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Sample records for ankerite

  1. Mineralogical anomalies and their influences on elemental geochemistry of the main workable coal beds from the Dafang Coalfield, Guizhou, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Ren, D.; Li, D.; Chou, C.-L.; Luo, K.

    2006-01-01

    Mineralogy and geochemistry of the No. 11 Coal bed were investigated by using inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX), sequential chemical extraction procedure (SCEP), and optical microscopy. The results show that the No. 11 Coal bed has very high contents of veined quartz (Vol. 11.4%) and veined ankerite (Vol. 10.2 %). The veined ankerite was generally coated by goethite and the veined quartz embraced chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and selenio-galena. In addition, a trace amount of kaolinite was filled in the veins. These seven minerals often occur in the same veins. The formation temperatures of the veined ankerite and quartz are 85??C and 180??C respectively, indicating their origins of iron-rich calcic and siliceous low-temperature hydrothermal fluids in different epigenetic periods. Studies have also found that the veined quartz probably formed earlier than the veined ankerite, and at least three distinct ankerite formation stages were observed by the ration of Ca/Sr and Fe/Mn of ankerite. The mineral formation from the early to late stage is in order of sulfide, quartz, kaolinite, ankerite, and goethite. The veined ankerite is the dominant source of Mn, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, which are as high as 0.09%, 74.0 ??g/g, 33.6 ??g/g, 185 ??g/g, and 289 ??g/g in this coal seam, respectively. However, the veined quartz is the main carrier of Pd, Pt, and Ir, which are 1.57 ??g/g, 0.15 ??g/g, and 0.007 ??g/g in this coal seam, respectively. In addition, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, and selenio-galena of hydrothermal origin were determined in the veined quartz, and these three sulfide minerals are also important carriers of Cu, Zn and Pb in the No. 11 Coal bed.

  2. Compositional Evolution of Pyrochlore-Group Minerals in Carbonatites of the Belaya Zima Pluton, Eastern Sayan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khromova, E. A.; Doroshkevich, A. G.; Sharygin, V. V.; Izbrodin, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    Pyrochlore-group minerals are the main concentrators of niobium in carbonatites of the Belaya Zima alkaline pluton. Fluorcalciopyrochlore, kenopyrochlore and hydropyrochlore were identified in chemical composition. Their main characteristics are given: compositional variation, morphology, and zoning. During evolution from early calcite to late ankerite carbonatites, the UO2, TiO2, REE, and Y contents gradually increased. All carbonatite types are suggested to contain initial fluorcalciopyrochlore. However, in calcite-dolomite and ankerite carbonatites, it is partially or completely hydrated due to hydrothermal processes at the late stage of the pluton. This hydration resulted in the appearance of kenopyrochlore and hydropyrochlore due to removal of Ca, Na and F, and input of Ba, H2O, K, Si, Fe, and probably U and REE. At the last stage of the pluton, this hydrated pyrochlore was replaced by Fe-bearing columbite.

  3. On stages of hydrothermal mineralization of molybdenum-uranium ore manifestation in volcanic edifice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakovlev, P.D.; Mamotin, S.A.

    1976-01-01

    Volcanogenic-intrusive complex of the ore manifestation region is represented by various facies of liparite and granitoid formation rocks. Numerous dislocations with breaks in continuity and the corresponding feathering fissures relate to 3 stages of hydrothermal mineralization of rocks. Quartz-sericite-kaolin metasomatites were formed at the earlier (volcanic) stage. Tourmalinization was associated with the middle stage which accompanied the granitoid intrusive formation. The later mineralization stage was accompanied by formation of beresites and molibdenum-uranium ores. Identification was controlled by the dislocation, ore bodies had the shape of lens, vein or small nest. 7 stages separated by shores were identified at the ore stage: quartz-sericite pyritic; quartz-pyrite-arsenopyritic; sulfide-pitchblendic; chalcedonic; ankeritic; quartz-calcitic and pyrite-ankeritic

  4. Temperature Range for Metasomatism at the Bakalskoe Siderite Deposits with Use of Geochemical Data

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    M. T. Krupenin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The data obtained with the quantitative microprobe ankerite–siderite composition analysis of seven samples from the different parts of Bakalskoe field showed that the wallrock ankerites in the western and central parts of the ore field differ in average concentrations of FeCO 3 (respectively 14.21 and 20.84 wt.%. However, there is no significant difference in composition of siderites. The calculation of the Mg-Fe metasomatism temperatures based on ankerite-siderite and ankerite-breinerite geothermometers showed the close agreement of the values of both methods at temperatures of 250 °C and above. The average temperatures of siderite metasomatism in the central part of the Bakalskoe ore field are in range 250-270 ° C, and, in the peripheral part, the determined temperature does not exceed 190-220 ° C. These values do not depend on the position of the siderite deposits in stratigraphic level of the Bakalskaya Suite.

  5. Telescoped porphyry-style and epithermal veins and alteration at the central Maratoto valley prospect, Hauraki Goldfield, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, M.P.; Mauk, J.L.; Kendrick, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    At the central Maratoto valley prospect, southern Coromandel Peninsula, New Zealand, andesite flows and dacite breccias host rare porphyry-style quartz veins that are telescoped by widespread epithermal veins and alteration. Early porphyry-style quartz veins, which lack selvages of porphyry-style alteration, host hypersaline fluid inclusions that contain several translucent daughter crystals, including halite and sylvite. Overprinting epithermal veins and alteration are divided into two stages. Main-stage epithermal alteration and veins are characterised by the successive deposition of pyrite, quartz, and ankerite-dolomite veinlets coupled with intense alteration of the wall rock to quartz, illite, interlayer illite-smectite (≤ 10% smectite), chlorite, pyrite, ankerite, and dolomite. Late-stage epithermal veins and alteration are characterised by the formation of calcite and siderite veinlets, coupled with overprinting of the wall rocks by both these minerals. Multiphase fluid inclusions in a porphyry-style quartz vein formed at temperatures >400 degrees C and trapped hypersaline magmatic fluid. Lower temperature secondary liquid-rich inclusions in the porphyry-style quartz vein homogenise between 283 and 329 degrees C and trapped a dilute fluid with 18 O (VSMOW) values of 13.5-18.1 permille, whereas late-stage epithermal calcite has δ 18 O (VSMOW) values of 3.1-5.1 permille. Calculated isotopic compositions for the fluid in equilibrium with ankerite-dolomite and calcite at 260 degrees C, averages 6 and -3 permille, respectively. The enriched value for main-stage ankerite-dolomite suggests formation from waters that underwent significant water-rock exchange, whereas isotopically lighter water that formed late-stage calcite underwent little water-rock interaction. We propose a three-stage model to explain telescoped veins and alteration styles at the central Maratoto valley prospect area. Porphyry-style quartz veins were the first to form from hot hypersaline

  6. Geochemistry of rare earths elements from ferriferous formations of the Serpentina's range, Conceicao do Mato Dentro, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dossin, T.M.; Dossin, I.A.; Dardenne, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The banded iron formations of the Serpentina's Range constitute the aim of this report. Their stratigraphy and geochemistry are suggestive that deposits formed under epicontinental basin environments of Lake Superior type. Their mineralogy is essentially represented by hematite and magnetite, locally with siderite and ankerite. Rare earth elements data from the iron formations of the are show Eu and Ce anomalies relatively the other elements, which is interpreted as a response to intermediate oxigenation levels of atmosphere and hidrosphere between the Archean and the Upper Proterozoic. (author) [pt

  7. Petrography and diagensis of Padeha Formation sandstones (Lower-Middle Devonian at Bujhan section, Binalud Basin, NE Iran

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    Mehdi Reza Poursoltani

    2016-12-01

    Conclusion: Based on petrological and geochemical studies, minor diagenetic events in the eodiagenetic stage include cementation (calcite, dolomite and iron oxide and rarely fracturing. Mesodiagenetic events were dominated by cementation (silica, dolomite, calcite, iron oxide components, clay minerals, compaction, intra-grain microfractures, alteration of unstable clasts, dissolution and replacement, pressure solution, and rarely formation of apatite. Minor telodiagenetic events include dissolution and cementation (dolomite, ankerite, siderite, iron oxide and rarely kaolinite. The bulk of the porosity is secondary, with an average of 4.7%, which is the result of dissolution and fractures

  8. Hydrothermal Pb-Zn sulphide mineralization on the site Marianka (Small Carpathians); Hydrotermalna Pb-Zn sulfidicka mineralizacia na lokalite Marianka (Male Karpaty)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubac, A [Univerzita Komenskeho v Bratislave, Prirodovedecka fakulta, Katedra mineralogie a petrologie, 84215 Bratislava (Slovakia)

    2012-04-25

    Hydrothermal Pb-Zn sulphide mineralization at Marianka village in Small Carpathians occurs in Palaeozoic metapelit rocks of Tatricum crystalline. Mineralization consists of ore lenses. Banded texture of ores is typical. The main ore minerals are sphalerite and galenite accompanied by bournonit, boulangerit, meneghinit, pyrite, chalcopyrite, tetrahedrite, marcasite and pyrotite. Quartz is the main non-metallic mineral. Other non-metallic minerals are calcite, ankerite, siderite and dolomite. Micro-thermometric measurements of fluid inclusions in quartz indicate creation of mineralization probably from low salinic fluids (0.1 to 20 wt.% NaCl equiv.), at 100 to 150 grad C. (authors)

  9. High resolution cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of carbonate cementation in Khurmala Formation (Paleocene-L. Eocene) from Iraqi Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Muhamed F.; Omer, Dilshad; Zebari, Bahroz Gh.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of high resolution cathodoluminsecnce-spectroscopy (HRS-CL) with spatial electron microprobe analysis and optical microscopy is used to determine paragenesis and history of cementation in the limestones and dolostones of Khurmala Formation which is exposed in many parts of Northern Iraq. Khurmala Formation was subjected to different diagenetic processes such as micritization, compaction, dissolution, neomorphism, pyritization and cementation that occurred during marine to shallow burial stages and culminated during intermediate to deep burial later stages. Five dolomite textures are recognized and classified according to crystal size distribution and crystal-boundary shape. Dolomitization is closely associated with the development of secondary porosity that pre-and postdates dissolution and corrosion; meanwhile such porosity was not noticed in the associated limestones. Microprobe analysis revealed three types of cement, calcite, dolomite and ankerite which range in their luminescence from dull to bright. Cathodoluminescence study indicated four main texture generations. These are (1) unzoned microdolomite of planar and subhedral shape, with syntaxial rim cement of echinoderm that show dull to red luminescence, (2) equant calcite cements filling interparticle pores which shows dull luminescence and weak zonal growth, (3.1) homogenous intrinsic blue stoichiometric calcite with dull luminescence and without activators, (3.2) coarse blocky calcite cement with strong oscillatory zoning and bright orange luminescence which postdates other calcite cements, (4) ankerite cement with red to orange, non-luminescence growth zonation which is the last formed cement.

  10. Diagenesis of Permian alluvial fan deposits of Northern Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bluem, W.

    1987-01-01

    Fine-grained sandstones of Permian alluvial fan deposits from three Nagra boreholes (Weiach, Riniken, Kaisten) and an exploration well, drilled at Wintersingen are clast supported, moderately sorted arkosic greywackes containing typically 2-20 % clayey matrix. Petrographic studies indicate that the origin of this clayey matrix is postdepositional. Mechanical infiltration of fines and diagenetic reddening of detrital and authigenic iron oxides are the earliest recorded events. Additionally, nodular calcites of calcrete origin and fibrous illitic clays are also ascribed to the eogenetic environment. The present strong compaction fabric results from general lack of eogenetic framework supporting cements. During mesogenesis, secondary porosity was generated through partial removal of early calcite. At the same time, a first generation of syntaxial quartz cementation and a subsequent fibrous illite authigenesis took place. Leaching of detrital K-feldspars post-dating compaction is recorded throughout the studied boreholes. The following burial diagenetic events differ between the various boreholes: in Weiach and Wintersingen kaolinite, illite, prismatic quartz and ankerite/siderite are recorded; in Riniken K-feldspar, illite, prismatic quartz and dolomite developed; whilst in Kaisten K-feldspar and microcrystalline quartz-cement dominate. These differences reflect the chemistry, pH and ionic strength of the pore fluids. Filling of veins by dolomite/ankerite, iron-rich and subsequent iron-poor calcite is the latest recorded event. (author) 21 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  11. Rare earth chemistry of gold-bearing sedimentary carbonate horizons from the Abitibi Greenstone Belt, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, I.L.; Roberts, R.G.; Reading, D.J.R.

    1984-01-01

    The ankerite, gold ore bodies of the Dome Mine, Timmins, Ontario are interflow units, 1 to 3 m thick in a sequence of tholeiitic basalts. The units consist of discontinuous layers of ferroan dolomite, chert and pyroclastic material, and laminations of iron sulfides, tourmaline, and graphite. They have been interpreted as sediments on the basis of their internal structure. Seven Rare Earth elements (REE) (Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Tm, Yb) were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis, on 10 samples of carbonate material from the ankerite units. The chondrite normalized REE plots have relatively flat patterns with, in some cases, positive Europium anomalies. The flat patterns suggest that the fluids from which the carbonate precipitated was in equilibrium with volcanic rocks of tholeiitic and komatiitic composition. The positive Europium anomalies imply that the fluids were reducing at times. Such patterns are characteristic of Archaean sediments and also the precipitates associated with the discharge of hydrothermal solutions from vents on the East Pacific Rise

  12. Mineral identification in Colombian coals using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fajardo, M.; Mojica, J.; Barraza, J.; Perez Alcazar, G.A.; Tabares, J.A.

    1999-01-01

    Minerals were identified in three Colombian coal samples from the Southwest of the country using Moessbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Original and sink separated coal fractions of specific gravity 1.40 and 1.60 with particle size less than 600 μm were used in the study. Using Moessbauer spectroscopy, the minerals identified in the original coal samples were pyrite jarosite, ankerite, illite and ferrous sulfate, whereas by means of X-ray diffraction, minerals identified were kaolinite, quartz, pyrite, and jarosite. Differences in mineral composition were found in the original and sink separated fractions using both techniques. Moessbauer spectra show that the mineral phases in low concentrations such as illite, ankerite and ferrous sulfate do not always appear in the spectra of sink coals, despite of those minerals occurring in the original coal, due to the fact that they are associated with the organic matter and not liberated in the grinding process. X-ray results show that the peak intensity grows as the specific gravity is increased indicating that the density separation method could be an effective process to clean coal

  13. ASTER spectral analysis and lithologic mapping of the Khanneshin carbonatite volcano, Afghanistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John C.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data of the early Quaternary Khanneshin carbonatite volcano located in southern Afghanistan were used to identify carbonate rocks within the volcano and to distinguish them from Neogene ferruginous polymict sandstone and argillite. The carbonatitic rocks are characterized by diagnostic CO3 absorption near 11.2 μm and 2.31–2.33 μm, whereas the sandstone, argillite, and adjacent alluvial deposits exhibit intense Si-O absorption near 8.7 μm caused mainly by quartz and Al-OH absorption near 2.20 μm due to muscovite and illite.Calcitic carbonatite was distinguished from ankeritic carbonatite in the short wave infrared (SWIR) region of the ASTER data due to a slight shift of the CO3 absorption feature toward 2.26 μm (ASTER band 7) in the ankeritic carbonatite spectra. Spectral assessment using ASTER SWIR data suggests that the area is covered by extensive carbonatite flows that contain calcite, ankerite, and muscovite, though some areas mapped as ankeritic carbonatite on a preexisting geologic map were not identified in the ASTER data. A contact aureole shown on the geologic map was defined using an ASTER false color composite image (R = 6, G = 3, B = 1) and a logical operator byte image. The contact aureole rocks exhibit Fe2+, Al-OH, and Fe, Mg-OH spectral absorption features at 1.65, 2.2, and 2.33 μm, respectively, which suggest that the contact aureole rocks contain muscovite, epidote, and chlorite. The contact aureole rocks were mapped using an Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operator.A visible through short wave infrared (VNIR-SWIR) mineral and rock-type map based on matched filter, band ratio, and logical operator analysis illustrates: (1) laterally extensive calcitic carbonatite that covers most of the crater and areas northeast of the crater; (2) ankeritic carbonatite located southeast and north of the crater and some small deposits located within the crater; (3) agglomerate that

  14. THE ROLE OF DYNAMOMETAMORPHISM IN THE FORMATION OF THE MUKODEK GOLD FIELD (NORTH PRIBAIKALIE

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    V. A. Vanin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Mukodek gold field is discussed as an example proving that dynamometamorphism is a major factor in the formation of gold deposits in the Abchad fault zone. This deposit belongs to the gold‐silver‐ore zones of mylonitization and schistosity. The ore source is related to the original host rocks with an increased geochemical background concentration of Au. Due to dynamometamorphism processes, gold particles are abundant and mostly enlarged. From the primary rocks, the dynamometamorphites inherit a positive correlation between the number of particles and the concentrations of gold. The dynamometamorphic complex of the ore field developed in two stages, as a minimum. At the early stage (321.0±1.9 Ma, the host rocks were mechanochemically deformed and transformed into the gold‐ bearing mineralized dynamometamorphites containing sericite, chlorite, ankerite, albite, and quartz. In the second stage (280±15 Ma, the albite‐dolomite‐quartz ore veins were formed. Such veins have industrial gold contents.

  15. Microstructural characterization of material used as supporter in pre hispanic paints; Caracterizacion microestructural de material utilizado como soporte en pinturas prehispanicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva V, Y. [FIME-UANL, San Nicolas de los Garza, Nuevo Leon (Mexico); Zorrilla, C.; Canetas, J.; Hernandez, R.; Aguilar F, M.; Arenas A, J. [IFUNAM, 04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Martinez, G. [INAH, 04000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    The aim of this work is to show the characterization of pre hispanic paintings mainly of the materials that support the pigments. The samples come from three different archaeological sites, Palenque-Chiapas (two specimens), Teotihuacan-Estado de Mexico (one specimen) and Mitla-Oaxaca (one specimen); Mayan, Teotihuacan and Mixtec-Zapotec culture respectively. The samples were analyzed by Sem, EDS, Tem, XRD and IR. The results show calcite as common phase for all the samples, however exist other phases identified depending on the site as dolomite, ankerite, calcium silicon chloride, etc. The origin of the red color of the analyzed pigments were cinnabar (HgS) by a sample of Palenque and hematite (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) by the other specimen, this last crystalline phase also present in the Mitla and Teotihuacan samples. By IR were identified some organic compounds in all the samples, but not copal. (Author)

  16. Mössbauer study of Fe mineralogy with respect to rank, type and Colombian carboniferous zone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballero, F. Reyes; Martínez Ovalle, S. A.; Díaz Lagos, M.; Gómez, O. P.; Blandón, A.

    2017-01-01

    The transmission mode of Fe-57 Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to identify iron bearing minerals and establish relationships between and among these minerals and the ranks and types of various carboniferous zones in Colombia. Maceral and mineral compositions vary significantly among Colombian carboniferous zones. These variations determine some of the final characteristics and potential uses of coal, and therefore significantly contribute to defining coal quality. A comparison of spectroscopy results shows that the thermal maturity of the Colombian coals ranges from lignite to semianthracite. Similarities and differences exist with respect to conventional parameters. The coals of Córdoba and Cauca have higher sulfur contents > 2 % ash contents. Iron bearing minerals identified included pyrite, which was, found everywhere, and illite, ankerite, siderite, iron sulfates were found in particular areas. Coals from Valle del Cauca, Córdoba, Caldas and Santander are characterized by oxidation of pyrite and its transformation into ferrous or ferric sulfate.

  17. Mössbauer study of Fe mineralogy with respect to rank, type and Colombian carboniferous zone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caballero, F. Reyes, E-mail: carefa4@hotmail.com; Martínez Ovalle, S. A., E-mail: s.agustin.martinez@uptc.edu.co [Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Grupo de Física Nuclear Aplicada y Simulación (Colombia); Díaz Lagos, M., E-mail: mercedes.diaz@uptc.edu.co [Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Escuela de Ingeniería Geológica (Colombia); Gómez, O. P., E-mail: olgapatricia.gomez@uptc.edu.co [Universidad Pedagógica y Tecnológica de Colombia, Escuela de Ingeniería de Minas (Colombia); Blandón, A., E-mail: asblando@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Materiales y Minerales, Facultad de Minas (Colombia)

    2017-11-15

    The transmission mode of Fe-57 Mössbauer spectroscopy was used to identify iron bearing minerals and establish relationships between and among these minerals and the ranks and types of various carboniferous zones in Colombia. Maceral and mineral compositions vary significantly among Colombian carboniferous zones. These variations determine some of the final characteristics and potential uses of coal, and therefore significantly contribute to defining coal quality. A comparison of spectroscopy results shows that the thermal maturity of the Colombian coals ranges from lignite to semianthracite. Similarities and differences exist with respect to conventional parameters. The coals of Córdoba and Cauca have higher sulfur contents > 2 % ash contents. Iron bearing minerals identified included pyrite, which was, found everywhere, and illite, ankerite, siderite, iron sulfates were found in particular areas. Coals from Valle del Cauca, Córdoba, Caldas and Santander are characterized by oxidation of pyrite and its transformation into ferrous or ferric sulfate.

  18. Microstructural characterization of material used as supporter in pre hispanic paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva V, Y.; Zorrilla, C.; Canetas, J.; Hernandez, R.; Aguilar F, M.; Arenas A, J.; Martinez, G.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work is to show the characterization of pre hispanic paintings mainly of the materials that support the pigments. The samples come from three different archaeological sites, Palenque-Chiapas (two specimens), Teotihuacan-Estado de Mexico (one specimen) and Mitla-Oaxaca (one specimen); Mayan, Teotihuacan and Mixtec-Zapotec culture respectively. The samples were analyzed by Sem, EDS, Tem, XRD and IR. The results show calcite as common phase for all the samples, however exist other phases identified depending on the site as dolomite, ankerite, calcium silicon chloride, etc. The origin of the red color of the analyzed pigments were cinnabar (HgS) by a sample of Palenque and hematite (Fe 2 O 3 ) by the other specimen, this last crystalline phase also present in the Mitla and Teotihuacan samples. By IR were identified some organic compounds in all the samples, but not copal. (Author)

  19. Carbonate hosted gold deposit in Tasmania, Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadi, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: This study uses elemental and isotopic composition of carbonates associated with gold from Henty and Beaconsfield in Tasmania, Australia, to illustrate source of gold-bearing fluids, salinity, temperature and dissolution and reprecipitation of carbonate. The Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are located in northern and western Tasmania respectively. Gold mineralisation in Beaconsfield occurs within the quartz-carbonate Tasmania Reef (Lower to Middle Palaeozoic sequence, Hills, 1998). The Henty gold mine is located at the base of the Cambrian Tyndall Group (volcano-sedimentary succession, White and McPhie, 1996) close to Henty Fault. Gold in carbonate samples from Henty ranges from 7.7 to 9360 ppm and in Beaconsfield ranges from 0.01 to 434 ppm. The amount of carbonate in samples from Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines varies from approximately 24 to 99.8%. Bivariate plot of Ca relative to total amounts of Mg, Fe and Mn illustrates that the major carbonate minerals at Beaconsfield and Henty gold mines are magnesian ankerite and calcite. The difference in carbonate mineralogy, at Henty and Beaconsfield gold mines, is attributed to the composition of fluids responsible for carbonate alteration. Gold and magnesium in Beaconsfield ankerite are derived from the leaching of Cambrian ultramafic rocks during the Devonian by the passage of meteoric fluids through tectonically affected Ordovician carbonates (Rao and Adabi, 1999). The total concentration of Fe and Mn are low (0.5 to 2%) in Henty and high (1 to 17.5%) in Beaconsfield ankerite, possibly due to oxidising conditions at Henty and reducing conditions at Beaconsfield gold mines during gold mineralisation. Variation of Sr values between Beaconsfield ankerite and Henty calcite is related to dissolution of limestone that increase Sr concentrations in gold mineralising fluids. Na values in both Beaconsfield (20 to 1100 ppm) and Henty carbonates (25 to 1650 ppm) suggest low salinity fluids responsible for gold

  20. Multiple episodes of dolomitization and dolomite recrystallization during shallow burial in Upper Jurassic shelf carbonates: eastern Swabian Alb, southern Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhold, C.

    1998-10-01

    The Upper Jurassic of the eastern Swabian Alb is composed of oolitic platform sands with associated microbe-siliceous sponge mounds at the platform margins. They are surrounded by argillaceous or calcareous mudstones and marl-limestone alternations, deposited in adjacent marl basins. Partial to complete dolomitization is predominantly confined to the mound facies. Six types of dolomite, as well as one type of ankerite, document a complex diagenetic history during shallow burial with multiple episodes of dolomite formation and recrystallization. The earliest massive matrix dolomitization is Ca-rich, has slightly depleted oxygen isotope values relative to Late Jurassic seawater, and carbon isotopic values in equilibrium with Late Jurassic seawater. This initial massive matrix dolomitization occurred during latest Jurassic to earliest Cretaceous and is related to pressure dissolution during very shallow burial at temperatures of at least 50°C. Hydrologic conditions and mass-balance calculations indicate that burial compaction provided sufficient fluids for dolomitization. Mg is derived from negligibly modified seawater, that was expelled from the adjacent off-reef strata into the mound facies. Position of the mounds along the platform margins controlled the distribution of the shallow-burial dolomite. Covariant trends between textural modification, increasing stoichiometry, partial changes in trace element content (Mn, Fe, Sr) and depletion in stable isotopes as well as distinctive CL pattern illustrate two recrystallization phases of the precursor matrix dolomite during further burial at elevated temperatures. Strong Sr enrichment of the second phase of recrystallized dolomite is ascribed to Sr-rich meteoric waters descending from overlying aragonite-bearing reef limestones or evaporite-bearing peritidal carbonates. Late-stage coarsely crystalline dolomite cements occur as vug and fracture fillings and formed during burial. Ankerite, associated with sulphide and

  1. GEOLOGY OF NIŽNÁ SLANÁ DEPOSIT AND ITS NEIGHBOURHOOD

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    Mihók Ján

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Carbonates in Early Paleozoic complexes appear in the upper part of the thick black phyllites forma-tion (Betliar Formation. They are present in the Holec Beds containing black metapelites with lydite and the upper carbonatic horizon with a slight admixture of basic volcanism. From the genetic point of view the stratiform and ankerite deposits of Gemericum are regarded to be f the hydrothermal - metasomatic origin. Owing to the positive results of the geological survey, the Nižná Slaná region has become the most important basis of Fe - ore in the Spiš - Gemer Ore Mts. but in Western Carpathinas as well. The potential of industrial siderite was 63 mil ton. Mano deposit surfaces on the southeren slope of Rimberg hill, where are the superficial parts of forma-tion of black phyllites with carbonatic bodies. The formation, thick to 450 m,contains carbonatic and lyditic ho-rizons with carbonates metasomatically changed to ankerite and siderite. The biggest siderite bodies have maxi-mal directional length of 300 m and thikness of 100 m.The accumulation of metasomatic siderite near obe-liarovo is located in the northern limb of anticline in Betliar Formation. Ore bodies are a typical example of the blind deposit. The average quality of economic ores is following: Fe 33,5 %, Mn 2,18 %, SiO2 8,5 %, As 0,001 – 0,2 %, Pb 0,001 - 0,03 %, Zn 0,002 - 0,009 %, S 0,5 - 1,5 %. Basicity of siderite is 1,4 - 1,7.

  2. The thermal and chemical evolution of hydrothermal vent fluids in shale hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) systems from the MacMillan Pass district (Yukon, Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnall, J. M.; Gleeson, S. A.; Blamey, N. J. F.; Paradis, S.; Luo, Y.

    2016-11-01

    At Macmillan Pass (YT, Canada), the hydrothermal vent complexes beneath two shale-hosted massive sulphide (SHMS) deposits (Tom, Jason) are well preserved within Late Devonian strata. These deposits provide a unique opportunity to constrain key geochemical parameters (temperature, salinity, pH, fO2, ΣS) that are critical for metal transport and deposition in SHMS systems, and to evaluate the interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the mudstone host rock. This has been achieved using a combination of detailed petrography, isotopic techniques (δ34S, δ13C and δ18O values), carbonate rare earth element analysis (LA-ICP-MS), fluid inclusion analysis (microthermometry, gas analysis via incremental crush fast scan mass spectrometry), and thermodynamic modelling. Two main paragenetic stages are preserved in both vent complexes: Stage 1 comprises pervasive ankerite alteration of the organic-rich mudstone host rock and crosscutting stockwork ankerite veining (±pyrobitumen, pyrite and quartz) and; Stage 2 consists of main stage massive sulphide (galena-pyrrhotite-pyrite ± chalcopyrite-sphalerite) and siderite (±quartz and barytocalcite) mineralisation. Co-variation of δ18O and δ13C values in ankerite can be described by temperature dependent fractionation and fluid rock interaction. Together with fluid inclusion microthermometry, this provides evidence of a steep thermal gradient (from 300 to ∼100 °C) over approximately 15 m stratigraphic depth, temporally and spatially constrained within the paragenesis of both vent complexes and developed under shallow lithostatic (28), characteristic of diagenetic fluids, are coupled with positive europium anomalies and variable light REE depletion, which are more consistent with chloride complexation in hot (>250 °C) hydrothermal fluids. In this shallow sub-seafloor setting, thermal alteration of organic carbon in the immature, chemically reactive mudstones also had an important role in the evolution of fluid chemistry

  3. Corrosion of metal iron in contact with anoxic clay at 90 °C: Characterization of the corrosion products after two years of interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlegel, Michel L.; Bataillon, Christian; Brucker, Florence; Blanc, Cécile; Prêt, Dimitri; Foy, Eddy; Chorro, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Generalized, heterogeneous corrosion is observed. • The corrosion interface is made of several layers with distinct mineralogy. • Magnetite, chukanovite, Fe-phyllosilicate, ankerite are identified from metal to clay. • The estimated corrosion damage (15 μm in two years) supports surface passivation. • The corrosion products contain only half of oxidized Fe. - Abstract: Chemical and mineralogical properties of solids formed upon free corrosion of two iron probes (one massive iron rod, and one model overpack made by two pipes covering the ends of a glass rod) in saturated clay rock (Callovo-Oxfordian formation, East of Paris Basin, France) at 90 °C over two years were investigated by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques (X-ray tomography, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis, Raman microspectroscopy, micro-X-ray diffraction, and micro-X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy). The corrosion rate of the massive rod was monitored in situ by electrochemical impedance spectrometry, and found to decrease from about 90 μm/year during the first month of reaction, to less than 1 μm/year after two years. X-ray tomography revealed the presence of several fractures suggesting the presence of preferential flow and diffusion pathways along the iron samples. Microscopic observations revealed similar corrosion interfaces for both samples. Corrosion heterogeneously affected the interface, with damaged thickness from ∼0 to 80 μm. In extensively damaged areas, an inner discontinuous layer of magnetite in contact with metal, an intermediate chukanovite (Fe 2 CO 3 (OH) 2 ) layer (only when magnetite is present, and only for the overpack), and an outer layer of poorly ordered Fe phyllosilicate were observed. In areas with little damage, only the Fe-silicate solids are observed. The clay transformation layer is predominantly made of ankerite ((Fe,Ca,Mg)CO 3 ) forming a massive unit near the trace of the original

  4. Ferroan dolomites in Miocene sediments of the Xisha Islands and their genetic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Zhang, Weiwei; Wei, Kai; He, Qingkun; Jiang, Yunshui; Xu, Tingting; Jiang, Xuejun; Yan, Guijing; Song, Hongying; Wang, Jianghai

    2018-01-01

    Carbonate rocks are important reservoirs for global petroleum exploration. The largest oilfield in the South China Sea, Liuhua 11-1, is distributed in the massive carbonate reef area of the Zhujiang (Pearl) River Mouth Basin. Previous studies showed that one 802.17-m-long core from well Xichen-1 in the South China Sea mainly consisted of white and light gray-white organic reefs. Recently, a Miocene whole core (161.9 m long) of well Xiyong-2, near well Xichen-1, was found to contain six layers of yellowish brown, light yellowish gray, iron black, or light yellowish gray-white organic reefs. Scanning electron microscope images of these layers reveal a typical ferroan dolomite rich in Fe (up to 29%), with the high concentrations of Mn, Cu, W, Zn, Cr, Ni, and Co. Systematic X-ray powder diffraction analysis yields a 1.9-6.1 match in phase ratio with ankerite, 5.4-26.9 with dolomite, and zero with calcite, which indicate that the samples can be classified as ferroan dolomite. The iron and heavy metals are inferred to be originated from multiple volcanic eruptions of Gaojianshi Island in the Dongdao Atoll during the middle-late Miocene. These elements were dissolved in seawater, likely as a sol, and carried to Yongxing Island in the Xuande Atoll by sea currents and tides enhanced by prevailing winds, and deposited as a part of the sedimentation process in the study area. The ferroan dolomite has Sr content of (125-285)×10-6, which is lower than the accepted Sr boundary value of dolomite. This finding suggests that dolomitization occurred during large-scale global glacial regression in the late Miocene. The isolated Xisha carbonate platform, exposed to air, underwent freshwater leaching and dolomitization induced by mixed water, and caused the extensive Fe-Mg exchange along the organic reef profile to form ankerite and ferroan dolomite. These results may help to understand paleoceanographic environmental changes in the South China Sea during the Miocene.

  5. A high-pyrite semianthracite of Late Permian age in the Songzao Coalfield, southwestern China: Mineralogical and geochemical relations with underlying mafic tuffs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, S.; Wang, X.; Chen, W.; Li, D.; Chou, C.-L.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, Chen; Li, H.; Zhu, Xudong; Xing, Y.; Zhang, W.; Zou, J.

    2010-01-01

    The No. 12 Coal (Late Permian) in the Songzao Coalfield, Chongqing, southwestern China, is characteristically high in pyrite and some trace elements. It is uniquely deposited directly above mafic tuff beds. Samples of coal and tuffs have been studied for their mineralogy and geochemistry using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, plasma low-temperature ashing plus powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis.The results show that the minerals of the No. 12 Coal are mainly composed of pyrite, clay minerals (kaolinite, chamosite, and illite), ankerite, calcite, and trace amounts of quartz and boehmite. Kaolinite and boehmite were mainly derived from sediment source region of mafic tuffs. Chamosite was formed by the reaction of kaolinite with Fe-Mg-rich fluids during early diagenesis. The high pyrite (Sp,d=8.83%) in the coal was related to marine transgression over peat deposits and abundant Fe derived from the underlying mafic tuff bed. Ankerite and calcite were precipitated from epigenetic fluids.Chemical compositions of incompatible elements indicate that the tuffs were derived from enriched mantle and the source magmas had an alkali-basalt character. Compared to other coals from the Songzao Coalfield and common Chinese coals, the No. 12 Coal has a lower SiO2/Al2O3 (1.13) but a higher Al2O3/Na2O (80.1) value and is significantly enriched in trace elements including Sc (13.5??g/g), V (121??g/g), Cr (33.6??g/g), Co (27.2??g/g), Ni (83.5??g/g), Cu (48.5??g/g), Ga (17.3??g/g), Y (68.3??g/g), Zr (444??g/g), Nb (23.8??g/g), and REE (392??g/g on average). Above mineralogical compositions, as well as similar ratios of selected elements (e.g., SiO2/Al2O3 and Al2O3/Na2O) and similar distribution patterns of incompatible elements (e.g., the mantle-normalized diagram for incompatible elements and chondrite-normalized diagram for rare earth elements) of coal and tuff, indicated that

  6. Petrography and geochemistry of Oligocene bituminous coal from the Jiu Valley, Petrosani basin (southern Carpathian Mountains), Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkin, Harvey E.; Tewalt, Susan J. [U.S. Geological Survey, 956 National Center, Reston, VA 20192 (United States); Hower, James C. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); Stucker, J.D. [University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research, 2540 Research Park Drive, Lexington, KY 40511 (United States); University of Kentucky Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); O' Keefe, Jennifer M.K. [Morehead State University, Morehead, KY, 40351 (United States); Tatu, Calin A. [University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Department of Immunology, Clinical Laboratory No. 1, Pta. E. Murgu No. 2, RO-1900 Timisoara (Romania); Buia, Grigore [University of Petrosani, Department of Geology, University St. 20, RO-2675 Petrosani (Romania)

    2010-05-01

    Belt samples of Oligocene (Chattian) bituminous coal from 10 underground mines located in the Jiu Valley, Hunedoara County, Petrosani basin, Romania, have been examined and analyzed for proximate and ultimate analysis, major-, minor- and trace-element chemistry, organic petrography, and vitrinite reflectance. The mineral chemistry and mode of occurrence of trace elements also have been investigated using SEM and electron microprobe techniques. Twenty coal beds occur in the Jiu Valley and most of the samples are from bed no. 3, the most productive bed of the Dilja-Uricani Formation of Oligocene age. The Petrosani basin, oriented SW-NE, is 48-km long, 10-km wide at the eastern part and 2-km wide at the western part. The coal mines are distributed along the center of the valley generally following the Jiu de Vest River. Reflectance measurements indicate that the rank of the coals ranges from high-volatile B to high-volatile A bituminous. Overall, rank decreases from the southwest to the northeast. In bed no. 3, R{sub max} varies from 0.75% in the northeast to 0.93% in the southwest. Although, most Oligocene coals in Romania and adjacent countries are lignite in rank, the Jiu Valley bituminous coals have been affected by regional metamorphism and attending hydrothermal fluids related to the Alpine orogenic event. The coals are all dominated by vitrinite; resinite and funginite are important minor macerals in most of the coals. Pyrite and carbonate generally dominate the mineral assemblages with carbonate more abundant in the northwest. Siderite occurs as nodules and masses within the macerals (generally vitrinite). Dolomite and calcite occur as fracture fillings, plant-cell fillings, and in other authigenic forms. Late-stage fracture fillings are siderite, dolomite, calcite, and ankerite. In one instance, two populations of siderite ({proportional_to} 35 and {proportional_to} 45 wt.% FeO) plus ankerite fill a large fracture. Late-stage pyrite framboid alteration is Ni

  7. Diagenesis and reservoir quality evolution of palaeocene deep-water, marine sandstones, the Shetland-Faroes Basin, British continental shelf

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansurbeg, H. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, SE 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Morad, S. [Department of Earth Sciences, Uppsala University, Villavaegen 16, SE 752 36 Uppsala (Sweden); Department of Petroleum Geosciences, The Petroleum Institute, P.O. Box 2533, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Salem, A. [Faculty of Education at Kafr El-Sheikh, Tanta University, Kafr El-Sheikh (Egypt); Marfil, R.; Caja, M.A. [Departmento Petrologia y Geoquimica, Facultad de Geologia, UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain); El-ghali, M.A.K. (Geology Department, Al-Fateh University, P.O. Box 13696, Libya); Nystuen, J.P. [Department of Geosciences, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1047 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Amorosi, A. [Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bologna, Via Zamboni 67, 40127 Bologna (Italy); Garcia, D. [Centre SPIN, Department GENERIC, Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint Etienne 158, Cours Fauriel 42023, Saint-Etienne (France); La Iglesia, A. [Instituto de Geologia Economica (CSIC-UCM), Facultad de Geologia, UCM, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2008-06-15

    The Palaeocene, deep-water marine sandstones recovered from six wells in the Shetland-Faroes Basin represent lowstand, transgressive and highstand systems tract turbiditic sediments. Mineralogic, petrographic, and geochemical analyses of these siliciclastics are used to decipher and discuss the diagenetic alterations and subsequent reservoir quality evolution. The Middle-Upper Palaeocene sandstones (subarkoses to arkoses) from the Shetland-Faroes Basin, British continental shelf are submarine turbiditic deposits that are cemented predominantly by carbonates, quartz and clay minerals. Carbonate cements (intergranular and grain replacive calcite, siderite, ferroan dolomite and ankerite) are of eogenetic and mesogenetic origins. The eogenetic alterations have been mediated by marine, meteoric and mixed marine/meteoric porewaters and resulted mainly in the precipitation of calcite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-10.9 permille and -3.8 permille), trace amounts of non-ferroan dolomite, siderite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-14.4 permille to -0.6 permille), as well as smectite and kaolinite in the lowstand systems tract (LST) and highstand systems tract (HST) turbiditic sandstone below the sequence boundary. Minor eogenetic siderite has precipitated between expanded and kaolinitized micas, primarily biotite. The mesogenetic alterations are interpreted to have been mediated by evolved marine porewaters and resulted in the precipitation of calcite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-12.9 permille to -7.8 permille) and Fe-dolomite/ankerite ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub V-PDB}=-12.1 permille to -6.3 permille) at temperatures of 50-140 and 60-140 C, respectively. Quartz overgrowths and outgrowth, which post- and pre-date the mesogenetic carbonate cements is more common in the LST and TST of distal turbiditic sandstone. Discrete quartz cement, which is closely associated with illite and chlorite, is the final diagenetic phase. The clay minerals include intergranular and grain replacive

  8. Fluid evolution and mineralogy of Mn-Fe-barite-fluorite mineralizations at the contact of the Thuringian Basin, Thüringer Wald and Thüringer Schiefergebirge in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majzlan Juraj

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous small deposits and occurrences of Mn-Fe-fluorite-barite mineralization have developed at the contact of the Thuringian Basin, Thüringer Wald and Thüringer Schiefergebirge in central Germany. The studied mineralizations comprise the assemblages siderite+ankerite-calcite-fluorite-barite and hematite-Mn oxides-calcite-barite, with the precipitation sequence in that order within each assemblage. A structural geological analysis places the origin of the barite veins between the Middle Jurassic and Early Cretaceous. Primary fluid inclusions contain water vapour and an aqueous phase with NaCl and CaCl2 as the main solutes, with salinities mostly between 24–27 mass. % CaCl2 eq. Th measurements range between 85 °C and 160 °C in barite, between 139 °C and 163 °C in siderite, and between 80 °C and 130 °C in fluorite and calcite. Stable isotopes (S, O point to the evaporitic source of sulphur in the observed mineralizations. The S,C,O isotopic compositions suggest that barite and calcite could not have precipitated from the same fluid. The isotopic composition of the fluid that precipitated barite is close to the sea water in the entire Permo–Mesozoic time span whereas calcite is isotopically distinctly heavier, as if the fluids were affected by evaporation. The fluid evolution in the siliciclastic/volcanic Rotliegend sediments (as determined by a number of earlier petrological and geochemical studies can be correlated with the deposition sequence of the ore minerals. In particular, the bleaching of the sediments by reduced Rotliegend fluids (basinal brines could be the event that mobilized Fe and Mn. These elements were deposited as siderite+ankerite within the Zechstein carbonate rocks and as hematite+Mn oxides within the oxidizing environment of the Permian volcanic and volcanoclastic rocks. A Middle-Jurassic illitization event delivered Ca, Na, Ba, and Pb from the feldspars into the basinal brines. Of these elements, Ba was

  9. Biogeochemical processes controlling authigenic carbonate formation within the sediment column from the Okinawa Trough

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiwei; Peng, Xiaotong; Bai, Shijie; Chen, Zhiyan; Van Nostrand, Joy D.

    2018-02-01

    Authigenic carbonates are one type of conspicuous manifestation in seep environments that can provide long-term archives of past seepage activity and methane cycling in the oceans. Comprehensive investigations of the microbial community functional structure and their roles in the process of carbonate formation are, however, lacking. In this study, the mineralogical, geochemical, and microbial functional composition were examined in seep carbonate deposits collected from the west slope of the northern section of the Okinawa Trough (OT). The aim of this work was to explore the correspondence between the mineralogical phases and microbial metabolism during carbonate deposit formation. The mineralogical analyses indicated that authigenic carbonate minerals (aragonite, magnesium-rich calcite, dolomite, ankerite and siderite) and iron-bearing minerals (limonite, chlorite, and biotite) were present in these carbonate samples. The carbon and oxygen isotopic values of the carbonate samples varied between -51.1‰ to -4.7‰ and -4.8‰ to 3.7‰, respectively. A negative linear correlation between carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions was found, indicating a mixture of methane-derived diagenetic (low δ13C/high 18O) carbonates and detrital origin (high δ13C/low 18O) carbonates at the OT. GeoChip analyses suggested that various metabolic activities of microorganisms, including methanogenesis, methane oxidation, sulfite oxidation, sulfate reduction, and metal biotransformations, all occurred during the formation process. On the basis of these findings, the following model for the methane cycle and seep carbonate deposit formation in the sediment column at the OT is proposed: (1) in the upper oxidizing zone, aerobic methane oxidation was the main way of methane consumption; (2) in the sulfate methane transition zone, sulfate-dependent AOM (anaerobic oxidation of methane) consumes methane, and authigenic minerals such as aragonite, magnesium-calcite, and sulfide minerals

  10. How much CO2 is trapped in carbonate minerals of a natural CO2 occurrence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Király, Csilla; Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Szamosfalvi, Ágnes; Cseresznyés, Dóra; Király, Edit; Szabó, Csaba; Falus, György

    2017-04-01

    Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a transitional technology to decrease CO2 emissions from human fossil fuel usage and, therefore, to mitigate climate change. The most important criteria of a CO2 geological storage reservoir is that it must hold the injected CO2 for geological time scales without its significant seepage. The injected CO2 undergoes physical and chemical reactions in the reservoir rocks such as structural-stratigraphic, residual, dissolution or mineral trapping mechanisms. Among these, the safest is the mineral trapping, when carbonate minerals such as calcite, ankerite, siderite, dolomite and dawsonite build the CO2 into their crystal structures. The study of natural CO2 occurrences may help to understand the processes in CO2 reservoirs on geological time scales. This is the reason why the selected, the Mihályi-Répcelak natural CO2 occurrence as our research area, which is able to provide particular and highly significant information for the future of CO2 storage. The area is one of the best known CO2 fields in Central Europe. The main aim of this study is to estimate the amount of CO2 trapped in the mineral phase at Mihályi-Répcelak CO2 reservoirs. For gaining the suitable data, we apply petrographic, major and trace element (microprobe and LA-ICP-MS) and stable isotope analysis (mass spectrometry) and thermodynamic and kinetic geochemical models coded in PHREEQC. Rock and pore water compositions of the same formation, representing the pre-CO2 flooding stages of the Mihályi-Répcelak natural CO2 reservoirs are used in the models. Kinetic rate parameters are derived from the USGS report of Palandri and Kharaka (2004). The results of petrographic analysis show that a significant amount of dawsonite (NaAlCO3(OH)2, max. 16 m/m%) precipitated in the rock due to its reactions with CO2 which flooded the reservoir. This carbonate mineral alone traps about 10-30 kg/m3 of the reservoir rock from the CO2 at Mihályi-Répcelak area, which is an

  11. A high-pyrite semianthracite of Late Permian age in the Songzao Coalfield, southwestern China: Mineralogical and geochemical relations with underlying mafic tuffs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Shifeng; Wang, Xibo; Chen, Wenmei [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083, (China); Li, Dahua [Research Center of State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, Chongqing 400042, (China); Chou, Chen-Lin [Illinois State Geological Survey (Emeritus), 615 East Peabody Drive, Champaign, IL 61820, (United States); Zhou, Yiping [Yunnan Institute of Coal Geology Prospection, Kunming 650218, (China); Zhu, Changsheng; Li, Hang [Research Center of State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, Chongqing 400042, (China); Zhu, Xingwei; Xing, Yunwei; Zhang, Weiguo; Zou, Jianhua [State Key Laboratory of Coal Resources and Safe Mining, China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing 100083, (China)

    2010-09-01

    The No. 12 Coal (Late Permian) in the Songzao Coalfield, Chongqing, southwestern China, is characteristically high in pyrite and some trace elements. It is uniquely deposited directly above mafic tuff beds. Samples of coal and tuffs have been studied for their mineralogy and geochemistry using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, X-ray fluorescence, plasma low-temperature ashing plus powder X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The results show that the minerals of the No. 12 Coal are mainly composed of pyrite, clay minerals (kaolinite, chamosite, and illite), ankerite, calcite, and trace amounts of quartz and boehmite. Kaolinite and boehmite were mainly derived from sediment source region of mafic tuffs. Chamosite was formed by the reaction of kaolinite with Fe-Mg-rich fluids during early diagenesis. The high pyrite (S{sub p,d} 8.83%) in the coal was related to marine transgression over peat deposits and abundant Fe derived from the underlying mafic tuff bed. Ankerite and calcite were precipitated from epigenetic fluids. Chemical compositions of incompatible elements indicate that the tuffs were derived from enriched mantle and the source magmas had an alkali-basalt character. Compared to other coals from the Songzao Coalfield and common Chinese coals, the No. 12 Coal has a lower SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (1.13) but a higher Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}O (80.1) value and is significantly enriched in trace elements including Sc (13.5 {mu}g/g), V (121 {mu}g/g), Cr (33.6 {mu}g/g), Co (27.2 {mu}g/g), Ni (83.5 {mu}g/g), Cu (48.5 {mu}g/g), Ga (17.3 {mu}g/g), Y (68.3 {mu}g/g), Zr (444 {mu}g/g), Nb (23.8 {mu}g/g), and REE (392 {mu}g/g on average). Above mineralogical compositions, as well as similar ratios of selected elements (e.g., SiO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Na{sub 2}O) and similar distribution patterns of incompatible elements (e.g., the mantle-normalized diagram for

  12. From Carbonatite to Ikaite: How high-T carbonates are transformed into low-T carbonate minerals in SW Greenland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stockmann, G. J.; Tollefsen, E.; Ranta, E.; Skelton, A.; Sturkell, E.; Lundqvist, L.

    2015-12-01

    The 1300 Ma Grønnedal-Íka igneous complex in southwest Greenland comprises nepheline syenites and carbonatites. It belongs to a suite of intrusions formed 1300-1100 Ma ago referred to as the Gardar period. In modern time (the last ca. 8000 years), fluid-rock interactions involving the nepheline syenites and carbonatites gives rise to about one thousand submarine columns made of the rare low-T mineral ikaite (CaCO3x6H2O). The columns are found in a shallow, narrow fjord named Ikka Fjord and their distribution clearly follows the outcrop of the Grønnedal-Íka complex. When meteoric water percolates through the highly fractured complex, a sodium carbonate solution of pH 10 is formed through hitherto unknown fluid-rock reactions. This basic solution seeps up through fractures at the bottom of Ikka Fjord and when mixed with seawater, the mineral ikaite is formed. As the seepage water has a lower density than seawater, there is an upwards flow that creates columns. What is peculiar about ikaite is its limited stability making it unstable above +6 °C. Isotopic studies of ikaite reveal a seawater origin for the Ca2+ ions, and the carbonatite being the most likely source for the CO32- ions. The carbonatite is mainly of søvite composition (CaCO3) with high contents of siderite and ankerite in certain areas. The nepheline syenites contain Na,K-rich minerals like nepheline, alkali-feldspar, aegirine-augite, katophorite and biotite. Nepheline is mainly replaced by muscovite, and aegirine-augite partly by chlorite, which could release sodium into solution. A dolerite dyke of unknown age prompted extensive mineralization of magnetite by activating hydrothermal fluid convection. The fluid interacted with the carbonatite, replacing siderite and ankerite by magnetite and later hematite. In a newly launched project at Stockholm University, we are trying to unravel the chemical reactions taking place inside the Grønnedal-Íka igneous complex leading to the formation of the

  13. Automated mineralogical logging of coal and coal measure core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephen Fraser; Joan Esterle; Colin Ward; Ruth Henwood; Peter Mason; Jon Huntington; Phil Connor; Reneta Sliwa; Dave Coward; Lew Whitbourn [CSIRO Exploration & Mining (Australia)

    2006-06-15

    A mineralogical core logging system based on spectral reflectance (HyLogger{trademark}) has been used to detect and quantify mineralogies in coal and coal measure sediments. The HyLogger{trademark} system, as tested, operates in the visible-to-shortwave infrared spectral region, where iron oxides, sulphates, hydroxyl-bearing and carbonate minerals have characteristic spectral responses. Specialized software assists with mineral identification and data display. Three Phases of activity were undertaken. In Phase I, carbonates (siderite, ankerite, calcite) and clays (halloysite, dickite) were successfully detected and mapped in coal. Repeat measurements taken from one of the cores after three months demonstrated the reproducibility of the spectral approach, with some spectral differences being attributed to variations in moisture content and oxidation. Also, investigated was HyLogger{trademark} ability to create a 'brightness-profile' on coal materials, and these results were encouraging. In Phase II, geotechnically significant smectitic clays (montmorillonite) were detected and mapped in cores of clastic roof and floor materials. Such knowledge would be useful for mine planning and design purposes. In Phase III, our attempts at determining whether phosphorus-bearing minerals such as apatite could be spectrally detected were less than conclusive. A spectral index could only be created for apatite, and the relationships between the spectrally-derived apatite-index, the XRD results and the analytically-derived phosphorus measurements were ambiguous.

  14. CALCIUM OXIDE CHARACTERISTICS PREPARED FROM AMBUNTEN’S CALCINED LIMESTONE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatimatul Munawaroh

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxide (CaO and calcium carbonate (CaCO3 are widely used in industry. CaO and CaCO3 can be synthesized or derived from limestone. The purpose of this study to determine the characteristics of CaO calcined limestone from Ambunten Sumenep. Lime in calcined at 850 ° C for 6 hours. Characterization of X-ray fluorescence (XRF was conducted to determine the chemical composition of limestone, X-ray diffraction test (XRD to find the lime crystalline phase and FTIR test to determine the absorption of wave number. XRF test results showed that the limestone chemical composition consisted of Ca of 95.37% as the dominant element, Mg of 4.1%, Fe 0.17% and Y by 0.39%. The XRD test results showed that the limestone crystal phase is ankerite (Ca [Fe, Mg] [CO3] 2 and after the calcined phase calcination is vaterite (Ca [OH] 2, calcite (CaO and calcite (CaCO3. While the FTIR test results show that the CaO spectra are seen at 3741.24, 1417.12 and 874.14 cm-1.

  15. Mineralogy and origin of atmospheric particles in the industrial area of Huelva (SW Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernabé, J. M.; Carretero, M. I.; Galán, E.

    The mineralogy of atmospheric particles at the confluence of the Tinto and Odiel rivers, south of Huelva (a highly industrialized city in the SW Spain), was characterized in view to identify source origins. In spite of the small amount of sample collected, mineralogical characterization was performed by X-ray diffraction, polarized light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with EDS analysis system, using an adequate sample preparation methodology. Sedimentable (SP) and aerosols particles were sampled an one-week basis every two months for one year. Quartz, calcite and feldspars were found to be the major minerals in both fractions, and phyllosilicates, dolomite and gypsum were also identified in lower content. Minor mineral particles included barite, apatite, sphalerite and pyrite. SEM studies revealed the additional presence of chalcopyrite in both SP and aerosols, and of chalcocite-covellite, halite and sylvite in the latter. Siderite, hematite and ankerite were only detected in the SP fraction. The concentrations of the previous minerals increased in summer by effect of the limited rain and the resulting scarcity of atmosphere washing. Non-mineral particles detected by SEM in SP and aerosol fractions included spherical, biological and compositionally complex particles. The main source of mineral particles was found to be the soil suspension in addition to the metallurgical and fertilizer production industries in the area.

  16. A salt diapir-related Mississippi Valley-type deposit: the Bou Jaber Pb-Zn-Ba-F deposit, Tunisia: fluid inclusion and isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Salah; Leach, David L.; Johnson, Craig A.; Marsh, Erin; Salmi-Laouar, Sihem; Banks, David A.

    2016-08-01

    The Bou Jaber Ba-F-Pb-Zn deposit is located at the edge of the Bou Jaber Triassic salt diapir in the Tunisia Salt Diapir Province. The ores are unconformity and fault-controlled and occur as subvertical column-shaped bodies developed in dissolution-collapse breccias and in cavities within the Late Aptian platform carbonate rocks, which are covered unconformably by impermeable shales and marls of the Fahdene Formation (Late Albian-Cenomanian age). The host rock is hydrothermally altered to ankerite proximal to and within the ore bodies. Quartz, as fine-grained bipyramidal crystals, formed during hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The ore mineral assemblage is composed of barite, fluorite, sphalerite, and galena in decreasing abundance. The ore zones outline distinct depositional events: sphalerite-galena, barite-ankerite, and fluorite. Fluid inclusions, commonly oil-rich, have distinct fluid salinities and homogenization temperatures for each of these events: sphalerite-galena (17 to 24 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 112 to 136 °C); ankerite-barite (11 to 17 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 100 to 130 °C); fluorite (19 to 21 wt% NaCl eq., Th from 140 to 165 °C). The mean temperature of the ore fluids decreased from sphalerite (125 °C) to barite (115 °C) and increased during fluorite deposition (152 °C); then decreased to ˜110 °C during late calcite precipitation. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fluid inclusions in fluorite are metal rich (hundreds to thousands ppm Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe) but the inclusions in barite are deficient in Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe. Inclusions in fluorite have Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of several thousand, consistent with dissolution of halite while the inclusions analysed in barite have values lower than seawater which are indicative of a Br-enriched brine derived from evaporation plus a component of halite dissolution. The salinity of the barite-hosted fluid inclusions is less than obtained simply by the

  17. Rare Earth Elements (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, and Sm from a Carbonatite Deposit: Mineralogical Characterization and Geochemical Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Edahbi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Geochemical characterization including mineralogical measurements and kinetic testing was completed on samples from the Montviel carbonatite deposit, located in Quebec (Canada. Three main lithological units representing both waste and ore grades were sampled from drill core. A rare earth element (REE concentrate was produced through a combination of gravity and magnetic separation. All samples were characterized using different mineralogical techniques (i.e., quantitative evaluation of minerals by scanning electron microscopy (QEMSCAN, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and scanning electron microscopy with X-ray microanalysis (SEM-EDS in order to quantify modal mineralogy, liberation, REE deportment and composition of REE-bearing phases. The REE concentrate was then submitted for kinetic testing (weathering cell in order to investigate the REE leaching potential. The mineralogical results indicate that: (i the main REE-bearing minerals in all samples are burbankite, kukharenkoite-Ce, monazite, and apatite; (ii the samples are dominated by REE-free carbonates (i.e., calcite, ankerite, and siderite; and (iii LREE is more abundant than HREE. Grades of REE minerals, sulfides and oxides are richer in the concentrate than in the host lithologies. The geochemical test results show that low concentrations of light REE are leached under kinetic testing conditions (8.8–139.6 µg/L total light REE. These results are explained by a low reactivity of the REE-bearing carbonates in the kinetic testing conditions, low amounts of REE in solids, and by precipitation of secondary REE minerals.

  18. Phase transformations of siderite ore by the thermomagnetic analysis data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponomar, V.P., E-mail: vitaliyponomar.vp@gmail.com; Dudchenko, N.O.; Brik, A.B.

    2017-02-01

    Thermal decomposition of Bakal siderite ore (that consists of magnesium siderite and ankerite traces) was investigated by thermomagnetic analysis. Thermomagnetic analysis was carried-out using laboratory-built facility that allows automatic registration of sample magnetization with the temperature (heating/cooling rate was 65°/min, maximum temperature 650 °C) at low- and high-oxygen content. Curie temperature gradually decreases with each next cycles of heating/cooling at low-oxygen content. Curie temperature decrease after 2nd cycle of heating/cooling at high-oxygen content and do not change with next cycles. Final Curie temperature for both modes was ~320 °C. Saturation magnetization of obtained samples increases up to 20 Am{sup 2}/kg. The final product of phase transformation at both modes was magnesioferrite. It was shown that intermediate phase of thermal decomposition of Bakal siderite ore was magnesiowustite. - Highlights: • Mg-siderite decomposition was investigated by thermomagnetic analysis. • Magnetization and Curie temperature change with each next cycle of heating/cooling. • Magnesioferrite is the final phase of Mg-siderite thermal decomposition. • Transformation exclude the hematite formation.

  19. Piedramuelle Limestone in the building heritage of Oviedo, Spain, and adjacent towns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardenes Van den Eynde, Victor; Mateos, Felix Javier; Valdeon, Luis; Rojo, Araceli

    2017-04-01

    The Piedramuelle limestone has a very important representation in the building heritage of Oviedo, historical capital of Asturias (Spain) and surrounding towns. This argillaceous limestone has been quarried since the High Middle Ages until the beginning of the XX century. The main mineralogical components are carbonates (mainly calcite and sometimes ankerite, 70-90%), quartz (5-15%), terrigenous minerals (6-15%) and iron oxides (blocks and ashlars of the buildings. Some of the buildings constructed with Piedramuelle limestone are the Cathedral, the Old University and the Palaces from the XVII and XVIII centuries. The ambiance and historical architecture of Oviedo and adjacent towns is closely linked with the textures and colors of this stone. Nowadays, the Piedramuelle limestone is not exploited anymore, being the quarries exhausted. This represents an issue from a conservation point of view, since there is not a suitable stone for replacement. In order to preserve and maintain the building heritage of these towns, it is very important to prospect and protect the remaining outcrops still able to supply this characteristic stone.

  20. Metasomatic zoning at some stratiform rare metal deposits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altyntsev, Yu.V.; Bazhenov, M.I.; Bepeshov, G.V.; Komarnitskij, G.M.; Petrov, I.Ya.; Serykh, A.S.

    1985-01-01

    Metasomatic zoning of stratiform deposits of rare metals (Mo, Pb, As, V, Se, U, etc.) in intermontane depresions, deposited at the postorogenic stage of Paleozoic geosyncline region development, is considered. Geochemical and geophysical characteristics of metasomatic zoning in the case of sloping and steep rock deposition are given. It is established, that in rare metal deposits in variegated deposits of molassoid formation of Middle-Upper Paleozoic the external and internal zones of metasomatic alterations are distinctly separated. The external zone is presented by mineral association: quartz + -albile + -calcite + -epidote; the internal one - by hydromica + -chlorite + -analcite, laumontite + -hematite + -ankerite + -kaolinite. Geochemical zoning is manifested quite regularly at all the deposits and it is subjected to metasomatic zoning. Changes in physical properties of rocks reflect the metasomatic zoning. The character of metasomatic alterations of rocks, geochemical zoning of metasomatites at rare metal deposits in molassoid deposits and spatially contiguous deposits in volcanogenic complexes have common features. A supposition is made on polygenic ore formation in sedimentary rocks of the depressions

  1. Dissolution and secondary mineral precipitation in basalts due to reactions with carbonic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanakiya, Shreya; Adam, Ludmila; Esteban, Lionel; Rowe, Michael C.; Shane, Phil

    2017-06-01

    One of the leading hydrothermal alteration processes in volcanic environments is when rock-forming minerals with high concentrations of iron, magnesium, and calcium react with CO2 and water to form carbonate minerals. This is used to the advantage of geologic sequestration of anthropogenic CO2. Here we experimentally investigate how mineral carbonation processes alter the rock microstructure due to CO2-water-rock interactions. In order to characterize these changes, CO2-water-rock alteration in Auckland Volcanic Field young basalts (less than 0.3 Ma) is studied before and after a 140 day reaction period. We investigate how whole core basalts with similar geochemistry but different porosity, permeability, pore geometry, and volcanic glass content alter due to CO2-water-rock reactions. Ankerite and aluminosilicate minerals precipitate as secondary phases in the pore space. However, rock dissolution mechanisms are found to dominate this secondary mineral precipitation resulting in an increase in porosity and decrease in rigidity of all samples. The basalt with the highest initial porosity and volcanic glass volume shows the most secondary mineral precipitation. At the same time, this sample exhibits the greatest increase in porosity and permeability, and a decrease in rock rigidity post reaction. For the measured samples, we observe a correlation between volcanic glass volume and rock porosity increase due to rock-fluid reactions. We believe this study can help understand the dynamic rock-fluid interactions when monitoring field scale CO2 sequestration projects in basalts.

  2. A salt diapir-related Mississippi Valley-type deposit: The Bou Jaber Pb-Zn-Ba-F deposit, Tunisia: Fluid inclusion and isotope study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhlel, Salah; Leach, David; Johnson, Craig A.; Marsh, Erin; Salmi-Laouar, Sihem; Banks, David A.

    2016-01-01

    The Bou Jaber Ba-F-Pb-Zn deposit is located at the edge of the Bou Jaber Triassic salt diapir in the Tunisia Salt Diapir Province. The ores are unconformity and fault-controlled and occur as subvertical column-shaped bodies developed in dissolution-collapse breccias and in cavities within the Late Aptian platform carbonate rocks, which are covered unconformably by impermeable shales and marls of the Fahdene Formation (Late Albian–Cenomanian age). The host rock is hydrothermally altered to ankerite proximal to and within the ore bodies. Quartz, as fine-grained bipyramidal crystals, formed during hydrothermal alteration of the host rocks. The ore mineral assemblage is composed of barite, fluorite, sphalerite, and galena in decreasing abundance. The ore zones outline distinct depositional events: sphalerite-galena, barite-ankerite, and fluorite. Fluid inclusions, commonly oil-rich, have distinct fluid salinities and homogenization temperatures for each of these events: sphalerite-galena (17 to 24 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 112 to 136 °C); ankerite-barite (11 to 17 wt% NaCl eq., and Th from 100 to 130 °C); fluorite (19 to 21 wt% NaCl eq., Th from 140 to 165 °C). The mean temperature of the ore fluids decreased from sphalerite (125 °C) to barite (115 °C) and increased during fluorite deposition (152 °C); then decreased to ∼110 °C during late calcite precipitation. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) analyses of fluid inclusions in fluorite are metal rich (hundreds to thousands ppm Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe) but the inclusions in barite are deficient in Pb, Zn, Cu, Fe. Inclusions in fluorite have Cl/Br and Na/Br ratios of several thousand, consistent with dissolution of halite while the inclusions analysed in barite have values lower than seawater which are indicative of a Br-enriched brine derived from evaporation plus a component of halite dissolution. The salinity of the barite-hosted fluid inclusions is less than obtained

  3. Exploration for gold mineralization in the Arabo Nubian Shield: Using remote sensing Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Talaat

    2013-04-01

    In the southern part of the Eastern Desert of Egypt, Landsat Thematic Mapper (ETM+) data and fieldwork was combined with mineralogical and geochemical investigations in order to detect and characterize alteration zones within Pan-African rocks. The processing of Landsat ETM+ data using ratioing (bands 5/7,5/1,4/3 in Red, Green, Blue) showed two different types of alteration zones (type l and 2). Type 1 is close to the ophiolitic ultramafic rocks and type 2 is located within island-arc related metavolcanic rocks at the study areas. Both of these alteration zones are concordant with the main NW-SE structural trend. Mineralogical studies indicate that the alteration zones of type 1 consist mainly of calcite, ankerite, magnesite, dolomite and quartz. Chromian spinel, pyrite, and Ni-bearing sulphides (gersdorffite, pentlandite and polydymite) are the main ore minerals within this zone. Alteration zones of type 2 are strongly potassium-enriched and pyrophyllite, kaolinite, illite, gypsum and quartz occur. The brecciated quartz-veins associated with theses alteration zones consist of quartz, Fe-hydroxides, hematite and native gold. The gold content reaches up to 5 g/t in the alteration zone, while it extends up to 50 g/t in the quartz veins. This study presents a mineralogical characterization of such zones and demonstrates the utility of orbital remote sensing for finding unknown alteration zones in the Eastern Desert and other arid areas with similar host rock lithologies.

  4. Crystallization process of zircon and fergusonite during hydrothermal alteration in Nechalacho REE deposit, Thor Lake, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Murakami, H.; Kon, Y.; Tsunematsu, M.

    2012-04-01

    intergrowth with REE fluorocarbonates; (4) the CO3-rich hydrothermal fluid corroded type-3, forming Nb-REE-poor zircons (type-3). Niobium and REE was no longer stable in the zircon structure and crystallized as fergusonite around the REE-Nb-leached zircon (type-4); (5) type-5 zircons are formed from more CO3-rich hydrothermal alteration of type-3 zircon. Therefore, type-4 and -5 zircons are often included in ankerite. Type 3-5 zircons at Nechalacho REE deposit were formed by leaching and/or dissolution of type-2 zircon in the presence of F- and/or CO3-rich hydrothermal fluid. The above mineral association indicates that three hydrothermal stages were present and related to HFSE enrichment in the Nechalacho REE deposit: (1) F-rich hydrothermal stage caused the crystallization of REE-Nb-rich zircon (type-2 rim and type-3), with abundant formation of phlogophite and fluorite, (2) F-CO3-rich hydrothermal stage led to the replacement of a part of REE-Nb-F-rich zircon by REE fluorocarbonate and (3) hydrothermal stage rich in CO3 resulted in crystallization of REE-Nb-F-poor zircon and fergusonite, with ankerite. Increases of HFSE contents, REE-Nb-F-poor zircon (type-4 and -5) and fergusonite contents during progress of hydrothermal alteration show that REE and Nb in hydrothermal fluid in the Nechalacho REE deposit were finally concentrated into fergusonite by way of zircon.

  5. Evolution of the Bucium Rodu and Frasin magmatic-hydrothermal system, Metaliferi Mountains, Romania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatan, Elena Luisa; Berbeleac, Ion; Visan, Madalina; Minut, Adrian; Nadasan, Laurentiu

    2013-04-01

    The Miocene Bucium Rodu and Frasin maar-diatreme structures and related Au-Ag epithermal low sulfidation with passing to mesothermal mineralizations are located in the Bucium-Rosia Montana-Baia de Aries metallogenetic district, within so called the "Golden Quatrilaterum", in the northeastern part of the Metaliferi Mountains. These structures are situated at about 5 km southeast from Rosia Montana, the largest European Au-Ag deposit. The total reserves for Bucium Rodu-Frasin are estimated at 43.3 Mt with average contents of 1.3 g/t Au and 3 g/t Ag. The Miocene geological evolution of Bucium Rodu and Frasin magmatic-hydrothermal system took place in closely relationships with tectonic, magmatic and metallogenetic activity from Bucium-Rosia Montana-Baia de Aries district in general, and adjacent areas, in special. The hydrothermal alteration is pervasive; adularia followed by phyllic, carbonatization and silicification alterations, usually show a close relationship with the mineralizations. Propylitic alteration occurs dominantly towards the depth; argillic alteration shows a local character. The mineralization occurs in veins, breccias, stockworks and disseminations and is hosted within two volcanic structures emplaced into a sequence of Cretaceous sediments in closely genetically relations with the Miocene phreatomagmatic fracturing and brecciation events. Within Rodu maar-diatreme structure the mineralizations follow especially the contact between the diatreme and Cretaceous flysch. The vein sets with low, moderately and near vertical dippings, cover 400x400m with N-S trend. The most important mineralization style is represented by veins, accompanied by hydrothermal breccias and disseminations. The veins spatial distribution relives as "en echelon" tension veins. They carry gold, minor base metal sulphides (pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, tetrahedrite, arsenopyrite). Gangue is represented by carbonates (calcite, dolomite, ankerite, siderite, rhodochrosite

  6. Preliminary reactive geochemical transport simulation study on CO2 geological sequestration at the Changhua Coastal Industrial Park Site, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, R.; Li, M.

    2013-12-01

    assumed throughout the simulation domain. Comparisons among simulated results with different mesh systems of nested meshes and non-nested meshes and considerations of multiphase reactive transport and physical transport were demonstrated in this study. Preliminary results of injection CO2 for 50 years are: (1) about 7 wt.% of injected CO2 was trapped as carbonate minerals mainly as ankerite; (2) porosities were decreased by 0.014 % and increased by 0.102 % at the injection point and beneath the cap rock, respectively, and were subsequently decreased with time due to minerals precipitation mostly as illite and ankerite; (3) differences of simulated aquifer responses between reactive transport and physical transport were insignificant; and (4) projected CO2 plumes with the nested meshes was smaller than those by the non-nested meshes after cease of CO2 injection. Keywords: CO2-Saline-Mineral Interaction, Reactive Geochemical Transport, TOUGHREACT, Mineral Trapping Assessment, Changhua Costal Industrial Park Site, Taiwan Reference: Marini, L., 2006, Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide, Volume 11: Thermodynamics, Kinetics, and Reaction Path Modeling, Elsevier Science, pp.470. Xu, T., J. A. Apps and K. Pruess, 2004, Numerical simulation of CO2 disposal by mineral trapping in deep aquifers, Applied Geochemistry, Vol. 19:917-936.

  7. Geology of uranium vein deposits (including Schwartzwalder Mine) in Proterozoic metamorphic rocks, Front Range, Colorado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voto, R.H. de; Paschis, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The Schwartzwalder uranium deposit is one of many uranium vein occurrences in the Lower Proterozoic metamorphic rocks of the Front Range, Colorado. The principal veins of significant uranium content occur marginal to the Colorado Mineral Belt; are localized by structural dilation zones, vein junctions, fault deflections or branching; and occur dominantly within or at the contact of certain preferred metamorphic-stratigraphic units, particularly the siliceous, garnetiferous gneisses, where these rock units are broken by faults and fractures associated with the north-northwest-trending throughgoing faults. Uranium at the Schwartzwalder mine occurs primarily as open-space brecciated vein filling along the steeply west-dipping Illinois vein and numerous east-dipping subsidiary veins where they cut preferred metamorphic host rocks that are tightly folded. Uraninite occurs with molybdenite, adularia, jordisite, ankerite, pyrite, base-metal sulphides, and calcite in vein-filling paragenetic sequence. Minor wall-rock alteration is mainly hematite alteration and bleaching. Vertical relief on the developed ore deposit is 900 metres and still open-ended at depth. No vertical zonation of alteration, vein mineralogy, density of the subsidiary veins, or ore grade has been detected. The Schwartzwalder uranium deposit is of substantial tonnage (greater than 10,000 metric tons of U 3 O 8 ) and grade (averaging 0.57% U 3 O 8 ). Structural mapping shows that the Illinois vein-fault is a Proterozoic structure. Discordant Proterozoic (suggested) and Laramide dates have been obtained from Schwartzwalder ore. The data suggest, therefore, a Proterozoic ancestry of this heretofore presumed Laramide (Late Cretaceous-Early Tertiary) hydrothermal uranium deposit. The authors suggest a polygenetic model for the origin of the Schwartzwalder uranium deposit

  8. The study of the mineralogy and rare earth elements behavior in the hydrothermal alteration zones of the Astaneh granitoid massif (SW Arak, Markazi province, Iran)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeily, D.; Afshooni, S. Z.; Valizadeh, M. V.

    2009-01-01

    The Astaneh granitoid massif is located about 40 km to Arak city, central Iran, is a part of Sanandaj-Sirjan structural zone. These intrusive rocks which are mainly composed of gronodioritic rocks, widely affected under hydrothermal alteration. The alteration zones, on the basis of field studies and mineralogy as well as the study of the REE behavior, are investigated in this paper. Eight alteration zones including phyllic (sericitic) with quartz, sericite and pyrite; chloritic with quartz, sericite and chlorite; propylitic with chlorite, epidot, calcite and albite; argillic with clay minerals (chlorite and illite); silicic with abundant quartz; albitic with albite, chlorite and quartz; hematitisation with hematite, Fe-carbonates (ankerite and siderite) and tourmalinisation with tourmaline (dravite) are identified. The results demonstrate notable differences in the REE behavior in the different alteration zones. Accordingly, comparison with the fresh rocks, in the phyllic (sericitic) alteration, LREE are enriched, but HREE, except Yb which enriched, unchanged. Also in chloritic alteration zone, LREEs are depleted, but HREEs represent different behaviors. In the argillic and propylitic alteration zones, all REE are depleted, but compared with HREE, the LREE represent more depletion. In the silicic and hematitisation alteration zones, compared with HREE, the LREE are enriched. Finally, in the albitic and tourmalinisation alteration zones all REE are depleted. These features indicate that the behavior of REE in the hydrothermal alteration zones of the Astaneh granitoid rocks is mainly controlled by p H, availability of complexing ions in the fluid as well as the presence of secondary phases as host REE minerals

  9. The Elk Creek Carbonatite, Southeast Nebraska-An Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, M. P.; Treves, S. B.

    2005-01-01

    A framework geophysical program in southeastern Nebraska during 1970 identified a near-circular feature having gravity relief of about 8 mgal and a magnetic anomaly of about 800 gammas. Analysis of the geophysical data provided a model of a cylindrical mass of indefinite length with a radius of 5500 ft (1676 m) and beveled at the basement surface at about 600 ft (183 m). At the approximate depth at which Precambrian rocks were expected, the initial test hole (2-B-71) encountered an iron-rich weathered zone overlying carbonate-rich rock. The carbonate rocks consist essentially of dolomite, calcite, and ankerite and lesser amounts of hematite, chlorite, phlogopite, barite, serpentine, pyrochlore, and quartz and contain barium, strontium, and rare earths. Total REE, P2O5, and 87Sr/86Sr ratios confirm the carbonatite identification. Texturally, the rocks range from fragmental to contorted to massive. Associated with the carbonatite are lesser amounts of basalt, lamprophyre, and syenite. Additional exploratory drilling has provided about 80,000 ft (24,384 m) of rock record and has penetrated about 3400 ft (1038 m) of carbonatite. The carbonatite is overlain by marine sediments of Pennsylvanian (Missourian) age. The surrounding Precambrian basement rocks are low-to medium-grade metamorphic gneiss and schist of island arc origin and granitic plutons. The Elk Creek carbonatite is located near the boundary between the Penokean orogen created at about 1.84 Ga (billion years) and the Dawes terrane (1.78 Ga) of the Central Plains orogen. This boundary strongly influenced the geometry of both the Midcontinent Rift System (1.1 Ga) and the Nemaha uplift (0.3 Ga). It is assumed that the emplacement of the Elk Creek carbonatite (0.5 Ga) was influenced similarly by the pre-existing tectonic sutures

  10. Origin of carbonate concretions from mud mounds in the Gulf of Cadiz (SW Iberian Peninsula); Origen de las concreciones carbonatadas de los monticulos de fango en el Golfo de Cadiz (SO Peninsula Iberica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejas, M.; Taberner, C.; Pueyo, J. J.; Giralt, S.; Mata, M. P.; Gibert, J. M. de; Diaz del Rio, V.

    2015-07-01

    The Gulf of Cadiz displays a number of structures that are associated with fluid circulation (mud volcanoes, mud mounds and pockmarks).This area has been used as natural laboratory for the sedimentological, bio- logical and biogeochemical studies of these environments. Analysis of the associated authigenic carbonates has been widely used as a proxy to yield insights into the circulation and chemical composition of these flu- ids. A study of carbonate concretions from the Iberico, Cornide and Arcos mud mounds in the Diasom Field was undertaken to better understand the origin and type of fluids from which these concretions precipitated. The concretions display varying morphologies, some of which correspond to bioturbation traces. X-ray dif- fractions revealed that these carbonate concretions are mainly composed of dolomite, Fe-rich dolomite, high magnesium calcite (HMC) and ankerite. The δ{sup 1}3 C values of carbonate minerals ranged between -48.3 and-10.9 V-PDB, which suggests that the main processes involved in their genesis are organic matter oxidation, bac- terial sulphate-reduction (BSR) and anaerobic methane oxidation (AOM). The origin of the methane is main- ly thermogenic, and only few concretions yielded δ{sup 1}3C values lower than -40 V-PDB, suggesting oxidation of microbial methane. Fluids involved in the carbonate precipitation are interpreted as being related to gas hydrate destabilisation (δ{sup 18}O fluid-V-SMOW values higher than +2%) and, to a lesser extent, modified seawater enriched in {sup 18}O due to rock-water interaction. Nevertheless, the highest δ{sup 1}8O fluid-V-SMOW values suggest that the influence of other deep-seated fluids due to clay-mineral dehydration cannot be ruled out. (Author)

  11. Mineralogical and geochemical characteristics of Miocene pelitic sedimentary rocks from the south-western part of the Pannonian Basin System (Croatia: Implications for provenance studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Grizelj

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty-two samples of Miocene pelitic sedimentary rock from outcrops on Medvednica, Moslavačka Gora and Psunj Mts., and boreholes in the Sava Depression and the Požega Sub-depression were investigated. These sediments formed in different marine (with normal and reduced salinity, brackish, and freshwater environments, depending on the development stage of the Pannonian Basin System. Carbonate minerals, clay minerals and quartz are the main constituents of all pelitic sedimentary rocks, except in those from Moslavačka Gora Mt in which carbonate minerals are not present. Feldspars, pyrite, opal-CT, and hematite are present as minor constituents in some rocks. Besides calcite, dependent on the sedimentary environment and diagenetic changes, high-magnesium calcite, aragonite, dolomite and ankerite/Ca-dolomite are also present. Smectite or illite-smectite is the main clay minerals in the samples. Minor constituents, present in almost all samples, are detrital illite and kaolinite. In some samples chlorite is also present in a low amount. Major elements, trace elements and rare earth elements patterns used in provenance analysis show that all analysed samples have a composition similar to the values of the upper continental crust (UCC. The contents of major and trace elements as well as SiO2/Al2O3, K2O/Al2O3, Na2O/K2O, Eu/Eu*, La/Sc, Th/Sc, La/Co Th/Co, Th/Cr, Ce/Ce* and LREE/HREE ratios, show that the analysed pelitic sedimentary rocks were formed by weathering of different types of mostly acidic (silicic, i.e. felsic rocks.

  12. Diagenesis of amorphous organic matter as an essential aspect of genesis and alteration of tabular-type uranium-vanadium deposits, Colorado Plateau

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spirakis, C.S.; Hansley, P.L.

    1987-01-01

    Organic matter was the key to the initial concentration of uranium and vanadium (during the sulfate reduction stage of early diagenesis) in all sandstone-hosted, tabular deposits in the Morrison Formation, Colorado Plateau. In deposits rich in amorphous organic matter, as are many in the Grants uranium region (GUR), diagenesis did not proceed beyond sulfate reduction. In contrast, in organic-poor, chlorite deposits of the Henry Mountains district, 13 C- and 18 O-enriched dolomites preserve evidence of a subsequent methanogenic stage. In these and similar organic-poor deposits in the Slick Rock district and in parts of the GUR, aluminosilicate dissolution (including a distinctive, organic-acid-induced etching of garnets) and growth of coarse-grained coffinite, albite, ankerite, and chlorite suggest diagenesis reached the organic acid stage. Temperature and thermal maturation indicators (vitrinite reflectance, type IIb chlorite, ordered illite/smectite, and fluid inclusion data) are consistent with temperatures of organic-acid stage diagenesis (∼ 100 0 C). The localization of these alterations in and around organic-poor, clay-rich ore; the similarities in type and sequence of these alterations to the normal alteration of organic-bearing sediments; the alteration of iron-titanium oxides (attributed to the action of soluble organic complexes) around both organic-rich and organic-poor deposits; and the gradation from organic-rich to organic-poor, chlorite-rich deposits (in GUR) suggest that (1) amorphous organic matter was involved in the genesis of all of these deposits and (2) differences among deposits may reflect varying degrees of diagenesis of the organic matter

  13. Diagenesis and reservoir quality of the Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation tight sandstones in the southern Songliao Basin, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Kelai; Cao, Yingchang; Jahren, Jens; Zhu, Rukai; Bjørlykke, Knut; Haile, Beyene Girma; Zheng, Lijing; Hellevang, Helge

    2015-12-01

    The Lower Cretaceous Quantou Formation in the southern Songliao Basin is the typical tight oil sandstone in China. For effective exploration, appraisal and production from such a tight oil sandstone, the diagenesis and reservoir quality must be thoroughly studied first. The tight oil sandstone has been examined by a variety of methods, including core and thin section observation, XRD, SEM, CL, fluorescence, electron probing analysis, fluid inclusion and isotope testing and quantitative determination of reservoir properties. The sandstones are mostly lithic arkoses and feldspathic litharenites with fine to medium grain size and moderate to good sorting. The sandstones are dominated by feldspar, quartz, and volcanic rock fragments showing various stages of disintegration. The reservoir properties are quite poor, with low porosity (average 8.54%) and permeability (average 0.493 mD), small pore-throat radius (average 0.206 μm) and high displacement pressure (mostly higher than 1 MPa). The tight sandstone reservoirs have undergone significant diagenetic alterations such as compaction, feldspar dissolution, quartz cementation, carbonate cementation (mainly ferrocalcite and ankerite) and clay mineral alteration. As to the onset time, the oil emplacement was prior to the carbonate cementation but posterior to the quartz cementation and feldspar dissolution. The smectite to illite reaction and pressure solution at stylolites provide a most important silica sources for quartz cementation. Carbonate cements increase towards interbedded mudstones. Mechanical compaction has played a more important role than cementation in destroying the reservoir quality of the K1q4 sandstone reservoirs. Mixed-layer illite/smectite and illite reduced the porosity and permeability significantly, while chlorite preserved the porosity and permeability since it tends to be oil wet so that later carbonate cementation can be inhibited to some extent. It is likely that the oil emplacement occurred

  14. Petrographic and Geochemical Analyses of Kirana Hills Shield Rocks around Sargodha and Economic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Waseem Khan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with geochemical and petrographic analysis of the Kirana Hill shield rocks of Punjab plains from Buland, Hachi, Shaheen Abad, Shaikh and Machh hills. On basis of the current studies certain modifications have been made in the classification and nomenclature of rocks exposed in the study areas. Chemical analyses have also been carried out in order to calculate Cross Iddings, Pirsson, and Washington (CIPW norms”, to strengthen nomenclature scheme and finally rocks are classified by using “MAGMA SOFTWARE”. Rhyolites predominate over the basalts/dolerites, andesites, and phyllite/ slate. Rhyolitic rocks are light grey, greenish grey and light brown in color, aphanitic in nature. The observed microscopic textures are aphyric, phyric or porphyritic and micropoikilitc. Moreover, some rhyolitic rocks also show flow texture. They are either cryptocrystalline to microcrystalline or microcrystalline to cryptocrystalline. No glassy material has been observed in any thin section. Mafic rocks are characterized by the presence of ferromagnesian minerals with plagioclase. Andesites exhibit mainly porphyritic texture, but aphyric texture has also been observed in few samples. Hydrothermal alterations are also very common in these rocks. Other rock assemblages identified during laboratory studies from Kirana area include: tuffs i.e. (Lithic Crystal Tuff and Lithic Tuff, basaltic andesite, rhyodacite/ dacite, slate/ phyllite, ankeritic rocks/ veins and quartzofeldspathic veins. Our studies also reveal that no evidence of quartzite has been found in the samples collected from above mentioned areas of Kirana, although it has been reported in previous literature. Iron (Fe has been observed in rhyolite as well as other volcanic rocks of Kirana hills, its presence suggests magma from deep mantle instead of crustal melting / anatexis. In the present analysis some primary and secondary copper minerals including chalcopyrite, atacamite and

  15. Material Exchange and Migration between Pore Fluids and Sandstones during Diagenetic Processes in Rift Basins: A Case Study Based on Analysis of Diagenetic Products in Dongying Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, East China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Meng

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The exchange and migration of basin materials that are carried by pore fluids are the essence of diagenesis, which can alter physical properties of clastic rocks as well as control formation and distribution of favorable reservoirs of petroliferous basins. Diagenetic products and pore fluids, resulting from migration and exchange of basin materials, can be used to deduce those processes. In this study, 300 core samples from 46 wells were collected for preparation of casting thin sections, SEM, BSE, EDS, inclusion analysis, and isotope analysis in Dongying Sag, Bohai Bay Basin, East China. Combined with geochemical characteristics of pore fluids and geological background of the study area, the source and exchange mechanisms of materials in the pore fluids of rift basins were discussed. It was revealed that the material exchange of pore fluids could be divided into five stages. The first stage was the evaporation concentration stage during which mainly Ca2+, Mg2+, and CO32- precipitated as high-Mg calcites. Then came the shale compaction stage, when mainly Ca2+ and CO32- from shale compaction water precipitated as calcites. The third stage was the carboxylic acid dissolution stage featured by predominant dissolution of plagioclases, during which Ca2+ and Na+ entered pore fluids, and Si and Al also entered pore fluids and then migrated as clathrates, ultimately precipitating as kaolinites. The fourth stage was the organic CO2 stage, mainly characterized by the kaolinization of K-feldspar as well as dissolution of metamorphic lithic fragments and carbon cements. During this stage, K+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, HCO3-, and CO32- entered pore fluids. The fifth stage was the alkaline fluid stage, during which the cementation of ferro-carbonates and ankerites as well as illitization or chloritization of kaolinites prevailed, leading to the precipitation of K+, Fe2+, Mg2+, Ca2+, and CO32- from pore fluids.

  16. Numerical simulation of CO2 disposal by mineral trapping in deep aquifers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    Carbon dioxide disposal into deep aquifers is a potential means whereby atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases may be reduced. However, our knowledge of the geohydrology, geochemistry, geophysics, and geomechanics of CO 2 disposal must be refined if this technology is to be implemented safely, efficiently, and predictably. As a prelude to a fully coupled treatment of physical and chemical effects of CO 2 injection, the authors have analyzed the impact of CO 2 immobilization through carbonate mineral precipitation. Batch reaction modeling of the geochemical evolution of 3 different aquifer mineral compositions in the presence of CO 2 at high pressure were performed. The modeling considered the following important factors affecting CO 2 sequestration: (1) the kinetics of chemical interactions between the host rock minerals and the aqueous phase, (2) CO 2 solubility dependence on pressure, temperature and salinity of the system, and (3) redox processes that could be important in deep subsurface environments. The geochemical evolution under CO 2 injection conditions was evaluated. In addition, changes in porosity were monitored during the simulations. Results indicate that CO 2 sequestration by matrix minerals varies considerably with rock type. Under favorable conditions the amount of CO 2 that may be sequestered by precipitation of secondary carbonates is comparable with and can be larger than the effect of CO 2 dissolution in pore waters. The precipitation of ankerite and siderite is sensitive to the rate of reduction of Fe(III) mineral precursors such as goethite or glauconite. The accumulation of carbonates in the rock matrix leads to a considerable decrease in porosity. This in turn adversely affects permeability and fluid flow in the aquifer. The numerical experiments described here provide useful insight into sequestration mechanisms, and their controlling geochemical conditions and parameters

  17. Determination of rare earth elements in products of Chadormalu iron ore concentrator plant (Iran) from beneficiation point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorjani, E.; Bagherieh, A. H.; Rezai, B.

    2007-01-01

    :Different samples have been prepared from different products in Chadormalu iron ore concentrator plant: Low intensity magnetite separators concentrate (magnetite concentrate), reverse flotation tail (final hematite concentrate), flotation concentrate (apatite concentrate), final tail (L.I. M.S. tail + reverse flotation concentrate + apatite flotation tail). The samples were used for rare earth elements (REEs) distribution and origin studies. The assay of REEs was determined by ICP-MS spectrometry. The amount of total (light and heavy) REEs were 9631, 291, 199, 2236 ppm and the distributions were 19.3, 3.6, 10.1, 67% in flotation concentrate (apatite concentrate), reverse flotation tail (hematite concentrate), magnetite concentrate and total tail respectively. About 19.3% of total REEs were distributed in apatite concentrate with an assay of 9631 ppm. Therefore, further studies have been conducted on this product. According to the Xray studies the minerals of fluoroapatite, ankerite and calcite are the main mineral phases in apatite concentrate which the apatite is dominant among them. The scanning electron microscopy studies were shown that the high amount of REEs distributed on fluoroapatite mineral. The results have clearly shown that the apatite concentrate that is a by product of iron dressing in Chadormalu plant, with a low economical value and left without any further treatment, can be used as a significant source of REEs. According to this characterization studies, the recovery of a mixed rare earth oxide from fluoroapatite is possible either with the treatment of liquors from the total dissolution of the ore in nitric acid or with the proposed treatment of the phosphogypsum by-product from the conventional sulphuric acid route and the recovery of rare earth oxides from phosphoric acid sludges that the detailed flowsheet needs further extraction work

  18. Evolution of pores and fractures in an unconventional Upper Carboniferous reservoir analogue, Westphalian D, W-Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoehne, M.; Schurk, K.; Hilgers, C. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Reservoir-Petrology, Energy and Mineral Resources Group (EMR); Koehrer, B. [Wintershall Holding GmbH, Barnstorf (Germany); Bertier, P. [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Clay and Interface Mineralogy

    2013-08-01

    Uncertainties in reservoir characterization of tight gas sandstones can be significantly reduced by using quantitative data from outcrops. The active Piesberg quarry near Osnabrueck exposes Upper Carboniferous strata and therefore provides a reservoir outcrop analog to the gas-bearing tight gas fields in NW-Germany. This study focused on variations of sedimentary facies, porosity, diagenesis and structural inventory in the quarry. The Westphalian D strata at Piesberg consist of siliciclastic, coarse- to fine-grained sandstones with a strong cementation, intercalated with coal seams, siltstones and mudstones. Petrography shows shale-, mudstone and clay rip-up fragments squeezed into primary porosity during eodiagenesis. Sandstone types commonly show low porosities (<10 %) and very low permeabilities (<0.01 mD) mainly due to intense quartz cementation. Scarce authigenic carbonates are euhedral ankerites formed during burial. Secondary porosity resulted mostly from detrital carbonate leaching and limited dissolution of feldspars. Within a zone of up to several meters around faults, porosity is much higher. Feldspars are almost completely altered to illite and locally to kaolinite. Partly dissolved detrital carbonates show Fe-oxide margins around intragranular pores, indicative of Fe-rich compositions formed during telo-diagenesis. Both joints and faults were mapped throughout the quarry and strike, slip and throw of the latter were documented. Cemented fractures prevail around faults and may thus be associated with the structural and diagenetic evolution of the Upper Carboniferous of the Piesberg area. This study is embedded into a larger outcrop analog study of RWTH Aachen in cooperation with Wintershall. Its aim is to unravel the impact of structural diagenesis on the alteration and evolution of pore space and thus reservoir quality. Results can be used to develop datadriven exploration strategies and improved development options for analogous subsurface tight gas

  19. Petrology And Geochemistry Of Barite Mineralisation Around Azara North Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanko

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Azara barite deposits formed parts of Middle Benue Trough which is located in an elongated rift or faulted-bounded mega structural depression trending NE-SW to a length of over 1000 km and a width of 100 km.Petrological and geochemical investigations of Azrara barite deposits were carried out. Eight 8 selected samples of barites were collected from the veins four from known veins V1V3V17 and V 18 and four from new veins VAVBVCand VD werecarried out with the aim of determining their mineralisation potentials using petrographic studies and gravimetric method of analyses. The Petrographic studies of some of the thin section of the samples conducted using a polarizing microscope to determine the contents distributions and textures of the various veins Table 1. The weight percentage composition of barite in the samples are V1 86.39 VC82.61 V1881.48 V3 81.17 V17 79.82 VA78.94 VB76.82 and VD 70.55 respectively. It is deduced from this work that the chemical weathering of the carbonates resulted in two distinct types of barites Barite associated with mainly quartz SiO2 and limonite FeOOH.nH2O as major gangue and barite with siderite Ferrous Carbonate with high amount of Mg ankerite Ca Fe Mg CO3 and Calcite CaCO3. The outcomes were compared with the barite specification of Weigal1937 of 95.00 and were found to be good for making drilling mud for use in the oil industry paints and other chemicals

  20. Palaeoredox indicators from the organic-rich Messinian early post-evaporitic deposits of the Apennines (Central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampalmieri, G.; Iadanza, A.; Cipollari, P.; Cosentino, D.; Lo Mastro, S.

    2009-04-01

    barren laminated sediments, hasn't been thoroughly clarified yet. The aim of the present study, dealing with messinian p-ev1 deposits from Marche and Maiella successions, is to provide more details in the definition of the environment developed during the early post-evaporitic phase. Since the lamination and the absence of benthic fauna suggest the occurrence of anoxic conditions, the following indirect proxies for the detection of organic matter have been investigated: 1) sedimentary fabric and microfacies; 2) framboidal pyrite size distribution; 3) natural radioactivity (authigenic uranium values, Th/U ratios). Natural radioactivity has been achieved through gamma spectrometry, with field and laboratory specific techniques. In the Maccarone section (Marche region), p-ev1 deposits are constituted by: barren greyish shales; laminated black shales interbedded with calcitic and ankeritic horizons; thin intercalations of sandstones. Organic-matter and framboidal pyrite commonly occur. Size analysis of framboids populations yielded a mean diameter of 4÷8 m, typical of disaerobic facies. Microfacies analysis yielded also the presence of crystals aggregates of barite, up to 50 m in size, and of isolated detrital (silicilastic) crystals. Without considering γ-ray values of the volcaniclastic layer (52-65 Cps) occurring within the p-ev1 interval, black shales horizons revealed the maximum natural radioactivity (NRD of about 50 Cps) recorded inthe studied section. Lower γ-activity characterizes the calcitic layers (i.e. "Colombacci") and the ankerites. Field NRD spectra acquired on different lithologies, showed variable contributions of 238U, 232Th and 40K. Both the blue-greyish shales and the black shales are characterized by total NRD related to the three main radioelements: 40K is associated to abundant 238U content (Thppm/Uppm 1). The 238U content is primarily referable to processes of organic matter enrichment (authigenic uranium) and secondarily to the input of

  1. Analysis of mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep aquifers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-07-20

    CO{sub 2} disposal into deep aquifers has been suggested as a potential means whereby atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases may be reduced. However, our knowledge of the geohydrology, geochemistry, geophysics, and geomechanics of CO{sub 2} disposal must be refined if this technology is to be implemented safely, efficiently, and predictably. As a prelude to a fully coupled treatment of physical and chemical effects of CO{sub 2} injection, we have analyzed the impact of CO{sub 2} immobilization through carbonate precipitation. A survey of all major classes of rock-forming minerals, whose alteration would lead to carbonate precipitation, indicated that very few minerals are present in sufficient quantities in aquifer host rocks to permit significant sequestration of CO{sub 2}. We performed batch reaction modeling of the geochemical evolution of three different aquifer mineralogies in the presence of CO{sub 2} at high pressure. Our modeling considered (1) redox processes that could be important in deep subsurface environments, (2) the presence of organic matter, (3) the kinetics of chemical interactions between the host rock minerals and the aqueous phase, and (4) CO{sub 2} solubility dependence on pressure, temperature and salinity of the system. The geochemical evolution under both natural background and CO{sub 2} injection conditions was evaluated. In addition, changes in porosity were monitored during the simulations. Results indicate that CO{sub 2} sequestration by matrix minerals varies considerably with rock type. Under favorable conditions the amount of CO{sub 2} that may be sequestered by precipitation of secondary carbonates is comparable with and can be larger than the effect of CO{sub 2} dissolution in pore waters. The precipitation of ankerite and siderite is sensitive to the rate of reduction of ferric mineral precursors such as glauconite, which in turn is dependent on the reactivity of associated organic material. The accumulation of carbonates in

  2. Micro-Raman and micro-XRF analysis of glass beads from the Chungde site, Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Y. S.; Wang, S. C.; Liu, Y. C.

    2014-12-01

    A large number of ancient glass beads dating back from Late Neolithic Age to early Historical Period (ca. 2300-400 BP) of Taiwan have been uncovered from archaeological sites. These glass beads with variant colors, shapes, and stylistics have long been considered to possess socio-cultural significance. Due to the color and chemical composition of glass bead might be determined by raw materials, fluxing agents, colorants, opacifiers and stabilizers. In addition, ancient glass beads are rare and precious, non-destructive analysis has been employed to decipher about the provenances, manufacturing techniques, and exchange/trade routes. In this work, micro-Raman spectroscopy and micro X-ray fluorescent spectrometer (μ-XRF) were used to examine ten ancient glass beads excavated from the Chungde site, Hualien, Taiwan, dating back to 1500-800 BP, to unravel the mineralogical and chemical compositions. Micro Raman experimental results show that glass and anorthite glass are the main constituents accompanying with trace level of quartz, albite, siderite, ankerite, and amazonite. The Raman Index of Polymerization (Ip) indicate that the sintering temperature of the glass beads is in the range of 1000~1400°C. Furthermore, the chemical compositions are corresponding to the maximum stretching vibration peak wave number (νmax Si-O Stretching) and the maximum bending vibration peak wave number (δmax Si-O Bending), which are essentially consistent with that of the India-Pacific beads. The μ-XRF results indicate the presence of oxides including SiO2, Al2O3, Fe2O3, Na2O, K2O, CaO, MgO, SnO2, TiO2, CuO, etc., and could be classified to high aluminum of soda-lime glass system. According to ternary phase diagram analysis of CaO-K2O-Na2O and K2O-Al2O3-CaO, the ancient glass beads analyzed could be attributed to the India-Pacific beads, and is in accordance with that of Raman spectra. The combination of these facts leads to the conclusion that glass beads obtained from the Chungde

  3. Extremely High Phosphate Sorption Capacity in Cu-Pb-Zn Mine Tailings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Longbin; Li, Xiaofang; Nguyen, Tuan A H

    2015-01-01

    Elevated inorganic phosphate (Pi) concentrations in pore water of amended tailings under direct revegetation may cause toxicity in some native woody species but not native forbs or herb species, all of which are key constituents in target native plant communities for phytostabilizing base metal mine tailings. As a result, Pi sorption capacity has been quantified by a conventional batch procedure in three types of base metal mine tailings sampled from two copper (Cu)-lead (Pb)-zinc (Zn) mines, as the basis for Pi-fertiliser addition. It was found that the Pi-sorption capacity in the tailings and local soil was extremely high, far higher than highly weathered agricultural soils in literature, but similar to those of volcanic ash soils. The Langmuir P-sorption maximum was up to 7.72, 4.12, 4.02 and 3.62 mg P g-1 tailings, in the fresh tailings of mixed Cu-Pb-Zn streams (MIMTD7), the weathered tailings of mixed Cu-Pb-Zn streams (MIMTD5), EHM-TD (fresh Cu-stream, high magnetite content) and local soil (weathered shale and schist), respectively. Physicochemical factors highly correlated with the high Pi-sorption in the tailings were fine particle distribution, oxalate and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate extractable Fe (FeO and Fed), oxalate-extractable Al and Mn, and the levels of soluble Cd and Zn, and total S and Fe. Large amounts of amorphous Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides may have been formed from the oxidation of pyritic materials and redox cycles of Fe-minerals (such as pyrite (FeS2), ankerite (Ca(Fe Mg)(CO3)2 and siderite (FeCO3), as indicated by the extractable FeO values. The likely formation of sparingly soluble Zn-phosphate in the Pb-Zn tailings containing high levels of Zn (from sphalerite ((Zn,Fe)S, ZnS, (Zn,Cd)S)) may substantially lower soluble Zn levels in the tailings through high rates of Pi-fertiliser addition. As a result, the possibility of P-toxicity in native plant species caused by the addition of soluble phosphate fertilizers would be minimal.

  4. Toxic metal(loid) speciation during weathering of iron sulfide mine tailings under semi-arid climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, Robert A.; Hayes, Sarah M.; Hammond, Corin M.; Maier, Raina M.; Chorover, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Toxic metalliferous mine-tailings pose a significant health risk to ecosystems and neighboring communities from wind and water dispersion of particulates containing high concentrations of toxic metal(loid)s (e.g., Pb, As, Zn). Tailings are particularly vulnerable to erosion before vegetative cover can be reestablished, i.e., decades or longer in semi-arid environments without intervention. Metal(loid) speciation, linked directly to bioaccessibility and lability, is controlled by mineral weathering and is a key consideration when assessing human and environmental health risks associated with mine sites. At the semi-arid Iron King Mine and Humboldt Smelter Superfund site in central Arizona, the mineral assemblage of the top 2 m of tailings has been previously characterized. A distinct redox gradient was observed in the top 0.5 m of the tailings and the mineral assemblage indicates progressive transformation of ferrous iron sulfides to ferrihydrite and gypsum, which, in turn weather to form schwertmannite and then jarosite accompanied by a progressive decrease in pH (7.3 to 2.3). Within the geochemical context of this reaction front, we examined enriched toxic metal(loid)s As, Pb, and Zn with surficial concentrations 41.1, 10.7, 39.3 mM kg-1 (3080, 2200, and 2570 mg kg-1), respectively. The highest bulk concentrations of As and Zn occur at the redox boundary representing a 1.7 and 4.2 fold enrichment relative to surficial concentrations, respectively, indicating the translocation of toxic elements from the gossan zone to either the underlying redox boundary or the surface crust. Metal speciation was also examined as a function of depth using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The deepest sample (180 cm) contains sulfides (e.g., pyrite, arsenopyrite, galena, and sphalerite). Samples from the redox transition zone (25-54 cm) contain a mixture of sulfides, carbonates (siderite, ankerite, cerrusite, and smithsonite) and metal(loid)s sorbed to neoformed secondary Fe

  5. Late-stage anhydrite-gypsum-siderite-dolomite-calcite assemblages record the transition from a deep to a shallow hydrothermal system in the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burisch, Mathias; Walter, Benjamin F.; Gerdes, Axel; Lanz, Maximilian; Markl, Gregor

    2018-02-01

    The majority of hydrothermal vein systems of economic interest occur at relatively shallow crustal levels, although many of them formed at significantly greater depths. Their present position is a consequence of uplift and erosion. Although, many aspects of their formation are well constrained, the temporal chemical evolution of such systems during uplift and erosion is still poorly understood. These vein minerals comprise calcite, dolomite-ankerite, siderite-magnesite, anhydrite and gypsum forming the last gangue assemblages in Jurassic and Tertiary sulphide-fluorite-quartz-barite veins of the Schwarzwald mining district, SW Germany. Mineral textures of samples from nine localities reveal that in these sequences, mineral precipitation follows a recurring pattern: early calcite is followed by anhydrite or gypsum, siderite and/or dolomite. This succession may repeat up to three times. In-situ (LA-ICP-MS) U-Pb age dating of 15 carbonates from three subsequent generations of the late-stage vein assemblage yield robust ages between 20 and 0.6 Ma. Each mineral sequence forms in a distinctive period of about 2-5 Ma. These ages clearly relate these late-stage mineral phases to the youngest geological episode of the Schwarzwald, which is associated with the Cenozoic Rhine Graben rifting and basement uplift. Based on thermodynamic modelling, the formation of the observed mineral assemblages required an deeply sourced Mg-, Fe- and SO4-rich fluid (b), which was episodically mixed with a shallow crustal HCO3-rich fluid (a). As a consequence of fluid mixing, concentrations of Mg, Fe and SO4 temporarily increased and initiated the formation of the observed sulphate-carbonate mineral sequences. This discontinuous large-scale vertical fluid mixing was presumably directly related to episodes of active tectonics associated with the Cenozoic strike-slip regime of the Upper Rhine Graben. Analogously, episodic fluid mixing is a major key in the formation of older (Jurassic to early

  6. An integrated study of fluid–rock interaction in a CO2-based enhanced geothermal system: A case study of Songliao Basin, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Jin; Xu, Tianfu; Yuan, Yilong; Feng, Bo; Tian, Hailong; Bao, Xinhua

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We evaluated the interactions between rock, brine, and CO 2 in CO 2 -EGS using laboratory experiments. • We examined changes of the dissolved ionic composition of the solution. • Minerals dissolve (feldspar and calcite) or precipitate (secondly carbonates). • We used numerical simulations to reproduce chemical processes of CO 2 -EGS. • Numerical simulations were generally consistent with experimental results. - Abstract: The reactive behavior of a mixture of supercritical CO 2 and brine under physical–chemical conditions relevant to the CO 2 -based Enhanced Geothermal System (CO 2 -EGS) is largely unknown. Thus, laboratory experiments and numerical simulations were employed in this study to investigate the fluid–rock interaction occurring in the CO 2 -EGS. Rock samples and thermal–physical conditions specific to the Yingcheng Formation of Songliao Basin, China, an EGS research site, were used. Experiments were conducted by using of reactors at high temperature and pressure. Six batch reaction experiments injected with supercritical CO 2 were designed at temperatures of 150–170 °C and a pressure of 35 MPa. Moreover, a separate experiment at the same experimental conditions without injection of CO 2 was also conducted for comparison. Analyses of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of the resulting solids were conducted to characterize changes in mineral phases. Numerical simulations were also performed under the same conditions as those used in the experiments. Significant mineral alterations were detected at the CO 2 -EGS reservoir, which may change the properties of fluid flow. The presence of supercritical CO 2 led to an dissolution of primary minerals such as calcite and K-feldspar and precipitations of secondary carbonate such as calcite and ankerite. The numerical simulations were generally consistent with laboratory experiments, which provide a tool for scaling the time up for long period of reservoir

  7. Mineralogical characterization of tailing dams: incidence of abandoned mining works on soil pollution (Linares, Jaén)

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Torre, M. J.; Hidalgo, C.; Rey, J.; Martínez, J.

    2012-04-01

    The metallogenic district of Linares-La Carolina (Jaén, Spain) consists of dyke mineralizations mainly of galena, accompanied by blende, chalcopyrite and barite. Associated to these abandoned mines, relatively extensive areas occupied by spoil heaps and tailing impoundments exist and constitute potential sources of soil pollution by metals and semimetals. In order to analyze the pollution potential of these mining wastes, we have carried out a mineralogical and geochemical study of seven tailing dams and surrounding soils in the area. The mineralogy of the samples was studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition, the total metal content of samples was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analysis. Samples were taken from the first 30 cm of the waste piles and soil deposits and white efflorescences were also obtained from the surface of the tailings. In all analyzed heaps, high to very high total contents in Pb (1220-22890 mg/kg), Zn (150-51280 mg/kg), Mn (2658-4160 mg/kg), Ba (1026-19610 mg/kg) and Fe (19400-138000 mg/kg) were observed. The concentrations for these same elements in the studied soils range from 527-9900 mg/kg for Pb, 27-1700 mg/kg for Zn, 506-2464 mg/kg for Mn, 2832-4306 for Ba and 8642-29753 mg/kg for Fe, and these figures indicate a contamination of the soils, according to the guidelines established by the Spanish law. The XRD and SEM results indicate that the tailings are primarily constituted by gangue of the exploited mineralization: quartz, calcite, ankerite, feldspars and phyllosilicates. They are inherited, primary mineral phases. Galena, also primary, appears in low proportion, as well as lepidocrocite, melanterite and cerussite, being these three last secondary minerals and indicating a certain remobilization of metal cations, especially lead and iron. On the other hand, quartz and phyllosilicates predominate in the soils, in which, in addition, is identified a

  8. A preliminary study of mineralogy and geochemistry of four coal samples from northern Iran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodarzi, F.; Sanei, H.; Stasiuk, L.D.; Reyes, J. [Natural Resources Canada, Geological Survey of Canada-Calgary Division, Calgary, Alberta (Canada); Bagheri-Sadeghi, H. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Azad University, Central Campus, Tehran (Iran)

    2006-01-03

    This study is related to four Jurassic-age bituminous coal (0.69-1.02 Ro%) samples collected from coal mines from the west, central and east of central, Alborz in northern Iran. Geological settings played key roles in determining the geochemistry and mineralogy of coals from the central Alborz region of northern Iran. The mineralogy of coals from the eastern part of the region is dominated by kaolinite; halloysite; and carbonates such as calcite, dolomite/ankerite, and siderite. The coals were deposited in a lacustrine environment. In the western part of the region, where the depositional setting was also lacustrine with volcanic input and tonstein deposition (glass shards present), the coal primarily contains kaolinite (68%) and fluorapatite (26%). In contrast, coal from the central part of the region, which was deposited in a terrestrial environment and on eroded limestone and dolomite rocks, is dominated by dolomite (98%) with little input by kaolinite. These coals have low sulphur (0.35-0.70 wt.%), which is mostly in the organic form (0.34-0.69 wt.%). Pyritic sulphur is detected only in one coal and in small quantities. The boron contents of these coals range from 9 to 33 mg/kg, indicating that deposition occurred in a fresh water environment. Coal with higher concentrations of Ba, Sr, and P contain fluorapatite and goyazite-gorceixite series [BaAl{sub 3} (PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (OH){sub 5}, H{sub 2}O] minerals, which indicates volcanoclastic input. Compared to world coal averages, these coals exhibit low concentrations of elements of environmental concern, such as As (1.3-5.9 mg/kg), Cd (<0.02-0.06 mg/kg), Hg (<0.01-0.07 mg/kg) Mo (<0.6-1.7 mg/kg), Pb (4.8-13 mg/kg), Th (0.5-21 mg/kg), Se (<0.2-0.8 mg/kg) and U (0.2-4.6 mg/kg). Two of the northern Iranian coals have concentrations of Cl (2560 and 3010 mg/kg) that are higher than world coal average. (author)

  9. Age and geochemistry of the Newania dolomite carbonatites, India: implications for the source of primary carbonatite magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Jyotiranjan S.; Pande, Kanchan; Bhutani, Rajneesh; Shukla, Anil D.; Rai, Vinai K.; Kumar, Alok; Awasthi, Neeraj; Smitha, R. S.; Panda, Dipak K.

    2013-12-01

    The Newania carbonatite complex of India is one of the few dolomite-dominated carbonatites of the world. Intruding into Archean basement gneisses, the rocks of the complex have undergone limited diversification and are not associated with any alkaline silicate rock. Although the magmatic nature of the complex was generally accepted, its age of emplacement had remained equivocal because of the disturbed nature of radioisotope systems. Many questions about the nature of its mantle source and mode of origin had remained unanswered because of lack of geochemical and isotopic data. Here, we present results of our effort to date the complex using 147Sm-143Nd, 207Pb-206Pb and 40Ar-39Ar dating techniques. We also present mineral chemistry, major and trace element geochemistry and Sr-Nd isotopic ratio data for these carbonatites. Our age data reveal that the complex was emplaced at ~1,473 Ma and parts of it were affected by a thermal event at ~904 Ma. The older 207Pb-206Pb ages reported here (~2.4 Ga) and by one earlier study (~2.3 Ga; Schleicher et al. Chem Geol 140:261-273, 1997) are deemed to be a result of heterogeneous incorporation of crustal Pb during the post-emplacement thermal event. The thermal event had little effect on many magmatic signatures of these rocks, such as its dolomite-magnesite-ankerite-Cr-rich magnetite-magnesio-arfvedsonite-pyrochlore assemblage, mantle like δ13C and δ18O and typical carbonatitic trace element patterns. Newania carbonatites show fractional crystallization trend from high-Mg to high-Fe through high-Ca compositions. The least fractionated dolomite carbonatites of the complex possess very high Mg# (≥80) and have similar major element oxide contents as that of primary carbonatite melts experimentally produced from peridotitic sources. In addition, lower rare earth element (and higher Sr) contents than a typical calcio-carbonatite and mantle like Nb/Ta ratios indicate that the primary magma for the complex was a magnesio

  10. Agricolaite, a new mineral of uranium from Jáchymov, Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skála, Roman; Ondruš, Petr; Veselovský, František; Císařová, Ivana; Hloušek, Jan

    2011-11-01

    The new mineral agricolaite, a potassium uranyl carbonate with ideal formula K4(UO2)(CO3)3, occurs in vugs of ankerite gangue in gneisses in the abandoned Giftkiesstollen adit at Jáchymov, Czech Republic. The name is after Georgius Agricola (1494-1555), German scholar and scientist. Agricolaite occurs as isolated equant irregular translucent grains to 0.3 mm with yellow color, pale yellow streak, and vitreous luster. It is brittle with uneven fracture and displays neither cleavage nor parting. Agricolaite is non-fluorescent. Mohs hardness is ~4. It is associated with aragonite, brochantite, posnjakite, malachite, rutherfordine, and "pseudo-voglite". Experimental density is higher than 3.3 g.cm-3, Dcalc is 3.531 g. cm-3. The mineral is monoclinic, space group C2/ c, with a 10.2380(2), b 9.1930(2), c 12.2110(3) Å, β 95.108(2)°, V 1144.71(4) Å3, Z = 4. The strongest lines in the powder X-ray diffraction pattern are d( I)( hkl): 6.061(55)(002), 5.087(57)(200), 3.740(100)(202), 3.393(43)(113), 2.281(52)(402). Average composition based on ten electron microprobe analyses corresponds to (in wt.%) UO3 48.53, K2O 31.49, CO2(calc) 22.04 which gives the empirical formula K3.98(UO2)1.01(CO3)3.00. The crystal structure was solved from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to R 1 = 0.0184 on the basis of the 1,308 unique reflections with F o > 4 σF o. The structure of agricolaite is identical to that of synthetic K4(UO2)(CO3)3 and consists of separate UO2(CO3)3 groups organized into layers parallel to (100) and two crystallographically non-equivalent sites occupied by K+ cations. Both the mineral and its name were approved by the IMA-CNMNC.

  11. Chemistry, mineralogy and alteration intensity of hydrothermal altered Mt Unzen conduit rocks (Shimabara/Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Kai-Uwe; Yilmaz, Tim; Gilg, H. Albert; Janots, Emilie; Mayer, Klaus; Nakada, Setsuya; Dingwell, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Investigations were carried out on hydrothermally altered coherent dacitic dykes samples from (USDP-4) drill core at Mt Unzen stratovolcano (Shimabara/Japan). XRF, XRD, EMPA, C-O-isotope, hot-cathode CL and SEM analysis led to insights concerning chemistry, mineralogy, and intensity and type of alteration as well as the origin of carbonate-precipitating fluids. Additionally a textural characterization of the occurring replacement features in the volcanic conduit rocks was performed. The occurrence of the main secondary phases such as chlorite, pyrite, carbonates, and R1 (Reichweite parameter) illite-smectite and kaolinite group minerals indicate a weak to moderate propylitic to phyllic hydrothermal alteration. The dacitic samples of the dykes show different hydrothermal alteration features: (i) carbonate and chlorite pseudomorphs after hornblende as well as core and zonal textures due to replacement of plagioclase by R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals, (ii) colloform banded fracture fillings and fillings in dissolution vugs, and (iii) chlorite, R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals in the groundmass. Late chlorite veins crosscut precipitates of R1 illite-smectite as well as kaolinite group minerals. Carbonates in fractures and in pseudomorphs after hornblende comprise iron-rich dolomite solid solutions ("ankerite") and calcite. Isotopic values indicate a hydrothermal-magmatic origin for the carbonate formation. The chlorite-carbonate-pyrite index (CCPI) and the Ishikawa alteration index (AI), applied to the investigated samples show significant differences (CCPI=52.7-57.8; AI=36.1-40.6) indicating their different degree of alteration. According to Nakada et al., 2005, the C13 to C16 dykes represent the feeder dyke from the latest eruption (1991-1995) whereas C8 represents an earlier dyke feeder dyke from an older eruption. Weakest alteration, which was obtained in samples C16-1-5 and C13-2-5, correlates with the alteration

  12. Hydrothermal Alteration of the Mt Unzen Conduit (Shimabara/Japan)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, T. I.; Mayer, K.; Hess, K. U.; Janots, E.; Gilg, H. A.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2016-12-01

    Investigations were carried out on hydrothermally altered coherent dacitic dykes samples from (USDP-4) drill core at Mt Unzen stratovolcano (Shimabara/Japan). XRF, XRD, EMPA, and C-O-isotope analysis led to insights concerning chemistry, mineralogy, and intensity of alteration as well as the origin of carbonate-precipitating fluids. Additionally a textural characterization of the occurring replacement features in the magma conduit zone was performed. The occurrence of the main secondary phases such as chlorite, pyrite, carbonates, and R1 (Reichweite parameter) illite-smectite indicate a weak to moderate propylitic to phyllic hydrothermal alteration. The dacitic samples of the dykes show different hydrothermal alteration features: (i) carbonate pseudomorphs after hornblende as well as core and zonal textures due to replacement of plagioclase by R1 illite-smectite, (ii) colloform banded fracture fillings and fillings in dissolution vugs, and (iii) chlorite and R1 illite-smectite in the groundmass. Carbonates in fractures comprise iron-rich dolomite solid solutions ("ankerite") and calcite. Isotopic values of d13Cvpdb = -4.59 ± 0.6‰ and d18Ovpdb = -21.73 ± 0.5‰ indicate a hydrothermal-magmatic origin for the carbonate formation. The chlorite-carbonate-pyrite index (CCPI) and the Ishikawa alteration index (AI), applied to the investigated samples show significant differences (CCPI=52.7-57.8; AI=36.1-40.6) indicating their different degree of alteration. According to Nakada et al., 2005, the C13 to C16 dykes represent the feeder dyke from the latest eruption (1991-1995) whereas C8 represents an earlier dyke feeder dyke from an older eruption. Weakest conduit alteration, which was obtained in samples C16-1-5 and C13-2-5, correlates with the alteration degree of the pristine dome rocks. Highest CCPI value was determined for sample C14-1-5 and the highest AI value was determined for sample C15-2-6. The degrees of alteration do not indicate highest alteration of the

  13. Extremely High Phosphate Sorption Capacity in Cu-Pb-Zn Mine Tailings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longbin Huang

    Full Text Available Elevated inorganic phosphate (Pi concentrations in pore water of amended tailings under direct revegetation may cause toxicity in some native woody species but not native forbs or herb species, all of which are key constituents in target native plant communities for phytostabilizing base metal mine tailings. As a result, Pi sorption capacity has been quantified by a conventional batch procedure in three types of base metal mine tailings sampled from two copper (Cu-lead (Pb-zinc (Zn mines, as the basis for Pi-fertiliser addition. It was found that the Pi-sorption capacity in the tailings and local soil was extremely high, far higher than highly weathered agricultural soils in literature, but similar to those of volcanic ash soils. The Langmuir P-sorption maximum was up to 7.72, 4.12, 4.02 and 3.62 mg P g-1 tailings, in the fresh tailings of mixed Cu-Pb-Zn streams (MIMTD7, the weathered tailings of mixed Cu-Pb-Zn streams (MIMTD5, EHM-TD (fresh Cu-stream, high magnetite content and local soil (weathered shale and schist, respectively. Physicochemical factors highly correlated with the high Pi-sorption in the tailings were fine particle distribution, oxalate and dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate extractable Fe (FeO and Fed, oxalate-extractable Al and Mn, and the levels of soluble Cd and Zn, and total S and Fe. Large amounts of amorphous Fe oxides and oxyhydroxides may have been formed from the oxidation of pyritic materials and redox cycles of Fe-minerals (such as pyrite (FeS2, ankerite (Ca(Fe Mg(CO32 and siderite (FeCO3, as indicated by the extractable FeO values. The likely formation of sparingly soluble Zn-phosphate in the Pb-Zn tailings containing high levels of Zn (from sphalerite ((Zn,FeS, ZnS, (Zn,CdS may substantially lower soluble Zn levels in the tailings through high rates of Pi-fertiliser addition. As a result, the possibility of P-toxicity in native plant species caused by the addition of soluble phosphate fertilizers would be minimal.

  14. Structural-Diagenetic Controls on Fracture Opening in Tight Gas Sandstone Reservoirs, Alberta Foothills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukar, Estibalitz; Eichhubl, Peter; Fall, Andras; Hooker, John

    2013-04-01

    In tight gas reservoirs, understanding the characteristics, orientation and distribution of natural open fractures, and how these relate to the structural and stratigraphic setting are important for exploration and production. Outcrops provide the opportunity to sample fracture characteristics that would otherwise be unknown due to the limitations of sampling by cores and well logs. However, fractures in exhumed outcrops may not be representative of fractures in the reservoir because of differences in burial and exhumation history. Appropriate outcrop analogs of producing reservoirs with comparable geologic history, structural setting, fracture networks, and diagenetic attributes are desirable but rare. The Jurassic to Lower Cretaceous Nikanassin Formation from the Alberta Foothills produces gas at commercial rates where it contains a network of open fractures. Fractures from outcrops have the same diagenetic attributes as those observed in cores fractures relative to fold cores, hinges and limbs, 2) compare the distribution and attributes of fractures in outcrop vs. core samples, 3) estimate the timing of fracture formation relative to the evolution of the fold-and-thrust belt, and 4) estimate the degradation of fracture porosity due to postkinematic cementation. Cathodoluminescence images of cemented fractures in both outcrop and core samples reveal several generations of quartz and ankerite cement that is synkinematic and postkinematic relative to fracture opening. Crack-seal textures in synkinematic quartz are ubiquitous, and well-developed cement bridges abundant. Fracture porosity may be preserved in fractures wider than ~100 microns. 1-D scanlines in outcrop and core samples indicate fractures are most abundant within small parasitic folds within larger, tight, mesoscopic folds. Fracture intensity is lower away from parasitic folds; intensity progressively decreases from the faulted cores of mesoscopic folds to their forelimbs, with lowest intensities within

  15. Reactive Transport Models with Geomechanics to Mitigate Risks of CO2 Utilization and Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deo, Milind [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Huang, Hai [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kweon, Hyukmin [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Guo, Luanjing [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2016-03-28

    Reactivity of carbon dioxide (CO2), rocks and brine is important in a number of practical situations in carbon dioxide sequestration. Injectivity of CO2 will be affected by near wellbore dissolution or precipitation. Natural fractures or faults containing specific minerals may reactivate leading to induced seismicity. In this project, we first examined if the reactions between CO2, brine and rocks affect the nature of the porous medium and properties including petrophysical properties in the timeframe of the injection operations. This was done by carrying out experiments at sequestration conditions (2000 psi for corefloods and 2400 psi for batch experiments, and 600°C) with three different types of rocks – sandstone, limestone and dolomite. Experiments were performed in batch mode and corefloods were conducted over a two-week period. Batch experiments were performed with samples of differing surface area to understand the impact of surface area on overall reaction rates. Toughreact, a reactive transport model was used to interpret and understand the experimental results. The role of iron in dissolution and precipitation reactions was observed to be significant. Iron containing minerals – siderite and ankerite dissolved resulting in changes in porosity and permeability. Corefloods and batch experiments revealed similar patterns. With the right cationic balance, there is a possibility of precipitation of iron bearing carbonates. The results indicate that during injection operations mineralogical changes may lead to injectivity enhancements near the wellbore and petrophysical changes elsewhere in the system. Limestone and dolomite cores showed consistent dissolution at the entrance of the core. The dissolution led to formation of wormholes and interconnected dissolution zones. Results indicate that near wellbore dissolution in these rock-types may lead to rock failure. Micro-CT images of the cores before and after the experiments

  16. Chemical and mineralogical data of the metalliferous mineralization from S. Carlo mine (Peloritani mts, Ne Sicily, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pisacane, G

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available The mineralization processes in the Peloritani Belt (Southern Sector of the Calabria- Peloritani Arc prevalently developed during the Variscan orogenesis producing Pb, Zn, Fe, As, Sb, Cu, Ag, W, etc. polymetalliferous ore-bearing horizons. This paper focuses on the polymetalliferous mineralization recognised in the ancient S. Carlo Mine, which has already been subject of some studies and is part of an important discordant vein deposits system that are widespread in the Mandanici Unit (MaU. This Unit is characterized by a Variscan low-P, polyphasic and plurifacial metamorphic basement, exhibiting a prograde zoning, from chlorite zone of greenschist facies to oligoclase-almandine zone of amphibolite facies. The Variscan main foliation (Fv2 is irregularly cut by mineralized veins of decimetric to metric width. They are also perpendicular to the Alpine mylonitic shear zones of metric thickness developing along the sub-horizontal tectonic contacts between the tectono-stratigraphic units. These vein deposits formed along late-Alpine systems of fractures and faults, after Peloritani nappe emplacement. Minerographic study reveals a metalliferous mineral association mainly composed of tetrahedrite associated with, in order of decreasing abundance, chalcopyrite, bournonite, pentlandite, stromeyerite, arsenopyrite, scheelite, galena, sphalerite, pyrite, bismuthinite, boulangerite, jamesonite, covellite, bornite and argentite. Quartz, siderite and ankerite among non-metalliferous minerals are predominant. This work has been supported by mineralogical studies and chemical analyses carried out by Atomic Absorption and Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry on powdered and separated samples of minerals. Geochemical data (major and trace elements have allowed a detailed characterization of the minerals. They have revealed that the most significant minerals with Au contents around 1 ppm are tetrahedrite, sphalerite, chalcopyrite and bournonite. The

  17. Hydrothermal alteration styles in ancient and modern orogenic gold deposits, New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craw, D.; Upton, P.; MacKenzie, D.J.

    2009-01-01

    Orogenic hydrothermal systems in the South Island of New Zealand were active during Mesozoic and late Cenozoic collisional deformation and metamorphism of greywacke/schist terranes. Observations on the currently active mountain-building environment yield insights on processes occurring in the upper 5-15 km of the crust, and observations on an adjacent lithologically identical exhumed ancient mountain belt provide information on processes at 10-20 km in the crust. Hydrothermal fluids were mainly derived from metamorphic dehydration reactions and/or circulating topographically driven meteoric water in these mountain belts. Three geochemically and mineralogically different types of hydrothermal alteration and vein mineralisation occurred in these orogenic belts, and gold enrichment (locally economic) occurred in some examples of each of these three types. The first type of alteration involved fluids that were in or near chemical equilibrium with their greenschist facies host rocks. Fluid flow was controlled by discontinuous fractures, and by microshears and grain boundaries in host rocks, in zones from metres to hundreds of metres thick. Vein and alteration mineralogy was similar to that of the host rocks, and included calcite and chlorite. The second type of alteration occurred where the fluids were in distinct disequilibrium with the host rocks. Fracture permeability was important for fluid flow, but abundant host rock alteration occurred as well. The alteration zones were characterised by decomposition of chlorite and replacement by ankeritic carbonate in zones up to tens of metres thick. The mineralising fluid was deep-sourced and initially rock-equilibrated, with some meteoric input. The third type of mineralisation was controlled almost exclusively by fracture permeability, and host rock alteration was minor (centimetre scale). This mineralisation type commonly involved calcite and chlorite as vein and alteration minerals, and mineralisation fluids had a major

  18. THE SECRETS OF MASSIVE SULFIDE DEPOSITS ON MID-OCEAN RIDGES AND KÜRE- MAĞARADORUK COPPER DEPOSIT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yılmaz ALTUN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Küre region is located in western part of the Pontide tectonic belt. The oldest rocks around Küre are Paleozoic metamorphic rocks constituting “Rhodope-Pontide” continent. Liassic-pre Liassic ophiolites and basaltic volcanics, which form Paleotethys Ocean Floor are situated on “Rhodope-Pontide” continent as Paleotethys Ocean Floor residuals. Massive sulfide deposits in Küre Region are closely associated with pre Liassic – Liassic basaltic volcanics and inter- calating black shale. These deposits are considered to have formed during hydrothermal mi- neralization processes when basaltic volcanism had stopped and defined as “Black Smoker” today. Massive sulfide bodies in Mağaradoruk copper deposits are lens shaped. Although ore lenses take place sometimes in basalts and black shales, they are generally located on basalts and are covered by black shales. In Küre region, fold structures are intensely observed, and Mağaradoruk deposit is located on western flank of an overturned anticline. Mağaradoruk deposit is formed by several small and a big ore body and by less developed, underlying stockwork disseminated ore. The big ore body is 600 m long, 250 m wide and nearly 40 m thick. As main ore minerals; pyrite and chalcopyrite are observed. In few amounts; marcasite, magnetite, hematite, sphalerite, covelline, neo-digenite, malachite, azurite, fahlers are seen. In fewer amounts; bravoite, lineiite (karolite, limonite, and in trace amounts; chromite, rutile anatase, chalcosine, cuprite, tenorite, pyrrhotite, valleriite, bornite, galenite, native copper and native gold are observed. Main gangue minerals are; quartz, siderite-ankerite calcite, dolomite and chlorite. Mağaradoruk massive sulfide deposit rocks resembles to Siirt Madenköy, Ergani massive sulfide deposits, to “Cyprus” type massive sulfide deposits and modern Cyprus type massive sulfide deposits in terms of mineral contents; and to Ergani Mihrapdağı, Papuke, Pakotai

  19. Analysis of mineral trapping for CO(sub 2) disposal in deep aquifers; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten

    2001-01-01

    CO(sub 2) disposal into deep aquifers has been suggested as a potential means whereby atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases may be reduced. However, our knowledge of the geohydrology, geochemistry, geophysics, and geomechanics of CO(sub 2) disposal must be refined if this technology is to be implemented safely, efficiently, and predictably. As a prelude to a fully coupled treatment of physical and chemical effects of CO(sub 2) injection, we have analyzed the impact of CO(sub 2) immobilization through carbonate precipitation. A survey of all major classes of rock-forming minerals, whose alteration would lead to carbonate precipitation, indicated that very few minerals are present in sufficient quantities in aquifer host rocks to permit significant sequestration of CO(sub 2). We performed batch reaction modeling of the geochemical evolution of three different aquifer mineralogies in the presence of CO(sub 2) at high pressure. Our modeling considered (1) redox processes that could be important in deep subsurface environments, (2) the presence of organic matter, (3) the kinetics of chemical interactions between the host rock minerals and the aqueous phase, and (4) CO(sub 2) solubility dependence on pressure, temperature and salinity of the system. The geochemical evolution under both natural background and CO(sub 2) injection conditions was evaluated. In addition, changes in porosity were monitored during the simulations. Results indicate that CO(sub 2) sequestration by matrix minerals varies considerably with rock type. Under favorable conditions the amount of CO(sub 2) that may be sequestered by precipitation of secondary carbonates is comparable with and can be larger than the effect of CO(sub 2) dissolution in pore waters. The precipitation of ankerite and siderite is sensitive to the rate of reduction of ferric mineral precursors such as glauconite, which in turn is dependent on the reactivity of associated organic material. The accumulation of carbonates in

  20. Experiment and simulation study on the effects of cement minerals on the water-rock-CO2 interaction during CO2 geological storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, N.; Cheng, J.

    2016-12-01

    storage and its effects on the CO2-water-rock interaction should be focused no matter for the benefit of injection sustainability or carbon sequestration capability. And more cement minerals such as ankerite should be included and the reservoir quality changes should also be taken consideration in the further study.

  1. Self-sealing Faults in the Opalinus Clay - Evidence from Field Observations, Hydraulic Testing and Pore water Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gautschi, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    As part of the Swiss programme for high-level radioactive-waste, the National Cooperative for the Disposal of Radioactive Waste (Nagra) is currently investigating the Jurassic (Aalenian) Opalinus Clay as a potential host formation (Nagra 1988, 1994). The Opalinus Clay consists of indurated dark grey micaceous Clay-stones (shales) that are subdivided into several litho-stratigraphic units. Some of them contain thin sandy lenses, limestone concretions or siderite nodules. The clay mineral content ranges from 40-80 weight per cent (9-29% illite, 3-10% chlorite, 6-20% kaolinite and 4-22% illite/smectite mixed layers in the ratio 70/30). Other minerals are quartz (15-30%), calcite (6-40%), siderite (2-3%), ankerite (0-3%), feldspars (1-7%), pyrite (1-3%) and organic carbon (<1%). The total water content ranges from 4-19% (Mazurek 1999, Nagra 2001). Faults are mainly represented by fault gouge and fault breccias, partly associated with minor veins of calcite. A key question in safety assessment is, whether these faults may represent preferential pathways for radionuclide transport. An extensive hydrogeological data base - part of which derives from strongly tectonized geological environments - suggests that advective transport through faults in the Opalinus Clay at depth > 200 m is insignificant. This conclusion is also supported by independent evidence from clay pore water hydrochemical and isotopic data. The lack of hydrochemical anomalies and the lack of extensive mineral veining suggest that there was also no significant paleo-flow through such faults. These observations can only be reconciled with a strong self-sealing capacity of the faults. Therefore it is concluded, that reactivated existing faults or newly induced fractures will not act as pathways for significant fluid flow at anytime due to self-healing processes. These conclusions are supported by results from laboratory hydro-frac and flow-through tests, and from field-tests in the Mont Terri underground

  2. Internal features, mineralogy and geochemistry of ferromanganese nodules from the Gulf of Cadiz: The role of the Mediterranean Outflow Water undercurrent

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, F. J.; Somoza, L.; Lunar, R.; Martínez-Frías, J.; Rubí, J. A. Martín; Torres, T.; Ortiz, J. E.; Díaz-del-Río, V.

    2010-03-01

    A large suite of Fe-Mn nodules (561 samples) were recovered during the Anastasya2001 cruise (TASYO project) along the continental margin of the Gulf of Cadiz (Eastern Central Atlantic), at the confluence of the Mediterranean Sea with the Atlantic Ocean, where extensive nodule fields were discovered. Based on wide previous studies that included swath bathymetry, multi-channel and very high-resolution seismic reflection, gravimetry, magnetism, heat flow probes and underwater photography surveys, nodules were collected at water depths ranging from 850 to 1000 m, associated with hydrocarbon-derived Mg-calcite, ankerite and dolomite chimneys and crusts. Forty-six selected samples among the various morphological types were used for the laboratory analysis of physical properties (morphology, color, surface texture, sphericity, weight and size), mineralogy (XRD, optical and electronic microscopy), geochemistry (XRF, AAS, ICP-MS, ICP-AES, EPMA, and GC-MS) and stable isotopes. The nodules show a wide range of sizes, densities, weights and morphologies. They are formed by multiple millimeter-thick layers of Fe and Mn oxyhydroxides surrounding the nucleus composed of Early-Middle Miocene plastic marl and sediment, which were derived from underlying units by fluid venting. Massive, laminated, detrital and mottled to dendritic textural features were developed by the Fe and Mn oxyhydroxide layers. The main components are Goethite, lepidocrocite, Mn oxides (7 Å manganates and 10 Å manganates), quartz, and phyllosilicates. Accessory minerals are calcite, dolomite, siderite, rhodochrosite, kutnahorite, pyrite, chalcopyrite, potassium feldspar, zircon, rutile, ilmenite and chlorite. Fe-Mn carbonates from the siderite-rhodochrosite continuous series are the principal constituent of the nuclei. Framboidal, filamentous and globular textures are observed in Fe-Mn oxides and pyrite, suggesting biogenic origin. The nodules show a high mean abundance of Fe (38.6%), moderate Mn (6.0%) and

  3. Simulation with Phast of the pore water chemistry experiment results (Mont Terri Url, Switzerland), including transport, thermodynamics, kinetics, and biological activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tournassat, C.; Gaucher, E.; Pearson, F.J.; Mettler, S.; Wersin, P.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The Pore water Chemistry (PC-)experiment was initially designed to determine the processes that control the redox properties of pore water in the Opalinus Clay at the Mont Terri URL. However, changes in isotopic data and chemical parameters such as pH, alkalinity, dissolved methane, acetate and sulphate concentrations indicated unexpected microbial activity. The origin of the bacteria is not clear. In the light of published data, an indigenous origin cannot be ruled out. A combined biological and reactive transport model has been developed with the parallel PHAST software to simulate the processes that determine pore water chemistry. The influence of bacterial activity on the system is successfully modelled by considering different reaction pathways scenarios including aceto-genesis, methano-genesis, and methane/acetate oxidation coupled to sulphate reduction. Several conclusions can be clearly stated in the light of the simulation results: - The measured redox potentials (redox electrode) are in line with the S(-II)/S(+VI) redox system. - In the undisturbed pore water, S(-II) and S(+VI) activities are controlled by a mineral assemblage containing pyrite and a Fe carbonate (siderite or ankerite). pH is buffered by mineral phases and SO 4 2- concentration is inherited from the marine sedimentary rock. - Some local redox potentials in the sedimentary rock do not correspond to the measured redox potential; for instance, organic matter/HCO 3 - and CH 4 /HCO 3 - systems are not at equilibrium with the measured redox potential. - Redox disequilibrium can be exploited by micro-organisms as a source of energy for their metabolism. In this experiment CH 4 , acetate and other organic acids were produced and SO 4 2- was reduced to HS - . The redox properties of the system are then governed by kinetics rather than by thermodynamic equilibrium. The unexpected persistence of acetate in the borehole water is one of the consequences of these

  4. On the potential for CO2 mineral storage in continental flood basalts – PHREEQC batch- and 1D diffusion–reaction simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Pham Thi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Continental flood basalts (CFB are considered as potential CO2 storage sites because of their high reactivity and abundant divalent metal ions that can potentially trap carbon for geological timescales. Moreover, laterally extensive CFB are found in many place in the world within reasonable distances from major CO2 point emission sources. Based on the mineral and glass composition of the Columbia River Basalt (CRB we estimated the potential of CFB to store CO2 in secondary carbonates. We simulated the system using kinetic dependent dissolution of primary basalt-minerals (pyroxene, feldspar and glass and the local equilibrium assumption for secondary phases (weathering products. The simulations were divided into closed-system batch simulations at a constant CO2 pressure of 100 bar with sensitivity studies of temperature and reactive surface area, an evaluation of the reactivity of H2O in scCO2, and finally 1D reactive diffusion simulations giving reactivity at CO2 pressures varying from 0 to 100 bar. Although the uncertainty in reactive surface area and corresponding reaction rates are large, we have estimated the potential for CO2 mineral storage and identified factors that control the maximum extent of carbonation. The simulations showed that formation of carbonates from basalt at 40 C may be limited to the formation of siderite and possibly FeMg carbonates. Calcium was largely consumed by zeolite and oxide instead of forming carbonates. At higher temperatures (60 – 100 C, magnesite is suggested to form together with siderite and ankerite. The maximum potential of CO2 stored as solid carbonates, if CO2 is supplied to the reactions unlimited, is shown to depend on the availability of pore space as the hydration and carbonation reactions increase the solid volume and clog the pore space. For systems such as in the scCO2 phase with limited amount of water, the total carbonation potential is limited by the amount of water present

  5. An integrated geochemical, geophysical and mineralogical study of river sediments in alpine area and soil samples near steel plant, in Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, M. I.; Meisel, T.

    2012-04-01

    , ankerite, corundum (anthropogenic), garnet, chlorite, titanium oxide minerals (ilmenite, rutile, titanite) and amphibole etc. The observed significant increase in heavy metal content from the source region of the Vordernberger Bach at 1500 m above sea level to the confluence of the Vordernberger Bach with the Mur River at 540 m AMSL can be attributed to anthropogenic influence. As expected, the anthropogenic input is more pronounced in the vicinity of historic and current iron and steel production.

  6. Morphology of micro- and nanoparticles emitted by copper plants in Western Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konarski, P.; Cwil, M.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.; Diduszko, R.

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol particles were collected in the vicinity of copper plants in Western Poland and analysed by mass spectrometry methods like secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS) and X-ray diffraction to characterise the possible dangers for the environment and health. The motivation of the work was to approach the toxicological mechanisms that are triggered when aerosol nanoparticles enter the human body. Different analytical techniques were used in order to compare bulk and surface properties of particles. The particle collection was performed with nine-stage cascade impactor with rotating plates and also with micro-fibre quartz filter collector. SSMS bulk analysis of copper plant emitted particles shows the presence of over 30 elements, the concentration in wt.% of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cl is 30, 5, 2 and 1, respectively. XRD analysis of these particles shows crystalline phases of quartz and probable phases containing copper CuS 2 , lead Pb 2 SiO 4 , PbO - massicot, Pb 5 [OH][PO 4 ] 3 , Pb 3 SiO 5 , iron and calcium Ca[Mg 0.67 Fe 0.33 ][CO 3 ] - dolomite, ferroan, Ca[FeMg][CO 3 ] 2 - ankerite, Ca[MgFe]Si 2 O 6 - augite. Surface sensitive SIMS depth profile analysis revealed the core-shell structure of copper plant emitted particles. The obtained structure of these particles shows that surfaces of the particles are enriched in elements like chlorine, fluorine, lead and chromium with respect to the core concentrations of these elements. The cores are composed mainly of copper, oxygen and carbon containing compounds. Lead concentration is nearly two times greater at the surface layers of particles than in the cores. SIMS analysis of urban aerosol particles collected in Legnica shows compositional dependence with size. Surface shell layer concentration of lead is three times greater for coarse 6-15 μm particles than for tiny 300 nm-1 μm particles. Such non-uniform particle morphology may enhance the toxic properties of particles suspended in

  7. Morphology of micro- and nanoparticles emitted by copper plants in Western Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konarski, P.; Cwil, M.; Iwanejko, I.; Mierzejewska, A.; Diduszko, R

    2004-07-01

    Aerosol particles were collected in the vicinity of copper plants in Western Poland and analysed by mass spectrometry methods like secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS), spark source mass spectrometry (SSMS) and X-ray diffraction to characterise the possible dangers for the environment and health. The motivation of the work was to approach the toxicological mechanisms that are triggered when aerosol nanoparticles enter the human body. Different analytical techniques were used in order to compare bulk and surface properties of particles. The particle collection was performed with nine-stage cascade impactor with rotating plates and also with micro-fibre quartz filter collector. SSMS bulk analysis of copper plant emitted particles shows the presence of over 30 elements, the concentration in wt.% of Cu, Pb, Zn and Cl is 30, 5, 2 and 1, respectively. XRD analysis of these particles shows crystalline phases of quartz and probable phases containing copper CuS{sub 2}, lead Pb{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, PbO - massicot, Pb{sub 5}[OH][PO{sub 4}]{sub 3}, Pb{sub 3}SiO{sub 5}, iron and calcium Ca[Mg{sub 0.67}Fe{sub 0.33}][CO{sub 3}] - dolomite, ferroan, Ca[FeMg][CO{sub 3}]{sub 2} - ankerite, Ca[MgFe]Si{sub 2}O{sub 6} - augite. Surface sensitive SIMS depth profile analysis revealed the core-shell structure of copper plant emitted particles. The obtained structure of these particles shows that surfaces of the particles are enriched in elements like chlorine, fluorine, lead and chromium with respect to the core concentrations of these elements. The cores are composed mainly of copper, oxygen and carbon containing compounds. Lead concentration is nearly two times greater at the surface layers of particles than in the cores. SIMS analysis of urban aerosol particles collected in Legnica shows compositional dependence with size. Surface shell layer concentration of lead is three times greater for coarse 6-15 {mu}m particles than for tiny 300 nm-1 {mu}m particles. Such non-uniform particle

  8. Basalt Reactivity Variability with Reservoir Depth in Supercritical CO2 and Aqueous Phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter; Owen, Antionette T.

    2011-04-01

    were sparse, conditions corresponding to deeper depths showed increasing carbonate precipitation. Basalts exposed to aqueous dissolved CO{sub 2} (25.5 MPa, 116 C) for 30 days were coated in tiny nodules of precipitate ({approx}100 {micro}m in diameter) that were identified by micro x-ray diffraction as ankerite, [Ca(Fe,Mg)(CO{sub 3}){sub 2}], a variety of dolomite commonly associated with hydrothermal and metamorphic environments. Surface characterization by SEM revealed well-developed round nodules composed of discrete individual platelets. In contrast, reaction products forming on the basalt in the corresponding wet scCO{sub 2} phase had completely different morphology, appearing in an optical microscope as a surface coating instead of discrete nodules. Examination by SEM revealed layers of discrete platelets forming a cover over a few discrete nodules. Longer test durations (180 days) produced severe iron staining along with minerals structures similar to rhodochrosite and kutnohorite. These preliminary experiments show strong evidence of the faster rate of increase in mineralization reactions taking place in the scCO{sub 2} phase, transformation reactions that are just beginning to be explored in detail.

  9. Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 withH2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

    2004-09-07

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations could decrease the atmospheric accumulation of this gas from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, by co-injecting H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2}, the products respectively of coal gasification or combustion, with captured CO{sub 2}, problems associated with surface disposal would be mitigated. We developed models that simulate the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} into an arkose formation at a depth of about 2 km and 75 C. The hydrogeology and mineralogy of the injected formation are typical of those encountered in Gulf Coast aquifers of the United States. Six numerical simulations of a simplified 1-D radial region surrounding the injection well were performed. The injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S results in a concentrically zoned distribution of secondary minerals surrounding a leached and acidified region adjacent to the injection well. Co-injection of SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} results in a larger and more strongly acidified zone, and alteration differs substantially from that caused by the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Precipitation of carbonates occurs within a higher pH (pH > 5) peripheral zone. Significant quantities of CO{sub 2} are sequestered by ankerite, dawsonite, and lesser siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capacity of the formation can attain 40-50 kg/m{sup 3} medium for the selected arkose. In contrast, secondary sulfates precipitate at lower pH (pH < 5) within the acidified zone. Most of the injected SO{sub 2} is transformed and immobilized through alunite precipitation with lesser amounts of anhydrite and minor quantities of pyrite. The dissolved CO{sub 2} increases with time (enhanced solubility trapping). The mineral alteration induced by injection of CO{sub 2} with either SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S leads to corresponding changes in porosity. Significant increases in porosity occur in the acidified

  10. The mangazeya Ag-Pb-Zn vein deposit hosted in sedimentary rocks, Sakha-Yakutia, Russia: Mineral assemblages, fluid inclusions, stable isotopes (C, O, S), and origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikina, E. Yu.; Bortnikov, N. S.; Klubnikin, G. K.; Gamyanin, G. N.; Prokof'ev, V. Yu.

    2016-05-01

    The succession of mineral assemblages, chemistry of gangue and ore minerals, fluid inclusions, and stable isotopes (C, O, S) in minerals have been studied in the Mangazeya silver-base-metal deposit hosted in terrigenous rocks of the Verkhoyansk Fold-Thrust Belt. The deposit is localized in the junction zone of the Kuranakh Anticlinorium and the Sartanga Synclinorium at the steep eastern limb of the Endybal Anticline. The deposit is situated at the intersection of the regional Nyuektame and North Tirekhtyakh faults. Igneous rocks are represented by the Endybal massif of granodiorite porphyry 97.8 ± 0.9 Ma in age and dikes varying in composition. One preore and three types of ore mineralization separated in space are distinguished: quartz-pyrite-arsenopyrite (I), quartz-carbonate-sulfide (II), and silver-base-metal (III). Quartz and carbonate (siderite) are predominant in ore veins. Ore minerals are represented by arsenopyrite, pyrite, sphalerite, galena, fahlore, and less frequent sulfosalts. Three types of fluid inclusions in quartz differ in phase compositions: two- or three-phase aqueous-carbon dioxide (FI I), carbon dioxide gas (FI II), and two-phase (FI III) containing liquid and a gas bubble. The homogenization temperature and salinity fall within the ranges of 367-217°C and 13.8-2.6 wt % NaCl equiv in FI I; 336-126°C and 15.4-0.8 wt % NaCl equiv in FI III. Carbon dioxide in FI II was homogenized in gas at +30.2 to +15.3°C and at +27.2 to 29.0°C in liquid. The δ34S values for minerals of type I range from-1.8 to +4.7‰ (V-CDT); of type II, from-7.4 to +6.6‰; and of type III, from-5.6 to +7.1‰. δ13C and δ18O vary from-7.0 to-6.7‰ (V-PDB) and from +16.6 to +17.1 (V-SMOW) in siderite-I; from-9.1 to-6.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +18.9 (V-SMOW) in siderite-II; from-5.4 to-3.1‰ (V-PDB) and from +14.6 to +19.5 (V-SMOW) in ankerite; and from-4.2 to-2.9‰ (V-PDB) and from +13.5 to +16.8 (V-SMOW) in calcite. The data on mineral assemblages, fluid

  11. Organic petrology and geochemistry of mudrocks from the lacustrine Lucaogou Formation, Santanghu Basin, northwest China: Application to lake basin evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackley, Paul C.; Fishman, Neil; Wu, Tao; Baugher, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    inertinite is present in the upper section, indicating greater terrestrial influx and consistent with higher quartz and plagioclase content (dominantly authigenic chalcedony and albite). Laminated mudstones in the upper section indicate anoxia prevented bioturbation from benthic grazing, also indicating stratified water column conditions. A decrease upsection in authigenic dolomite with reciprocal increase of ankerite/siderite is consistent with decreasing salinity, as is an overall decrease in gammacerane index values. These observations suggest evolution from a shallow, stratified evaporative (saline) setting to a deeper, stratified freshwater basin with higher water input during Lucaogou deposition. The evolution from an under-filled to balance-filled lake in Santanghu Basin is similar to Lucaogou deposition in Junggar Basin, suggesting similar tectonic and climatic controls. Paleoclimate interpretations from other researchers in this area suggested an evolution from semi-arid to humid conditions during the Roadian; we interpret that the evolution from an under-filled to balanced-filled lake seen in our data is in response to climate change, and may represent increased groundwater delivery to the Santanghu Basin.

  12. The interplay of evolved seawater and magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in the 3.24 Ga panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide hydrothermal system, North Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drieberg, Susan L.; Hagemann, Steffen G.; Huston, David L.; Landis, Gary; Ryan, Chris G.; Van Achterbergh, Esmé; Vennemann, Torsten

    2013-01-01

    The ~3240 Ma Panorama volcanic-hosted massive sulfide (VHMS) district is unusual for its high degree of exposure and low degree of postdepositional modification. In addition to typical seafloor VHMS deposits, this district contains greisen- and vein-hosted Mo-Cu-Zn-Sn mineral occurrences that are contemporaneous with VHMS orebodies and are hosted by the Strelley granite complex, which also drove VHMS circulation. Hence the Panorama district is a natural laboratory to investigate the role of magmatic-hydrothermal fluids in VHMS hydrothermal systems. Regional and proximal high-temperature alteration zones in volcanic rocks underlying the VHMS deposits are dominated by chlorite-quartz ± albite assemblages, with lesser low-temperature sericite-quartz ± K-feldspar assemblages. These assemblages are typical of VHMS hydrothermal systems. In contrast, the alteration assemblages associated with granite-hosted greisens and veins include quartz-topaz-muscovite-fluorite and quartz-muscovite (sericite)-chlorite-ankerite. These vein systems generally do not extend into the overlying volcanic pile. Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies suggest that the greisens were produced by high-temperature (~590°C), high-salinity (38–56 wt % NaCl equiv) fluids with high densities (>1.3 g/cm3) and high δ18O (9.3 ± 0.6‰). These fluids are compatible with the measured characteristics of magmatic fluids evolved from the Strelley granite complex. In contrast, fluids in the volcanic pile (including the VHMS ore-forming fluids) were of lower temperature (90°–270°C), lower salinity (5.0–11.2 wt % NaCl equiv), with lower densities (0.88–1.01 g/cm3) and lower δ18O (−0.8 ± 2.6‰). These fluids are compatible with evolved Paleoarchean seawater. Fluids that formed the quartz-chalcopyrite-sphalerite-cassiterite veins, which are present within the granite complex near the contact with the volcanic pile, were intermediate in temperature and isotopic composition between the greisen

  13. Reactivity of micas and cap-rock in wet supercritical CO_2 with SO_2 and O_2 at CO_2 storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearce, Julie K.; Dawson, Grant K.W.; Law, Alison C.K.; Biddle, Dean; Golding, Suzanne D.

    2016-01-01

    Seal or cap-rock integrity is a safety issue during geological carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS). Industrial impurities such as SO_2, O_2, and NOx, may be present in CO_2 streams from coal combustion sources. SO_2 and O_2 have been shown recently to influence rock reactivity when dissolved in formation water. Buoyant water-saturated supercritical CO_2 fluid may also come into contact with the base of cap-rock after CO_2 injection. Supercritical fluid-rock reactions have the potential to result in corrosion of reactive minerals in rock, with impurity gases additionally present there is the potential for enhanced reactivity but also favourable mineral precipitation. The first observation of mineral dissolution and precipitation on phyllosilicates and CO_2 storage cap-rock (siliciclastic reservoir) core during water-saturated supercritical CO_2 reactions with industrial impurities SO_2 and O_2 at simulated reservoir conditions is presented. Phyllosilicates (biotite, phlogopite and muscovite) were reacted in contact with a water-saturated supercritical CO_2 containing SO_2, or SO_2 and O_2, and were also immersed in the gas-saturated bulk water. Secondary precipitated sulfate minerals were formed on mineral surfaces concentrated at sheet edges. SO_2 dissolution and oxidation resulted in solution pH decreasing to 0.74 through sulfuric acid formation. Phyllosilicate dissolution released elements to solution with ∼50% Fe mobilized. Geochemical modelling was in good agreement with experimental water chemistry. New minerals nontronite (smectite), hematite, jarosite and goethite were saturated in models. A cap-rock core siltstone sample from the Surat Basin, Australia, was also reacted in water-saturated supercritical CO_2 containing SO_2 or in pure supercritical CO_2. In the presence of SO_2, siderite and ankerite were corroded, and Fe-chlorite altered by the leaching of mainly Fe and Al. Corrosion of micas in the cap-rock was however not observed as the pH was

  14. An experimental study on mineral sequestration of CO{sub 2} in basics and ultra basics rocks; Etude experimentale des reactions de carbonatation minerale du CO{sub 2} dans les roches basiques et ultrabasiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufaud, F

    2006-11-15

    percents per hour in high temperature experiments. In all cases, carbonation is shown to proceed according to dissolution/precipitation mechanisms. A quasi stoichiometric coupling is evidenced between carbonation and (proto) serpentinization in high-temperature experiments. Newly formed carbonates are mostly magnesite MgCO{sub 3} with Fe and Ca in solid solution. In low temperature samples, the silicates are covered with a thin silica layer and with carbonate spherules consisting of ankerite CaFe(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} - dolomite CaMg(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} - siderite cores surrounded by magnesite overgrowth. In CO{sub 2}-saturated water, peridotites are more reactive than serpentinite and basalts, in accordance with thermodynamic modelling whereas serpentinites are the most reactive in the supercritical CO{sub 2} phase, showing stronger reactivities in this latter phase than in CO{sub 2}-saturated water. In high temperature experiments, the rate of mineral storage is larger at 400 C than at 500 C, in agreement with thermodynamic modelling of the system. High water fugacities and high fluid salinities are shown to have a positive effect on mineral storage rates. Isotopic mass balance of carbon have evidenced that about 15% of the mineral storage consist of a reduced carbon phase, also identified by transmission electron microscopy as an ill-organized graphite phase. (author)

  15. Assessing Biogenecity of Stromatolites: Return to the Facies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, R. S.; Jameson, S.; Rutter, A.; McCarthy, K.; Planavsky, N. J.; Severson, M.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of richly microfossiliferous cherty stromatolites near Schreiber and Kakabeka Falls, Ontario, in the 1.9 Ga Gunflint Iron Formation, firmly established the field of pre-Cambrian paleontology. In the half-century since this discovery, paradigm shifts in the ecology of the microfossils as well as the utility of stromatolites as biological markers has caused a re-evaluation of our understanding of the pre-Cambrian fossil record. This research summarizes facies evaluation of the two stromatolite marker beds in the Gunflint-correlative Biwabik Iron Formation of Minnesota. The centimeter-scale microstratigraphy of cores drilled through the central and eastern Mesabi Iron Range was coupled with field descriptions of outcrops and mines in both the Biwabik and Gunflint iron formations. Eight lithologic facies associated with the stromatolites are identified: A) Pebble conglomerate clasts ranging in size of 0.5-3 cm, syneresis cracks, and septarian nodules with medium to coarse grain matrix; B) siltstone with subparallel sub-mm to 5 cm magnetitic and non-magnetic bands; C) stromatolitic boundstone comprising stratiform, pseudocolumnar, domal, undulatory, flat-laminated, dendritic, columnar, and mico-digitate forms and oncoids 0.5 to 2 cm diameter; D) grainstone with medium to coarse siliceous and carbonate ooids and peloids; E) massive green crystalline beds with bands of magnetite, quartz, calcite, disseminated pyrite and localized ankerite; F) autobreccicated fabric of 0.3 to 10 mm clasts; G) medium to coarse sandstone; H) quartzite. Correlation between 11 cores near Hoyt Lakes and 9 cores through the basal stromatolite layer at the MinnTac Mine near Virginia revealed that stromatolites formed both on conglomerate and medium quartz sandstone. Multiple forms of stromatolite may occur in a vertical succession (flat-laminated to undulatory to psuedocolumnar to columnar) or a core may be dominated by one type, typically columnar-stratiform. Where stromatolites do

  16. An experimental study on mineral sequestration of CO2 in basics and ultra basics rocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dufaud, F.

    2006-11-01

    , carbonation is shown to proceed according to dissolution/precipitation mechanisms. A quasi stoichiometric coupling is evidenced between carbonation and (proto) serpentinization in high-temperature experiments. Newly formed carbonates are mostly magnesite MgCO 3 with Fe and Ca in solid solution. In low temperature samples, the silicates are covered with a thin silica layer and with carbonate spherules consisting of ankerite CaFe(CO 3 ) 2 - dolomite CaMg(CO 3 ) 2 - siderite cores surrounded by magnesite overgrowth. In CO 2 -saturated water, peridotites are more reactive than serpentinite and basalts, in accordance with thermodynamic modelling whereas serpentinites are the most reactive in the supercritical CO 2 phase, showing stronger reactivities in this latter phase than in CO 2 -saturated water. In high temperature experiments, the rate of mineral storage is larger at 400 C than at 500 C, in agreement with thermodynamic modelling of the system. High water fugacities and high fluid salinities are shown to have a positive effect on mineral storage rates. Isotopic mass balance of carbon have evidenced that about 15% of the mineral storage consist of a reduced carbon phase, also identified by transmission electron microscopy as an ill-organized graphite phase. (author)

  17. Analysis of a intra-Carixian clay horizon into carbonate platform of the Ouarsenis (Algeria): composition, dynamic and paleo-climatic implication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benhamou, M.; Salhi, A. [Oran Univ., Faculte des Sciences de la Terre et de l' Amenagement du Territoire, Dpt. de Geologie (Algeria)

    2005-07-01

    During the Late Sinemurian a carbonate platform has developed on the Ouarsenis area (external Tell o f the Algerian Alpine belt) with setting deposits of the Kef Sidi Amar Carbonate Formation. A first maximum flooding materialized by a brachiopods (Zeilleriids) layer, is occurring during the Late Carixian. The Late Carixian deepening has been followed by a sea-level fall documented by several meters incisions filled by transgressive breccia and conglomerates. After this episode, this material was sealed by a pedogenic bed (0,05 to 0,20 m) which corresponds to a yellow clay deposit containing well rounded particles interpreted as pedo-genetic globules. These corpuscles are composed of reddish and hardened clay, corroded quartz grains, rhombic and zoned dolomite crystals and ankerite, monocrystalline and xeno-morphous detrital quartz grains (1-2 mm). The observed characteristics allow to recognize a typical calcrete. They are the result of pedo-genetic diagenesis developed inside the phreatic water-table near the surface: this is an alteration profile. The mineralogic fraction has been analyzed by X-Ray which show results of association clay mineral as a predominance of illite (85%) and mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite (I-M, 10%) associated with a low ration of chlorite (5%) and kaolinite trace (1%). This mineralogic clay association indicates a shallow water (hydro-morphic zone). Among these clay minerals, the illite reveals the precious indications in a source area. In this case, it comes from the decomposition of the schist paleo-relief located in the internal domain. This rock was transformed by acid leaching (action of the sour humus) into kaolinite with the presence of the quartzification. The origin of the mixed-layer clay I-M (10%) is the result of the active pedogenesis. The simultaneous presence of the illite, chlorite, kaolinite and the mixed-layer clay I-M seems to be result from the erosion exercised on the alteration product or arenitisation of the

  18. (S, C, O, Sr) isotopic constraints on the diagenetic evolution of the COX clay formations at the Bure URL site, Paris Basin)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerouge, C.; Gaucher, E. C.; Tournassat, C.; Agrinier, P.; Widory, D.; Guerrot, C.; Buschaert, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Underground Research Laboratory of Bure, located in the Eastern part of the Paris Basin, was selected by ANDRA (French Agency for Nuclear Management) in order to study the feasibility of a nuclear waste disposal in the Callovian-Oxfordian thick clayey formation at 400 meters depth. Since 1994's, numerous investigations have been initiated to understand and predict the behaviour of the clay formation in time and in space, by constraining its stability, the chemical evolution of the porewaters, and solution transfers between the clayey formation and its adjacent limestone sequences during geological times (ANDRA, 2005). In that way, this study presents combined new mineralogical and isotopic data of the diagenetic mineral sequence to constrain the porewater chemistry of the rock at different stages of the sedimentary then burial history of the clayey formation. The petrological study of Callovian-Oxfordian claystones provided evidence of the following diagenetic mineral sequence: 1) Framboïdal pyrite ± micritic calcite in replacement of carbonate bioclasts and in bioturbations, 2) Iron-rich euhedral carbonates (ankerite, sideroplesite), Glauconite, 3) Sparry dolomite, celestite in residual porosity, 4) Chalcedony 5) quartz/calcite. Pyrite in bioturbations shows a wide range of δ34S (-38 to +74 permil/CDT), providing evidence of bacterial sulphate reduction processes. The lowest negative values (-38 to -22 permil) indicate precipitation of pyrite in a marine environment with a permanent recharge in sulphate, whereas the higher pyrite δ34S values (-14 up to +74 permil) show that pyrite precipitated in a system that closed for sulphate. Consequently the variations of pyrite δ34S in bioturbations along the lithostratigraphic profil indicate a change of sedimentation conditions from a deep marine environment to an environment with alternative recharge of marine sulphates; that is consistent with the transgression/regression cycle observed in the middle sequence

  19. CaCO3-III and CaCO3-VI, high-pressure polymorphs of calcite: Possible host structures for carbon in the Earth's mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, M.; Hanfland, M.; Crichton, W. A.

    2012-06-01

    time, Mg and Fe solubility in aragonite is hindered energetically in the 9-fold coordination site. Above 15 GPa, and up to the maximum pressure investigated (40 GPa), we observe the high-pressure polymorph CaCO3-VI, triclinic [a=3.3187(12) Å, b=4.8828(14) Å, c=5.5904(14) Å, α=103.30(2)°, β=94.73(2)°, γ=89.21(2)°, V=87.86(20) Å3 at 30.4 GPa] with 10 atoms in the unit cell. It is characterised by coplanar CO3 groups but the structure is no longer layered, as in the lower pressure polymorphs. The density of the CaCO3-VI structure (3.78 g/cm3 at 30.4 GPa) is higher than aragonite. For this reason it could be supposed that a region may exist where this polymorph replaces aragonite in the Earth's intermediate mantle. The lower coordination number for the Ca site [7+2] instead of [9] in aragonite suggests that this structure could be easily adopted by an extended solid-solution range from calcite towards the dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2]-ankerite [CaFe(CO3)2] compositional join. The transitions from calcite to CaCO3-III, CaCO3-IIIb and CaCO3-VI are perfectly reversible and after pressure release we always observe the calcite structure, with the sample recovered as a single-crystal. Indeed, it is highly unlikely that these structures can be observed in samples recovered from high-pressure environments.

  20. Effect of the Callovian-Oxfordian clayey fraction on borosilicate glass alteration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debure, M.; Frugier, P.; GIN, S.; De Windt, L.; Michau, N.

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. In France, high-level nuclear waste (HLW) is confined in a glass matrix packaged into stainless steel canister and carbon steel overpack. The HLW should be buried in a geological clay formation like, potentially, the Callovian-Oxfordian (COx) clay-stone located in the north-eastern Parisian basin. The COx clay-stone contains minerals that can feed the near-field with soluble Mg. Such minerals are carbonates (ankerite, dolomite) as well as clay minerals (chlorite, illite, interstratified illite/smectite). Previous laboratory experiments have proved that aqueous solutions of Mg salts could significantly increase the alteration rate of nuclear glass (Jollivet et al., 2012). This motivated to go a step further by studying the alteration of nuclear glass put in contact with Mg minerals. A first set of experiments have revealed that the rate of glass dissolution was increased with hydro-magnesite (4MgCO 3 .Mg(OH) 2 .4H 2 O, a chemically simple model mineral) and dolomite. In both cases, Mg coming from carbonate dissolution reacts with Si, provided by the glass, in order to form Mg silicates (Debure et al., 2012). In that case, Si consumption sustains glass alteration. Mg silicate precipitation also consumes protons; therefore the interdiffusion of alkali within the glass alteration layer eventually becomes a driving force that sustains Mg silicate precipitation. The second set of experiments, presented here, aimed at better characterizing the role of the COx clayey fraction. The separation of the clayey phases of the COx clay-stone has been made in collaboration with the LEM lab (Nancy, France) by a sequence of sieving, acidic dissolution of carbonates, NaCl washing and sedimentation (Rivard, 2011). According to XRD and infrared analyses, the clayey fraction was mainly composed of kaolinite, illite, interstratified illite/smectite and chlorite (plus a little residual amount of quartz). This first step aimed to remove