLerena, Adrian; Nacak, Muradiye; Shimoda, Kazutaka; Someya, Toshiyuki; Srivastava, Sanjeeva; Tomlinson, Brian; Vayena, Effy; Warnich, Louise; Yaşar, Ümit

    2014-01-01

    Abstract This article announces the recipient of the 2014 inaugural Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize in Global Omics and Personalized Medicine by the Pacific Rim Association for Clinical Pharmacogenetics (PRACP): Bernard Lerer, professor of psychiatry and director of the Biological Psychiatry Laboratory, Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Center, Jerusalem, Israel. The Werner Kalow Responsible Innovation Prize is given to an exceptional interdisciplinary scholar who has made highly innovative and enduring contributions to global omics science and personalized medicine, with both vertical and horizontal (transdisciplinary) impacts. The prize is established in memory of a beloved colleague, mentor, and friend, the late Professor Werner Kalow, who cultivated the idea and practice of pharmacogenetics in modern therapeutics commencing in the 1950s. PRACP, the prize's sponsor, is one of the longest standing learned societies in the Asia-Pacific region, and was founded by Kalow and colleagues more than two decades ago in the then-emerging field of pharmacogenetics. In announcing this inaugural prize and its winner, we seek to highlight the works of prize winner, Professor Lerer. Additionally, we contextualize the significance of the prize by recalling the life and works of Professor Kalow and providing a brief socio-technical history of the rise of pharmacogenetics and personalized medicine as a veritable form of 21st century scientific practice. The article also fills a void in previous social science analyses of pharmacogenetics, by bringing to the fore the works of Kalow from 1995 to 2008, when he presciently noted the rise of yet another field of postgenomics inquiry—pharmacoepigenetics—that railed against genetic determinism and underscored the temporal and spatial plasticity of genetic components of drug response, with invention of the repeated drug administration (RDA) method that estimates the dynamic heritabilities of drug response. The prize goes a

  1. Who can get the next Nobel Prize in infectious diseases?

    OpenAIRE

    Onder Ergonul; Can Ege Yalcin; Mahmut Alp Erkent; Mert Demirci; Sanem Pinar Uysal; Nur Zeynep Ay; Asena Omeroglu

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to deliver a perspective on future Nobel prizes by reviewing the features of Nobel prizes awarded in the infectious diseases-related (IDR) field over the last 115 years. Thirty-three out of 106 Nobel prizes (31%) in Physiology or Medicine have been awarded for IDR topics. Out of 58 Nobel laureates for IDR topics, two have been female; 67% have been medical doctors. The median age of Nobel laureates in Physiology or Medicine was found to be lower than the median age of...

  2. The Ripple Effect: Citation Chain Reactions of a Nobel Prize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faber Frandsen, Tove; Nicolaisen, Jeppe

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores the possible citation chain reactions of a Nobel Prize using the mathematician Robert J. Aumann as a case example. The results show that the award of the Nobel Prize in 2005 affected not only the citations to his work, but also affected the citations to the references in his...... scientific oeuvre. The results indicate that the spillover effect is almost as powerful as the effect itself. We are consequently able to document a ripple effect in which the awarding of the Nobel Prize ignites a citation chain reaction to Aumann's scientific ouvre and to the references in its nearest...

  3. From nerves and hormones to bacteria in the stomach; Nobel prize for achievements in gastrology during last century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konturek, S J; Konturek, P C; Brzozowski, T; Konturek, J W; Pawlik, W W

    2005-12-01

    Rapid progress in gastroenterological research, during past century, was initiated by the discovery by W. Prout in early 18th century of the presence of inorganic, hydrochloric acid in the stomach and by I.P. Pavlov at the end of 19th century of neuro-reflex stimulation of secretion of this acid that was awarded by Nobel prize in 1904. Then, J. W. Black, who followed L. Popielski's concept of histamine involvement in the stimulation of this secretion, was awarded second Nobel prize in gastrology within the same century for the identification of histamine H2-receptor (H2-R) antagonists, potent gastric acid inhibitors, accelerating ulcer healing. The concept of H2-R interaction with other receptors such as muscarinic receptors (M3-R), mediating the action of acetylocholine released from local cholinergic nerves, and those mediating the action of gastrin (CCK2-R) on parietal cells, has been confirmed both in vivo studies and in vitro isolated parietal cells. The discovery of H2-R antagonists by Black and their usefulness in control of gastric secretion and ulcer healing, were considered as real breakthrough both in elucidation of gastric secretory mechanisms and in ulcer therapy. Discovery of even more powerful gastric acid inhibitors, proton pump inhibitors (PPI), also highly effective in acceleration of ulcer healing was, however, not awarded Nobel prize. Unexpectedly, two Australian clinical researchers, R.J. Warren and B.J. Marshall, who discovered in the stomach spiral bacteria, named Helicobacter pylori, received the third in past century Nobel prize in gastrology for the finding that this bacterium, is related to the pathogenesis of gastritis and peptic ulcer. They documented that eradication of H. pylori from the stomach, using antibiotics and potent gastric inhibitors, not only accelerates healing of ulcer but also prevents its recurrence, the finding considered as greatest discovery in practical gastrology during last century. Thus, the outstanding

  4. PC 2 Phone Event Announcer

    CERN Document Server

    Parhizkar, Behrang; Ali, Mohammad Nabil Sadegh; Ramachandran, Anand; Navaratnam, Sujata

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, mobile phones are indispensable devices; it has become a trend now that college and university students are owners of such devices and this particular factor plays a very important role behind the coming up with the proposed system. "PC 2 Phone event Announcer", is the name of the new proposed system suggested to solve the existing communication problem between the College staff and students. As the name suggests, it can be deduced that the system will involve computers and phones, more specifically mobile phones.

  5. Large Deviations: An Introduction to 2007 Abel Prize

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Ramasubramanian

    2008-05-01

    2007 Abel prize has been awarded to S R S Varadhan for creating a unified theory of large deviations. We attempt to give a flavour of this branch of probability theory, highlighting the role of Varadhan.

  6. QUALITY LEADERS - LEARNING FROM THE DEMING PRIZE WINNERS IN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagadeesh Rajashekharaiah

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Different governments and professional agencies have set up a number of awards to recognize and reward quality initiatives. Deming Prize is one such award and ever since it was open for companies from outside Japan, maximum number of winning companies are from India, with 20 companies winning the Deming Prize and four among them also winning the Deming Grand Prize. This paper traces the path taken by these companies to know how these companies embarked a journey of Total Quality Management (TQM and reached their goal of winning the prestigious Deming Prize. The common working principles of these companies and the various tools and techniques used by them are described in a concise manner in this paper. Further, the paper highlights the lessons from these companies to inspire others. The data taken from the respective websites of the companies has been used to list out the objectives, methodologies, and the benefits accrued by the companies.

  7. Pennies from heaven? Conceptions and earmarking of lottery prize money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenus, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The source of money has been shown to be important for how money is spent. In addition, sudden wealth is often associated with social and psychological risks. This article investigates if conceptions of lottery prize money--as a special kind of money--imply restrictions on how it can be spent. Analysis of interviews with lottery winners shows that interviewees use earmarking of the prize money as a strategy for avoiding the pitfalls associated with a lottery win. Conceptions of lottery prize money as 'a lot' or as 'a little', as shared or personal, and as an opportunity or a risk, influences the ends for which it is earmarked: for self-serving spending, a 'normal' living standard, paying off loans, saving for designated purposes, or for economic security and independence. Clearly defining and earmarking lottery prize money thus helps lottery winners construe their sudden wealth, not as a risk, but as 'pennies from heaven.' PMID:24661232

  8. Recipients of 2013 EPS High Energy & Particle Physics Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    ATLAS, Experiment

    2014-01-01

    (From left) Joe Incandela, Peter Higgs, Francois Englert, Tejinder Virdee, Dave Charlton, and Peter Jenni. Higgs and Englert gave the prizes to the recipients of the 2013 European Physical Society's High Energy and Particle Physics Prize, for an outstanding contribution to high energy physics. "For the discovery of a Higgs boson, as predicted by the Brout-Englert-Higgs mechanism," the prize was awarded to the ATLAS and CMS collaborations. Spokesperson for CMS, Incandela, and Spokesperson for ATLAS, Charlton, accepted the awards on their collaborations' behalf. "For their pioneering and outstanding leadership roles in the making of the ATLAS and CMS experiments," the prize was awarded to Jenni, Virdee, and Michel Della Negra (not present). Image: ATLAS

  9. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School.

  10. Nobel Prize for Our Advisor, Gerhard Ertl, Germany

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ The 2007 Nobel Prize for chemistry has been awarded on December 10th to the German scientist Gerhard Ertl for "his thorough studies of fundamental molecular processes at the gas-solid interface" as the fundamentals of catalysis.

  11. 2016 ISCB Overton Prize awarded to Debora Marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogg, Christiana N; Kovats, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) recognizes the achievements of an early- to mid-career scientist with the Overton Prize each year. The Overton Prize was established to honor the untimely loss of Dr. G. Christian Overton, a respected computational biologist and founding ISCB Board member. Winners of the Overton Prize are independent investigators in the early to middle phases of their careers who are selected because of their significant contributions to computational biology through research, teaching, and service. 2016 will mark the fifteenth bestowment of the ISCB Overton Prize.  ISCB is pleased to confer this award the to Debora Marks, Assistant Professor of Systems Biology and director of the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Laboratory for Computational Biology at Harvard Medical School. PMID:27429747

  12. Pennies from heaven? Conceptions and earmarking of lottery prize money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedenus, Anna

    2014-06-01

    The source of money has been shown to be important for how money is spent. In addition, sudden wealth is often associated with social and psychological risks. This article investigates if conceptions of lottery prize money--as a special kind of money--imply restrictions on how it can be spent. Analysis of interviews with lottery winners shows that interviewees use earmarking of the prize money as a strategy for avoiding the pitfalls associated with a lottery win. Conceptions of lottery prize money as 'a lot' or as 'a little', as shared or personal, and as an opportunity or a risk, influences the ends for which it is earmarked: for self-serving spending, a 'normal' living standard, paying off loans, saving for designated purposes, or for economic security and independence. Clearly defining and earmarking lottery prize money thus helps lottery winners construe their sudden wealth, not as a risk, but as 'pennies from heaven.'

  13. Georges Charpak, Nobel Physics Prize 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wednesday 14 October looked like being a day like any other for detector specialist Georges Charpak. Except he had an unwelcome appointment with the dentist early that afternoon. Late that morning he was able to telephone to cancel the appointment. 'I have a small problem...', he explained. The problem was the announcement that Georges Charpak receives 1992's most prestigious award for physics

  14. Announcements

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-07-01

    1998 Welch Award in Chemistry Pierre Chambon has been named Proposal Deadlines National Science Foundation Division of Undergraduate Education (DUE) Course, Curriculum, and Laboratory Improvement (CCLI) - November 16, 1998 The Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation, Inc. Scholar/Fellow Program for Undergraduate Institutions: July 1, 1998 Special Grant Program in the Chemical Sciences: July15, 1998 Camille Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program: November 16, 1998

  15. Romanians and the Nobel Prizes for Science and Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilica Sirbu

    2012-01-01

    There is much to be said about the Nobel Prizes. Numerous pages are written each year to promote, describe, analyze and criticize the prizes, their initiator and their evolution since 1901. The purpose of this study is to bring back to light from the dust of the archives information about those Romanians who were ahead of their times through their outstanding thinking and understanding of the world. Little has been written about those nominated, since it has been considered more relevant to f...

  16. Allocation of Prizes in Contests with Participation Constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Aner Sela; Reut Megidish

    2009-01-01

    We study all-pay contests with an exogenous minimal effort constraint where a player can participate in a contest only if his effort (output) is equal to or higher than the minimal effort constraint. Contestants are privately informed about a parameter (ability) that affects their cost of effort. The designer decides about the size and the number of prizes. We analyze the optimal prize allocation for the contest designer who wishes to maximize either the total effort or the highest effort. It...

  17. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Mazloumian; Young-Ho Eom; Dirk Helbing; Sergi Lozano; Santo Fortunato

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the ...

  18. Intellectual Property Versus Prizes: A Policy-Lever Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Roin, Benjamin N.

    2010-01-01

    Most developed nations rely on intellectual property as one of their primary tools to promote private investments in R&D. An alternative approach is for the government to reward innovators with a prize instead of an intellectual property right, such that innovations fall immediately into the public domain. This idea dates back centuries, but over the past decade there has been an explosion of scholarship on the subject. Policymakers and even the press have started to talk about use prizes as ...

  19. Prizes and Lemons: Procurement of Innovation under Imperfect Commitment

    OpenAIRE

    Ding, Wei; Wolfstetter, Elmar G.

    2009-01-01

    The literature on R&D contests implicitly assumes that contestants submit their innovation regardless of its value. This ignores a potential adverse selection problem. The present paper analyzes the procurement of innovations when the procurer cannot commit to never bargain with innovators who bypass the contest. We compare ?xed-prize tournaments with and without entry fees, and optimal scoring auctions with and without minimum score requirement. Our main result is that the optimal ?xed-prize...

  20. BANKS OFFER LOTTERY PRIZES: WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS?

    OpenAIRE

    Shami, Majed; Omet, Ghassan; Bino, Adel; Khalaf, Bashar Abu

    2015-01-01

    The primary goal of this interdisciplinary paper is to examine whether or not the adoption of depositor-focused marketing tool (Lottery prizes) pays in the Jordanian banking system. The fact that about half of the commercial banks offer lottery (cash) prizes to their customers (depositors), it would be interesting for academics in finance and marketing, bank managers, and bank shareholders, to examine the impact of this marketing policy on the performance of this sector in terms of return on ...

  1. 1990 Nobel Prize for the 'discovery' of quarks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1990 Nobel Prize in Physics has been awarded to Jerome I. Friedman, Henry W. Kendall and Richard E. Taylor for pioneering investigations of deep inelastic electron scattering off protons and neutrons, which played a crucial role in the development of quark model in particle physics. This paper is an attempt to present some background to the 1990 Nobel Prize and outlines the consequences of the experiments cited

  2. Conductive concrete wins Popular Science prize

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1997-06-01

    A conductive concrete developed by a research team at IRC (Institute for Research in Construction, National Research Council of Canada) has won a prize in the home technology category because of its possible use in heating homes. Following the award, there have been a number of inquiries regarding possible applications for the concrete. Greatest interests in the concrete have been in its potential to heat buildings by using it as flooring. Other possible applications included de-icing pavements to building warming pads for parking aircraft. Essentially, carbon fibres and conductive particles are added to a concrete mix in such a quantity that they form a network within the mix, ensuring high electrical conductivity. A demonstration project is underway to build a 20 by 80 foot conductive concrete pad to test the material`s capability as a snow removal and de-icing tool.

  3. Shaw Prize Goes to Reinhard Genzel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    The Shaw Prize in Astronomy for 2008 is awarded to Professor Reinhard Genzel, Director of the Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (MPE), in recognition of his outstanding contribution in demonstrating that the Milky Way contains a supermassive black hole at its centre, a result largely obtained with the help of ESO's telescopes. Black Hole ESO PR Photo 18/08 Motion of a Star The Shaw Prize is awarded annually by the Shaw Prize Foundation in Hong Kong in the Life Sciences, Mathematical Sciences and Astronomy, each of the three prizes bearing a monetary award of one million US dollars. "I warmly congratulate Professor Genzel for this well-deserved award which highlights some of the best science produced with ESO's telescopes," says Tim de Zeeuw, ESO's Director General. "Professor Genzel and his team have made a dedicated, long-term effort, using our telescopes and co-developing instruments, to study the Centre of our Galaxy, and as such, he has allowed us to enter an era of observational black hole physics." In 1969, Donald Lynden-Bell and Martin Rees suggested that the Milky Way might contain a supermassive black hole at its centre. But evidence for such an object was lacking at the time because the centre of the Milky Way is obscured by interstellar dust, and was detected only as a relatively faint radio source. Reinhard Genzel and his collaborators obtained compelling evidence for this black hole by developing state-of-the-art astronomical instruments to be used on ESO's telescopes and carrying out a persistent programme of observing the Galactic Centre and its surrounding stars for many years, which ultimately led to the discovery of a black hole with a mass of about three million times that of the Sun. Genzel's group has in particular followed since 1992, the motion of several stars, around the Galactic Centre. These observations were first done with the MPE-built near-infrared speckle imaging camera SHARP on ESO's New Technology Telescope at La

  4. Volatility, house edge and prize structure of gambling games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Nigel E

    2011-12-01

    This study used simulations to examine the effect of prize structure on the outcome volatility and the number of winners of various game configurations. The two most common prize structures found in gambling games are even money payoff games (bet $1; win $2) found on most table games and multilevel prizes structures found in gambling machine games. Simulations were set up to examine the effect of prize structure on the long-term outcomes of these games. Eight different prize structures were compared in terms of the number of winners and volatility. It was found that the standard table game and commercial gambling machines produced fairly high numbers of short term winners (1 h), but few long term winners (50 h). It was found that the typical even money game set up produced the lowest level of volatility. Of the multilevel prize structures examined, the three simulations based on commercial gambling machines were the least volatile. The results are examined in terms of the pragmatics of game design. PMID:21243518

  5. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, His 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and Why He Didn't Get a Second Prize

    CERN Document Server

    Jarlskog, C

    2008-01-01

    "I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist." Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes. In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the "Theory of Everything"?

  6. Amount of earnings during prize contingency management treatment is associated with posttreatment abstinence outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Nancy M; Roll, John M

    2011-12-01

    Contingency management (CM) treatments that provide patients with the opportunity to earn chances of winning prizes of varying magnitudes are becoming increasingly popular. In the CM literature, magnitude of reinforcement is linked with effect sizes, such that CM treatments that provide larger magnitude reinforcement are more efficacious than those that provide lower magnitude reinforcement. With prize CM, even when magnitudes of overall expected prize earnings are constant, some patients win more prizes than others. Thus, patients who win larger overall amounts of prizes during treatment may have better outcomes than those who win fewer prizes. This study evaluated the impact of overall amounts of prizes won on long-term abstinence outcomes. The dollar amount of prizes won during prize CM treatments was determined from 78 cocaine-abusing methadone-maintenance patients who were randomized to prize CM treatments in three clinical trials. Abstinence three months following the end of the CM intervention was the primary dependent variable. The dollar amount of prizes won during CM treatment was a significant predictor of submission of cocaine-negative urine samples and self-reports of cocaine abstinence at the follow-up evaluation, even after controlling for other variables associated with long-term abstinence, such as pretreatment urinalysis results and longest duration of abstinence achieved during treatment. These results suggest that magnitudes of earnings during prize CM may impact outcomes and call for further experimentation of parameters related to the efficacy of prize CM.

  7. A PATENT PRIZE SYSTEM TO PROMOTE DEVELOPMENT OF NEW ANTIBIOTICS AND CONSERVATION OF EXISTING ONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Nickas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are valuable drugs that fight bacterial infections, but our supply of antibiotics is at risk. Existing antibiotics gradually lose their effectiveness due to bacterial resistance, and few new antibiotics are being developed to replace them. A variety of models have been proposed to promote the conservation of existing antibiotics or incentivize private actors, i.e., drug companies, to develop new ones. Previous models, however, all encourage investment in antibiotic research and development via patent rights, which also create an incentive to oversell antibiotics. Because the inappropriate use of antibiotics accelerates the development of resistance, patent rights put the public health objectives of antibiotic development and conservation in tension with one another. This article proposes an antibiotic-specific patent prize system that uncouples the two policy objectives necessary to achieve a stable antibiotic supply. Although others have proposed patent prize systems to promote drug development generally, the system described here is tailored to address the unique features of antibiotic markets.

  8. Future accelerators (?)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Womersley

    2003-08-21

    I describe the future accelerator facilities that are currently foreseen for electroweak scale physics, neutrino physics, and nuclear structure. I will explore the physics justification for these machines, and suggest how the case for future accelerators can be made.

  9. Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. receives architectural and engineering design contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. announced that a subsidiary company won a contract from Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), to provide architectural and engineering design services for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) conventional facilities" (1/2 page)

  10. Literary prizes and literary taste : A comparative study of prizes given to children's books

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This is a study examining which children’s and young adult’s fiction books have won the most prestigious literary awards during the last decade in Norway and England. The awards I am studying are the Norwegian Critic’s Awards for the best children’s and young adult’s book and the British Carnegie Medal in Literature. These two literary prizes are awarded by judges who belong within different professions; the Critic’s Award for the best children’s and young adult’s books is awarded by ...

  11. Posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics available from the Library

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Library

    2014-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences produces three posters annually, each of which explains the motivation for the award of the Nobel prizes in Physics, Chemistry and Economics.   The files of the posters are available here: http://www.kva.se/en/Prizes/Nobel-prizes/Nobel-Posters/ The good news is that the CERN Library has got a stock of posters of the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physics. They are available free from the Library (52-1-052).

  12. Recognizing mid-career productivity: the 2008 Retrovirology Prize, call for nomination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A recent analysis suggested a narrow age range for productivity of innovative work by researchers. The Retrovirology Prize seeks to recognize the research of a mid-career retrovirologist between the ages of 45 and 60. The 2007 Retrovirology Prize was awarded to Dr. Karen Beemon. Nominations are being solicited for the 2008 prize.

  13. The Nobel Prize Award Ceremony 1984 at the Stockholm Concert Hall, Sweden, 10 December

    CERN Multimedia

    TV1 Fakta, Stockholm

    1984-01-01

    The Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature as well as the Economics Prize are awarded on 10 December at the Stockholm Concert Hall in Sweden. Organized by the Nobel Foundation, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony is the highlight of the Nobel Week celebrating the Nobel Laureates and their work.

  14. The Nobel Prize Award Ceremony 1992 at the Stockholm Concert Hall, Sweden, 10 December

    CERN Multimedia

    Eurovision / TF1

    1992-01-01

    The Nobel Prizes in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine and Literature as well as the Economics Prize are awarded on 10 December at the Stockholm Concert Hall in Sweden. Organized by the Nobel Foundation, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony is the highlight of the Nobel Week – celebrating the Nobel Laureates and their work.

  15. Highlights from e-EPS: Jean-Michel Raimond wins EPS Edison-Volta Prize 2014

    CERN Multimedia

    Martina Knoop, e-EPS News

    2014-01-01

    e-EPS News is a monthly addition to the CERN Bulletin line-up, showcasing articles from e-EPS – the European Physical Society newsletter – as part of a collaboration between the two publications.   The European Physical Society has the pleasure to announce that the 2014 EPS Edison-Volta Prize is awarded to Jean-Michel Raimond for “seminal contribution to physics (that) have paved the way for novel explorations of quantum mechanics and have opened new routes in quantum information processing”. J.-M. Raimond’s PhD thesis was supervised by Serge Haroche at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, France, in the early 1980′s, and together S. Haroche, M. Brune and J.-M. Raimond have built an extremely successful research group since then. J.-M. Raimond has made seminal contributions to the development of cavity QED experiments, in particular involving circular Rydberg atoms interacting with very high-Q superc...

  16. Prize Contingency Management for Smoking Cessation: A Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledgerwood, David M.; Arfken, Cynthia L.; Petry, Nancy M.; Alessi, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adjunctive behavioral smoking cessation treatments have the potential to improve outcomes beyond standard care. The present study had two aims: 1) compare standard care (SC) for smoking (four weeks of brief counseling and monitoring) to SC plus prize-based contingency management (CM), involving the chance to earn prizes on days with demonstrated smoking abstinence (carbon monoxide (CO) ≤6ppm); and 2) compare the relative efficacy of two prize reinforcement schedules - one a traditional CM schedule, and the second an early enhanced CM schedule providing greater reinforcement magnitude in the initial week of treatment but equal overall reinforcement. Methods Participants (N = 81 nicotine-dependent cigarette smokers) were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. Results Prize CM resulted in significant reductions in cigarette smoking relative to SC. These reductions were not apparent at follow-up. We found no meaningful differences between the traditional and enhanced CM conditions. Conclusions Our findings reveal that prize CM leads to significant reductions in smoking during treatment relative to a control intervention, but the benefits did not extend long-term. PMID:24793364

  17. Pomeranchuk Prize awarded to André Martin

    CERN Multimedia

    Jordan Juras

    2010-01-01

    Professor André Martin has been awarded the I.Ya.Pomeranchuk Prize 2010, alongside Professor Valentine Zakharov.   André Martin, CERN theorist, pictured at the ceremony held in honour of his 80th birthday (August 2009). Established by the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP) in memory of an outstanding scientist Isaak Yakovlevich Pomeranchuk, the prize is awarded for the study of analytic properties of the scattering amplitude; which lead to the Froissart—Martin bound on the cross section growth with energy. The prize comes as a great honor for Martin, who was in fact a good friend of Mr. Pomeranchuk, "I am surprised and delighted to learn that I will be receiving the 2010 Pomeranchuk Prize. I was an admirer of Pomeranchuk and we shared a great friendship. I met with him for the last time in Erevan (Armenia) in 1965. As a good-bye, he told me, 'Analyticity exists'. This is precisely what I proved to earn the prize"....

  18. Physics GRE Scores of Prize Postdoctoral Fellows in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Levesque, Emily M; Tremblay, Grant R

    2015-01-01

    The Physics GRE is currently a required element of the graduate admissions process in nearly all U.S. astronomy programs; however, its predictive power and utility as a means of selecting "successful" applicants has never been examined. We circulated a short questionnaire to 271 people who have held U.S. prize postdoctoral fellowships in astrophysics between 2010-2015, asking them to report their Physics GRE scores (this should not in any way be interpreted as a belief that a prize fellowship is the best or only metric of "success" in astronomy). The response rate was 64%, and the responding sample is unbiased with respect to the overall gender distribution of prize fellows. The responses reveal that the Physics GRE scores of prize fellows do not adhere to any minimum percentile score and show no statistically significant correlation with the number of first author papers published. As an example, a Physics GRE percentile cutoff of 60% would have eliminated 44% of 2010-2015 U.S. prize postdoctoral fellows, in...

  19. An X-prize for transport airships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hochstetler, R. [SAIC Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Prentice, B.E. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg, MB (Canada). Transport Inst.

    2007-07-01

    Domestic air freight in the United States is expected to increase by at least 3 per cent every year for the next decade, while international demand will increase at twice that rate. As such, a new type of airship will be the most promising technological advance for the twenty-first century. Congestion in built up areas and demand for transport in remote areas has stimulated a resurgence of market interest in the potential value of lighter-than-air (LTA) vehicles for transport. Although most technical challenges have been addressed, the greatest challenge facing shippers is a lack of business confidence and policy directions to support investment in technology. Shippers are reluctant to commit the initial development funds needed to construct operational prototypes for testing. In 2004 and 2005, SAIC Canada conducted studies on airship technologies for the United States Army, and for use in the construction of oil and gas pipelines in remote regions. This paper presented a literature review of LTA technology as well as a brief market assessment. The criterion for an airship X-prize was then proposed as a challenge to stimulate the development of a transport airship capable of year round operations. It was concluded that transport airships offer a more benign system of transport that reduce greenhouse gases and provide a means of mitigating the damages done by existing transport services. 5 refs.

  20. Accelerating Value Creation with Accelerators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonsson, Eythor Ivar

    2015-01-01

    accelerator programs. Microsoft runs accelerators in seven different countries. Accelerators have grown out of the infancy stage and are now an accepted approach to develop new ventures based on cutting-edge technology like the internet of things, mobile technology, big data and virtual reality. It is also...... with the traditional audit and legal universes and industries are examples of emerging potentials both from a research and business point of view to exploit and explore further. The accelerator approach may therefore be an Idea Watch to consider, no matter which industry you are in, because in essence accelerators...

  1. USAJOBS Job Opportunity Announcements (JOA) REST API

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — This REST-based API is designed to support lightweight Federal Job Opportunity Announcement (JOA) content consumption by consumers. It is anticipated that this API...

  2. USAJOBS Job Opportunity Announcements (JOA) SOAP API

    Data.gov (United States)

    Office of Personnel Management — The purpose of the SOAP based API is to provide the full Federal Job Opportunity Announcement (JOA) content to the consumer. It is anticipated that this API will be...

  3. 2006 RE Export Enterprises List Announced

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ According to "Requirement for RE Export Enterprises and Application Procedure in 2006", the Ministry of Commerce P.R.C announced "2006 Rare Earth Export Enterprises List "on December 30th of 2005. The enterprises are listed below.

  4. New Funding Opportunities for Small Businesses Announced

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program recently announced $8 million in new contract funding opportunities to assist small businesses with cancer research and technology development. The 12 new contract funding opp

  5. Discovery announced of four new elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2016-02-01

    The International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) have announced the discovery of four new elements: 113, 115, 117 and 118 - completing the periodic table's seventh row.

  6. Romanians and the Nobel Prizes for Science and Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasilica Sirbu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There is much to be said about the Nobel Prizes. Numerous pages are written each year to promote, describe, analyze and criticize the prizes, their initiator and their evolution since 1901. The purpose of this study is to bring back to light from the dust of the archives information about those Romanians who were ahead of their times through their outstanding thinking and understanding of the world. Little has been written about those nominated, since it has been considered more relevant to focus on the winners. There were plentiful creative minds who only needed an opportunity to be known to the world. Famous Romanian names show up from the archives and the nomination database provided by the Nobel Institution and enable us to get a broad perspective of the nominators and the nominees. Ironically, as in the case of the Nobel Peace Prize, most of those who genuinely had a chance to win were never nominated.

  7. Marie and Irene Curie. The first female Nobel Prize winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie Curie was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1903 and in 1911. Also her daughter, Irene Joliot-Curie, received a Nobel Prize for science in 1935. In this book an overview is given of the academic world at that time: limited access to universities for women, the carriers of both women in physics and their pioneering research and discoveries, the refusal of Marie Curie by the French Academy of Sciences, the awarding of the Nobel Prize and the assignment of Irene Joliot-Curie as the first female minister in France, the impact of the two World Wars, their married and private lives and the constant smear campaign of the press against both women. The lives and works of both women are hold against the light of the present position of women in physical sciences

  8. Reminiscing Stock Splits Announcement: A Malaysian Case

    OpenAIRE

    Zahiruddin Ghazali; Fauziah Md. Taib; Noraini Othman

    2014-01-01

    This study attempts to understands and verify the effects of stock splits on the abnormal returns of announcing companies share prices using Market Adjusted Returns (MAR) Model. Test findings reveal splits announcements in Malaysia result in positive but insignificant abnormal returns. Additional OLS test was carry out to examine the relationship between companies’ cumulative abnormal returns (CAAR) and prior dividend yield (PDY). Result from uni-variate regression analysis shows there is min...

  9. VEDs for charged particle accelerators: Indian scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the initial times after their invention, the charged particle accelerators have, primarily, been used for fundamental studies on nuclei and atoms. From the first modern accelerator, the cathode ray tube, used by J.J. Thomson for the discovery of electron, very recently the gigantic 27 km circumference Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is operational in the search of Higg's boson and related physics issues. Particle accelerators have emerged as powerful microscopes for investigating the finest details of cells, genes, molecules, atoms, protons, neutrons, muons, electrons, quarks and, possibly, still undiscovered even more fundamental constituents of the universe, such as dark matter and dark energy. Several noble prize winning discoveries have been made using accelerators. Accelerators are now being used in a wide area of industrial and medical applications. They are used for the production of radioisotopes for medical imaging, cancer therapy, food sterilization, treatment of waste water, sterilization of medical equipment, material modification, mass spectroscopy, cargo scanning, fabrication of semiconductors etc. Ongoing effort towards the development of accelerators with megawatt beam power is showing hope for a cleaner source of nuclear energy and treatment of nuclear waste. Several tens of thousands of accelerators are presently operational in the world for basic research and applications. Development of new accelerators has several times been driven by new technologies and materials and sometimes they have driven the technological developments towards cutting edge. Some examples are ultra-high vacuum in large volumes, superfluid helium in cryogenics, cryocoolers, superconducting magnets and RF cavities, high power vacuum electronic devices, global control systems, superfast computing and communication networks, giant data storage/processing systems etc. India has been pursuing a fairly robust programme of accelerator development at various institutions. It

  10. PUBLISHER'S ANNOUNCEMENT: Fast Track Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Robert; Adams, Judith

    2006-12-01

    We are very pleased to announce that Classical and Quantum Gravity will launch a new Fast Track Communications section from January 2007, after which date Letters to the Editor will no longer be published. Fast Track Communications (FTCs) are short, timely papers presenting only the most important new developments. To reflect their high significance FTCs will be published at the front of the journal and will be freely available online to ensure the widest visibility. As with all articles submitted to Classical and Quantum Gravity, there are no page charges, including online colour reproduction and multi-media attachments. Authors who wish to include colour in the print version of their article will, however, be required to cover the costs. Submissions to the new Fast Track Communications section are very welcome. For details of how to submit an FTC please visit IOP Publishing's webpages http://authors.iop.org, or contact the journal at cqg@iop.org. To facilitate refereeing, authors are asked to submit a short statement accompanying their FTC, outlining why they feel that the article merits high-priority publication. Length restrictions will also be applied such that FTCs should be a maximum of 8 journal pages (5000 words) in length. The section will aim to be a high-quality, high-profile outlet for new and important research of interest to the Classical and Quantum Gravity community. We look forward to seeing it grow and take shape over the next year.

  11. Laser accelerator

    OpenAIRE

    Vigil, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited In 1979,W. B. Colson and S. K. Ride proposed a new kind of electron accelerator using a uniform magnetic field in combination with a circularly-polarized laser field. A key concept is to couple the oscillating electric field to the electron’s motion so that acceleration is sustained. This dissertation investigates the performance of the proposed laser accelerator using modern high powered lasers and mag-netic fields that are significan...

  12. Club of Bologna International Best PhD Prize 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Fiala

    2012-01-01

    The Club of Bologna, in collaboration with UNACOMA, will be awarding a prize for the best PhD theses on subjects related to agricultural machinery design and development. Up to ten theses will be selected and the best five of these will have the chance of being presented during the annual Club of Bologna meeting that will be held from 9 to 10 November 2012, on occasion of the EIMA. The authors of the best three PhD theses will also receive a cash prize. The winners will be guests in Bologna o...

  13. Pioneers in ozone research receive Nobel Prize in chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded its 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three AGU members for their work in atmospheric chemistry, particularly concerning the formation and decomposition of ozone. Only one other Nobel prize has ever been awarded in the realm of atmospheric research. The honorees are professors Paul Crutzen of the Max-Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany; Mario Molina of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and F. Sherwood Rowland of the University of California, Irvine. The Academy credits the three with contributing to “our salvation from a global environmental problem that could have catastrophic consequences.”

  14. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    This book contains two parts about items by chemistry. The first part introduces Alfred Bernhard Nodel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne and Firefly. The second part lists PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond Incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation work, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Freon gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and winners of Nobel prize in physics.

  15. Firm Incentives for Invention Prizes with Multiple Winners

    OpenAIRE

    S. Keith Berry

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers several multiple winner models where firms compete for invention prizes determined by the social planner. The short-run model, with a fixed number of firms, can result in negative expected societal benefit where welfare gains are totally dissipated. In the long-run model, with entry and exit, it is demonstrated that there is always a positive net welfare gain. The final model developed is one where the social planner sets the prize and the number of firms. Under certain c...

  16. F.A. Hayek's Influence on Nobel Prize Winners

    OpenAIRE

    Skarbek, David

    2009-01-01

    F.A. Hayek’s broad research program has led some to conclude that his impact on economics has been minimal. This citation study examines the frequency of Nobel laureates cited by other laureates in the official Prize Lectures to understand how elite economists influence other elite economists. It finds that Hayek is the second most frequently mentioned laureate in the Prize Lectures, and he has the second most publication citations of the laureates. Hayek’s influence on the top tier of econom...

  17. The time-dependent prize-collecting arc routing problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Black, Dan; Eglese, Richard; Wøhlk, Sanne

    2013-01-01

    A new problem is introduced named the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-PARP). It is particularly relevant to situations where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries on a road network where travel times change with the t......A new problem is introduced named the Time-Dependent Prize-Collecting Arc Routing Problem (TD-PARP). It is particularly relevant to situations where a transport manager has to choose between a number of full truck load pick-ups and deliveries on a road network where travel times change...

  18. The 2012 Nobel Prize in physics and David Wineland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2012 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to David Wineland, together with Serge Haroche. David Wineland received the prize for ground-breaking experimental methods that enabled the measurement and manipulation of individual quantum systems, especially systems with trapped ions. He improved a trapped ion system and opened a new quantum world leading to quantum computation. He also realized optical atomic ion clocks with unprecedented precision through his experimental research. This article briefly reviews the history of trapped ion systems, the development of trapped-ion based quantum computation, and the development of the atomic ion clock, which are closely related to Wineland's achievements. (authors)

  19. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book contains two parts about items by chemistry. The first part introduces Alfred Bernhard Nodel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne and Firefly. The second part lists PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond Incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation work, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Freon gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and winners of Nobel prize in physics.

  20. Ecosystems Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. H.; Frame, M. T.; Ferriter, O.; Recker, J.

    2014-12-01

    Stimulating innovation and private sector entrepreneurship is an important way to advance the preparedness of communities, businesses and individuals for the impacts of climate change on certain aspects of ecosystems, such as: fire regimes; water availability; carbon sequestration; biodiversity conservation; weather-related hazards, and the spread of invasive species. The creation of tools is critical to help communities and natural resource managers better understand the impacts of climate change on ecosystems and the potential resulting implications for ecosystem services and conservation efforts. The Department of the Interior is leading an interagency effort to develop the Ecosystems Vulnerability theme as part of the President's Climate Action Plan. This effort will provide seamless access to relevant datasets that can help address such issues as: risk of wildfires to local communities and federal lands; water sensitivity to climate change; and understanding the role of ecosystems in a changing climate. This session will provide an overview of the proposed Ecosystem Vulnerability Challenge and Prize Competition, outlining the intended audience, scope, goals, and overall timeline. The session will provide an opportunity for participants to offer new ideas. Through the Challenge, access will be made available to critical datasets for software developers, engineers, scientists, students, and researchers to develop and submit applications addressing critical science issues facing our Nation today. Application submission criteria and guidelines will also be discussed. The Challenge will be open to all sectors and organizations (i.e. federal, non-federal, private sector, non-profits, and universities) within the United States. It is anticipated the Challenge will run from early January 2015 until spring of 2015.

  1. LIBO accelerates

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The prototype module of LIBO, a linear accelerator project designed for cancer therapy, has passed its first proton-beam acceleration test. In parallel a new version - LIBO-30 - is being developed, which promises to open up even more interesting avenues.

  2. 77 FR 16229 - Announcement of Requirements and Registration for the “2012 ASPR Challenge Titled Now Trending...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ... prize submission will be awarded $21,000.00. If a team wins the prize, the prize money will be divided... mobile handheld device, console, or any platform broadly accessible on the open Internet. 3....

  3. Tight Focus on Instruction Wins Texas District Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Lesli A.

    2009-01-01

    It took a while for four-time finalist Aldine, Texas, to win the Broad Prize for Urban Education. But it took even longer to craft the system that ultimately put the district over the top. Educators in Aldine district have been working for more than a decade to refine their "managed instruction" system. Reviewers examined how the school district,…

  4. The Nobel Prize in Medicine for Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Charles G.

    2004-01-01

    Nobel Prize in Medicine awarded in December 2003 to chemist Paul C. Lauterbur and physicist Peter Mansfield for the development of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), a long overdue recognition of the huge impact MRI has had in medical diagnostics and research is mentioned. MRI was derived, and remains an extension of nuclear magnetic resonance…

  5. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robyn Ready

    2011-12-31

    The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program conducted education and outreach activities and used the competition's technical goals and vehicle demonstrations as a means of attracting students and the public to learn more about advanced vehicle technologies, energy efficiency, climate change, alternative fuels, and the science and math behind efficient vehicle development. The Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE Education Program comprised three integrated components that were designed to educate the general public and create a multi-tiered initiative to engage students and showcase the 21st century skills students will need to compete in our global economy: teamwork, creativity, strong literacy, math and science skills, and innovative thinking. The elements included an Online Experience, a National Student Contest, and in person education events and activites. The project leveraged online connections, strategic partnerships, in-classroom, and beyond-the-classroom initiatives, as well as mainstream media. This education program supported by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) also funded the specification of vehicle telemetry and the full development and operation of an interactive online experience that allowed internet users to follow the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE vehicles as they performed in real-time during the Progressive Insurance Automotive X PRIZE competition events.

  6. What Is Community College Excellence? Lessons from the Aspen Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyner, Joshua

    2012-01-01

    Over the past year, in a process to select the winner of the Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence, the Aspen Institute has convened national experts to define and determine how to measure "excellence," to identify community colleges with high levels of student success, and to help more community colleges understand what can be done to…

  7. The 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlstein, Linda

    2013-01-01

    For millions of Americans, community colleges provide an essential pathway to well-paying jobs and continuing higher education. The Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence honors those institutions that strive for and achieve exceptional levels of success for all students, while they are in college and after they graduate. Community colleges…

  8. Defining Excellence: Lessons from the 2013 Aspen Prize Finalists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aspen Institute, 2013

    2013-01-01

    In many respects, one couldn't find a group of 10 schools more diverse than the finalists for the 2013 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence. One community college serves 1,500 students, another 56,000. There are institutions devoted primarily--even solely--to technical degrees, and ones devoted mainly to preparing students for further…

  9. Templeton Prize winner defends Christianity's credibility in a scientific age

    CERN Multimedia

    Heffern, Rich

    2002-01-01

    The 2002 Templeton Prize has gone to the Rev. John C. Polkinghome, a British mathematical physicist and Anglican priest, and a key spokesperson for belief in God in an age of science, defending the ideal that faith is not against science but inconcert with it

  10. Eppur si muove! The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jeremy C; Roux, Benoît

    2013-12-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry has been awarded to Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt, and Arieh Warshel for their work on developing computational methods to study complex chemical systems. Their work has led to mechanistic critical insights into chemical systems both large and small and has enabled progress in a number of different fields, including structural biology.

  11. E pluribus tres: the 2009 nobel prize in chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W

    2009-12-01

    This year's Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology.

  12. Modular Curriculum: English, American Nobel Prize Winners in Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James A.

    This independent study module treats those Americans who have been awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. They include Sinclair Lewis, Eugene O'Neill, T. S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Ernest Hemingway, John Steinbeck, and Pearl Buck. Selections from the writings of these authors are included. Their works represent many literary genres and also…

  13. Nobel-Prize Economists Back A Stable RMB Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    @@ RMB has been put under great pressure of appreciation. But after all, what will be the after effect? In the Forum of the 8th China Beijing International High-tech Expo in May, three Nobel-Prize economists said No simultaneously to the RMB appreciation.

  14. E Pluribus Tres: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Summary This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology. PMID:20004159

  15. Nobel Prize-winning economist to speak on Oct. 3

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    Nobel Prize winning economist Eric Maskin, professor of social science at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, will present "Mechanism Design: How to Implement Social Goals," on Saturday, Oct. 3 at 2 p.m. in Pamplin Hall Room 1045 on the Virginia Tech campus.

  16. Stephen Prisley recognized for contribution to 2007 Nobel Peace Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2008-01-01

    Stephen Prisley, associate professor of forest inventory and geographical information systems (GIS) in Virginia Tech's College of Natural Resources, has received a certificate commemorating his involvement with the International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), which received the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize along with former Vice President Al Gore.

  17. E Pluribus Tres: The 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    This year’s Nobel Prize in Chemistry celebrates a multitude of research areas, making the difficult selection of those most responsible for providing atomic details of the nanomachine that makes proteins according to genetic instructions. The Ribosome and RNA polymerase (recognized in 2006) structures highlight a puzzling asymmetry at the origins of biology.

  18. The 2007 Nobel Prize in Economics: Mechanism Design Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Èihák

    2008-01-01

    The 2007 Nobel Prize in Economics has been awarded to Leonid Hurwicz, Eric Maskin, and Roger Myerson, for their contributions to mechanism design theory. The article discusses the importance of mechanism design theory for modern economics, focusing on some of its implications for economic policy making.

  19. Harry Smith — recipient of the 2008 Molecular Ecology Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harry Smith is a scholar, mentor, internationally renowned researcher, eloquent speaker and author, pioneering journal editor and highly valued colleague who has contributed greatly in multiple ways to plant science and the community. He richly deserves the honour of the Molecular Ecology Prize....

  20. Reclaiming "Lost Prizes": An Interview with Ken McCluskey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bockern, Steve

    2012-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Dr. Ken McCluskey, Dean and Professor of Education at the University of Winnipeg. He is known internationally for his work in several areas including: (1) mentoring; (2) attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder; (3) at-risk children and youth (where his "Lost Prizes" and related projects serve as models…

  1. Nobel-Prize Economists Back A Stable RMB Rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

      RMB has been put under great pressure of appreciation. But after all, what will be the after effect? In the Forum of the 8th China Beijing International High-tech Expo in May, three Nobel-Prize economists said No simultaneously to the RMB appreciation.……

  2. Student Intern Lands Top Prize in National Science Competition | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Student intern Sam Pritt’s interest in improving geolocation led him to develop a project that won a top regional prize at the Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology in November. Pritt was awarded a $3,000 college scholarship, and he competed in the national competition in early December.

  3. John Hardy is the UK's first Breakthrough Prize laureate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Seamus J

    2015-12-01

    John Hardy, Professor of Neuroscience at University College London and Editorial Board member of The FEBS Journal, has been awarded The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences in recognition of his work identifying mutations that cause amyloid build-up in the brain--research that has transformed the study of Alzheimer's disease and other major neurodegenerative diseases.

  4. "Not Censorship but Selection": Censorship and/as Prizing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    This essay calls for a fresh critical approach to the topic of censorship, suggesting that anticensorship efforts, while important and necessary, function much like literary prizing. The analysis draws especially on James English's recent study "The Economy of Prestige." There are two central arguments: first, that the librarian ethic of…

  5. John Hardy is the UK's first Breakthrough Prize laureate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Seamus J

    2015-12-01

    John Hardy, Professor of Neuroscience at University College London and Editorial Board member of The FEBS Journal, has been awarded The Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences in recognition of his work identifying mutations that cause amyloid build-up in the brain--research that has transformed the study of Alzheimer's disease and other major neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26573785

  6. The ozone hole and the 1995 Nobel prize in chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To mark to award of the 1995 Nobel Prize in chemistry to three world renowned atmospheric chemists, this paper recalls the history of scientific progress in stratospheric ozone chemistry. Then it summarizes current knowledge of ozone-layer depletion and its impact on climate, vegetation and human health. (author). 21 refs., 12 figs

  7. Norman Ramsey. Nobel Prize Winner in Physics (1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman Ramsey (Washington 1915) received the Nobel Prize in Physics (shared with con H. G. Dehmelt and W. Paul) for the development of study techniques for Atomic Physics. This tireless researcher participated in the discovery of the Magnetic Resonance Method for Molecular Emission. He invented the hydrogen maser and the hydrogen atomic clock, in addition to being a profile author. (Author)

  8. Neutron scattering and the 1994 Nobel Physics Prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron scattering is an efficient method for detecting the microstructure of matter by which we can study, for example, details of the phonon spectrum in solids, and the isotopic effect. Bertram N. Brockhouse and Clifford G. Shull earned the Nobel Physics Prize in 1994 for their significant contributions in this domain

  9. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  10. Engineering alumni present fourth $10,000 prize

    OpenAIRE

    Nystrom, Lynn A.

    2005-01-01

    A group of seven Virginia Tech alumni, in conjunction with the university's College of Engineering, has awarded its fourth $10,000 prize to university's Department of Computer Science in recognition of improvements to the department's Ph.D. program during the past year.

  11. The competition 'First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y.; Żuberek, R.

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants.

  12. How Robert A. Millikan Got the Physics Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panusch, Martin; Heering, Peter; Singh, Rajinder

    2010-01-01

    In 1923, R.A. Millikan was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for his work on the elementary charge of electricity and on the photoelectric effect. Recently, historical research had a focus on Millikan's publication practice, as well as on the role of his assistant, Harvey Fletcher. Several studies have raised doubts on whether Millikan can…

  13. The Competition "First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzkowski, W.; Surya, Y; Zuberek, R

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the history of the competition First Step to Nobel Prize in Physics organized by Poland, its development from a national workshop in 1991/92 to an international competition nowadays and its organization, as well as the results obtained by the participants. (Contains 1 table.)

  14. SunShot Catalyst Prize Competition Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solar Energy Technologies Office

    2015-04-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Catalyst Energy Innovation Prize, an open innovation program launched in 2014 by the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. This program aims to catalyze the rapid creation and development of products and solutions that address near-term challenges in the U.S. solar energy marketplace.

  15. Berners-Lee wins inaugural Millennium Technology prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    "World Wide Web inventor Tim Berners-Lee today was named recipient of the first-ever Millennium Technology Prize. The honor, which is accompanied by one million euros, is bestowed by the Finnish Technology Award Foundation as an international acknowledgement of outstanding technological innovation aimed at promoting quality of life and sustainable economic and societal development" (1 page)

  16. Realized Bond-Stock Correlation: Macroeconomic Announcement Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Charlotte; Ranaldo, Angelo

    2005-01-01

    We investigate the effects of macroeconomic announcements on the realized correlation between bond and stock returns. Our results deliver insights into the dominating drivers of bond-stock comovements. We find that it is not so much the surprise component of the announcement, but the mere fact that...... an announcement occurs that influences the realized bond-stock correlation. The impact of macroeconomic announcements varies across the business cycle. Announcement effects are highly dependent on the sign of the realized bond-stock correlation which has recently gone from positive to negative....... Macroeconomic announcement effects on realized bond and stock volatilities are also investigated....

  17. IAEA Nobel Peace Prize cancer and nutrition fund

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Norwegian Nobel Committee awarded the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize to the IAEA and Director General ElBaradei in equal shares. The IAEA and its Director General won the 2005 Peace Prize for their efforts to prevent nuclear energy from being used for military purposes and to ensure that nuclear energy for peaceful purposes is used in the safest possible way. The IAEA Board of Governors subsequently decided that the IAEA's share of the prestigious prize would be used to create a special fund for fellowships and training to improve cancer control and childhood nutrition in the developing world. This fund is known as the 'IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund'. The money will be dedicated to enhancing human resources in developing regions of the world for improved cancer control and childhood nutrition. In the area of cancer control, the money will be spent on establishing regional cancer training institutes for the training of new doctors, medical physicists and technologists in radiation oncology to improve cancer treatment and care, as part of the IAEA's Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT). In the realm of nutrition, the focus of the Fund will be on capacity building in the use of nuclear techniques to develop interventions to contribute to improved nutrition and health for children in the developing world. Fund-supported fellowship awards will target young professionals, especially women, from Member States, through the IAEA's Technical Cooperation (TC) Programme. Alongside such awards, regional events will be organized in Africa, Asia and Latin America in cancer control and nutrition during 2006. The IAEA Secretariat is encouraging Member States and donors to contribute to the IAEA Nobel Peace Prize Cancer and Nutrition Fund by providing additional resources, in cash and in-kind

  18. Muller's Nobel Prize Lecture: when ideology prevailed over science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2012-03-01

    This paper extends and confirms the report of Calabrese (Calabrese, E. J. (2011b). Muller's Nobel Lecture on dose-response for ionizing radiation: Ideology or science? Arch. Toxicol. 85, 1495-1498) that Hermann J. Muller knowingly made deceptive comments in his 1946 Nobel Prize Lecture (Muller, H. J. (1946). Nobel Prize Lecture. Stockholm, Sweden. Available at http://www.nobelprize.org/. Accessed December 12) concerning the dose-response. Supporting a linearity perspective, Muller stated there is "no escape from the conclusion that there is no threshold" while knowing the results of a recent study by Ernst Caspari and Curt Stern contradicted these comments. Recently uncovered private correspondence between Muller and Stern reveals Muller's scientific assessment of the Caspari and Stern manuscript in a letter from Muller to Stern 5 weeks (14 January 1947) after his Nobel Prize Lecture of 12 December 1946. Muller indicated that the manuscript was of acceptable scientific quality; he indicated the manuscript should be published, but the findings needed replication because it significantly challenged the linearity hypothesis. These findings complement the previous letter (12 November 1946 letter from Muller to Stern), which revealed that Muller received the Caspari and Stern manuscript, recognized it as significant, and recommended its replication 5 weeks before his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller therefore supported this position immediately before and after his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller's opinions on the Caspari and Stern manuscript therefore had not changed during the time leading up to his Lecture, supporting the premise that his Lecture comments were deceptive. These findings are of historical and practical significance because Muller's comments were a notable contributory factor, changing how risks would be assessed for carcinogens (i.e., changing from a threshold to a linear model) throughout the 20th century to the present. PMID:22166484

  19. Muller's Nobel Prize Lecture: when ideology prevailed over science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2012-03-01

    This paper extends and confirms the report of Calabrese (Calabrese, E. J. (2011b). Muller's Nobel Lecture on dose-response for ionizing radiation: Ideology or science? Arch. Toxicol. 85, 1495-1498) that Hermann J. Muller knowingly made deceptive comments in his 1946 Nobel Prize Lecture (Muller, H. J. (1946). Nobel Prize Lecture. Stockholm, Sweden. Available at http://www.nobelprize.org/. Accessed December 12) concerning the dose-response. Supporting a linearity perspective, Muller stated there is "no escape from the conclusion that there is no threshold" while knowing the results of a recent study by Ernst Caspari and Curt Stern contradicted these comments. Recently uncovered private correspondence between Muller and Stern reveals Muller's scientific assessment of the Caspari and Stern manuscript in a letter from Muller to Stern 5 weeks (14 January 1947) after his Nobel Prize Lecture of 12 December 1946. Muller indicated that the manuscript was of acceptable scientific quality; he indicated the manuscript should be published, but the findings needed replication because it significantly challenged the linearity hypothesis. These findings complement the previous letter (12 November 1946 letter from Muller to Stern), which revealed that Muller received the Caspari and Stern manuscript, recognized it as significant, and recommended its replication 5 weeks before his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller therefore supported this position immediately before and after his Nobel Prize Lecture. Muller's opinions on the Caspari and Stern manuscript therefore had not changed during the time leading up to his Lecture, supporting the premise that his Lecture comments were deceptive. These findings are of historical and practical significance because Muller's comments were a notable contributory factor, changing how risks would be assessed for carcinogens (i.e., changing from a threshold to a linear model) throughout the 20th century to the present.

  20. ["The prize goes to self-sufficiency"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trias, M

    1993-12-01

    The Colombian family planning organization Profamilia was recognized at the 1993 annual meeting of the Western Hemisphere Region of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) for its efforts to achieve financial self-sufficiency. Because of the announced termination of annual assistance from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), one of Profamilia's most significant external donors, the pressure to achieve self-sufficiency has intensified. Funds will be made available to Profamilia before the termination of assistance to improve infrastructure, equipment, and training. A large quantity of contraceptives will also be provided, and a new endowment will be created by USAID from which Profamilia may use the earnings. Profamilia's strategy for achieving self-sufficiency consists of five specific tactics. Recuperation refers to a cautious but sustained increase in family planning fees. Diversification refers to the medical and surgical activities apart from family planning that Profamilia will carry out for profit. The social marketing program will be expanded and improved. The fourth tactic involves a series of unrelated mechanisms to generate income, and the fifth refers to reduction of all nonessential expenditures. The measures will be made without hurting the quality of Profamilia's services or improving the average socioeconomic profile of users, who will continue to belong primarily to the less favored classes. The continued assistance of the IPPF is especially important to Profamilia as it prepares for the change. PMID:12287890

  1. ["The prize goes to self-sufficiency"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trias, M

    1993-12-01

    The Colombian family planning organization Profamilia was recognized at the 1993 annual meeting of the Western Hemisphere Region of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) for its efforts to achieve financial self-sufficiency. Because of the announced termination of annual assistance from the US Agency for International Development (USAID), one of Profamilia's most significant external donors, the pressure to achieve self-sufficiency has intensified. Funds will be made available to Profamilia before the termination of assistance to improve infrastructure, equipment, and training. A large quantity of contraceptives will also be provided, and a new endowment will be created by USAID from which Profamilia may use the earnings. Profamilia's strategy for achieving self-sufficiency consists of five specific tactics. Recuperation refers to a cautious but sustained increase in family planning fees. Diversification refers to the medical and surgical activities apart from family planning that Profamilia will carry out for profit. The social marketing program will be expanded and improved. The fourth tactic involves a series of unrelated mechanisms to generate income, and the fifth refers to reduction of all nonessential expenditures. The measures will be made without hurting the quality of Profamilia's services or improving the average socioeconomic profile of users, who will continue to belong primarily to the less favored classes. The continued assistance of the IPPF is especially important to Profamilia as it prepares for the change.

  2. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarlskog, Cecilia

    2008-11-01

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  3. Lord Rutherford of Nelson, his 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and why he didn't get a second prize

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'I have dealt with many different transformations with various periods of time, but the quickest that I have met was my own transformation in one moment from a physicist to a chemist.' Ernest Rutherford (Nobel Banquet, 1908) This article is about how Ernest Rutherford (1871-1937) got the 1908 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and why he did not get a second Prize for his subsequent outstanding discoveries in physics, specially the discovery of the atomic nucleus and the proton. Who were those who nominated him and who did he nominate for the Nobel Prizes? In order to put the Prize issue into its proper context, I will briefly describe Rutherford's whereabouts. Rutherford, an exceptionally gifted scientist who revolutionized chemistry and physics, was moulded in the finest classical tradition. What were his opinions on some scientific issues such as Einstein's photon, uncertainty relations and the future prospects for atomic energy? What would he have said about the 'Theory of Everything'? Extended version of an invited talk presented at the conference 'Neutrino 2008', Christchurch, NZ, 25-31 May 2008

  4. RIBA2011斯特灵奖入围名单揭晓%RIBA Stinling Prize 2011 Shorlist Announced

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    伦敦奥林匹克公园精美简洁的室内赛车场、埃文河畔斯科拉特福市皇家莎士比亚天鹅剧院谨慎精巧的重构、位于城市密集区极富想象力的伦敦学院、德里市全新的充满活力的文化中心、由20世纪80年代普通办公楼改造成的优雅的新办公和商业区、德国一座令人叹为观止的博物馆的扩建,以上为2011年有资格获得两万欧元奖金的RIBA斯特灵奖入围作品。今年是斯特灵奖设立的第16个年头,RIBA斯特灵奖被认为是欧洲地区关于英国建筑设计最及时、最权威的奖项。获奖者名单将于2011年10月10日在位于罗瑟勒姆的麦格纳科学探索中心公布。

  5. Northwest to Accelerate Retirement of Dc10 Aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Northwest Airlines announced that it will accelerate the retirement of its remaining 12DC10-30 aircraft in service. The airline said that during the next seven months,it will replace DC10 aircraft with new Airbus A330s and Boeing 747-400aircraft being returned to service.Currently, seven routes are served with the DC10.

  6. Differential Investors’ Response to Restatement Announcements: An Empirical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Demirkan

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available When firms announce a restatement of their financial reports, they inform investors that their prior announcements were faulty. Not only do companies lose credibility at times such as this but also their securities are revalued as investors respond to the substance of the announcement. We investigate investor size to understand how large and small investors differ in their responses to restatement announcements. Our results indicate that large investors seemingly anticipate the announcement; their holdings decrease before restatement announcements; consequently large investors trading after announcements is less pronounced than for smaller investors. The response of small investors depends on who has prompted the restatement: the company itself, FASB or the SEC and not on the reason for the restatement such as problems with revenue recognition, restructuring or cost/expense. Large investor trading volume is affected by both the source of the restatement and the reason for it. Large investors seem to anticipate potential problems, and sell securities before restatement announcements.

  7. Differential Investors' Response to Restatement Announcements: An Empirical Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebahattin Demirkan

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available When firms announce a restatement of their financial reports, they inform investors that their prior announcements were faulty. Not only do companies lose credibility at times such as this but also their securities are revalued as investors respond to the substance of the announcement. We investigate investor size to understand how large and small investors differ in their responses to restatement announcements. Our results indicate that large investors seemingly anticipate the announcement; their holdings decrease before restatement announcements; consequently large investors trading after announcements is less pronounced than for smaller investors. The response of small investors depends on who has prompted the restatement: the company itself, FASB or the SEC and not on the reason for the restatement such as problems with revenue recognition, restructuring or cost/expense. Large investor trading volume is affected by both the source of the restatement and the reason for it. Large investors seem to anticipate potential problems, and sell securities before restatement announcements.

  8. Fermilab and Berkeley Lab Collaborate with Meyer Tool on Key Component for European Particle Accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Officials of the U.S. Department of Energy's Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory announced yesterday the completion of a key component of the U.S. contribution to the Large Hadron Collider, a particle accelerator under construction at CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland

  9. Undergraduate student Caleb Fleming wins Scripps Howard collegiate reporting prize

    OpenAIRE

    Broughton, Sandra S.

    2010-01-01

    The Scripps Howard Foundation has announced that Collegiate Times writer Caleb Fleming, of Warrenton, Va., a junior majoring in economics in the College of Science at Virginia Tech, has been awarded a 10-day journalism study trip to Japan.

  10. Overbidding and overspreading in rent-seeking experiments: Cost structure and prize allocation rules

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Subhasish; Sheremeta, Roman; Turocy, Theodore

    2014-01-01

    We study experimentally the effects of cost structure and prize allocation rules on the performance of rent-seeking contests. Most previous studies use a lottery prize rule and linear cost, and find both overbidding relative to the Nash equilibrium prediction and significant variation of efforts, which we term ‘overspreading.’ We investigate the effects of allocating the prize by a lottery versus sharing it proportionally, and of convex versus linear costs of effort, while holding fixed the N...

  11. Prizes and Productivity- How Winning the Fields Medal Affects Scientific Output

    OpenAIRE

    Borjas, George J.; Kirk B. Doran

    2013-01-01

    Knowledge generation is key to economic growth, and scientific prizes are designed to encourage it. But how does winning a prestigious prize affect future output? We compare the productivity of Fields medalists (winners of the top mathematics prize) to that of similarly brilliant contenders. The two groups have similar publication rates until the award year, after which the winners' productivity declines. The medalists begin to "play the field," studying unfamiliar topics at the expense of wr...

  12. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Clean Energy Entrepreneurship Prize 2008 Final Report DOE Award # DE-FG36-07GO17110

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2008-08-09

    The MIT Clean Energy Prize was established to accelerate the pace of innovation in the energy space, specifically with regard to clean energy and to reduce our dependence on foreign oil. Through a prize structure designed to incent new ideas to be brought forward coupled with a supporting infrastructure to educate, mentor, network and provide a platform for visibility, it was believed we could achieve this goal in a very efficient and effective manner. The grand prize of $200K was meant to be the highly visible and attractive carrot to achieve this and through a public-private partnership of sponsors who held a long term view (i.e., they were not Venture Capitalists or law firms looking for short term business through advantaged deal flow). It was also designed to achieve this in a highly inclusive manner. Towards this end, while MIT was the platform on which the competition was run, and this brought some instant cache and differentiation, the competition was open to all teams which had at least one US citizen. Both professional teams and student teams were eligible.

  13. Do Macroeconomic Announcements Cause Asymetric Volatility?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Goeij (Peter); W.A. Marquering (Wessel)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we study the impact of macroeconomic news announcements on the conditional volatility of stock and bond returns. Using daily returns on the S&P 500 index, the NASDAQ index, and the 1 and 10 year U.S. Treasury bonds, for January 1982 - August 2001, some interesting results e

  14. Monetary target announcements, reputation and hysteresis

    OpenAIRE

    Grüner, Hans Peter

    1994-01-01

    Two signaling games of monetary policy are considered: game one examines the effect of hysteresis on the labor market on the results of the repeated monetary policy game. Disciplinary effects of reputation disappear in presence of hysteresis. The second game compares weifare effects of monetary target announcements to those of a rigid rule under alternative assumptions on the policymaker's type space.

  15. CAS Announces Academicians Elected in 2009

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Thirty five Chinese scientists and six of their colleagues from Canada,France and the United States were elected into CAS in 2009.The announcement was made by CAS President LU Yongxiang at a press conference held on December 4,2009,in Beijing.CAS Vice President LI Jinghai read the list of the new Members.

  16. 75 FR 33856 - Announcement of Public Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... MANAGEMENT Announcement of Public Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Office of Personnel Management. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Office of Personnel Management will hold a public meeting on June 25, 2010, as part... should be a career of choice for the most talented Americans.'' This public meeting will constitute...

  17. Announcements and credibility of monetary policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    1996-01-01

    An infinitely repeated monetary policy game à la Barro and Gordon is considered. Before the game starts the government announces a policy rule. If there is a slight probability that government is honest and a slight probability that the government makes mistakes, then a sufficiently patient...

  18. Announcements and Credibility of Monetary Policy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Christian

    An infinitely repeated monetary policy game à la Barro and Gordon (1983) is considered. Before the game starts the government announces a policy rule. If there is a slight probability that government is honest and a slight probability that the government makes mistakes, then a sufficiently patient...

  19. 76 FR 16630 - Announcement of an Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-24

    ...) announces the award of a cooperative agreement to the Congressional Hunger Center in Washington, DC. C.F.D.A... cooperative agreement with the Congressional Hunger Center (CHC) in Washington, DC, to work with ACF programs on hunger and obesity issues for young children. An award in the amount of $3,000 has been made...

  20. Video of Christian Skau and Martin Raussen's interview with the Abel Prize Winner John Milnor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skau, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The television interview with Abel Laureate John Milnor that was broadcasted on Norwegian television in June is now available on the Abel Prize multimedia page. John Milnor received the Abel Prize «for pioneering discoveries in topology, geometry and algebra» to quote the Abel Committee. King...... Harald presented the Abel Prize to John Milnor at the award ceremony in Oslo, Norway on 24 May. Before the interview there is a short presentation of the award ceremony. John Milnor is interviewed by Martin Raussen and Christian Skau. The Abel Prize that carries a cash award of NOK 6 million (about EUR...

  1. The roads to Stockholm: On the 2002 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    @@ On November 27, 1895, Alfred Nobel signed his last will and testament in Paris that specified details of five prizes to "those who during the past year have done humanity the greatest service". For the past over 100 years, the Nobel Prizes have been forever linked to the supreme achievement of the modern world in science and literature. Winning the Nobel Prizes became dreams of many young and not so young people in science and literature. "How to win a Nobel Prize?" was an innocent question posed to Sydney Brenner recently by a Chinese student.

  2. Nobel Prize winner visits CERN’s superconductors

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    On Wednesday 23 April Georg Bednorz, who won the Nobel Prize for physics in 1987, visited CERN along with 44 of his colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory. Georg Bednorz (second from right) with colleagues from the IBM Zurich Research Laboratory in the LHC tunnel. On their arrival, Jos Engelen, the Chief Scientific Officer, gave the IBM group an introduction to CERN. Bednorz came to CERN only recently for the Open Days to give a seminar, but unfortunately did not have time to visit the experiments, so this trip was organised instead. Along with Alex Müller, Bednorz was awarded the Noble Prize for his discovery of superconductivity for the so-called high temperature superconductors, essentially copper-oxide-based compounds showing superconductivity at temperatures much higher than had previously been thought possible. The LHC magnets are built with low-temperature superconductors but many current leads that supply power to the LHC cryostats are made with...

  3. CERN visit for a Norwegian Prize-winner

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    One of the prize-winners of the Contest «Life in the Universe», the final of which was held at CERN during the Science and Technology Week in November 2001 (See Bulletin n°47/2002), came to CERN to receive his prize last June. The 15-year old Norwegian Ivar Marthinusen won a two-day visit to the Laboratory. He poses on the picture surrounded by his CERN's guardian angels: from left to right, Frank Tecker and Georges-Henry Hemelsoet from PS, Tommy Eriksson from AD, Sandrine Sanchez from the Visits Service, Ivar Mathinusen with his parents, Egil Lillestol (CERN/EP), Jens Vigen from the Library, Régine Chareyron from the Visits Service, Richard Jacobsson (CERN/EP) and Sophie Baillard from the Visits Service.

  4. Tim Berners-Lee receives the Millennium Technology Prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 15 April, for his invention of the Web, Tim Berners-Lee was awarded the first ever Millennium Technology Prize by the Finnish Technology Award Foundation, which recognises technological innovations of lasting benefit to society. "Tim Berners-Lee's invention perfectly encapsulates the spirit of the Prize. The Web is encouraging new types of social networks, contributing to transparency and democracy, and opening up new avenues for information management and business development," underlined Pekka Tarjanne, chairman of the jury and former Secretary-General of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU). Tim Berners-Lee is congratulated by Jukka Valtasaari, Finland's Ambassador to the United States. Tim Berners-Lee created the first server, browser and editor, the HTML code, the URL address and the HTTP transmission protocol at CERN in 1990. CERN released the Web into the public domain in 1993. Tim Berners-Lee is currently head of the World Wide Web Consortium, managed by ERCIM (Europe...

  5. Prizes, Groups and Pivotal Voting in a Poisson Voting Game

    CERN Document Server

    Smith, Alastair; de Mesquita, Bruce Bueno

    2011-01-01

    We model elections between two parties in a Poisson random population of voters (Myerson 1998, 2000). In addition to offering different policy benefits, parties offer contingent prizes to those identifiable groups of voters that offer the highest level of political support. In large populations, voters are only likely to influence the electoral outcome when the vote share between two parties is perfectly equal and even then their influence on the outcome is small. In contrast voters retain significant influence over the distribution of prizes even in lopsided elections. Equilibrium behavior is driven by voters competing to win preferential treatment for their group and not by policy concerns. The results address variance in turnout in elections, political rewards and the persistence of dominant parties even when they are popularly perceived as inferior.

  6. 'Exhibitions and experiments', in celebration of nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nobel Prize in Physics for 2008 was awarded to Professors Yoichiro Nambu, Makoto Kobayashi and Toshihide Maskawa. At this opportunity, we held an exhibition to introduce the achievements of the laureates for 10 days at the Omiya campus in May 2009. With the explanations of elementary particle physics, we prepared several experimental instruments with which visitors could play and learn the spontaneous symmetry breaking, cosmic rays, a circle path of an electron in a magnetic field and so on. Our main purpose of the exhibition was, however, not just to explain the contents of the Nobel Prize in Physics, but also to attract students' interests to physics. More than 800 individual students attended during the period, and the survey of questionnaires shows positive contributions to raise the students' awareness of the excitement of physics. (author)

  7. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and Nobel Prizes

    CERN Document Server

    Mazloumian, Amin; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo; 10.1371/journal.pone.0018975

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their...

  8. Director of IMCS - National Prize Laureate of Moldova

    OpenAIRE

    Editorial board of the "Computer Science Journal of Moldova"

    2016-01-01

    Director of the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, Vice Editor-in-Chief of CSJM, and our colleague, D.Hab. Svetlana Cojocaru, in 2011 became the National Prize Laureate of Moldova. In accordance with Government decision, this distinction is given for ``outstanding achievements whose results have substantially enriched science, culture and art, had a considerable contribution to promoting a positive image of the country in the international arena, a significant impact on the develo...

  9. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levi, B.G.

    1993-01-01

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [open quotes]for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.[close quotes] Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  10. The Sociology of Vocational Prizes: Recognition as Esteem

    OpenAIRE

    Heinich, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    Artistic and scientific activities, pertaining to the world of “vocation”, are here closely linked to recognition issues. Referring to recent trends in French, German and American sociology and political philosophy, this paper addresses the very status of recognition in present day sociology. Grounded on two empirical surveys about literary and scientific prizes, conducted according to the methods of comprehensive sociology, it displays some of the axiological problems raised by such a mode o...

  11. The noble enigma: Chagas' nominations for the Nobel Prize

    OpenAIRE

    Marilia Coutinho; Olival Freire Jr.; João Carlos Pinto Dias

    1999-01-01

    Carlos Chagas, a Brazilian physician, discovered the American trypanosomiasis in 1909. Like other remarkable discoveries of those days, his work helped to articulate the insect-vector theory and other theoretical guidelines in tropical medicine. Unlike all other discoveries, all the stages of this work were accomplished in a few months and by a single man. Chagas' discovery was widely recognized at home and abroad. He was twice nominated for the Nobel Prize - in 1913 and in 1921-, but never r...

  12. From Nobel Prize to Project Management: Getting Risks Right

    OpenAIRE

    Bent Flyvbjerg

    2013-01-01

    A major source of risk in project management is inaccurate forecasts of project costs, demand, and other impacts. The paper presents a promising new approach to mitigating such risk, based on theories of decision making under uncertainty which won the 2002 Nobel prize in economics. First, the paper documents inaccuracy and risk in project management. Second, it explains inaccuracy in terms of optimism bias and strategic misrepresentation. Third, the theoretical basis is presented for a promis...

  13. Nobel Memorial Prize in Economics for the year 2000

    OpenAIRE

    Viktor Kotlán

    2001-01-01

    The article summarizes the recent seminar of the Czech Economic Association devoted to the Nobel Prize laureates in economics for 2000, James J. Heckman and Daniel L. McFadden. A paper presented by M. Zajícek concentrated mainly on the work of Mr. McFadden. Economic problems, especially those related to the self-selection bias and its role in appraising the outcome of social programs, are considered.

  14. The psychological insights that won a Nobel Prize in Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Maya Bar-Hillel

    2003-01-01

    A Nobel Prize in Economics was given to the psychologist Daniel Kahneman for his joint research with the late psychologist Amos Tversky on decision making under uncertainty and on subjective judgments of uncertainty. The two proposed Prospect Theory as a descriptive alternative to Utility Theory, the reigning normative theory of choice under uncertainty. Kahneman and Tversky argued that human psychology prevents people from being rational in the sense required by Utility Theory -- consistency...

  15. The Nobel Literature Prize Sparks a Mo Yan Craze

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    正At 19 o'clock, October 11th, Beijing time, the Swedish Academy awarded the 2012 Nobel Prize for Literature to the Chinese writer Mo Yan. Within several hours, Mo Yan's works were struck by the "Nobel effect", sales shooting up in both bookstores and online marts. Some websites also jumped on the bandwagon and put up a reservation service for the new editions.

  16. Alert with destruction of stratospheric ozone: 95 Nobel Prize Winners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After briefly summarizing the discoveries of the 95 Nobel Prize Winners in Chemistry related to the threats to the ozone layer by chemical pollutants, we make a soft presentation of the overall problem of stratospheric ozone, starting with the destructive catalytic cycles of the pollutant-based free radicals, following with the diffusion mathematical models in Atmospheric Chemistry, and ending with the increasing annual drama of the ozone hole in the Antarctica. (Author)

  17. Praise for the prize - Hopes for peace: World leaders react

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents highlights of words of praise and congratulations for the IAEA and its Director General up on the awarding of the 2005 Nobel Peace Prize. The list include Mr. Kofi Annan, the Secretary General of the UN; Mr. Hans Blix, Director General and Chief UN Weapons Inspector in Iraq; Ms. Condoleezza rice, US Secretary of State; Mr. Jacques Chirac, President of France and the European Commission

  18. Marcus wins nobel prize in chemistry for electron transfer theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article describes the work of Rudolf Marcus of Caltech leading to his receipt of the 1992 Nobel Prize in Chemistry open-quotes for his contributions to the theory of electron transfer reactions in chemical systems.close quotes Applications of Marcus' theory include such diverse phenomena as photosynthesis, electrically conducting polymers, chemiluminescence, and corrosion. Historical aspects of his career are given. 10 refs., 1 fig

  19. Accelerator operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section is concerned with the operation of both the tandem-linac system and the Dynamitron, two accelerators that are used for entirely different research. Developmental activities associated with the tandem and the Dynamitron are also treated here, but developmental activities associated with the superconducting linac are covered separately because this work is a program of technology development in its own right

  20. Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer visits CERN

    CERN Document Server

    2008-01-01

    The Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer met young scientists on a recent visit to the Laboratory. From left to right: Xavier Gréhant (CERN Openlab), Ewa Stanecka (ATLAS), Magda Kowalska (ISOLDE), Heinrich Rohrer, Stéphanie Beauceron (CMS) and Ana Gago Da Silva (UNOSAT).Heinrich Rohrer, who shared the 1986 Nobel prize for physics with Gerd Binnig for the design of the scanning tunnelling microscope, visited CERN on 25 June. Welcomed by the Director-General, Robert Aymar, he visited the ATLAS cavern and control room, the Computer Centre, the Unosat project, the Antimatter Decelerator and ISOLDE. At the end of his visit, he voiced his admiration for CERN and its personnel. As a renowned Nobel prize-winner Heinrich Rohrer has the opportunity to pass on his experience and enthusiasm to young scientists. During the evening meal, at which he met five young physicists and computer scientists, who were delighted with the chance to talk to him, he stressed the importance for re...

  1. Kevin E. Trenberth Receives 2013 Climate Communication Prize: Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trenberth, Kevin E.

    2014-01-01

    I am delighted to be recognized with this prize. I want to first thank AGU and the prize committee and, especially, Nature's Own for establishing this prize in a field that has become contentious and highly political. It did not used to be this way. Following the media frenzy with the 2007 Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report, there was hope at the 2009 Conference of Parties meeting in Copenhagen that an international framework agreement on climate change might be achieved. It was not to be. Planned actions to address issues of climate change were undermined by huge funding of misinformation by vested interests. It was not helped by so-called "climategate" in which many emails illegally hacked from a computer server at the University of East Anglia in the United Kingdom were released, cherry picked, distorted, and misused by climate change deniers. Minor errors in the IPCC report were blown out of all proportion and ineffectively addressed. I was caught up in all this, and one of my many emails went viral: the "travesty" quote in which I bemoaned the inability to close the global energy balance associated with short-term climate variability but which was misinterpreted as saying there was no global warming. These examples highlight failures of communication.

  2. "Highly qualified loser"? Harvey Cushing and the Nobel Prize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Schlich, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Neurosurgery, in particular surgery of the brain, was recognized as one of the most spectacular transgressions of the traditional limits of surgical work. With their audacious, technically demanding, laboratory-based, and highly promising new interventions, prominent neurosurgeons were primary candidates for the Nobel Prize. Accordingly, neurosurgical pioneers such as Victor Horsley and, in particular, Harvey Cushing continued to be nominated for the prize. However, only António Egas Moniz was eventually awarded the prestigious award in 1949 for the introduction of frontal lobotomy, an intervention that would no longer be prize-worthy from today's perspective. Horsley and Cushing, who were arguably the most important proponents of early neurosurgery, remained "highly qualified losers," as such cases have been called. This paper examines the nominations, reviews, and discussions kept in the Nobel Archives to understand the reasons for this remarkable choice. At a more general level, the authors use the example of neurosurgery to explore the mechanisms of scientific recognition and what could be called the enacting of excellence in science and medicine.

  3. Advanced accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report discusses the suitability of four novel particle acceleration technologies for multi-TeV particle physics machines: laser driven linear accelerators (linac), plasma beat-wave devices, plasma wakefield devices, and switched power and cavity wakefield linacs. The report begins with the derivation of beam parameters practical for multi-TeV devices. Electromagnetic field breakdown of materials is reviewed. The two-beam accelerator scheme for using a free electron laser as the driver is discussed. The options recommended and the conclusions reached reflect the importance of cost. We recommend that more effort be invested in achieving a self-consistent range of TeV accelerator design parameters. Beat-wave devices have promise for 1-100 GeV applications and, while not directly scalable to TeV designs, the current generation of ideas are encouraging for the TeV regime. In particular, surfatrons, finite-angle optical mixing devices, plasma grating accelerator, and the Raman forward cascade schemes all deserve more complete analysis. The exploitation of standard linac geometry operated in an unconventional mode is in a phase of rapid evolution. While conceptual projects abound, there are no complete designs. We recommend that a fraction of sponsored research be devoted to this approach. Wakefield devices offer a great deal of potential; trades among their benefits and constraints are derived and discussed herein. The study of field limitation processes has received inadequate attention; this limits experiment designers. The costs of future experiments are such that investment in understanding these processes is prudent. 34 refs., 12 figs., 3 tabs

  4. Announcing climate policy. Can a green paradox arise without scarcity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smulders, Sjak [Tilburg Univ. (Netherlands). Dept. of Economics and CentER; Tsur, Yacov [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, Rehovot (Israel). Dept. of Agricultural Economics and Management; Zemel, Amos [Ben Gurion Univ. of the Negev, Sede Boker (Israel). Dept. of Solar Energy and Environmental Physics

    2010-12-15

    Unintended consequences of a pre-announced climate policy have been studied in a variety of situations. We show that early announcement of a carbon tax gives rise to a ''Green-Paradox,'' in that it increases polluting emissions in the interim period (between announcement and actual implementation), irrespective of the scarcity of fossil fuels. The phenomenon holds both when the announced implementation date is taken as a credible threat and when households are skeptical about the (political) will or capability of the government to implement the policy as announced. The paradoxical outcome is driven by consumptionsaving tradeoffs facing households who seek to smooth consumption over time. (orig.)

  5. 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize Acceptance Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, P. B.

    2015-01-01

    It is a great honor to receive the 2014 Nuclear Fusion Prize, here at the 25th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference. On behalf of everyone involved in this work, I would like to thank the IAEA, the Nuclear Fusion journal team, the IOP, and specifically Mitsuru Kikuchi, for their support of this important award. I would also like to acknowledge the many important contributions made by the other ten papers nominated for this prize. Our paper investigates the physics of the H-mode pedestal in tokamaks, specifically the development of a predictive understanding of the pedestal structure based on electromagnetic instabilities which constrain it, and the testing of the resulting theoretical model (EPED) against detailed observations on multiple devices. In addition to making pedestal predictions for existing devices, the paper also presents predictions for ITER, including methods for optimizing its pedestal height and fusion performance. What made this work possible, and indeed a pleasure to be involved with, was an extensive set of collaborations, including theory-experiment, multi-institutional, and international collaborations. Many of these collaborations have gone on for over a decade, and have been fostered in part by the ITPA Pedestal Group. The eight authors of this paper, from five institutions, all made important contributions. Rich Groebner, Tom Osborne and Tony Leonard carried out dedicated experiments and data analysis on the DIII-D tokamak, testing the EPED model over a very wide range of parameters. Jerry Hughes led dedicated experiments on Alcator C-Mod which tested the model at high magnetic field and pedestal pressure. Marc Beurskens carried out experiments and data analysis on the JET tokamak, testing the model at large scale. Xueqiao Xu conducted two-fluid studies of diamagnetic stabilization, which enabled a more accurate treatment of this important effect. Finally, Howard Wilson and I have been working together for many years to develop analytic formalism

  6. KEKB accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEKB, the B-Factory at High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) recently achieved the luminosity of 1 x 1034 cm-2s-1. This luminosity is two orders higher than the world's level at 1990 when the design of KEKB started. This unprecedented result was made possible by KEKB's innovative design and technology in three aspects - beam focusing optics, high current storage, and beam - beam interaction. Now KEKB is leading the luminosity frontier of the colliders in the world. (author)

  7. Accelerating networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolving out-of-equilibrium networks have been under intense scrutiny recently. In many real-world settings the number of links added per new node is not constant but depends on the time at which the node is introduced in the system. This simple idea gives rise to the concept of accelerating networks, for which we review an existing definition and-after finding it somewhat constrictive-offer a new definition. The new definition provided here views network acceleration as a time dependent property of a given system as opposed to being a property of the specific algorithm applied to grow the network. The definition also covers both unweighted and weighted networks. As time-stamped network data becomes increasingly available, the proposed measures may be easily applied to such empirical datasets. As a simple case study we apply the concepts to study the evolution of three different instances of Wikipedia, namely, those in English, German, and Japanese, and find that the networks undergo different acceleration regimes in their evolution

  8. Volume, Volatility and Public News Announcements

    OpenAIRE

    Bollerslev, Tim; Li, Jia; Xue, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We provide new empirical evidence for the way in which financial markets process information. Our results are based on high-frequency intraday data along with new econometric techniques for making inference on the relationship between trading intensity and spot volatility around public news announcements. Consistent with the predictions derived from a theoretical model in which investors agree to disagree, our estimates for the intraday volume-volatility elasticity around the most important n...

  9. A Nobel Prize for empirical macroeconometrics: assessing the contributions of Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Boumans; E.M. Sent

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an assessment of the contributions of the 2011 Nobel Prize winners, Thomas Sargent and Christopher Sims. They received the prize ‘for their empirical research on cause and effect in the macroeconomy’. The paper illustrates that Sargent entertained different interpretations of rat

  10. The young, not-so-young, and the 2007 Retrovirology Prize: call for nominations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeang Kuan-Teh

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent findings suggest an aging scientific work force and an almost static publishing productivity in the United States. The Retrovirology Prize seeks to recognize and encourage the work of a mid-career retrovirologist between the ages of 45 and 60. The 2006 Retrovirology Prize was awarded to Dr. Joseph G. Sodroski.

  11. Collecting Poetry for the Academic Library: An Evaluation of Poetry Prizes as Selection Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Liorah

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the usefulness of poetry book prizes as a selection tool by evaluating their fairness, meaningfulness, and reliability as an indication of quality. The results of two surveys, one collecting data on poetry book prizes and the other asking librarians about their collecting practices, suggest that selecting on the basis of prizes…

  12. 45 CFR 73.735-505 - Acceptance of awards and prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Acceptance of awards and prizes. 73.735-505 Section 73.735-505 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-505 Acceptance of awards and prizes. (a) Employees may accept awards, including cash...

  13. The Effects of Prize Spread and Noise in Elimination Tournaments: A Natural Field Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Delfgaauw (Josse); A.J. Dur (Robert); J.A. Non (Arjan); W.J.M.I. Verbeke (Willem)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractWe conduct a field experiment in a large retail chain to test basic predictions of tournament theory regarding prize spread and noise. A random subset of the 208 stores participates in two-stage elimination tournaments. Tournaments differ in the distribution of prize money across winners

  14. Frank Weiner wins first place in the competition for EAAE Prize 2003 - 2005

    OpenAIRE

    Watson-Bloch, Cathy

    2005-01-01

    Frank H. Weiner, associate professor in the School of Architecture + Design has won the European Association for Architectural Education Prize 2003 -- 2005. A biennial international competition on the subject of architectural education, the EAAE Prize was first awarded in 1991, "with the aim to stimulate original writings on the subject of architectural education in order to improve the quality of architectural education in Europe."

  15. 77 FR 56697 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The English Prize: The...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The English Prize: The Capture of... ``The English Prize: The Capture of the Westmorland, an Episode of the Grand Tour,'' imported...

  16. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  17. Robert R. Wilson Prize for Achievement in the Physics of Particle Accelerators Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peoples, John, Jr.

    2010-02-01

    The 1982 Design Luminosity Requirement for the Tevatron Collider luminosity was 10^30 cm-2 s-1. At the time this seemed like an ambitious goal because the uncompleted Tevatron would be the first superconducting synchrotron, the anti-proton source design was an ambitious two ring design, which many wise people thought was too complicated, magnetic field of the low beta quads was at the limit of superconducting wire performance and a thin rod of lithium carrying a mega-amp was the first anti-proton collection lens. The highest luminosity achieved in the first run of the Tevatron, as a Collider in 1987, was only 3x10^29 cm^2 s-1. Nevertheless, the original goal of 10^30 cm-2 s-1 was reached and then exceeded in the next two years and the luminosity goals were set higher. Twenty years later, the peak Tevatron collider luminosity in the two interaction regions is typically 3x10^32 cm-2s-1. This lecture will trace the nearly thirty year campaign of improvements that led to the current performance. )

  18. And the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics Goes to ...The Accelerating Universe!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2012-11-01

    The 5000-year-old remains of Stonehenge, in England, testify to humankind's reverence for the stars. Humans hauled four-ton stones from as far away as 240 km to make these monuments. They are the remains of a larger structure used for religious purposes and to predict astronomical events such as solstices, equinoxes, and perhaps even eclipses, an impressive feat for people who did not use writing. Eclipses occur in an irregular and apparently random pattern that repeats itself only over a 56-year cycle. Even to have been aware that a repeated pattern exists required enormous dedication and attention to detail.

  19. And the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics Goes to ...The Accelerating Universe!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Art

    2012-01-01

    The 5000-year-old remains of Stonehenge, in England, testify to humankind's reverence for the stars. Humans hauled four-ton stones from as far away as 240 km to make these monuments. They are the remains of a larger structure used for religious purposes and to predict astronomical events such as solstices, equinoxes, and perhaps even eclipses, an…

  20. Accelerators and the Accelerator Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malamud, Ernest; Sessler, Andrew

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, standing back--looking from afar--and adopting a historical perspective, the field of accelerator science is examined. How it grew, what are the forces that made it what it is, where it is now, and what it is likely to be in the future are the subjects explored. Clearly, a great deal of personal opinion is invoked in this process.

  1. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavitytThere is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  2. Remark on receiving encouraging prize; Shoreisho jusho shokan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mizutani, Tomichika [Meji University, Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-07-31

    The 1998 fiscal year Japan Solar Energy Soc. encouraging prize is received this time, and it is really sure of thank you and this winning prize for future research activity with large encouragement, while research activity in the university becomes in the good commemoration. This study also put environmental problem in visual field oil crisis energy resource worldwide new, and it was noticed in the wave energy which was one of the natural energy, it was started. That the wave energy was noticed, when the research of various natural energy was advanced, Over 10 years, it is the idea which was produced by the process in which the mechanics laboratory studies the vibration problem, and it is regarded as connecting with present winning prize as a summing-up of research result kept since the front. In the keyword of 'new{exclamation_point}' it began to leave Mr.Taichi Matsuoka and cooperation of the science graduate student as a partner of the graduation thesis the research the present it was a start from the nothing as a thing of this type. It is negative to advance this study in which the failure was always given here, when the new work began, of Mr.Matsuoka of the passion for the research. Away from the research of the wave power generation, solar light and wind power generation are noticed a little, and I aim at the hybridization of the wave power generation, and the research is advanced. Therefore, the vibration-proof stage for installing sun and wind energy conversion system on the wave-power device at present has been designed. At the end, the gratitude is shown to the everybody who received the enthusiastic guidance for this study. (translated by NEDO)

  3. Education and Skills for Development in South Africa: Reflections on the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, S.; Akoojee, Salim

    2007-01-01

    In July 2005, President Mbeki announced the launch of the Accelerated and Shared Growth Initiative for South Africa (AsgiSA), a new development strategy designed to help the South African state meet the ANC's 2004 election pledges, namely: (1) halve unemployment; (2) halve poverty; (3) accelerate employment equity; and (4) improve broad-based…

  4. Impact of Mergers and Acquisitions announcement on shareholder value: An empirical evidence of short-term performance from Singapore market.

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Thi Quynh,

    2013-01-01

    This thesis examines the impact of Mergers and Acquisitions announcements on shareholders wealth of acquirers in Singapore. In detail, this thesis will study the stock performance in response to M&A announcement under three time intervals: pre-announcement period (from day 5 to day 2 prior to announcement day), announcement period (including 1 day prior to announcement day and announcement day) and post-announcement period (from day 1 to day 5 after the announcement). The methodology to inves...

  5. Google Science Fair 2012 : Grand Prize Winner Brittany Wenger

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    17-18 age category AND Grand Prize Winner: Brittany Wenger (USA)—“Global Neural Network Cloud Service for Breast Cancer.” Brittany’s project harnesses the power of the cloud to help doctors accurately diagnose breast cancer. Brittany built an application that compares individual test results to an extensive dataset stored in the cloud, allowing doctors to assess tumors using a minimally-invasive procedure. Brittany Michelle Wenger, and her mother, passed through the CERN Control Centre accompanied by Mike Lamont, CERN Beams Department, Operation Group Leader.

  6. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-06-15

    This book has two parts of items related chemistry. The contents of the first part are Preface, Alfred Bemhard Nobel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne, and firefly. The contents of the second part are PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond, an incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation works, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Propane gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and reference.

  7. Competitive Prizes: When Less Scrutiny Induces More Effort

    OpenAIRE

    Pradeep Dubey; Chien-wei Wu

    2000-01-01

    We consider a principal who is keen to induce his agents to work at their maximal effort levels. To this end, he samples n days at random out of the T days on which they work, and awards a prize of B dollars to the most productive agent. The principal's policy (B,n) induces a strategic game Gamma(B,n) between the agents. We show that to implement maximal effort levels weakly (or, strongly) as a strategic equilibrium (or, as dominant strategies) in Gamma(B,n), at the least cost B to himself, t...

  8. When is Bargaining Successful? Negotiated Division of Tournament Prizes

    OpenAIRE

    Goldreich, David; Pomorski, Lukasz

    2007-01-01

    We study bargaining at the end of high-stakes poker tournaments, in which participants often negotiate a division of the prize money rather than bear the risk of playing the game until the end. This setting is ideal for studying bargaining: the stakes are substantial, there are no restrictions on the negotiations or the terms of a deal, outside options are clearly defined, there are no agency conflicts, and there is little private information. Even in this setting, we find that risk-reducing ...

  9. The optimal allocation of prizes in contests: An auction approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kiho Yoon

    2012-01-01

    We characterize the optimal structure of prizes in contests, when the contest designer is interested in the maximization of either the expected total e¢çort or the expected highest e¢çort. The all-pay auction framework in the present paper makes it possible to derive all the results in Benny Moldovanu and Aner Sela's (2001, American Economic Review, 542-558) incomplete-information model of contests as well as other results in a particularly simple fashion.

  10. Manne Siegbahn and the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergstroem, I.

    1988-01-01

    The Research Institute of Physics celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with a Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles. On July 1, 1937, Professor Manne Siegbahn was appointed the first director of the Institute. Because of this celebration a personal account is given of Manne Siegbahn's contribution to atomic structure physics. Comments will also be given on the procedure in the Swedish Academy of Sciences when Siegbahn in 1925 received the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics 'for his discoveries and research in the field of X-ray spectroscopy'.

  11. Director of IMCS - National Prize Laureate of Moldova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Editorial board of the "Computer Science Journal of Moldova"

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Director of the Institute of Mathematics and Computer Science, Vice Editor-in-Chief of CSJM, and our colleague, D.Hab. Svetlana Cojocaru, in 2011 became the National Prize Laureate of Moldova. In accordance with Government decision, this distinction is given for ``outstanding achievements whose results have substantially enriched science, culture and art, had a considerable contribution to promoting a positive image of the country in the international arena, a significant impact on the development of socio-economic, scientific and technical progress, national and world culture.''

  12. A Review of Toni Morrison's Nobel Prize Speech

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张冉; 张帆

    2009-01-01

    Beginning with and old story,Toni Morrison uses her unique method to tell us the functions of language and her perspectives of language and literature.From this story,we can understand her writing standpoint and her determination of making contributions to her nation and people.This paper tries to review her speech given in the Nobel Prize in Literature from four aspects.They are the introduction and comprehension of the story,narrative point of view,discourse and power and feminist criticism.

  13. The world made by Noble prize : chemistry volume II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book has two parts of items related chemistry. The contents of the first part are Preface, Alfred Bemhard Nobel, Pioneers without Nobel Prize, Garbage Bag, Non-sticky Frying Pan, Nylon Stockings, Plastic Electricity, Synthetic Dyestuff, Gin and Tonic, Soccer Ball, Fertilizer, DDT, Dentifrice, Kimchi, Makgeolli, Ice cream, Anodyne, and firefly. The contents of the second part are PET-MRI, Color photo, Holography, Art diamond, an incandescent lamp and Neon Sign, Imitation works, Alchemy, Nuclear Power plant, Synthetic Oil and Sugar, Propane gas, Water Car, Estate agency Mars, and reference.

  14. Manne Siegbahn and the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Research Institute of Physics celebrates its fiftieth anniversary with a Workshop and Symposium on the Physics of Low-Energy Stored and Trapped Particles. On July 1, 1937, Professor Manne Siegbahn was appointed the first director of the Institute. Because of this celebration a personal account is given of Manne Siegbahn's contribution to atomic structure physics. Comments will also be given on the procedure in the Swedish Academy of Sciences when Siegbahn in 1925 received the 1924 Nobel Prize for Physics 'for his discoveries and research in the field of X-ray spectroscopy'. (orig.)

  15. Insider trading legislation and acquisition announcements : do laws matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Maug, Ernst; Halteren, Jörn van; Ackerman, Abraham

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how the enactment and enforcement of insider trading restrictions affect the way in which information about acquisitions is released before the actual acquisition announcement. We analyze a sample with almost 19,000 acquisition announcements from 48 countries. We find that insider trading legislation strongly affects the information revealed to the market in the runup phase before the announcement whereas the impact of subsequent enforcement actions by regulators ...

  16. Insider Trading Legislation and Acquisition Announcements: Do Laws Matter?

    OpenAIRE

    Maug, Ernst; Ackerman, Abraham

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we investigate how the enactment and enforcement of insider trading restrictions affect the way in which information about acquisitions is released before the actual acquisition announcement. We analyze a sample with almost 19,000 acquisition announcements from 48 countries. We find that insider trading legislation strongly affects the information revealed to the market in the runup phase before the announcement whereas the impact of subsequent enforcement actions by regulators ...

  17. [Opinions of the participants of 'Quit and Win' competition concerning prizes motivating to refrain from smoking].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalska, Alina; Stelmach, Włodzimierz; Rzeźnicki, Adam

    2009-01-01

    Big antinicotine campaigns both in Poland and worldwide, are finished with a competition with prizes of different value. Psychologists say that a prize significantly motivates a person to certain kinds of behaviour. During educational activities carried out in the time of campaign, it is recommended to use techniques of psychological interaction that would release motives most beneficial to health. The aim of the work was to recognize frequency of being influenced mostly by the possibility of winning a prize before making a decision about quitting smoking and joining the competition, and learning the opinions of prize laureates concerning efficiency of 'Quit and Win' competitions. Empirical material comes from two sources. The first one is the selected fragments of a survey study carried out at Social and Preventive Medicine Department among 1700 participants of 'Quit and Win' competition that finished the 2nd International Antinicotine Campaign in Poland. The correctly filled survey was sent by 1285 people, that is 75.6%. The second source is a fragment of a survey study carried out in 2003 among 54 laureates of 'Quit and Win' competition in Poland. The completed survey was sent by majority of the laureates, that is 34 people (f = 0.63). Possibility of winning a prize as the most important reason for taking up the attempt to stop smoking and joining the competition was pointed to by 56 respondents (4.4%), whereas the remaining people chose other reasons as the most important ones. In the group of 34 respondents who were the laureates of competitions, majority, that is 22 people (f = 0.65) claimed the competition with prizes as a very effective method of reducing smoking. Half of the surveyed (17 people) claimed the possibility of winning a few prizes of high value would be more motivating than winning one of many prizes of smaller value. As the least attractive, prize gifts were pointed to. A prize in the form of a trip or holiday was considered very popular, as

  18. The Popular Nobel Prize Award Banquet: Distanced Participation of an Interacting TV-Audience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Hugoson

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available When chemist, inventor, and businessman Alfred Nobel died in 1896 he left a will establishing the Nobel Prize. Over the years, the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony, and the following Nobel Prize Award Banquet, developed into a spectacular and well-known event that was sometimes broadcast on radio. Then, in the year 1950, it was shown on Swedish television for the first time. In the decades that followed television became part of almost each and every household, and the viewing audience could now follow the festivities as they occurred, almost as if they had been invited themselves. A playful attitude towards the event developed, consisting of banter but also of distanced participation in which people dressed up and staged their own Nobel Prize Award “banquets” in front of their television-sets. In later years this phenomenon has developed, simultaneously becoming both more elaborate and more common, and today there is a variety of privately arranged Nobel Prize Award “banquets” to be found throughout Sweden, some even including their own Nobel Prize Award Ceremonies and attending royalty. In my paper, I will present this public parallel to the highly exclusive Nobel Prize Award Banquet and touch on international counterparts to it and the humorous language that surrounds these events.

  19. Molecular approaches to understanding neural network plasticity and memory: the Kavli Prize Inaugural Symposium on Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, M; Bergersen, L H; Storm-Mathisen, J

    2009-11-10

    The Kavli Prizes were awarded for the first time in Oslo, Norway on September 9, 2008 to seven of the world's most prominent scientists in astrophysics, nanoscience and neuroscience. The astrophysics prize was awarded jointly to Maarten Schmidt, of the California Institute of Technology, USA, and Donald Lynden-Bell, of Cambridge University, UK; the nanoscience prize was awarded jointly to Louis E. Brus, of Columbia University, USA, and Sumio Iijima, of Meijo University, Japan; and the neuroscience prize was awarded jointly to Pasko Rakic, of the Yale University School of Medicine, USA, Thomas Jessell, of Columbia University, USA, and Sten Grillner, of the Karolinska Institute, Sweden. The Kavli Prize is a joint venture of the Kavli Foundation, the Norwegian Academy of Science and Letters, and the Norwegian Ministry of Education and Research. The Kavli Prize Inaugural Symposium on Neuroscience was held at the University of Oslo on 8 September, 2008, organized by L.H. Bergersen, E. Moser M.-B. Moser, and J. Storm-Mathisen. At this Symposium, seven leading neuroscientists described their groundbreaking work, which encompasses some of the most important recent advances in the field of neuroscience, from molecule to synapse to network to behavior. The Symposium was a fitting tribute to Fred Kavli's vision of neuroscience as an outstanding area of progress, and to the achievements of the winners of the first Kavli Prize in Neuroscience. The main points of the Symposium presentations are summarized below.

  20. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation

  1. APS presents prizes in fluid dynamics and plasma physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-12-01

    This article reviews the presentation of the American Physical Society awards in fluid dynamics and plasma physics. The recipient of the plasma physics James Clerk Maxwell Prize was John M. Green for contributions to the theory of magnetohydrodynamics equilibria and ideal and resistive instabilities, for discovering the inverse scattering transform leading to soliton solutions of many nonlinear partial differential equations and for inventing the residue method of determining the transition to global chaos. The excellence in Plasma Physics Research Award was presented to Nathaniel A. Fisch for theoretical investigations of noninductive current generation in toroidally confined plasma. Wim Pieter Leemans received the Simon Ramo Award for experimental and simulational contributions to laser-plasma physics. William R. Sears was given the 1992 Fuid Dynamics Prize for contributions to the study of steady and unsteady aerodynamics, aeroacoustics, magnetoaerodynamics,and wind tunnel design. William C. Reynolds received the Otto Laporte Award for experimental, theoretical, and computational work in turbulence modeling and control and leadership in direct numerical simulation and large eddy simulation.

  2. Prizes to solve problems in and beyond medicine, big and small: it can work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erren, Thomas C

    2007-01-01

    This article complements Dr. Charlton's follow-up of David Horrobin's suggestion in Nature two decades ago to offer sizeable prizes for practical approaches to either eliminate a problem in medicine or reduce the cost of its solution. Examples from the 20th and 21st centuries illustrate that prizes--small and big--have generated sustained and successful attacks on defined problems in biology, physics and, lately, mathematics. Provided that glittering prizes are offered and awarded with care, they can lead to effective problem-solving in medicine and related biomedical sciences as well. PMID:17207938

  3. Yellow fever and Max Theiler: the only Nobel Prize for a virus vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Erling

    2007-01-01

    In 1951, Max Theiler of the Rockefeller Foundation received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his discovery of an effective vaccine against yellow fever—a discovery first reported in the JEM 70 years ago. This was the first, and so far the only, Nobel Prize given for the development of a virus vaccine. Recently released Nobel archives now reveal how the advances in the yellow fever vaccine field were evaluated more than 50 years ago, and how this led to a prize for Max Theiler. PMID:18039952

  4. Can exit prizes induce lame ducks to shirk less? Experimental evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Helland

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Elected representatives serving their final period face only weak incentives to provide costly effort. However, overlapping generations (OLG models suggest that exit prizes sustained by trigger strategies can induce representatives in their final period to provide such effort. We evaluate this hypothesis using a simple OLG public good experiment, the central treatment being whether exit prizes are permitted. We find that a significantly higher number of subjects in their final period contribute when exit prizes are permitted. However, this result does not originate from use of trigger strategies. More likely explanations include gift-exchange and focal-point effects.

  5. Do employees participate in workplace HIV testing just to win a lottery prize? A quantitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Weihs

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: To encourage workers to participate in workplace HIV testing, some SouthAfrican automotive companies use lotteries. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence on how lottery incentives may influence employees’ workplace HIV counselling and testing behaviour.Research purpose: Determine whether workers intend to test for HIV only to win a lottery prize.Motivation for the study: The positive and also negative influences of lotteries on workers’ HIV testing behaviour need to be understood to avoid undue coercion in workplace HIV testing participation.Research design, approach and method: Post-test only quasi-experimental studies were conducted the day HIV testing and lotteries were announced to staff in four companies using a cross-sectional, self-administered survey that measured workers’ workplace HIV testing behaviour intentions. Intention to participate in workplace HIV counselling and testing was used as the main outcome of respondents’ behaviour and investigated via the statement: ‘If the company would organise its on-site Wellness Day tomorrow, I would go testing for HIV tomorrow’. In a first setting, two companies’ workers had to test for HIV to be entered in the lottery (n = 198. In the second setting, two other companies’ workers did not have to test to be entered in the lottery (n = 316. Chi-square tests were conducted to measure significant differences between the two conditions distinguishing between permanent and non-permanent staff.Main findings: No significant association was found between behaviour intention in the two settings for permanent workers’ workplace HIV testing intention ( χ2 = 1.145, p = 0.285, phi = -0.097. However, a significant association with a small effect size was found for non-permanent workers ( χ2 = 8.04, p = 0.005, phi = -0.279.Practical/managerial implications: Results show that lotteries to encourage workplace HIV testing are very likely to help workers ‘do the right

  6. 76 FR 44934 - Announcement of Five Single Source Grant Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... related to child development outcomes; improved school readiness; improved family socio-economic status... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children And Families Announcement of Five Single Source Grant Awards... Children and Families (ACF), Office of Child Care (OCC) announces the award of five Fiscal Year 2011...

  7. 45 CFR 1634.4 - Announcement of competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Announcement of competition. 1634.4 Section 1634.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION COMPETITIVE BIDDING FOR GRANTS AND CONTRACTS § 1634.4 Announcement of competition. (a) The Corporation shall...

  8. 24 CFR 954.106 - Announcement of competition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Announcement of competition. 954... URBAN DEVELOPMENT INDIAN HOME PROGRAM Applying for Assistance § 954.106 Announcement of competition. A... submission of applications, the total funding available for the competition and any maximum amount...

  9. 7 CFR 1600.5 - Public announcement of meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL INFORMATION Meetings of the Board of Directors of the Rural Telephone Bank... exempt from disclosure under § 1600.6, each such public announcement will state the time, place, and... Board may omit from the announcement information usually included, if and to the extent that it...

  10. 78 FR 34395 - Announcement of Foreign-Trade Zones Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-07

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Announcement of Foreign-Trade Zones Test AGENCY: U.S. Customs... announces U.S. Customs and Border Protection's (``CBP's'') plan to conduct a voluntary general test regarding certain foreign-trade zone (``FTZ'' or ``zone'') activities. Pursuant to the FTZ test,...

  11. Type Ia Supernovae and the discovery of the Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Clocchiatti, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    I present a review of the research and analysis paths that converged to make Type Ia SNe the most mature cosmological distance estimator of the present time. The narrative starts with the first works in the early decades of the 20th century and finishes with the more recent results. The review was written by a member of the High Z Supernova Search Team, the international group of astronomers that discovered Cosmic Acceleration in 1998. This result, confirmed by the Supernova Cosmology Project in 1999, received an impressive string of recognition culminating with the current Nobel prize in Physics. The review is presented thinking of physicists with a strong interest in Cosmology, who might have pondered why was that, after decades of not being able to agree upon the rate of cosmic expansion, astronomers were so quick to concur on cosmic acceleration.

  12. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine. PMID:26676474

  13. Nobel Prize for Physical Therapy? Rise, Fall, and Revival of Medico-Mechanical Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Ottosson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    This historical vignette explores the considerations of the Nobel Prize Committee for Physiology or Medicine by vetting the Nobel Prize chances of Dr Gustaf Zander (1835-1920). His way to stardom started 150 years ago when he began mechanizing the passive and active movements that physical therapists manually used to treat diseases. A glance at his machines shows that they parallel surprisingly well what can be found in modern fitness studios. By combining files from the Nobel Prize Archive and sources from the first physical therapists, this vignette pieces together why Zander was considered one of the best candidates for the Nobel Prize in 1916. By providing this glimpse of history, questions about the origin of physical therapy concepts and the profession of the physical therapist are raised. PMID:25655882

  14. Exploring the Uses of RNAi — Gene Knockdown and the Nobel Prize

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.

    2006-01-01

    The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded this year to Andrew Fire (Stanford University School of Medicine) and Craig Mello (University of Massachusetts Medical School) for their discovery of a new form of gene silencing.

  15. Increased Oil Recovery Prize for work on Troll; Fikk pris for Troll-arbeid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steensen, Anders J.

    2007-07-01

    Halliburton and Baker Hughes have developed tools that ensures increased oil recovery from the Troll platform. For this work, the companies were awarded the Increased Oil Recovery (IOR) Prize. Details on the technical principles are provided (ml)

  16. [On the Awarding of the First Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine to Emil von Behring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Enke, Ulrike

    2015-12-01

    In his will of 1895, the Swedish inventor Alfred Nobel laid the foundation for prizes in physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace to those who had "conferred the greatest benefit on mankind" during the last year. The Nobel Prize is today widely considered as the most prestigious international symbol of scientific excellence, but it still is an exciting research question how it gained such prestige. Drawing on files from the Emil von Behring Archive in Marburg, Germany, and the Archive of the Nobel Assembly for Physiology or Medicine in Stockholm this essay aims at shedding light on why the first Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1901 was awarded the German immunologist Emil von Behring, and how this decision was viewed at that time. This study is part of a research project that explores mechanisms leading to scientific recognition by using the example of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine.

  17. Discovery of superfluid 3He phases wins 1996 nobel prize in physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1996 Nobel prize in physics was awarded to David M. Lee, Douglas D. Osheroff and Robert C. Richardson for their discovery of superfluidity in 3He in 1971. A short account of the discovery and its importance is given

  18. Kaasaegse kunsti muuseum suurendab panuseid - Köler Prize / Hanno Soans

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Soans, Hanno, 1974-

    2011-01-01

    Eesti Kaasaegse Kunsti Muuseumi loodud kaasaegse kunsti preemiast. 6. juunini EKKM-is avatud Köler Prize 2011 nominentide - Dénes Kalev Farkas, Tõnis Saadoja, Timo Toots, Sigrid Viir, Jevgeni Zolotko - näitusest

  19. Nobel Prize for Physical Therapy? Rise, Fall, and Revival of Medico-Mechanical Institutes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Nils; Ottosson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    This historical vignette explores the considerations of the Nobel Prize Committee for Physiology or Medicine by vetting the Nobel Prize chances of Dr Gustaf Zander (1835-1920). His way to stardom started 150 years ago when he began mechanizing the passive and active movements that physical therapists manually used to treat diseases. A glance at his machines shows that they parallel surprisingly well what can be found in modern fitness studios. By combining files from the Nobel Prize Archive and sources from the first physical therapists, this vignette pieces together why Zander was considered one of the best candidates for the Nobel Prize in 1916. By providing this glimpse of history, questions about the origin of physical therapy concepts and the profession of the physical therapist are raised.

  20. From the editors: special issue announcement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XiaozhaiQi; George C.Lee

    2008-01-01

    @@ This issue contains the first paper on lessons leamed from the Great Wenchuan Earthquake that JEEEV hopes to continue to provide to our readers. We welcome contributions for consideration for future publication. During the past several months, we have been considering "Special Issues" on a variety of topics for the journal ofEarthquake Engineering and Engineering Vibration. We are pleased to announce that the December 2008 issue will befocused on "Seismic Design and Retrofit of Highway Bridges," with Professor Li Jianzhong of Tongji University andProfessor Ian Buckle of the University of Nevada at Reno serving as Guest Editors. We invite you to contribute to thisSpecial Issue by submitting a manuscript to either our Harbin or Buffalo office by August 15, 2008 with an indication"For 2008 Special Issue."

  1. NSF assistant director for geosciences announces resignation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zielinki, Sarah

    Margaret Leinen, assistant director for geosciences at the U.S. National Science Foundation, announced on 7 December that she will be leaving NSF in January 2007 to become the chief science officer and vice president of Climos, a new company based in San Francisco, Calif., that plans to develop solutions to reduce greenhouse gases. Leinen will oversee efforts to better understand the planet's carbon cycle to address global climate change issues.Leinen has managed the Directorate for Geosciences since 2000. She also served as vice chair of the U.S. Climate Change Science Program, which coordinates federal climate change research, and as co-chair of the National Science and Technology Council's Joint Committee on Ocean Science and Technology.

  2. Multiscale modeling of nerve agent hydrolysis mechanisms: a tale of two Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Martin J.; Wymore, Troy W.

    2014-10-01

    The 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry was awarded for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems, whereas the 2013 Peace Prize was given to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons for their efforts to eliminate chemical warfare agents. This review relates the two by introducing the field of multiscale modeling and highlighting its application to the study of the biological mechanisms by which selected chemical weapon agents exert their effects at an atomic level.

  3. Can exit prizes induce lame ducks to shirk less? Experimental evidence

    OpenAIRE

    Leif Helland; Jon Hovi; Lars Monkerud

    2012-01-01

    Elected representatives serving their final period face only weak incentives to provide costly effort. However, overlapping generations (OLG) models suggest that exit prizes sustained by trigger strategies can induce representatives in their final period to provide such effort. We evaluate this hypothesis using a simple OLG public good experiment, the central treatment being whether exit prizes are permitted. We find that a significantly higher number of subjects in their final...

  4. Two paradigms and Nobel prizes in economics : a contradiction or coexistence?

    OpenAIRE

    Levy, Haim; De Giorgi, Enrico; Hens, Thorsten

    2003-01-01

    Markowitz and Sharpe won the Nobel Prize in Economics more than a decade ago for the development of Mean-Variance analysis and the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM). In the year 2002, Kahneman won the Nobel Prize in Economics for the development of Prospect Theory. Can these two apparently contradictory paradigms coexist? In deriving the CAPM, Sharpe, Lintner and Mossin assume expected utility (EU) maximization following the approach proposed by Markowitz, normal distributions and risk avers...

  5. From Stealing Fire to Cellular Reprogramming: A Scientific History Leading to the 2012 Nobel Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lensch, M. William; Mummery, Christine L.

    2013-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming was recently “crowned” with the award of the Nobel Prize to two of its groundbreaking researchers, Sir John Gurdon and Shinya Yamanaka. The recent link between reprogramming and stem cells makes this appear almost a new field of research, but its historical roots have actually spanned more than a century. Here, the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2012 is placed in its historical context. PMID:24052937

  6. Technological innovation: rather than a successful project. Regarding the national prize for innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Mario Rodríguez Devis

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the results of the Colombian Ministry of Industry, Trade and Turism’s Premio Colombiano a la 1nnovacion Tecnologica Fmpresarial para las M1PYMFS-2005 (the Colombian prize for Company Technological Innovation for Small- and Medium-sized Companies, 2005). The model used is a Vision Hiper 666 application developed by the author, who was also the scientific and technical director for the aforementioned prize. The innovatory concept was proposed by the Unive...

  7. Evolution of National Nobel Prize Shares in the 20th Century

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidhuber, Juergen

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the evolution of cumulative national shares of Nobel Prizes since 1901, properly taking into account that most prizes were divided among several laureates. We rank by citizenship at the moment of the award, and by country of birth. Surprisingly, graphs of this type have not been published before, even though they powerfully illustrate the century's migration patterns (brain drains and gains) in the sciences and other fields.

  8. Homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize Nelore bull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobreiro, J

    2007-01-01

    Treatments for infertility in bulls are not described in homeopathic literature. A few treatments, such as changing the protein content of the diet, giving extra minerals, etc have been proposed. This case report describes homeopathic treatment for infertility in a prize bull. A Nelore bull, considered infertile for 3 years, was treated with homeopathic Pulsatilla nigricans 200 CH. Decreased total sperm defects, increased sperm motility and a very impressive increased number of doses of semen produced were observed. The bull relapsed after treatment was withdrawn, but again responded when it was resumed. Since only one animal was observed one cannot assume that the observed changes were due only to this treatment. Further studies may establish the real benefits of a homeopathic medicine in bull infertility. PMID:17227749

  9. The noble enigma: Chagas' nominations for the Nobel Prize

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coutinho Marilia

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Carlos Chagas, a Brazilian physician, discovered the American trypanosomiasis in 1909. Like other remarkable discoveries of those days, his work helped to articulate the insect-vector theory and other theoretical guidelines in tropical medicine. Unlike all other discoveries, all the stages of this work were accomplished in a few months and by a single man. Chagas' discovery was widely recognized at home and abroad. He was twice nominated for the Nobel Prize - in 1913 and in 1921-, but never received the award. Evidence suggests that the reasons for this failure are related to the violent opposition that Chagas faced in Brazil. The contentions towards Chagas were related to a rejection of the meritocratic procedures that gave him prominence, as well as to local petty politics.

  10. Honoring antiparasitics: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-June

    2016-04-01

    Protozoa and helminths are the two main groups that cause parasitic diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Protozoa are unicellular organisms like the malaria parasite Plasmodium, which is responsible for the majority of deaths associated with parasitic infections. Helminths are alternative parasites that can produce debilitating diseases in hosts, some of which result in chronic infections. The discovery of effective therapeutic drugs is the key to improving health in regions of poverty and poor sanitation where these parasites usually occur. It is very encouraging that the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Youyou Tu as well as William C. Campbell and Satoshi Õmura for their considerable contributions in discovering artemisinin and avermectin, respectively. Both drugs revolutionized therapies for filariasis and malaria, significantly reducing by large percentages their morbidity and mortality. PMID:27372164

  11. Prize-linked savings mechanism in the portfolio selection framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kaliciak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prize-linked savings (PLS instruments implement the lottery-like component into the structure of traditional financial products. Following existing research based on both real and experimental data, such programs appeared highly successful in raising the overall savings rates within the given environments. PLS accounts seem to be treated by decision-makers as substitutes to ordinary lotteries, but this does not hold when comparing PLS with traditional interest-bearing savings products. This paper explains such empirical observations in a framework of portfolio selection problem. For that purpose, two models have been presented and used for deriving optimal portfolios in a presence of PLS, lottery and savings products. As shown in the analysis, the standard mean-variance model does not allow for a PLS instrument to be of optimum choice, whereas in the case of behavioural portfolio model allocating all disposable income

  12. Physics Nobel prize 2004: Surprising theory wins physics Nobel

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    From left to right: David Politzer, David Gross and Frank Wilczek. For their understanding of counter-intuitive aspects of the strong force, which governs quarks inside protons and neutrons, on 5 October three American physicists were awarded the 2004 Nobel Prize in Physics. David J. Gross (Kavli Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara), H. David Politzer (California Institute of Technology), and Frank Wilczek (Massachusetts Institute of Technology) made a key theoretical discovery with a surprising result: the closer quarks are together, the weaker the force - opposite to what is seen with electromagnetism and gravity. Rather, the strong force is analogous to a rubber band stretching, where the force increases as the quarks get farther apart. These physicists discovered this property of quarks, known as asymptotic freedom, in 1976. It later became a key part of the theory of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the Standard Model, the current best theory to describe the interac...

  13. IEEE prize awarded to CERN PhD student

    CERN Document Server

    2006-01-01

    Rafael Ballabriga Suñe (right) receives the Student Paper Award. Rafael Ballabriga Suñe is the recipient of the 2006 Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. (IEEE) Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society (NPSS)'s Student Paper Award. Ballabriga's winning paper reported on a prototype chip, which belongs to a new generation of single photon counting hybrid pixel detector readout chips - Medipix3. The NPSS established this award in 2005 to encourage outstanding student contributions and greater student participation as principle or sole authors of papers. The prizes were presented at the IEEE Nuclear Science Symposium held in San Diego on 29 October to 4 November. The prototype chip was designed by Ballabriga based on ideas generated within the CERN Medipix team - part of the PH Microelectronics group. It could be used in various fields in the future, including medical imaging, neutron imaging, electron microscopy, radiation monitoring and other applications in high-energy physics. The novel aspe...

  14. Nobel Prize in physics 1985: Quantum Hall effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions (like very strong magnetic fields, ultralow temperatures, and occurrence of a two-dimensional electron gas in microelectronic structures) for the measurement of the quantum Hall effect are explained. Two possible measuring methods are described. Measuring results for p-Si-MOSFET, GaAs/AlGaAs heterojuntions and grain boundaries in InSb crystals are reported. Differences between normal (integer) and fractional quantum Hall effect are discussed. One of the important consequences is that by means of the quantum Hall effect the value h/e2 can be determined with very high accuracy. In 1985 Klaus von Klitzing was awarded the Nobel Prize for his work on the quantum Hall effect

  15. Honoring antiparasitics: The 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-June

    2016-04-01

    Protozoa and helminths are the two main groups that cause parasitic diseases with a broad spectrum of clinical symptoms. Protozoa are unicellular organisms like the malaria parasite Plasmodium, which is responsible for the majority of deaths associated with parasitic infections. Helminths are alternative parasites that can produce debilitating diseases in hosts, some of which result in chronic infections. The discovery of effective therapeutic drugs is the key to improving health in regions of poverty and poor sanitation where these parasites usually occur. It is very encouraging that the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was awarded to Youyou Tu as well as William C. Campbell and Satoshi Õmura for their considerable contributions in discovering artemisinin and avermectin, respectively. Both drugs revolutionized therapies for filariasis and malaria, significantly reducing by large percentages their morbidity and mortality.

  16. Linear Accelerator (LINAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Linear Accelerator A linear accelerator (LINAC) customizes high energy x-rays to ... ensured? What is this equipment used for? A linear accelerator (LINAC) is the device most commonly used ...

  17. How Citation Boosts Promote Scientific Paradigm Shifts and Nobel Prizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the “boosting effect” of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying “boost factor” is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229

  18. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Mazloumian

    Full Text Available Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  19. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-05-04

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract.

  20. How citation boosts promote scientific paradigm shifts and nobel prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloumian, Amin; Eom, Young-Ho; Helbing, Dirk; Lozano, Sergi; Fortunato, Santo

    2011-01-01

    Nobel Prizes are commonly seen to be among the most prestigious achievements of our times. Based on mining several million citations, we quantitatively analyze the processes driving paradigm shifts in science. We find that groundbreaking discoveries of Nobel Prize Laureates and other famous scientists are not only acknowledged by many citations of their landmark papers. Surprisingly, they also boost the citation rates of their previous publications. Given that innovations must outcompete the rich-gets-richer effect for scientific citations, it turns out that they can make their way only through citation cascades. A quantitative analysis reveals how and why they happen. Science appears to behave like a self-organized critical system, in which citation cascades of all sizes occur, from continuous scientific progress all the way up to scientific revolutions, which change the way we see our world. Measuring the "boosting effect" of landmark papers, our analysis reveals how new ideas and new players can make their way and finally triumph in a world dominated by established paradigms. The underlying "boost factor" is also useful to discover scientific breakthroughs and talents much earlier than through classical citation analysis, which by now has become a widespread method to measure scientific excellence, influencing scientific careers and the distribution of research funds. Our findings reveal patterns of collective social behavior, which are also interesting from an attention economics perspective. Understanding the origin of scientific authority may therefore ultimately help to explain how social influence comes about and why the value of goods depends so strongly on the attention they attract. PMID:21573229