WorldWideScience

Sample records for anisotropy probe observations

  1. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) First Year Observations TE Polarization

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J; Barnes, C; Bennett, C L; Halpern, M; Hinshaw, G; Jarosik, N C; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Page, L; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2003-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) has mapped the full sky in Stokes I, Q, and U parameters at frequencies 23, 33, 41, 61, and 94 GHz. We detect correlations between the temperature and polarization maps significant at more than 10 standard deviations. The correlations are present in all WMAP frequency bands with similar amplitude from 23 to 94 GHz, and are consistent with a superposition of a CMB signal with a weak foreground. The fitted CMB component is robust against different data combinations and fitting techniques. On small angular scales theta 20 agree well with the signal predicted solely from the temperature power spectra, with no additional free parameters. We detect excess power on large angular scales (theta > 10 deg) compared to predictions based on the temperature power spectra alone. The excess power is well described by reionization at redshift 11 < z_r < 30 at 95% confidence, depending on the ionization history. A model-independent fit to reionization optical depth yields ...

  2. Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Likelihoods and Parameters from the WMAP Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunkey, J.; Komatsu, E.; Nolta, M.R.; Spergel, D.N.; Larson, D.; Hinshaw, G.; Page, L.; Bennett, C.L.; Gold, B.; Jarosik, N.; Weiland, J.L.; Halpern, M.; Hill, R.S.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S.S.; Tucker, G.S.; Wollack, E.; Wright, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP), launched in 2001, has mapped out the Cosmic Microwave Background with unprecedented accuracy over the whole sky. Its observations have led to the establishment of a simple concordance cosmological model for the contents and evolution of the universe, consistent with virtually all other astronomical measurements. The WMAP first-year and three-year data have allowed us to place strong constraints on the parameters describing the ACDM model. a flat universe filled with baryons, cold dark matter, neutrinos. and a cosmological constant. with initial fluctuations described by nearly scale-invariant power law fluctuations, as well as placing limits on extensions to this simple model (Spergel et al. 2003. 2007). With all-sky measurements of the polarization anisotropy (Kogut et al. 2003; Page et al. 2007), two orders of magnitude smaller than the intensity fluctuations. WMAP has not only given us an additional picture of the universe as it transitioned from ionized to neutral at redshift z approx.1100. but also an observation of the later reionization of the universe by the first stars. In this paper we present cosmological constraints from WMAP alone. for both the ACDM model and a set of possible extensions. We also consider tlle consistency of WMAP constraints with other recent astronomical observations. This is one of seven five-year WMAP papers. Hinshaw et al. (2008) describe the data processing and basic results. Hill et al. (2008) present new beam models arid window functions, Gold et al. (2008) describe the emission from Galactic foregrounds, and Wright et al. (2008) the emission from extra-Galactic point sources. The angular power spectra are described in Nolta et al. (2008), and Komatsu et al. (2008) present and interpret cosmological constraints based on combining WMAP with other data. WMAP observations are used to produce full-sky maps of the CMB in five frequency bands centered at 23, 33, 41, 61, and 94 GHz

  3. Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Final Maps and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L.; Jaorsik, N.; Hinshaw, G.; Odegard, N.; Smith, K. M.; Hill, R. S.; Gold, B.; Halpern, M; Komatsu, E.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Wollack, E.; Dunkley, J.; Kogut, A.; Limon,, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Tucker, G. S.; Wright, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail.We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground reduced are presented.We nowimplement an optimal C(exp -1)1 weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained Lambda-CDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N(sub eff) = 3.84 +/- 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is (sub 0) = 13.772 +/- 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H(sub 0) = 69.32 +/- 0.80 km/s/ Mpc. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (n(sub s) = 0.9608+/-0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (Omega = -0.0027+0.0039/-0.0038). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six

  4. NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: FINAL MAPS AND RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S. [ADNET Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Drive, Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Smith, K. M. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Gold, B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dunkley, J. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Tucker, G. S., E-mail: cbennett@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States); and others

    2013-10-01

    We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground-reduced CMB maps are presented. We now implement an optimal C {sup –1} weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained ΛCDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N {sub eff} = 3.84 ± 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is t {sub 0} = 13.772 ± 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H {sub 0} = 69.32 ± 0.80 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (n{sub s} = 0.9608 ± 0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (Ω{sub k} = -0.0027{sup +0.0039}{sub -0.0038}). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor

  5. Nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Final Maps and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L.; Jarosik, N.; Hinshaw, G.; Odegard, N.; Smith, K. M.; Hill, R. S.; Gold, B.; Halpern, M.; Komatsu, E.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Wollack, E.; Dunkley, J.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Tucker, G. S.; Wright, E. L.

    2013-10-01

    We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground-reduced CMB maps are presented. We now implement an optimal C -1 weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained ΛCDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N eff = 3.84 ± 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is t 0 = 13.772 ± 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H 0 = 69.32 ± 0.80 km s-1 Mpc-1. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (ns = 0.9608 ± 0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (\\Omega _k = -0.0027^{+ 0.0039}_{-0.0038}). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model

  6. First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe(WMAP) Observations: Data Processing Methods and Systematic Errors Limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, G.; Barnes, C.; Bennett, C. L.; Greason, M. R.; Halpern, M.; Hill, R. S.; Jarosik, N.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.

    2003-01-01

    We describe the calibration and data processing methods used to generate full-sky maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first year of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations. Detailed limits on residual systematic errors are assigned based largely on analyses of the flight data supplemented, where necessary, with results from ground tests. The data are calibrated in flight using the dipole modulation of the CMB due to the observatory's motion around the Sun. This constitutes a full-beam calibration source. An iterative algorithm simultaneously fits the time-ordered data to obtain calibration parameters and pixelized sky map temperatures. The noise properties are determined by analyzing the time-ordered data with this sky signal estimate subtracted. Based on this, we apply a pre-whitening filter to the time-ordered data to remove a low level of l/f noise. We infer and correct for a small (approx. 1 %) transmission imbalance between the two sky inputs to each differential radiometer, and we subtract a small sidelobe correction from the 23 GHz (K band) map prior to further analysis. No other systematic error corrections are applied to the data. Calibration and baseline artifacts, including the response to environmental perturbations, are negligible. Systematic uncertainties are comparable to statistical uncertainties in the characterization of the beam response. Both are accounted for in the covariance matrix of the window function and are propagated to uncertainties in the final power spectrum. We characterize the combined upper limits to residual systematic uncertainties through the pixel covariance matrix.

  7. First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations Angular Power Spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Hinshaw, G; Verde, L; Hill, R S; Meyer, S S; Barnes, C; Bennett, C L; Halpern, M; Jarosik, N C; Kogut, A J; Komatsu, E; Limon, M; Page, L; Tucker, G S; Weiland, J; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2003-01-01

    We present the angular power spectrum derived from the first-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps. We study a variety of power spectrum estimation methods and data combinations and demonstrate that the results are robust. The data are modestly contaminated by diffuse Galactic foreground emission, but we show that a simple Galactic template model is sufficient to remove the signal. Point sources produce a modest contamination in the low frequency data. After masking ~700 known bright sources from the maps, we estimate residual sources contribute ~3500 uK^2 at 41 GHz, and ~130 uK^2 at 94 GHz, to the power spectrum l*(l+1)*C_l/(2*pi) at l=1000. Systematic errors are negligible compared to the (modest) level of foreground emission. Our best estimate of the power spectrum is derived from 28 cross-power spectra of statistically independent channels. The final spectrum is essentially independent of the noise properties of an individual radiometer. The resulting spectrum provides a definitive mea...

  8. NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinshaw, G.; Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Larson, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Weiland, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Spergel, D. N. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Dunkley, J. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George St., University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Hill, R. S.; Odegard, N. [ADNET Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Dr., Suite A100 Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Page, L.; Jarosik, N. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Smith, K. M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Gold, B. [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kogut, A.; Wollack, E. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W. 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Tucker, G. S., E-mail: hinshaw@physics.ubc.ca [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope St., Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States); and others

    2013-10-01

    We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data, in conjunction with a number of additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter ΛCDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l cosmic microwave background anisotropy, the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, and the Hubble constant, the matter and energy densities, Ω {sub b} h {sup 2}, Ω {sub c} h {sup 2}, and Ω{sub Λ}, are each determined to a precision of ∼1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5σ level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional ΛCDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their ΛCDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are presented, for example: the fractional contribution of tensor modes is limited to r < 0.13 (95% CL); the spatial curvature parameter is limited to Ω{sub k} = -0.0027{sup +0.0039}{sub -0.0038}; the summed mass of neutrinos is limited to Σm {sub ν} < 0.44 eV (95% CL); and the number of relativistic species is found to lie within N {sub eff} = 3.84 ± 0.40, when the full data are analyzed. The joint constraint on N {sub eff} and the primordial helium abundance, Y {sub He}, agrees with the prediction of standard big bang nucleosynthesis. We compare recent Planck measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with our seven-year measurements, and show their mutual agreement. Our analysis of the polarization pattern around temperature extrema is updated. This confirms a fundamental prediction of the standard

  9. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M; Friedel, Reinhard H; Funsten, Herbert O; Gary, S Peter; Hospodarsky, George B; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Skoug, Ruth M; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ∼Ω e /2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  10. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωrcell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ˜Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  11. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    CERN Document Server

    Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2014-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat $\\Lambda$ cold dark matter ($\\Lambda$CDM) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of >68,000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino backgrou...

  12. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Planets and Celestial Calibration Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Wollack, E; Hinshaw, G; Greason, M R; Jarosik, N; Page, L; Bennett, C L; Dunkley, J; Gold, B; Halpern, M; Kogut, A; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    We present WMAP seven-year observations of bright sources which are often used as calibrators at microwave frequencies. Ten objects are studied in five frequency bands (23 - 94 GHz): the outer planets (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) and five fixed celestial sources (Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, 3C274 and 3C58). The seven-year analysis of Jupiter provides temperatures which are within 1-sigma of the previously published WMAP five-year values, with slightly tighter constraints on variability with orbital phase, and limits (but no detections) on linear polarization. Scaling factors are provided which, when multiplied by the Wright Mars thermal model predictions at 350 micron, reproduce WMAP seasonally averaged observations of Mars within ~2%. An empirical model is described which fits brightness variations of Saturn due to geometrical effects and can be used to predict the WMAP observations to within 3%. Seven-year mean temperatures for Uranus and Neptune are also tabulated. Uncertainties in Uranus temperatu...

  13. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, B; Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Kogut, A; Bennett, C L; Hinshaw, G; Dunkley, J; Halpern, M; Jarosik, N; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Page, L; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show...

  14. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  15. Limits on SUSY GUTs and Defects Formation in Hybrid Inflationary Models with Three-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Fraisse, A A

    2006-01-01

    We confront the predicted effects of hybrid inflationary models on the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) with three years of Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations. Using model selection, we compare the ability of a simple flat power-law LCDM model to describe the data to hybrid inflationary models involving global or local cosmic strings, or global textures. We find that it is statistically impossible to distinguish between these models: they all give a similar description of the data, the maximum ratio of the various evidences involved being never higher than e^{0.1 \\pm 0.5}. We then derive the maximum contribution that topological defects can make to the CMB, and place an upper bound on the possible value of cosmic strings tension of G\\mu \\leq 2.1 \\times 10^{-7} (68% CL). Finally, we give the corresponding constraints on the strings and D-strings masses, as well as limits on the D- and F-term coupling constants (\\kappa and \\lambda) and mass scales (M and \\sqrt{\\xi}).

  16. Alignment, vibronic level splitting, and coherent coupling effects on the pump-probe polarization anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric R; Jonas, David M

    2011-04-28

    The pump-probe polarization anisotropy is computed for molecules with a nondegenerate ground state, two degenerate or nearly degenerate excited states with perpendicular transition dipoles, and no resonant excited-state absorption. Including finite pulse effects, the initial polarization anisotropy at zero pump-probe delay is predicted to be r(0) = 3/10 with coherent excitation. During pulse overlap, it is shown that the four-wave mixing classification of signal pathways as ground or excited state is not useful for pump-probe signals. Therefore, a reclassification useful for pump-probe experiments is proposed, and the coherent anisotropy is discussed in terms of a more general transition dipole and molecular axis alignment instead of experiment-dependent ground- versus excited-state pathways. Although coherent excitation enhances alignment of the transition dipole, the molecular axes are less aligned than for a single dipole transition, lowering the initial anisotropy. As the splitting between excited states increases beyond the laser bandwidth and absorption line width, the initial anisotropy increases from 3/10 to 4/10. Asymmetric vibrational coordinates that lift the degeneracy control the electronic energy gap and off-diagonal coupling between electronic states. These vibrations dephase coherence and equilibrate the populations of the (nearly) degenerate states, causing the anisotropy to decay (possibly with oscillations) to 1/10. Small amounts of asymmetric inhomogeneity (2 cm(-1)) cause rapid (130 fs) suppression of both vibrational and electronic anisotropy beats on the excited state, but not vibrational beats on the ground electronic state. Recent measurements of conical intersection dynamics in a silicon napthalocyanine revealed anisotropic quantum beats that had to be assigned to asymmetric vibrations on the ground electronic state only [Farrow, D. A.; J. Chem. Phys. 2008, 128, 144510]. Small environmental asymmetries likely explain the observed absence

  17. Large-Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as a Probe of Interstellar Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Giacinti, Gwenael

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the large-scale cosmic-ray (CR) anisotropies predicted for a range of Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) and isotropic models of interstellar turbulence, and compare them with IceTop data. In general, the predicted CR anisotropy is not a pure dipole; the cold spots reported at 400 TeV and 2 PeV are consistent with a GS model that contains a smooth deficit of parallel-propagating waves and a broad resonance function, although some other possibilities cannot, as yet, be ruled out. In particular, isotropic fast magnetosonic wave turbulence can match the observations at high energy, but cannot accommodate an energy-dependence in the shape of the CR anisotropy. Our findings suggest that improved data on the large-scale CR anisotropy could provide a valuable probe of the properties - notably the power-spectrum - of the local interstellar turbulence.

  18. Probing pre-inflationary anisotropy with directional variations in the gravitational wave background

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Yu; Sendouda, Yuuiti

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis on a primordial gravitational-wave background amplified during a Kasner-like pre-inflationary phase allowing for general triaxial anisotropies. It is found that the predicted angular distribution map of gravitational-wave intensity on large scales exhibits topologically distinctive patterns according to the degree of the pre-inflationary anisotropy, thereby serving as a potential probe for the pre-inflationary early universe with future all-sky observations of gravitational waves. We also derive an observational limit on the amplitude of such anisotropic gravitational waves from the B-mode polarisation of the cosmic microwave background.

  19. Rotational Doppler Effect: A Probe for Molecular Orbitals Anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Quan; Travnikova, Oksana; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Kimberg, Victor; Sun, Yu-Ping; Thomas, T Darrah; Nicolas, Christophe; Patanen, Minna; Miron, Catalin

    2015-05-01

    The vibrationally resolved X-ray photoelectron spectra of X2Σg+(3σg−1) and B2Σu+(2σu−1) states of N2+ were recorded for different photon energies and orientations of the polarization vector. Clear dependencies of the spectral line widths on the X-ray polarization as well as on the symmetry of the final electronic states are observed. Contrary to the translational Doppler, the rotational Doppler broadening is sensitive to the photoelectron emission anisotropy. On the basis of theoretical modeling, we suggest that the different rotational Doppler broadenings observed for gerade and ungerade final states result from a Young's double-slit interference phenomenon.

  20. Anisotropies of Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens as a New Cosmological Probe without Redshift Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-03-25

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary stars at cosmological distances are promising and powerful cosmological probes, referred to as the GW standard sirens. With future GW detectors, we will be able to precisely measure source luminosity distances out to a redshift z∼5. To extract cosmological information, previously proposed cosmological studies using the GW standard sirens rely on source redshift information obtained through an extensive electromagnetic follow-up campaign. However, the redshift identification is typically time consuming and rather challenging. Here, we propose a novel method for cosmology with the GW standard sirens free from the redshift measurements. Utilizing the anisotropies of the number density and luminosity distances of compact binaries originated from the large-scale structure, we show that, once GW observations will be well established in the future, (i) these anisotropies can be measured even at very high redshifts (z≥2), where the identification of the electromagnetic counterpart is difficult, (ii) the expected constraints on the primordial non-Gaussianity with the Einstein Telescope would be comparable to or even better than the other large-scale structure probes at the same epoch, and (iii) the cross-correlation with other cosmological observations is found to have high-statistical significance, providing additional cosmological information at very high redshifts.

  1. The Spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy from the Combined COBE FIRAS and WMAP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fixsen, D. J.

    2003-09-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data from the COBE Far Infrared Absolute Spectrophotometer (FIRAS) is reanalyzed in light of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) observations. The frequency spectrum of the FIRAS signal that has the spatial distribution seen by WMAP is shown to be consistent with CMB temperature fluctuations well into the Wien region of the spectrum. The consistency of these data, from very different instruments with very different observing strategies, provides compelling support for the interpretation that the signal seen by WMAP is temperature anisotropy of cosmological origin. The data also limit rms fluctuations in the Compton y parameter, observable via the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect, to Δy<3×10-6 (95% confidence level) on ~5° angular scales. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) was responsible for the design, development, and operation of the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE).

  2. Anisotropies of gravitational-wave standard sirens as a new cosmological probe without redshift information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Namikawa, Toshiya; Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary stars at cosmological distances are promising and powerful cosmological probes, referred to as the GW standard sirens. With future GW detectors, we will be able to precisely measure source luminosity distances out to a redshift z 5. To extract cosmological information, previous studies using the GW standard sirens rely on source redshift information obtained through an extensive electromagnetic follow-up campaign. However, the redshift identification is typically time-consuming and rather challenging. Here we propose a novel method for cosmology with the GW standard sirens free from the redshift measurements. Utilizing the anisotropies of the number density and luminosity distances of compact binaries originated from the large-scale structure, we show that (i) this anisotropies can be measured even at very high-redshifts (z = 2), (ii) the expected constraints on the primordial non-Gaussianity with Einstein Telescope would be comparable to or even better than the other large-scale structure probes at the same epoch, (iii) the cross-correlation with other cosmological observations is found to have high-statistical significance. A.N. was supported by JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad No. 25-180.

  3. Anisotropy and probe-medium interactions in the microrheology of nematic fluids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoba, Andres; Stieger, Tillmann; Mazza, Marco G.; Schoen, Martin; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical formalism is presented to analyze and interpret microrheology experiments in anisotropic fluids with nematic order. The predictions of that approach are examined in the context of a simple coarse-grained molecular model which is simulated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics calculations. The proposed formalism is used to study the effect of confinement, the type of anchoring at the probe-particle surface, and the strength of the nematic field on the rheological response functions obtained from probe-particle active microrheology. As expected, a stronger nematic field leads to increased anisotropy in the rheological response of the material. It is also found that the defect structures that arise around the probe particle, which are determined by the type of anchoring and the particle size, have a significant effect on the rheological response observed in microrheology simulations. Independent estimates of the bulk dynamic modulus of the model nematic fluid considered here are obtained from small-amplitude oscillatory shear simulations with Lees Edwards boundary conditions. The results of simulations indicate that the dynamic modulus extracted from particle-probe microrheology is different from that obtained in the absence of the particle, but that the differences decrease as the size of the defect also decreases. Importantly, the results of the nematic microrheology theory proposed here are in much closer agreement with simulations than those from earlier formalisms conceived for isotropic fluids. As such, it is anticipated that the theoretical framework advanced in this study could provide a useful tool for interpretation of microrheology experiments in systems such as liquid crystals and confined macromolecular solutions or gels.

  4. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Source Catalog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, E.L.; Chen, X.; Odegard, N.; Bennett, C.L.; Hill, R.S.; Hinshaw, G.; Jarosik, N.; Komatsu, E.; Nolta, M.R.; Page, L.; Spergel, D.N.; Weiland, J.L.; Wollack, E.; Dunkley, J.; Gold, B.; Halpern, M.; Kogut, A.; Larson, D.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S.; Tucker, G.S.

    2008-01-01

    We present the list of point sources found in the WMAP 5-year maps. The technique used in the first-year and three-year analysis now finds 390 point sources, and the five-year source catalog is complete for regions of the sky away from the galactic plane to a 2 Jy limit, with SNR greater than 4.7 in all bands in the least covered parts of the sky. The noise at high frequencies is still mainly radiometer noise, but at low frequencies the CMB anisotropy is the largest uncertainty. A separate search of CMB-free V-W maps finds 99 sources of which all but one can be identified with known radio sources. The sources seen by WMAP are not strongly polarized. Many of the WMAP sources show significant variability from year to year, with more than a 2:l range between the minimum and maximum fluxes.

  5. Probing the Intergalactic Magnetic Field with the Anisotropy of the Extragalactic Gamma-ray Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venters, T. M.; Pavlidou, V.

    2013-01-01

    The intergalactic magnetic field (IGMF) may leave an imprint on the angular anisotropy of the extragalactic gamma-ray background through its effect on electromagnetic cascades triggered by interactions between very high energy photons and the extragalactic background light. A strong IGMF will deflect secondary particles produced in these cascades and will thus tend to isotropize lower energy cascade photons, thereby inducing a modulation in the anisotropy energy spectrum of the gamma-ray background. Here we present a simple, proof-of-concept calculation of the magnitude of this effect and demonstrate that current Fermi data already seem to prefer nonnegligible IGMF values. The anisotropy energy spectrum of the Fermi gamma-ray background could thus be used as a probe of the IGMF strength.

  6. Inflation model constraints from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three-year data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, William H.; /SUNY, Buffalo; Kolb, Edward W.; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Melchiorri, Alessandro; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Riotto, Antonio; /CERN

    2006-05-01

    We extract parameters relevant for distinguishing among single-field inflation models from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year data set, and also from WMAP in combination with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy power spectrum. Our analysis leads to the following conclusions: (1) the Harrison-Zel'dovich model is consistent with both data sets at a 95% confidence level; (2) there is no strong evidence for running of the spectral index of scalar perturbations; (3) Potentials of the form V {infinity} {phi}{sup P} are consistent with the data for p = 2, and are marginally consistent with the WMAP data considered alone for p = 4, but ruled out by WMAP combined with SDSS. We perform a ''Monte Carlo reconstruction'' of the inflationary potential, and find that: (1) there is no evidence to support an observational lower bound on the amplitude of gravitational waves produced during inflation; (2) models such as simple hybrid potentials which evolve toward an inflationary late-time attractor in the space of flow parameters are strongly disfavored by the data, (3) models selected with even a weak slow-roll prior strongly cluster in the region favoring a ''red'' power spectrum and no running of the spectral index, consistent with simple single-field inflation models.

  7. Inflation model constraints from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three-year data

    CERN Document Server

    Kinney, W H; Melchiorri, A; Riotto, Antonio; Kinney, William H.; Kolb, Edward W.; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Riotto, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    We extract parameters relevant for distinguishing among single-field inflation models from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year data set, and also from WMAP in combination with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy power spectrum. Our analysis leads to the following conclusions: 1) the Harrison--Zel'dovich model is consistent with both data sets at a 95% confidence level; 2) there is no strong evidence for running of the spectral index of scalar perturbations; 3) Potentials of the form V \\propto \\phi^p are consistent with the data for p = 2, and are marginally consistent with the WMAP data considered alone for p = 4, but ruled out by WMAP combined with SDSS. We perform a "Monte Carlo reconstruction" of the inflationary potential, and find that: 1) there is no evidence to support an observational lower bound on the amplitude of gravitational waves produced during inflation; 2) models such as simple hybrid potentials which evolve toward an inflationary late-time attractor in the space...

  8. The Anisotropic Line Correlation Function as a Probe of Anisotropies in Galaxy Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Eggemeier, Alexander; Smith, Robert E; Niemeyer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We propose an anisotropic generalisation of the line correlation function (ALCF) to separate and quantify phase information in the large-scale structure of galaxies. The line correlation function probes the strictly non-linear regime of structure formation and since phase information drops out of the power spectrum, the line correlation function provides a complementary tool to commonly used techniques based on two-point statistics. Furthermore, it is independent of linear bias as well as the Gaussian variance on the modulus of the density field and thus may also prove to be advantageous compared to the bispectrum or similar higher-order statistics for certain cases. For future applications it is vital, though, to be able to account for observational effects that cause anisotropies in the distribution of galaxies. Based on a number of numerical studies, we find that our ALCF is well suited to accomplish this task and we demonstrate how the Alcock-Paczynski effect and kinematical redshift-space distortions can...

  9. Direct probe of anisotropy in atom-molecule collisions via quantum scattering resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Ayelet; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Żuchowski, Piotr S; Pawlak, Mariusz; Janssen, Liesbeth M C; Moiseyev, Nimrod; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T; van der Avoird, Ad; Koch, Christiane P; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropy is a fundamental property of particle interactions. It occupies a central role in cold and ultra-cold molecular processes, where long range forces have been found to significantly depend on orientation in ultra-cold polar molecule collisions. Recent experiments have demonstrated the emergence of quantum phenomena such as scattering resonances in the cold collisions regime due to quantization of the intermolecular degrees of freedom. Although these states have been shown to be sensitive to interaction details, the effect of anisotropy on quantum resonances has eluded experimental observation so far. Here, we directly measure the anisotropy in atom-molecule interactions via quantum resonances by changing the quantum state of the internal molecular rotor. We observe that a quantum scattering resonance at a collision energy of $k_B$ x 270 mK appears in the Penning ionization of molecular hydrogen with metastable helium only if the molecule is rotationally excited. We use state of the art ab initio and ...

  10. Statistical analysis in search for anisotropies for the observed UHECRs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Soumavo

    2012-07-01

    Cosmic accelerators produce particles with energies in a wide range (PeV to EeV, 1 PeV ˜ 10-15 eV, 1 EeV ˜ 10-18 eV) . The energy spectrum follows three power laws like a ` leg' structure of which the `knee' part ( ˜ 3 PeV) is of Galactic origin, the `ankle' part is unassociated with Glaxy and the highest energy source above the ankle shows evidence for extragalactic origin. In the present work various cross correlation functions are studied between the samples of observed UHECRs and and the catalogue of nearby galaxies to search for anisotropies , if any, in the arrival directions of UHECRs for identifying their possible sources. The robustness of the functions are studies through many random realizations of the original samples under considerations. Similar procedure is followed for catalogues also for comparison.

  11. Anisotropy in Fracking: A Percolation Model for Observed Microseismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. Quinn; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (fracking), using high pressures and a low viscosity fluid, allow the extraction of large quantiles of oil and gas from very low permeability shale formations. The initial production of oil and gas at depth leads to high pressures and an extensive distribution of natural fractures which reduce the pressures. With time these fractures heal, sealing the remaining oil and gas in place. High volume fracking opens the healed fractures allowing the oil and gas to flow to horizontal production wells. We model the injection process using invasion percolation. We use a 2D square lattice of bonds to model the sealed natural fractures. The bonds are assigned random strengths and the fluid, injected at a point, opens the weakest bond adjacent to the growing cluster of opened bonds. Our model exhibits burst dynamics in which the clusters extend rapidly into regions with weak bonds. We associate these bursts with the microseismic activity generated by fracking injections. A principal object of this paper is to study the role of anisotropic stress distributions. Bonds in the y-direction are assigned higher random strengths than bonds in the x-direction. We illustrate the spatial distribution of clusters and the spatial distribution of bursts (small earthquakes) for several degrees of anisotropy. The results are compared with observed distributions of microseismicity in a fracking injection. Both our bursts and the observed microseismicity satisfy Gutenberg-Richter frequency-size statistics.

  12. Observations of the anisotropy of cosmic rays at TeV-PeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    BenZvi, S.

    2014-07-01

    During the past decade, multiple observatories have reported significant observations of the anisotropy of cosmic rays in the TeV energy band. The anisotropy has been observed at large scales and small scales in both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. The source of the anisotropy is not well-understood, though both a galactic and a heliospheric origin have been suggested. We discuss recent observations of the shape and energy dependence of the anisotropy, with particular attention to measurements by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory in the Southern Hemisphere and the Milagro and High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatories in the Northern Hemisphere.

  13. On the Observation of the Cosmic Ray Anisotropy below 10$^{15}$ eV

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays is complementary to the study of their energy spectrum and chemical composition to understand their origin and propagation. It is also a tool to probe the structure of the magnetic fields through which cosmic rays travel. As cosmic rays are mostly charged nuclei, their trajectories are deflected by the action of galactic magnetic field they propagate through before reaching the Earth atmosphere, so that their detection carries directional information only up to distances as large as their gyro-radius. If cosmic rays below $10^{15}{\\rm\\,eV}$ are considered and the local galactic magnetic field ($\\sim3{\\rm\\,\\mu G}$) is accounted for, gyro-radii are so short that isotropy is expected. At most, a weak di-polar distribution may exist, reflecting the contribution of the closest CR sources. However, a number of experiments observed an energy-dependent \\emph{"large scale"} anisotropy in the sidereal time frame with an amplitude of about 10$^{-4...

  14. PROBING THE EPOCH OF PRE-REIONIZATION BY CROSS-CORRELATING COSMIC MICROWAVE AND INFRARED BACKGROUND ANISOTROPIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atrio-Barandela, F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Kashlinsky, A., E-mail: atrio@usal.es, E-mail: Alexander.Kashlinsky@nasa.gov [Observational Cosmology Lab, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 665, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-12-20

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the cosmic infrared background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from Euclid, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies, can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined, CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space- and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky Euclid CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales ∼5'-60' with signal-to-noise ratios (S/Ns) of up to S/N ∼ 4-8 depending on the contribution to the Thomson optical depth during those pre-reionization epochs (Δτ ≅ 0.05) and the temperature of the IGM (up to ∼10{sup 4} K). Such a measurement would offer a new window to explore the emergence and physical properties of these first light sources.

  15. Probing the epoch of pre-reionization by cross-correlating cosmic microwave and infrared background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Atrio-Barandela, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    The epoch of first star formation and the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at that time are not directly observable with current telescopes. The radiation from those early sources is now part of the Cosmic Infrared Background (CIB) and, as these sources ionize the gas around them, the IGM plasma would produce faint temperature anisotropies in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) via the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (TSZ) effect. While these TSZ anisotropies are too faint to be detected, we show that the cross-correlation of maps of source-subtracted CIB fluctuations from {\\it Euclid}, with suitably constructed microwave maps at different frequencies can probe the physical state of the gas during reionization and test/constrain models of the early CIB sources. We identify the frequency-combined CMB-subtracted microwave maps from space and ground-based instruments to show that they can be cross-correlated with the forthcoming all-sky {\\it Euclid} CIB maps to detect the cross-power at scales $\\sim 5'-60'$ w...

  16. Lipidic Carbo-benzenes: Molecular Probes of Magnetic Anisotropy and Stacking Properties of α-Graphyne.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chongwei; Rives, Arnaud; Duhayon, Carine; Maraval, Valérie; Chauvin, Remi

    2017-01-20

    Solubilization of the C18 fundamental circuit of α-graphyne has been envisaged by decoration with aliphatic chains R = n-CnH2n+1. The synthesis and characterization of p-dialkyl-tetraphenyl-carbo-benzenes (n = 2, 8, 14, 20) are thus presented and compared to the monoalkyl series produced concomitantly. In both series, a dramatic enhancement of solubility in organic solvents (CH2Cl2, CHCl3) is observed for n ≥ 8, and in the dialkyl series, the melting-decomposition temperature of the solid products is shown to decrease linearly from 208 °C for n = 2 to 149 °C for n = 20. Fluoroalkyl analogues with R = n-C8H4F13 are also described. The products display classical UV-vis electronic spectra of carbo-benzenes in solution (λmax = 445.5 ± 1 nm, ε ≈ 200 000 L·mol(-1)·cm(-1)). They are also characterized by UV-vis absorption in the solid state, which is found to be correlated with the color and crystal packing. The methylene groups of R provide an experimental probe of the magnetic anisotropy and aromaticity of the C18 ring through the progressive NMR shielding of the (1)H nuclei from ca. 4.70 to 1.25 ppm going away from the border of the ring (as far as 8 Å away). All alkyl-carbo-benzenes were also found to be highly crystalline. Seven of them have been characterized by X-ray diffraction analysis and the C18 columnar packing compared in a systematic manner. Crystals of the diethyl and bistetradecyl derivatives, containing no solvent molecule, provided the first examples of direct π-stacking of carbo-benzene rings, with inter-ring distances very close to calculated interlayer distances in AB and ABC α-graphityne (3.255 and 3.206 Å vs 3.266 and 3.201 Å, respectively).

  17. Application of Monte-Carlo Analyses for the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarch, Michael A.; Rohrbaugh, David; Schiff, Conrad; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is the third launch in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) a Medium Class Explorers (MIDEX) program. MAP will measure, in greater detail, the cosmic microwave background radiation from an orbit about the Sun-Earth-Moon L2 Lagrangian point. Maneuvers will be required to transition MAP from it's initial highly elliptical orbit to a lunar encounter which will provide the remaining energy to send MAP out to a lissajous orbit about L2. Monte-Carlo analysis methods were used to evaluate the potential maneuver error sources and determine their effect of the fixed MAP propellant budget. This paper will discuss the results of the analyses on three separate phases of the MAP mission - recovering from launch vehicle errors, responding to phasing loop maneuver errors, and evaluating the effect of maneuver execution errors and orbit determination errors on stationkeeping maneuvers at L2.

  18. The Maneuver Planning Process for the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesarch, Michael A.; Andrews, Stephen F.; Bauer, Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission utilized a strategy combining highly eccentric phasing loops with a lunar gravity assist to provide a zero-cost insertion into a Lissajous orbit about the Sun-Earth/Moon L2 point. Maneuvers were executed at the phasing loop perigees to correct for launch vehicle errors and to target the lunar gravity assist so that a suitable orbit at L2 was achieved. This paper will discuss the maneuver planning process for designing, verifying, and executing MAP's maneuvers. This paper will also describe how commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tools were used to execute these tasks and produce a command sequence ready for upload to the spacecraft. These COTS tools included Satellite Tool Kit, MATLAB, and Matrix-X.

  19. Reproducing the observed Cosmic microwave background anisotropies with causal scaling seeds

    OpenAIRE

    Durrer, R.; Kunz, M.; Melchiorri, A.

    2000-01-01

    During the last years it has become clear that global O(N) defects and U(1) cosmic strings do not lead to the pronounced first acoustic peak in the power spectrum of anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background which has recently been observed to high accuracy. Inflationary models cannot easily accommodate the low second peak indicated by the data. Here we construct causal scaling seed models which reproduce the first and second peak. Future, more precise CMB anisotropy and polarization ex...

  20. Characterization of Residual Stresses in Ferrous Components by Magnetic Anisotropy Measurements Using a Hall Effect Sensor Array Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, C. C. H.

    2011-06-01

    A new surface sensor probe comprising an angular array of Hall effect sensors has been developed for characterization of residual stresses in ferrous materials by means of stress-induced magnetic anisotropy measurements. The sensor probe applies a radially spreading ac magnetic field to a test sample, and detects stray fields in different directions simultaneously to determine the principal stress axes. In situ measurements were conducted on a annealed steel plate under four-point bending stresses to evaluate the probe performance. The ratio of stray field signals measured along and perpendicular to the stress axis varies linearly with the surface stress, indicating the possibility of characterizing residual stresses in ferrous components using the sensor array probe.

  1. Observation of uniaxial anisotropy along the [100] direction in crystalline Fe film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bac, Seul-Ki; Lee, Hakjoon; Lee, Sangyoep; Choi, Seonghoon; Yoo, Taehee; Lee, Sanghoon; Liu, X.; Furdyna, J. K.

    2015-12-01

    We report an observation of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy along the [100] crystallographic direction in crystalline Fe film grown on Ge buffers deposited on a (001) GaAs substrate. As expected, planar Hall resistance (PHR) measurements reveal the presence of four in-plane magnetic easy axes, indicating the dominance of the cubic anisotropy in the film. However, systematic mapping of the PHR hysteresis loops observed during magnetization reversal at different field orientations shows that the easy axes along the and are not equivalent. Such breaking of the cubic symmetry can only be ascribed to the presence of uniaxial anisotropy along the direction of the Fe film. Analysis of the PHR data measured as a function of orientation of the applied magnetic field allowed us to quantify the magnitude of this uniaxial anisotropy field as Oe. Although this value is only 1.5% of cubic anisotropy field, its presence significantly changes the process of magnetization reversal, revealing the important role of the uniaxial anisotropy in Fe films. Breaking of the cubic symmetry in the Fe film deposited on a Ge buffer is surprising, and we discuss possible reason for this unexpected behavior.

  2. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background as a Probe of its Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Miniati, Francesco; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-01-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB), at the level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter from a few tens of arcmin to several degree scales, together with complementary GLAST observations of gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters and the blazars luminosity function, can discriminate between a background that originates from unresolved blazars or cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks.

  3. Reproducing the observed Cosmic microwave background anisotropies with causal scaling seeds

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Melchiorri, A; Durrer, {R.

    2001-01-01

    During the last years it has become clear that global O(N) defects and U(1) cosmic strings do not lead to the pronounced first acoustic peak in the power spectrum of anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background which has recently been observed to high accuracy. Inflationary models cannot easily accommodate the low second peak indicated by the data. Here we construct causal scaling seed models which reproduce the first and second peak. Future, more precise CMB anisotropy and polarization experiments will however be able to distinguish them from the ordinary adiabatic models.

  4. Holographic Phase Transition Probed by Nonlocal Observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Xiong Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available From the viewpoint of holography, the phase structure of a 5-dimensional Reissner-Nordström-AdS black hole is probed by the two-point correlation function, Wilson loop, and entanglement entropy. As the case of thermal entropy, we find for all the probes that the black hole undergoes a Hawking-Page phase transition, a first-order phase transition, and a second-order phase transition successively before it reaches a stable phase. In addition, for these probes, we find that the equal area law for the first-order phase transition is valid always and the critical exponent of the heat capacity for the second-order phase transition coincides with that of the mean field theory regardless of the size of the boundary region.

  5. Space-time anisotropy: theoretical issues and the possibility of an observational test

    CERN Document Server

    , Sergey; Brinzei, Nicoleta

    2008-01-01

    The specific astrophysical data collected during the last decade causes the need for the modification of the expression for the Einstein-Hilbert action, and several attempts sufficing this need are known. The modification suggested in this paper stems from the possible anisotropy of space-time and this means the natural change of the simplest scalar in the least action principle. To provide the testable support to this idea, the optic-metrical parametric resonance is regarded - an experiment on the galactic scale based on the interaction between the electromagnetic radiation of cosmic masers and periodical gravitational waves emitted by close double systems or pulsars. Since the effect depends on the space-time metric, the possible anisotropy could reveal itself through observations. To give the corresponding theory predicting the corrections to the expected results of the experiment, the specific mathematical formalism of Finsler geometry was chosen. It was found that in case the anisotropy of the space-time...

  6. Direct Observation of Magnetic Anisotropy in an Individual Fe4 Single-Molecule Magnet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burzuri, E.; Zyazin, A.S.; Cornia, A.; Van der Zant, H.S.J.

    2012-01-01

    We study three-terminal charge transport through individual Fe4 single-molecule magnets. Magnetic anisotropy of the single molecule is directly observed by introducing a spectroscopic technique based on measuring the position of the degeneracy point as a function of gate voltage and applied magnetic

  7. Cassini observations of ion cyclotron waves and ions anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, F. J.; Dols, V. J.; Cassidy, T. A.; Tokar, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    In Saturn's equatorial, inner magnetosphere, the production of fresh ions in a pick-up distribution generates ion cyclotron waves. These waves are a sensitive indicator of fresh plasma production, but the quantitative relation between wave properties and ionization rates is nontrivial. We present a combined analysis of Cassini MAG and CAPS data, from a variety of equatorial orbits between 2005 and 2012. Using the MAG data, we determine the amplitude and peak frequency of ion cyclotron waves. From the CAPS data we extract the parallel and perpendicular velocity distribution of water group ions. We compare these results with hybrid simulations of the ion cyclotron instability and relate the observed wave amplitudes and ion velocity distributions to the production rate of pickup ions. The resulting relation between wave and plasma properties will allow us to infer ion production rates even at times when no direct ion measurements are available.

  8. Transport anisotropy as a probe of the interstitial vortex state in superconductors with artificial pinning arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    We show using simulations that when interstitial vortices are present in superconductors with periodic pinning arrays, the transport in two perpendicular directions can be anisotropic. The degree of the anisotropy varies as a function of field due to the fact that the interstitial vortex lattice has distinct orderings at different matching fields. The anisotropy is most pronounced at the matching fields but persists at incommensurate fields, and it is most prominent for triangular, honeycomb, and kagome pinning arrays. Square pinning arrays can also show anisotropic transport at certain fields in spite of the fact that the perpendicular directions of the square pinning array are identical. We show that the anisotropy results from distinct vortex dynamical states and that although the critical depinning force may be lower in one direction, the vortex velocity above depinning may also be lower in the same direction for ranges of external drives where both directions are depinned. For honeycomb and kagome pinning arrays, the anisotropy can show multiple reversals as a function of field. We argue that when the pinning sites can be multiply occupied such that no interstitial vortices are present, the anisotropy is strongly reduced or absent.

  9. The Large Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as Observed with Milagro

    CERN Document Server

    Abdo, A A; Aune, T; Berley, D; Casanova, S; Chen, C; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Hoffman, C M; Hopper, B; Hüntemeyer, P H; Kolterman, B E; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Mincer, A I; Némethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2008-01-01

    Results are presented of a harmonic analysis of the large scale cosmic-ray anisotropy as observed by the Milagro observatory. We show a two-dimensional display of the sidereal anisotropy projections in right ascension generated by the fitting of three harmonics to 18 separate declination bands. The Milagro observatory is a water Cherenkov detector located in the Jemez mountains near Los Alamos, New Mexico. With a high duty cycle and large field-of-view, Milagro is an excellent instrument for measuring this anisotropy with high sensitivity at TeV energies. The analysis is conducted using a seven year data sample consisting of more than 95 billion events. We observe an anisotropy with a magnitude around 0.1% for cosmic rays with a median energy of 6 TeV. The dominant feature is a deficit region of depth (-2.85 +/- 0.06 stat. +/- 0.08 syst.)x10^(-3) in the direction of the Galactic North Pole with a range in declination of -10 to 45 degrees and 150 to 225 degrees in right ascension. We observe a steady increase ...

  10. Large-Scale Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy as a Probe of Interstellar Turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the large-scale cosmic-ray (CR) anisotropies predicted for a range of Goldreich-Sridhar (GS) and isotropic models of interstellar turbulence, and compare them with IceTop data. In general, the predicted CR anisotropy is not a pure dipole; the cold spots reported at 400 TeV and 2 PeV are consistent with a GS model that contains a smooth deficit of parallel-propagating waves and a broad resonance function, although some other possibilities cannot, as yet, be ruled out. In particula...

  11. Probing the Anisotropy of the Milky Way Gaseous Halo-II: sightline toward Mrk509

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Anjali; Krongold, Yair

    2016-01-01

    Hot, million degree gas appears to pervade the Milky way halo, containing a large fraction of the Galactic missing baryons. This circumgalactic medium (CGM) is probed effectively in X-rays, both in absorption and in emission. The CGM also appears to be anisotropic, so we have started a program to determine CGM properties along several sightlines by combining absorption and emission measurements. Here we present the emission measure close to the Mrk 509 sightline using new Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We also present new analysis and modeling of Chandra HETG spectra to constrain the absorption parameters. The emission measure in this sightline is high, EM$=0.0165\\pm0.0008\\pm0.0006~$cm$^{-6}~$pc, five times larger than the average. The observed OVII column density N(O$_{VII}) = 2.35\\pm0.4 \\times 10^{16}$cm$^{-2}$, however, is close to the average. We find that the temperature of the emitting and absorbing gas is the same: $\\log T (\\rm K) = 6.33\\pm0.01$ and $\\log T (\\rm K)=6.33\\pm0.16$ respectively. We fi...

  12. Spectra and anisotropy of magnetic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosheath: Cluster observations

    CERN Document Server

    Alexandrova, Olga; Mangeney, Andre

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the spectral shape, the anisotropy of the wave vector distributions and the anisotropy of the amplitudes of the magnetic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosheath within a broad range of frequencies. We present the first observations of a Kolmogorov-like inertial range of Alfvenic fluctuations in the magnetosheath flanks, below fci. In the vicinity of fci, a spectral break is observed, like in solar wind turbulence. Above the break, the energy of compressive and Alfvenic fluctuations generally follow a power law with a spectral index between -3 and -2. Concerning the anisotropy of the wave vector distribution, we observe a change in its nature in the vicinity of ion characteristic scales: if at MHD scales there is no evidence for a dominance of a slab (k||>kperp) or 2D (kperp>k||) turbulence, above the spectral break, (f>fci, kc/wpi>1) the 2D turbulence dominates. This 2D turbulence is observed in six selected one-hour intervals among which the average proton beta varies from 0.8 to 9. It is ob...

  13. Regional variation of inner core anisotropy from seismic normal mode observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuss, Arwen; Irving, Jessica C E; Woodhouse, John H

    2010-05-21

    Earth's solid inner core is surrounded by a convecting liquid outer core, creating the geodynamo driving the planet's magnetic field. Seismic studies using compressional body waves suggest hemispherical variation in the anisotropic structure of the inner core, but are poorly constrained because of limited earthquake and receiver distribution. Here, using normal mode splitting function measurements from large earthquakes, based on extended cross-coupling theory, we observe both regional variations and eastern versus western hemispherical anisotropy in the inner core. The similarity of this pattern with Earth's magnetic field suggests freezing-in of crystal alignment during solidification or texturing by Maxwell stress as origins of the anisotropy. These observations limit the amount of inner core super rotation, but would be consistent with oscillation.

  14. Observation of Cosmic Ray Anisotropy with the IceTop Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cru; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Clercq, C D; Ridder, S D; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Vries-Uiterweerd, G d; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Ha; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; Drift, D va de; Eijndhoven, N va; Overloop, A Va; Santen, J va; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report on the observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at PeV energies. The analysis is based on data taken between 2009 and 2012 with the IceTop air shower array at the South Pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10^-3 level can, for the first time, be extended to PeV energies. We divide the data set into two parts with median energies of 400 TeV and 2 PeV, respectively. In the low energy band, we observe a strong deficit with an angular size of about 30 degrees and an amplitude of (-1.58 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.52 (sys)) x 10^(-3) at a location consistent with previous observations of cosmic rays with the IceCube neutrino detector. The study of the high energy band shows that the anisotropy persists to PeV energies and increases in amplitude to (-3.11 +/- 0.38 (stat) +/- 0.96 (sys)) x 10^(-3).

  15. Cosmological observables, IR growth of fluctuations, and scale-dependent anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Giddings, Steven B

    2011-01-01

    We extend semiclassical methods in inflationary cosmology that capture leading IR corrections to correlators. Such large IR effects can be absorbed into a coordinate change when examining sufficiently local observables, but not when comparing observations at large separation in scales, such as seen by a late-time observer. The analysis is facilitated by definition of a scale-dependent metric and physical momentum. These assist definition of "IR-safe" observables seen by a post-inflationary observer, which are contrasted to those based on the local geometry of the reheating surface. For such observables, the observer's horizon provides an effective IR cutoff. IR growth contributes to enhanced statistical inhomogeneities/anisotropies at short scales, observation of which by a present day observer might be sought in 21 cm measurements. Such IR corrections are argued to grow large for a very late-time observer.

  16. Cosmological observables, IR growth of fluctuations, and scale-dependent anisotropies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    B. Giddings, Steven; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2011-01-01

    We extend semiclassical methods in inflationary cosmology that capture leading IR corrections to correlators. Such large IR effects can be absorbed into a coordinate change when examining sufficiently local observables, but not when comparing observations at large separation in scales, such as seen...... by a late-time observer. The analysis is facilitated by definition of a scale-dependent metric and physical momentum. These assist definition of "IR-safe" observables seen by a post-inflationary observer, which are contrasted to those based on the local geometry of the reheating surface....... For such observables, the observer's horizon provides an effective IR cutoff. IR growth contributes to enhanced statistical inhomogeneities/anisotropies at short scales, observation of which by a present day observer might be sought in 21 cm measurements. Such IR corrections are argued to grow large for a very late...

  17. Limits on Alpha Particle Temperature Anisotropy and Differential Flow from Kinetic Instabilities: Solar Wind Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Bourouaine, Sofiane; Chandran, Benjamin D G; Maruca, Bennett A; Kasper, Justin C

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the observed temperature anisotropies of protons and alpha particles in the solar wind are constrained by theoretical thresholds for pressure-anisotropy-driven instabilities such as the Alfv\\'en/ion-cyclotron (A/IC) and fast-magnetosonic/whistler (FM/W) instabilities. In this letter, we use a long period of in-situ measurements provided by the {\\em Wind} spacecraft's Faraday cups to investigate the combined constraint on the alpha-proton differential flow velocity and the alpha-particle temperature anisotropy due to A/IC and FM/W instabilities. We show that the majority of the data are constrained to lie within the region of parameter space in which A/IC and FM/W waves are either stable or have extremely low growth rates. In the minority of observed cases in which the growth rate of the A/IC (FM/W) instability is comparatively large, we find relatively higher values of $T_{\\perp\\alpha}/T_{\\perp p}$ ($T_{\\parallel\\alpha}/T_{\\parallel p}$) when alpha-proton differential flow vel...

  18. Probing the Light Speed Anisotropy with respect to the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation Dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Gurzadyan, V G; Kashin, A L; Margarian, A T; Bartalini, O; Bellini, V; Castoldi, M; D'Angelo, A; Didelez, J P; Salvo, R D; Fantini, A; Gervino, G; Ghio, F; Girolami, B; Giusa, A; Hourany, E; Knyazyan, S; Kuznetsov, V E; Lapik, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Llères, A; Mehrabyan, S S; Moricciani, D; Nedorezov, V; Perrin, C; Rebreyend, D; Russo, G; Rudnev, N; Schärf, C; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, M C; Turinge, A

    2005-01-01

    We have studied the angular fluctuations in the speed of light with respect to the apex of the dipole of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) radiation using the experimental data obtained with GRAAL facility, located at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) in Grenoble. The measurements were based on the stability of the Compton edge of laser photons scattered on the 6 GeV monochromatic electron beam. The results enable to obtain a conservative constraint on the anisotropy in the light speed variations \\Delta c(\\theta)/c < 3 10^{-12}, i.e. with higher precision than from previous experiments.

  19. Ultrafast magneto-photocurrents as probe of anisotropy relaxation in GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Christian B; Pierz, Klaus; Bieler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We induce ultrafast photocurrents in a GaAs crystal exposed to a magnetic field by optical femtosecond excitation. The magneto-photocurrents are studied by time-resolved detection of the simultaneously emitted THz radiation. We find that their dynamics differ considerably from the dynamics of other photocurrents which are expected to follow the temporal shape of the optical intensity. We attribute this difference to the influence of carrier-anisotropy relaxation on the magneto-photocurrents. Our measurements show that the anisotropy relaxation for carrier densities ranging between $10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $5 \\times 10^{17}$ cm$^{-3}$ occurs on two different time scales. While the slow time constant is approximately 100 fs long and most likely governed by electron-phonon scattering, the fast time constant is on the order of 10 fs and presumably linked to the valence band. Our studies not only help to better understand the microscopic origins of optically induced currents but - being even more important - show t...

  20. Agyrotropy: An Observable Probe of Magnetic Topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scudder, J.; Daughton, W.; Karimabadi, H.

    2007-05-01

    Claims for traversal of magnetic separatrices and electron diffusion region transits are many, though few, if any, are theoretically certain. The reason for this on the edge of the MMS era is that there is no clearly agreed upon observable for this type of identification that has a theoretical basis. All too often data signatures are interpreted as, or circularly defined to be, those of the magnetic separatrices or the electron diffusion region. Examples of such identifications are a burst of electric field noise, parallel electric fields, heat flux layers, or "bursts" of energetic particles. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss an observable, electron agyrotropy, that agilely illuminates the boundaries of magnetic topology. For this study fully kinetic simulations of reconnecting layers have been used with open boundary conditions including guide and anti-parallel geometries and multiple island equilibria. Unlike observations, the actual magnetic topology in the simulations can be determined using the vector potential; the same simulation run can be used to compute the observable electron agyrotropy from the pressure tensor of the PIC particles in the code. In this way the patterns of agyrotropy are demonstrated to "paint" the mathematical separatrices of the vector potential. Even in time dependent geometries the electron agyrotropy provides a clear indication of the location of such layers. Since non-zero agyrotropy reflects an electron distribution that is not cylindrically symmetrical about the magnetic field direction, its detection would be a strong local signature that unusually thin layers are being traversed. Because these layers are structured in space, they can support electric fields from the off diagonal elements of the pressure tensor of the type required to explain collisionless magnetic reconnection. As it is a local measurement, the pattern of agyrotropy can be found by orchestrating simultaneous independent measurements using an array

  1. Heat assisted magnetic probe recording onto a thin film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onoue, T.; Siekman, M.H.; Abelmann, L.; Lodder, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of magnetic probe recording into a continuous perpendicular medium is discussed. By applying a current from the tip to the medium, a very localized area can be heated and bits as small as 80 nm in diameter could be written. This value is close to the calculated minimum diameter of re

  2. Bidirectional electron anisotropies in the distant tail - ISEE 3 observations of polar rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Gosling, J. T.; Zwickl, R. D.; Slavin, J. A.; Smith, E. J.

    1987-01-01

    A detailed observational treatment of bidirectional electrons (50 approx. 500 eV) in the distant magnetotail (or greater than or equal to 100 R sub E) is presented. It is found that electrons in this energy range commonly exhibit strong, field aligned anisotropies in the tail lobes. Because of large tail motions, the ISEE-3 data provide extensive sampling of both the north and south lobes in rapid succession, demonstrating directly the strong asymetries that exist between the north and south lobes at any one time. The bidirectional fluxes are found to occur predominantly in the lobe directy connected to the sunward IMF in the open magnetosphere model (north lobe for away sectors and south lobe for toward sectors). Electron anisotropy and magnetic field data are presented which show the transition from unidirectional (sheath) electron populations to bidirectional (lobe) populations. Taken together, the present evidence suggests that the bidirectional electrons that we observe in the distant tail are closely related to the Polar rain electrons observed previously at lower altitudes. Furthermore, these data provide strong evidence that the distant tail is comprised largely of open magnetic field lines in contra distinction to some recently advanced models.

  3. Bidirectional electron anisotropies in the distant tail: ISEE-3 observations of polar rain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.N.; Bame, S.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Gosling, J.T.; Zwickl, R.D.; Slavin, J.A.; Smith, E.J.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed observational treatment of bidirectional electrons (50 approx.500 eV) in the distant magnetotail (r greater than or equal to 100 R/sub E/) is presented. It is found that electrons in this energy range commonly exhibit strong, field-aligned anisotropies in the tail lobes. Because of large tail motions, the ISEE-3 data provide extensive sampling of both the north and south lobes in rapid succession, demonstrating directly the strong asymmetries that exist between the north and south lobes at any one time. The bidirectional fluxes are found to occur predominantly in the lobe directly connected to the sunward IMF in the open magnetosphere model (north lobe for away sectors and south lobe for toward sectors). Electron anisotropy and magnetic field data are presented which show the transition from unidirectional (sheath) electron populations to bidirectional (lobe) populations. Taken together, the present evidence suggests that the bidirectional electrons that we observe in the distant tail are closely related to the polar rain electrons observed previously at lower altitudes. Furthermore, these data provide strong evidence that the distant tail is comprised largely of open magnetic field lines in contradistinction to some recently advanced models.

  4. POLAR spacecraft observations of helium ion angular anisotropy in the Earth's radiation belts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. N. Spjeldvik

    Full Text Available New observations of energetic helium ion fluxes in the Earth's radiation belts have been obtained with the CAMMICE/HIT instrument on the ISTP/GGS POLAR spacecraft during the extended geomagnetically low activity period April through October 1996. POLAR executes a high inclination trajectory that crosses over both polar cap regions and passes over the geomagnetic equator in the heart of the radiation belts. The latter attribute makes possible direct observations of nearly the full equatorial helium ion pitch angle distributions in the heart of the Earth's radiation belt region. Additionally, the spacecraft often re-encounters the same geomagnetic flux tube at a substantially off-equatorial location within a few tens of minutes prior to or after the equatorial crossing. This makes both the equatorial pitch angle distribution and an expanded view of the local off-equatorial pitch angle distribution observable. The orbit of POLAR also permitted observations to be made in conjugate magnetic local time sectors over the course of the same day, and this afforded direct comparison of observations on diametrically opposite locations in the Earth's radiation belt region at closely spaced times. Results from four helium ion data channels covering ion kinetic energies from 520 to 8200 KeV show that the distributions display trapped particle characteristics with angular flux peaks for equatorially mirroring particles as one might reasonably expect. However, the helium ion pitch angle distributions generally flattened out for equatorial pitch angles below about 45°. Significant and systematic helium ion anisotropy difference at conjugate magnetic local time were also observed, and we report quiet time azimuthal variations of the anisotropy index.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (energetic particles · trapped; magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; plasmasphere

  5. Carrier-phonon interactions in hybrid halide perovskites probed with ultrafast anisotropy studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivett, Jasmine P. H.; Richter, Johannes M.; Price, Michael B.; Credgington, Dan; Deschler, Felix

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid halide perovskites are at the frontier of optoelectronic research due to their excellent semiconductor properties and solution processability. For this reason, much attention has recently been focused on understanding photoexcited charge-carrier generation and recombination in these materials. Conversely, very few studies have so far been devoted to understanding carrier-carrier and carrier-phonon scattering mechanisms in these materials. This is surprising given that carrier scattering mechanisms fundamentally limit charge-carrier motilities and therefore the performance of photovoltaic devices. We apply linear polarization selective transient absorption measurements to polycrystalline CH3NH3PbBr3 hybrid halide perovskite films as an effective way of studying the scattering processes in these materials. Comparison of the photo induced bleach signals obtained when the linear polarizations of the pump and probe are aligned either parallel or perpendicular to one another, reveal a significant difference in spectral intensity and shape within the first few hundred femtoseconds after photoexcitation.

  6. Size-dependent ligand layer dynamics in semiconductor nanocrystals probed by anisotropy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadar, Ido; Abir, Tsafrir; Halivni, Shira; Faust, Adam; Banin, Uri

    2015-10-12

    Colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NC) have reached a high level of synthetic control allowing the tuning of their properties, and their use in various applications. However, the surface of NCs and in particular their size-dependent capping organic ligand behavior, which play an important role in the NC synthesis, dispersibility, and optoelectronic properties, is still not well understood. We study the size-dependent properties of the ligand shell on the surface of NCs, by embedding surface bound dyes as a probe within the ligand shell. The reorientation times for these dyes show a linear dependence on the NC surface curvature indicating size-dependent change in viscosity, which is related to a change in the density of the ligand layer because of the geometry of the surface, a unique feature of NCs. Understanding the properties of the ligand shell will allow rational design of the surface to achieve the desired properties, providing an additional important knob for tuning their functionality.

  7. Observation of Optical Solitons and Abnormal Modulation Instability in Liquid Crystals with Negative Dielectric Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Junzhu; Liu, Jinlong; Wang, Zhuo; Li, Yiheng; Guo, Qi; Hu, Wei; Xuan, Li

    2015-01-01

    We investigate theoretically and experimentally the optical beam propagation in the nematic liquid crystal with negative dielectric anisotropy, which is aligned homeotropically in a $80\\mu m$-thickness planar cell in the presence of an externally voltage. It is predicted that the nonlocal nonlinearity of liquid crystal undergo an oscillatory response function with a negative nonlinear refractive index coefficient. We found that the oscillatory nonlocal nonlinearity can support stable bright solitons, which are observed in experiment. We also found that abnormal modulation instability occurs with infinity gain coefficient at a fixed spatial frequency, which is no depend on the beam intensity. We observed the modulation instability in the liquid crystal at a very low intensity ($0.26W/cm^2$), and the maximum gain frequency were found kept unchange when beam power changes over 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  8. Temporal and Spatial Turbulent Spectra of MHD Plasma and an Observation of Variance Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffner, D A; Lukin, V S

    2014-01-01

    The nature of MHD turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparison amongst magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor Hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed as well as the role laboratory experiment can play in understanding turbulence typica...

  9. Planar current anisotropy and field dependence of J c in coated conductors assessed by scanning Hall probe microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, M.; Hecher, J.; Sieger, M.; Pahlke, P.; Bauer, M.; Hühne, R.; Eisterer, M.

    2017-02-01

    The local distribution of the critical current density, J c, of coated conductors and YBa2Cu3O{}7-δ (YBCO) films on single crystalline substrate was investigated by scanning Hall probe microscopy. The high spatial resolution of the measurements enabled an assessment of dependence of the local J c on the local magnetic induction, B, and electric field, E. The derived J c(B)-dependence agreed well with the global J c obtained from magnetization loops and provided values of J c at very low fields, which are inaccessible to magnetization and transport measurements. The anisotropic current flow within the film plane was investigated in YBCO films on miscut SrTiO3 substrates and a GdBa2Cu3O{}7-δ film on an MgO buffer layer prepared by inclined substrate deposition on a Hastelloy substrate. The c-axis currents calculated from the Hall maps were significantly larger than previously reported data obtained from direct transport measurements. The planar current anisotropy at 77 K was found to be highly influenced by the microstructure which can either deteriorate the current flowing across the ab-planes or cause enhanced pinning and increase the critical current flowing parallel to the ab-planes.

  10. Heat-assisted magnetic probe recording onto a thin film with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onoue, T; Siekman, M; Abelmann, L; Lodder, J C [Systems and Materials for Information storage (SMI), MESA Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, PO Box 217, 7500 AE, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2008-08-07

    The possibility of magnetic probe recording into a continuous perpendicular medium is discussed. By applying a current from the tip to the medium, a very localized area can be heated and bits as small as 80 nm in diameter could be written. This value is close to the calculated minimum diameter of reversed cylindrical domains in our perpendicular medium. A current can be injected directly from the tip to the medium by means of a current source, or one can use capacitive currents. We prefer the first method, since the current, and therefore the heating process, can be controlled more precisely. The energy required to write a bit is in the order of 1 nJ. Calculations show that most of the heat is dissipated at the tip end. Demagnetizing fields of the surrounding material play an important role and are so strong that bits can be written without applying an external field. By decreasing the film thickness, the demagnetizing fields are reduced, and selective overwriting of previously written bits could be demonstrated.

  11. Spectra and anisotropy of magnetic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosheath: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Alexandrova

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spectral shape, the anisotropy of the wave vector distributions and the anisotropy of the amplitudes of the magnetic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosheath within a broad range of frequencies [10−3, 10] Hz which corresponds to spatial scales from ~10 to 105 km. We present the first observations of a Kolmogorov-like inertial range of Alfvénic fluctuations δB2}~f−5/3 in the magnetosheath flanks, below the ion cyclotron frequency fci. In the vicinity of fci, a spectral break is observed, like in solar wind turbulence. Above the break, the energy of compressive and Alfvénic fluctuations generally follows a power law with a spectral index between −3 and −2. Concerning the anisotropy of the wave vector distribution, we observe a clear change in its nature in the vicinity of ion characteristic scales: if at MHD scales there is no evidence for a dominance of a slab (kł>>k or 2-D (k>>kł turbulence, above the spectral break, (f>fci, kcpi>1 the 2-D turbulence dominates. This 2-D turbulence is observed in six selected one-hour intervals among which the average ion β varies from 0.8 to 10. It is observed for both the transverse and compressive magnetic fluctuations, independently on the presence of linearly unstable modes at low frequencies or Alfvén vortices at the spectral break. We then analyse the anisotropy of the magnetic fluctuations in a time dependent reference frame based on the field B and the flow velocity V directions. Within the range of the 2-D turbulence, at scales [1,30]kcpi, and for any β we find that the magnetic fluctuations at a given frequency in the plane perpendicular to B have more energy along the

  12. Low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies and their relation to transient interplanetary magnetic structures: ISEE-3 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, R. G.; Sanderson, T. R.; Wenzel, K. P.; Smith, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is known that the interplanetary medium in the period approaching solar maximum is characterized by an enhancement in the occurrence of transient solar wind streams and shocks and that such systems are often associated with looplike magnetic structures or clouds. There is observational evidence that bidirectional, field aligned flows of low energy particles could be a signature of such looplike structures, although detailed models for the magnetic field configuration and injection mechanisms do not exist at the current time. Preliminary results of a survey of low energy proton bidirectional anisotropies measured on ISEE-3 in the interplanetary medium between August 1978 and May 1982, together with magnetic field data from the same spacecraft are presented.

  13. Mechanical Anisotropy and Pressure Induced Structural Changes in Piroxicam Crystals Probed by In Situ Indentation and Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manimunda, Praveena; Hintsala, Eric; Asif, Syed; Mishra, Manish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The ability to correlate mechanical and chemical characterization techniques in real time is both lacking and powerful tool for gaining insights into material behavior. This is demonstrated through use of a novel nanoindentation device equipped with Raman spectroscopy to explore the deformation-induced structural changes in piroxicam crystals. Mechanical anisotropy was observed in two major faces ( 0bar{1}1 ) and (011), which are correlated to changes in the interlayer interaction from in situ Raman spectra recorded during indentation. The results of this study demonstrate the considerable potential of an in situ Raman nanoindentation instrument for studying a variety of topics, including stress-induced phase transformation mechanisms, mechanochemistry, and solid state reactivity under mechanical forces that occur in molecular and pharmaceutical solids.

  14. Implications of primordial power spectra with statistical anisotropy on CMB temperature fluctuation and polarizations

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe

    2013-01-01

    Both the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and Planck observations reported the hemispherical asymmetry of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature fluctuation. The hemispherical asymmetry might be stemmed from the primordial statistical anisotropy during the inflationary era of the universe. In this paper, we study possible implications of the primordial power spectra with dipolar anisotropy on the CMB temperature fluctuation and polarizations. We explicitly show that the statistical dipolar anisotropy may induce the off-diagonal (\\(\\ell'\

  15. The effect of asymmetric beams in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Wehus, Ingunn Kathrine; Eriksen, H K; Groeneboom, Nicolaas E

    2009-01-01

    We generate simulations of the CMB temperature field as observed by the WMAP satellite, taking into account the detailed shape of the asymmetric beams and scanning strategy of the experiment, and use these to re-estimate the WMAP beam transfer functions. This method avoids the need of artificially symmetrizing the beams, as done in the baseline WMAP approach, and instead measures the total convolution effect by direct simulation. We find noticeable differences with respect to the nominal transfer functions. For instance, the nominal V1 beam under-estimates the full beam convolution by ~0.5% at l=500 and ~1.0% at l=800. Similar differences are seen for other DA's. This in turn implies that the high-l power spectrum is biased low by 1-2%, effectively tilting the spectrum slightly. Re-estimating cosmological parameters we find that the spectral index of scalar perturbations is n_s = 0.969 +- 0.014 after correcting for this effect, corresponding to a positive shift of 0.3 sigma compared to the previously released...

  16. Probing new CP violating observables in D meson decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yong-Feng; Kang, Xian-Wei

    2016-08-01

    CP violation in the charm quark sector has not been examined very well as the case for strange and beauty ones. Some novel insights into the issue on the CP violation in D meson decay are discussed. Specifically, i) the T-violating observables in D → VV decays are constructed. Assuming CPT invariance T violation implies CP violation. This is a new idea and an alternative way for probing CP violation in D decays; ii) the decay of quantum correlated DD̅ pair to vector mesons (denoted by V) is explored, which offers the new CP violating observables that have not been noticed before;

  17. Direct observation of dendritic domain growth in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy CoFe/Pt multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Haoliang [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); He Wei, E-mail: hewei@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Du Haifeng; Wu Qiong; Fang Yapeng [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhu Yun [College of Physics and Electronic Information Science, Tianjin Normal University, Tianjin 300387 (China); Cai Jianwang [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cheng Zhaohua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2011-09-15

    We present the experimental results on thermally activated magnetization reversal for [Co{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}(5.0 A)/Pt(20 A)]{sub 4} multilayer. Direct domain observations show that magnetization reversal is initiated with rare nucleation and followed by dendritic growth of domain walls. Based on macroscopic magnetic parameters from experimental data, the dendritic domain growth mode is qualitatively interpreted by Monte Carlo simulations in terms of a simple uniaxial magnetic anisotropy model. Moreover, both time evolution of domain growth observation and magnetic relaxation measurements reveal that CoFe/Pt multilayer has a relatively large activation volume compared with Co/Pt multilayers. - Highlights: > We investigate magnetization reversal of [Co{sub 0.9}Fe{sub 0.1}(5.0 A)/Pt(20 A)]{sub 4} multilayer. > Magnetization reversal is governed by thermally activated mechanism. > Magnetic domains evolve in dendritic domain growth mode. > Relatively large activation volume is obtained for the multilayer. > Monte Carlo simulation reproduces the domain growth mode well.

  18. Generation and effects of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes on 18 March 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Saikin, A.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Geoffrey, R.; Smith, C. W.; Torbert, R. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play a crucial role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. The free energy for EMIC wave generation is usually provided by the temperature anisotropy of the energetic ring current ions. EMIC waves can in turn cause particle energization and losses through resonant wave-particle interactions. Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated plasma conditions observed on 18 March 2013. From 0204 to 0211 UT, the Van Allen Probe-B detected He+-band EMIC wave activity in the post-midnight sector (MLT=4.6-4.9) at very low L-shells (L=2.6-2.9). The event occurred right outside the inward-pushed plasmapause in the early recovery phase of an intense geomagnetic storm - min. Dst = -132 nT at 2100 UT on 17 March 2013. During this event, the fluxes of energetic (> 1 keV), anisotropic O+ dominate both the H+ and He+ fluxes in this energy range. Meanwhile, O+ fluxes at low energies (coefficient (Dαα) of the EMIC wave packets by using nominal ion composition, derived total ion density from the frequencies of upper hybrid resonance, and measured ambient and wave magnetic field. EMIC wave growth rates are also calculated to evaluate the role of loss-cone distributed ring current ions in the EMIC wave generation.

  19. Observation of an Anisotropy in the Galactic Cosmic Ray arrival direction at 400 TeV with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Allen, M M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, C C; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic ray induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between May 2009 and May 2010. The data include a total of 33$\\times 10^{9}$ muon events with a median angular resolution of $\\sim3^{\\circ}$ degrees. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high energy skymap shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3$\\sigma$. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  20. Van Allen Probes observations of EMIC events triggered by solar wind dynamic pressure enhancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. Y.; Cho, J.; Roh, S. J.; Shin, D. K.; Hwang, J.; Kim, K. C.; Choi, C.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.; Larsen, B.; Skoug, R. M.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are one of the key plasma waves that can affect charged particle dynamics in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. One of the generation mechanisms of EMIC waves has long been known to be due to magnetospheric compression due to impact by enhanced solar wind dynamic pressure Pdyn. With the Van Allen Probes observations, we have identified 4 EMIC wave events that are triggered by Pdyn enhancements under northward IMF, prolonged quiet time conditions. We find the following features of the EMIC events. (1) They are triggered immediately at the Pdyn impact and remain active during the same period as the enhanced Pdyn duration. (2) They occur in either H band or He band or both. (3) Two events occur inside the plasmasphere and the other two outside the plasmasphere. (4) The wave polarization, either R or L, are highly elliptical, being close to be linear. (5) The wave normal angles are quite large, well away from being field-aligned. (6) About 10 - 50 keV proton fluxes indicate enhanced flux state with ~90 deg-peaked anisotropy in velocity distribution after the Pdyn impact. (7) From low altitude NOAA POES satellite observations of particles we find no obvious evidence for relativistic electron precipitation due to these Pdyn-triggered EMIC events. We will discuss implications of these observations on wave generation mechanism and interaction with radiation belt electrons.

  1. Momentum Imbalance Observables as a Probe of Gluon TMDs

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    The unpolarized and linearly polarized gluon TMDs can be directly probed in heavy quark and jet pair production in unpolarized electron-proton collisions by looking at observables, like transverse momentum distributions and azimuthal asymmetries, depending on the momentum imbalance of the pair. Analytical expressions are presented for these observables and for analogous ones in Higgs plus jet and quarkonium plus photon production in unpolarized proton-proton scattering experiments. It is shown how the proposed measurements, to be performed at a future EIC and at the LHC, could provide important information on the size and shape of gluon TMDs, as well as on other fundamental properties such as their process and energy scale dependences.

  2. Observation of Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    CERN Document Server

    BenZvi, S Y; Westerhoff, S

    2015-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, located 4100 m above sea level near Sierra Negra (19$^\\circ$ N) in Mexico, is sensitive to gamma rays and cosmic rays at TeV energies. The arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at these energies shows significant anisotropy on several angular scales, with a relative intensity ranging between 10$^{-3}$ and 10$^{-4}$. We present the results of a study of cosmic-ray anisotropy based on more than 86 billion cosmic-ray air showers recorded with HAWC since June 2013. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map, which has a median energy of 2 TeV, exhibits several regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux. We present the energy dependence of the anisotropy and the cosmic-ray spectrum in the regions of significant excess.

  3. Observations of Large Scale Sidereal Anisotropy in 1 and 11 TeV cosmic rays from the MINOS experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Jong, J.K.

    2012-01-01

    The MINOS Near and Far Detectors are two large, functionally-identical, steel-scintillating sampling calorimeters located at depths of 220 mwe and 2100 mwe respectively. The detectors observe the muon component of hadronic showers produced from cosmic ray interactions with nuclei in the earth's atmosphere. From the arrival direction of these muons, the anisotropy in arrival direction of the cosmic ray primaries can be determined. The MINOS Near and Far Detector have observed anisotropy on the order of 0.1% at 1 and 11 TeV respectively. The amplitude and phase of the first harmonic at 1 TeV are 8.2 {+-} 1.7(stat.) x 10{sup -4} and (8.9 {+-} 12.1(stat.)){sup o}, and at 11 TeV are 3.8 {+-} 0.5(stat.) x 10{sup -4} and (27.2 {+-} 7.2(stat.)){sup o}.

  4. LARGE GAMMA ANISOTROPY OBSERVED IN THE CF-252 SPONTANEOUS-FISSION PROCESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPLOEG, H; BACELAR, JC; VANDENBERG, T; IACOB, VE; JONGMAN, [No Value; VANDERWOUDE, A

    1992-01-01

    The energy spectrum and the angular dependence relative to the fission direction of photons in the energy region between 2 and 40 MeV have been measured for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252. A large anisotropy was found in the energy region 8 to 12 MeV implying that photons in this region are emitt

  5. First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations Determination of Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Spergel, D N; Peiris, H V; Komatsu, E; Nolta, M R; Bennett, C L; Halpern, M; Hinshaw, G; Jarosik, N C; Kogut, A J; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Page, L; Tucker, G S; Weiland, J L; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2003-01-01

    WMAP precision data enables accurate testingof cosmological models. We find that the emerging standard model of cosmology, a flat Lambda-dominated universe seeded by a nearly scale-invariant adiabatic Gaussian fluctuations, fits the WMAP data. With parameters fixed only by WMAP data, we can fit finer scale CMB measurements and measurements of large scale structure (galaxy surveys and the Lyman Alpha forest). This simple model is also consistent with a host of other astronomical measurements. We then fit the model parameters to a combination of WMAP data with other finer scale CMB experiments (ACBAR and CBI), 2dFGRS measurements and Lyman Alpha forest data to find the model's best fit cosmological parameters: h = 0.71^{+ 0.04}_{- 0.03}}, Omega_bh^2 = 0.0224+/-0.0009}, Omega_mh^2 = 0.135^{+ 0.008}_{- 0.009}}, tau = 0.17+/-0.06}, n_s(0.05 Mpc$^{-1}) = 0.93 \\pm 0.03}, and sigma_8 = 0.84+/-0.04}. WMAP's best determination of tau=0.17+/-0.04 arises directly from the TE data and not from this model fit, but they are...

  6. Probing the Anisotropy of the Milky Way Gaseous Halo-II: Sightline toward Mrk 509

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A.; Mathur, S.; Krongold, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Hot, million degree gas appears to pervade the Milky Way halo, containing a large fraction of the Galactic missing baryons. This circumgalactic medium (CGM) is probed effectively in X-rays, both in absorption and in emission. The CGM also appears to be anisotropic, so we have started a program to determine CGM properties along several sightlines by combining absorption and emission measurements. Here we present the emission measure close to the Mrk 509 sightline using new Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations. We also present new analysis and modeling of Chandra HETG spectra to constrain the absorption parameters. The emission measure in this sightline is high, EM = 0.0165 ± 0.0008 ± 0.0006 cm‑6 pc, five times larger than the average. The observed O vii column density N(O vii) = 2.35+/- 0.4× {10}16 cm‑2, however, is close to the average. We find that the temperature of the emitting and absorbing gas is the same: logT(K) = 6.33 ± 0.01 and logT(K) = 6.33 ± 0.16 respectively. We fit the observed column density and emission measure with a β-model density profile. The central density is constrained to be between n 0 = 2.8–6.0 × 10‑4 cm‑3 and the core radius of the density profile has a lower limit of 40 kpc. This shows that the hot gas is mostly in the CGM of the galaxy, not in the Galactic disk. Our derived density profile is close to the Maller & Bullock profile for adiabatic gas in hydrostatic equilibrium with an NFW dark-matter potential well. Assuming this density profile, the minimum mass of the hot CGM is 3.2× {10}10 M ⊙.

  7. Probing large-scale structure with radio observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Shea D.

    This thesis focuses on detecting magnetized relativistic plasma in the intergalactic medium (IGM) of filamentary large-scale structure (LSS) by observing synchrotron emission emitted by structure formation shocks. Little is known about the IGM beyond the largest clusters of galaxies, and synchrotron emission holds enormous promise as a means of probing magnetic fields and relativistic particle populations in these low density regions. I'll first report on observations taken at the Very Large Array and the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope of the diffuse radio source 0809+39. I use these observations to demonstrate that 0809+39 is likely the first "radio relic" discovered that is not associated with a rich |"X-ray emitting cluster of galaxies. I then demonstrate that an unconventional reprocessing of the NVSS polarization survey can reveal structures on scales from 15' to hundreds of degrees, far larger than the nominal shortest-baseline scale. This yields hundreds of new diffuse sources as well as the identification of a new nearby galactic loop . These observations also highlight the major obstacle that diffuse galactic foreground emission poses for any search for large-scale, low surface- brightness extragalactic emission. I therefore explore the cross-correlation of diffuse radio emission with optical tracers of LSS as a means of statistically detecting the presence of magnetic fields in the low-density regions of the cosmic web. This initial study with the Bonn 1.4 GHz radio survey yields an upper limit of 0.2 mG for large-scale filament magnetic fields. Finally, I report on new Green Bank Telescope and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope observations of the famous Coma cluster of galaxies. Major findings include an extension to the Coma cluster radio relic source 1253+275 which makes its total extent ~2 Mpc, as well as a sharp edge, or "front", on the Western side of the radio halo which shows a strong correlation with merger activity associated with an

  8. Direct observation of massless domain wall dynamics in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, J; Bonfim, M; Rougemaille, N; Boulle, O; Miron, I M; Auffret, S; Rodmacq, B; Gaudin, G; Cezar, J C; Sirotti, F; Pizzini, S

    2012-06-15

    Domain wall motion induced by nanosecond current pulses in nanostripes with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (Pt/Co/AlO(x)) is shown to exhibit negligible inertia. Time-resolved magnetic microscopy during current pulses reveals that the domain walls start moving, with a constant speed, as soon as the current reaches a constant amplitude, and no or little motion takes place after the end of the pulse. The very low "mass" of these domain walls is attributed to the combination of their narrow width and high damping parameter α. Such a small inertia should allow accurate control of domain wall motion by tuning the duration and amplitude of the current pulses.

  9. A measurement of secondary cosmic microwave background anisotropies with two years of South Pole Telescope observations

    CERN Document Server

    Reichardt, C L; Zahn, O; Aird, K A; Benson, B A; Bleem, L E; Carlstrom, J E; Chang, C L; Cho, H M; Crawford, T M; Crites, A T; de Haan, T; Dobbs, M A; Dudley, J; George, E M; Halverson, N W; Holder, G P; Holzapfel, W L; Hoover, S; Hou, Z; Hrubes, J D; Joy, M; Keisler, R; Knox, L; Lee, A T; Leitch, E M; Lueker, M; Luong-Van, D; McMahon, J J; Mehl, J; Meyer, S S; Millea, M; Mohr, J J; Montroy, T E; Natoli, T; Padin, S; Plagge, T; Pryke, C; Ruhl, J E; Schaffer, K K; Shirokoff, E; Spieler, H G; Staniszewski, Z; Stark, A A; Story, K; van Engelen, A; Vanderlinde, K; Vieira, J D; Williamson, R

    2011-01-01

    We present the first three-frequency South Pole Telescope (SPT) cosmic microwave background (CMB) power spectra. The band powers presented here cover angular scales 2000 < ell < 9400 in frequency bands centered at 95, 150, and 220 GHz. At these frequencies and angular scales, a combination of the primary CMB anisotropy, thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects, radio galaxies, and cosmic infrared background (CIB) contributes to the signal. We combine Planck and SPT data at 220 GHz to constrain the amplitude and shape of the CIB power spectrum and find strong evidence for non-linear clustering. We explore the SZ results using a variety of cosmological models for the CMB and CIB anisotropies and find them to be robust with one exception: allowing for spatial correlations between the thermal SZ effect and CIB significantly degrades the SZ constraints. Neglecting this potential correlation, we find the thermal SZ power at 150 GHz and ell = 3000 to be 3.65 +/- 0.69 muK^2, and set an upper limit on...

  10. Holographic phase transition probed by non-local observables

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Xiao-Xiong

    2016-01-01

    From the viewpoint of holography, the phase structure of a 5-dimensional Reissner-Nordstr\\"{o}m-AdS black hole is probed by the two point correlation function, Wilson loop, and entanglement entropy. As the case of thermal entropy, we find for all the probes, the black hole undergos a Hawking-Page phase transition, a first order phase transition and a second order phase transition successively before it reaches to a stable phase. In addition, for these probes, we find the equal area law for the first order phase transition is valid always and the critical exponent of the heat capacity for the second order phase transition coincides with that of the mean field theory regardless of the size of the boundary region.

  11. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  12. Observation of TeV-Energy Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy with the HAWC Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Daniel W.

    Over the past two decades, ground-based measurements of the arrival directions of TeV cosmic rays have revealed an unexpected anisotropy. Multiple detectors have recorded fluxes above all-sky averages to high statistical significance for features at large (about 180°) and small (about 5°) angular sizes. Likely sources of high-energy cosmic rays are no closer than about 100 pc, about 100,000 Larmor radii for a TeV proton in typical interstellar magnetic fields of order several microGauss. This thesis outlines methods to search for signals in cosmic-ray arrival directions on data from the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory -- an extended air shower detector array in Puebla, Mexico, sensitive to gamma rays and cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is currently under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 86 billion events recorded between June 2013 and July 2014 shows anisotropy at the 10. (-4) level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-raysky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to l=15 contribute significantly to the excesses. Large angular scales (>60°) are also considered, but the results are still preliminary as they are contaminated with non-sidereal signals which cancel for integer years of continuous data. An analysis of the cosmic-ray Moon shadow is shown to demonstrate the angular resolution and energy scale of the data set and to evaluate part of the analysis technique.

  13. Observation of Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Galactic Cosmic Rays at Multiple Angular Scales with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Denger, T; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hajismail, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; a,; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madajczyk, B; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; b,; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, C C; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; c,; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stössl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Stür, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2011-01-01

    Between May 2009 and May 2010, the IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole recorded 32 billion muons generated in air showers produced by cosmic rays with a median energy of 20 TeV. With a data set of this size, it is possible to probe the southern sky for per-mille anisotropy on all angular scales in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays. Applying a power spectrum analysis to the relative intensity map of the cosmic ray flux in the southern hemisphere, we show that the arrival direction distribution is not isotropic, but shows significant structure on several angular scales. In addition to previously reported large-scale structure in the form of a strong dipole and quadrupole, the data show small-scale structure on scales between 15 degrees and 30 degrees. The skymap exhibits several localized regions of significant excess and deficit in cosmic ray intensity. The relative intensity of the smaller-scale structures is about a factor of 5 weaker than that of the dipole and quadrupole structure. ...

  14. Probing the effect of OSCE checklist length on inter-observer reliability and observer accuracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrina F. Hurley

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE is a widely employed tool for measuring clinical competence. In the drive toward comprehensive assessment, OSCE stations and checklists may become increasingly complex. The objective of this study was to probe inter-observer reliability and observer accuracy as a function of OSCE checklist length. Method: Study participants included emergency physicians and senior residents in Emergency Medicine at Dalhousie University. Participants watched an identical series of four, scripted, standardized videos enacting 10-min OSCE stations and completed corresponding assessment checklists. Each participating observer was provided with a random combination of two 40-item and two 20-item checklists. A panel of physicians scored the scenarios through repeated video review to determine the ‘gold standard’ checklist scores. Results: Fifty-seven observers completed 228 assessment checklists. Mean observer accuracy ranged from 73 to 93% (14.6–18.7/20, with an overall accuracy of 86% (17.2/20, and inter-rater reliability range of 58–78%. After controlling for station and individual variation, no effect was observed regarding the number of checklist items on overall accuracy (p=0.2305. Consistency in ratings was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficient and demonstrated no significant difference in consistency between the 20- and 40-item checklists (ranged from 0.432 to 0.781, p-values from 0.56 to 0.73. Conclusions: The addition of 20 checklist items to a core list of 20 items in an OSCE assessment checklist does not appear to impact observer accuracy or inter-rater reliability.

  15. Probing the cosmic x-ray and MeV gamma ray background radiation through the anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States); Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve a sensitivity better than 10–12 erg cm–2 s–1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV—although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors—angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  16. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  17. The effects of structure anisotropy on lensing observables in an exact general relativistic setting for precision cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Troxel, M A; Peel, Austin

    2013-01-01

    The study of relativistic, higher order and nonlinear effects has become necessary in recent years in the pursuit of precision cosmology. We develop and apply here a framework to study gravitational lensing in exact models in general relativity that are not restricted to homogeneity and isotropy, and where full nonlinearity and relativistic effects are included. We apply the framework to a specific, anisotropic galaxy cluster model which is based on a modified NFW halo density profile and described by the Szekeres metric. We examine the effects of increasing levels of anisotropy in the galaxy cluster on lensing observables like the convergence and shear for various lensing geometries, finding a strong nonlinear response in both the convergence and shear for rays passing through anisotropic regions of the cluster. Deviation from the expected values in a spherically symmetric structure are asymmetric with respect to path direction and thus will persist as a statistical effect when averaged over some ensemble of...

  18. High Speed Pump-Probe Apparatus for Observation of Transitional Effects in Ultrafast Laser Micromachining Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Alexeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A pump-probe experimental approach has been shown to be a very efficient tool for the observation and analysis of various laser matter interaction effects. In those setups, synchronized laser pulses are used to create an event (pump and to simultaneously observe it (probe. In general, the physical effects that can be investigated with such an apparatus are restricted by the temporal resolution of the probe pulse and the observation window. The latter can be greatly extended by adjusting the pump-probe time delay under the assumption that the interaction process remains fairly reproducible. Unfortunately, this assumption becomes invalid in the case of high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser material processing, where the irradiation history strongly affects the ongoing interaction process. In this contribution, the authors present an extension of the pump-probe setup that allows to investigate transitional and dynamic effects present during ultrafast laser machining performed at high pulse repetition frequencies.

  19. The Anisotropy of the Microwave Background to l = 3500 Mosaic Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Shepherd, M C; Sievers, J L; Udomprasert, P S; Cartwright, J K; Farmer, A J; Padin, S; Myers, S T; Bond, J R; Contaldi, C R; Pen, U L; Prunet, S; Pogosyan, D; Carlstrom, J E; Kovács, J; Leitch, E M; Pryke, C L; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Altamirano, P; Bronfman, L; Casassus, S; May, J; Joy, M

    2003-01-01

    Using the Cosmic Background Imager, a 13-element interferometer array operating in the 26-36 GHz frequency band, we have observed 40 sq deg of sky in three pairs of fields, each ~ 145 x 165 arcmin, using overlapping pointings (mosaicing). We present images and power spectra of the cosmic microwave background radiation in these mosaic fields. We remove ground radiation and other low-level contaminating signals by differencing matched observations of the fields in each pair. The primary foreground contamination is due to point sources (radio galaxies and quasars). We have subtracted the strongest sources from the data using higher-resolution measurements, and we have projected out the response to other sources of known position in the power-spectrum analysis. The images show features on scales ~ 6 - 15 arcmin, corresponding to masses ~ (5 - 80)*10^{14} Msun at the surface of last scattering, which are likely to be the seeds of clusters of galaxies. The power spectrum estimates have a resolution Delta-l = 200 an...

  20. Removing 1/f noise stripes in cosmic microwave background anisotropy observations

    CERN Document Server

    Maino, D; Górski, K M; Mandolesi, N; Bersanelli, M

    2002-01-01

    Removal of systematic effects is crucial in present and future CMB experiments mapping large fraction of the sky. Accurate CMB measurements ask for multi-feed array instruments observing the sky with a redundant scanning strategy covering the same region of the sky on different time scales and with different detectors for a better control of systematic effects. We investigate here the capability to suppress 1/f noise features in Time Ordered Data (TOD) by using the destriping technique described in Maino et al. (1999), under realistic assumptions for crossing condition between different scan circles and sky signal fluctuations on small angular scales. We consider as working case, Planck-LFI simulated observations with few arminutes pixel size convolved with LFI beam resolutions. We also extend the analysis to high values of the knee-frequency and found a residual additional noise rms ~31% larger than the pure white noise rms at fk=1 Hz which could be a critical issue in the extraction of the CMB angular power...

  1. Probing Electronic Wave Functions of Sodium-Doped Clusters: Dyson Orbitals, Anisotropy Parameters, and Ionization Cross-Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunina, Anastasia O; Krylov, Anna I

    2016-12-15

    We apply high-level ab initio methods to describe the electronic structure of small clusters of ammonia and dimethyl ether (DME) doped with sodium, which provide a model for solvated electrons. We investigate the effect of the solvent and cluster size on the electronic states. We consider both energies and properties, with a focus on the shape of the electronic wave function and the related experimental observables such as photoelectron angular distributions. The central quantity in modeling photoionization experiments is the Dyson orbital, which describes the difference between the initial N-electron and final (N-1)-electron states of a system. Dyson orbitals enter the expression of the photoelectron matrix element, which determines total and partial photoionization cross-sections. We compute Dyson orbitals for the Na(NH3)n and Na(DME)m clusters using correlated wave functions (obtained with equation-of-motion coupled-cluster model for electron attachment with single and double substitutions) and compare them with more approximate Hartree-Fock and Kohn-Sham orbitals. We also analyze the effect of correlation and basis sets on the shapes of Dyson orbitals and the experimental observables.

  2. Removing 1/f noise stripes in cosmic microwave background anisotropy observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maino, D.; Burigana, C.; Górski, K. M.; Mandolesi, N.; Bersanelli, M.

    2002-05-01

    Removal of systematic effects is crucial in present and future CMB experiments mapping large fraction of the sky. Accurate CMB measurements ask for multi-feed array instruments observing the sky with a redundant scanning strategy covering the same sky region on different time scales and with different detectors for a better control of systematic effects. We investigate the capability to suppress 1/f noise features in Time Ordered Data (TOD) by using the destriping technique described in Maino et al. (1999), under realistic assumptions for crossing condition between different scan circles and sky signal fluctuations on small angular scales. We perform, as a working case, PLANCK-LFI simulated observations with few arcminutes pixel size convolved with LFI beam resolutions. In the noiseless case for crossing condition based on pixels with side larger than the input one, the destriping algorithm inserts extra-noise in the final map of the order of ~ mu K in rms and few mu K in peak-to-peak amplitude at 30 GHz. However including instrumental noise (white and 1/f noise) in the TOD, the impact of the sky signal on the destriping is found to be very small. In addition, for crossing condition based on pixels with side half of the one of the final map (typically ~ 1/3 of the FWHM), we find only a small improvement ( ~ 1% level) in the destriping quality with respect to the case when crossings are searched on pixels with same size of the final map one. We can conclude that the receiver noise is the driver for destriping quality. We extend the analysis to high values of the knee frequency and find that, although significantly suppressed by destriping, the residual additional noise rms is ~ 31% larger than the pure white noise rms at fk = 1 Hz which could be a critical issue in the extraction of CMB angular power spectrum. We verified that the approximation of the 1/f noise on averaged scan circles as a single baseline still works well even for these high values of the knee

  3. Probing the anisotropy of the Milky Way gaseous halo: Sight-lines toward Mrk 421 and PKS2155-304

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, A; Galeazzi, M; Krongold, Y

    2013-01-01

    The halo of the Milky Way contains a large reservoir of warm-hot gas that contains a large fraction of the missing baryons from the Galaxy. The average physical properties of this circumgalactic medium(CGM) are determined by combining average absorption and emission measurements along several extragalactic sightlines. However, there is a wide distribution of \\ovii column density of through the Galactic halo,and the halo emission measure also shows a similarly wide distribution. This clearly shows that the Galactic warm-hot gaseous halo is anisotropic. We present Suzaku observations of fields close to two sightlines along which we have \\ovii absorption measurements with Chandra. The column densities along these two sightlines are similar within errors, but we find that the emission measure is lower than the average near the Mrk 421 direction ($0.0025\\pm0.0006$cm$^{-6} $pc) and is higher than average close to the PKS2155-304 sightline ($0.0042\\pm0.0008 $cm$^{-6} $pc). In the Mrk 421 direction we derive the dens...

  4. Microfabric and anisotropy of elastic waves in sandstone - An observation using high-resolution X-ray microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahl, Wolf-Achim; Hinkes, Robert; Feeser, Volker; Holzheid, Astrid

    2013-04-01

    Petrophysical experiments, using acoustic velocities to characterise anisotropies of mechanical behaviour of rocks are of essential relevance to understand the geomechanical behaviour of sandstone reservoirs under changing stress fields. Here, we present high-resolution X-ray microtomography (μ-CT) as a supplementary research tool to interpret anisotropic ultrasound velocities in sandstones with variation of isotopic stress. Specimens of two Lower Cretaceous sandstones (localities Bentheim and Obernkirchen, both Germany) have been used in petrophysical laboratory experiments under dry conditions to study ultrasonic sound velocities (frequency of signal input 1 MHz). Subsequently, oriented micro-plugs drilled from the sandstone samples were investigated using high-resolution X-ray microtomography. By means of image processing of the reconstructed scan images, geometric attributes such as mean structural thickness, orientation and tortuosity were evaluated from the μ-CT data for both pore space and grain skeleton. Our observations clearly indicate the different roles of pore space and grain skeleton in regard to the propagation of ultrasonic waves: because the pores do not transmit the waves, it was sufficient to investigate the average thickness of this fabric element. In contrast, as the ultrasonic waves traverse the rock via the adjacent grains, it was necessary to survey the actual travel lengths of seismic waves in the sandstone grain skeleton.

  5. Long-term variation of the solar diurnal anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays observed with the Nagoya multi-directional muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, K.; Kozai, M.; Kato, C. [Physics Department, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kóta, J., E-mail: kmuna00@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 87721 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We analyze the three-dimensional anisotropy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities observed independently with a muon detector at Nagoya in Japan and neutron monitors over four solar activity cycles. We clearly see the phase of the free-space diurnal anisotropy shifting toward earlier hours around solar activity minima in A > 0 epochs, due to the reduced anisotropy component parallel to the mean magnetic field. This component is consistent with a rigidity-independent spectrum, while the perpendicular anisotropy component increases with GCR rigidity. We suggest that this harder spectrum of the perpendicular component is due to contribution from the drift streaming. We find that the bi-directional latitudinal density gradient is positive in the A > 0 epoch, while it is negative in the A < 0 epoch, in agreement with the drift model prediction. The radial density gradient of GCRs, on the other hand, varies with a ∼11 yr cycle with maxima (minima) in solar maximum (minimum) periods, but we find no significant difference between the radial gradients in the A > 0 and A < 0 epochs. The corresponding parallel mean free path is larger in A < 0 than in A > 0. We also find, however, that the parallel mean free path (radial gradient) appears to persistently increase (decrease) in the last three cycles of weakening solar activity. We suggest that simple differences between these parameters in A > 0 and A < 0 epochs are seriously biased by these long-term trends.

  6. Observation of Structural Anisotropy and the Onset of Liquid-like Motion during the Non-thermal Melting of InSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, K.J.; Lindenberg, A.M.; /SLAC, SSRL; Larsson, J.; /Lund Inst. Tech.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; /Jena U. /Duisburg U.; Blome, C.; /DESY; Synnergren, O.; /Lund Inst.; Sheppard, J.; /Oxford U.; Caleman, C.; /Uppsala U.; MacPhee, A.G.; Weinstein, D.; Lowney, D.P.; Allison, T.K.; Matthews, T.; Falcone, R.W.; /UC, Berkeley; Cavalieri, A.L.; /Michigan U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. Quantenopt.; Dritz, D.M.; Lee, S.H.; Bucksbau, P.H.p a Reis, D.A.; /Michigan U.; Rudati, J.; Macrander, A.T.; /ANL, APS; Fuoss, P.H.; /Argonne

    2005-09-30

    The melting dynamics of laser excited InSb have been studied with femtosecond x-ray diffraction. These measurements observe the delayed onset of diffusive atomic motion, signaling the appearance of liquid-like dynamics. They also demonstrate that the root mean-squared displacement in the [111] direction increases faster than in the [110] direction after the first 500 fs. This structural anisotropy indicates that the initially generated fluid differs significantly from the equilibrium liquid.

  7. Magnetic anisotropy and porosity of Antarctic chondrites

    OpenAIRE

    Hamano,Yozo/Yomogida,Kiyoshi

    1982-01-01

    Magnetic susceptibility anisotropy and porosity were measured in eleven Antarctic meteorites. These meteorites are ordinary chondrites (H and L type) in various metamorphic stages. Large magnetic anisotropy has been observed in most of the chondrites. The foliation type of the anisotropy, inferred from the shape of the susceptibility ellipsoid indicates that a uniaxial compressional type deformation is responsible for the anisotropy. The degree of the anisotropy and the porosity do not correl...

  8. Solar cycle dependence of the diurnal anisotropy of 0.6 TeV cosmic ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro underground muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Munakata, K; Kato, C; Yasue, S; Mori, S; Takita, M; Kota, J

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the temporal variation of the diurnal anisotropy of sub-TeV cosmic ray intensity observed with the Matsushiro (Japan) underground muon detector over two full solar activity cycles in 1985-2008. The average sidereal amplitude over the entire period is 0.036+-0.002 %, which is roughly one third of the amplitude reported from AS and deep-underground muon experiments monitoring multi-TeV GCR intensity suggesting a significant attenuation of the anisotropy due to the solar modulation. The amplitude of the sidereal diurnal anisotropy appears to decrease gradually from its maximum of 0.058+-0.009 % in 1988, with a minimum of 0.009+-0.009 % in 1998, while there is no clear correlation with either the solar activity- or magnetic-cycles. We examine the temporal variation of the "single-band valley depth" (SBVD) quoted by the Milagro experiment and, by contrast with recent Milagro reports, we find no steady increase in the Matsushiro observations in a 7-year period between 2000 and 2007. We suggest, therefore...

  9. Observation and manipulation of glial cell function by virtue of sufficient probe expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akiyo eNatsubori

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The development of gene-encoded indicators and actuators to observe and manipulate cellular functions is being advanced and investigated. Expressing these probe molecules in glial cells is expected to enable observation and manipulation of glial cell activity, leading to elucidate the behaviors and causal roles of glial cells. The first step toward understanding glial cell functions is to express the probes in sufficient amounts, and the Knockin-mediated ENhanced Gene Expression (KENGE-tet system provides a strategy for achieving this. In the present article, three examples of KENGE-tet system application are reviewed: depolarization of oligodendrocytes, intracellular acidification of astrocytes, and observation of intracellular calcium levels in the fine processes of astrocytes.

  10. Effect of induced shape anisotropy on magnetic properties of ferromagnetic cobalt nanocubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikala, D; Singh, V N; Banerjee, A; Mehta, B R

    2010-12-01

    We report on the synthesis of ferromagnetic cobalt nanocubes of various sizes using thermal pyrolysis method and the effect of shape anisotropy on the static and dynamic magnetic properties were studied. Shape anisotropy of approximately 10% was introduced in nanocubes by making nanodiscs using a linear chain amine surfactant during synthesis process. It has been observed that, ferromagnetism persisted above room temperature and a sharp drop in magnetic moment at low temperatures in zero-field cooled magnetization may be associated with the spin disorder due to the effective anisotropy present in the system. Dynamic magnetic properties were studied using RF transverse susceptibility measurements at different temperatures and the singularities due to anisotropy fields were probed at low temperatures. Symmetrically located broad peaks are observed in the frozen state at the effective anisotropy fields and the peak structure is strongly affected by shape anisotropy and temperature. Irrespective of size the shape anisotropy gave rise to higher coercive fields and larger transverse susceptibility ratio at all temperatures. The role of shape anisotropy and the size of the particles on the observed magnetic behaviour were discussed.

  11. Calculations of x-ray anisotropy for energies > 150 keV and its comparison with PVO/ISEE-3 observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazir, N.; Rausaria, R.R.; Khosa, P.N.

    1987-01-01

    The evolution of electron energy and angular distributions has been studied at different levels in the solar atmosphere by combining a smallangle analytical treatment with large-angle Monte Carlo calculations for electron energies greater than 500 keV. Using these distributions energy spectra and angular distributions of photons for energies greater than 150 keV have been computed as a function of height. The anisotropy ratio for these photon energies first decreases then increases with decrease in height (increase of column density). The results are compared with the observations of PVO/ISEE-3. The calculated characteristics of the x-ray flux ratio closely resemble the above observations.

  12. Does a possible laboratory observation of a frequency anisotropy of light result from a non-zero photon mass m?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narlikar, J. V.; Pecker, J. C.; Vigier, J. P.

    1991-04-01

    Assuming a priori the existence of a non-zero photon rest-mass mγ>0 and justifying this assumption, we can predict the existence of an anisotropy in velocity and frequency of light in the direction of the apex of the 3 K background cosmic radiation field. Since this frequency shift can now be tested in the laboratory, it is important to improve the precision of these measurements in order to check our predictions. Its possible confirmation implies indeed the definition of an absolute evolution parameter in the rest frame Σ0 of this 3 K background microwave radiation.

  13. Probing Final Stages of Stellar Evolution with X-Ray Observations of SN 2013ej

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Smith, Randall; Margutti, Raffaella; Pooley, David; Bose, Subhash; Sutaria, Firoza; Chandra, Poonam; Dwarkadas, Vikram V; Ryder, Stuart; Maeda, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Massive stars shape their surroundings with mass loss from winds during their lifetimes. Fast ejecta from supernovae, from these massive stars, shocks this circumstellar medium. Emission generated by this interaction provides a window into the final stages of stellar evolution, by probing the history of mass loss from the progenitor. Here we use Chandra and Swift x-ray observations of the type II-P/L SN 2013ej to probe the history of mass loss from its progenitor. We model the observed x-rays as emission from both heated circumstellar matter and supernova ejecta. The circumstellar density profile probed by the supernova shock reveals a history of steady mass loss during the final 400 years. The inferred mass loss rate of $2 \\times 10^{-6} {\\rm \\; M_\\odot \\; yr^{-1}}$ points back to a 13 $M_\\odot$ progenitor. Soon after the explosion we find significant absorption of reverse shock emission by a cooling shell. The column depth of this shell observed in absorption provides an independent and consistent measureme...

  14. The observation of AE events under uniaxial compression and the quantitative relationship between the anisotropy index and the main failure plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhibo; Wang, Enyuan; Chen, Dong; Li, Xuelong; Li, Nan

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, the P-wave velocities in different directions of sandstone samples under uniaxial compression are measured. The results indicate that the changes in the P-wave velocity in different directions are almost the same. In the initial stage of loading, the P-wave velocity exhibits a rising trend due to compaction and closure of preexisting fissures. As the stress increase, preexisting fissures are closed but induced fractures are not yet generated. The sandstone samples become denser and more uniform. The P-wave velocity remains in a steady state at a high level. In the late stage of loading, the P-wave velocity drops significantly due to the expansion and breakthrough of induced fractures. The P-wave velocity anisotropy index ε is analyzed during the process of loading. It can be observed that the change in the degree of wave velocity anisotropy can be divided into three stages: the AB stage, the BC stage and the CD stage, with a changing trend from decline to incline. In the initial stage of loading, the preexisting fissures have a randomized distribution, and the change is large-scale and uniform. The difference in each spatial point decreases gradually, and synchronization increases gradually. Thus, the P-wave velocity anisotropy declines. As the stress increases gradually, with the expansion and breakthrough of induced fractures, the difference in each spatial point increases. Before failure of rock samples, the violent change region of the rock samples' internal structure is focused on a narrow two-dimensional zone, and the rock samples' structural change is obviously local. Therefore, the degree of velocity anisotropy rises after declining, and it also has good corresponding relation among the AE count, the location of AE events and the degree of wave velocity anisotropy. The projection plane of the main fracture plane on the axis plane is recorded as M plane. Based on the AFF equation, for the CD stage, we analyze the quantitative relationship

  15. Experimental observation of pump-probe spectra of caesium D2 line with a vapour cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan-Hua; Yang Hai-Jing; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2005-01-01

    Pump-probe spectra of caesium D2 line are experimentally investigated in a Cs atomic vapour cell with copropagating orthogonal linearly-polarized pump and probe laser beams. Absorption-reduction dips duo to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in multi-A-type Zeeman sublevels of 6 S1/2 F=3-6 P3/2 F'=2 hyperfine transition and absorption-enhanced peaks due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in 6 S1/2 F=4-6 P3/2 F'=5 hyperfine transition are demonstrated. With detuned pump beam abnormal sign-reversed signals inside the EIT dip and the EIA peak are clearly observed.

  16. Observation of Small-scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Leó, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hüntemeyer, P; Hui, C M; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Riviére, C; Rosa-González, D; Ruiz-Velasco, E; Ryan, J; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on $4.9\\times 10^{10}$ events recorded between June 2013 and February 2014 shows anisotropy at the $10^{-4}$ level on angular scales of about $10^\\circ$. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to $\\ell=15$ contribute significantly to the excesses.

  17. Observation of small-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of TeV cosmic rays with HAWC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alfaro, R.; Belmont, E. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R. [CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia (Mexico); Ayala Solares, H. A. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Baughman, B. M.; Berley, D.; Braun, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Bonilla Rosales, M.; Carramiñana, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J., E-mail: dan.fiorino@wipac.wisc.edu [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration; and others

    2014-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 10{sup 10} events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10{sup –4} level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to ℓ = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  18. Probing New Physics Scales from Higgs and Electroweak Observables at $e^+ e^-$ Higgs Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Shao-Feng; Xiao, Rui-Qing

    2016-01-01

    New physics beyond the standard model (SM) can be formulated via dimension-6 effective operators, whose coefficients (cutoffs) characterize the scales of new physics. We study the probe of new physics scales from the electroweak precision observables (EWPO) and the Higgs observables (HO) at the future $e^+e^-$ Higgs Factory (such as CEPC). To optimize constraints of new physics from all available observables, we establish a scheme-independent approach. With this formulation, we treat the SM electroweak parameters and the coefficients of dimension-6 operators on equal footing, which can be fitted simultaneously by the same $\\chi^2$ function. As deviations from the SM are generally small, we can expand the new physics parameters up to linear order and perform an analytical $\\chi^2$ fit to derive the potential reach of the new physics scales. We find that the HO (from both Higgs produnction and decay rates) can probe the new physics scales up to 10TeV (and to 40TeV for the case of gluon-involved operator $\\mathc...

  19. Lab-frame observables for probing the top-Higgs interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Boudjema, Fawzi; Guadagnoli, Diego; Mohan, Kirtimaan A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate methods to explore the CP nature of the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling at the LHC, focusing on associated production of the Higgs with a $t \\bar{t}$ pair. We first discuss the constraints implied by low-energy observables and by the Higgs-rate information from available LHC data, emphasizing that they cannot provide conclusive evidence on the nature of this coupling. We then investigate kinematic observables that could probe the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling directly, in particular quantities that can be constructed out of just lab-frame kinematics. We define one such observable by exploiting the fact that $t \\bar{t}$ spin correlations do also carry information about the CP-nature of the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling. Finally, we introduce a CP-odd quantity and a related asymmetry, able to probe CP violation in the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling and likewise constructed out of lab-frame momenta only.

  20. Swelling-induced optical anisotropy of thermoresponsive hydrogels based on poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate): deswelling kinetics probed by quantitative Mueller matrix polarimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Nagaraj; Soni, Jalpa; Ghosh, Nirmalya; De, Priyadarsi

    2012-11-29

    Thermodynamically favored polymer-water interactions below the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) caused swelling-induced optical anisotropy (linear retardance) of thermoresponsive hydrogels based on poly(2-(2-methoxyethoxy)ethyl methacrylate). This was exploited to study the macroscopic deswelling kinetics quantitatively by a generalized polarimetry analysis method, based on measurement of the Mueller matrix and its subsequent inverse analysis via the polar decomposition approach. The derived medium polarization parameters, namely, linear retardance (δ), diattenuation (d), and depolarization coefficient (Δ), of the hydrogels showed interesting differences between the gels prepared by conventional free radical polymerization (FRP) and reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization (RAFT) and also between dry and swollen state. The effect of temperature, cross-linking density, and polymerization technique employed to synthesize hydrogel on deswelling kinetics was systematically studied via conventional gravimetry and corroborated further with the corresponding Mueller matrix derived quantitative polarimetry characteristics (δ, d, and Δ). The RAFT gels exhibited higher swelling ratio and swelling-induced optical anisotropy compared to FRP gels and also deswelled faster at 30 °C. On the contrary, at 45 °C, deswelling was significantly retarded for the RAFT gels due to formation of a skin layer, which was confirmed and quantified via the enhanced diattenuation and depolarization parameters.

  1. On the rms anisotropy at 7 deg and 10 deg observed in the COBE-DMR two year sky maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banday, A. J.; Gorski, K. M.; Tenorio, L.; Wright, E. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Lineweaver, C. H.; Kogut, A.; Hinshaw, G.; Bennett, C. L.

    1994-01-01

    The frequency-independent rms temperature fluctuations determined from the Cosmic Background Explorer-Differential Microwave Radiometer (COBE-DMR) two-year sky maps are used to infer the parameter Q(sub rms-PS), which characterizes the normalization of power-law models of primordial cosmological temperature anisotropy, for a forced fit to a scale-invariant Harrison-Zel'dovich (n = 1) spectral model. Using a joint analysis of the 7 deg and 10 deg 'cross'-rms derived from both the 53 and 90 GHz sky maps, we find Q(sub rms-PS) = 17.0(sub -2.1 sup +2.5) micro Kelvin when the low quadrupole is included, and Q(sub rms-PS) = 19.4(sub -2.1 sup +2.3) micro Kelvin excluding the quadrupole. These results are consistent with the n = 1 fits from more sensitive methods. The effect of the low quadrupole derived from the COBE-DMR data on the inferred Q(sub rms-PS) normalization is investigated. A bias to lower Q(sub rms-PS) is found when the quadrupole is included. The higher normalization for a forced n = 1 fit is then favored by the cross-rms technique.

  2. Nano-fabricated perpendicular magnetic anisotropy electrodes for lateral spin valves and observation of Nernst-Ettingshausen related signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chejanovsky, N.; Sharoni, A., E-mail: amos.sharoni@biu.ac.il [Department of Physics and Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials, Bar Ilan University, Ramat-Gan 590002 (Israel)

    2014-08-21

    Lateral spin valves (LSVs) are efficient structures for characterizing spin currents in spintronics devices. Most LSVs are based on ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes for spin-injection and detection. While there are advantages for using perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) FM, e.g., stability to nano-scaling, these have almost not been studied. This is mainly due to difficulties in fabricating PMA FMs in a lateral geometry. We present here an efficient method, based on ion-milling through an AlN mask, for fabrication of LSVs with multi-layered PMA FMs such as Co/Pd and Co/Ni. We demonstrate, using standard permalloy FMs, that the method enables efficient spin injection. We show the multi-layer electrodes retain their PMA properties as well as spin injection and detection in PMA LSVs. In addition, we find a large asymmetric voltage signal which increases with current. We attribute this to a Nernst-Ettingshausen effect caused by local Joule heating and the perpendicular magnetic easy axis.

  3. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Gu, Bao-Min; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2017-02-01

    The future gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. However, if there exist extra dimensions and only GWs can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of GWs and electromagnetic waves (EMWs) are in general different. In this paper, we study null geodesics of GWs and EMWs in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time in the presence of the curvature of the universe. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of GW is longer than EMW within equal time. Taking the GW150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Monitor as an example, we study how the curvature k and the constant curvature radius l affect the horizon radii of GW and EMW in the de Sitter and Einstein-de Sitter models of the universe. This provides an alternative method for probing extra dimension through future GW observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts.

  4. Observations of Quasi-Periodic Whistler Mode Waves by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hospodarsky, George; Wilkinson, Darrelle; Kurth, William; Kletzing, Craig; Santolik, Ondrej

    2016-10-01

    Observed in Earth's inner magnetosphere, quasi-periodic whistler mode emissions (QP) are electromagnetic waves in the frequency range from a few hundred Hz to a few kHz that exhibit a periodic modulation (typically a few minutes) of their wave intensity. These waves were first detected at high latitude ground stations, but more recently have been observed by a number of spacecraft, including the twin Van Allen Probes. The Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) instrument simultaneously measures the vector wave magnetic field and electric field, allowing wave propagation parameters, such as wave normal angle and Poynting vector, to be obtained. Almost four years of Van Allen Probes data have been examined and a statistical survey of the occurrence and properties of the QP emissions has been performed. The QP emissions were found to have periods ranging from 1 to 16 minutes with events lasting from less than 1 hour up to 6 hours. Some events were detected on successive orbits and a number of events were simultaneously detected by both spacecraft, even during large spacecraft separations, providing an opportunity to investigate the source and propagation properties of these waves.

  5. Nanosecond pump and probe observation of bimolecular exciton effects in rubrene single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ward, Kebra A.; Richman, Brittany R.; Biaggio, Ivan [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Transient grating pump and probe experiments are used to investigate excitonic processes on the nanosecond time scale in rubrene single crystals. We find that bimolecular interactions cause a photoinduced excited state density on the order of 0.5 × 10{sup 20 }cm{sup −3}—corresponding to an average distance of ∼3 nm between individual states—to decrease by a factor of 2 after 2 ns, following a typical power-law decay. We assign the observed power-law decays to high-density interactions between excited states. Because of the high efficiency singlet exciton fission observed in rubrene, these bimolecular interactions are likely those between triplet excitons or between coherent quantum superpositions of a singlet and a pair of triplet-excitons.

  6. Electron dropout echoes induced by interplanetary shock: Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Y. X.; Zong, Q.-G.; Zhou, X.-Z.; Fu, S. Y.; Rankin, R.; Yuan, C.-J.; Lui, A. T. Y.; Spence, H. E.; Blake, J. B.; Baker, D. N.; Reeves, G. D.

    2016-06-01

    On 23 November 2012, a sudden dropout of the relativistic electron flux was observed after an interplanetary shock arrival. The dropout peaks at ˜1 MeV and more than 80% of the electrons disappeared from the drift shell. Van Allen twin Probes observed a sharp electron flux dropout with clear energy dispersion signals. The repeating flux dropout and recovery signatures, or "dropout echoes", constitute a new phenomenon referred to as a "drifting electron dropout" with a limited initial spatial range. The azimuthal range of the dropout is estimated to be on the duskside, from ˜1300 to 0100 LT. We conclude that the shock-induced electron dropout is not caused by the magnetopause shadowing. The dropout and consequent echoes suggest that the radial migration of relativistic electrons is induced by the strong dusk-dawn asymmetric interplanetary shock compression on the magnetosphere.

  7. Evolution of chorus emissions into plasmaspheric hiss observed by Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qinghua; Xiao, Fuliang; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; He, Yihua; Wygant, J. R.; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2016-05-01

    The two classes of whistler mode waves (chorus and hiss) play different roles in the dynamics of radiation belt energetic electrons. Chorus can efficiently accelerate energetic electrons, and hiss is responsible for the loss of energetic electrons. Previous studies have proposed that chorus is the source of plasmaspheric hiss, but this still requires an observational confirmation because the previously observed chorus and hiss emissions were not in the same frequency range in the same time. Here we report simultaneous observations form Van Allen Probes that chorus and hiss emissions occurred in the same range ˜300-1500 Hz with the peak wave power density about 10-5 nT2/Hz during a weak storm on 3 July 2014. Chorus emissions propagate in a broad region outside the plasmapause. Meanwhile, hiss emissions are confined inside the plasmasphere, with a higher intensity and a broader area at a lower frequency. A sum of bi-Maxwellian distribution is used to model the observed anisotropic electron distributions and to evaluate the instability of waves. A three-dimensional ray tracing simulation shows that a portion of chorus emission outside the plasmasphere can propagate into the plasmasphere and evolve into plasmaspheric hiss. Moreover, hiss waves below 1 kHz are more intense and propagate over a broader area than those above 1 kHz, consistent with the observation. The current results can explain distributions of the observed hiss emission and provide a further support for the mechanism of evolution of chorus into hiss emissions.

  8. Development of a new expendable probe for the study of pelagic ecosystems from Voluntary Observing Ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcelli

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Physical and biological processes of the marine ecosystem have a high spatial and temporal variability, whose study is possible only through high resolution and synoptic observations. The T-FLAP (Temperature and Fluorescence LAunchable Probe was charted in order to answer to the claim of a cost effective temperature and fluorescence expendable profiler, to be used in ships of opportunity. The development of the expendable fluorimeter has followed similar concepts of the XBT (a wire conducting the signal to a computer card, but differently from that, T-FLAP was developed with an electronic system that can be improved and adapted to several variables measure channels. Commercial components were utilized to reach the aim of a low-cost probe: a glass bulb temperature resistor for the temperature measurement, blue LEDs, a photodiode and available selective glass filters, for fluorescence measurement. The measurement principle employed to detect phytoplankton's biomass is the active fluorescence. This method is an in vivo chlorophyll measure, that can get the immediate biophysical reaction of the cell inside the aquatic ecosystem; it is a non-disruptive method which gives a real time measure and avoids the implicit errors due to the manipulation of samples. The possibility of using continuous profiling probe, with an active fluorescence measurement, is very important in the study of phytoplankton in real time; it is the best way to follow the variability of sea productivity. In fact, because of the high time and space variability of phytoplankton, due to its capability to answer in a relatively short time to ecological variations in its environment and because of its characteristic patchiness, there isn't a precise quantitative estimation of the biomass present in the Mediterranean sea.

  9. Development of a new expendable probe for the study of pelagic ecosystems from voluntary observing ships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Marcelli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Physical and biological processes of the marine ecosystem have a high spatial and temporal variability, whose study is possible only through high resolution and synoptic observations. The Temperature and Fluorescence Launchable Probe was charted in order to answer to the claim of a cost effective temperature and fluorescence expendable profiler, to be used in ships of opportunity. The development of the expendable fluorometer has followed similar concepts of the XBT (a wire conducting the signal to a computer card, but differently from the latter it was developed with an electronic system which can be improved and adapted to several variables measure channels. To reach the aim of a low-cost probe, were utilized commercial components: a glass bulb temperature resistor for the temperature measurement, blue LEDs, a photodiode and available selective glass filters, for the fluorescence measurement. The measurement principle employed to detect phytoplankton's biomass is the active fluorescence. This method is an in vivo chlorophyll estimation, that can get the immediate biophysical reaction of phytoplankton inside the aquatic environment; it is a non-disruptive method which gives real time estimation and avoids the implicit errors due to the manipulation of samples. The possibility of using a continuous profiling probe, with an active fluorescence measurement, is very important in real time phytoplankton's study; it is the best way to follow the variability of sea productivity. In fact, because of the high time and space variability of phytoplankton, due to its capability to answer in a relatively short time to ecological variations in its environment and because of its characteristic patchiness, there isn't a precise quantitative estimation of the biomass present in the Mediterranean Sea.

  10. Atom-column distinction by Kikuchi pattern observed by an aberration-corrected convergent electron probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitoh, Koh; Tatara, Yoshihide; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2010-01-01

    Kikuchi patterns of an MgO crystal at the [110] incidence have been taken by a sub-angstrom electron beam focused on the single atom-column. A significant change in intensity has been observed in the 111 band; that is, the contrast in the central and side bands is reversed depending on the illuminated atom-column. The contrast reversal in the 111 band has been reproduced by multislice simulation using the frozen-phonon approach. The beam-position dependence of the 111 band intensity can be interpreted by electron channelling and the reciprocity theorem. The anomalous Kikuchi pattern can be a probe for identifying the illuminated atom-column, which is useful for column-by-column electron energy-loss spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy.

  11. Observing trans-Planckian ripples in the primordial power spectrum with future large scale structure probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamann, Jan [LAPTH (Laboratoire d' Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique Theorique, CNRS UMR5108 and Universite de Savoie), BP 110, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux Cedex (France); Hannestad, Steen; Sloth, Martin S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, Ny Munkegade, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Wong, Yvonne Y Y, E-mail: hamann@lapp.in2p3.fr, E-mail: sth@phys.au.dk, E-mail: sloth@phys.au.dk, E-mail: ywong@mppmu.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik (Werner-Heisenberg-Institut), Foehringer Ring 6, D-80805 Muenchen (Germany)

    2008-09-15

    We revisit the issue of ripples in the primordial power spectra caused by trans-Planckian physics, and the potential for their detection by future cosmological probes. We find that for reasonably large values of the first slow-roll parameter {epsilon} ({approx}>0.001), a positive detection of trans-Planckian ripples can be made even if the amplitude is as low as 10{sup -4}. Data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the proposed future 21 cm survey with the Fast Fourier Transform Telescope (FFTT) will be particularly useful in this regard. If the scale of inflation is close to its present upper bound, a scale of new physics as high as {approx}0.2 M{sub P} could lead to observable signatures.

  12. Observing trans-Planckian ripples in the primordial power spectrum with future large scale structure probes

    CERN Document Server

    Hamann, Jan; Sloth, Martin S; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

    2008-01-01

    We revisit the issue of ripples in the primordial power spectra caused by trans-Planckian physics, and the potential for their detection by future cosmological probes. We find that for reasonably large values of the first slow-roll parameter epsilon (> 0.001), a positive detection of trans-Planckian ripples can be made even if the amplitude is as low as 10^-4. Data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the proposed future 21 cm survey with the Fast Fourier Transform Telescope (FFTT) will be particularly useful in this regard. If the scale of inflation is close to its present upper bound, a scale of new physics as high as 0.2 M_Planck could lead to observable signatures.

  13. First Observation of Electron Transfer Mediated Decay in Aqueous Solutions: A Novel Probe of Ion Pairing

    CERN Document Server

    Unger, I; Thürmer, S; Aziz, E F; Cederbaum, L S; Muchová, E; Slavíček, P; Winter, B; Kryzhevoi, N V

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of many spectroscopic techniques is to provide comprehensive information on the local chemical environment. Electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) is a sensitive probe of the environment since it is actively involved in this non-local radiationless decay process through electron and energy transfer steps. We report the first experimental observation of ETMD in the liquid phase. Using liquid-jet X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we explore LiCl aqueous solution, and detect low-energy electrons unambiguously emerging from the ETMD processes of core-ionized Li+. We interpret the experimental results with molecular dynamics and high-level ab initio calculations. By considering various solvation-structure models we show that both water molecules and Cl- anions can participate in ETMD, with each process having its characteristic spectral fingerprint. Different ion associations lead to different spectral shapes. The potential application of the unique sensitivity of the ETMD spectroscopy to the local hy...

  14. Observational constraints on viable f(R) parametrizations with geometrical and dynamical probes

    CERN Document Server

    Basilakos, Spyros; Perivolaropoulos, Leandros

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that a wide range of viable f(R) parameterizations (including the Hu & Sawicki and the Starobinsky models) can be expressed as perturbations deviating from the LCDM Lagrangian. We constrain the deviation parameter b using a combination of geometrical and dynamical observational probes. In particular, we perform a joint likelihood analysis of the recent Supernovae Type Ia data, the Cosmic Microwave Background shift parameters, the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations and the growth rate data provided by the various galaxy surveys. This analysis provides constraints for the following parameters: the matter density Omega_{m0}, the deviation from LCDM parameter b and the growth index gamma(z). We parametrize the growth index gamma(z) in three manners (constant, Taylor expansion around z=0, and Taylor expansion around the scale factor). We point out the numerical difficulty for solving the generalized f(R) Friedman equation at high redshifts due to stiffness of the resulting ordinary differential equa...

  15. Van Allen Probes observations of oxygen cyclotron harmonic waves in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, M. E.; Malaspina, D. M.; Jaynes, A. N.; Bruder, R. J.; Mann, I. R.; Wygant, J. R.; Ergun, R. E.

    2016-09-01

    Waves with frequencies in the vicinity of the oxygen cyclotron frequency and its harmonics have been regularly observed on the Van Allen Probes satellites during geomagnetic storms. We focus on properties of these waves and present events from the main phase of two storms on 1 November 2012 and 17 March 2013 and associated dropouts of a few MeV electron fluxes. They are electromagnetic, in the frequency range ~0.5 to several Hz, and amplitude ~0.1 to a few nT in magnetic and ~0.1 to a few mV/m in electric field, with both the wave velocity and the Poynting vector directed almost parallel to the background magnetic field. These properties are very similar to those of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves, which are believed to contribute to loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons and therefore can be also important for inner magnetosphere dynamics.

  16. Observations of the White Light Corona from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R. A.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Korendyke, C. M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Linton, M. G.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Velli, M. M.; Mikic, Z.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The SoloHI instrument on Solar Orbiter and the WISPR instrument on Solar Probe+ will make white light coronagraphic images of the corona as the two spacecraft orbit the Sun. The minimum perihelia for Solar Orbiter is about 60 Rsun and for SP+ is 9.5 Rsun. The wide field of view of the WISPR instrument (about 105 degrees radially) corresponds to viewing the corona from 2.2 Rsun to 20 Rsun. Thus the entire Thomson hemisphere is contained within the telescope's field and we need to think of the instrument as being a traditional remote sensing instrument and then transitioning to a local in-situ instrument. The local behavior derives from the fact that the maximum Thomson scattering will favor the electron plasma close to the spacecraft - exactly what the in-situ instruments will be sampling. SoloHI and WISPR will also observe scattered light from dust in the inner heliosphere, which will be an entirely new spatial regime for dust observations from a coronagraph, which we assume to arise from dust in the general neighborhood of about half way between the observer and the Sun. As the dust grains approach the Sun, they evaporate and do not contribute to the scattering. A dust free zone has been postulated to exist somewhere inside of 5 Rsun where all dust is evaporated, but this has never been observed. The radial position where the evaporation occurs will depend on the precise molecular composition of the individual grains. The orbital plane of Solar Orbiter will gradually increase up to about 35 degrees, enabling a very different view through the zodiacal dust cloud to test the models generated from in-ecliptic observations. In this paper we will explore some of the issues associated with the observation of the dust and will present a simple model to explore the sensitivity of the instrument to observe such evaporations.

  17. Probing the Higgs with angular observables at future e+e- colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhen

    2016-10-01

    I summarize our recent works on using differential observables to explore the physics potential of future e+e- colliders in the framework of Higgs effective field theory. This proceeding is based upon Refs. 1 and 2. We study angular observables in the e+e-→ ZHℓ+ℓ-bb¯ channel at future circular e+e- colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy s = 240 GeV and 5 (30) ab-1 integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for the Higgsstrahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of constraining the “blind spot” in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners. We also discuss the possibility of using ZZ-fusion at e+e- machines at different energies to probe new operators.

  18. Observations of liver cancer cells in scanning probe acoustic microscope: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Xi, Qing; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) can be used to acquire the morphology image as well as the non-destructive internal structures acoustic image. However, the observations of the morphology image as well as the internal structures acoustic image of liver cancer cells in SPAM are few. In this paper, we cultured 4 different types of liver cancer cells on the silicon wafer and coverslip to observe their morphology images as well as acoustic images in SPAM, and made a preliminary study of the 8 types of cells specimens (hereinafter referred to as the silicon specimens and coverslips specimens). The experimental measurement results showed that some cellular pseudopodium were observed in the morphology images of the coverslip specimens while no such cellular pseupodium were appeared in the morphology images of the silicon specimens, which concluded that the living liver cancer cells were less likely to grow on the silicon wafer. SPAM provides a rapid and sensitive visual method for studying the morphology and internal structures of the cancer cells. The proposed method can be also used to obtain the morphology and internal information in both solid and soft material wafers, such as silicon and cells, with the resolution of nanometer scale.

  19. Statistical Features of EMIC Waves Observed on Van Allen Probes in the Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, D. Y.; Roh, S. J.; Cho, J.; Shin, D. K.; Hwang, J.; Kim, K. C.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Thaller, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are one of the key plasma waves that can affect charged particle dynamics in the Earth's inner magnetosphere. Knowledge of global distribution of the EMIC waves is critical for accurately assessing the significance of its interaction with charged particles. With the Van Allen Probes EMFISIS observations, we have surveyed EMIC events for ~2.5 years period. We have identified well-defined, banded wave activities only, as distinguished from broad band wave activities. We have obtained global distribution of occurrence of the identified waves with distinction between H- and He-bands. We compare it with previous observations such as THEMIS and CRRES. For the identified events we have drawn all the basic wave properties including wave frequency, polarization, wave normal angle. In addition, we have distinguished the EMIC events that occur inside the plasmasphere and at the plasmapause from those outside the plasmasphere. Finally, we have tested solar wind and geomagnetic dependence of the wave events. We give discussions about implications of these observations on wave generation mechanism and interaction with radiation belt electrons.

  20. Understanding Earth's radiation belt electron dynamics: Van Allen Probes observations and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Ma, Qianli; Thorne, Richard; Bortnik, Jacob; Zhang, Xiaojia

    2016-10-01

    Various physical processes are known to cause acceleration, loss, and transport of energetic electrons in the Earth's radiation belts, but their quantitative roles in different time and space need further investigation. In the present paper, we evaluate the relative roles of various physical processes during geomagnetic storms using a 3D diffusion simulation. By quantitatively comparing the electron evolution observed by Van Allen Probes and simulation, we found that whistler-mode chorus waves play a critical role in accelerating electrons up to several MeV through efficient energy diffusion. By only including radial diffusion driven by ultra-low-frequency waves, the simulation underestimates the observed electron acceleration, while radial diffusion plays an important role in redistributing electrons. Although an additional loss process is required to fully explain the overestimated electron fluxes at multi-MeV, the combined physical processes of radial diffusion and scattering by whistler-mode waves reproduce the observed electron dynamics remarkably well, suggesting that quasi-linear diffusion theory is reasonable to evaluate radiation belt electron dynamics, and the importance of nonlinear wave-particle interaction may still remain as an open question. We would like to acknowledge AFOSR Award FA9550-15-1-0158, NASA Grants NNX15AI96G, NNX15AF61G, and the NSF Grant AGS 1564510 for supporting this research.

  1. Late time CMB anisotropies constrain mini-charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrage, C.; Redondo, J.; Ringwald, A. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Jaeckel, J. [Univ. of Durham, Inst. for Particle Physics Phenomenology (United Kingdom)

    2009-09-15

    Observations of the temperature anisotropies induced as light from the CMB passes through large scale structures in the late universe are a sensitive probe of the interactions of photons in such environments. In extensions of the Standard Model which give rise to mini-charged particles, photons propagating through transverse magnetic fields can be lost to pair production of such particles. Such a decrement in the photon flux would occur as photons from the CMB traverse the magnetic fields of galaxy clusters. Therefore late time CMB anisotropies can be used to constrain the properties of mini- charged particles. We outline how this test is constructed, and present new constraints on mini-charged particles from observations of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect in the Coma cluster. (orig.)

  2. Polarization singularity anisotropy: determining monstardom

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    C points, that is isolated points of circular polarization in transverse fields of varying polarization, are classified morphologically into three distinct types, known as lemons, stars and monstars. These morphologies are interpreted here according to two natural parameters associated with the singularity, namely the anisotropy of the C point, and the polarization azimuth on the anisotropy axis. In addition to providing insight into singularity morphology, this observation applies to the densities of the various morphologies in isotropic random polarization speckle fields.

  3. Probing the functions of contextual modulation by adapting images rather than observers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Countless visual aftereffects have illustrated how visual sensitivity and perception can be biased by adaptation to the recent temporal context. This contextual modulation has been proposed to serve a variety of functions, but the actual benefits of adaptation remain uncertain. We describe an approach we have recently developed for exploring these benefits by adapting images instead of observers, to simulate how images should appear under theoretically optimal states of adaptation. This allows the long-term consequences of adaptation to be evaluated in ways that are difficult to probe by adapting observers, and provides a common framework for understanding how visual coding changes when the environment or the observer changes, or for evaluating how the effects of temporal context depend on different models of visual coding or the adaptation processes. The approach is illustrated for the specific case of adaptation to color, for which the initial neural coding and adaptation processes are relatively well understood, but can in principle be applied to examine the consequences of adaptation for any stimulus dimension. A simple calibration that adjusts each neuron's sensitivity according to the stimulus level it is exposed to is sufficient to normalize visual coding and generate a host of benefits, from increased efficiency to perceptual constancy to enhanced discrimination. This temporal normalization may also provide an important precursor for the effective operation of contextual mechanisms operating across space or feature dimensions. To the extent that the effects of adaptation can be predicted, images from new environments could be "pre-adapted" to match them to the observer, eliminating the need for observers to adapt.

  4. Probing recent star formation with absorption-line strengths in hierarchical models and observations

    CERN Document Server

    Trager, S C

    2009-01-01

    Stellar population parameters derived from spectral line-strengths provide a powerful probe of galaxy properties and formation histories. We implement the machinery for extracting single-stellar-population-equivalent stellar population parameters from synthetic spectra generated by a hierarchical galaxy formation model. We find that the SSP-equivalent age is related to the light-weighted age in a complicated fashion that reflects the influence of recently-formed stars and is poorly correlated with the mass-weighted age. The tendency for SSP-equivalent ages to be biased young means that archaeological downsizing overstates the mass-weighted downsizing in age with mass. We find that the SSP-equivalent metallicity closely tracks the mass- and light-weighted metallicities, so that observed mass--metallicity relations for old galaxies closely reflect the underlying trends. We construct mock catalogues of early-type galaxies in a Coma cluster-sized halo and compare them directly to observations of early-type galaxi...

  5. Anisotropy in conductance of a quasi-one-dimensional metallic surface state measured by a square micro-four-point probe method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagawa, Taizo; Hobara, Rei; Matsuda, Iwao; Tanikawa, Takehiro; Natori, Akiko; Hasegawa, Shuji

    2003-07-18

    We have devised a "square micro-four-point probe method" using an independently driven ultrahigh-vacuum four-tip scanning tunneling microscope, and succeeded for the first time to directly measure anisotropic electrical conductance of a single-atomic layer on a solid surface. A quasi-one-dimensional metal of a single-domain Si(111)4 x 1-In had a surface-state conductance along the metallic atom chains (sigma(axially)) to be 7.2(+/-0.6) x 10(-4) S/square at room temperature, which was larger than that in the perpendicular direction (sigma(radially)) by approximately 60 times. The sigma(axially) was consistently interpreted by a Boltzmann equation with the anisotropic surface-state band dispersion, while the sigma(radially) was dominated by a surface-space-charge-layer conductance.

  6. Probing solute-solvent interaction in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids: A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudhir Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2014-03-01

    Rotational diffusion of two organic solutes, coumarin153 (C153) and 4-aminophthalimide (AP) has been investigated in four ionic liquids (ILs), viz. 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate (EMIMTFA), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate (EMIMESU), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIMTFB) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate (EMIMTCB), as a function of temperature. Between the two probes, AP can act as hydrogen-bond-donor to the solvents having hydrogen bond acceptor ability. The results indicate that the rotational dynamics of C153 is mainly governed by the viscosity of the medium. On the other hand, the rotational motion of AP is found to be significantly hindered in the ILs depending on the nature of anions of the ILs. Rotational coupling constant values for AP in the ILs follow the order TFA > ESU > TCB > TFB. The slower rotational motion of AP in these ILs has been attributed to the specific hydrogen bonding interaction between AP and anions of ILs.

  7. A minimal empirical model for the cosmic far-infrared background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Hao-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Cosmic far-infrared background (CFIRB) probes unresolved dusty star-forming galaxies across cosmic time and is complementary to ultraviolet/optical probes of galaxy evolution. In this work, we interpret the observed CFIRB anisotropies using an empirical model based on recent galaxy survey results, including stellar mass functions, star-forming main sequence, and dust attenuation. Without introducing new parameters, our model agrees well with the CFIRB anisotropies observed by Planck and the submillimeter number counts observed by Herschel. We find that the commonly used linear relation between infrared luminosity and star-formation rate over-produces the observed CFIRB amplitudes, and lower infrared luminosities from low-mass galaxies are required. Our results indicate that CFIRB not only provides a consistency check for galaxy evolution models but also informs the star-formation rate and dust content for low-mass galaxies.

  8. Probing Individual Sources during Reionization and Cosmic Dawn using Square Kilometre Array HI 21-cm Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kanan K. Datta; Raghunath Ghara; Suman Majumdar; T. Roy Choudhury; Somnath Bharadwaj; Himadri Roy; Abhirup Datta

    2016-12-01

    Detection of individual luminous sources during the reionization epoch and cosmic dawn through their signatures in the HI 21-cm signal is one of the direct approaches to probe the epoch. Here, we summarize our previous works on this and present preliminary results on the prospects of detecting such sources using the SKA1-low experiment. We first discuss the expected HI 21-cm signal around luminous sources at different stages of reionization and cosmic dawn. We then introduce two visibility based estimators for detecting such signals: one based on the matched filtering technique and the other relies on simply combing the visibility signal from different baselines and frequency channels. We find that the SKA1-low should be able to detect ionized bubbles of radius $R_{\\mathrm {b}} \\gtrsim 10$ Mpc with $\\sim100 \\rm h$ of observations at redshift $z\\sim8$ provided that the mean outside neutral hydrogen fraction $\\mathrm {x}_{\\text {HI}} \\gtrsim 0.5$. We also investigate the possibility of detecting HII regions around known bright QSOs such as around ULASJ1120+0641 discovered by Mortlock et al. (Nature 474, 7353 (2011)). We find that a $5σ$ detection is possible with 600 h of SKA1-low observations if the QSO age and the outside $\\mathrm {x}_{\\text {HI}}$ are at least $\\sim2 \\times 10^7$ Myr and $\\sim0.2$ respectively. Finally, we investigate the possibility of detecting the very first X-ray and Ly- α sources during the cosmic dawn. We consider mini-QSOs like sources which emits in X-ray frequency band. We find that with a total $\\sim 1000 \\rm h$ of observations, SKA1-low should be able to detect those sources individually with a $∼ 9σ$ significance at redshift z=15. We summarize how the SNR changes with various parameters related to the source properties.

  9. Cluster observations in the magnetosheath – Part 1: Anisotropies of the wave vector distribution of the turbulence at electron scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Bosqued

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the power spectral density δB2 and δE2 of the magnetic and electric fluctuations measured by Cluster 1 (Rumba in the magnetosheath during 23 h, on four different days. The frequency range of the STAFF Spectral Analyser (f=8 Hz to 4 kHz extends from about the lower hybrid frequency, i.e. the electromagnetic (e.m. range, up to about 10 times the proton plasma frequency, i.e. the electrostatic (e.s. range. In the e.m. range, we do not consider the whistler waves, which are not always observed, but rather the underlying, more permanent fluctuations. In this e.m. range, δB2 (at 10 Hz increases strongly while the local angle ΘBV between the magnetic field B and the flow velocity V increases from 0° to 90°. This behaviour, also observed in the solar wind at lower frequencies, is due to the Doppler effect. It can be modelled if we assume that, for the scales ranging from kc/ωpe≃0.3 to 30 (c/ωpe is the electron inertial length, the intensity of the e.m. fluctuations for a wave number k (i varies like k−ν with ν>≃3, (ii peaks for wave vectors k perpendicular to B like |sinθkB|µ with µ>≃100. The shape of the observed variations of δB2 with f and with ΘBV implies that the permanent fluctuations, at these scales, statistically do not obey the dispersion relation for fast/whistler waves or for kinetic Alfvén waves: the fluctuations have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, i.e. their phase velocity is negligible with respect to V (Taylor hypothesis. The electrostatic waves around 1 kHz behave differently: δE2 is minimum for ΘBV>≃90°. This can be modelled, still with the Doppler effect, if we assume that, for the scales ranging from k λDe>≃0.1 to 1 (λDe is the Debye length, the intensity of the e.s. fluctuations (i varies like k−ν with ν>≃4, (ii peaks for k parallel to B like |cosθkB|µ with µ>≃100. These e.s. fluctuations may have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, or may be ion acoustic

  10. Cluster observations in the magnetosheath - Part 1: Anisotropies of the wave vector distribution of the turbulence at electron scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangeney, A.; Lacombe, C.; Maksimovic, M.; Samsonov, A. A.; Cornilleau-Wehrlin, N.; Harvey, C. C.; Bosqued, J.-M.; Trávníček, P.

    2006-12-01

    We analyse the power spectral density δB2 and δE2 of the magnetic and electric fluctuations measured by Cluster 1 (Rumba) in the magnetosheath during 23 h, on four different days. The frequency range of the STAFF Spectral Analyser (f=8 Hz to 4 kHz) extends from about the lower hybrid frequency, i.e. the electromagnetic (e.m.) range, up to about 10 times the proton plasma frequency, i.e. the electrostatic (e.s.) range. In the e.m. range, we do not consider the whistler waves, which are not always observed, but rather the underlying, more permanent fluctuations. In this e.m. range, δB2 (at 10 Hz) increases strongly while the local angle ΘBV between the magnetic field B and the flow velocity V increases from 0° to 90°. This behaviour, also observed in the solar wind at lower frequencies, is due to the Doppler effect. It can be modelled if we assume that, for the scales ranging from kc/ωpe≃0.3 to 30 (c/ωpe is the electron inertial length), the intensity of the e.m. fluctuations for a wave number k (i) varies like k-ν with ν>≃3, (ii) peaks for wave vectors k perpendicular to B like |sinθkB|µ with µ>≃100. The shape of the observed variations of δB2 with f and with ΘBV implies that the permanent fluctuations, at these scales, statistically do not obey the dispersion relation for fast/whistler waves or for kinetic Alfvén waves: the fluctuations have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, i.e. their phase velocity is negligible with respect to V (Taylor hypothesis). The electrostatic waves around 1 kHz behave differently: δE2 is minimum for ΘBV>≃90°. This can be modelled, still with the Doppler effect, if we assume that, for the scales ranging from k λDe>≃0.1 to 1 (λDe is the Debye length), the intensity of the e.s. fluctuations (i) varies like k-ν with ν>≃4, (ii) peaks for k parallel to B like |cosθkB|µ with µ>≃100. These e.s. fluctuations may have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, or may be ion acoustic waves. Our

  11. Cross-scale observations of the 2015 St. Patrick's day storm: THEMIS, Van Allen Probes, and TWINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J.; Angelopoulos, V.; De Pascuale, S.; Funsten, H. O.; Kurth, W. S.; LLera, K.; McComas, D. J.; Perez, J. D.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Thaller, S. A.; Valek, P. W.; Wygant, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We present cross-scale magnetospheric observations of the 17 March 2015 (St. Patrick's Day) storm, by Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS), Van Allen Probes (Radiation Belt Storm Probes), and Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS), plus upstream ACE/Wind solar wind data. THEMIS crossed the bow shock or magnetopause 22 times and observed the magnetospheric compression that initiated the storm. Empirical models reproduce these boundary locations within 0.7 RE. Van Allen Probes crossed the plasmapause 13 times; test particle simulations reproduce these encounters within 0.5 RE. Before the storm, Van Allen Probes measured quiet double-nose proton spectra in the region of corotating cold plasma. About 15 min after a 0605 UT dayside southward turning, Van Allen Probes captured the onset of inner magnetospheric convection, as a density decrease at the moving corotation-convection boundary (CCB) and a steep increase in ring current (RC) proton flux. During the first several hours of the storm, Van Allen Probes measured highly dynamic ion signatures (numerous injections and multiple spectral peaks). Sustained convection after ˜1200 UT initiated a major buildup of the midnight-sector ring current (measured by RBSP A), with much weaker duskside fluxes (measured by RBSP B, THEMIS a and THEMIS d). A close conjunction of THEMIS d, RBSP A, and TWINS 1 at 1631 UT shows good three-way agreement in the shapes of two-peak spectra from the center of the partial RC. A midstorm injection, observed by Van Allen Probes and TWINS at 1740 UT, brought in fresh ions with lower average energies (leading to globally less energetic spectra in precipitating ions) but increased the total pressure. The cross-scale measurements of 17 March 2015 contain significant spatial, spectral, and temporal structure.

  12. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hao; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along the null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. But when one considers that there exists the fifth dimension and only the GW can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of the GW and electromagnetic wave (EMW) are in general different. In this paper, we compute the null geodesics of the GW and EMW in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time and our four-dimensional universe in the present of the curvature of universe $k$, respectively. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of the GW is longer than the EMW within the equal time. Taking the GW 150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Mo...

  13. Molecular ions and protonated molecules observed in the atmospheric solids analysis probe analysis of steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Andrew D; Hammond, Janet; Major, Hilary

    2010-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) has often been used to ionise steroids in mass spectrometry, usually when interfaced to high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). However, in positive ion mode, a dehydrated protonated molecule is often observed with a loss of structural information. The recently introduced technique of atmospheric solids analysis probe (ASAP) has the advantage that the sample can be analysed directly and does not need to be interfaced to HPLC. Existing ionisation sources such as direct analysis in real time (DART) and desorption electrospray ionisation (DESI) have shown the advantage of direct analysis techniques in a variety of applications. ASAP can be performed on commercial atmospheric pressure ionisation (API) mass spectrometers with only simple modifications to API sources. The samples are vaporised by hot nitrogen gas from the electrospray desolvation heater and ionised by a corona discharge. A range of commercially available steroids were analysed by ASAP to investigate the mechanism of ionisation. ASAP analysis of steroids generally results in the formation of the parent molecular ion as either the radical cation M+* or the protonated molecule MH+. The formation of the protonated molecule is a result of proton transfer from ionised water clusters in the source. However, if the source is dry, then formation of the radical cation is the primary ionisation mechanism.

  14. Probing the hadron-quark mixed phase at high isospin and baryon density. Sensitive observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Toro, Massimo; Greco, Vincenzo [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); University of Catania, Physics and Astronomy Dept., Catania (Italy); Colonna, Maria [INFN-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania (Italy); Shao, Guo-Yun [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Department of Applied Physics, Xi' an (China)

    2016-08-15

    We discuss the isospin effect on the possible phase transition from hadronic to quark matter at high baryon density and finite temperatures. The two-Equation of State (Two-EoS) model is adopted to describe the hadron-quark phase transition in dense matter formed in heavy-ion collisions. For the hadron sector we use Relativistic Mean-Field (RMF) effective models, already tested on heavy-ion collision (HIC). For the quark phase we consider various effective models, the MIT-Bag static picture, the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) approach with chiral dynamics and finally the NJL coupled to the Polyakov-loop field (PNJL), which includes both chiral and (de)confinement dynamics. The idea is to extract mixed phase properties which appear robust with respect to the model differences. In particular we focus on the phase transitions of isospin asymmetric matter, with two main results: (i) an earlier transition to a mixed hadron-quark phase, at lower baryon density/chemical potential with respect to symmetric matter; (ii) an ''Isospin Distillation'' to the quark component of the mixed phase, with predicted effects on the final hadron production. Possible observation signals are suggested to probe in heavy-ion collision experiments at intermediate energies, in the range of the NICA program. (orig.)

  15. Probing individual sources during reionization and cosmic dawn using SKA HI 21-cm observations

    CERN Document Server

    Datta, Kanan K; Majumdar, Suman; Choudhury, T Roy; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Roy, Himadri; Datta, Abhirup

    2016-01-01

    Detection of individual luminous sources during the reionization epoch and cosmic dawn through their signatures in the HI 21-cm signal is one of the direct approaches to probe the epoch. Here, we summarize our previous works on this and present preliminary results on the prospects of detecting such sources using the SKA1-low experiment. We first discuss the expected HI 21-cm signal around luminous sources at different stages of reionization and cosmic dawn. We then introduce two visibility based estimators for detecting such signal: one based on the matched filtering technique and the other relies on simply combing the visibility signal from different baselines and frequency channels. We find that that the SKA1-low should be able to detect ionized bubbles of radius $R_b \\gtrsim 10$ Mpc with $\\sim 100$ hr of observations at redshift $z \\sim 8$ provided that the mean outside neutral Hydrogen fraction $ x_{\\rm HI} \\gtrsim 0.5$. We also investigate the possibility of detecting HII regions around known bright QSOs...

  16. Stress orientation and anisotropy based on shear-wave splitting observations in the Cerro Prieto fault area, Baja California, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zúñiga, F. R.; Castro, R. R.; Domínguez, T.

    1995-03-01

    Digital seismograms continuously recorded from 1988 to 1992 by two stations of the RESNOM seismic network in northern Baja California, Mexico, were used to search for probable shear-wave anisotropic characteristics in the region of the Cerro Prieto fault. Shear-wave splitting was identified in many of the three-component records analyzed. We measured the polarization direction of the leading S wave inside the S-wave window as well as the delay times between fast and slow phases on those records displaying shear-wave splitting. For station CPX, which is nearest the Imperial Valley region to the north, the preferred polarization direction found in this study (azimuth 180°±10°) coincides with the direction of the regional maximum compressive stress determined for the region. This polarization direction can be interpreted in terms of the “Extensive Dilatancy Anisotropy” model as the effect of vertical parallel aligned cracks. The preferred polarization direction measured at LMX, however, gives an azimuth of 45°±5°. Thus, it appears that faults and fractures aligned oblique to the main tectonic trend have a greater influence on the anisotropic characteristics of the crust south of Cerro Prieto volcano than that of the regional stress field. Time delays between slow and fast S waves observed at CPX appear constant from 1988 to 1992 while delays measured at LMX for the same interval indicate a small increase with time which cannot be attributed to azimuthal variations of paths.

  17. Protoplanetary disks in Taurus: Probing the role of multiplicity with ALMA observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laos, Stefan; Akeson, Rachel L.; Jensen, Eric L. N.

    2017-01-01

    We present results from an ALMA survey of single and multiple young systems in Taurus designed to probe how protoplanetary disk mass depends on both stellar mass and multiplicity. In observations taken in Cycles 0 and 2, we detect over 25 new disks. These detections include disks around stars in both single and multiple systems and are predominantly around lower mass stars with spectral types from M0 to M6. Combined with previous detections, these observations reveal a wide range of disk mass around both primary and companion stars, and allow us to test if the relation previously seen between disk and stellar mass continues at lower stellar masses. We find that within multiple systems the ratio of primary to secondary stellar mass is not correlated with the ratio of primary to secondary disk mass. In some cases, the secondary star hosts the more massive disk, contrary to theoretical predictions. We will discuss the implications of these results for the process of planet formation in multiple systems.This work makes use of the following ALMA data: ADS/JAO.ALMA#2011.0.00150.S. and ADS/JAO.ALMA#2013.1.00105.S. ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA) and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA (Taiwan), in cooperation with the Republic of Chile. The Joint ALMA Observatory is operated by ESO, AUI/NRAO and NAOJ. The National Radio Astronomy Observatory is a facility of the National Science Foundation operated under cooperative agreement by Associated Universities, Inc.

  18. Observational probes of the connection between Star Formation Efficiency and Dark Matter halo mass of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Veselina; Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Modern simulations predict that the stellar mass and the star formation efficiency of a galaxy are tightly linked to the dark matter (DM) halo mass of that galaxy. This prediction relies on a specific model of galaxy evolution and so testing this prediction directly tests our best models of galaxy formation and evolution. Recent DM numerical studies propose relationships between star formation efficiency and the DM halo mass with two domains based on SF feedback (low-mass) vs. AGN feedback (high-mass), see Moster et al. (2013). The observational probe of such parameters in the relationship imply globally important physics that are fundamental as, e.g., the star formation law (e.g., Kennicutt et al., 1998), the universal depletion time (Leroy et al. 2008), and the origin of the cold gas phase with respect to the stellar disc (Davis et al.2011). Thus, we can directly measure whether this parameterization is correct by estimating the stellar mass, star formation efficiency and dynamical (DM) mass for a set of galaxies at strategically selected points to test if they fall on the predicted relationship.We use CO data from the Extragalactic Database for Galaxy Evolution survey (EDGE) in conjunction with archival 21-cm data and spectroscopic data from Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field spectroscopy Area survey (CALIFA) to measure the stellar vs. halo mass and star-formation-efficiency vs. halo mass relations of the galaxies. We also analyze archival 21-cm spectra to estimate rotation speeds, atomic gas masses and halo masses for a set of EDGE galaxies. Data from CALIFA are used for high quality star formation efficiency and stellar mass measurements. By linking these three parameters - stellar mass, star formation efficiency (SFE) and DM halo mass - we can test the simulation models of how the gas is cooling in the potential wells of the dark matter halos and then forms stars.

  19. Probing turbulent, magnetized star formation with ALMA observations and next-generation AREPO simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Mocz, Philip; Burkhart, Blakesley K.; Miquel Girart, Josep; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Cortes, Paulo; Li, Zhi-Yun; Lai, Shih-Ping; Hernquist, Lars; Springel, Volker

    2017-01-01

    The first polarization data from ALMA have been delivered, and are both expanding and confounding our understanding of the role of magnetic fields in low-mass star formation. Here I will show the highest resolution and highest sensitivity polarization images ever made of a Class 0 protostellar source. These new ALMA observations of the source, known as Ser-emb 8, achieve 140 AU resolution, allowing us to probe polarization -- and thus magnetic field orientation -- in the innermost regions surrounding the protostar. The collapse of strongly magnetized dense gas is predicted to pinch the magnetic field into an hourglass shape that persists down to scales <100 AU. However, in contrast with more than 50 years of theory, the ALMA data definitively rule out an hourglass morphology and instead reveal a chaotic magnetic field that has not been inherited from the field in the interstellar medium surrounding the source. We have simulated the star formation process with cutting-edge, moving-mesh AREPO simulations on scales from a million AU (5 pc) down to 60 AU. We find that only in the case of a very strong magnetic field (~100 microgauss on 5 pc scales) is the field direction preserved from cloud to disk scales. When the field is weak, turbulence in the interstellar gas shapes the field on large scales, and the forming star system re-shapes the field again on small scales, divorcing the field from its history on larger scales. We conclude that this is what has happened in Ser-emb 8. The main distinction from the strong-field star formation model is that in the weak-field case it is turbulence -- not the magnetic field -- that shapes the material that forms the protostar.

  20. Nutrient amendments in soil DNA stable isotope probing experiments reduce the observed methanotroph diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cébron, Aurélie; Bodrossy, Levente; Stralis-Pavese, Nancy; Singer, Andrew C; Thompson, Ian P; Prosser, James I; Murrell, J Colin

    2007-02-01

    Stable isotope probing (SIP) can be used to analyze the active bacterial populations involved in a process by incorporating 13C-labeled substrate into cellular components such as DNA. Relatively long incubation times are often used with laboratory microcosms in order to incorporate sufficient 13C into the DNA of the target organisms. Addition of nutrients can be used to accelerate the processes. However, unnatural concentrations of nutrients may artificially change bacterial diversity and activity. In this study, methanotroph activity and diversity in soil was examined during the consumption of 13CH4 with three DNA-SIP experiments, using microcosms with natural field soil water conditions, the addition of water, and the addition of mineral salts solution. Methanotroph population diversity was studied by targeting 16S rRNA and pmoA genes. Clone library analyses, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis fingerprinting, and pmoA microarray hybridization analyses were carried out. Most methanotroph diversity (type I and type II methanotrophs) was observed in non-amended SIP microcosms. Although this treatment probably best reflected the in situ environmental conditions, one major disadvantage of this incubation was that the incorporation of 13CH4 was slow and some cross-feeding of 13C occurred, thereby leading to labeling of nonmethanotroph microorganisms. Conversely, microcosms supplemented with mineral salts medium exhibited rapid consumption of 13CH4, resulting in the labeling of a less diverse population of only type I methanotrophs. DNA-SIP incubations using water-amended microcosms yielded faster incorporation of 13C into active methanotrophs while avoiding the cross-feeding of 13C.

  1. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  2. Galaxy clusters and microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Quilis, V; Sáez, D

    1995-01-01

    Previous estimates of the microwave background anisotropies produced by freely falling spherical clusters are discussed. These estimates are based on the Swiss-Cheese and Tolman-Bondi models. It is proved that these models give only upper limits to the anisotropies produced by the observed galaxy clusters. By using spherically symmetric codes including pressureless matter and a hot baryonic gas, new upper limits are obtained. The contributions of the hot gas and the pressureless component to the total anisotropy are compared. The effects produced by the pressure are proved to be negligible; hence, estimations of the cluster anisotropies based on N-body simulations are hereafter justified. After the phenomenon of violent relaxation, any realistic rich cluster can only produce small anisotropies with amplitudes of order 10^{-7}. During the rapid process of violent relaxation, the anisotropies produced by nonlinear clusters are expected to range in the interval (10^{-6},10^{-5}). The angular scales of these anis...

  3. Elastic anisotropy of crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M. Kube

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An anisotropy index seeks to quantify how directionally dependent the properties of a system are. In this article, the focus is on quantifying the elastic anisotropy of crystalline materials. Previous elastic anisotropy indices are reviewed and their shortcomings discussed. A new scalar log-Euclidean anisotropy measure AL is proposed, which overcomes these deficiencies. It is based on a distance measure in a log-Euclidean space applied to fourth-rank elastic tensors. AL is an absolute measure of anisotropy where the limiting case of perfect isotropy yields zero. It is a universal measure of anisotropy applicable to all crystalline materials. Specific examples of strong anisotropy are highlighted. A supplementary material provides an anisotropy table giving the values of AL for 2,176 crystallite compounds.

  4. Probing recent star formation with absorption-line strengths in hierarchical models and observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trager, S. C.; Somerville, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    Stellar population parameters (e. g. age, metallicity and stellar abundance ratios) derived from spectral line strengths provide a powerful probe of galaxy properties and formation histories. We implement the machinery for extracting line strengths and 'single-stellar-population-equivalent' (SSP-equ

  5. Low Energy Plasma in the Outer Magnetosphere as Observed by Interball Tail Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Victoria N.; Vaisberg, Oleg L.; Gallagher, Dennis L.; Chandler, Michael O.

    1999-01-01

    The Interball Tail Probe crosses the dayside magnetopause at low latitudes where it frequently measures low energy ion plasma (<100 eV) in the outer magnetosphere. We present the plasma characteristics of this cold component, including it's dependence on solar wind parameters and interaction with PC-5 type waves.

  6. Observations of the azimuthal dependence of normal mode coupling below 4 mHz at the South Pole and its nearby stations: Insights into the anisotropy beneath the Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Gang

    2016-08-01

    Normal mode coupling pair 0S26-0T26 and 0S27-0T27 are significantly present at the South Pole station QSPA after the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku earthquake. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms responsible for the coupling pairs, I first investigate mode observations at 43 stations distributed along the polar great-circle path for the earthquake and observations at 32 Antarctic stations. I rule out the effect of Earth's rotation as well as the effect of global large-scale lateral heterogeneity, but argue instead for the effect of small-scale local azimuthal anisotropy in a depth extent about 300 km. The presence of quasi-Love waveform in 2-5 mHz at QSPA and its nearby stations confirms the predication. Secondly, I analyze normal mode observations at the South Pole location after 28 large earthquakes from 1998 to 2015. The result indicates that the presence of the mode coupling is azimuthal dependent, which is related to event azimuths in -46° to -18°. I also make a comparison between the shear-wave splitting measurements of previous studies and the mode coupling observations of this study, suggesting that their difference can be explained by a case that the anisotropy responsible for the mode coupling is not just below the South Pole location but located below region close to the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Furthermore, more signals of local azimuthal anisotropy in normal-mode observations at QSPA and SBA, such as coupling of 0S12-0T11 and vertical polarization anomaly for 0T10, confirms the existence of deep anisotropy close to TAM, which may be caused by asthenospheric mantle flow and edge convection around cratonic keel of TAM.

  7. Formation of Magnetic Anisotropy by Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Si Nyeon; Nam, Yoon Jae; Kim, Yang Doo; Choi, Jun Woo; Lee, Heon; Lim, Sang Ho

    2016-05-24

    Artificial interface anisotropy is demonstrated in alternating Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns, providing a means of forming magnetic anisotropy using lithography. In-plane hysteresis loops measured along two principal directions are explained in depth by two competing shape and interface anisotropies, thus confirming the formation of interface anisotropy at the Co/Pt and Co/Pd interfaces of the stripe patterns. The measured interface anisotropy energies, which are in the range of 0.2-0.3 erg/cm(2) for both stripes, are smaller than those observed in conventional multilayers, indicating a decrease in smoothness of the interfaces when formed by lithography. The demonstration of interface anisotropy in the Co/Pt and Co/Pd stripe patterns is of significant practical importance, because this setup makes it possible to form anisotropy using lithography and to modulate its strength by controlling the pattern width. Furthermore, this makes it possible to form more complex interface anisotropy by fabricating two-dimensional patterns. These artificial anisotropies are expected to open up new device applications such as multilevel bits using in-plane magnetoresistive thin-film structures.

  8. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron-Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump-Probe Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    optoelectronic devices that rely on long charge carrier lifetimes, such as nanostructured solar cells . Further studies of the effects of strain on the carrier...resolution and submicron spatial resolution to characterize charge–carrier recombination and transport dynamics in silicon nanowires (NWs) locally strained...release; distribution is unlimited. Reversible Strain-Induced Electron–Hole Recombination in Silicon Nanowires Observed with Femtosecond Pump–Probe

  9. Observations of a doubly driven V system probed to a fourth level in laser-cooled rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    D'Echaniz, S R; Durrant, A V; Segal, D M; Marangos, J P; Vaccaro, J A; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2001-01-01

    Observations of a doubly driven V system probed to a fourth level in an N configuration are reported. A dressed state analysis is also presented. The expected three-peak spectrum is explored in a cold rubidium sample in a magneto-optic trap. Good agreement is found between the dressed state theory and the experimental spectra once light shifts and uncoupled absorptions in the rubidium system are taken into account.

  10. Anisotropy in solar wind plasma turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oughton, S; Matthaeus, W H; Wan, M; Osman, K T

    2015-05-13

    A review of spectral anisotropy and variance anisotropy for solar wind fluctuations is given, with the discussion covering inertial range and dissipation range scales. For the inertial range, theory, simulations and observations are more or less in accord, in that fluctuation energy is found to be primarily in modes with quasi-perpendicular wavevectors (relative to a suitably defined mean magnetic field), and also that most of the fluctuation energy is in the vector components transverse to the mean field. Energy transfer in the parallel direction and the energy levels in the parallel components are both relatively weak. In the dissipation range, observations indicate that variance anisotropy tends to decrease towards isotropic levels as the electron gyroradius is approached; spectral anisotropy results are mixed. Evidence for and against wave interpretations and turbulence interpretations of these features will be discussed. We also present new simulation results concerning evolution of variance anisotropy for different classes of initial conditions, each with typical background solar wind parameters.

  11. On the problem of electron-induced anisotropy effect in As{sub 2}S{sub 3}-based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, V.O.; Shpotyuk, O.I. E-mail: karat@ipm.lviv.ua

    2000-05-02

    Effect of electron-induced anisotropy was observed in glassy As{sub 2}S{sub 3}-based samples irradiated by accelerated electrons (E=2.8 MeV) in the perpendicular plane to the probe light. Spectral and compositional dependences of this effect and its time stability at room temperature were discussed. It was supposed that the microstructural mechanism of the anisotropy effect was connected with electron-induced formation of new oriented (relatively to the electron flow) defects in the form of broken chemical bonds.

  12. Observation of femtosecond X-ray interactions with matter using an X-ray-X-ray pump-probe scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Ichiro; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Tono, Kensuke; Katayama, Tetsuo; Kameshima, Takashi; Ogawa, Kanade; Togashi, Tadashi; Owada, Shigeki; Amemiya, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Takashi; Hara, Toru; Yabashi, Makina

    2016-02-01

    Resolution in the X-ray structure determination of noncrystalline samples has been limited to several tens of nanometers, because deep X-ray irradiation required for enhanced resolution causes radiation damage to samples. However, theoretical studies predict that the femtosecond (fs) durations of X-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) pulses make it possible to record scattering signals before the initiation of X-ray damage processes; thus, an ultraintense X-ray beam can be used beyond the conventional limit of radiation dose. Here, we verify this scenario by directly observing femtosecond X-ray damage processes in diamond irradiated with extraordinarily intense (∼10(19) W/cm(2)) XFEL pulses. An X-ray pump-probe diffraction scheme was developed in this study; tightly focused double-5-fs XFEL pulses with time separations ranging from sub-fs to 80 fs were used to excite (i.e., pump) the diamond and characterize (i.e., probe) the temporal changes of the crystalline structures through Bragg reflection. It was found that the pump and probe diffraction intensities remain almost constant for shorter time separations of the double pulse, whereas the probe diffraction intensities decreased after 20 fs following pump pulse irradiation due to the X-ray-induced atomic displacement. This result indicates that sub-10-fs XFEL pulses enable conductions of damageless structural determinations and supports the validity of the theoretical predictions of ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions. The X-ray pump-probe scheme demonstrated here would be effective for understanding ultraintense X-ray-matter interactions, which will greatly stimulate advanced XFEL applications, such as atomic structure determination of a single molecule and generation of exotic matters with high energy densities.

  13. Impact of atmospheric refraction: How deeply can we probe exo-Earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Betremieux, Y

    2013-01-01

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density, probed during primary eclipses, as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction and show that most habitable exo-Earths cannot be probed down to their surface. We present 0.4-5.0micron model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  14. Spectral Anisotropy of Els\\"asser Variables in Two Dimensional Wave-vector Space as Observed in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Limei; Zhang, Lei; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Xin; Wang, Linghua; Wicks, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Intensive studies have been conducted to understand the anisotropy of solar wind turbulence. However, the anisotropy of Els\\"asser variables ($\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$) in 2D wave-vector space has yet to be investigated. Here we first verify the transformation based on the projection-slice theorem between the power spectral density PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ and the spatial correlation function CF$_{2D} (r_\\parallel,r_\\perp )$. Based on the application of the transformation to the magnetic field and the particle measurements from the WIND spacecraft, we investigate the spectral anisotropy of Els\\"asser variables ($\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$), and the distribution of residual energy E$_{R}$, Alfv\\'en ratio R$_{A}$ and Els\\"asser ratio R$_{E}$ in the $(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp)$ space. The spectra PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ of $\\textbf{B}$, $\\textbf{V}$, and $\\textbf{Z}_{major}$ (the larger of $\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$) show a similar pattern that PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ is mainly distributed along a ridge inclined toward t...

  15. Cosmological Inflation: Theory and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In this article we review the theory of cosmological inflation with a particular focus on the beautiful connection it provides between the physics of the very small and observations of the very large. We explain how quantum mechanical fluctuations during the inflationary era become macroscopic density fluctuations which leave distinct imprints in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We describe the physics of anisotropies in the CMB temperature and polarization and discuss how CMB observations can be used to probe the primordial universe.

  16. Higher order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model -- disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Lökös, Sándor; Csörgő, Tamás; Tomášik, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii.

  17. Higher-order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model: Disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loekoes, Sandor [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Csanad, Mate [Eoetvoes Lorand University, Budapest (Hungary); Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY (United States); Tomasik, Boris [Univerzita Mateja Bela, Banska Bystrica (Slovakia); Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Prague (Czech Republic); Csoergo, Tamas [Wigner RCP, Budapest (Hungary); KRF, Gyoengyoes (Hungary)

    2016-10-15

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii. (orig.)

  18. Convection Electric Field Observations by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, S.; Li, X.; Bonnell, J. W.; Wygant, J. R.; Malaspina, D.; Hartinger, M.; Thaller, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    We present direct electric field measurements made by THEMIS and the Van Allen Probes in the inner magnetosphere, focusing on the large-scale, near-DC convection electric field. The convection electric field drives plasma Earthward from the tail into the inner magnetosphere, playing a critical role in forming the ring current. Although it is normally shielded deep inside the magnetosphere, during storm times this large-scale electric field can penetrate to low L values (L mechanism for ~100 keV electron injection into the slot region and inner radiation belt. The relationship of the convection electric field with the plasmasphere is also important for understanding the dynamic outer radiation belt, as the plasmapause boundary has been strongly correlated with the dynamic variation of the outer radiation belt electrons.

  19. Multiphoton reaction of DTTCI observed by femtosecond pump–probe and two-pulse correlation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furuta, Koich [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Fuyuki, Masanori [Organization of Advanced Science and Technology, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Wada, Akihide, E-mail: aki.wada@koala.kobe-u.ac.jp [Molecular Photoscience Research Center, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-06-03

    Highlights: • Photoisomerization of DTTCI preferred two-photon process in red-tail excitation. • Photoisomerization time from the S{sub n} state was approximately 0.5 ns. • Two concurrent processes are involved in the two-photon excitation process. • Intermediate state in two-step excitation shows double-exponential decay behavior. • Relaxation of the intermediate state shows time-constants of 0.1 ps and 5 ps. - Abstract: To understand the elementary steps of chemical reactions, unimolecular reactions are important and considered to be model reactions. We carried out pump–probe and two-pulse correlation (2PC) measurements of the multiphoton-induced reaction of DTTCI (3,3′-diethyl-2,2′-thiatricarbocyanine iodide), a kind of cyanine dyes, under the red-tail excitation condition and found that both photoisomerization and photodegradation were caused by a two-photon process and the reaction time for photoisomerization was approximately 0.5 ns. Excitation dynamics was examined by 2PC measurements and the temporal character of the intermediate state was analyzed.

  20. Probing equilibration in HICs and symmetry energy by using isospin-related observables

    CERN Document Server

    Li Qi

    2002-01-01

    The authors have studied the equilibration with respect to isospin degree of freedom in four systems sup 9 sup 6 Ru + sup 9 sup 6 Ru, sup 9 sup 6 Ru + sup 9 sup 6 Zr, sup 9 sup 6 Zr + sup 9 sup 6 Ru, sup 9 sup 6 Zr + sup 9 sup 6 Zr at 100 MeV/u and 400 MeV/u with isospin dependent QMD. It is proposed that the neutron-proton differential rapidity distribution is a sensitive probe to the degree of equilibration with respect to the isospin degree of freedom. By analyzing the average N/Z ratio of emitted nucleons, light charged particles (LCP) and intermediate mass fragments (IMF), it is found that there exists memory effect in multifragmentation process. The average N/Z ratio of IMF reduces largely as beam energy increases from 100 MeV/u to 400 MeV/u, which may result from the change of the behavior of the isotope distribution of IMF. The isotope distribution of IMF does also show certain memory effect at 100 MeV/u case but not at 400 MeV/u case. The authors also found the rapidity distribution of differential n...

  1. A Modified Version of Taylor's Hypothesis for Solar Probe Plus Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Kristopher G; Verscharen, Daniel; Mallet, Alfred; Chandran, Benjamin D G

    2014-01-01

    The Solar Probe Plus (SPP) spacecraft will explore the near-Sun environment, reaching heliocentric distances as small as~$9.5 R_{\\odot}$. Near Earth, spacecraft measurements of fluctuating velocities and magnetic fields taken in the time domain are translated into information about the spatial structure of the solar wind via Taylor's "frozen turbulence" hypothesis. Near the perihelion of SPP, however, the solar-wind speed is comparable to the Alfv\\'en speed, and Taylor's hypothesis in its usual form does not apply. In this paper, we show that a modified version of Taylor's hypothesis can be recovered in the near-Sun region. In particular, we show that transverse, non-compressive fluctuations propagating away from the Sun in the plasma frame obey a relation analogous to Taylor's hypothesis when $V_{\\rm sc,\\perp} \\gg |\\bm{z}^-|$ and $|\\bm{z}^+| \\gg |\\bm{z}^-|$, where $V_{\\rm sc,\\perp}$ is the component of the spacecraft velocity perpendicular to the mean magnetic field and $\\bm{z}^+$ ($\\bm{z}^-$) is the Els\\"as...

  2. Probing the origin of VHE emission from M 87 with MWL observations in 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Raue, Martin; Mazin, Daniel; Colin, Pierre; Hui, Michelle; Beilicke, Matthias; Walker, Craig; MAGIC,; VERITAS,

    2012-01-01

    The large majority of extragalactic very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) sources belongs to the class of active galactic nuclei (AGN), in particular the BL Lac sub-class. AGNs are characterized by an extremely bright and compact emission region, powered by a super-massive black hole (SMBH) and an accretion disk, and relativistic outflows (jets) detected all across the electro-magnetic spectrum. In BL Lac sources the jet axis is oriented close to the line of sight, giving rise to a relativistic boosting of the emission. In radio galaxies, on the other hand, the jet makes a larger angle to the line of sight allowing to resolve the central core and the jet in great details. The giant radio galaxy M 87 with its proximity (1 6Mpc) and its very massive black hole ((3-6) x 10^9 M_solar) provides a unique laboratory to investigate VHE emission in such objects and thereby probe particle acceleration to relativistic energies near SMBH and in jets. M 87 has been established as a VHE emitter since 2005. The VHE emission dis...

  3. The Intrinsic Quasar Luminosity Function: Accounting for Accretion Disk Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    DiPompeo, M A; Brotherton, M S; Runnoe, J C; Green, R F

    2014-01-01

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic --- in part due to its disk-like structure --- but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic l...

  4. Probing the gamma-ray variability in 3C 279 using broad-band observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, B.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Lee, S.-S.; Sokolovsky, K.; Kang, S.; Byun, D.-Y.; Mosunova, D.; Zensus, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a broad-band radio-to-GeV observing campaign organized to get a better understanding of the radiation processes responsible for the γ-ray flares observed in 3C 279. The total intensity and polarization observations of the source were carried out between 2013 December 28 and 2014 January 03 using the Fermi-Large Area Telescope, Swift-XRT, Swift-UVOT, and Korean VLBI Network telescopes. A prominent flare observed in the optical/near-UV passbands was found to be correlated with a concurrent γ-ray flare at a confidence level >95 per cent, which suggests a co-spatial origin of the two. Moreover, the flaring activity in the two regimes was accompanied by no significant spectral variations. A peak in the X-ray light curve coincides with the peaks of the fractional polarization curves at 43 and 86 GHz radio bands. No prominent variation was noticed for the total intensity and the electric vector position angle observations at radio bands during this period. We noticed a possible hint of steepening of the radio spectrum with an increase in percentage polarization, which suggests that the radio polarization variations could be simply due to a spectral change. In a simple scenario, the correlated optical/γ-ray flares could be caused by the same population of emitting particles. The coincidence of the increase in radio polarization with the X-ray flux supports the picture that X-rays are produced via inverse-Compton scattering of radio photons. The observed fractional variability for the γ-ray flare ˜0.23 does not exceed that in the optical regime, which is inconsistent with what we usually observe for 3C 279; it could be due to different dependencies of the magnetic field and the external radiation field energy density profiles along the jet.

  5. Probing the gamma-ray variability in 3C279 using broadband observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rani, B; Lee, S -S; Sokolovsky, K; Kang, S; Byun, D -Y; Mosunova, D; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a broadband radio-to-GeV observing campaign organized to get a better understanding of the radiation processes responsible for the $\\gamma$-ray flares observed in 3C 279. The total intensity and polarization observations of the source were carried out between December 28, 2013 and January 03, 2014 using the Fermi-LAT, Swift-XRT, Swift-UVOT, and KVN telescopes. A prominent flare observed in the optical/near-UV passbands was found to be correlated with a concurrent $\\gamma$-ray flare at a confidence level $>$95$\\%$, which suggests a co-spatial origin of the two. Moreover, the flaring activity in the two regimes was accompanied by no significant spectral variations. A peak in the X-ray light curve coincides with the peaks of the fractional polarization curves at 43 and 86 GHz radio bands. No prominent variation was noticed for the total intensity and the electric vector position angle (EVPA) observations at radio bands during this period. We noticed a possible hint of steepening of the ...

  6. Van Allen Probes observations of dipolarization and its associated O+ flux variations in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nose, M.; Keika, K.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.

    2015-12-01

    Recent study employing the MDS-1 satellite reveals that magnetic field dipolarization in the deep inner magnetosphere is not unusual. When the MDS-1 satellite was located at L=3.5-5.0 near the auroral onset longitude (MLT difference of ≤2.5 h), the occurrence probability of local dipolarization was about 16%. Surprisingly, an event was found at L~3.6, far inside the geosynchronous altitude. It was also shown that after the dipolarization, the oxygen ENA flux in the nightside ring current region measured by the IMAGE satellite was predominantly enhanced by a factor of 2-5 and stayed at an enhanced level for more than 1 h, while clear enhancement was scarcely seen in the hydrogen ENA flux. To better understand mechanisms of the selective acceleration of O+ ions during dipolarization, an in-situ measurement of ion fluxes is needed. However, there are few studies investigating H+ and O+ flux variations during dipolarization in the deep inner magnetosphere. In this study we investigate magnetic field dipolarization and its associated ion flux variations in the deep inner magnetosphere, using magnetic field and ion flux data obtained by the Van Allen Probes. From the magnetic field data recorded on the nightside (1800-0600 MLT) in the inner magnetosphere (L=3.0-6.6) in VDH coordinates, we select substorm-related dipolarization events in which the H component increases by more than 20 nT and the absolute value of the V component decreases by more than 8 nT in 5 minutes. About 150 dipolarization events are identified from 1 October 2012 to 30 June 2015. We find that the dipolarization mostly occurs at L=4.5-6.5 in the premidnight sector (2100-0000 MLT). No events are found at Levents are accompanied by O+ flux enhancements in the energy range higher than a few keV, which have the pitch angle distribution peaked around 45 or 135 degrees. We also find that low energy O+ ions often appear after dipolarization with an energy dispersion starting from around keV down to a few

  7. Observational legacy of preon stars: Probing new physics beyond the CERN LHC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandin, F.; Hansson, J.

    2007-12-01

    We discuss possible ways to observationally detect the superdense cosmic objects composed of hypothetical subconstituent fermions beneath the quark/lepton level, recently proposed by us. The characteristic mass and size of such objects depend on the compositeness scale, and their huge density cannot arise within a context of quarks and leptons alone. Their eventual observation would therefore be a direct vindication of physics beyond the standard model of particle physics, possibly far beyond the reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in a relatively simple and inexpensive manner. If relic objects of this type exist, they can possibly be detected by present and future x-ray observatories, high-frequency gravitational wave detectors, and seismological detectors. To have a realistic detection rate, i.e., to be observable, they must necessarily constitute a significant fraction of cold dark matter.

  8. The observational legacy of preon stars - probing new physics beyond the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Sandin, F

    2007-01-01

    We discuss possible ways to observationally detect the superdense cosmic objects composed of hypothetical sub-constituent fermions beneath the quark/lepton level, recently proposed by us. The characteristic mass and size of such objects depend on the compositeness scale, and their huge density cannot arise within a context of quarks and leptons alone. Their eventual observation would therefore be a direct vindication of physics beyond the standard model of particle physics, possibly far beyond the reach of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), in a relatively simple and inexpensive manner. If relic objects of this type exist, they can possibly be detected by present and future x-ray observatories, high-frequency gravitational wave detectors, and seismological detectors. To have a realistic detection rate, i.e., to be observable, they must necessarily constitute a significant fraction of cold dark matter.

  9. Constraints on the symmetry energy from observational probes of the neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Newton, William G; Gearheart, Michael; Murphy, Kyleah; Wen, De-Hua; Fattoyev, Farrukh; Li, Bao-An

    2015-01-01

    A number of observed phenomena associated with individual neutron star systems or neutron star populations find explanations in models in which the neutron star crust plays an important role. We review recent work examining the sensitivity to the slope of the symmetry energy $L$ of such models, and constraints extracted on $L$ from confronting them with observations. We focus on six sets of observations and proposed explanations: (i) The cooling rate of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, confronting cooling models which include enhanced cooling in the nuclear pasta regions of the inner crust, (ii) the upper limit of the observed periods of young X-ray pulsars, confronting models of magnetic field decay in the crust caused by the high resistivity of the nuclear pasta layer, (iii) glitches from the Vela pulsar, confronting the paradigm that they arise due to a sudden re-coupling of the crustal neutron superfluid to the crustal lattice after a period during which they were decoupled due to vortex pinning, (iv) Th...

  10. HI observations of low surface brightness galaxies : Probing low-density galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    deBlok, WJG; McGaugh, SS; vanderHulst, JM

    1996-01-01

    We present Very Large Array (VLA) and Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT) 21-cm HI observations of 19 late-type low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies. Our main findings are that these galaxies, as well as having low surface brightnesses, have low HI surface densities, about a factor of simil

  11. Constraints on the symmetry energy from observational probes of the neutron star crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Gearheart, Michael; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Li, Bao-An [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); Murphy, Kyleah [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); Umpqua Community College, Roseburg, Oregon (United States); Wen, De-Hua [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); South China University of Technology, Department of Physics, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    A number of observed phenomena associated with individual neutron star systems or neutron star populations find explanations in models in which the neutron star crust plays an important role. We review recent work examining the sensitivity to the slope of the symmetry energy L of such models, and constraints extracted on L from confronting them with observations. We focus on six sets of observations and proposed explanations: (i) The cooling rate of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, confronting cooling models which include enhanced cooling in the nuclear pasta regions of the inner crust; (ii) the upper limit of the observed periods of young X-ray pulsars, confronting models of magnetic field decay in the crust caused by the high resistivity of the nuclear pasta layer; (iii) glitches from the Vela pulsar, confronting the paradigm that they arise due to a sudden recoupling of the crustal neutron superfluid to the crustal lattice after a period during which they were decoupled due to vortex pinning; (iv) the frequencies of quasi-periodic oscillations in the X-ray tail of light curves from giant flares from soft gamma-ray repeaters, confronting models of torsional crust oscillations; (v) the upper limit on the frequency to which millisecond pulsars can be spun-up due to accretion from a binary companion, confronting models of the r-mode instability arising above a threshold frequency determined in part by the viscous dissipation timescale at the crust-core boundary; and (vi) the observations of precursor electromagnetic flares a few seconds before short gamma-ray bursts, confronting a model of crust shattering caused by resonant excitation of a crustal oscillation mode by the tidal gravitational field of a companion neutron star just before merger. (orig.)

  12. Probing 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko's Electron Environment Through Ultraviolet Emission by Rosetta Alice Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindhelm, Eric; Noonan, John; Keeney, Brian A.; Broiles, Thomas; Bieler, Andre; A'Hearn, Michael F.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Feaga, Lori M.; Feldman, Paul D.; Parker, Joel Wm.; Steffl, Andrew Joseph; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.

    2016-10-01

    The Alice Far-Ultraviolet (FUV) Spectrograph onboard ESA's Rosetta spacecraft has observed the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko from far approach in summer 2014 until the end of mission in September 2016. We present an overall perspective of the bright FUV emission lines (HI 1026 Å, OI 1302/1305/1306 Å multiplet, OI] 1356 Å, CO 1510 (1-0) Å, and CI 1657 Å) above the sunward hemisphere, detailing their spatial extent and brightness as a function of time and the heliocentric distance of the comet. We compare our observed gas column densities derived using electron temperatures and densities from the Ion Electron Sensor (IES) with those derived using the Inner Coma Environment Simulator (ICES) models in periods when electron-impact excited emission dominates over solar fluorescence emission. The electron population is characterized with 2 three-dimensional kappa functions, one dense and warm, one rarefied and hot.

  13. Probing dark matter decay and annihilation with Fermi LAT observations of nearby galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Vertongen, Gilles [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Weniger, Christoph [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Galaxy clusters are promising targets for indirect dark matter searches. Gamma-ray signatures from the decay or annihilation of dark matter particles inside these clusters could be observable with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on three years of Fermi LAT gamma-ray data, we analyze the flux coming from eight nearby clusters individually as well as in a combined likelihood analysis. Concentrating mostly on signals from dark matter decay, we take into account uncertainties of the cluster masses as determined by X-ray observations and model the cluster emission with extended sources. We do not find significant emission from any of the considered clusters and present limits on the dark matter lifetime and annihilation cross-section. We compare our lifetime limits derived from cluster observations with the limits that can be obtained from the extragalactic gamma-ray background, and find that in case of hadronic decay the cluster limits become competitive at dark matter masses below a few hundred GeV. Finally, we show that in presence of dark matter substructures down to 10{sup -6} solar masses the limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section could improve by a factor of a few hundred, possibly going down to the thermal cross-section of 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} for dark matter masses observation of long-lived superparticles at the LHC are discussed. (orig.)

  14. Impact of atmospheric refraction: how deeply can we probe exo-earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bétrémieux, Yan [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kaltenegger, Lisa, E-mail: betremieux@mpia.de [Also at Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density and pressure, probed during primary eclipses as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction for all exoplanets and tabulate the critical altitude, density, and pressure for an exoplanet identical to Earth with a 1 bar N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere as a function of both the incident stellar flux (Venus, Earth, and Mars-like) at the top of the atmosphere and the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We show that such a habitable exo-Earth can be probed to a surface pressure of 1 bar only around the coolest stars. We present 0.4-5.0 μm model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  15. Spectro-polarimetric observation in UV with CLASP to probe the chromosphere and transition region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Ryouhei; Ishikawa, Ryohko; Winebarger, Amy R.; Auchère, Frédéric; Trujillo Bueno, Javier; Narukage, Noriyuki; Kobayashi, Ken; Bando, Takamasa; Katsukawa, Yukio; Kubo, Masahito; Ishikawa, Shin-Nosuke; Giono, Gabriel; Hara, Hirohisa; Suematsu, Yoshinori; Shimizu, Toshifumi; Sakao, Taro; Tsuneta, Saku; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Goto, Motoshi; Cirtain, Jonathan W.; De Pontieu, Bart; Casini, Roberto; Manso Sainz, Rafael; Asensio Ramos, Andres; Stepan, Jiri; Belluzzi, Luca; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-05-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a NASA sounding-rocket experiment that was performed in White Sands in the US on September 3, 2015. During its 5-minute ballistic flight, CLASP successfully made the first spectro-polarimetric observation in the Lyman-alpha line (121.57 nm) originating in the chromosphere and transition region. Since the Lyman-alpha polarization is sensitive to magnetic field of 10-100 G by the Hanle effect, we aim to infer the magnetic field information in such upper solar atmosphere with this experiment.The obtained CLASP data showed that the Lyman-alpha scattering polarization is about a few percent in the wings and the order of 0.1% in the core near the solar limb, as it had been theoretically predicted, and that both polarization signals have a conspicuous spatio-temporal variability. CLASP also observed another upper-chromospheric line, Si III (120.65 nm), whose critical field strength for the Hanle effect is 290 G, and showed a measurable scattering polarization of a few % in this line. The polarization properties of the Si III line could facilitate the interpretation of the scattering polarization observed in the Lyman-alpha line.In this presentation, we would like to show how the upper chromosphere and transition region are seen in the polarization of these UV lines and discuss the possible source of these complicated polarization signals.

  16. Probing the Disk-jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed with Suzaku

    CERN Document Server

    Kataoka, J; Iwasawa, K; Markowitz, A G; Mushotzky, R F; Arimoto, M; Takahashi, T; Tsubuku, Y; Ushio, M; Watanabe, S; Gallo, L C; Madejski, G M; Terashima, Y; Isobe, N; Tashiro, M S; Kohmura, T; Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi

    2006-01-01

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C~120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K_a core (sigma ~ 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at ~10 r_g. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R ~ 0.6), superposed ...

  17. Supernovae anisotropy power spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Ghodsi, Hoda; Habibi, Farhang

    2016-01-01

    We contribute another anisotropy study to this field of research using Supernovae Type Ia (SNe Ia). In this work, we utilise the power spectrum calculation method and apply it to both the current SNe Ia data and simulation. Our simulations are constructed with the characteristics of the upcoming survey of the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST), which shall bring us the largest SNe Ia collection to date. We make predictions for the amplitude of a possible dipole anisotropy or anisotropy in higher multipole moments that would be detectable by the LSST.

  18. Density waves in Saturn's rings probed by radio and optical occultation - Observational tests of theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Thomas G.; Rosen, Paul A.

    1992-01-01

    A parallel examination is conducted of Voyager radio and photopolarimeter occultation observations of the Saturn A ring's density waves. The radio instrument waves exhibit an average -90 deg offset from the dynamical phase. A warping height of about 100-m amplitude can qualtitatively reproduce this phase shift, while preserving the overall model wave shape. These results may be profoundly relevant for satellite-ring torque calculations in Saturn's rings, given the deposition of all of the net torque of the standard model in the first wavelength.

  19. Probing quantum gravity using photons from a flare of the active galactic nucleus Markarian 501 observed by the MAGIC telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea del Pozo, E; Delgado Mendez, C; de los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; García-López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Göbel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Pérez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saitô, T; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Mavromatos, N E; Nanopoulos, D V; Sakharov, Alexander S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2008-01-01

    We use the timing of photons observed by the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope during a flare of the active galaxy Markarian 501 to probe a vacuum refractive index ~ 1-(E/M_QGn)^n, n = 1,2, that might be induced by quantum gravity. The peaking of the flare is found to maximize for quantum-gravity mass scales M_QG1 ~ 0.4x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 ~ 0.6x10^11 GeV, and we establish lower limits M_QG1 > 0.26x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 > 0.39x10^11 GeV at the 95% C.L. Monte Carlo studies confirm the MAGIC sensitivity to propagation effects at these levels. Thermal plasma effects in the source are negligible, but we cannot exclude the importance of some other source effect.

  20. The Canadian Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP Mission: Current Status and Planned Observations and Data Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A W Yau

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The CASSIOPE Enhanced Polar Outflow Probe (e-POP is a Canadian small-satellite mission dedicated to the study of polar ion outflows and related magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling processes in the topside ionosphere. Scheduled for launch in 2009, it will carry eight scientific instruments, including imaging plasma and neutral particle sensors, magnetometers, dual-frequency GPS receivers, CCD cameras, a radio wave receiver and a beacon transmitter, for in-situ particle, field, and current measurements and auroral imaging and radio measurements. We present an overview of the e-POP mission, its current status and plan of observations and data distribution during the operation phase of the mission.

  1. Van Allen Probes observations of prompt MeV radiation belt electron acceleration in nonlinear interactions with VLF chorus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, J. C.; Erickson, P. J.; Omura, Y.; Baker, D. N.; Kletzing, C. A.; Claudepierre, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    Prompt recovery of MeV (millions of electron Volts) electron populations in the poststorm core of the outer terrestrial radiation belt involves local acceleration of a seed population of energetic electrons in interactions with VLF chorus waves. Electron interactions during the generation of VLF rising tones are strongly nonlinear, such that a fraction of the relativistic electrons at resonant energies are trapped by waves, leading to significant nonadiabatic energy exchange. Through detailed examination of VLF chorus and electron fluxes observed by Van Allen Probes, we investigate the efficiency of nonlinear processes for acceleration of electrons to MeV energies. We find through subpacket analysis of chorus waveforms that electrons with initial energy of hundreds of keV to 3 MeV can be accelerated by 50 keV-200 keV in resonant interactions with a single VLF rising tone on a time scale of 10-100 ms.

  2. Optical-reflectance anisotropy in epitaxial metastable (GaAs) sub 1 minus x (Si sub 2 ) sub x (001) alloys: A probe for the zinc-blende--to--diamond structural transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lastras-Martriaanez, A.; Rodriguez-Pedroza, G. (Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi, Alvaro Obregon 64, San Luis Potosi, San Luis Potosi, Mexico (MX)); Mei, D.H.; Kramer, B.; Lubben, D.; Greene, J.E. (Department of Materials Science, The Coordinated Science Laboratory, the Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, 1101 West Springfield Ave., Urbana, Illinois 61801 (USA))

    1991-06-15

    Anisotropy in the above-band-gap optical reflectance along the (110) and (1{bar 1}0) directions has been used to investigate long-range atomic ordering in metastable epitaxial (GaAs){sub 1{minus}{ital x}}(Si{sub 2}){sub {ital x}}(001) alloys as a function of Si concentration {ital x}. The amplitude of the differentiated reflectance-difference signal was found to decrease monotonically with increasing {ital x} and reach zero, corresponding to the critical concentration for the zinc-blende--to--diamond transition, at {ital x}{congruent}0.37, consistent with x-ray-diffraction results. The highest sensitivity in the optical-anisotropy spectra was obtained in the spectral region near the {ital E}{sub 0}{sup {prime}} critical point (4.5 eV in GaAs).

  3. Optimal core baseline design and observing strategy for probing the astrophysics of reionization with the SKA

    CERN Document Server

    Greig, Bradley; Koopmans, Léon V E

    2015-01-01

    With the first phase of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA1) entering into its final pre-construction phase, we investigate how best to maximise its scientific return. Specifically, we focus on the statistical measurement of the 21 cm power spectrum (PS) from the epoch of reionization (EoR) using the low frequency array, SKA1-low. To facilitate this investigation we use the recently developed MCMC based EoR analysis tool 21CMMC (Greig & Mesinger). In light of the recent 50 per cent cost reduction, we consider several different SKA core baseline designs, changing: (i) the number of antenna stations; (ii) the number of dipoles per station; and also (iii) the distribution of baseline lengths. We find that a design with a reduced number of dipoles per core station (increased field of view and total number of core stations), together with shortened baselines, maximises the recovered EoR signal. With this optimal baseline design, we investigate three observing strategies, analysing the trade-off between lowering t...

  4. Event Horizon Telescope Observations as Probes for Quantum Structure of Astrophysical Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Giddings, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    The need for a consistent quantum evolution for black holes has led to proposals that their semiclassical description is modified not just near the singularity, but at horizon or larger scales. If such modifications extend beyond the horizon, they influence regions accessible to distant observeration. Natural candidates for these modifications behave like metric fluctuations, with characteristic length and time scales set by the horizon radius. We investigate the possibility of using the Event Horizon Telescope to observe these effects, if they have a strength sufficient to make quantum evolution consistent with unitarity. We find that such quantum fluctuations can introduce a strong time dependence for the shape and size of the shadow that a black hole casts on its surrounding emission. For the black hole in the center of the Milky Way, detecting the rapid time variability of its shadow will require non-imaging timing techniques. However, for the much larger black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy, a vari...

  5. Probing the Intermediate-Age Globular Clusters in NGC 5128 from Ultraviolet Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rey, Soo-Chang; Beasley, Michael A; Lee, Young-Wook; Rich, R Michael; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Yi, Sukyoung K; Bianch, Luciana; Kang, Yongbeom; Lee, Kyeongsook; Chung, Chul; Barlow, Tom A; Foster, Karl; Friedman, Peter G; Martin, D Christopher; Morrissey, Patrick; Neff, Susan G; Schiminovich, David; Seibert, Mark; Wyder, Ted K; Donas, Jose; Heckman, Timothy M; Madore, Barry F; Milliard, Bruno; Szalay, A S; Welsh, Barry Y

    2009-01-01

    We explore the age distribution of the globular cluster (GC) system of the nearby elliptical galaxy NGC 5128 using ultraviolet (UV) photometry from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) observations, with UV - optical colors used as the age indicator. Most GCs in NGC 5128 follow the general trends of GCs in M31 and Milky Way in UV - optical color-color diagram, which indicates that the majority of GCs in NGC 5128 are old similar to the age range of old GCs in M31 and Milky Way. A large fraction of spectroscopically identified intermediate-age GC (IAGC) candidates with ~ 3-8 Gyr are not detected in the FUV passband. Considering the nature of intermediate-age populations being faint in the far-UV (FUV) passband, we suggest that many of the spectroscopically identified IAGCs may be truly intermediate in age. This is in contrast to the case of M31 where a large fraction of spectroscopically suggested IAGCs are detected in FUV and therefore may not be genuine IAGCs but rather older GCs with developed blue horizontal b...

  6. Type II supernovae as probes of environment metallicity: observations of host HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J P; Dessart, L; Hamuy, M; Galbany, L; Morrell, N I; Stritzinger, M D; Phillips, M M; Folatelli, G; Boffin, H M J; de Jaeger, T; Kuncarayakti, H; Prieto, J L

    2016-01-01

    Spectral modelling of SNII atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these SNe can be used as metallicity indicators. To assess this accuracy we present a sample of SNII HII-region spectroscopy, from which environment abundances are derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in SN spectra. Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host HII regions, by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. Then, following Dessart et al., these abundances are compared to equivalent widths of Fe 5018 A at various time and colour epochs. Our distribution of inferred SNII host HII-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of SNeII exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe 5018 A at 50 days po...

  7. Kalman Filtering and Smoothing of the Van Allen Probes Observations to Estimate the Radial, Energy and Pitch Angle Diffusion Rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podladchikova, T.; Shprits, Y.; Kellerman, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Kalman filter technique combines the strengths of new physical models of the Earth's radiation belts with long-term spacecraft observations of electron fluxes and therefore provide an extremely useful method for the analysis of the state and evolution of the electron radiation belts. However, to get the reliable data assimilation output, the Kalman filter application is confronted with a set of fundamental problems. E.g., satellite measurements are usually limited to a single location in space, which confines the reconstruction of the global evolution of the radiation environment. The uncertainties arise from the imperfect description of the process dynamics and the presence of observation errors, which may cause the failure of data assimilation solution. The development of adaptive Kalman filter that combines the Van Allen Probes data and 3-D VERB code, its accurate customizations in the reconstruction of model describing the phase space density (PSD) evolution, extension of the possibilities to use measurement information, and the model adjustment by developing the identification techniques of model and measurement errors allowed us to reveal hidden and implicit regularities of the PSD dynamics and obtain quantitative and qualitative estimates of radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion characteristics from satellite observations. In this study we propose an approach to estimate radial, energy and pitch angle diffusion rates, as well as the direction of their propagation.

  8. Magnetic anisotropy and the phase diagram of chiral MnSb2O6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, J.; Koo, C.; Klingeler, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Ovchenkov, Y. A.; Polovkova, A. S.; Raganyan, G. V.; Zvereva, E. A.

    2016-09-01

    The magnetic phase diagram and low-energy magnon excitations of structurally and magnetically chiral MnSb2O6 are reported. The specific heat and the static magnetization are investigated in magnetic fields up to 9 and 30 T, respectively, while the dynamic magnetic properties are probed by X-band as well as tunable high-frequency electron spin-resonance spectroscopy. Below TN=11.5 K, we observe antiferromagnetic resonance modes which imply small but finite planar anisotropy showing up in a zero-field splitting of 20 GHz. The data are well described by means of an easy-plane two-sublattice model with the anisotropy field BA=0.02 T. The exchange field BE=13 T is obtained from the saturation field derived from the pulsed-field magnetization. A crucial role of the small anisotropy for the spin structure is reflected by competing antiferromagnetic phases appearing, at T =2 K, in small magnetic fields at BC 1 ≈0.5 T and BC 2=0.9 T. We discuss the results in terms of spin reorientation and of small magnetic fields favoring helical spin structure over the cycloidal ground state which, at B =0 , is stabilized by the planar anisotropy. Above TN, short-range magnetic correlations up to ≳60 K and magnetic entropy changes well above TN reflect the frustrated triangular arrangement of Mn2 + ions in MnSb2O6 .

  9. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-11-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the O-ion/H-ion abundance ratio. Of unique interest to ring current dynamics are the spatial-temporal decay characteristics of the two injected populations. We observe that He-ions decay more quickly at lower L shells, on the order of ∼0.8 day at L shells of 3-4, and decay more slowly with higher L shell, on the order of ∼1.7 days at L shells of 5-6. Conversely, O-ions decay very rapidly (∼1.5 h) across all L shells. The He-ion decay time are consistent with previously measured and calculated lifetimes associated with charge exchange. The O-ion decay time is much faster than predicted and is attributed to the inclusion of higher-energy (> 500 keV) O-ions in our decay rate estimation. We note that these measurements demonstrate a compelling need for calculation of high-energy O-ion loss rates, which have not been adequately studied in the literature to date.

  10. Skewness in the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy from Inflationary Gravity Wave Background

    CERN Document Server

    Bharadwaj, S; Souradeep, T; Bharadwaj, Somnath; Munshi, Dipak; Souradeep, Tarun

    1997-01-01

    In the context of inflationary scenarios, the observed large angle anisotropy of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) temperature is believed to probe the primordial metric perturbations from inflation. Although the perturbations from inflation are expected to be gaussian random fields, there remains the possibility that nonlinear processes at later epochs induce ``secondary'' non-gaussian features in the corresponding CMB anisotropy maps. The non-gaussianity induced by nonlinear gravitational instability of scalar (density) perturbations has been investigated in existing literature. In this paper, we highlight another source of non-gaussianity arising out of higher order scattering of CMB photons off the metric perturbations. We provide a simple and elegant formalism for deriving the CMB temperature fluctuations arising due to the Sachs-Wolfe effect beyond the linear order. In particular, we derive the expression for the second order CMB temperature fluctuations. The multiple scattering effect pointed out i...

  11. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    CERN Document Server

    Bengaly,, C A P; Alcaniz, J S; Xavier, H S; Novaes, C P

    2016-01-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is $A = 0.0507 \\pm 0.0014$ toward the $(l,b) = (323^{\\circ},-5^{\\circ})$ direction. This result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues.Furthermore, this dipole amplitude obtained is statistically consistent with mock catalogues simulated according to the $\\Lambda$CDM matter density expected fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage, anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy...

  12. Mantle wedge dynamics from seismic anisotropy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, M. D.; Wirth, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle wedge above subducting slabs plays a critical role in many of the physical processes associated with subduction, including water transport into the upper mantle and the generation and transport of melts. Our understanding of mantle wedge dynamics is incomplete; in particular, the mantle flow field above subducting slabs remains poorly understood. Because seismic anisotropy is a consequence of deformation, observations of anisotropy (such as shear wave splitting and P-to-SH converted waves) can constrain the geometry of the wedge flow field. Additionally, because the presence of water (either in nominally anhydrous minerals or as hydrous phases) can have a large effect on anisotropic structure, a detailed understanding of mantle wedge anisotropy can help to constrain processes related to water cycling in subduction systems. We present a global, synoptic view of anisotropy observations in subduction zone mantle wedges, compiled from a large number of individual studies, with the goal of understanding the first-order controls on wedge anisotropy and flow patterns. This compilation allows us to explicitly test the predictions made by many different conceptual models for wedge anisotropy, as well as to explore the relationships between observed anisotropy parameters and other parameters that describe subduction. We find that no simple model can explain all of the trends observed in the global data set. Mantle wedge flow is likely controlled by a combination of downdip motion of the slab, trench migration, ambient mantle flow, small-scale convection, proximity to slab edges, and slab morphology, with the relative contributions of these in any given subduction system controlled by the subduction kinematics and mantle rheology. There is also a likely contribution from B-type olivine and/or serpentinite fabric in many subduction zones, governed by the local thermal structure and volatile distribution.

  13. Combined convective and diffusive simulations: VERB-4D comparison with 17 March 2013 Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shprits, Yuri Y.; Kellerman, Adam C.; Drozdov, Alexander Y.; Spence, Harlan E.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Baker, Daniel N.

    2015-11-01

    This study is focused on understanding the coupling between different electron populations in the inner magnetosphere and the various physical processes that determine evolution of electron fluxes at different energies. Observations during the 17 March 2013 storm and simulations with a newly developed Versatile Electron Radiation Belt-4D (VERB-4D) are presented. Analysis of the drift trajectories of the energetic and relativistic electrons shows that electron trajectories at transitional energies with a first invariant on the scale of ~100 MeV/G may resemble ring current or relativistic electron trajectories depending on the level of geomagnetic activity. Simulations with the VERB-4D code including convection, radial diffusion, and energy diffusion are presented. Sensitivity simulations including various physical processes show how different acceleration mechanisms contribute to the energization of energetic electrons at transitional energies. In particular, the range of energies where inward transport is strongly influenced by both convection and radial diffusion are studied. The results of the 4-D simulations are compared to Van Allen Probes observations at a range of energies including source, seed, and core populations of the energetic and relativistic electrons in the inner magnetosphere.

  14. Phase structure of the Born-Infeld-anti-de Sitter black holes probed by non-local observables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng, Xiao-Xiong [Chongqing Jiaotong University, School of Material Science and Engineering, Chongqing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Beijing (China); Liu, Xian-Ming [Center for Theoretical Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Hubei University for Nationalities, Center for Theoretical Physics, School of Sciences, Enshi, Hubei (China); Li, Li-Fang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Beijing (China)

    2016-11-15

    With the non-local observables such as two point correlation function and holographic entanglement entropy, we probe the phase structure of the Born-Infeld-anti-de Sitter black holes. For the case bQ > 0.5, where b is the Born-Infeld parameter and Q is the charge of the black hole, the phase structure is found to be similar to that of the Van der Waals phase transition, namely the black hole undergoes a first order phase transition and a second order phase transition before it reaches a stable phase. While for the case bQ < 0.5, a new phase branch emerges besides the Van der Waals phase transition. For the first order phase transition, the equal area law is checked, and for the second order phase transition, the critical exponent of the heat capacity is obtained. All these results are found to be the same as that observed in the entropy-temperature plane. (orig.)

  15. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, D; Kama, M; Bruderer, S; Hogerheijde, M

    2016-01-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-$J$ CO rotational lines is a powerful tool to assess the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-$J$ ($J_{\\rm u} > 14$) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new {\\it Herschel}/HIFI and archival PACS observations of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO and \\cii \\ emission in 4 Herbig AeBe (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and 3 T Tauri (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya) disks. In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all other systems, the {\\it Herschel} CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally-resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyze...

  16. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Peloso, Marco; Unal, Caner, E-mail: nicola.bartolo@pd.infn.it, E-mail: peloso@physics.umn.edu, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: unal@physics.umn.edu [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis 55455 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F{sup 2} gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales.

  17. An approach to directly probe simultaneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipreos, Edward T.; Balachandran, Riju S.

    2016-08-01

    The theory of special relativity derives from the Lorentz transformation. The Lorentz transformation implies differential simultaneity and light speed isotropy. Experiments to probe differential simultaneity should be able to distinguish the Lorentz transformation from a kinematically-similar alternate transformation that predicts absolute simultaneity, the absolute Lorentz transformation. Here, we describe how published optical tests of light speed isotropy/anisotropy cannot distinguish between the two transformations. We show that the shared equations of the two transformations, from the perspective of the “stationary” observer, are sufficient to predict null results in optical resonator experiments and in tests of frequency changes in one-way light paths. In an influential 1910 exposition on differential simultaneity, Comstock described how a “stationary” observer would observe different clock readings for spatially-separated “moving” clocks. The difference in clock readings is an integral aspect of differential simultaneity. We derive the equation for the difference in clock readings and show that it is equivalent to the Sagnac correction that describes light speed anisotropies in satellite communications. We describe an experimental strategy that can measure the differences in spatially-separated clock times to allow a direct probe of the nature of simultaneity.

  18. Detecting 3D vegetation structure with the Galileo space probe: Can a distant probe detect vegetation structure on Earth?

    CERN Document Server

    Doughty, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal an...

  19. Mid-IR Observations of T Tauri stars: Probing the Star-Disk Connection in Rotational Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kundurthy, P; Robberto, M; Beckwith, S V W; Herbst, T; Kundurthy, Praveen; Meyer, Michael R.; Robberto, Massimo; Beckwith, Steven V.W.; Herbst, Tom

    2006-01-01

    We present mid-IR N-band $(\\lambda_{eff} = 10.2\\micron)$ photometry of a carefully selected sample of T Tauri stars thought to be single from the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. Infrared excesses in these stars are generally attributed to circumstellar dust-disks. Combining observations at 2.16$\\micron$ (K$_{s}$-band) and 10.2$\\micron$ (N-band) we probe a region in the circumstellar dust-disk from a few stellar radii through the terrestrial planet zone (0.02-1.0AU). By analyzing the distribution of the $(K_{s}-N)$ color index with respect to previously measured photometric rotation periods we investigate what role circumstellar disks play in the rotational evolution of the central star. The resulting positive correlation between these two variables is consistent with the notion that a star-disk interaction facilitates the regulation of angular momentum during the T Tauri stage. We also demonstrate, how including non-single stars in such an analysis will \\textit{weaken} any correlation in the relation between $...

  20. Competing magnetic anisotropies in obliquely deposited thin permalloy film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belyaev, B.A. [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 50/38, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Reshetnev Siberian State Aerospace University, 31, pr. Imeni Gazety “Krasnoyarskii Rabochii”, Krasnoyarsk 660014 (Russian Federation); Izotov, A.V. [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation); Kirensky Institute of Physics, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 50/38, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036 (Russian Federation); Solovev, P.N., E-mail: platon.solovev@gmail.com [Siberian Federal University, 79, pr. Svobodnyi, Krasnoyarsk 660041 (Russian Federation)

    2016-01-15

    Distribution of the magnetic anisotropy in thin film prepared by thermal vacuum oblique deposition of permalloy with small off-normal angle of incident in the presence of an external magnetic field has been studied by ferromagnetic resonance technique. On local area of the sample, a mutual compensation of near orthogonal in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropies induced by oblique deposition and by applied magnetic field has been found. Moreover, in addition to the uniaxial (twofold) magnetic anisotropy, fourfold and sixfold magnetic anisotropies have been observed in the sample. To explain the obtained high-order anisotropies, we assumed that the sample has exchange coupled adjacent regions or phases with different parameters of magnetic anisotropy. The results of the micromagnetic analysis of a two-layer model of the sample confirm the hypothesis.

  1. CMB anisotropy science: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Challinor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides us with our most direct observational window to the early universe. Observations of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB have played a critical role in defining the now-standard cosmological model. In this contribution we review some of the basics of CMB science, highlighting the role of observations made with ground-based and balloon-borne Antarctic telescopes. Most of the ingredients of the standard cosmological model are poorly understood in terms of fundamental physics. We discuss how current and future CMB observations can address some of these issues, focusing on two directly relevant for Antarctic programmes: searching for gravitational waves from inflation via B-mode polarization, and mapping dark matter through CMB lensing.

  2. Dark matter electron anisotropy. A universal upper limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borriello, Enrico [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , Napoli (Italy). Dipt. di Scienze Fisiche; INFN, Sezione di Napoli (Italy); Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Maccione, Luca [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Cuoco, Alessandro [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-12-15

    Indirect searches of particle Dark Matter (DM) with high energy Cosmic Rays (CR) are affected by large uncertainties, coming both from the DM side, and from poor understanding of the astrophysical backgrounds. We show that, on the contrary, the DM intrinsic degree of anisotropy in the arrival directions of high energy CR electrons and positrons does not suffer from these unknowns. Furthermore, if contributions from possible local sources are neglected, the intrinsic DM anisotropy sets the maximum degree of total anisotropy. As a consequence, if some anisotropy larger than the DM upper bound is detected, its origin could not be ascribed to DM, and would constitute an unambiguous evidence for the presence of astrophysical local discrete sources of high energy electrons and positrons. The Fermi-LAT will be able to probe such scenarios in the next years. (orig.)

  3. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in obliquely sputtered metallic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Wormeester, H.; Poelsema, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reorientation in the magnetic anisotropy as a function of film thickness has been observed in Co-Ni and Co thin films, obliquely sputtered on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate at a large incidence angle (70°). This effect is a consequence of the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the films (f

  4. Observed Coupling Between the International Space Station PCU Plasma and a FPMU Langmuir Probe Facilitated by the Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, William; Koontz, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is a matter of serious concern resulting from the possibility of vehicle arcing and electrical shock hazard to crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). A Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed and integrated into ISS in order to control the ISS floating potential, thereby, minimize vehicle charging and associated hazards. One of the principle factors affecting ISS electrical charging is the ionosphere plasma state (i.e., electron temperature and density). To support ISS electrical charging studies a Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) is also integrated into ISS in order to measure the ionosphere properties using Langmuir probes (LP). The FPMU was located on the Starboard side of ISS. The PCU is located near the center of ISS with its plasma exhaust pointed to port. From its integration on ISS in 2006 through November of 2009, the FPMU data exhibited nominal characteristics during PCU operation. On November 21, 2009 the FPMU was relocated from the Starboard location to a new Port location. After relocation significant enhanced noise was observed in both the LP current-voltage sweeps and the derived electron temperature data. The enhanced noise only occurred when the PCU was in discharge and at unique and repeatable locations of the ISS orbit. The cause of this enhanced noise was investigated. It was found that there is coupling occurring between the PCU plasma and the FPMU LP. In this paper we shall 1) present the on-orbit data and the presence of enhanced noise, 2) demonstrate that the coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU measurements is geomagnetically organized, 3) show that coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU is primarily due to and driven by particle-wave interaction and 4) show that the ionosphere conditions are adequate for Alfven waves to be generated by the PCU plasma.

  5. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  6. CMB Anisotropies Total Angular Momentum Method

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, W; Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-01-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the CMB. Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g.~defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic type parity at small angles and ...

  7. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolo, Nicola; Ricciardone, Angelo; Unal, Caner

    2014-01-01

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the "solid" must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initia...

  8. Heterogeneity and anisotropy of Earth's inner core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deuss, Arwen

    2014-01-01

    Seismic observations provide strong evidence that Earth's inner core is anisotropic, with larger velocity in the polar than in the equatorial direction. The top 60-80 km of the inner core is isotropic; evidence for an innermost inner core is less compelling. The anisotropy is most likely due to alig

  9. Polarimetry-based method to extract geometry-independent metrics of tissue anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallenburg, Marika A; Wood, Michael F G; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Vitkin, I Alex

    2010-08-01

    Recently, we have used polarimetry as a method for assessing the linear retardance of infarcted myocardium. While linear retardance reflects tissue anisotropy, experimental geometry has a confounding effect due to dependence of the linear retardance on the orientation of the sample with respect to the probing beam. Here, polarimetry imaging of an 8mm diameter birefringent polystyrene sphere of known anisotropy axis was used to test a dual-projection method by which the anisotropy axis and its true magnitude can be reconstructed, thus eliminating the confounding effect of anisotropy axis orientation. Feasibility is demonstrated in ex-vivo tissue imaging.

  10. Structural and Magnetic Anisotropy in Amorphous Terbium-Iron Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufnagel, Todd Clayton

    1995-01-01

    High density, removable media magnetooptic disk drives have recently begun to make significant gains in the information mass storage market. The media in these disks are amorphous rare-earth/transition-metal (RE-TM) alloys. One vital property of these materials is a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy; that is, an easy axis of magnetization which is perpendicular to the plane of the film. A variety of theories, sometimes contradictory, have been proposed to account for this surprising presence of an anisotropic property in an amorphous material. Recent research indicates that there is an underlying atomic-scale structural anisotropy which is responsible for the observed magnetic anisotropy. Several different types of structural anisotropy have been proposed to account for the observed magnetic anisotropy, including pair-ordering anisotropy (anisotropic chemical short-range order) and bond orientation anisotropy (an anisotropy in coordination number or distances independent of chemical ordering). We have studied the structural origins of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in amorphous Tb-Fe thin films by employing high-energy and anomalous dispersion x-ray scattering. The as-deposited films show a clear structural anisotropy, with a preference for Tb-Fe near neighbors to align in the out-of-plane direction. These films also have a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Upon annealing, the magnetic anisotropy energy drops significantly, and we see a corresponding reduction in the structural anisotropy. The radial distribution functions indicate that the number of Tb-Fe near-neighbors increases in the in-plane direction, but does not change in the out-of-plane direction. Therefore, the distribution of Tb-Fe near-neighbors becomes more uniform upon annealing. We propose that the observed reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy is a result of this change in structure. Our results support the pair -ordering anisotropy model of the structural anisotropy

  11. Initial measurements of O-ion and He-ion decay rates observed from the Van Allen probes RBSPICE instrument

    OpenAIRE

    Gerrard, Andrew; Lanzerotti, Louis; Gkioulidou, Matina; Mitchell, Donald; Manweiler, Jerry; Bortnik, Jacob; Keika, Kunihiro

    2014-01-01

    H-ion (∼45 keV to ∼600 keV), He-ion (∼65 keV to ∼520 keV), and O-ion (∼140 keV to ∼1130 keV) integral flux measurements, from the Radiation Belt Storm Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) instrument aboard the Van Allan Probes spacecraft B, are reported. These abundance data form a cohesive picture of ring current ions during the first 9 months of measurements. Furthermore, the data presented herein are used to show injection characteristics via the He-ion/H-ion abundance ratio and the ...

  12. Azimuthal anisotropy measurements by STAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Li

    2014-06-15

    The recent study of centrality and transverse momentum (p{sub T}) dependence of inclusive charged hardron elliptic anisotropy (v{sub 2}) at midrapidity (|η|<1.0) in Au+Au collision at √(s{sub NN})=7.7,11.5,19.6,27, and39 GeV in STAR Beam Energy Scan program is presented. We show that the observed increase of inclusive v{sub 2} is mainly due to the average p{sub T} increase with energy. In Au+Au 200 GeV collisions, the triangular anisotropy (v{sub 3}) measurements highly depend on measurement methods; v{sub 3} is strongly dependent on Δη. The difference between two- and four-particle cumulants v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4} for Au+Au and Cu+Cu collision at √(s{sub NN})=62.4 and 200 GeV is used to explore flow fluctuations. Furthermore, by exploiting the symmetry of average flow in pseudorapidity η about midrapidity, the Δη-dependent and independent components are separated using v{sub 2}{2} and v{sub 2}{4}.

  13. Observation of long-range elliptic anisotropies in √{ s} = 13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions with the ATLAS detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Mingliang

    2016-12-01

    ATLAS has measured two-particle angular correlations in √{ s} = 13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions at the LHC. The well-known "ridge" is observed in high-multiplicity events. Per-trigger-particle yields, Y (Δϕ), are found to be consistent with a linear combination of the per-trigger-yield measured with cos ⁡ (2 Δϕ). The fitted Fourier coefficient v2,2 exhibits factorization, suggesting that the ridge results from per-event cos ⁡ (2 ϕ) modulation of the single-particle distribution with Fourier coefficient v2. They are found to be weakly dependent on multiplicity and to have a pT dependence similar to that measured in p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions. The v2 values in the 13 and 2.76 TeV are consistent within uncertainties. These results suggest that the ridge in pp collisions arises from the same or similar underlying physics as observed in p+Pb collisions, and that the dynamics responsible for the ridge has no strong √{ s} dependence.

  14. STUDYING THE INTERSTELLAR MAGNETIC FIELD FROM ANISOTROPIES IN VELOCITY CHANNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-543, 04510 México D.F., México (Mexico); Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin–Madison, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI (United States); Pogosyan, D., E-mail: esquivel@nucleares.unam.mx, E-mail: lazarian@astro.wisc.edu, E-mail: pogosyan@ualberta.ca [Physics Department, University of Alberta, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2015-11-20

    Turbulence in the interstellar medium is anisotropic due to the ubiquitous magnetic fields. This anisotropy depends on the strength of the magnetic field and leaves an imprint on observations of spectral line maps. We use a grid of ideal magnetohydrodynamic simulations of driven turbulence and produce synthetic position–position–velocity maps to study the turbulence anisotropy in velocity channels of various resolutions. We found that the average structure function of velocity channels is aligned with the projection of the magnetic field on the plane of the sky. We also found that the degree of such anisotropy increases with the magnitude of the magnetic field. For thick velocity channels (low velocity resolution), the anisotropy is dominated by density, and the degree of anisotropy in these maps allows one to distinguish sub-Alfvénic and super-Alfvénic turbulence regimes, but it also depends strongly on the sonic Mach number. For thin channels (high velocity resolution), we find that the anisotropy depends less on the sonic Mach number. An important limitation of this technique is that it only gives a lower limit on the magnetic field strength because the anisotropy is related only to the magnetic field component on the plane of the sky. It can, and should, be used in combination with other techniques to estimate the magnetic field, such as the Fermi-Chandrasekhar method, anisotropies in centroids, Faraday rotation measurements, or direct line-of-sight determinations of the field from Zeeman effect observations.

  15. An approach to directly probe simultaneity

    CERN Document Server

    Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    The theory of special relativity derives from the Lorentz transformation. The Lorentz transformation implies differential simultaneity and light speed isotropy. Experiments to probe differential simultaneity should be able to distinguish the Lorentz transformation from a kinematically-similar alternate transformation that predicts absolute simultaneity, the absolute Lorentz transformation. Here, we describe how published optical tests of light speed isotropy/anisotropy cannot distinguish between the two transformations. We show that the shared equations of the two transformations, from the perspective of the "stationary" observer, are sufficient to predict null results in optical resonator experiments and in tests of frequency changes in one-way light paths. In an influential 1910 exposition on differential simultaneity, Comstock described how a "stationary" observer would observe different clock readings for spatially-separated "moving" clocks. The difference in clock readings is an integral aspect of differ...

  16. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  17. Observation of Long-Range Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropies in sqrt[s]=13 and 2.76 TeV pp Collisions with the ATLAS Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Agricola, J; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Biesuz, N V; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Bjergaard, D M; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanco, J E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Blunier, S; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Bogaerts, J A; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boutle, S K; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Breaden Madden, W D; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bruscino, N; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bullock, D; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgard, C D; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, A R; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cairo, V M; Cakir, O; Calace, N; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Camarri, P

    2016-04-29

    ATLAS has measured two-particle correlations as a function of the relative azimuthal angle, Δϕ, and pseudorapidity, Δη, in sqrt[s]=13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions at the LHC using charged particles measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η|<2.5. The correlation functions evaluated in different intervals of measured charged-particle multiplicity show a multiplicity-dependent enhancement at Δϕ∼0 that extends over a wide range of Δη, which has been referred to as the "ridge." Per-trigger-particle yields, Y(Δϕ), are measured over 2<|Δη|<5. For both collision energies, the Y(Δϕ) distribution in all multiplicity intervals is found to be consistent with a linear combination of the per-trigger-particle yields measured in collisions with less than 20 reconstructed tracks, and a constant combinatoric contribution modulated by cos(2Δϕ). The fitted Fourier coefficient, v_{2,2}, exhibits factorization, suggesting that the ridge results from per-event cos(2ϕ) modulation of the single-particle distribution with Fourier coefficients v_{2}. The v_{2} values are presented as a function of multiplicity and transverse momentum. They are found to be approximately constant as a function of multiplicity and to have a p_{T} dependence similar to that measured in p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions. The v_{2} values in the 13 and 2.76 TeV data are consistent within uncertainties. These results suggest that the ridge in pp collisions arises from the same or similar underlying physics as observed in p+Pb collisions, and that the dynamics responsible for the ridge has no strong sqrt[s] dependence.

  18. Ferromagnetic resonance of nanocrystal chains with competitive and cooperative anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulialias, D.

    2015-12-01

    The formation of cellular magnetic dipoles by chain assemblies of nearly equidimensional, stable single domain magnetite nanocrystals aligned along their [111] easy axes is a common property encountered in many magnetotactic bacteria (MTB). The development of such dipoles permits the navigation of MTB along the geomagnetic field towards favourable habitats, a process also referred to as magnetotaxis. An important characteristic is the anisotropy within the chains, which mainly consists of the magnetocrystalline and the shape anisotropy. The two anisotropy contributions can be cooperative or competitive depending on the orientation with respect to the chain axis. The change in the relative orientation between the two anisotropy contributions caused by the Verwey transition TV, can be used to unambigously detect MTB and their fossil remains. Ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) is a well-established method to probe magnetic anisotropy in absolute units. Here, we use X- and Q-band FMR spectroscopy and numerical simulation to analyze the MTB species of Desulfovibrio magneticus RS-1 with elongated magnetosomes aligned along the [100] hard axis. In this special case, the magnetotaxis above TV is strongly affected by the shape anisotropy of the nanocrystals and it is competitive to the magnetocrystalline anisotropy. Below TV, the change of the easy axis [111] to [100] generates a cooperative system, which can be considered as the optimal case for magnetotaxis, i.e., shape and magnetocrystalline anisotropies are nearly parallel to the MTB chain axis. In summary, the nanocrystal assembly in RS-1 provides another step towards a better understanding of the physics behind magnetotaxis.

  19. Subminiature Hot-Wire Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westphal, R. V.; Lemos, F. R.; Ligrani, P. M.

    1989-01-01

    Class of improved subminiature hot-wire flow-measuring probes developed. Smaller sizes yield improved resolution in measurements of practical aerodynamic flows. Probe made in one-wire, two-perpendicular-wire, and three-perpendicular-wire version for measurement of one, two, or all three components of flow. Oriented and positioned on micromanipulator stage and viewed under microscope during fabrication. Tested by taking measurements in constant-pressure turbulent boundary layer. New probes give improved measurements of turbulence quantities near surfaces and anisotropies of flows strongly influence relative errors caused by phenomena related to spatial resolution.

  20. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPompeo, M. A.; Myers, A. D.; Brotherton, M. S. [University of Wyoming, Department of Physics and Astronomy 3905, 1000 East University, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Runnoe, J. C. [Penn State University, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 413 Davey Lab, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Green, R. F. [Large Binocular Telescope Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  1. Observing Fluorescent Probes in Living Cells using a Low-Cost LED Flashlight Retrofitted to a Common Vintage Light Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Babbitt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available While the application of molecular biological techniques based upon fluorescent probes has rapidly expanded over recent decades, the equipment cost of fluorescent microscopy has largely prevented its adoption in the college and high school classroom. We offer a simple solution to this problem by describing in detail how to build with simple tools, a fluorescent microscope using a common brand of colored LED flashlights and second-hand components of vintage Nikon microscopes. This extremely low cost solution is qualitatively compared to an expensive modern Zeiss system.

  2. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point...... to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development...

  3. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings...... point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face...

  4. Observation of chorus waves by the Van Allen Probes: Dependence on solar wind parameters and scale size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aryan, Homayon; Sibeck, David; Balikhin, Michael; Agapitov, Oleksiy; Kletzing, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Highly energetic electrons in the Earth's Van Allen radiation belts can cause serious damage to spacecraft electronic systems and affect the atmospheric composition if they precipitate into the upper atmosphere. Whistler mode chorus waves have attracted significant attention in recent decades for their crucial role in the acceleration and loss of energetic electrons that ultimately change the dynamics of the radiation belts. The distribution of these waves in the inner magnetosphere is commonly presented as a function of geomagnetic activity. However, geomagnetic indices are nonspecific parameters that are compiled from imperfectly covered ground based measurements. The present study uses wave data from the two Van Allen Probes to present the distribution of lower band chorus waves not only as functions of single geomagnetic index and solar wind parameters but also as functions of combined parameters. Also the current study takes advantage of the unique equatorial orbit of the Van Allen Probes to estimate the average scale size of chorus wave packets, during close separations between the two spacecraft, as a function of radial distance, magnetic latitude, and geomagnetic activity, respectively. Results show that the average scale size of chorus wave packets is approximately 1300-2300 km. The results also show that the inclusion of combined parameters can provide better representation of the chorus wave distributions in the inner magnetosphere and therefore can further improve our knowledge of the acceleration and loss of radiation belt electrons.

  5. Optical anisotropy in packed isotropic spherical particles: indication of nanometer scale anisotropy in packing structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kohei; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2013-02-28

    We investigated the origin of birefringence in colloidal films of spherical silica particles. Although each particle is optically isotropic in shape, colloidal films formed by drop drying demonstrated birefringence. While periodic particle structures were observed in silica colloidal films, no regular pattern was found in blended films of silica and latex particles. However, since both films showed birefringence, regular film structure patterns were not required to exhibit birefringence. Instead, we propose that nanometer-scale film structure anisotropy causes birefringence. Due to capillary flow from the center to the edge of a cast suspension, particles are more tightly packed in the radial direction. Directional packing results in nanometer-scale anisotropy. The difference in the interparticle distance between radial and circumferential axes was estimated to be 10 nm at most. Nanometer-scale anisotropy in colloidal films and the subsequent optical properties are discussed.

  6. Anisotropy of ice Ih: Developement of fabric and effects of anisotropy on deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorsteinsson, Throstur

    The anisotropy arising from preferred crystal orientation of ice I h is examined. To understand plastic anisotropy of polycrystalline materials it is necessary to examine the behavior at the single crystal level. Ice crystals have extremely strong plastic anisotropy that strongly influences the bulk behavior. There are several ways to relate single crystal deformation to the bulk behavior. Two approaches are used here. The first one is to assume a homogeneous stress throughout the bulk, which allows us to derive analytical relations between stress and strain rate. The anisotropy affects the strain rate-stress relationship significantly. For example strongly anisotropic ice, with a vertically symmetric fabric, can deform transversely to the applied stress in pure shear, be nearly undeformable in vertical compression, and shear easily in simple shear. The second approach takes the interaction between neighboring crystals into account, and recrystallization processes are also considered. Comparison of fabric evolution using the model and fabric from the GRIP ice core indicates that nearest neighbor interaction is necessary to explain observations. Quantification of the interaction is complicated by recrystallization processes. A consistent method of characterizing measured fabric is needed to verify models of fabric development. Here the elastic anisotropy of ice plays a central role, and relations between fabric and elastic wave velocities are used to characterize fabric. As always, several other methods are possible, but comparison indicates that sonic measurements give an accurate estimate for deformation effects from vertically symmetric fabric especially in simple shear. The deformation of the borehole at Dye 3, Greenland, has been measured with borehole inclinometry. Sonic velocity measurements done in the borehole allow us to model the deformation using an anisotropic flow law. Anisotropy alone cannot explain all the deformation. The additional processes

  7. Seasonal anisotropy in handedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Gregory V; Martin, Maryanne

    2008-01-01

    The preference for using either the left or the right hand has been linked to important human characteristics such as language lateralisation within the cerebral hemispheres, and evidence has been reported that the proportions of different types of handedness may be influenced by factors such as levels of maternal hormones and anxiety. Under such influences, it is possible in principle that distributions of handedness provide evidence of seasonal anisotropy, that is, variation in the direction of handedness for births in different parts of the year. The results of a number of studies are compared here, and shown to provide evidence of a significant tendency for the incidence of left-handed people to be higher among those born in the spring and ensuing months (March-July in the northern hemisphere) than among those born in the remainder of the year, at least among the male population.

  8. Physics of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), especially of its frequency spectrum and its anisotropies, both in temperature and in polarization, have played a key role in the development of modern cosmology and our understanding of the very early universe. We review the underlying physics of the CMB and how the primordial temperature and polarization anisotropies were imprinted. Possibilities for distinguishing competing cosmological models are emphasized. The current status of CMB experiments and experimental techniques with an emphasis toward future observations, particularly in polarization, is reviewed. The physics of foreground emissions, especially of polarized dust, is discussed in detail, since this area is likely to become crucial for measurements of the B modes of the CMB polarization at ever greater sensitivity.

  9. CMB anisotropies from primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Lewis, A

    2004-01-01

    Primordial inhomogeneous magnetic fields of the right strength can leave a signature on the CMB temperature anisotropy and polarization. Potentially observable contributions to polarization B-modes are generated by vorticity and gravitational waves sourced by the magnetic anisotropic stress. We compute the corresponding CMB transfer functions in detail including the effect of neutrinos. The shear rapidly causes the neutrino anisotropic stress to cancel the stress from the magnetic field, suppressing the production of gravitational waves and vorticity on super-horizon scales after neutrino decoupling. A significant large scale signal from tensor modes can only be produced before neutrino decoupling, and the actual amplitude is somewhat uncertain. Plausible values suggest primordial nearly scale invariant fields of ~ 10^(-10)G today may be observable from their large scale tensor anisotropy. They can be distinguished from primordial gravitational waves by their non-Gaussianity. Vector mode vorticity sources B-m...

  10. Probing Cosmic Distance Duality Relation with Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect, X-rays Observations and Supernovae Ia

    CERN Document Server

    Holanda, R F L; Ribeiro, M B

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect and X-ray combined with the validity of the distance-duality relation can determine the angular diameter distances from galaxy clusters. This sort of combination enable us to probe the galaxy cluster physics or even to test the validity of the distance-duality relation based on two different approaches. Firstly, the possible galaxy cluster morphologies are constrained by assuming the strict validity of the distance-duality relation in the LCDM framework. Secondly, by adopting a cosmological-model-independent test, we confront directly the angular diameters from galaxy clusters with two Supernovae Ia (SNe Ia) sub-samples (carefully chosen to coincide with cluster positions). In our analysis we consider three galaxy clusters samples whose difference lies in the underlying assumptions used to describe the clusters: (i) isothermal elliptical beta model, (ii) isothermal spherical beta model, and (iii) non-isothermal spherical double beta model. The elliptical beta model pro...

  11. Crustal radial anisotropy beneath Cameroon from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Adebayo Oluwaseun; Ni, Sidao; Li, Zhiwei

    2017-01-01

    To increase the understanding of crustal deformation and crustal flow patterns due to tectonic processes in Cameroon, we study the lateral variability of the crustal isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy estimated using Ambient Noise Tomography (ANT). Rayleigh and Love wave Noise Correlation Functions (NCFs) were retrieved from the cross-correlation of seismic ambient noise data recorded in Cameroon, and phase velocities at periods of 8 to 30 s were measured to perform surface wave tomography. Joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave data for isotropic velocity models could not fit the observed dispersions simultaneously. We attribute the Love-Rayleigh discrepancy to the presence of radial anisotropy in the crust and estimated its magnitude. Our 3-D radial anisotropic model reveals the spatial variation of strong to weak positive (Vsh > Vsv) and negative (Vsv > Vsh) radial anisotropy in the crust. We observe negative radial anisotropy in the upper crust that is associated mainly with the location of a previously reported mantle plume. The anisotropy could be attributed to the vertical alignment of fossil microcracks or metamorphic foliations due to the upwelling of plume material. A strong positive radial anisotropy is centered at the location of an inferred boundary between the Congo Craton and the Oubanguides Belt that might be related to the preferred orientation of crustal anisotropic minerals associated with shearing in this fault zone. The middle crust is characterized by a widespread negative radial anisotropy that is likely caused by the flow-induced alignment of anisotropic minerals that crystallized during magma intrusion. The magnitude of the radial anisotropy varies systematically from predominantly negative in the middle crust to positive in the lower crust. The imaged patterns of the isotropic velocity and radial anisotropy are consistent with previous studies and agree with regional tectonics.

  12. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Santo-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Lazarian, A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic MHD turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the isotropic (standard) one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are able to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropy can also drive kinetic instabilities which grow faster near the ions kinetic scales. Observations from the solar wind suggest that these micro- instabilities scatter the ions, thus relaxing the anisotropy. This work aims to compare this relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the scattering rate provided by...

  13. Origin of magnetization-induced anisotropy of magnetic films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Han-Min; Chong-Oh Kim; Taek-Dong Lee; Hyo-Jin Kim

    2007-01-01

    It is proposed that the magnetization-induced anisotropy of magnetic films of cubic crystal structure originates from the anisotropy of atomic pair ordering, shape anisotropy, and strain anisotropy resulting from the constraint of the magnetostriction strain imposed on the film by the substrate. Calculated are the three anisotropy constants and their sum K vs temperature for Ni, Fe, and 55%Ni-Fe films; the room temperature (RT) constants vs the substrate temperature Tt during deposition or annealing after deposition for Ni and 50%Ni-Co films; the RT constants vs composition fraction for Fe-Ni films with Tt = RT, 250℃ and 450℃, Co-Ni films at Tt = RT, 100℃ and 320℃, and Fe-Co films with Tt = RT and 300℃; the spread of RT K vs composition fraction for Fe-Ni films; and RT △K/K vs composition fraction for Fe-Ni and Co-Ni films, where △K denotes the variation of K of the film that is detached from its substrate. The calculated curves well accord with the measurements. The irrelevancy of K to the substrate material and the fast kinetics of the annealing in a field applied in the direction of the hard axis are explained reasonably.The anisotropies of Fe and Ni films originate mainly from the shape anisotropy and the strain anisotropy, respectively. The major anisotropy component in many cases depends not only on composition fraction but also on Tt . For example, the RT anisotropy of 40-70%Ni-Fe films, when Tt is RT, mostly comes from the anisotropy of atomic pair ordering while it stems mostly from the shape anisotropy when Tt is 450 ℃. The most important cause of the spread in values of K is the spread of the intrinsic anisotropic stresses superimposed on the intrinsic isotropic planar stress. It is suggested that the field cooling induced magnetic anisotropy originating from the induced crystal texture observed in the bulk alloys is also a major origin for Co and Co-rich alloy films of hexagonal crystal structure.

  14. Site-specific interaction between α-synuclein and membranes probed by NMR-observed methionine oxidation rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltsev, Alexander S; Chen, Jue; Levine, Rodney L; Bax, Ad

    2013-02-27

    α-Synuclein (αS) is an intrinsically disordered protein that is water-soluble but also can bind negatively charged lipid membranes while adopting an α-helical conformation. Membrane affinity is increased by post-translational N-terminal acetylation, a common modification in all eukaryotic cells. In the presence of lipid vesicles containing a small fraction of peroxidized lipids, the N-terminal Met residues in αS (Met1 and Met5) rapidly oxidize while reducing the toxic lipid hydroperoxide to a nonreactive lipid hydroxide, whereas C-terminal Met residues remain unaffected. Met oxidation can be probed conveniently and quantitatively by NMR spectroscopy. The results show that oxidation of Met1 reduces the rate of oxidation of Met5 and vice versa as a result of decreased membrane affinity of the partially oxidized protein. The effect of Met oxidation on the αS-membrane affinity extends over large distances, as in the V49M mutant, oxidation of Met1 and Met5 strongly impacts the oxidation rate of Met49 and vice versa. When not bound to membrane, oxidized Met1 and Met5 of αS are excellent substrates for methionine sulfoxide reductase (Msr), thereby providing an efficient vehicle for water-soluble Msr enzymes to protect the membrane against oxidative damage.

  15. Anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, K. D.; Spence, P.; Waterman, S.; Sommer, J. Le; Molines, J.-M.; Lilly, J. M.; England, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    The anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean is examined in geostrophic surface velocities derived from satellite observations and in the horizontal velocities of a 1/12° global ocean model. Eddy anisotropy is of oceanographic interest as it is through anisotropic velocity fluctuations that the eddy and mean-flow fields interact dynamically. This study is timely because improved observational estimates of eddy anisotropy will soon be available with Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) altimetry data. We find there to be good agreement between the characteristics and distributions of eddy anisotropy from the present satellite observations and model ocean surface. In the model, eddy anisotropy is found to have significant vertical structure and is largest close to the ocean bottom, where the anisotropy aligns with the underlying isobaths. The highly anisotropic bottom signal is almost entirely contained in the barotropic variability. Upper-ocean variability is predominantly baroclinic and the alignment is less sensitive to the underlying bathymetry. These findings offer guidance for introducing a parameterization of eddy feedbacks, based on the eddy kinetic energy and underlying bathymetry, to operate on the barotropic flow and better account for the effects of barotropic Reynolds stresses unresolved in coarse-resolution ocean models.

  16. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of cobalt thin films on different substrates using CW-MOKE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Vijay, E-mail: shuklavs@rrcat.gov.in [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Mukherjee, C. [Mechanical and Optical Support Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Chari, R. [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Rai, S. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramnna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Bindra, K.S. [Solid State Laser Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Banerjee, A. [BARC training school at RRCAT and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Cobalt thin films were deposited on GaAs, Si and Glass substrates by RF-magnetron sputtering. The structure was studied using atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Magnetic properties were determined with the magneto-optic Kerr effect. The deposited films have in-plane uniaxial anisotropy and after annealing the anisotropy reduces. The reduction in anisotropy may be due to release of stress and the remaining anisotropy after annealing may be due to shape anisotropy of the particulates. - Highlights: • Deposited cobalt thin films on different substrates and annealed at 300 °C. • Characterized as-grown and annealed films by GIXRD, AFM and MOKE. • Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy observed for all the samples. • Decrease in anisotropy on annealing may be due to release of stress during deposition.

  17. Probing SZ Source Detection with Gasdynamical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Wadsley, J W; Gladders, M D; Ruetalo, Marcelo I.; Wadsley, James W.; Gladders, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The huge worldwide investment in CMB experiments should make the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect a key probe of the cosmic web in the near future. For the promise to be realized, substantial development of simulation and analysis tools to relate observation to theory is needed. The high nonlinearity and dissipative/feedback gas physics lead to highly non-Gaussian patterns that are much more difficult to analyze than Gaussian primary anisotropies for which the procedures are reasonably well developed. Historical forecasts for what CMB experiments might see used semi-analytic tools, including large scale map constructions, with localized and simplified pressure structures distributed on a point process of (clustered) sources. Hydro studies beyond individual cluster/supercluster systems were inadequate, but now large-volume simulations with high resolution are beginning to shift the balance. We illustrate this by applying ``Gasoline'' (parallelized Tree+SPH) computations to construct SZ maps and derive statistical...

  18. Anisotropies in the HI gas distribution toward 3C 196

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalberla, P. M. W.; Kerp, J.

    2016-10-01

    Context. The local Galactic Hi gas was found to contain cold neutral medium (CNM) filaments that are aligned with polarized dust emission. These filaments appear to be dominated by the magnetic field and in this case turbulence is expected to show distinct anisotropies. Aims: We use the Galactic Effelsberg-Bonn Hi Survey (EBHIS) to derive 2D turbulence spectra for the Hi distribution in direction to 3C 196 and two more comparison fields. Methods: Prior to Fourier transform we apply a rotational symmetric 50% Tukey window to apodize the data. We derive average as well as position angle dependent power spectra. Anisotropies in the power distribution are defined as the ratio of the spectral power in orthogonal directions. Results: We find strong anisotropies. For a narrow range in position angle, in direction perpendicular to the filaments and the magnetic field, the spectral power is on average more than an order of magnitude larger than parallel. In the most extreme case the anisotropy reaches locally a factor of 130. Anisotropies increase on average with spatial frequency as predicted by Goldreich & Sridhar (1995, ApJ, 438, 763), at the same time the Kolmogorov spectral index remains almost unchanged. The strongest anisotropies are observable for a narrow range in velocity and decay with a power law index close to -8/3, almost identical to the average isotropic spectral index of -2.9 <γ< -2.6. Conclusions: Hi filaments, associated with linear polarization structures in LOFAR observations in direction to 3C 196, show turbulence spectra with marked anisotropies. Decaying anisotropies appear to indicate that we witness an ongoing shock passing the Hi and affecting the observed Faraday depth.

  19. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo; Arroja, Frederico

    2014-01-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by $P_h({\\bf k}) = P_h^{(0)}(k) [ 1 + \\sum_{LM} f_L(k) g_{LM} Y_{LM} (\\hat{\\bf k}) ]$, where $P_h^{(0)}(k)$ is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with $f_0(k) = f_2(k) \\propto k^{-2}$ are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely $\\ell_2 = \\ell_1 \\pm 2$ in $TT$, $TE$, $EE$ and $BB$, and $\\ell_2 = \\ell_1 \\pm 1$ in $TB$ and $EB$. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic varian...

  20. Microwave Anisotropies from Texture Seeded Structure Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Zhou, Z H

    1994-01-01

    The cosmic microwave anisotropies in a scenario of large scale structure formation with cold dark matter and texture are discussed and compared with recent observational results of the COBE satellite. A couple of important statistical parameters are determined. The fluctuations are slightly non gaussian. The quadrupole anisotropy is $1.5\\pm 1.2\\times 10^{-5}$ and the fluctuations on a angular scale of 10 degrees are $ (3.8\\pm 2.6)\\times 10^{-5}$. The COBE are within about one standard deviation of the typical texture + CDM model discussed in this paper. Furthermore, we calculate fluctuations on intermediate scales (about 2 degrees) with the result $\\De T/T(\\theta \\sim 2^o) = 3.9\\pm 0.8)\\times 10^{-5}$. Collapsing textures are modeled by spherically symmetric field configurations. This leads to uncertainties of about a factor of~2.

  1. A sensitive fluorescence anisotropy method for detection of lead (II) ion by a G-quadruplex-inducible DNA aptamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dapeng [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Yin, Lei; Meng, Zihui [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yu, Anchi [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing, 100872 (China); Guo, Lianghong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Wang, Hailin, E-mail: hlwang@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A fluorescence anisotropy approach for detection of Pb{sup 2+} was developed. •The strategy was based on binding-induced allosteric conformational change of aptamer probe. •The sensing mechanism was established by testing the photoinduced electron transfer interaction. -- Abstract: Sensitive and selective detection of Pb{sup 2+} is of great importance to both human health and environmental protection. Here we propose a novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) approach for sensing Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution by a G-rich thrombin binding aptamer (TBA). The TBA labeled with 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR) at the seventh thymine nucleotide was used as a fluorescent probe for signaling Pb{sup 2+}. It was found that the aptamer probe had a high FA in the absence of Pb{sup 2+}. This is because the rotation of TMR is restricted by intramolecular interaction with the adjacent guanine bases, which results in photoinduced electron transfer (PET). When the aptamer probe binds to Pb{sup 2+} to form G-quadruplex, the intramolecular interaction should be eliminated, resulting in faster rotation of the fluorophore TMR in solution. Therefore, FA of aptamer probe is expected to decrease significantly upon binding to Pb{sup 2+}. Indeed, we observed a decrease in FA of aptamer probe upon Pb{sup 2+} binding. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetime measurement were used to verify the reliability and reasonability of the sensing mechanism. By monitoring the FA change of the aptamer probe, we were able to real-time detect binding between the TBA probe and Pb{sup 2+}. Moreover, the aptamer probe was exploited as a recognition element for quantification of Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution. The change in FA showed a linear response to Pb{sup 2+} from 10 nM to 2.0 μM, with 1.0 nM limit of detection. In addition, this sensing system exhibited good selectivity for Pb{sup 2+} over other metal ions. The method is simple

  2. Remanence anisotropy effect on the palaeointensity results obtained from various archaeological materials, excluding pottery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacheva, M.; Chauvin, A.; Jordanova, N.; Lanos, P.; Karloukovski, V.

    2009-06-01

    The effect of magnetic anisotropy on the palaeointensity results has been evaluated in different materials, including samples from archaeological structures of various ages, such as baked clay from prehistoric domestic ovens or pottery kilns, burnt soil from ancient fires, and bricks and bricks or tiles used in the kiln's construction. The remanence anisotropy was estimated by the thermoremanent (TRM) anisotropy tensor and isothermal remanence (IRM) tensor methods. The small anisotropy effect (less than 5%) observed in the palaeointensity results of baked clay from the relatively thin prehistoric oven's floors estimated previously through IRM anisotropy was confirmed by TRM anisotropy of this material. The new results demonstrate the possibility of using IRM anisotropy evaluation to correct baked clay palaeointensity data instead of the more difficult to determine TRM anisotropy ellipsoid. This is not always the case for the palaeointensity results from bricks and tiles. The anisotropy correction to palaeointensity results seems negligible for materials other than pottery. It would therefore appear that the palaeointensity determination is more sensitive to the degree of remanence anisotropy P and the angle between the natural remanent magnetization (NRM) vector and the laboratory field direction, than to the angle between the NRM and the maximum axis of the remanence anisotropy ellipsoid (Kmax).

  3. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  4. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  5. Friction Anisotropy: A unique and intrinsic property of decagonal quasicrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mulleregan, Alice; Park, Jeong Young; Salmeron, Miquel; Ogetree, D.F.; Jenks, C.J.; Thiel, P.A.; Brenner, J.; Dubois, J.M.

    2008-06-25

    We show that friction anisotropy is an intrinsic property of the atomic structure of Al-Ni-Co decagonal quasicrystals and not only of clean and well-ordered surfaces that can be prepared in vacuum [J.Y. Park et al., Science (2005)]. Friction anisotropy is manifested both in nanometer size contacts obtained with sharp atomic force microscope (AFM) tips as well as in macroscopic contacts produced in pin-on-disc tribometers. We show that the friction anisotropy, which is not observed when an amorphous oxide film covers the surface, is recovered when the film is removed due to wear. Equally important is the loss of the friction anisotropy when the quasicrystalline order is destroyed due to cumulative wear. These results reveal the intimate connection between the mechanical properties of these materials and their peculiar atomic structure.

  6. A New Maximum-Likelihood Technique for Reconstructing Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy at All Angular Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus; Desiati, Paolo; Díaz-Vélez, Juan Carlos; Fiorino, Daniel W; Westerhoff, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The arrival directions of TeV-PeV cosmic rays show weak but significant anisotropies with relative intensities at the level of one per mille. Due to the smallness of the anisotropies, quantitative studies require careful disentanglement of detector effects from the observation. We discuss an iterative maximum-likelihood reconstruction that simultaneously fits cosmic ray anisotropies and detector acceptance. The method does not rely on detector simulations and provides an optimal anisotropy reconstruction for ground-based cosmic ray observatories located in the middle latitudes. It is particularly well suited to the recovery of the dipole anisotropy, which is a crucial observable for the study of cosmic ray diffusion in our Galaxy. We also provide general analysis methods for recovering large- and small-scale anisotropies that take into account systematic effects of the observation by ground-based detectors.

  7. Relativistic electron microbursts and variations in trapped MeV electron fluxes during the 8-9 October 2012 storm: SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurita, Satoshi; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Blake, J. Bernard; Reeves, Geoffery D.; Kletzing, Craig A.

    2016-04-01

    It has been suggested that whistler mode chorus is responsible for both acceleration of MeV electrons and relativistic electron microbursts through resonant wave-particle interactions. Relativistic electron microbursts have been considered as an important loss mechanism of radiation belt electrons. Here we report on the observations of relativistic electron microbursts and flux variations of trapped MeV electrons during the 8-9 October 2012 storm, using the SAMPEX and Van Allen Probes satellites. Observations by the satellites show that relativistic electron microbursts correlate well with the rapid enhancement of trapped MeV electron fluxes by chorus wave-particle interactions, indicating that acceleration by chorus is much more efficient than losses by microbursts during the storm. It is also revealed that the strong chorus wave activity without relativistic electron microbursts does not lead to significant flux variations of relativistic electrons. Thus, effective acceleration of relativistic electrons is caused by chorus that can cause relativistic electron microbursts.

  8. Abundance of Escherichia coli F1-ATPase molecules observed to rotate via single-molecule microscopy with gold nanorod probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Justin; Spetzler, David; Hornung, Tassilo; Ishmukhametov, Robert; Martin, James; Frasch, Wayne D

    2007-12-01

    The abundance of E. coli F1-ATPase molecules observed to rotate using gold nanorods attached to the gamma-subunit was quantitated. Individual F1 molecules were determined to be rotating based upon time dependent fluctuations of red and green light scattered from the nanorods when viewed through a polarizing filter. The average number of F1 molecules observed to rotate in the presence of GTP, ATP, and without nucleotide was approximately 50, approximately 25, and approximately 4% respectively. In some experiments, the fraction of molecules observed to rotate in the presence of GTP was as high as 65%. These data indicate that rotational measurements made using gold nanorods provide information of the F1-ATPase mechanism that is representative of the characteristics of the enzyme population as a whole.

  9. Assessment of the mode of action of polyhexamethylene biguanide against Listeria innocua by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadeau, Elise; Dumas, Emilie; Adt, Isabelle; Degraeve, Pascal; Noël, Claude; Girodet, Christophe; Oulahal, Nadia

    2012-12-01

    Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB) is a cationic biocide. The antibacterial mode of action of PHMB (at concentrations not exceeding its minimal inhibitory concentration) upon Listeria innocua LRGIA 01 was investigated by Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy analysis. Fourier transformed infrared spectra of bacteria treated with or without PHMB presented some differences in the lipids region: the CH(2)/CH(3) (2924 cm(-1)/2960 cm(-1)) band areas ratio significantly increased in the presence of PHMB. Since this ratio generally reflects membrane phospholipids and membrane microenvironment of the cells, these results suggest that PHMB molecules interact with membrane phospholipids and, thus, affect membrane fluidity and conformation. To assess the hypothesis of PHMB interaction with L. innocua membrane phospholipids and to clarify the PHMB mode of action, we performed fluorescence anisotropy experiments. Two probes, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) and its derivative 1-[4-(trimethyl-amino)-phenyl]-6-phenylhexa-1,3,5-triene (TMA-DPH), were used. DPH and TMA-DPH incorporate inside and at the surface of the cytoplasmic membrane, respectively. When PHMB was added, an increase of TMA-DPH fluorescence anisotropy was observed, but no changes of DPH fluorescence anisotropy occurred. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that PHMB molecules perturb L. innocua LRGIA 01 cytoplasmic membrane by interacting with the first layer of the membrane lipid bilayer.

  10. Real & Simulated IFU Observations of Low-Mass Early-Type Galaxies: Environmental Influence Probed for Cluster Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sybilska, Agnieszka; Łokas, Ewa Luiza; Fouquet, Sylvain

    2017-03-01

    We combine high-quality IFU data with a new set of numerical simulations to study low-mass early type galaxies (dEs) in dense environments. Our earlier study of dEs in the Virgo cluster has produced the first large-scale maps of kinematic and stellar population properties of dEs in those environments (Ryś et al. 2013, 2014, 2015). A quantitative discrimination between various (trans)formation processes proposed for these objects is, however, a complex issue, requiring a priori assumptions about the progenitors of galaxies we observe and study today. To bridge this gap between observations and theoretical predictions, we use the expertise gained in the IFU data analysis to look ``through the eye of SAURON'' at our new suite of high-resolution N-body simulations of dEs in the Virgo cluster. Mimicking the observers perspective as closely as possible, we can also indicate the existing instrumental and viewer limitations regarding what we are/are not able to detect as observers.

  11. Herschel observations of Extra-Ordinary Sources: Methanol as a probe of physical conditions in Orion KL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, S; Crockett, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Lis, D C; Pearson, J C; Schilke, P; Bell, T A; Comito, C; Blake, G A; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Cernicharo, J; Daniel, F; Dubernet, M -L; Emprechtinger, M; Encrenaz, P; Gerin, M; Giesen, T F; Goicoechea, J R; Gupta, H; Herbst, E; Joblin, C; Johnstone, D; Langer, W D; Latter, W B; Lord, S D; Maret, S; Martin, P G; Melnick, G J; Menten, K M; Morris, P; Muller, H S P; Murphy, J A; Neufeld, D A; Ossenkopf, V; Perault, M; Phillips, T G; Plume, R; Qin, S -L; Schlemmer, S; Stutzki, J; Trappe, N; van der Tak, F F S; Vastel, C; Yorke, H W; Yu, S; Zmuidzinas, J

    2011-01-01

    We have examined methanol emission from Orion KL with of the {\\em Herschel}/HIFI instrument, and detected two methanol bands centered at 524 GHz and 1061 GHz. The 524 GHz methanol band (observed in HIFI band 1a) is dominated by the isolated $\\Delta$J$=$0, K$=-4\\rightarrow$-3, v$_t

  12. Probing the extremes of Seyfert activity BeppoSAX observations of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Comastri, A; Leighly, K M; Fiore, F; Guainazzi, M; Matt, G; Stirpe, G M

    1997-01-01

    Results are presented for the first year of observations of a selected sample of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 galaxies (Ton S 180, RE J1034+396, Ark 564) obtained with the imaging instruments onboard BeppoSAX. These are the first simultaneous broad band (0.1--10 keV) spectra so far obtained for this class of objects.

  13. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  14. CMB anisotropies: Total angular momentum method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wayne; White, Martin

    1997-07-01

    A total angular momentum representation simplifies the radiation transport problem for temperature and polarization anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Scattering terms couple only the quadrupole moments of the distributions and each moment corresponds directly to the observable angular pattern on the sky. We develop and employ these techniques to study the general properties of anisotropy generation from scalar, vector, and tensor perturbations to the metric and the matter, both in the cosmological fluids and from any seed perturbations (e.g., defects) that may be present. The simpler, more transparent form and derivation of the Boltzmann equations brings out the geometric and model-independent aspects of temperature and polarization anisotropy formation. Large angle scalar polarization provides a robust means to distinguish between isocurvature and adiabatic models for structure formation in principle. Vector modes have the unique property that the CMB polarization is dominated by magnetic-type parity at small angles (a factor of 6 in power compared with 0 for the scalars and 8/13 for the tensors) and hence potentially distinguishable independent of the model for the seed. The tensor modes produce a different sign from the scalars and vectors for the temperature-polarization correlations at large angles. We explore conditions under which one perturbation type may dominate over the others including a detailed treatment of the photon-baryon fluid before recombination.

  15. Dynamical anisotropy of the optical propagation paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyan, Tatiana I.; Pisklin, Maksim V.; Suhareva, Natalia A.; Zotov, Aleksey M.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamics of laser beam intensity profile spatial modulations over a model tropospheric path with the controlled meteorological parameters was studied. Influence of the underlying surface temperature as well as the side wind load were considered. The increase of dynamic anisotropic disturbances saturation with the path length was observed. Spatio-temporal correlation characteristics of the directivity pattern in the signal beam registration plane were obtained. Proposed method of the experimental samples analysis on the base of chronogram with the following definition of the dynamic structure tensors array allows to estimate local and averaged projections of the flow velocities over the chosen spatio-temporal region and to restore their geometry in the zone of intersection with the signal beam. Additional characteristics suggested for the diagonalized local structure tensors such as local energy capacity and local structuredness are informative for the estimation of the inhomogeneities spatial dimensions, time of access through the section considered, the dynamics of energetic jets. The concepts of rotational and translational dynamic anisotropy are introduced to discriminate the types of the changes of the local ellipsoids axes orientation as well as their values. Rotational anisotropy shows itself in the changes of the local ellipsoids orientation, thus characterizing the illumination variation over the beam cross-section. Translational anisotropy describes the difference between the axes values for local ellipsoids.

  16. Magnetization switching behavior with competing anisotropies in epitaxial Co3FeN /MnN exchange-coupled bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiri, T.; Yoshida, T.; Jaiswal, S.; Filianina, M.; Borie, B.; Ando, H.; Asano, H.; Zabel, H.; Kläui, M.

    2016-11-01

    We report unusual magnetization switching processes and angular-dependent exchange bias effects in fully epitaxial Co3FeN /MnN bilayers, where magnetocrystalline anisotropy and exchange coupling compete, probed by longitudinal and transverse magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) magnetometry. The MOKE loops show multistep jumps corresponding to the nucleation and propagation of 90∘ domain walls in as-grown bilayers. By inducing exchange coupling, we confirm changes of the magnetization switching process due to the unidirectional anisotropy field of the exchange coupling. Taking into account the experimentally obtained values of the fourfold magnetocrystalline anisotropy, the unidirectional anisotropy field, the exchange-coupling constant, and the uniaxial anisotropy including its direction, the calculated angular-dependent exchange bias reproduces the experimental results. These results demonstrate the essential role of the competition between magnetocrystalline anisotropy and exchange coupling for understanding and tailoring exchange-coupling phenomena usable for engineering switching in fully epitaxial bilayers made of tailored materials.

  17. Probing Our Heliospheric History I: High-Resolution Observations of Na I and Ca II Along the Solar Historical Trajectory

    CERN Document Server

    Wyman, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Over the course of its motion through the Galaxy, our solar system has encountered many interstellar environments of varying characteristics. Interstellar medium (ISM) density variations spanning seven orders of magnitude are commonly seen throughout the general Galactic environment, and a sufficiently dense cloud within this range has the potential to dramatically alter the structure of the heliosphere. We present observations of the ISM environments the Sun has most recently encountered based on high-resolution optical spectra toward nearby stars in the direction of the historical solar trajectory. The data were obtained with the highest-resolution spectrographs available, including the Tull Spectrograph on the Harlan J. Smith Telescope at McDonald Observatory and the Ultra-High-Resolution Facility on the Anglo-Australian Telescope at the Anglo-Australian Observatory. Observations were made of interstellar Na I and Ca II doublet absorption toward 43 bright stars within about 500 pc. No absorption is seen ou...

  18. Pn anisotropy in Mesozoic western Pacific lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, Natsumi; Forsyth, Donald W.; Hajewski, Christina J.; Weeraratne, Dayanthie S.

    2014-04-01

    Pn is the high-frequency, scattered P phase guided for great distances within the old oceanic lithosphere. Two arrays of ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on old (150-160 Ma) seafloor in the northwestern Pacific south of Shatsky Rise for the Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment. We use Pn phases from 403 earthquakes during the 1 year of deployment to measure apparent velocities across the arrays. Each array was deployed on a separate limb of a magnetic bight, formed near a fast-spreading, ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction. Using high-frequency waves (5-10 Hz), we look at variations of Pn velocities as a function of azimuth. In the western array, we find Pn anisotropy with velocities ranging from ~8.7 km/s in the back azimuth (θ) direction of 310° to ~7.7 km/s at ~350°. In the eastern array, the velocity ranges from ~8.5 km/s in back azimuth direction of ~210° to ~7.7 km/s at 260° and ~310°. We observe rapid velocity changes with azimuth in the both arrays requiring sinusoidal variations of roughly equal amplitude as a function of both 2θ and 4θ, which is not expected for the orthorhombic symmetry of olivine or orthopyroxene. The fastest directions on the two limbs are roughly orthogonal to each other suggesting the dominance of fossil anisotropy, but the fast directions of the 2θ components are skewed counterclockwise from the spreading directions. We speculate that the rapid azimuthal variations may be caused by vertical stratification with changing anisotropy with depth in the oceanic lithosphere.

  19. Recovering hidden signals of statistical anisotropy from a masked or partial CMB sky

    CERN Document Server

    Aluri, Pavan K; Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Any isotropy violating phenomena on cosmic microwave background (CMB) induces off-diagonal correlations in the two-point function. These correlations themselves can be used to estimate the underlying anisotropic signals. Masking due to residual foregrounds, or availability of partial sky due to survey limitation, are unavoidable circumstances in CMB studies. But, masking induces additional correlations, and thus complicates the recovery of such signals. In this work, we discuss a procedure based on bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) formalism to comprehensively addresses any spurious correlations induced by masking and successfully recover hidden signals of anisotropy in observed CMB maps. This method is generic, and can be applied to recover a variety of isotropy violating phenomena. Here, we illustrate the procedure by recovering the subtle Doppler boost signal from simulated boosted CMB skies, which has become possible with the unprecedented full-sky sensitivity of PLANCK probe.

  20. Time delay anisotropy in photoelectron emission from the isotropic ground state of helium

    CERN Document Server

    Heuser, Sebastian; Cirelli, Claudio; Sabbar, Mazyar; Boge, Robert; Lucchini, Matteo; Gallmann, Lukas; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli S; Dahlström, J Marcus; Lindroth, Eva; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Keller, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Time delays of electrons emitted from an isotropic initial state and leaving behind an isotropic ion are assumed to be angle-independent. Using an interferometric method involving XUV attosecond pulse trains and an IR probe field in combination with a detection scheme, which allows for full 3D momentum resolution, we show that time delays between electrons liberated from the $1s^{2}$ spherically symmetric ground state of He depend on the emission direction of the electrons with respect to the linear polarization axis of the ionizing XUV light. Such time delays can exhibit values as large as 60 attoseconds. With the help of refined theoretical models we can attribute the observed anisotropy to the interplay between different final quantum states, which arise naturally when two photons are involved in the photoionization process. Since most measurement techniques tracing attosecond electron dynamics have involved at least two photons so far, this is a general, significant, and initially unexpected effect that m...

  1. Influence of interface exchange coupling in perpendicular anisotropy [Pt/Co]50/TbFe bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mangin, S.; Hauet, T.; Fischer, P.; Kim, D.H.; Kortright, J.B.; Chesnel, K.; Arenholz, E.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2007-10-10

    We present the magnetization evolution of perpendicular anisotropy TbFe and [Co/Pt]{sub 50} thin films either in direct contact resulting in antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling or separated by a thick Pt layer. Magnetometry and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy determine the spatially averaged magnetic properties. Resonant magnetic x-ray small-angle scattering and magnetic soft X-ray transmission microscopy probed the domain configurations and correlations in the reversal processes. While the Co/Pt multilayer reverses by domain propagation, the TbFe magnetization reversal is found to be dominated either by coherent magnetization reversal processes or by lateral domain formation depending on the interface exchange coupling. In the presence of lateral domains, dipolar field induced domain replication phenomena are observed.

  2. Radar model fusion of asteroid (4179) Toutatis via its optical images observed by Chang'e-2 probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Liu, Peng; Sun, Lei; Huang, Jiangchuan; Tang, Xianglong

    2016-06-01

    Asteroid (4179) Toutatis has been modeling by ground-based radar observations until Dec 13th, 2012, when distinct optical images of Toutatis were captured during the Chang'e-2 flyby at the shortest distance for the first time. The surface details on Toutatis in the optical images are abundant enough to reinforce the radar model descriptions. Under this context, we customized a method of frequency domain data fusion, which combines the topography information of radar model and the 3rd dimension information estimated from optical image by shape from shading algorithm, and gave out a new Toutatis' radar model. A model with abundant surface characteristics had been resulted.

  3. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Lima, R. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Yan, H. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Potsdam Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik und Astronomie; Gouveia Dal Pino, E.M. de [Univ. de Sao Paulo (Brazil). Inst. de Astronomia, Geofisica e Ciencias Atmosfericas; Lazarian, A. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Astronomy

    2016-05-15

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are successful to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities which can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the ions scattering rate due to the parallel firehose, mirror, and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instabilities thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model which bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvenic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  4. Analysis of North Sky Cosmic Ray Anisotropy with Atmospheric Neutrinos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wills, Elizabeth; IceCube Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cosmic Ray anisotropy, no experiment has definitively discovered the source of this unexpected phenomenon. Studying the cosmic rays' neutral daughter particles with pointing capabilities, like neutrinos, could shed new light. This can be done at two levels; a source which produces cosmic rays must also produce high energy astrophysical neutrinos, and low energy atmospheric neutrinos are made when the cosmic rays interact with the atmosphere. This analysis focuses on atmospheric neutrinos detected by IceCube, a Cherenkov detector instrumenting a kilometer cubed of glacial ice at the South Pole. The anisotropy and its energy dependence have been studied in the Southern sky using atmospheric muons by IceCube. In the North, gamma ray detectors, such as HAWC, and Argo-YBJ, have observed this anisotropy in cosmic ray showers. Thus far, no single- detector full-sky map exists of the anisotropy. Using IceCube's neutrino data, we can complement these studies with an exploration of the northern sky anisotropy at higher energies of cosmic rays. This could bring us much closer to understanding the complete picture of this anisotropy across energy levels and the whole sky.

  5. Probing the Climatological Impact of a Cosmic Ray-Cloud Connection through Low-Frequency Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Magee, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that cosmic ray events could have a causal relationship with cloud formation rates. Given the weak constraints on the role that cloud formation plays in climate forcing it is essential to understand the role such a relationship could have in shaping the Earth's climate. This issue has been previously investigated in the context of the long-term effect of cosmic ray events on climate. However, in order to establish whether or not such a relationship exists, measurements of short-timescale solar events, individual cosmic ray events, and spatially correlated cloud parameters could be of great significance. Here we propose such a comparison using observations from a pair of radio telescopes arrays, the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA). These low-frequency radio arrays have a unique ability to simultaneously conduct solar, ionospheric and cosmic rays observations and are thus ideal for such a comparison. We will outline plans for a comparison usi...

  6. What have we learnt from Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Robert G Crittenden

    2004-10-01

    It has been a little over a year since WMAP produced its dramatic new glimpse of the cosmic microwave background. I review the results of the WMAP mission and the science that has arisen from it, focusing on the qualitatively new features of the data: the temperature-polarization correlation, correlations with large scale structure, the large-scale power deficit and its implications, and the search for non-Gaussianity.

  7. Cosmic Ray Small Scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    López-Barquero, Vanessa; Xu, S; Desiati, P; Lazarian, A

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments. However, a comprehensive and satisfactory explanation has been elusive for over a decade now. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays on Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium and small angular scale structure could be an effect of non diffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation of the observed small scale anisotropy observed at TeV energy scale, may come from the effect of particle scattering in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-$\\beta$ compressible mag...

  8. Probing the Accretion Disk and Central Engine Structure of the NGC 4258 with Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Markoff, Sera; Tueller, Jack; Wilms, Joern; Young, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    We present an X-ray study of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC 4258 using data from Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey. We find that signatures of X-ray reprocessing by cold gas are very weak in the spectrum of this Seyfert-2 galaxy; a weak, narrow fluorescent K(alpha) emission line of cod iron is robustly detected in both the Suzaku and XMM-Newton spectra but at a level much below that of most other Seyfert-2 galaxies. We conclude that the circumnuclear environment of this AGN is very "clean" and lacks the Compton-thick obscuring torus of unified Seyfert schemes. From the narrowness of the iron line, together with evidence of line flux variability between the Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations, we constrain the line emitting region to be between 3 x 10(exp 3)r(sub g) and 4 x 10(exp 4)r(sub g), from the black hole. We show that the observed properties of the iron line can be explained if the line originates from the surface layers of a warped accretion disk. In particular, we present explicit calculations of the expected iron line from a disk warped by Lens-Thirring precession from a misaligned central black hole. Finally, the Suzaku data reveal clear evidence of large amplitude 2-10 keV variability on timescales of 50 ksec and smaller amplitude flares on timescales as short as 5-10 ksec. If associated with accretion disk processes, such rapid variability requires an origin in the innermost regions of the disk (r approx. equals 10(r(sub g) or less). Analysis of the difference spectrum between a high- and low-flux states suggests that the variable component of the X-ray emission is steeper and more absorbed than the average AGN emission, suggesting that the primary X-ray source and absorbing screen have a spatial structure on comparable scales. We note the remarkable similarity between the circumnuclear environment of NGC 4258 and another well studied low-luminosity AGN, M81*.

  9. Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy and Observational Probes of Prebiotic Interstellar Gas and Ice Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brett A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the detection of amino acids in meteoritic and cometary samples, our understanding of the formation of such molecules remains incomplete, because we do not yet fully understand the interplay between chemical reactions occurring within interstellar ices, and the gas-phase chemistry which seeds and enriches them. My dissertation work takes a holistic view of the system, approaching the topic by studying both fundamental spectroscopic and physical properties of astrochemical ices, as well as chemical evolutionary processes in the gas-phase ISM. I'll discuss my work to confirm the detection of l-C3H+, a potentially key intermediate in interstellar carbon chemistry, as well as the first detection of HNCNH, a potential DNA nucleobase precursor, which must be formed in ices. I'll also present the design and construction of, and initial spectroscopic work with, a time-domain spectrometer built to study astrochemical ices in the largely unexplored TerHertz (far-Infrared) region of the spectrum, and its application to astronomical observations.

  10. Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect Observations of Strong Lensing Galaxy Clusters: Probing the Over-Concentration Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Megan B; Gladders, Michael D; Marrone, Daniel P; Barrientos, L Felipe; Bayliss, Matthew; Bonamente, Massimiliano; Bulbul, Esra; Carlstrom, John E; Culverhouse, Thomas; Gilbank, David G; Greer, Christopher; Hasler, Nicole; Hawkins, David; Hennessy, Ryan; Joy, Marshall; Koester, Benjamin; Lamb, James; Leitch, Erik; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony; Muchovej, Stephen; Oguri, Masamune; Plagge, Tom; Pryke, Clem; Woody, David

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) effect for a sample of ten strong lensing selected galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev Zel'dovich Array (SZA). The SZA is sensitive to structures on spatial scales of a few arcminutes, while the strong lensing mass modeling constrains the mass at small scales (typically < 30"). Combining the two provides information about the projected concentrations of the strong lensing clusters. The Einstein radii we measure are twice as large as expected given the masses inferred from SZ scaling relations. A Monte Carlo simulation indicates that a sample randomly drawn from the expected distribution would have a larger median Einstein radius than the observed clusters about 3% of the time. The implied overconcentration has been noted in previous studies with smaller samples of lensing clusters. It persists for this sample, with the caveat that this could result from a systematic effect such as if the gas fractions of the strong lensing clusters are substantially below what is ...

  11. Probing the Kinematics of the Narrow-Line Region in Seyfert Galaxies with Slitless Spectroscopy: Observational Results

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, J R; Krämer, S B; Bower, G A; Gull, T R; Hutchings, J B; Kaiser, M E; Weistrop, D

    2004-01-01

    We present slitless spectra of 10 Seyfert galaxies observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The spectra cover the [OIII] 4959, 5007 emission lines at a spectral resolving power of ~9000 and a spatial resolution of 0.1". We compare the slitless spectra with previous HST narrow-band images to determine the velocity shifts and dispersions of the bright emission-line knots in the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of these Seyferts. Many knots are spatially resolved with sizes of tenths of arcsecs, corresponding to tens of pcs, and yet they appear to move coherently with radial velocities between zero and +/- 1200 km/s with respect to the systemic velocities of their hostgalaxies. The knots also show a broad range in velocity dispersion, ranging from ~30 km/s (the velocity resolution) to ~1000 km/s FWHM. Most of the Seyfert galaxies in this sample show an organized flow pattern, with radial velocities near zero at the nucleus (defined by the optical continuum peak) and increas...

  12. Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS Observations of T Dwarfs: Brown Dwarf Multiplicity and New Probes of the L/T Transition

    CERN Document Server

    Burgasser, A J; Cruz, K L; Reid, I N; Leggett, S K; Liebert, J; Burrows, A; Brown, M E; Burgasser, Adam J.; Cruz, Kelle L.; Leggett, Sandy K.; Liebert, James; Burrows, Adam; Brown, Michael E.

    2006-01-01

    We present the results of a Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS imaging survey of 22 T-type field brown dwarfs. Five are resolved as binary systems with angular separations of 0"05-0"35, and companionship is established on the basis of component F110W-F170M colors (indicative of CH4 absorption) and low probabilities of background contamination. Prior ground-based observations show 2MASS 1553+1532AB to be a common proper motion binary. The properties of these systems - low multiplicity fraction (11[+7][-3]% resolved, as corrected for sample selection baises), close projected separations (a = 1.8-5.0 AU) and near-unity mass ratios - are consistent with previous results for field brown dwarf binaries. Three of the binaries have components that span the poorly-understood transition between L dwarfs and T dwarfs. Spectral decomposition analysis of one of these, SDSS 1021-0304AB, reveals a peculiar flux reversal between its components, as its T5 secondary is ~30% brighter at 1.05 and 1.27 micron than its T1 primary. This...

  13. Probing seismic solar analogues through observations with the NASA Kepler space telescope and HERMES high-resolution spectrograph

    CERN Document Server

    Beck, P G; García, R A; Nascimento,, J do; Duarte, T S S; Mathis, S; Regulo, C; Ballot, J; Egeland, R; Castro, M; Pérez-Herńandez, F; Creevey, O; Tkachenko, A; van Reeth, T; Bigot, L; Corsaro, E; Metcalfe, T; Mathur, S; Palle, P L; Prieto, C Allende; Montes, D; Johnston, C; Andersen, M F; van Winckel, H

    2016-01-01

    Stars similar to the Sun, known as solar analogues, provide an excellent opportunity to study the preceding and following evolutionary phases of our host star. The unprecedented quality of photometric data collected by the \\Kepler NASA mission allows us to characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology and study diagnostics of stellar evolution, such as variation of magnetic activity, rotation and the surface lithium abundance. In this project, presented in a series of papers by Salabert et al. (2016a,b) and Beck et al (2016a,b), we investigate the link between stellar activity, rotation, lithium abundance and oscillations in a group of 18 solar-analogue stars through space photometry, obtained with the NASA Kepler space telescope and from currently 50+ hours of ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy with the Hermes instrument. In these proceedings, we first discuss the selection of the stars in the sample, observations and calibrations and then summarise the main results of the project. By invest...

  14. Lithosphere Anisotropy of Prydz Bay,Antarctica:From Ocean Bottom Seismometer Long Term Observation%南极洲普里兹湾岩石圈各向异性:海底地震仪观测

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    牛雄伟; 高金耀; 吴招才; 阮爱国; 卫小冬; 刘晨光; 李天光; 沈中延; 潘少军

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand better the stress field and dynamics characteristic of the lithosphere at Prydz bay in the Ant-arctica,rotation-correlation shear wave splitting method is used to study 5 earthquakes recorded by three ocean bottom seis-mometers recovered at Prydz bay during the 31th Chinese Antarctic Research Expedition to obtain the anisotropy characteristics of the continent and ocean transition of Prydz bay in this paper.Our inversion results show strong anisotropy in the lithosphere of Prydz bay with spatial differences in small scale.The fast shear wave polarization directions are from N40°E to N60°E,fast and slow shear wave times delay are from 0.2 s to 1.3 s.We think that the anisotropy at the oceanic part is dominated by the mantle flow of mid-ocean ridge spreading,while the continental part is dominated by the relic structural fabric of the ancient lithosphere at the top of the upper mantle,and the middle zone with shallower and thinner anisotropy layer may be influenced by the both reasons above.%为了研究南极普里兹湾岩石圈深部应力场及其动力学,采用S波分裂旋转相关法,对中国第31次南极科学考察成功回收的3个站位海底地震仪数据(5个远震记录)进行了反演,获得了普里兹湾洋陆过渡带岩石圈各向异性特征.结果表明,台站所在区域各向异性显著,在较小的范围内存在明显的空间差异,快S波偏振方向变化范围是N40°E~N60°E,快慢波时间延迟变化范围为0.2~1.3 s.洋盆的各向异性主要取决于海底扩张地幔流作用,大陆及附近的各向异性主要受上地幔顶部残留构造的影响,而中间过渡带各向异性层厚度较小集中在地壳内,它可能受海底扩张地幔流和残留构造共同作用.

  15. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengaly, C. A. P., Jr.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Xavier, H. S.; Novaes, C. P.

    2017-01-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is A = 0.0507 ± 0.0014 towards the (l, b) = (323°, -5°) direction, whose result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues. Furthermore, this dipole amplitude is statistically consistent (p-value = 0.061) with mock catalogues simulated according to the expected Λ cold dark matter density fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage and anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy in the LSS, given the limitations and systematics of current data, in the concordance model scenario.

  16. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengaly, C. A. P.; Bernui, A.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Xavier, H. S.; Novaes, C. P.

    2016-09-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is A = 0.0507 ± 0.0014 toward the (l, b) = (323°, -5°) direction, whose result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues. Furthermore, this dipole amplitude is statistically consistent (p-value = 0.061) with mock catalogues simulated according to the expected ΛCDM matter density fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage and anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy in the LSS, given the limitations and systematics of current data, in the concordance model scenario.

  17. Probing Seismic Solar Analogues Through Observations With The NASA Kepler Space Telescope and Hermes High-Resolution Spectrograph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, P. G.; Salabert, D.; Garcia, R. A.; do Nascimento, J., Jr.; Duarte, T. S. S.; Mathis, S.; Regulo, C.; Ballot, J.; Egeland, R.; Castro, M.; Pérez-Herńandez, F.,; Creevey, O.; Tkachenko, A.; van Reeth, T.; Bigot, L.; Corsaro, E.; Metcalfe, T.; Mathur, S.; Palle, P. L.; Allende Prieto, C.; Montes, D.; Johnston, C.; Andersen, M. F.; van Winckel, H.

    2016-11-01

    Stars similar to the Sun, known as solar analogues, provide an excellent opportunity to study the preceding and following evolutionary phases of our host star. The unprecedented quality of photometric data collected by the Kepler NASA mission allows us to characterise solar-like stars through asteroseismology and study diagnostics of stellar evolution, such as variation of magnetic activity, rotation and the surface lithium abundance. In this project, presented in a series of papers by Salabert et al (2016ab) and Beck et al. (2016ab), we investigate the link between stellar activity, rotation, lithium abundance and oscillations in a group of 18 solar-analogue stars through space photometry, obtained with the NASA Kepler space telescope and from currently 50+ hours of ground-based, high-resolution spectroscopy with the Hermes instrument. In these proceedings, we first discuss the selection of the stars in the sample, observations and calibrations and then summarise the main results of the project. By investigating the chromospheric and photospheric activity of the solar analogues in this sample, it was shown that for a large fraction of these stars the measured activity levels are compatible to levels of the 11-year solar activity cycle 23. A clear correlation between the lithium abundance and surface rotation was found for rotation periods shorter than the solar value. Comparing the lithium abundance measured in the solar analogues to evolutionary models with the Toulouse-Geneva Evolutionary Code (TGEC), we found that the solar models calibrated to the Sun also correctly describe the set of solar/stellar analogs showing that they share the same internal mixing physics. Finally, the star KIC3241581 and KIC10644353 are discussed in more detail.

  18. Pump-probe SAXS experiments on ultrafast demagnetization of magnetic multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfau, B.; Schaffert, S.; Mohanty, J.; Geilhufe, J.; Flewett, S.; Eisebitt, S. [IOAP, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Buettner, F. [IOAP, Technische Universitaet Berlin (Germany); Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen (Switzerland); Mueller, L.; Gutt, C.; Al-Shemmary, A.; Duesterer, S.; Redlin, H.; Gruebel, G. [HASYLAB, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Vodungbo, B. [ENSTA ParisTech, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France); Luening, J. [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris (France); Stickler, D.; Froemter, R.; Oepen, H.P. [Universitaet Hamburg (Germany); Schlotter, W.F. [LCLS, SLAC, Menlo Park (United States)

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated the ultrafast optical demagnetization of domain patterns in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in an infrared-pump x-ray-probe experiment. As a probe we used small angle x-ray scattering which, via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co M-edge, allows us to simultaneously obtain information on the magnitude of the local magnetization and the characteristic length scale of the magnetic domains. The free-electron laser source FLASH at Hamburg was tuned to deliver {lambda}=20.9nm x-ray pulses of approx. 25 fs duration which were synchronized to an infrared fs laser for pump-probe experiments with sub-ps time resolution. In addition to ultrafast demagnetization, we observe sub-ps structural changes of the magnetic domain configuration. Models to explain this ultrafast structural change will be discussed.

  19. Effective magnetic anisotropy manipulation by oblique deposition in magnetostatically coupled Co nanostrip arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, A. G.; Stebliy, M. E.; Ognev, A. V.; Samardak, A. S.; Davydenko, A. V.; Chebotkevich, L. A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on an experimental investigation of magnetic properties and domain structure of single nanostrips and their magnetostatically coupled arrays possessing the shape anisotropy and anisotropy induced by oblique deposition, which are oriented at different angles to each other. The orientation of the effective anisotropy and the value of coercive force of nanostrip arrays depends on the angle between directions of the induced anisotropies. Micromagnetic simulations, performed to determine possible spin configurations especially within domain walls, support the experimentally observed magnetic domain structure. An influence of dipole-dipole interaction between magnetostatically coupled nanostrips on the domain structure and coercive force of arrays are discussed. We demonstrate the experimental validation of an early-proposed theoretical model for determination of the effective magnetic anisotropy through the combination of induced anisotropies.

  20. DFT calculations of magnetic anisotropy energy of Ge(1-x)Mn(x)Te ferromagnetic semiconductor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łusakowski, A; Bogusławski, P; Story, T

    2015-06-10

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the energy of magnetic anisotropy for diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge(1-x)Mn(x)Te were performed using OpenMX package with fully relativistic pseudopotentials. The influence of hole concentration and magnetic ion neighbourhood on magnetic anisotropy energy is presented. Analysis of microscopic mechanism of magnetic anisotropy is provided, in particular the role of spin-orbit coupling, spin polarization and spatial changes of electron density are discussed. The calculations are in accordance with the experimental observation of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in rhombohedral Ge(1-x)Mn(x)Te (1 1 1) thin layers.

  1. DFT calculations of magnetic anisotropy energy of Ge1-xMnxTe ferromagnetic semiconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łusakowski, A.; Bogusławski, P.; Story, T.

    2015-06-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the energy of magnetic anisotropy for diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge1-xMnxTe were performed using OpenMX package with fully relativistic pseudopotentials. The influence of hole concentration and magnetic ion neighbourhood on magnetic anisotropy energy is presented. Analysis of microscopic mechanism of magnetic anisotropy is provided, in particular the role of spin-orbit coupling, spin polarization and spatial changes of electron density are discussed. The calculations are in accordance with the experimental observation of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in rhombohedral Ge1-xMnxTe (1 1 1) thin layers.

  2. UV-Induced Anisotropy In CdBr2-CdBr2: Cu Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Naggar A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We have found an occurrence of anisotropy in the nanostructure CdBr2-CdBr2: Cu nanocrystalline films. The film thickness was varied from 4 nm up to 80 nm. The films were prepared by successive deposition of the novel layers onto the basic nanocrystals. The detection of anisotropy was performed by occurrence of anisotropy in the polarized light at 633 nm He-Ne laser wavelength. The occurrence of anisotropy was substantially dependent on the film thickness and the photoinduced power density. Possible mechanisms of the observed phenomena are discussed.

  3. Nonaxisymmetric anisotropy of solar wind turbulence as a direct test for models of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A J; Gogoberidze, G; Chapman, S C

    2012-02-24

    Single point spacecraft observations of the turbulent solar wind flow exhibit a characteristic nonaxisymmetric anisotropy that depends sensitively on the perpendicular power spectral exponent. We use this nonaxisymmetric anisotropy as a function of wave vector direction to test models of MHD turbulence. Using Ulysses magnetic field observations in the fast, quiet polar solar wind we find that the Goldreich-Sridhar model of MHD turbulence is not consistent with the observed anisotropy, whereas the observations are well reproduced by the "slab+2D" model. The Goldreich-Sridhar model alone cannot account for the observations unless an additional component is also present.

  4. Dynamics of low anisotropy morphologies in directional solidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utter, B; Bodenschatz, E

    2002-11-01

    We report experimental results on quasi-two-dimensional diffusion limited growth in directionally solidified succinonitrile with small amounts of poly(ethylene oxide), acetone, or camphor as a solute. Seaweed growth, or dense branching morphology, is selected by growing grains close to the [111] plane, where the in-plane surface tension is nearly isotropic. The observed growth morphologies are very sensitive to small anisotropies in surface tension caused by misorientations from the [111] plane. Different seaweed morphologies are found, including the degenerate, the stabilized, and the strongly tilted seaweeds. The degenerate seaweeds show a limited fractal scaling range and, with increased undercooling, suggests a transition from "fractal" to "compact" seaweed. Strongly tilted seaweeds demonstrate a significant twofold anisotropy. In addition, seaweed-dendrite transitions are observed in low anisotropy growth.

  5. Magnetic anisotropy of ultrafine 316L stainless steel fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyr, Tien-Wei; Huang, Shih-Ju; Wur, Ching-Shuei

    2016-12-01

    An as-received 316L stainless steel fiber with a diameter of 20 μm was drawn using a bundle drawing process at room temperature to form ultrafine stainless steel fibers with diameters of 12, 8, and 6 μm. The crystalline phases of the fibers were analyzed using the X-ray diffraction (XRD) profile fitting technique. The grain sizes of γ-austenite and α‧-martensite were reduced to nanoscale sizes after the drawing process. XRD analysis and focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope observations showed that the newly formed α‧-martensitic grains were closely arrayed in the drawing direction. The magnetic property was measured using a superconducting quantum interference device vibrating sample magnetometer. The magnetic anisotropy of the fibers was observed by applying a magnetic field parallel and perpendicular to the fiber axis. The results showed that the microstructure anisotropy including the shape anisotropy, magnetocrystalline anisotropy, and the orientation of the crystalline phases strongly contributed to the magnetic anisotropy.

  6. Lower hybrid frequency range waves generated by ion polarization drift due to electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves: Analysis of an event observed by the Van Allen Probe B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Boardsen, S.; Krivorutsky, E. N.; Engebretson, M. J.; Sibeck, D.; Chen, S.; Breneman, A.

    2017-01-01

    We analyze a wave event that occurred near noon between 07:03 and 07:08 UT on 23 February 2014 detected by the Van Allen Probes B spacecraft, where waves in the lower hybrid frequency range (LHFR) and electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves are observed to be highly correlated, with Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86. We assume that the correlation is the result of LHFR wave generation by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of the EMIC waves. To check this assumption the drift velocities of electrons and H+, He+, and O+ ions in the measured EMIC wave electric field were modeled. Then the LHFR wave linear instantaneous growth rates for plasma with these changing drift velocities and different plasma compositions were calculated. The time distribution of these growth rates, their frequency distribution, and the frequency dependence of the ratio of the LHFR wave power spectral density (PSD) parallel and perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field to the total PSD were found. These characteristics of the growth rates were compared with the corresponding characteristics of the observed LHFR activity. Reasonable agreement between these features and the strong correlation between EMIC and LHFR energy densities support the assumption that the LHFR wave generation can be caused by the ions' polarization drift in the electric field of an EMIC wave.

  7. CMB statistical anisotropy from noncommutative gravitational waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiraishi, Maresuke; Ricciardone, Angelo [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia ' ' G. Galilei' ' , Università degli Studi di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy); Mota, David F. [Institute of Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1029 Blindern, N-0315 Oslo (Norway); Arroja, Frederico, E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it, E-mail: d.f.mota@astro.uio.no, E-mail: angelo.ricciardone@pd.infn.it, E-mail: arroja@pd.infn.it [INFN, Sezione di Padova, via Marzolo 8, I-35131, Padova (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    Primordial statistical anisotropy is a key indicator to investigate early Universe models and has been probed by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies. In this paper, we examine tensor-mode CMB fluctuations generated from anisotropic gravitational waves, parametrised by P{sub h}(k) = P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) [ 1 + ∑{sub LM} f{sub L}(k) g{sub LM} Y{sub LM} ( k-circumflex )], where P{sub h}{sup (0)}(k) is the usual scale-invariant power spectrum. Such anisotropic tensor fluctuations may arise from an inflationary model with noncommutativity of fields. It is verified that in this model, an isotropic component and a quadrupole asymmetry with f{sub 0}(k) = f{sub 2}(k) ∝ k{sup -2} are created and hence highly red-tilted off-diagonal components arise in the CMB power spectra, namely ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 2 in TT, TE, EE and BB, and ℓ{sub 2} = ℓ{sub 1} ± 1 in TB and EB. We find that B-mode polarisation is more sensitive to such signals than temperature and E-mode polarisation due to the smallness of large-scale cosmic variance and we can potentially measure g{sub 00} = 30 and g{sub 2M} = 58 at 68% CL in a cosmic-variance-limited experiment. Such a level of signal may be measured in a PRISM like experiment, while the instrumental noise contaminates it in the Planck experiment. These results imply that it is impossible to measure the noncommutative parameter if it is small enough for the perturbative treatment to be valid. Our formalism and methodology for dealing with the CMB tensor statistical anisotropy are general and straightforwardly applicable to other early Universe models.

  8. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ < 3.00). Flow stresses (0.2% offset) were measured at room temperature by uniaxial t...

  9. Observational Constraints on Exponential Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Louis; Luo, Ling-Wei; Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2010-01-01

    We study the observational constraints on the exponential gravity model of f(R)=-beta*Rs(1-e^(-R/Rs)). We use the latest observational data including Supernova Cosmology Project (SCP) Union2 compilation, Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS DR7) and Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP7) in our analysis. From these observations, we obtain a lower bound on the model parameter beta at 1.27 (95% CL) but no appreciable upper bound. The constraint on the present matter density parameter is 0.245< Omega_m^0<0.311 (95% CL). We also find out the best-fit value of model parameters on several cases.

  10. Observational Probes of Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, David H; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Hirata, Christopher; Riess, Adam G; Rozo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of "dark energy" with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein's theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious experimental efforts to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit "Stage IV" dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock-Paczynski test, and direct meas...

  11. Fourier-transform infrared anisotropy in cross and parallel sections of tendon and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidthanapally Aruna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is used to investigate the amide anisotropies at different surfaces of a three-dimensional cartilage or tendon block. With the change in the polarization state of the incident infrared light, the resulting anisotropic behavior of the tissue structure is described here. Methods Thin sections (6 μm thick were obtained from three different surfaces of the canine tissue blocks and imaged at 6.25 μm pixel resolution. For each section, infrared imaging experiments were repeated thirteen times with the identical parameters except a 15° increment of the analyzer's angle in the 0° – 180° angular space. The anisotropies of amide I and amide II components were studied in order to probe the orientation of the collagen fibrils at different tissue surfaces. Results For tendon, the anisotropy of amide I and amide II components in parallel sections is comparable to that of regular sections; and tendon's cross sections show distinct, but weak anisotropic behavior for both the amide components. For articular cartilage, parallel sections in the superficial zone have the expected infrared anisotropy that is consistent with that of regular sections. The parallel sections in the radial zone, however, have a nearly isotropic amide II absorption and a distinct amide I anisotropy. Conclusion From the inconsistency in amide anisotropy between superficial to radial zone in parallel section results, a schematic model is used to explain the origins of these amide anisotropies in cartilage and tendon.

  12. Anisotropy spectra for enantiomeric differentiation of biomolecular building blocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A C; Meinert, C; Bredehöft, J H; Giri, C; Jones, N C; Hoffmann, S V; Meierhenrich, U J

    2013-01-01

    All biopolymers are composed of homochiral building blocks, and both D-sugars and L-amino acids uniquely constitute life on Earth. These monomers were originally enantiomerically differentiated under prebiotic conditions. Particular progress has recently been made in support of the photochemical model for this differentiation: the interaction of circularly polarized light with racemic molecules is currently thought to have been the original source for life's biological homochirality. The differential asymmetric photoreactivity of particular small molecules can be characterized by both circular dichroism and anisotropy spectroscopy. Anisotropy spectroscopy, a novel derivative of circular dichroism spectroscopy, records the anisotropy factor g = Δε/ε as a function of the wavelength. Anisotropy spectroscopy promisingly affords the wavelength-dependent determination of the enantiomeric excess (ee) inducible into chiral organic molecules by photochemical irradiation with circularly polarized light. Anisotropy spectra of small molecules therefore provide unique means for characterizing the different photochemical behaviors between enantiomers upon exposure to various wavelengths of circularly polarized light. This chapter will: (1) present the theory and configuration of anisotropy spectroscopy; (2) explain experimentally recorded anisotropy spectra of selected chiral biomolecules such as amino acids; and (3) discuss the relevance of these spectra for the investigation of the origin of the molecular homochirality observed in living organisms. This review describes a new chiroptical technique that is of significance for advances in asymmetric photochemistry and that is also highly relevant for the European Space Agency Rosetta Mission, which will determine enantiomeric excesses (ees) in chiral organic molecules in cometary ices when it lands on Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko in November 2014.

  13. Intermediate inflation in light of the three-year WMAP observations

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Pahud, C; Barrow, John D; Liddle, Andrew R

    2006-01-01

    The three-year observations from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe have been hailed as giving the first clear indication of a spectral index n_s0 is given (within the slow-roll approximation) by a version of the intermediate inflation model with expansion rate H(t) \\propto t^{-1/3}. We assess the status of this model in light of the WMAP3 data.

  14. Inter-observer reproducibility of diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis based on a combination of probe-to-bone test and simple radiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvaro-Afonso, Francisco Javier; Lázaro-Martínez, José Luis; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; García-Morales, Esther; García-Álvarez, Yolanda; Molines-Barroso, Raúl J

    2014-07-01

    Probe-to-bone test and simple X-rays are both standard tests for the diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis. This study demonstrates the importance of considering jointly clinical information (probe-to-bone test) and diagnostic tests (simple radiography) to increase agreement among clinicians on diagnosis of diabetic foot osteomyelitis.

  15. Anisotropy Studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Santos, E M

    2009-01-01

    An anisotropy signal for the arrival directions of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECR) of more than 99% confidence level was established using data collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory. Cosmic rays with energy above $\\sim 6 \\times 10^{19}$ eV show a correlation with the positions of extragalactic nearby active galactic nuclei (AGN), being maximum for sources at less than $\\sim$100 Mpc and angular separation of a few degrees. The evolution of the correlation signal with the energy shows that the departure from anisotropy coincides with the flux suppression observed in the spectrum, being therefore consistent with the hypothesis that the correlated events have their origin in extragalactic sources close enough to avoid significant interaction with the cosmic microwave background (the Greisen-Zatsepin-Kuz'min effect). Even though the observed signal cannot unambiguously identify AGNs as the production sites of UHECRs, the potential sources have to be distributed in a similar way. A number of additional st...

  16. A fully covariant description of CMB anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Dunsby, P K S

    1997-01-01

    Starting from the exact non-linear description of matter and radiation, a fully covariant and gauge-invariant formula for the observed temperature anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CBR) radiation, expressed in terms of the electric ($E_{ab}$) and magnetic ($H_{ab}$) parts of the Weyl tensor, is obtained by integrating photon geodesics from last scattering to the point of observation today. This improves and extends earlier work by Russ et al where a similar formula was obtained by taking first order variations of the redshift. In the case of scalar (density) perturbations, $E_{ab}$ is related to the harmonic components of the gravitational potential $\\Phi_k$ and the usual dominant Sachs-Wolfe contribution $\\delta T_R/\\bar{T}_R\\sim\\Phi_k$ to the temperature anisotropy is recovered, together with contributions due to the time variation of the potential (Rees-Sciama effect), entropy and velocity perturbations at last scattering and a pressure suppression term important in low density universes. We a...

  17. Anisotropy and temperature dependence of the first critical field in 2H-NbS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leroux, M., E-mail: maxime.leroux@grenoble.cnrs.fr [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Rodiere, P. [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Cario, L. [Institut des Materiaux Jean Rouxel (IMN), Universite de Nantes-CNRS, 2 rue de la Houssiniere, B.P. 32229, 44322 Nantes Cedex 03 (France); Klein, T. [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, 25 Avenue des Martyrs, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2012-06-01

    We report on {mu} Hall probe measurements on single crystals of 2H-NbS{sub 2}. This compound is the only superconducting 2H-dichalcogenide which does not develop a charge density wave. At low temperature and low magnetic field, a Bean profile is observed, allowing to evaluate the critical current. Moreover, the anisotropy and temperature dependence of the first critical field in 2H-NbS{sub 2} was measured down to 1.2 K. A linear temperature dependence of the first penetration field is clearly observed. The absolute magnetic penetration depth is found to be 83 nm which is slightly reduced compared to the iso-structural compound 2H-NbSe{sub 2}.

  18. On the origin of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in strained Fe-Co(-X) films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichel, L.; Edström, A.; Pohl, D.; Rusz, J.; Eriksson, O.; Schultz, L.; Fähler, S.

    2017-02-01

    Very high magnetic anisotropies have been theoretically predicted for strained Fe-Co(-X) and indeed several experiments on epitaxial thin films seemed to confirm strain induced anisotropy enhancement. This study presents a critical analysis of the different contributions to perpendicular anisotropy: volume, interface and surface anisotropies. Tracing these contributions, thickness series of single layer films as well as multilayers with Au-Cu buffers/interlayers of different lattice parameters have been prepared. The analysis of their magnetic anisotropy reveals a negligible influence of the lattice parameter of the buffer. Electronic effects, originating from both, the Au-Cu interface and the film surface, outrange the elastic effects. Surface anisotropy, however, exceeds the interface anisotropy by more than a factor of three. A comparison with results from density functional theory suggests, that the experimentally observed strong perpendicular surface anisotropy originates from a deviation from an ideal oxide-free surface. Accordingly, tailored Fe-Co-X/oxide interfaces may open a route towards high anisotropy in rare-earth free materials.

  19. Anisotropy vs chemical composition at ultra-high energies

    CERN Document Server

    Lemoine, Martin

    2009-01-01

    This paper proposes and discusses a test of the chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays that relies on the anisotropy patterns measured as a function of energy. In particular, we show that if one records an anisotropy signal produced by heavy nuclei of charge Z above an energy E_{thr}, one should record an even stronger (possibly much stronger) anisotropy at energies >E_{thr}/Z due to the proton component that is expected to be associated with the sources of the heavy nuclei. This conclusion remains robust with respect to the parameters characterizing the sources and it does not depend at all on the modelling of astrophysical magnetic fields. As a concrete example, we apply this test to the most recent data of the Pierre Auger Observatory. Assuming that the anisotropy reported above 55EeV is not a statistical accident, and that no significant anisotropy has been observed at energies 10^{45}Z^{-2}erg/s. Using this bound in conjunction with the above conclusions, we argue that the current PAO data...

  20. Origin of azimuthal seismic anisotropy in oceanic plates and mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Thorsten W.; Conrad, Clinton P.; Schaeffer, Andrew J.; Lebedev, Sergei

    2014-09-01

    Seismic anisotropy is ubiquitous in the Earth's mantle but strongest in its thermo-mechanical boundary layers. Azimuthal anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere and asthenosphere can be imaged by surface waves and should be particularly straightforward to relate to well-understood plate kinematics and large-scale mantle flow. However, previous studies have come to mixed conclusions as to the depth extent of the applicability of paleo-spreading and mantle flow models of anisotropy, and no simple, globally valid, relationships exist. Here, we show that lattice preferred orientation (LPO) inferred from mantle flow computations produces a plausible global background model for asthenospheric anisotropy underneath oceanic lithosphere. The same is not true for absolute plate motion (APM) models. A ˜200 km thick layer where the flow model LPO matches observations from tomography lies just below the ˜1200 °C isotherm of a half-space cooling model, indicating strong temperature-dependence of the processes that control the development of azimuthal anisotropy. We infer that the depth extent of shear, and hence the thickness of a relatively strong oceanic lithosphere, can be mapped this way. These findings for the background model, and ocean-basin specific deviations from the half-space cooling pattern, are found in all of the three recent and independent tomographic models considered. Further exploration of deviations from the background model may be useful for general studies of oceanic plate formation and dynamics as well as regional-scale tectonic analyses.

  1. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patell, Hilla

    2016-01-01

    In order to achieve the goal of observation, preparation of the adult, the observer, is necessary. This preparation, says Hilla Patell, requires us to "have an appreciation of the significance of the child's spontaneous activities and a more thorough understanding of the child's needs." She discusses the growth of both the desire to…

  2. Modified temperature-anisotropy instability thresholds in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlickeiser, R; Michno, M J; Ibscher, D; Lazar, M; Skoda, T

    2011-11-11

    The proton and electron temperature anisotropies in the solar wind are constrained by the instability thresholds for temperature-anisotropy-driven kinetic plasma instabilities. The modifications to the marginal instability conditions from accounting for the influence of damping connected with the collisional effects in the solar wind plasma are calculated for right- and left-handed polarized parallel propagating Alfvén waves and mirror and firehose fluctuations. These modifications provide tighter threshold constraints compared to the marginal thresholds but do not fully explain the observations at small values of the parallel plasma beta.

  3. Search for Large Scale Anisotropies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    The Pierre Auger Observatory studies the nature and the origin of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (>3\\cdot1018 eV). Completed at the end of 2008, it has been continuously operating for more than six years. Using data collected from 1 January 2004 until 31 March 2009, we search for large scale anisotropies with two complementary analyses in different energy windows. No significant anisotropies are observed, resulting in bounds on the first harmonic amplitude at the 1% level at EeV energies.

  4. Evidence for an anisotropy of the speed of light

    CERN Document Server

    de Aragao, C M L; Grillo, A

    2005-01-01

    By comparing with the most recent experimental results, we point out the model dependence of the present bounds on the anisotropy of the speed of light. In fact, by replacing the CMB with a class of preferred frames that can better account for the experimental data, one obtains values of the RMS anisotropy parameter (1/2 -beta + delta) that are one order of magnitude larger than the presently quoted ones. The resulting non-zero anisotropy can be understood starting from the observation that the speed of light in the Earth's gravitational field is not the basic parameter c=1 entering Lorentz transformations. In this sense, light can propagate isotropically only in one `preferred' frame.

  5. Effects of spacetime anisotropy on the galaxy rotation curves

    CERN Document Server

    Chang, Zhe; Li, Xin; Lin, Hai-Nan; Wang, Sai

    2013-01-01

    The observations on galaxy rotation curves show significant discrepancies from the Newtonian theory. This issue could be explained by the effect of the anisotropy of the spacetime. Conversely, the spacetime anisotropy could also be constrained by the galaxy rotation curves. Finsler geometry is a kind of intrinsically anisotropic geometry. In this paper, we study the effect of the spacetime anisotropy at the galactic scales in the Finsler spacetime. It is found that the Finslerian model has close relations with the Milgrom's MOND. By performing the best-fit procedure to the galaxy rotation curves, we find that the anisotropic effects of the spacetime become significant when the Newtonian acceleration \\(GM/r^2\\) is smaller than the critical acceleration \\(a_0\\). Interestingly, the critical acceleration \\(a_0\\), although varies between different galaxies, is in the order of magnitude \\(cH_0/2\\pi\\sim 10^{-10} \\rm{m\\,\\, s^{-2}}\\).

  6. Fire Hose instability driven by alpha particle temperature anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Matteini, Lorenzo; Schwartz, Steven; Landi, Simone

    2015-01-01

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, the instability can be triggered also when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies both of them can drive the instability, and we observe generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in...

  7. The anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingus, Brenda

    2013-02-01

    The arrival directions of cosmic rays will be isotropized by the deflection of these charged particles in the Galactic magnetic fields. For example, a 10 TeV proton in a typical Galactic field of 2 micro Gauss has a gyroradius of only 0.005 parsec (=1000 AU) which is much smaller than the distance to any postulated sources. However, observations of TeV cosmic rays by Milagro, Tibet III, ARGO, and IceCube, show anisotropies on both large and small angular scales. These observations require the detection of large numbers of cosmic rays because the anisotropies are less than a few parts in 1000. The large angular scale anisotropies, such as a dipole, could point to diffusion from a nearby source, but the smaller scale anisotropies of extent ~10 degrees are much more difficult to explain. Possibilities that have been explored in the literature include magnetic funneling of cosmic rays from nearby sources and acceleration by magnetic reconnection in the heliosphere's magnetotail. No matter what the mechanism, these observations provide new information about cosmic ray production, nearby magnetic fields, and how the cosmic rays observed at Earth are affected by their propagation.

  8. Is inner core seismic anisotropy a marker of plastic flow of cubic iron?

    CERN Document Server

    Lincot, A; Cardin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether observations of seismic anisotropy are compatible with a cubic structure of the inner core Fe alloy. We assume that anisotropy is the result of plastic deformation within a large scale flow induced by preferred growth at the inner core equator. Based on elastic moduli from the literature, bcc- or fcc-Fe produce seismic anisotropy well below seismic observations ($\\textless{}0.4\\%$). A Monte-Carlo approach allows us to generalize this result to any form of elastic anisotropy in a cubic system. Within our model, inner core global anisotropy is not compatible with a cubic structure of Fe alloy. Hence, if the inner core material is indeed cubic, large scale coherent anisotropic structures, incompatible with plastic deformation induced by large scale flow, must be present.

  9. FIRE HOSE INSTABILITY DRIVEN BY ALPHA PARTICLE TEMPERATURE ANISOTROPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matteini, L.; Schwartz, S. J. [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Hellinger, P. [Astronomical Institute, CAS, Prague (Czech Republic); Landi, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, Università di Firenze, Firenze (Italy)

    2015-10-10

    We investigate properties of a solar wind-like plasma, including a secondary alpha particle population exhibiting a parallel temperature anisotropy with respect to the background magnetic field, using linear and quasi-linear predictions and by means of one-dimensional hybrid simulations. We show that anisotropic alpha particles can drive a parallel fire hose instability analogous to that generated by protons, but that, remarkably, can also be triggered when the parallel plasma beta of alpha particles is below unity. The wave activity generated by the alpha anisotropy affects the evolution of the more abundant protons, leading to their anisotropic heating. When both ion species have sufficient parallel anisotropies, both of them can drive the instability, and we observe the generation of two distinct peaks in the spectra of the fluctuations, with longer wavelengths associated to alphas and shorter ones to protons. If a non-zero relative drift is present, the unstable modes propagate preferentially in the direction of the drift associated with the unstable species. The generated waves scatter particles and reduce their temperature anisotropy to a marginally stable state, and, moreover, they significantly reduce the relative drift between the two ion populations. The coexistence of modes excited by both species leads to saturation of the plasma in distinct regions of the beta/anisotropy parameter space for protons and alpha particles, in good agreement with in situ solar wind observations. Our results confirm that fire hose instabilities are likely at work in the solar wind and limit the anisotropy of different ion species in the plasma.

  10. Aligned submicron grains in archeological potteries with high TRM anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, K.; Ooga, M.; Isobe, H.

    2010-12-01

    Potteries have been often used to obtain archeointensity data because of the extremely high success rates in Thellier experiments. Since high anisotropy of thermoremanent magnetization (TRM) are commonly observed for potteries, anisotropy correction is routinely applied to make archeointensity data reliable. Such a TRM anisotropy is characterized by the foliated structure parallel to the surface and has been interpreted to reflect aligned magnetic minerals during molding. However, the high thermal stability and the higher degrees of TRM anisotropies than those of low-field susceptibility suggest that pottery TRM resides in fine-grained magnetic minerals formed during firing. Molding is not sufficient to explain highly anisotropic TRM of potteries. We measured TRM susceptibility tensors on potteries manufactured from 14th to 17th centuries in Japan. These potteries were fired up to about 1200°C resulting in partial vitrification. The ratios of maximum and minimum eigenvalues of the TRM susceptibility tensors are well distributed and reaches 1.8 for most anisotropic samples. The Curie temperature ranges from 500°C to 550°C implying titanium-poor titanomagnetite as TRM carriers, and the narrow unblocking temperature indicates that the low-titanium titanomagnetites are in or close to the single-domain size range. Submicron titanomagnetite grains were commonly observed on the polished sections under a FE-SEM. Some of the grains occur as inclusions in iron-bearing silicates such as pyroxene or hornblende, and other grains reside in glass matrix. In addition, vesiculated clay minerals contain highly elongated titanomagnetite grains. Such clay minerals seem stretched parallel to the pottery surface and inside titanomagnetite grains are also elongated along the surface. Relative abundance of titanomagnetite inclusions in silicates or glass against in clay minerals should control the degree of TRM anisotropy. Foliated TRM anisotropies originate from both alignment of clay

  11. Seismic lamination and anisotropy of the Lower Continental Crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meissner, Rolf; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Kern, Hartmut

    2006-04-01

    Seismic lamination in the lower crust associated with marked anisotropy has been observed at various locations. Three of these locations were investigated by specially designed experiments in the near vertical and in the wide-angle range, that is the Urach and the Black Forrest area, both belonging to the Moldanubian, a collapsed Variscan terrane in southern Germany, and in the Donbas Basin, a rift inside the East European (Ukrainian) craton. In these three cases, a firm relationship between lower crust seismic lamination and anisotropy is found. There are more cases of lower-crustal lamination and anisotropy, e.g. from the Basin and Range province (western US) and from central Tibet, not revealed by seismic wide-angle measurements, but by teleseismic receiver function studies with a P-S conversion at the Moho. Other cases of lamination and anisotropy are from exhumed lower crustal rocks in Calabria (southern Italy), and Val Sesia and Val Strona (Ivrea area, Northern Italy). We demonstrate that rocks in the lower continental crust, apart from differing in composition, differ from the upper mantle both in terms of seismic lamination (observed in the near-vertical range) and in the type of anisotropy. Compared to upper mantle rocks exhibiting mainly orthorhombic symmetry, the symmetry of the rocks constituting the lower crust is either axial or orthorhombic and basically a result of preferred crystallographic orientation of major minerals (biotite, muscovite, hornblende). We argue that the generation of seismic lamination and anisotropy in the lower crust is a consequence of the same tectonic process, that is, ductile deformation in a warm and low-viscosity lower crust. This process takes place preferably in areas of extension. Heterogeneous rock units are formed that are generally felsic in composition, but that contain intercalations of mafic intrusions. The latter have acted as heat sources and provide the necessary seismic impedance contrasts. The observed

  12. Probing magnetochirality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupamanjari Ghosh

    2002-08-01

    Magnetochiral anisotropy refers to the phenomenon that when light is passed through a chiral medium placed in an external magnetic field, the refractive index, or equivalently, the absorption encountered by the light differs depending on whether it travels parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. It is a very small effect, the change in refractive index because of this effect alone being of the order of 10-11. This effect has recently been measured in an active ring laser interferometer in which the detection scheme convincingly eliminates the contributions from natural optical activity, the Faraday effect and other stray anisotropies in the system. The phenomenon is important in the context of fundamental interactions between light and matter and the governing symmetry principles, and also in biochemistry as one possible explanation for the homochirality of life.

  13. Probe Storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gemelli, Marcellino; Abelmann, Leon; Engelen, Johan B.C.; Khatib, Mohammed G.; Koelmans, Wabe W.; Zaboronski, Olog; Campardo, Giovanni; Tiziani, Federico; Laculo, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    This chapter gives an overview of probe-based data storage research over the last three decades, encompassing all aspects of a probe recording system. Following the division found in all mechanically addressed storage systems, the different subsystems (media, read/write heads, positioning, data chan

  14. Cultural probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob Østergaard

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation.......The aim of this study was thus to explore cultural probes (Gaver, Boucher et al. 2004), as a possible methodical approach, supporting knowledge production on situated and contextual aspects of occupation....

  15. Plasmon-induced optical anisotropy in hybrid graphene-metal nanoparticle systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Adam M; Francescato, Yan; Roschuk, Tyler; Shautsova, Viktoryia; Chen, Yiguo; Sidiropoulos, Themistoklis P H; Hong, Minghui; Giannini, Vincenzo; Maier, Stefan A; Cohen, Lesley F; Oulton, Rupert F

    2015-05-13

    Hybrid plasmonic metal-graphene systems are emerging as a class of optical metamaterials that facilitate strong light-matter interactions and are of potential importance for hot carrier graphene-based light harvesting and active plasmonic applications. Here we use femtosecond pump-probe measurements to study the near-field interaction between graphene and plasmonic gold nanodisk resonators. By selectively probing the plasmon-induced hot carrier dynamics in samples with tailored graphene-gold interfaces, we show that plasmon-induced hot carrier generation in the graphene is dominated by direct photoexcitation with minimal contribution from charge transfer from the gold. The strong near-field interaction manifests as an unexpected and long-lived extrinsic optical anisotropy. The observations are explained by the action of highly localized plasmon-induced hot carriers in the graphene on the subresonant polarizability of the disk resonator. Because localized hot carrier generation in graphene can be exploited to drive electrical currents, plasmonic metal-graphene nanostructures present opportunities for novel hot carrier device concepts.

  16. Heliospheric influence on the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ming; Zuo, Pingbing [Department of Physics and Space Sciences, Florida Institute of Technology, Melbourne, FL 32901 (United States); Pogorelov, Nikolai, E-mail: mzhang@fit.edu [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research and Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2014-07-20

    This paper provides a theory of using Liouville's theorem to map the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays seen at Earth using the particle distribution function in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The ultimate source of cosmic ray anisotropy is the energy, pitch angle, and spatial dependence of the cosmic ray distribution function in the LISM. Because young nearby cosmic ray sources can make a special contribution to the cosmic ray anisotropy, the anisotropy depends on the source age, distance and magnetic connection, and particle diffusion of these cosmic rays, all of which make the anisotropy sensitive to the particle energy. When mapped through the magnetic and electric field of a magnetohydrodynamic model heliosphere, the large-scale dipolar and bidirectional interstellar anisotropy patterns become distorted if they are seen from Earth, resulting in many small structures in the observations. Best fits to cosmic ray anisotropy measurements have allowed us to estimate the particle density gradient and pitch angle anisotropies in the LISM. It is found that the heliotail, hydrogen deflection plane, and the plane perpendicular to the LISM magnetic field play a special role in distorting cosmic ray anisotropy. These features can lead to an accurate determination of the LISM magnetic field direction and polarity. The effects of solar cycle variation, the Sun's coronal magnetic field, and turbulence in the LISM and heliospheric magnetic fields are minor but clearly visible at a level roughly equal to a fraction of the overall anisotropy amplitude. The heliospheric influence becomes stronger at lower energies. Below 1 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by small-scale patterns produced by disturbances in the heliosphere.

  17. Anisotropy effects in magnetic hyperthermia: A comparison between spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshid, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Nemati, Z.; Phan, M. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Alonso, J. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Barandiarán, J. M. [BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Depto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa 48940 (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    Spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, with different FeO:Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ratios, have been prepared by a thermal decomposition method to probe anisotropy effects on their heating efficiency. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanoparticles are composed of FeO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases, with an average size of ∼20 nm. Magnetometry and transverse susceptibility measurements show that the effective anisotropy field is 1.5 times larger for the cubes than for the spheres, while the saturation magnetization is 1.5 times larger for the spheres than for the cubes. Hyperthermia experiments evidence higher values of the specific absorption rate (SAR) for the cubes as compared to the spheres (200 vs. 135 W/g at 600 Oe and 310 kHz). These observations point to an important fact that the saturation magnetization is not a sole factor in determining the SAR and the heating efficiency of the magnetic nanoparticles can be improved by tuning their effective anisotropy.

  18. Multi-Color Anisotropy Measurements of the Cosmic Near-Infrared Extragalactic Background Light with CIBER2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, James

    We propose to carry out a program of observations with the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER-2), a sounding rocket instrument designed to measure anisotropy in the extragalactic background light in multiple optical to near-infrared spectral bands. Scientifically, CIBER-2 follows on the results of CIBER-1, which has detected near-infrared background anisotropy. CIBER-1 has also produced leading results on the absolute brightness of the background, the spectrum of diffuse galactic light, the spectrum of Zodiacal light, and constraints on the Zodiacal light foreground from Fraunhofer line observations. CIBER-2 builds on the measurement techniques developed and successfully demonstrated by CIBER-1. With high-sensitivity, multi-color anisotropy measurements, CIBER-2 will elucidate the history of interhalo light production and carry out a deep search for extragalactic background fluctuations associated with the epoch of reionization. A plausible interpretation of the infrared background anisotropy detected by CIBER-1, Spitzer and AKARI is interhalo light from stars tidally stripped from their parent galaxies during galaxy mergers. Based on the rms amplitude of the anisotropy, interhalo light produces approximately half of the background, representing a major branch of light production. Probing the history of interhalo light through improved anisotropy measurements using multiple bands and correlating with tracers of large-scale structure is essential to understand its role in the cosmic history of star formation. The first generation of stars and their remnants are likely responsible for the reionization of the intergalactic medium, observed to be ionized out to distant quasars at a redshift of 6. The total luminosity produced by first stars is uncertain, but a lower limit can be placed assuming a minimal number of photons to produce and sustain reionization. This 'minimal' extragalactic background component associated with reionization is detectable in

  19. On Temporal Variations of the Multi-TeV Cosmic Ray Anisotropy using the Tibet III Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the large-scale two-dimensional sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays by Tibet Air Shower Array, with the data taken from 1999 November to 2008 December. To explore temporal variations of the anisotropy, the data set is divided into nine intervals, each in a time span of about one year. The sidereal anisotropy of magnitude about 0.1% appears fairly stable from year to year over the entire observation period of nine years. This indicates that the anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays remains insensitive to solar activities since the observation period covers more than a half of the 23rd solar cycle.

  20. Annealing effect on magnetic anisotropy in ultrathin (Ga,Mn)As

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Yan-Yong; Wang Hua-Feng; Cao Yu-Fei; Wang Kai-You

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the effect of low temperature annealing on magnetic anisotropy in 7-nm ultrathin Ga0.94Mn0.06As devices by measuring the angle-dependent planar Hall resistance (PHR).Obvious hysteresis loops were observed during the magnetization reversal through the clockwise and counterclockwise rotations under low magnetic fields (below 1000 Gs,1 Gs =10-4 T),which can be explained by competition between Zeeman energy and magnetic anisotropic energy.It is found that the uniaxial anisotropy is dominant in the whole measured ferromagnetic range for both the as-grown ultrathin Ga0.94Mn0.06As and the annealed one.The cubic anisotropy changes more than the uniaxial anisotropy in the measured temperature ranges after annealing.This gives a useful way to tune the magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin (Ga,Mn)As devices.

  1. Exotic skyrmion crystals in chiral magnets with compass anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. P.; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-07-01

    The compass-type anisotropy appears naturally in diverse physical contexts with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) such as transition metal oxides and cold atomic gases etc, and it has been receiving substantial attention. Motivated by recent studies and particularly recent experimental observations on helimagnet MnGe, we investigate the critical roles of this compass-type anisotropy in modulating various spin textures of chiral magnets with strong SOC, by Monte Carlo simulations based on a classical Heisenberg spin model with Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and compass anisotropy. A phase diagram with emergent spin orders in the space of compass anisotropy and out-of-plane magnetic field is presented. In this phase diagram, we propose that a hybrid super-crystal structure consisting of alternating half-skyrmion and half-anti-skyrmion is the possible zero-field ground state of MnGe. The simulated evolution of the spin structure driven by magnetic field is in good accordance with experimental observations on MnGe. Therefore, this Heisenberg spin model successfully captures the main physics responsible for the magnetic structures in MnGe, and the present work may also be instructive to research on the magnetic states in other systems with strong SOC.

  2. Giant and Tunable Anisotropy of Nanoscale Friction in Graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Clara M.; Prioli, Rodrigo; Fragneaud, Benjamin; Cançado, Luiz Gustavo; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; de Cicco, Marcelo; Menezes, Marcos G.; Achete, Carlos A.; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2016-08-01

    The nanoscale friction between an atomic force microscopy tip and graphene is investigated using friction force microscopy (FFM). During the tip movement, friction forces are observed to increase and then saturate in a highly anisotropic manner. As a result, the friction forces in graphene are highly dependent on the scanning direction: under some conditions, the energy dissipated along the armchair direction can be 80% higher than along the zigzag direction. In comparison, for highly-oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG), the friction anisotropy between armchair and zigzag directions is only 15%. This giant friction anisotropy in graphene results from anisotropies in the amplitudes of flexural deformations of the graphene sheet driven by the tip movement, not present in HOPG. The effect can be seen as a novel manifestation of the classical phenomenon of Euler buckling at the nanoscale, which provides the non-linear ingredients that amplify friction anisotropy. Simulations based on a novel version of the 2D Tomlinson model (modified to include the effects of flexural deformations), as well as fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations and first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) calculations, are able to reproduce and explain the experimental observations.

  3. Quantitative assessment of diffusional kurtosis anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, G Russell; Helpern, Joseph A; Tabesh, Ali; Jensen, Jens H

    2015-04-01

    Diffusional kurtosis imaging (DKI) measures the diffusion and kurtosis tensors to quantify restricted, non-Gaussian diffusion that occurs in biological tissue. By estimating the kurtosis tensor, DKI accounts for higher order diffusion dynamics, when compared with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and consequently can describe more complex diffusion profiles. Here, we compare several measures of diffusional anisotropy which incorporate information from the kurtosis tensor, including kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA) and generalized fractional anisotropy (GFA), with the diffusion tensor-derived fractional anisotropy (FA). KFA and GFA demonstrate a net enhancement relative to FA when multiple white matter fiber bundle orientations are present in both simulated and human data. In addition, KFA shows net enhancement in deep brain structures, such as the thalamus and the lenticular nucleus, where FA indicates low anisotropy. Thus, KFA and GFA provide additional information relative to FA with regard to diffusional anisotropy, and may be particularly advantageous for the assessment of diffusion in complex tissue environments.

  4. Seismic anisotropy above and below the subducting Nazca lithosphere in southern South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, Julia G.; Fischer, Karen M.; Anderson, Megan L.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this study is to better constrain anisotropy and mantle flow above and below the Nazca slab from 28°S to 42°S through modeling of shear wave splitting in local S, SKS and SKKS (SK(K)S) phases. Comparisons of local S splitting times and path lengths in the slab, mantle wedge, and upper plate indicate that splitting times for arc and back-arc stations are consistent with anisotropy in the mantle wedge, but long slab paths to fore-arc stations imply that slab anisotropy is also significant. SK(K)S shear wave splitting observations and models for sub-slab anisotropy show that significant anisotropy is present below the slab, and that the orientation of sub-slab anisotropy sometimes differs from anisotropy above the slab. Anisotropy both above the slab and below the slab in the South American subduction zone is consistent with mantle flow that is driven by a combination of entrainment with downgoing slab motion and flow complexity related to variations in slab shape and slab rollback.

  5. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-Gao; QIAN Xia; LIU Wei; LIU Chuan-lin; ZHAN Wen-Shan

    2000-01-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  6. Magnetic Anisotropy in the Radula of Chiton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jian-Gao; Qian, Xia; Liu, Wei; Liu, Chuan-Lin; Zhan, Wen-Shan

    2000-07-01

    Radular teeth of chitons were studied by using magnetic torque-meter and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The magnetic torque curves give clear evidence of presence of strong uni-axial magnetic anisotropy. The easy axis is along the length direction of tongue-like radula. The TEM pattern shows that long chip-like magnetite nano-scaled particles packed in the radular teeth with both uni-axial shape anisotropy and magneto-crystalline anisotropy.

  7. Anisotropy of light propagation in human skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Stephan; Hermann, Marcus; Essenpreis, Matthias; Farrell, Thomas J.; Krämer, Uwe; Patterson, Michael S.

    2000-10-01

    Using spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectometry, a directional dependence was found in the propagation of visible and near infrared light through human skin in vivo. The skin's reduced scattering coefficient µ's varies by up to a factor of two between different directions of propagation at the same position. This anisotropy is believed to be caused by the preferential orientation of collagen fibres in the dermis, as described by Langer's skin tension lines. Monte Carlo simulations that examine the effect of partial collagen fibre orientation support this hypothesis. The observation has consequences for non-invasive diagnostic methods relying on skin optical properties, and it could be used non-invasively to determine the direction of lines of cleavage in order to minimize scars due to surgical incisions.

  8. CMB Anisotropies from a Gradient Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    A pure gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect at linear level. We confirm this by showing that its contribution to the dipolar power asymmetry of CMB anisotropies vanishes, if Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To this end, the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit is extended to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. At second order, a gradient mode generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce a quadrupole moment. For instance in a matter-dominated model it is equal to 5/18 times the square of the linear gradient part. This quadrupole can be cancelled by superposing a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a non-linear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  9. Statistical Anisotropy from Anisotropic Inflation

    CERN Document Server

    Soda, Jiro

    2012-01-01

    We review an inflationary scenario with the anisotropic expansion rate. An anisotropic inflationary universe can be realized by a vector field coupled with an inflaton, which can be regarded as a counter example to the cosmic no-hair conjecture. We show generality of anisotropic inflation and derive a universal property. We formulate cosmological perturbation theory in anisotropic inflation. Using the formalism, we show anisotropic inflation gives rise to the statistical anisotropy in primordial fluctuations. We also explain a method to test anisotropic inflation using the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB).

  10. Surface magnetic anisotropy in amorphous alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, M.; Rubio, H.; Elbaile, L.; Iglesias, R. (Univ. de Oviedo (Spain). Dept. de Fisica)

    1993-11-01

    The total in-plane magnetic anisotropy and the in-plane surface magnetic anisotropy constants have been measured in nearly-zero magnetostrictive amorphous ribbons in as-quenched state. The magnetostatic energy of a two-dimensional square-lattice of parallelepipeds or ellipsoids, whose dimensions are determined by the parameters characterizing the roughness, is evaluated. From the results obtained, they can conclude that the in-plane surface anisotropy can be magnetostatic in origin but it has little influence on the total in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the ribbon.

  11. Observations performed by the SESAME/Permittivity Probe during the descent and after the landing of Philae upon the nucleus of Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Walter; Le Gall, Alice; Hamelin, Michel; Caujolle-Bert, Sylvain; Lethuillier, Anthony; Ciarletti, Valerie; Grard, Réjean

    2015-04-01

    The Permittivity Probe (PP), a component of the SESAME instrument on board Rosetta's Lander Philae, was operated prior to the separation of Philae from Rosetta, during the descent and at the location of the final landing site. The working principle of PP consists in measuring, with a receiving dipole, the voltage induced in the medium by a current of known phase and amplitude injected by a transmitting antenna. The primary objective of PP is to analyse the electrical properties of the comet surface material down to a depth of about 2 m, and to record their variations with temperature, solar illumination and heliocentric distance. These observations are particularly sensitive to the concentration of water ice at the landing site. The second objective of the instrument is to monitor the spectrum of the electromagnetic and electrostatic waves generated by the interaction between the comet and the solar wind at frequencies of up to 20 kHz. The measurements performed during the descent were mainly devoted to the calibration of the instrument in its nominal configuration, with deployed landing gear and away from the Rosetta spacecraft influence, in an environment of known permittivity, either a vacuum or a plasma whose density and temperature would have been derived from the LAP and MIP data. This approach is unfortunately invalidated owing to the fact the PP receiver was most of the time saturated by the operation of the CONSERT radar during the descent, an interference which seemed to have been minimized during in-flight interference tests, but which was significantly stronger after separation of Philae from Rosetta. Nevertheless, it was possible to recover some information about the instrument's transmitter and receiver performances then used during the analysis of the data measured on the cometary surface. Undisturbed measurements were fortunately performed at the landing site, under various solar illuminations, using the three feet of Philae as transmitting and

  12. Velocity Anisotropy in Self-gravitating Molecular Clouds. I. Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Frank; Ji, Weiguang; Li, Hua-bai

    2017-02-01

    The complex interplay between turbulence, magnetic fields, and self-gravity leads to the formation of molecular clouds out of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). One avenue of studying this interplay is by analyzing statistical features derived from observations, where the interpretation of these features is greatly facilitated by comparisons with numerical simulations. Here we focus on the statistical anisotropy present in synthetic maps of velocity centroid data, which we derive from three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of a turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating patch of ISM. We study how the orientation and magnitude of the velocity anisotropy correlate with the magnetic field and with the structures generated by gravitational collapse. Motivated by recent observational constraints, our simulations focus on the supersonic (sonic Mach number { M }≈ 2{--}17) but sub- to trans-alfvénic (alfvénic Mach number {{ M }}{{A}}≈ 0.2{--}1.2) turbulence regime, and we consider clouds that are barely to mildly magnetically supercritical (mass-to-flux ratio equal to once or twice the critical value). Additionally we explore the impact of the turbulence driving mechanism (solenoidal or compressive) on the velocity anisotropy. While we confirm previous findings that the velocity anisotropy generally aligns well with the plane-of-sky magnetic field, our inclusion of the effects of self-gravity reveals that in regions of higher column density, the velocity anisotropy may be destroyed or even reoriented to align with the gravitationally formed structures. We provide evidence that this effect is not necessarily due to the increase of {{ M }}{{A}} inside the high-density regions.

  13. Effects of anisotropy on interacting ghost dark energy in Brans-Dicke theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossienkhani, H.; Fayaz, V.; Azimi, N.

    2017-03-01

    In this work we concentrate on the ghost dark energy model within the framework of the Brans-Dicke theory in an anisotropic Universe. Within this framework we discuss the behavior of equation of state, deceleration and dark energy density parameters of the model. We consider the squared sound speed and quest for signs of stability of the model. We also probe observational constraints by using the latest observational data on the ghost dark energy models as the unification of dark matter and dark energy. In order to do so, we focus on observational determinations of the Hubble expansion rate (namely, the expansion history) H(z). Then we evaluate the evolution of the growth of perturbations in the linear regime for both ghost DE and Brans-Dicke theory and compare the results with standard FRW and ΛCDM models. We display the effects of the anisotropy on the evolutionary behavior the ghost DE models where the growth rate is higher in this models. Eventually the growth factor for the ΛCDM Universe will always fall behind the ghost DE models in an anisotropic Universe.

  14. Loss of long-range magnetic order in a nanoparticle assembly due to random anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binns, C [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Howes, P B [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Baker, S H [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Marchetto, H [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Potenza, A [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Steadman, P [Diamond Light Source Ltd, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Diamond House, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Dhesi, S S [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Roy, M [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Everard, M J [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Rushforth, A [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2RD (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-06

    We have used soft x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (XPEEM) combined with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and DC SQUID (superconducting quantum interference device) magnetometry to probe the magnetic ground state in Fe thin films produced by depositing size-selected gas-phase Fe nanoparticles with a diameter of 1.7 nm ({approx}200 atoms) onto Si substrates. The depositions were carried out in ultrahigh vacuum conditions and thicknesses of the deposited film in the range 5-50 nm were studied. The magnetometry data are consistent with the film forming a correlated super-spin glass with a magnetic correlation length {approx}5 nm. The XPEEM magnetic maps from the cluster-assembled films were compared to those for a conventional thin Fe film with a thickness of 20 nm produced by a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) source. Whereas a normal magnetic domain structure is observed in the conventional MBE thin film, no domain structure could be observed in any of the nanoparticle films down to the resolution limit of the XMCD based XPEEM (100 nm) confirming the ground state indicated by the magnetometry measurements. This observation is consistent with the theoretical prediction that an arbitrarily weak random anisotropy field will destroy long-range magnetic order.

  15. Anisotropy signature in reverse-time migration extended images

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul C.

    2014-11-04

    Reverse-time migration can accurately image complex geologic structures in anisotropic media. Extended images at selected locations in the Earth, i.e., at common-image-point gathers, carry rich information to characterize the angle-dependent illumination and to provide measurements for migration velocity analysis. However, characterizing the anisotropy influence on such extended images is a challenge. Extended common-image-point gathers are cheap to evaluate since they sample the image at sparse locations indicated by the presence of strong reflectors. Such gathers are also sensitive to velocity error that manifests itself through moveout as a function of space and time lags. Furthermore, inaccurate anisotropy leaves a distinctive signature in common-image-point gathers, which can be used to evaluate anisotropy through techniques similar to the ones used in conventional wavefield tomography. It specifically admits a V-shaped residual moveout with the slope of the "V" flanks depending on the anisotropic parameter η regardless of the complexity of the velocity model. It reflects the fourth-order nature of the anisotropy influence on moveout as it manifests itself in this distinct signature in extended images after handling the velocity properly in the imaging process. Synthetic and real data observations support this assertion.

  16. Contribution of Long Wavelength Gravitational Waves to the CMB Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    White, M

    1992-01-01

    We present an in depth discussion of the production of gravitational waves from an inflationary phase that could have occurred in the early universe, giving derivations for the resulting spectrum and energy density. We also consider the large-scale anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation coming from these waves. Assuming that the observed quadrupole anisotropy comes mostly from gravitational waves (consistent with the predictions of a flat spectrum of scalar density perturbations and the measured dipole anisotropy) we describe in detail how to derive a value for the scale of inflation of $(1.5-5)\\times 10^{16}$GeV, which is at a particularly interesting scale for particle physics. This upper limit corresponds to a 95\\% confidence level upper limit on the scale of inflation assuming only that the quadrupole anisotropy from gravitational waves is not cancelled by another source. Direct detection of gravitational waves produced by inflation near this scale will have to wait for the next generatio...

  17. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in the Heusler alloy Co2TiSi/GaAs(001 hybrid structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Dau

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of the thickness dependence of the magnetic anisotropy in B2-type Co2TiSi films on GaAs(001, shows a pronounced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy at 10 K for thicknesses up to 13.5 nm. We have evidenced that the interfacial anisotropy induced by interface clusters has a strong influence on the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of this hybrid structure, especially at temperatures lower than the blocking temperature of the clusters (28 K. However, as this influence can be ruled out at higher temperatures, the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy which is found to persist up to room-temperature can be ascribed to the magnetic properties of the Co2TiSi films. For thicknesses larger than 15.0 nm, we observe an alignment of the magnetic easy axis parallel to the sample surface, which is most likely due to the shape anisotropy and the film structure.

  18. Crustal radial anisotropy in Northeast China and its implications for the regional tectonic extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhen; Yang, Yingjie; Chen, Y. John

    2016-10-01

    We obtain high-resolution Rayleigh and Love wave phase velocity maps from ambient noise tomography using data recorded by NECESSArray in Northeast China. The resulting radial anisotropic model from the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love wave dispersion curves reveals strong relationship between the crustal radial anisotropy and tectonic provinces, that is, strong positive anisotropy (Vsh > Vsv) beneath the Songliao Basin and weak radial anisotropy beneath the Xinmeng Belt and Changbaishan Region. The Songliao Basin experienced widespread crustal extension during the late Mesozoic. We interpret the lower crustal anisotropy beneath the Songliao Basin as a result of ductile deformation during the rifting stage, which may lead to the alignment of anisotropic minerals and the observed strong radial anisotropy at present. In the northern Songliao Basin, where thick syn-rift and post-rift sediments (≥4 km) are believed to be present, we observe a broader lateral distribution of anisotropy with stronger amplitude compared with the southern basin. We suggest that the broader distribution of crustal radial anisotropy in the northern basin could be the consequence of outward lower crustal flow driven by the sedimentary loading during the post-rift stage, which is also proposed by previous numerical modeling.

  19. Measurements of the anisotropy in permalloy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijkel, Kees J.

    1988-01-01

    A measurement system is described, which accurately determines the anisotropy field H/sub k/ and the orientation of the easy-axis in a permalloy film or in any material showing magnetization induced resistance anisotropy. An accuracy of 0.1% in H/sub k/ and 0.1 degrees in easy-axis orientation is re

  20. Optical and diamagnetic anisotropy of graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, A. L.; Vora, P. M.; Lou, Z.; Johnson, A. T.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2009-03-01

    We have recently shown that graphene oxide (GO) emits a broad photoluminescence (PL) band in both solid and aqueous preparations. The origin of this PL is not yet well understood, but for absorptive and emissive optical processes originating in the two dimensional GO plane, one expects an in-plane polarization. Studies of optical anisotropy can therefore help to clarify the origin of the PL. Here we use a method of optical nanomagnetometry (Torrens, et al, JACS 129, p. 252 (2007)) to extract these quantities, also determining the magnetic anisotropy. We find that when aqueous preparations of GO are placed in a magnetic field, diamagnetically induced alignment leads to marked linear polarization anisotropy of absorbance and photoluminescence. By taking six optical measurements at each magnetic field, we are able to extract the intrinsic polarization anisotropies of optical absorption and emission of GO flakes and to quantify the orbital diamagnetic anisotropy. We discuss how these quantities give insight into electronic delocalization in these systems.

  1. Fluorescence anisotropy of acridinedione dyes in glycerol: Prolate model of ellipsoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Indirapriyadharshini; P Ramamurthy

    2007-03-01

    Time-dependent reorientations of resorcinol-based acridinidione (ADR) dyes in glycerol were studied using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies. The difference between fluorescence anisotropy decays recorded at 460 nm when exciting at 250 nm and those obtained when exciting at 394 nm are reported. When exciting at 394 nm, the fluorescence anisotropy decay is bi-exponential, while on exciting at 250 nm a mono-exponential fluorescence anisotropy decay is observed. We interpret this in terms of different directions of the absorption dipole at 394 and 250 nm with the emission dipole respectively, which is experimentally validated and further analysed as a prolate model of ellipsoid.

  2. Strong crustal seismic anisotropy in the Kalahari Craton based on Receiver Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    anisotropy in the crust of the Kalahari craton, which is 30-40% of the total anisotropy as measured by SKS splitting. Our analysis is based on calculation of receiver functions for the data from the SASE experiment which shows strong splitting between the SV and SH components. The direction of the fast axes...... is uniform within tectonic units and parallel to orogenic strike in the Limpopo and Cape fold belts. It is further parallel to the strike of major dyke swarms which indicates that a large part of the observed anisotropy is controlled by lithosphere fabrics and macroscopic effects. The directions of the fast...

  3. Inner Core Anisotropy Due to the Magnetic Field--induced Preferred Orientation of Iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karato, S

    1993-12-10

    Anisotropy of the inner core of the Earth is proposed to result from the lattice preferred orientation of anisotropic iron crystals during their solidification in the presence of a magnetic field. The resultant seismic anisotropy is related to the geometry of the magnetic field in the core. This hypothesis implies that the observed anisotropy (fast velocity along the rotation axis) indicates a strong toroidal field in the core, which supports a strong field model for the geodynamo if the inner core is made of hexagonal close-packed iron.

  4. Anisotropy dependent magnetization relaxation in (Cd,Mn)Te quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goryca, M.; Nawrocki, M. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Kossacki, P.; Pacuski, W.; Maslana, W. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, Hoza 69, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Joined Group Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, CNRS/CEA/ Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 87, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres cedex (France); Ferrand, D.; Tatarenko, S. [Joined Group Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs, CNRS/CEA/ Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble, BP 87, 38402 Saint Martin d' Heres cedex (France); Cibert, J. [Laboratoire Louis Neel, CNRS, BP166, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France)

    2006-07-01

    An optical study of magnetization relaxation is presented for p-doped quantum wells with magnetic ions. The magnetic anisotropy of the system is controlled by the heavy-light hole splitting, tuned by uniaxial strain. We show that a suppression of the magnetic anisotropy results in an enhancement of the observed relaxation rate by a factor of at least 20. This is explained by the fact that the decrease of the anisotropy results in the lowering of the energy barrier for the domain magnetization flip process. (copyright 2006 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Conductivity Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The Thermal and Electrical Conductivity Probe (TECP) for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander took measurements in Martian soil and in the air. The needles on the end of the instrument were inserted into the Martian soil, allowing TECP to measure the propagation of both thermal and electrical energy. TECP also measured the humidity in the surrounding air. The needles on the probe are 15 millimeters (0.6 inch) long. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  6. The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behar, A.; Carsey, F.; Lane, A.; Engelhardt, H.

    2000-01-01

    The Antartic Ice Borehole Probe mission is a glaciological investigation, scheduled for November 2000-2001, that will place a probe in a hot-water drilled hole in the West Antartic ice sheet. The objectives of the probe are to observe ice-bed interactions with a downward looking camera, and ice inclusions and structure, including hypothesized ice accretion, with a side-looking camera.

  7. Seepage Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Ore dumps are heterogeneous bodies with anisotropic seepage characteristics because of the ore segregation.In an indoor experiment, a dump was constructed with three strata, where the horizontal and vertical seepage experiments were carried out.Horizontals flow are regarded as phreatic plan flows without penetration.Its seepage law satifies the Dupuit equation.With parallel lay seepage model, the equivalent seepage coefficient in the horizontal flow was obtained and was equivalent to the weighted mean of the seepage coefficient of each stratum.An unsaturated flow appeared in the vertical experiment, with a hydraulic gradient of 1.The vertical flow was equivalent to the seepage model that moved in vertical bedding; its equivalent seepage coefficient depended on the stratum with the minimum seepage coefficient.That the experiment showed clear anisotropy in a heterogeneous body was obvious with an anisotropic coefficient between 63 and 155, which is 25 to 100 times larger than that of a homogeneous body.

  8. Remarks to solve disagreement between Gravity anisotropy and constraints on the variation of Gravitational constant (big G) based on gravimetric data Reply to "Nano-constraints on the spatial anisotropy of the Gravitational Constant"

    CERN Document Server

    Gershteyn, M L; Gershteyn, A; Karagioz, O V

    2002-01-01

    Remarks to solve disagreement between Gravity anisotropy observed at decimeter distances and constraints on the spatial variation of Gravitational constant (big G) based on gravimetric data and Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) experiments. Disagreement disappears when we assume that Gravitational anisotropy may depend on the magnitudes of the interacting masses and the distance between them.

  9. Fluorescence anisotropy of diphenylhexatriene and its cationic Trimethylamino derivative in liquid dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes: opposing responses to isoflurane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Steven C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism of action of volatile general anesthetics has not yet been resolved. In order to identify the effects of isoflurane on the membrane, we measured the steady-state anisotropy of two fluorescent probes that reside at different depths. Incorporation of anesthetic was confirmed by shifting of the main phase transition temperature. Results In liquid crystalline dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine liposomes, isoflurane (7-25 mM in the bath increases trimethylammonium-diphenylhexatriene fluorescence anisotropy by ~0.02 units and decreases diphenylhexatriene anisotropy by the same amount. Conclusions The anisotropy data suggest that isoflurane decreases non-axial dye mobility in the headgroup region, while increasing it in the tail region. We propose that these results reflect changes in the lateral pressure profile of the membrane.

  10. CMB anisotropies from a gradient mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-03-01

    A linear gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect on short distance physics. We confirm this by showing that if there was such a gradient mode extending across the whole observable Universe, it would not cause any hemispherical asymmetry in the power of CMB anisotropies, as long as Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To study the effect of the long wavelength mode on short wavelength modes, we generalize the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. Next, we consider effects that are of second order in the long mode. A gradient mode Φ = qṡx generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce an observable quadrupole moment. For instance, in a matter-dominated model it is equal to Q = 5(qṡx)2/18. This quadrupole can be canceled by superposition of a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a nonlinear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  11. Pollution Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chant, Donald A.

    This book is written as a statement of concern about pollution by members of Pollution Probe, a citizens' anti-pollution group in Canada. Its purpose is to create public awareness and pressure for the eventual solution to pollution problems. The need for effective government policies to control the population explosion, conserve natural resources,…

  12. Measuring the Alfvenic Nature of the Interstellar Medium: Velocity Anisotropy Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Leao, I C; de Medeiros, J R; Esquivel, A

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) are strongly affected by turbulence, which shows increased anisotropy in the presence of a magnetic field. We expand upon the Esquivel & Lazarian method to estimate the Alfven Mach number using the structure function anisotropy in velocity centroid data from position-position-velocity maps. We utilize 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of fully developed turbulence, with a large range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers, to produce synthetic observations of velocity centroids with observational characteristics such as thermal broadening, cloud boundaries, noise, and radiative transfer effects of carbon monoxide. In addition, we investigate how the resulting anisotropy-Alfven Mach number dependency found in Esquivel & Lazarian (2011) might change when taking the second moment of the position-position-velocity cube or when using different expressions to calculate the velocity centroids. We find that the degree of anisotropy is related primarily to the m...

  13. A search for small-scale anisotropy of PeV cosmic rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zotov, M. Yu.; Kulikov, G. V.

    2012-11-01

    Recent results of Milagro, Tibet, ARGO-YBJ, and IceCube experiments on the small-scale anisotropy of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) with energies from units up to a few hundred TeV arise a question on a possible nature of the observed phenomenon, as well as on the anisotropy of CRs at higher energies. An analysis of a small-scale anisotropy of CRs with energies at around PeV registered with the EAS MSU array presented in the article, reveals a number of regions with an excessive flux. A typical size of the regions varies from 3° up to 12°. We study correlation of these regions with positions of potential astrophysical sources of CRs and discuss a possible origin of the observed anisotropy.

  14. A Search for Small-Scale Anisotropy of PeV Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Zotov, M Yu

    2012-01-01

    Recent results of Milagro, Tibet, ARGO-YBJ and IceCube experiments on the small-scale anisotropy of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) with energies from units up to a few hundred TeV arise a question on a possible nature of the observed phenomenon, as well as on the anisotropy of CRs at higher energies. An analysis of a small-scale anisotropy of CRs with energies at around PeV registered with the EAS MSU array presented in the article, reveals a number of regions with an excessive flux. A typical size of the regions varies from 3 up to 12 degrees. We study correlation of these regions with positions of potential astrophysical sources of CRs and discuss a possible origin of the observed anisotropy.

  15. Giant enhancement of magnetocrystalline anisotropy in ultrathin manganite films via nanoscale 1D periodic depth modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapitamahuni, Anil; Zhang, Le; Singh, Vijay; Burton, John; Koten, Mak; Shield, Jeffrey; Tsymbal, Evgeny; Hong, Xia

    We report a unusual giant enhancement of in-plane magnetocrystalline anisotropy (MCA) in ultrathin colossal magnetoresistive oxide films due to 1D nanoscale periodic depth modulation. High quality epitaxial thin films of La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) of thickness 6 nm were grown on (001) SrTiO3 substrates via off-axis radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The top 2 nm of LSMO films are patterned into periodic nano-stripes using e-beam lithography and reactive ion etching. The resulting structure consists of nano-stripes of 2 nm height and 100-200 nm width on top of a 4 nm thick continuous base layer. We employed planar Hall effect measurements to study the in-plane magnetic anisotropy of the unpatterned and nanopatterned films. The unpatterned films show a biaxial anisotropy with easy axis along [110]. The extracted anisotropy energy density is ~1.1 x 105 erg/cm3, comparable to previously reported values. In the nanopatterned films, a strong uniaxial anisotropy is developed along one of the biaxial easy axes. The corresponding anisotropy energy density is ~5.6 x 106 erg/cm3 within the nano-striped volume, comparable to that of Co. We attribute the observed uniaxial MCA to MnO6 octahedral rotations/tilts and the enhancement in the anisotropy energy density to the strain gradient within the nano-stripes.

  16. Anisotropy of seasonal snow measured by polarimetric phase differences in radar time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinss, Silvan; Löwe, Henning; Proksch, Martin; Lemmetyinen, Juha; Wiesmann, Andreas; Hajnsek, Irena

    2016-08-01

    The snow microstructure, i.e., the spatial distribution of ice and pores, generally shows an anisotropy which is driven by gravity and temperature gradients and commonly determined from stereology or computer tomography. This structural anisotropy induces anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and dielectric properties. We present a method based on radio-wave birefringence to determine the depth-averaged, dielectric anisotropy of seasonal snow with radar instruments from space, air, or ground. For known snow depth and density, the birefringence allows determination of the dielectric anisotropy by measuring the copolar phase difference (CPD) between linearly polarized microwaves propagating obliquely through the snowpack. The dielectric and structural anisotropy are linked by Maxwell-Garnett-type mixing formulas. The anisotropy evolution of a natural snowpack in Northern Finland was observed over four winters (2009-2013) with the ground-based radar instrument "SnowScat". The radar measurements indicate horizontal structures for fresh snow and vertical structures in old snow which is confirmed by computer tomographic in situ measurements. The temporal evolution of the CPD agreed in ground-based data compared to space-borne measurements from the satellite TerraSAR-X. The presented dataset provides a valuable basis for the development of new snow metamorphism models which include the anisotropy of the snow microstructure.

  17. Modification of magnetic anisotropy in metallic glasses using high-energy ion beam irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Amrute; U R Mhatre; S K Sinha; D C Kothari; R Nagarajan; D Kanjilal

    2002-05-01

    Heavy ion irradiation in the electronic stopping power region induces macroscopic dimensional change in metallic glasses and introduces magnetic anisotropy in some magnetic materials. The present work is on the irradiation study of ferromagnetic metallic glasses, where both dimensional change and modification of magnetic anisotropy are expected. Magnetic anisotropy was measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy of virgin and irradiated Fe40Ni40B20 and Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 metallic glass ribbons. 90 MeV 127I beam was used for the irradiations. Irradiation doses were 5 × 1013 and 7.5 × 1013 ions/cm2. The relative intensity ratios 23 of the second and third lines of the Mössbauer spectra were measured to determine the magnetic anisotropy. The virgin samples of both the materials display in-plane magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the spins are oriented parallel to the ribbon plane. Irradiation is found to cause reduction in magnetic anisotropy. Near-complete randomization of magnetic moments is observed at high irradiation doses. Correlation is found between the residual stresses introduced by ion irradiation and the change in magnetic anisotropy.

  18. Effect of induced shape anisotropy on magnetic properties of ferromagnetic cobalt nanocubes

    OpenAIRE

    Srikala, D.; Singh, V. N.; Banerjee, A.; Mehta, B. R.

    2010-01-01

    We report on the synthesis of ferromagnetic cobalt nanocubes of various sizes using thermal pyrolysis method and the effect of shape anisotropy on the static and dynamic magnetic properties were studied. Shape anisotropy of approximately 10 % was introduced in nanocubes by making nanodiscs using a linear chain amine surfactant during synthesis process. It has been observed that, ferromagnetism persisted above room temperature and a sharp drop in magnetic moment at low temperatures in zero-fie...

  19. Anisotropy of rare-earth magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Skomski; D.J.Sellmyer

    2009-01-01

    Rare-earth intermetallics such as Nd2FeI4B and Sm-Co are widely used as high-performance permanent magnets,because they combine high magnetocrystalline anisotropy with reasonable magnetization and Curie temperature.The anisotropy is a combined effect of spin-orbit coupling and electrostatic crystal-field interactions.The main contribution comes from the rare-earth 4f electrons,which are well-screened from the crystalline environment but exhibit a strong spin-orbit coupling.In this limit,the magnetocrystalline anisotropy has a very transparent physical interpretation,the anisotropy energy essentially being equal to the energy of Hund's-rules 4f ion in the crystal field.The corresponding expression for the lowest-order uniaxial anisotropy constant K1 is used to discuss rare-earth substitutions,which have recently attracted renewed interest due to shifts in the rare-earth production and demand.Specific phenomena reviewed in this article are the enhancement of the anisotropy of Sm2Fe17 due to interstitial nitrogen,the use of Sm-Co magnets for high-temperature applications,and the comparison of rare-earth single-ion anisotropy with other single-ion and two-ion mechanisms.

  20. Therapeutic Observation on "Green Tortoise Probing Cave" Operation plus Stuck Needle Method in Treating Transverse Process Syndrome of the Third Lumbar Vertebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁业安; 王玲玲

    2009-01-01

    @@ Transverse process syndrome of the third lumbar vertebra is a common cause of lumbago and sciatica.It is manifested by localized soreness,distention and pain on unilateral or bilateral aspect of the third lumbar transverse process.There is also fixed tenderness point at the tip of the transverse process.This condition frequently occurs in young adults who are engaged in physical work.In recent years,the author used green tortoise probing cave method and stuck needle method for treating 72 cases of transverse process syndrome of the third lumbar vertebra,it is now report as follows.

  1. Observation of Lower Hybrid Current Drive Improved Confinement with a Graphite Probe at the Last Closed Flux Surface of the HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐国盛; 万宝年; 宋梅; 凌必利; 匡光力; 丁伯江

    2002-01-01

    High time resolution measurements of the electrostatic fluctuations, radial electric field Er and turbulence-induced electron flux Гe have been performed across the transition of lower hybrid current drive improved confinement with a graphite Langmuir probe array at the last closed flux surface of the HT-7 tokamak. The decrease of Гe is dominated by the suppression of fluctuation levels, which follows the change of Er. A reversal of the poloidal propagation direction of turbulence demonstrates that the poloidal propagation is dominated by Eт× Bφ drift. The enhancement of poloidal coherence accompanies the fluctuation suppression, which suggests the subtle variation of turbulence features.

  2. Two-dimensional Vortex Behavior in Highly Underdoped YBa2Cu3O6 x Observed by Scanning Hall Probe Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guikema, J.W.

    2010-02-22

    We report scanning Hall probe microscopy of highly underdoped superconducting YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 6+x} with T{sub c} ranging from 5 to 15 K which showed distinct flux bundles with less than one superconducting flux quantum ({Iota}{sub 0}) through the sample surface. The sub-{Iota}{sub 0} features occurred more frequently for lower T{sub c}, were more mobile than conventional vortices, and occurred more readily when the sample was cooled with an in-plane field component. We show that these features are consistent with kinked stacks of pancake vortices.

  3. Observation by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy of strongly inverted surface layers at the hydrogenated amorphous silicon/crystalline silicon heterojunctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, O. A.; Alvarez, J.; Gushina, E. V.; Favre, W.; Gueunier-Farret, M. E.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Ankudinov, A. V.; Terukov, E. I.; Kleider, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Heterojunctions made of hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and crystalline silicon (c-Si) are examined by conducting probe atomic force microscopy. Conductive channels at both (n )a-Si:H/(p)c-Si and (p)a-Si:H/(n)c-Si interfaces are clearly revealed. These are attributed to two-dimension electron and hole gases due to strong inversion layers at the c-Si surface in agreement with previous planar conductance measurements. The presence of a hole gas in (p )a-Si:H/(n)c-Si structures implies a quite large valence band offset (EVc-Si-EVa-Si:H>0.25 eV).

  4. The BEAN experiment - An EISCAT study of ion temperature anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. W. McCrea

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a novel EISCAT special programme, SP-UK-BEAN, intended for the direct measurement of the ion temperature anisotropy during ion frictional heating events in the high-latitude F-region. The experiment employs a geometry which provides three simultaneous estimates of the ion temperature in a single F-region observing volume at a range of aspect angles from 0° to 36°. In contrast to most previous EISCAT experiments to study ion temperature anisotropies, field-aligned observations are made using the Sodankylä radar, while the Kiruna radar measures at an aspect angle of the order of 30°. Anisotropic effects can thus be studied within a small common volume whose size and altitude range is limited by the radar beamwidth, rather than in volumes which overlap but cover different altitudes. The derivation of line-of-sight ion temperature is made more complex by the presence of an unknown percentage of atomic and molecular ions at the observing altitude and the possibility of non-Maxwellian distortion of the ion thermal velocity distribution. The first problem has been partly accounted for by insisting that a constant value of electron temperature be maintained. This enables an estimate of the ion composition to be made, and facilitates the derivation of more realistic line-of-sight ion temperatures and temperature anisotropies. The latter problem has been addressed by assuming that the thermal velocity distribution remains bi-Maxwellian. The limitations of these approaches are discussed. The ion temperature anisotropies and temperature partition coefficients during two ion heating events give values intermediate between those expected for atomic and for molecular species. This result is consistent with an analysis which indicates that significant proportions of molecular ions (up to 50% were present at the times of greatest heating.

  5. Fe-implanted 6H-SiC: Direct evidence of Fe{sub 3}Si nanoparticles observed by atom probe tomography and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, M. L.; Fnidiki, A., E-mail: abdeslem.fnidiki@univ-rouen.fr; Lardé, R.; Cuvilly, F.; Blum, I. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Lechevallier, L. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Département de GEII, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, rue d' Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Debelle, A.; Thomé, L. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3-Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condensé (DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC), UMR 3680 CNRS, Bât. 772, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Marteau, M.; Eyidi, D.; Declémy, A. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346 CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI, téléport 2, 11 Bvd M. et P. Curie 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-05-14

    In order to understand ferromagnetic ordering in SiC-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, Fe-implanted 6H-SiC subsequently annealed was studied by Atom Probe Tomography, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Thanks to its 3D imaging capabilities at the atomic scale, Atom Probe Tomography appears as the most suitable technique to investigate the Fe distribution in the 6H-SiC host semiconductor and to evidence secondary phases. This study definitely evidences the formation of Fe{sub 3}Si nano-sized clusters after annealing. These clusters are unambiguously responsible for the main part of the magnetic properties observed in the annealed samples.

  6. Probing The New Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zentner, A R

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in observational techniques have transformed cosmology into a field inundated with ever-expanding, high-quality data sets and driven cosmology toward a standard model where the classic cosmological parameters are accurately measured. I briefly discuss some of the methods used to determine cosmological parameters, particularly primordial nucleosynthesis, the magnitude- redshift relation of supernovae, and cosmic microwave background anisotropy. I demonstrate how cosmological data can be used to complement particle physics and constrain extensions to the Standard Model. Specifically, I present bounds on light particle species and the properties of unstable, weakly-interacting, massive particles. Despite the myriad successes of the emerging standard cosmological model, unanswered questions linger. Numerical simulations of structure formation predict galactic central densities that are considerably higher than observed. They also reveal hundreds of satellites orbiting Milky Way-like galaxies while th...

  7. Anisotropy above and below the subducting Nazca lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDougall, J. G.; Fischer, K. M.; Anderson, M. L.; Kincaid, C. R.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study is to constrain mantle flow above and below the subducting Nazca plate at latitudes of 30°-41° S. In this segment of the South American subduction zone, slab dip varies from flat slab subduction in the north to a dip of ~40° in the south, where the segment ends at a slab gap associated with Chile Ridge. We measured shear-wave splitting in over 280 S arrivals from local earthquakes recorded by the 2010 Chile RAMP IRIS/PASSCAL array (aftershock locations from Lange et al., 2010), the 2000-2002 CHARGE IRIS/PASSCAL array, and permanent stations PLCA (USGS/GTSN) and PEL (Geoscope). We also resolved splitting in 17 SK(K)S phases at PLCA and permanent station TRQA (IRIS/GSN). Splitting parameters for a subset of phases were determined using a range of filters; most were stable as a function of frequency. The results reported below correspond to a 0.05-2 Hz bandpass filter. Local S lag times range from 0.1-0.9 seconds. For back-arc stations above the area of steep subduction, lag times correlate with path length in the mantle wedge, indicating that wedge anisotropy dominates. Lag times from the Chile RAMP stations, which are located in the forearc between 33°S and 39°S and in general correspond to shorter paths, span a narrower range (0.1-0.4 seconds). Splitting fast polarizations at back-arc stations show a coherent variation with latitude. Fast polarizations vary from NE at 40°-41°S, to N (roughly slab-strike parallel) at 35°-36°S, to NE-ESE at 30°-33°S, curving as the slab flattens. Modeling of these local S splitting results reveals that the fast symmetry axis of anisotropy is sub-parallel to the overall trend of fast polarization directions at each station, and that the strength of anisotropy is equivalent to 10-30% of single crystal olivine anisotropy. At forearc stations, we observe roughly trench-parallel fast polarization directions (largely N-NE) with the exception of two areas of localized, yet robust trench-normal trends (E

  8. Effect of anisotropy on small magnetic clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Hucht, Alfred; Sil, Shreekantha; Entel, Peter; 10.1103/PhysRevB.84.104438

    2012-01-01

    The effect of dipolar interaction and local uniaxial anisotropy on the magnetic response of small spin clusters where spins are located on the vertices of icosahedron, cuboctahedron, tetrahedron and square geometry have been investigated. We consider the ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic spin-1/2 and spin-1 Heisenberg model with uniaxial anisotropy and dipolar interaction and apply numerical exact diagonalization technique in order to study the influence of frustration and anisotropy on the ground state properties of the spin-clusters. The ground state magnetization, spin-spin correlation and several thermodynamic quantities such as entropy and specific heat are calculated as a function of temperature and magnetic field.

  9. Magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction in nanocrystalline Fe–Al alloys obtained by melt spinning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, J.A.; Carrizo, J. [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Elbaile, L., E-mail: elbaile@uniovi.es [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Lago-Cachón, D.; Rivas, M. [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Castrillo, D. [Depto. de Ciencias de los Materiales de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Independencia, 33004 Oviedo (Spain); Pierna, A.R. [Depto. de Ingeniería Química y Medio Ambiente, EUPSS, UPV/EHU, San Sebastián (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    A study about the magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction in ribbons of composition Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} obtained by the melt spinning technique is presented. The hysteresis loops indicate that the easy magnetization direction lies in both cases on the plane of the ribbon. Torque magnetometry measurements show that the in-plane magnetic anisotropy constant results 10100 J m{sup −3} and 490 J m{sup −3} for the Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} respectively. After a thermal treatment of 2 h at 473 K to remove the residual stresses, the in-plane magnetic anisotropy constants falls down to 2500 J m{sup −3} in the first composition and remains the same in the second one, while the easy direction remains the same. Measurements of the magnetostriction and the residual stresses of both ribbons allow us to explain the above mentioned results about the magnetic anisotropy and to conclude that the residual stresses via magnetostriction are the main source of magnetic anisotropy in the case of Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} ribbon but they do not influence this property in the ribbon of composition Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30}. - Highlights: • The origin of magnetic anisotropy of Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} ribbons has been studied. • The magnetic anisotropy lies in the plane of the ribbons. • A huge difference in magnetic anisotropy between two ribbons has been observed. • Magnetostriction and residual stresses explain the magnetic anisotropy in Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} ribbon.

  10. Probing the Mass and Structure of the Ring Nebula in Lyra with SOFIA/GREAT Observations of the [CII] 158 micron line

    CERN Document Server

    Sahai, R; Werner, M W; Güsten, R; Wiesemeyer, H; Sandell, G

    2012-01-01

    We have obtained new velocity-resolved spectra of the [CII] 158 micron line towards the Ring Nebula in Lyra (NGC 6720), one of the best-studied planetary nebulae, in order to probe its controversial 3-dimensional structure and to estimate the mass of circumstellar material in this object. We used the Terahertz receiver GREAT aboard the SOFIA airborne telescope to obtain the [CII] spectra at eight locations within and outside the bright optical ring of NGC 6720. Emission was detected at all positions except for the most distant position along the nebula's minor axis, and generally covers a broad velocity range, ~50 km/s (FWZI), except at a position along the major axis located just outside the optical ring, where it is significantly narrower (~25 km/s). The one narrow spectrum appears to be probing circumstellar material lying outside the main nebular shell that has not been accelerated by past fast wind episodes from the central star, and therefore most likely comes from equatorial and/or low-latitude regions...

  11. Sound Velocity Measurements in Textured hcp-Iron and the Anisotropy and Structure of Earth's Inner Core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, D.; Occelli, F.; Badro, J.; Requardt, H.; Fiquet, G.; Krisch, M.

    2003-12-01

    Seismological studies show that the Earth's inner core is elastically anisotropic. The anisotropy has an axial symmetry and an amplitude of about 3-4%, with the fast direction oriented parallel to the Earth's rotation axis. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain this feature, but the lack of evidence from mineral physics does not allow to address them. Indeed, the experimental determination of sound velocity anisotropy in hcp-iron, the main constituent of the inner core, is of primary importance. Studies include first-principle calculations [1-5] and x-ray radial diffraction measurements [6], but the results show general disagreement, not only in magnitude, but in direction as well. We will report new inelastic x-ray scattering (IXS) data on polycrystalline hcp-iron as a function of pressure, complementing and extending previous IXS data [7]. The derived longitudinal and transverse sound velocities will be compared with the calculations and the experimental results present in literature. Furthermore, the issue of elastic anisotropy will be addressed. Taking advantage of the texturing developed by uniaxially compressed hcp-metals [8], and making use of a properly designed diamond anvil cell characterized by an angular aperture of more than \\begin{math} 90^{o} , we measured the sound velocity at 22 and 112 GPa in two different geometries with respect to the compression axis, probing the longitudinal sound propagation at \\begin{math} 50^{o} and \\begin{math} 90^{o} with respect to it. A difference in acoustic sound velocity of about 5% has been detected at the highest pressure. This effective anisotropy on a textured polycrystalline sample is comparable with the one observed in the Earth, further relaxing the requirement of a nearly perfect alignment of iron crystal grains sustained by previous theoretical investigations [1,4]. [1] L. Stixrude, R.E. Cohen, Science 267, 1972 (1995). [2] P. Soderlind et al., Phys. Rev. B 53, 14063 (1996). [3] R. E. Cohen et

  12. Radio Synchrotron Fluctuation Statistics as a Probe of Magnetized Interstellar Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Herron, C A; Lazarian, A; Gaensler, B M; McClure-Griffiths, N M

    2016-01-01

    We investigate how observations of synchrotron intensity fluctuations can be used to probe the sonic and Alfv\\'enic Mach numbers of interstellar turbulence, based on mock observations performed on simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We find that the structure function slope, and a diagnostic of anisotropy that we call the integrated quadrupole ratio modulus, both depend on the Alfv\\'enic Mach number. However, these statistics also depend on the orientation of the mean magnetic field in the synchrotron emitting region relative to our line of sight, and this creates a degeneracy that cannot be broken by observations of synchrotron intensity alone. We conclude that the polarization of synchrotron emission could be analyzed to break this degeneracy, and suggest that this will be possible with the Square Kilometre Array.

  13. Exchange anisotropy pinning of a standing spin-wave mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaraggia, R.; Kennewell, K.; Kostylev, M.; Stamps, R. L.; Ali, M.; Greig, D.; Hickey, B. J.; Marrows, C. H.

    2011-02-01

    Standing spin waves in a thin film are used as sensitive probes of interface pinning induced by an antiferromagnet through exchange anisotropy. Using coplanar waveguide ferromagnetic resonance, pinning of the lowest energy spin-wave thickness mode in Ni80Fe20/Ir25Mn75 exchange-biased bilayers was studied for a range of Ir25Mn75 thicknesses. We show that pinning of the standing mode can be used to amplify, relative to the fundamental resonance, frequency shifts associated with exchange bias. The shifts provide a unique “fingerprint” of the exchange bias and can be interpreted in terms of an effective ferromagnetic film thickness and ferromagnet-antiferromagnet interface anisotropy. Thermal effects are studied for ultrathin antiferromagnetic Ir25Mn75 thicknesses, and the onset of bias is correlated with changes in the pinning fields. The pinning strength magnitude is found to grow with cooling of the sample, while the effective ferromagnetic film thickness simultaneously decreases. These results suggest that exchange bias involves some deformation of magnetic order in the interface region.

  14. Edge anisotropy and the geometric perspective on flow networks

    CERN Document Server

    Molkenthin, Nora; Tupikina, Liubov; Marwan, Norbert; Donges, Jonathan F; Feudel, Ulrike; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V

    2016-01-01

    Spatial networks have recently attracted great interest in various fields of research. While the traditional network-theoretic viewpoint is commonly restricted to their topological characteristics (often disregarding existing spatial constraints), this work takes a geometric perspective, which considers vertices and edges as objects in a metric space and quantifies the corresponding spatial distribution and alignment. For this purpose, we introduce the concept of edge anisotropy and define a class of measures characterizing the spatial directedness of connections. Specifically, we demonstrate that the local anisotropy of edges incident to a given vertex provides useful information about the local geometry of geophysical flows based on networks constructed from spatio-temporal data, which is complementary to topological characteristics of the same flow networks. Taken both structural and geometric viewpoints together can thus assist the identification of underlying flow structures from observations of scalar v...

  15. Large magnetic anisotropy in ferrihydrite nanoparticles synthesized from reverse micelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte, E L [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, Sao Paulo, 05315-970 (Brazil); Itri, R [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, Sao Paulo, 05315-970 (Brazil); Jr, E Lima [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, CP 66318, Sao Paulo, 05315-970 (Brazil); Baptista, M S [Instituto de Quimica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Avenida Professor Lineu Prestes 748, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Berquo, T S [Institute for Rock Magnetism, University of Minnesota, 100 Union Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455-0128 (United States); Goya, G F [Instituto de Nanociencias de Aragon (INA), Universidad de Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12 (50009), Zaragoza (Spain)

    2006-11-28

    Six-line ferrihydrite (FH) nanoparticles have been synthesized in the core of reverse micelles, used as nanoreactors to obtain average particle sizes {approx} 2-4 nm. The blocking temperatures T{sub B}{sup m} extracted from magnetization data increased from {approx}10 to 20 K for increasing particle size. Low-temperature Moessbauer measurements allowed us to observe the onset of differentiated contributions from the particle core and surface as the particle size increases. The magnetic properties measured in the liquid state of the original emulsion showed that the ferrihydrite phase is not present in the liquid precursor, but precipitates in the micelle cores after the free water is freeze-dried. Systematic susceptibility {chi}{sub ac}(f,T) measurements showed the dependence of the effective magnetic anisotropy energies E{sub a} with particle volume, and yielded an effective anisotropy value of K{sub eff} = 312 {+-} 10 kJ m{sup -3}.

  16. Magnetic anisotropy and quantized spin waves in hematite nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Stine Nyborg; Lefmann, Kim; Lindgård, Per-Anker

    2004-01-01

    We report on the observation of high-frequency collective magnetic excitations, (h) over bar omegaapproximate to1.1 meV, in hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) nanoparticles. The neutron scattering experiments include measurements at temperatures in the range 6-300 K and applied fields up to 7.5 T as well...... the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy, which is strongly related to the suppression of the Morin transition in nanoparticles of hematite. Further, the localization of the signal in both energy and momentum transfer brings evidence for finite-size quantization of spin waves in the system....... as polarization analysis. We give an explanation for the field- and temperature dependence of the excitations, which are found to have strongly elliptical out-of-plane precession. The frequency of the excitations gives information on the magnetic anisotropy constants in the system. We have in this way determined...

  17. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  18. Edge anisotropy and the geometric perspective on flow networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molkenthin, Nora; Kutza, Hannes; Tupikina, Liubov; Marwan, Norbert; Donges, Jonathan F.; Feudel, Ulrike; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-03-01

    Spatial networks have recently attracted great interest in various fields of research. While the traditional network-theoretic viewpoint is commonly restricted to their topological characteristics (often disregarding the existing spatial constraints), this work takes a geometric perspective, which considers vertices and edges as objects in a metric space and quantifies the corresponding spatial distribution and alignment. For this purpose, we introduce the concept of edge anisotropy and define a class of measures characterizing the spatial directedness of connections. Specifically, we demonstrate that the local anisotropy of edges incident to a given vertex provides useful information about the local geometry of geophysical flows based on networks constructed from spatio-temporal data, which is complementary to topological characteristics of the same flow networks. Taken both structural and geometric viewpoints together can thus assist the identification of underlying flow structures from observations of scalar variables.

  19. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, R., E-mail: rbonino@to.infn.it [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica - IFSI, c.so Fiume 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); INFN sezione di Torino, v. P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy)

    2012-11-11

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  20. Large scale anisotropy studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonino, R.

    2012-11-01

    Completed at the end of 2008, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been continuously operating for more than seven years. We present here the analysis techniques and the results about the search for large scale anisotropies in the sky distribution of cosmic rays, reporting both the phase and the amplitude measurements of the first harmonic modulation in right ascension in different energy ranges above 2.5×1017 eV. Thanks to the collected statistics, a sensitivity of 1% at EeV energies can be reached. No significant anisotropies have been observed, upper limits on the amplitudes have been derived and are here compared with the results of previous experiments and with some theoretical expectations.

  1. Deciphering the Dipole Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the dipole anisotropy in the arrival directions of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) indicate a strong energy dependence of the dipole amplitude and phase in the TeV-PeV range. We argue here that these observations can be well understood within standard diffusion theory as a combined effect of (i) one or more local sources at Galactic longitude 120deg < l < 300deg dominating the CR gradient below 0.1-0.3 PeV, (ii) the presence of a strong ordered magnetic field in our local environment, (iii) the relative motion of the solar system, and (iv) the limited reconstruction capabilities of ground-based observatories. We show that an excellent candidate of the local CR source responsible for the dipole anisotropy at 1-100 TeV is the Vela supernova remnant.

  2. Variable variance Preisach model for multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, A. F.; Gonzalez-Fuentes, C.; Morales, R.; Ross, C. A.; Dumas, R.; Åkerman, J.; Garcia, C.

    2016-08-01

    We present a variable variance Preisach model that fully accounts for the different magnetization processes of a multilayer structure with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy by adjusting the evolution of the interaction variance as the magnetization changes. We successfully compare in a quantitative manner the results obtained with this model to experimental hysteresis loops of several [CoFeB/Pd ] n multilayers. The effect of the number of repetitions and the thicknesses of the CoFeB and Pd layers on the magnetization reversal of the multilayer structure is studied, and it is found that many of the observed phenomena can be attributed to an increase of the magnetostatic interactions and subsequent decrease of the size of the magnetic domains. Increasing the CoFeB thickness leads to the disappearance of the perpendicular anisotropy, and such a minimum thickness of the Pd layer is necessary to achieve an out-of-plane magnetization.

  3. Radial orbital anisotropy and the Fundamental Plane of elliptical galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Nipoti, Carlo; Londrillo, Pasquale; Ciotti, Luca

    2002-01-01

    The existence of the Fundamental Plane (FP) imposes strong constraints on the structure and dynamics of elliptical galaxies, and thus contains important information on the processes of their formation and evolution. Here we focus on the relations between the FP thinness and tilt and the amount of radial orbital anisotropy. By using N-body simulations of galaxy models characterized by observationally motivated density profiles, and also allowing for the presence of live, massive dark matter halos, we explore the impact of radial orbital anisotropy and instability on the FP properties. The numerical results confirm a previous semi--analytical finding: the requirement of stability matches almost exactly the thinness of the FP. In other words, galaxy models that are radially anisotropic enough to be found outside the observed FP (with their isotropic parent models lying on the FP) are unstable, and their end--products fall back on the FP itself. We also find that a systematic increase of radial orbit anisotropy w...

  4. Elastic anisotropy of Earth's inner core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belonoshko, Anatoly B; Skorodumova, Natalia V; Rosengren, Anders; Johansson, Börje

    2008-02-08

    Earth's solid-iron inner core is elastically anisotropic. Sound waves propagate faster along Earth's spin axis than in the equatorial plane. This anisotropy has previously been explained by a preferred orientation of the iron alloy hexagonal crystals. However, hexagonal iron becomes increasingly isotropic on increasing temperature at pressures of the inner core and is therefore unlikely to cause the anisotropy. An alternative explanation, supported by diamond anvil cell experiments, is that iron adopts a body-centered cubic form in the inner core. We show, by molecular dynamics simulations, that the body-centered cubic iron phase is extremely anisotropic to sound waves despite its high symmetry. Direct simulations of seismic wave propagation reveal an anisotropy of 12%, a value adequate to explain the anisotropy of the inner core.

  5. Anisotropy and Corotation of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Bi, X J; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Zhaoyang Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, J Y; Lou, Y Q; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2006-01-01

    The intensity of Galactic cosmic rays is nearly isotropic because of the influence of magnetic fields in the Milky Way. Here, we present two-dimensional high-precision anisotropy measurement for energies from a few to several hundred teraelectronvolts (TeV), using the large data sample of the Tibet Air Shower Arrays. Besides revealing finer details of the known anisotropies, a new component of Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy in sidereal time is uncovered around the Cygnus region direction. For cosmic-ray energies up to a few hundred TeV, all components of anisotropies fade away, showing a corotation of Galactic cosmic rays with the local Galactic magnetic environment. These results have broad implications for a comprehensive understanding of cosmic rays, supernovae, magnetic fields, and heliospheric and Galactic dynamic environments.

  6. Microwave Background Anisotropies from Scaling Seed Perturbations

    CERN Document Server

    Durrer, R; Durrer, Ruth; Sakellariadou, Mairi

    1997-01-01

    We study microwave background anisotropies induced by scaling seed perturbations in a universe dominated by cold dark matter. Using a gauge invariant linear perturbation analysis, we solve the perturbation equations on super-horizon scales, for CMB anisotropies triggered by generic gravitational seeds. We find that perturbations induced by seeds -- under very mild restrictions -- are nearly isocurvature. Thus, compensation, which is mainly the consequence of physically sensible initial conditions, is very generic. We then restrict our study to the case of scaling sources, motivated by global scalar fields. We parameterize the energy momentum tensor of the source by ``seed functions'' and calculate the Sachs-Wolfe and acoustic contributions to the CMB anisotropies. We discuss the dependence of the anisotropy spectrum on the parameters of the model considered. Even within the restricted class of models investigated in this work, we find a surprising variety of results for the position and height of the first ac...

  7. Magnetic anisotropies of rare-earth compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenhaupt, M.; Rotter, M.; Kramp, S.

    2000-03-01

    There are two kinds of magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth compounds: the single-ion anisotropy caused by the crystal field (CF) and the anisotropy of the two-ion interactions. Both types of anisotropy have to be considered to arrive at a consistent description of the magnetic properties of the orthorhombic intermetallic compound NdCu 2. From the analysis of NdCu 2 we can derive predictions for the type of ordering in other isostructural RCu 2 compounds, that agree well with experimental results: If the magnetic moments point into the crystallographic b-direction, an ordering wave vector of (2/3 0 0) is expected. If the moments are oriented perpendicular to b then the ordering wave vector is (2/3 1 0) .

  8. Characteristics of ring current protons and oxygen ions during the 7 January 2015 and 17 March 2015 storms: Van Allen Probes/RBSPICE observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keika, K.; Seki, K.; Nose, M.; Machida, S.; Miyoshi, Y.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Mitchell, D. G.; Gkioulidou, M.; Gerrard, A. J.; Manweiler, J. W.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate enhancements and losses of energetic (~50-~500 keV) protons and oxygen ions during two intense storms on January 7 and March 17 in 2015. We use proton and oxygen ion data from RBSPICE onboard Van Allen Probes. During the January 7 storm (Dstmin = -99 nT), Van Allen Probes explored the inner magnetosphere on the night side, with both spacecraft located around midnight at apogee. Their orbits were in opposite phase. RBSPICE data are available from both spacecraft during the rapid recovery of the storm. We analyze energy spectra of both species to identify whether the ring current is symmetric or not, and determine the dominant loss process. During the March 17 storm (Dstmin = -223 nT), Van Allen Probes traveled in the pre-midnight sector during the outbound paths and around midnight during the inbound path. The orbits of the two spacecraft were in opposite phase. The Dst index during the storm showed a two-step decrease with the first minimum at 9 UT and the second at 22 UT. Enhancements of ring current ions began at RBSPICE-B at ~7 UT, and RBSPICE-A entered the ring current region at ~9 UT. The RBSPICE data show penetration of energetic protons (μ~0.1 keV/nT) down to L~4 during the first storm development. Protons penetrated more deeply (as low as L~3) during the second enhancement. The protons, which we confirmed made a dominant contribution to energy density at L = 3-4, are more enhanced in flux around the storm maximum. The flux of 200-400 keV oxygen ions was enhanced and localized around midnight near the end of the first storm development. Oxygen ion enhancements during the second development were seen in a wide range of MLT (pre-midnight to midnight). We examine the evolution of ion energy spectra to identify whether each phase of the multi-step storm development was due to deep penetration of transport/injections, density enhancements, or/and non-adiabatic acceleration of protons and oxygen ions.

  9. Anisotropy induces non-Fermi liquid behavior and nemagnetic order in three-dimensional Luttinger semimetals

    CERN Document Server

    Boettcher, Igor

    2016-01-01

    We illuminate the intriguing role played by spatial anisotropy in three-dimensional Luttinger semimetals featuring quadratic band touching and long-range Coulomb interactions. We observe the anisotropy to be subject to an exceptionally slow renormalization group (RG) evolution so that it can be considered approximately constant when computing the impact of quantum fluctuations on the remaining couplings of the system. Using perturbative RG we then study the competition of all local short-range interactions that are generated from the long-range interactions for fixed anisotropy. Two main effects come to light for sufficiently strong anisotropy. First, the three-dimensional system features an Abrikosov non-Fermi liquid ground state. Second, there appear qualitatively new fixed points which describe quantum phase transitions into phases with nemagnetic orders - higher-rank tensor orders that break time-reversal symmetry, and thus have both nematic and magnetic character. In real materials these phases may be re...

  10. Strong crustal seismic anisotropy in the Kalahari Craton based on Receiver Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Earlier seismic studies of the Kalahari Craton in southern Africa infer deformation of upper mantle by flow with fast direction of seismic anisotropy being parallel to present plate motion, and/or report anisotropy frozen into the lithospheric mantle. We present evidence for very strong seismic...... is uniform within tectonic units and parallel to orogenic strike in the Limpopo and Cape fold belts. It is further parallel to the strike of major dyke swarms which indicates that a large part of the observed anisotropy is controlled by lithosphere fabrics and macroscopic effects. The directions of the fast...... that the crust and lithospheric mantle may have been coupled since cratonisation. If so, the apparent match between mantle anisotropy and the present plate motion is coincidental....

  11. Anisotropy and Magnetostriction in Cobalt-Modified Magnetite: A Crystal Field Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nlebedim, Cajetan; Jiles, David

    2013-03-01

    The anisotropy and magnetostrictive properties of magnetite are altered by the introduction of cobalt ions into the spinel crystal lattice. 4% of Co2+ substituted for Fe2+ changes both the sign and magnitude of magnetocrystalline anisotropy coefficient. Such strong dependence can be useful for tailoring the properties of cobalt-iron oxides for applications. This is especially important, considering that cobalt ferrite materials prepared for magnetostrictive, multiferroic and other related applications often deviate from targeted or stoichiometric compositions. In this study, magnetite has been systematically modified by substitution of cobalt. The changes in anisotropy and magnetostriction have been studied and can be explained using the single ion model. The agreement between the trend observed in this experimental investigation and previous theoretical studies is noteworthy. The variation in anisotropy and magnetostriction will be presented on the basis of two competing factors; the unquenched orbital angular momentum of Co2+ and changes in the crystal field due to Co2+ substitution.

  12. Investigation of magnetic properties in thick CoFeB alloy films for controllable anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ke; Huang, Ya; Chen, Ruofei; Xu, Zhan [Huaqiao University, College of Information Science and Engineering, Xiamen City (China)

    2016-02-15

    CoFeB alloy material has attracted interest for its wide uses in magnetic memory devices and sensors. We investigate magnetic properties of thick Co{sub 40}Fe{sub 40}B{sub 20} films in the thickness range from 10 to 100 nm sandwiched by MgO and Ta layers. Strong in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy is revealed in the as-deposited amorphous films by angular dependent magnetic measurements, and the growth-induced anisotropy is found to strongly depend on the film thickness. A fourfold cubic magnetic anisotropy develops with annealing, as a result of improved crystalline structure in films confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The observed magnetic properties can be explained by the superposition of the uniaxial and additional cubic magnetic anisotropy, tuned by annealing temperature. (orig.)

  13. Investigation of magnetic properties in thick CoFeB alloy films for controllable anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Huang, Ya; Chen, Ruofei; Xu, Zhan

    2016-02-01

    CoFeB alloy material has attracted interest for its wide uses in magnetic memory devices and sensors. We investigate magnetic properties of thick Co40Fe40B20 films in the thickness range from 10 to 100 nm sandwiched by MgO and Ta layers. Strong in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy is revealed in the as-deposited amorphous films by angular dependent magnetic measurements, and the growth-induced anisotropy is found to strongly depend on the film thickness. A fourfold cubic magnetic anisotropy develops with annealing, as a result of improved crystalline structure in films confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. The observed magnetic properties can be explained by the superposition of the uniaxial and additional cubic magnetic anisotropy, tuned by annealing temperature.

  14. Variations of three-dimensional anisotropy of cosmic rays during Forbush decreases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, S.; Akasofu, S.-I.; Ogita, N.; Gleeson, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Variations of three-dimensional anisotropy of cosmic rays during Forbush decreases are examined by a spherical harmonic method and by constructing successive isointensity contour maps in the solar ecliptic coordinate system. The east-west and north-south anisotropies are studied statistically and for several individual events; the data are based on cosmic ray records from about 24 stations for the 3-year period from 1966 to 1968. For the individual events, the high anisotropies of about 4% are examined in terms of the convective, diffusive and density gradient components of the differential streaming as well as the interplanetary magnetic field and solar wind. In each case, vector gradients are derived that lead to the observed anisotropies, and the magnitude of these gradients is typically 10-20 times that of the quiet time interplanetary gradient.

  15. Precision ESR measurements of transverse anisotropy in the single-molecule magnet Ni4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Charles A.; Allão Cassaro, Rafael A.; Friedman, Jonathan R.

    2016-12-01

    We present a method for precisely measuring the tunnel splitting in single-molecule magnets (SMMs) using electron-spin resonance, and use these measurements to precisely and independently determine the underlying transverse anisotropy parameter, given a certain class of transitions. By diluting samples of the SMM Ni4 via cocrystallization in a diamagnetic isostructural analog we obtain markedly narrower resonance peaks than are observed in undiluted samples. Using custom loop-gap resonators we measure the transitions at several frequencies, allowing a precise determination of the tunnel splitting. Because the transition under investigation occurs at zero field, and arises due to a first-order perturbation from the transverse anisotropy, we can determine the magnitude of this anisotropy independent of any other Hamiltonian parameters. This method can be applied to other SMMs with tunnel splittings arising from first-order transverse anisotropy perturbations.

  16. Spin kinetic Monte Carlo method for nanoferromagnetism and magnetization dynamics of nanomagnets with large magnetic anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bang-gui; ZHANG Kai-cheng; LI Ying

    2007-01-01

    The Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method based on the transition-state theory, powerful and famous for sim-ulating atomic epitaxial growth of thin films and nanostruc-tures, was used recently to simulate the nanoferromagnetism and magnetization dynamics of nanomagnets with giant mag-netic anisotropy. We present a brief introduction to the KMC method and show how to reformulate it for nanoscale spin systems. Large enough magnetic anisotropy, observed exper-imentally and shown theoretically in terms of first-principle calculation, is not only essential to stabilize spin orientation but also necessary in making the transition-state barriers dur-ing spin reversals for spin KMC simulation. We show two applications of the spin KMC method to monatomic spin chains and spin-polarized-current controlled composite nano-magnets with giant magnetic anisotropy. This spin KMC method can be applied to other anisotropic nanomagnets and composite nanomagnets as long as their magnetic anisotropy energies are large enough.

  17. Inherited crustal deformation along the East Gondwana margin revealed by seismic anisotropy tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilia, S.; Arroucau, P.; Rawlinson, N.; Reading, A. M.; Cayley, R. A.

    2016-12-01

    The mechanisms of continental growth are a crucial part of plate tectonic theory, yet a clear understanding of the processes involved remains elusive. Here we determine seismic Rayleigh wave phase anisotropy variations in the crust beneath the southern Tasmanides of Australia, a Paleozoic accretionary margin. Our results reveal a complex, thick-skinned pervasive deformation that was driven by the tectonic interaction between the proto-Pacific Ocean and the ancient eastern margin of Gondwana. Stress-induced effects triggered by the collision and entrainment of a microcontinent into the active subduction zone are evident in the anisotropy signature. The paleofracturing trend of failed rifting between Australia and Antarctica is also recorded in the anisotropy pattern as well as a tightly curved feature in central Tasmania. The observed patterns of anisotropy correlate well with recent geodynamic and kinematic models of the Tasmanides and provide a platform from which the spatial extent of deformational domains can be refined.

  18. Comparison of species-resolved energy spectra from ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, J.; Manweiler, J. W.; Armstrong, T. P.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.

    2013-12-01

    We present a comparison between energy spectra measured by the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) Electron Proton Alpha Monitor (EPAM) instrument and the Van Allen Probe Ion Composition Experiment (RBSPICE) for two significant and distinct events in early 2013. The first is an impulsive solar particle event on March 17th. While intense, this event presented no significant surprises in terms of its composition or anisotropy characteristics, thus providing a good baseline for response of the trapped radiation belts as observed by the Van Allen Probes. The second solar event occurred late May 22nd and early May 23rd. This event has a much greater concentration of medium and heavy ions than the St. Patrick's Day event, as well as having very peculiar energy spectra with evidence of two distinct populations. During the St. Patrick's Day Event, the energy spectra for helium, carbon, oxygen, neon, silicon, and iron all show the same spectral power law slope -3.1. The event shows strong anisotropy with intensities differing by a factor of four for both protons and Z>1 ions. The late May event also has strong anisotropy, and in the same directions as the St. Patrick's Day Event, but with very different composition and energy spectra. The spectra are much harder with power law spectral slopes of -0.5. Additionally, there is a significant spectral bump at 3 MeV/nuc for helium that is not present in the spectra of the heavier ions. The intensities of the heavier ions, however, show an increase that is an order of magnitude greater than the increase seen for helium. The March 17 RBSPICE observations show multiple injection events lasting for less than an hour each during the Van Allen Probes B apogees. These injections are seen in protons as well as Helium and only somewhat observed in Oxygen. Spectral slopes for the observations range from approximately -5 during quiet times to double peaked events with a spectral slope of approximately -2 at the beginning of the injection

  19. Stress, strain rate and anisotropy in Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. K.; Aoki, Y.; Unglert, K.; Ohkura, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Shimizu, H.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Ohminato, T.; Mori, J.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of wave speeds, may be caused by stress-oriented cracks or by strain-oriented minerals, yet few studies have quantitatively compared anisotropy to stress and strain over large regions. Here we compare crustal stress and strain rates on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, as measured from inversions of focal mechanisms, GPS and shear wave splitting. Over 85,000 shear wave splitting measurements from local and regional earthquakes are obtained from the NIED network between 2004 and 2012, and on Aso, Sakurajima, Kirishima and Unzen volcano networks. Strain rate measurements are made from the Japanese Geonet stations. JMA-determined S arrival times processed with the MFAST shear wave splitting code measure fast polarisations (Φ), related to the orientation of the anisotropic medium and time delays (dt), related to the path length and the percent anisotropy. We apply the TESSA 2-D delay time tomography and spatial averaging code to the highest quality events, which have nearly vertical incidence angles, separating the 3455 shallow (depth = 40 km) earthquakes. Using square grids with 30 km sides for all the inversions, the best correlations are observed between splitting from shallow earthquakes and stress. Axes of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) and Φ correlate with a coefficient c of 0.56, significant at the 99% confidence level. Their mean difference is 31.9°. Axes of maximum compressional strain rate and SHmax are also well aligned, with an average difference of 28°, but they do not correlate with each other, meaning that where they differ, the difference is not systematic. Anisotropy strength is negatively correlated with the stress ratio parameter determined from focal mechanism inversion (c = - 0.64; significant at the 99% confidence level). The anisotropy and stress results are consistent with stress-aligned microcracks in the crust in a dominantly strike-slip regime. Eigenvalues of maximum horizontal strain rate

  20. IMPRINTS OF EXPANSION ON THE LOCAL ANISOTROPY OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdini, Andrea [Dipartimento di fisica e astronomia, Università di Firenze, Firenze (Italy); Grappin, Roland [LPP, Ecole Polytechnique, Palaiseau (France)

    2015-08-01

    We study the anisotropy of II-order structure functions (SFs) defined in a frame attached to the local mean field in three-dimensional (3D) direct numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, with the solar wind expansion both included and not included. We simulate spacecraft flybys through the numerical domain by taking increments along the radial (wind) direction that form an angle of 45° with the ambient magnetic field. We find that only when expansion is taken into account do the synthetic observations match the 3D anisotropy observed in the solar wind, including the change of anisotropy with scale. Our simulations also show that the anisotropy changes dramatically when considering increments oblique to the radial directions. Both results can be understood by noting that expansion reduces the radial component of the magnetic field at all scales, thus confining fluctuations in the plane perpendicular to the radial. Expansion is thus shown to affect not only the (global) spectral anisotropy, but also the local anisotropy of second-order SF by influencing the distribution of the local mean field, which enters this higher-order statistics.

  1. Cap-Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Ultra-thin Fe/MgO(001) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Heft, Tobias; Pendharkar, Mihir; Lee, Elizabeth; Palmstrom, Chris

    Magnetic anisotropy plays an important role in the design of spintronic devices. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is preferred for magnetic tunnel junctions because the resulting energy barrier between magnetization states can be very high and this allows enhanced device scalability suitable for magnetic random access memory applications. Interface induced anisotropy is often used to control magnetic easy axes. For example, the Fe/MgO(001) system has been predicted to exhibit PMA in the ultrathin Fe limit. We have used in-situ magneto optic Kerr effect and ex-situ SQUID to study the changes in anisotropy constants between bare Fe/MgO(001) films and those capped with MgO, Pt, and Ta. In some cases in-plane anisotropy terms reverse sign after capping. We also observe transitions from superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic behavior induced by capping layers. Perpendicular anisotropy is observed for Pt/Fe/MgO(001) films after annealing to 300°C. These effects are characterized and incorporated into a magnetic simulation that accurately reproduces the behavior of the films. This work was supported in part by the Semiconductor Research Corporation programs (1) MSR-Intel, and (2) C-SPIN.

  2. Event-by-event azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xilin

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present with full details a systematic quantification, on an even-by-event basis, of the hard probe response to the geometry and fluctuations of the hot QCD matter created in heavy ion collisions at both the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching is extracted and decomposed as harmonic responses (for n=1,2,3,4,5,6) to the corresponding harmonics in the fluctuating initial condition. We show that such jet response harmonics are sensitive to the jet quenching models as well as to the bulk matter initial compositions. By studying these for all centralities at both RHIC and LHC energies we put a strong constraint on the path-length and medium-density dependence of jet energy loss. We also examine the hard-soft di-hadron correlation arising from the hard and soft sectors' responses to the common initial fluctuations. We demonstrate that the experimentally observed "hard-ridge" can be explained this way and that its depe...

  3. Age-independent seismic anisotropy under oceanic plates explained by strain history in the asthenosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedjazian, Navid; Garel, Fanny; Davies, D. Rhodri; Kaminski, Edouard

    2017-02-01

    The depth of the oceanic lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB), as inferred from shear wave velocities, increases with lithospheric age, in agreement with models of cooling oceanic lithosphere. On the other hand, the distribution of radial anisotropy under oceanic plates is almost age-independent. In particular, radial anisotropy shows a maximum positive gradient at a depth of ∼70 km, which, if used as a proxy, indicates an age-independent LAB depth. These contrasting observations have fueled a controversy on the seismological signature of the LAB. To better understand the discrepancy between these observations, we model the development of lattice preferred orientation (LPO) in upper mantle crystal aggregates and predict the seismic anisotropy produced by plate-driven mid-ocean ridge flows. The model accounts for the progressive cooling of the lithosphere with age and can incorporate both diffusion and dislocation creep deformation mechanisms. We find that an age-independent distribution of radial anisotropy is the natural consequence of these simple flows. The depth and strength of anisotropy is further controlled by the deformation regime - dislocation or diffusion creep - experienced by crystals during their ascent towards, and subsequent motion away from, the ridge axis. Comparison to surface wave tomography models yield constraints on rheological parameters such as the activation volume. Although not excluded, additional mechanisms proposed to explain some geophysical signatures of the LAB, such as the presence of partial melt or changes in water content, are not required to explain the radial anisotropy proxy. Our prediction, that the age-independent radial anisotropy proxy marks the transition to flow-induced asthenospheric anisotropy, provides a way to reconcile thermal, mechanical and seismological views of the LAB.

  4. Microstructures and seismic anisotropy of blueschist and eclogite from Ring Mountain and Jenner in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yoonhae; Jung, Haemyeong; Raymond, Loren

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy has been observed in many subduction zones. During subduction of slab, the oceanic crust changes to blueschist and eclogite. Since minerals in blueschist are very anisotropic elastically, seismic properties in the subducting slab can be attributed to the lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of these minerals. We studied microstructures and seismic properties of blueschist and eclogite from Ring Mt. and Jenner in California. Blueschist samples are mainly composed of glaucophane, epidote and phengite. Eclogite samples are mostly composed of omphacite, glaucophane, epidote and garnet. We determined LPOs of minerals using SEM/EBSD and calculated seismic properties of minerals and whole rocks. LPOs of glaucophane showed [001] axes are aligned subparallel to lineation, and both (110) poles and [100] axes subnormal to foliation. Glaucophane in samples from Jenner, however, exhibited [001] axes forming a girdle subparallel to lineation. Seismic anisotropy of glaucophane was stronger in samples from Ring Mt. than those from Jenner. Epidote showed [001] axes are aligned subnormal to foliation and (110) and (010) poles subparallel to lineation. LPOs of phengite were characterized by a maximum of [001] axes normal to foliation, with (110) and (010) poles and [100] axes aligning in a girdle parallel to foliation. Phengite showed the strongest seismic anisotropy among major minerals. LPOs of omphacite showed [001] axes are aligned subparallel to lineation and [010] axes subnormal to foliation. Seismic anisotropy of omphacite were very weak. Blueschist from Ring Mt. showed stronger seismic anisotropy than those from Jenner. Especially, blueschist including abundant phengite showed very strong seismic anisotropy (AVP=30%, max.AVS=23%). Eclogite showed much weaker seismic anisotropy (AVP=7%, max.AVS=6%) than blueschist (AVP=12-30%, max.AVS=9-23%). Therefore, strong seismic anisotropy observed in subduction zone can be more affected by blueschist than eclogite.

  5. Electrical conductivity anisotropy of partially molten peridotite under shear deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, B.; Yoshino, T.; Yamazaki, D.; Manthilake, G. M.; Katsura, T.

    2013-12-01

    Recent ocean bottom magnetotelluric investigations have revealed a high-conductivity layer (HCL) with high anisotropy characterized by higher conductivity values in the direction parallel to the plate motion beneath the southern East Pacific Rise (Evans et al., 2005) and beneath the edge of the Cocos plate at the Middle America trench offshore of Nicaragua (Naif et al., 2013). These geophysical observations have been attributed to either hydration (water) of mantle minerals or the presence of partial melt. Currently, aligned partial melt has been regarded as the most preferable candidate for explaining the conductivity anisotropy because of the implausibility of proton conduction (Yoshino et al., 2006). In this study, we report development of the conductivity anisotropy between parallel and normal to shear direction on the shear plane in partial molten peridotite as a function of time and shear strain. Starting samples were pre-synthesized partial molten peridotite, showing homogeneous melt distribution. The partially molten peridotite samples were deformed in simple shear geometry at 1 GPa and 1723 K in a DIA-type apparatus with uniaxial deformation facility. Conductivity difference between parallel and normal to shear direction reached one order, which is equivalent to that observed beneath asthenosphere. In contrast, such anisotropic behavior was not found in the melt-free samples, suggesting that development of the conductivity anisotropy was generated under shear stress. Microstructure of the deformed partial molten peridotite shows partial melt tends to preferentially locate grain boundaries parallel to shear direction, and forms continuously thin melt layer sub-parallel to the shear direction, whereas apparently isolated distribution was observed on the section perpendicular to the shear direction. The resultant melt morphology can be approximated by tube like geometry parallel to the shear direction. This observation suggests that the development of

  6. The Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect in CMB-calibrated theories applied to the Cosmic Background Imager anisotropy power at l > 2000

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Pen, U L; Pogosyan, D; Prunet, S; Ruetalo, M I; Wadsley, J W; Zhang, P; Mason, B S; Myers, S T; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Sievers, J L; Udomprasert, P S

    2002-01-01

    We discuss the nature of the possible high-l excess in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum observed by the Cosmic Background Imager (CBI). We probe the angular structure of the excess in the CBI deep fields and investigate whether the excess could be due to the scattering of CMB photons by hot electrons within clusters, the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect. We estimate the density fluctuation parameters for amplitude, sigma_8, and shape, Gamma, from CMB primary anisotropy data and other cosmological data. We use the results of two separate hydrodynamical codes for Lambda-CDM cosmologies, consistent with the allowed sigma_8 and Gamma values, to quantify the expected contribution from the SZ effect to the bandpowers of the CBI experiment and pass simulated SZ effect maps through our CBI analysis pipeline. The result is very sensitive to the value of sigma_8, and is roughly consistent with the observed power if sigma_8 ~ 1. We conclude that the CBI anomaly could be a result of the SZ eff...

  7. Loop quantum cosmology: Anisotropies and inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson-Ewing, Edward

    In this dissertation we extend the improved dynamics of loop quantum cosmology from the homogeneous and isotropic Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-times to cosmological models which allow anisotropies and inhomogeneities. Specifically, we consider the cases of the homogeneous but anisotropic Bianchi type I, II and IX models with a massless scalar field as well as the vacuum, inhomogeneous, linearly polarized Gowdy T3 model. For each case, we derive the Hamiltonian constraint operator and study its properties. In particular, we show how in all of these models the classical big bang and big crunch singularities are resolved due to quantum gravity effects. Since the Bianchi models play a key role in the Belinskii, Khalatnikov and Lifshitz conjecture regarding the nature of generic space-like singularities in general relativity, the quantum dynamics of the Bianchi cosmologies are likely to provide considerable intuition about the fate of such singularities in quantum gravity. In addition, the results obtained here provide an important step toward the full loop quantization of cosmological space-times that allow generic inhomogeneities; this would provide falsifiable predictions that could be compared to observations.

  8. $\\Lambda$-inflation and CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Lukash, V N

    2000-01-01

    We explore a broad class of three-parameter inflationary models, called the cosmic gravitational waves consistent with the Harrison-Zel'dovich spectrum of primordial cosmological perturbations, the non-power-law wing-like spectrum of matter density perturbations, high efficiency of these models to meet current observational tests, and others. We show that a parity contribution of the gravitational waves and adiabatic density perturbations into the large-scale temperature anisotropy, T/S $\\sim 1$, is a common feature of are reached in models where (i) the local spectrum shape of density perturbations is flat or slightly red ($n_S{}_\\sim^< 1$), and (ii) the residual potential energy of the inflaton is near the GUT scale ($V_0^{{1/4}} \\sim 10^{16} GeV$). The conditions to find large T/S in the paradigm of cosmic inflation and the relationship of T/S to the ratio of the power spectra, $r$, and to the inflationary $\\gamma$ and Hubble parameters, are discussed. We argue that a simple estimate, T/S$\\simeq 3r\\sime...

  9. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes...... in a photo-sensitive film illuminated with the probes, and it is confirmed that the radiated optical field is unambigiously confined only for the coated probe. Near-field optical imaging of a standing evanescent-wave pattern is used to compare the detection characteristics of the probes, and it is concluded...... that, for the imaging of optical-field intensity distributions containing predominantly evanescent-wave components, a sharp uncoated tip is the probe of choice. Complementary results obtained with optical phase-conjugation experiments with he uncoated probes are discussed in relation to the probe...

  10. Seismic determination of elastic anisotropy and mantle flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J; Yu, Y

    1993-08-27

    When deformed, many rocks develop anisotropic elastic properties. On many seismic records, a long-period (100 to 250 seconds), "quasi-Love" wave with elliptical polarization arrives slightly after the Love wave but before the Rayleigh wave. Mantle anisotropy is sufficient to explain these observations qualitatively as long as the "fast" axis of symmetry is approximately horizontal. Quasi-Love observations for several propagation paths near Pacific Ocean subduction zones are consistent with either flow variations in the mantle within or beneath subducting plates or variations in the direction of fossil spreading in older parts of the Pacific plate.

  11. Anomalous enhancement in interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy through uphill diffusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Tanmay; Kulkarni, Prabhanjan D; Purandare, S C; Barshilia, Harish C; Bhattacharyya, Somnath; Chowdhury, Prasanta

    2014-06-17

    We observed interfacial chemical sharpening due to uphill diffusion in post annealed ultrathin multilayer stack of Co and Pt, which leads to enhanced interfacial perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA). This is surprising as these elements are considered as perfectly miscible. This chemical sharpening was confirmed through quantitative energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and intensity distribution of images taken on high angle annular dark field (HAADF) detector in Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopic (STEM) mode. This observation demonstrates an evidence of miscibility gap in ultrathin coherent Co/Pt multilayer stacks.

  12. Magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin bismuth iron garnet films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popova, Elena, E-mail: popova@physique.uvsq.fr [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS/Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Franco Galeano, Andres Felipe [Laboratoire PROcédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (PROMES), CNRS/Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan (France); Deb, Marwan [Groupe d' Etude de la Matière Condensée (GEMaC), CNRS/Université de Versailles-Saint-Quentin, 45 Avenue des Etats-Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte [Centre d' Elaboration de Matériaux et d' Etudes Structurales (CEMES), CNRS, 29 rue Jeanne Marvig, 31055 Toulouse (France); Transpyrenean Associated Laboratory for Electron Microscopy (TALEM), CEMES-INA, CNRS–Universidad de Zaragoza (Spain); Kachkachi, Hamid [Laboratoire PROcédés, Matériaux et Energie Solaire (PROMES), CNRS/Université de Perpignan Via Domitia, 52 Avenue Paul Alduy, 66860 Perpignan (France); Gendron, François [Institut des NanoSciences de Paris (INSP), CNRS/Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, 4 place Jussieu, Boîte courrier 840, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Ott, Frédéric [Laboratoire Léon Brillouin (LLB), CNRS/CEA, Bâtiment 563, CEA Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); and others

    2013-06-15

    Ultrathin bismuth iron garnet Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} films were grown epitaxially on (001)-oriented gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. Film thickness varied from two to three dozens of unit cells. Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} films grow pseudomorphically on substrates up to a thickness of 20 nm, and then a lattice relaxation occurs. Magnetic properties of the films were studied as a function of bismuth iron garnet thickness. The magnetization and cubic anisotropy decrease with decreasing film thickness. The uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is constant for all film thicknesses. For two unit cell thick films, the easy magnetization axis changes from in-plane to perpendicular to the plane direction. Such a reorientation takes place as a result of the competition of constant uniaxial perpendicular anisotropy with weakening film magnetization. - Highlights: ► Ultrathin Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} films were grown epitaxially on structure-matching substrates. ► Magnetic properties of Bi{sub 3}Fe{sub 5}O{sub 12} were studied down to the thickness of 2.5 nm. ► Reorientation of easy magnetization axis as a function of film thickness was observed.

  13. Direct observation of electrical properties of grain boundaries in sputter-deposited CdTe using scan-probe microwave reflectivity based capacitance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Mohit; Koirala, Prakash; MacLaren, Scott; Collins, Robert; Rockett, Angus

    2015-10-01

    Polycrystalline CdTe in 12% efficient solar cells has been studied using scanning microwave impedance microscopy (sMIM). The CdS/CdTe junctions were grown on transparent-conducting-oxide-coated soda lime glass using rf sputter deposition. sMIM based capacitance measurements were performed on the exposed surface of CdCl2 treated CdTe adjacent to thermal-evaporation-deposited Cu/Au back contacts. The sMIM instrument was operated at ˜3 GHz, and capacitance measurements were performed as a function of ac and dc voltage biases applied to the tip, with and without sample illumination. Although dc capacitance measurements are affected by sample topography, the differential capacitance measurement was shown to be topography independent. It was found that the grain boundaries exhibit a depleted carrier concentration as compared to the grain bulk. This depletion effect is enhanced under photo-generated carrier separation or under sufficiently large probe tip biases opposite to the majority carrier charge.

  14. Inferring electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave intensity from low altitude POES proton flux measurements: A detailed case study with conjugate Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Shi, Run; Ni, Binbin; Gu, Xudong; Zhang, Xianguo; Zuo, Pingbing; Fu, Song; Xiang, Zheng; Wang, Qi; Cao, Xing; Zou, Zhengyang

    2017-03-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play an important role in the magnetospheric particle dynamics and can lead to resonant pitch-angle scattering and ultimate precipitation of ring current protons. Commonly, the statistics of in situ EMIC wave measurements is adopted for quantitative investigation of wave-particle interaction processes, which however becomes questionable for detailed case studies especially during geomagnetic storms and substorms. Here we establish a novel technique to infer EMIC wave amplitudes from low-altitude proton measurements onboard the Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). The detailed procedure is elaborated regarding how to infer the EMIC wave intensity for one specific time point. We then test the technique with a case study comparing the inferred root-mean-square (RMS) EMIC wave amplitude with the conjugate Van Allen Probes EMFISIS wave measurements. Our results suggest that the developed technique can reasonably estimate EMIC wave intensities from low-altitude POES proton flux data, thereby providing a useful tool to construct a data-based, near-real-time, dynamic model of the global distribution of EMIC waves once the proton flux measurements from multiple POES satellites are available for any specific time period.

  15. Magnetic anisotropy of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} nanopowders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radelytskyi, I., E-mail: radel@ifpan.edu.pl [Institute of Physics, PAS, 02-668 Warsaw, Al. Lotników 32/46 (Poland); Dłużewski, P. [Institute of Physics, PAS, 02-668 Warsaw, Al. Lotników 32/46 (Poland); Dyakonov, V. [Institute of Physics, PAS, 02-668 Warsaw, Al. Lotników 32/46 (Poland); A.A. Galkin Donetsk Physico-Technical Institute, NASU, 83114 Donetsk, R. Luxembourg Street 72 (Ukraine); Aleshkevych, P.; Kowalski, W.; Jarocki, P.; Szymczak, H. [Institute of Physics, PAS, 02-668 Warsaw, Al. Lotników 32/46 (Poland)

    2013-06-15

    The magnetic anisotropy of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} nanopowders was measured as a function of temperature by the modified singular point detection technique. In this method singularities indicating the anisotropy field were determined analyzing ac susceptibility data. The observed relationship between temperature dependence of anisotropy constant and temperature dependence of magnetization was used to deduce the origin of magnetic anisotropy in the nanopowders. It was shown that magnetic anisotropy of La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}MnO{sub 3} nanopowder is determined by the two-ion (dipolar or pseudodipolar) and single-ion mechanisms. Highlights: ► TEM observations did not reveal core-shell particles. ► Magnetic anisotropy of nanoparticles was measured using a singular point detection technique. ► Magnetic measurement indicated on core-shell magnetic structure particles.

  16. Large Voltage-Induced Changes in the Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy of an MgO-Based Tunnel Junction with an Ultrathin Fe Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Takayuki; Kozioł-Rachwał, Anna; Skowroński, Witold; Zayets, Vadym; Shiota, Yoichi; Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-04-01

    We study the voltage control of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in an ultrathin Fe layer sandwiched between the Cr buffer and MgO tunneling barrier layers. A high-interface magnetic anisotropy energy of 2.1 mJ /m2 is achieved in the Cr/ultrathin Fe /MgO structure. A large voltage-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy change is observed under the negative-bias voltage applications for the case of the Fe layer thinner than 0.6 nm. The amplitude of the voltage-induced anisotropy energy change exhibits a strong Fe-thickness dependence and it reaches as high as 290 fJ /Vm . The observed high values of the surface anisotropy and voltage-induced anisotropy energy change demonstrate the feasibility of voltage-driven spintronic devices.

  17. Limits on the ion temperature anisotropy in the turbulent intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lima, R.; Yan, H.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxies is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields. This is in contrast to previous cosmological MHD simulations that are successful in explaining the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities that can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasi-linear theory to estimate the ion scattering rate resulting from the parallel firehose, mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instability thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model that bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvénic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  18. Spin structure factors of Heisenberg spin chain in the presence of anisotropy and magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezania, H.

    2017-02-01

    We have theoretically studied the spin structure factors of spin chain in the presence of longitudinal field and transverse anisotropy. The possible effects of easy axis magnetization are investigated in terms of anisotropy in the Heisenberg interactions. This anisotropy is considered for exchange coupling constants perpendicular to magnetic field direction. The original spin model hamiltonian is mapped to a bosonic model via a hard core bosonic transformation where an infinite hard core repulsion is imposed to constrain one boson occupation per site. Using Green's function approach, the energy spectrum of quasiparticle excitation has been obtained. The spectrum of the bosonic gas has been implemented in order to obtain two particle propagator which corresponds to spin structure factor of original Heisenberg chain model Hamiltonian. The results show the position of peak in the longitudinal structure factor at fixed value for anisotropy moves to higher frequency with magnetic field. Also the intensity of dynamical structure factor decreases with magnetic field. A small dependence of longitudinal dynamical spin structure factor on the anisotropy is observed for fixed value of magnetic field. Our results show longitudinal static structure factor is found to be monotonically increasing with magnetic field due to increase of spins aligning along magnetic field. Furthermore the dispersion behaviors of static longitudinal and transverse structure factors for different magnetic fields and anisotropy parameters are addressed.

  19. Magnetic Barkhausen Noise Measurements Using Tetrapole Probe Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNairnay, Paul

    A magnetic Barkhausen noise (MBN) testing system was developed for Defence Research and Development Canada (DRDC) to perform MBN measurements on the Royal Canadian Navy's Victoria class submarine hulls that can be correlated with material properties, including residual stress. The DRDC system was based on the design of a MBN system developed by Steven White at Queen's University, which was capable of performing rapid angular dependent measurements through the implementation of a flux controlled tetrapole probe. In tetrapole probe designs, the magnetic excitation field is rotated in the surface plane of the sample under the assumption of linear superposition of two orthogonal magnetic fields. During the course of this work, however, the validity of flux superposition in ferromagnetic materials, for the purpose of measuring MBN, was brought into question. Consequently, a study of MBN anisotropy using tetrapole probes was performed. Results indicate that MBN anisotropy measured under flux superposition does not simulate MBN anisotropy data obtained through manual rotation of a single dipole excitation field. It is inferred that MBN anisotropy data obtained with tetrapole probes is the result of the magnetic domain structure's response to an orthogonal magnetization condition and not necessarily to any bulk superposition magnetization in the sample. A qualitative model for the domain configuration under two orthogonal magnetic fields is proposed to describe the results. An empirically derived fitting equation, that describes tetrapole MBN anisotropy data, is presented. The equation describes results in terms of two largely independent orthogonal fields, and includes interaction terms arising due to competing orthogonally magnetized domain structures and interactions with the sample's magnetic easy axis. The equation is used to fit results obtained from a number of samples and tetrapole orientations and in each case correctly identifies the samples' magnetic easy axis.

  20. Antiparallel interface coupling evidenced by negative rotatable anisotropy in IrMn/NiFe bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schafer, D.; Grande, P. L.; Pereira, L. G.; Azevedo, G. M.; Harres, A.; Geshev, J. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, 91501-970 Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil); Sousa, M. A. de [Instituto de Física, UFG, Goiânia, 74001-970 Goiás (Brazil); Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, 22290-180 Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Pelegrini, F. [Instituto de Física, UFG, Goiânia, 74001-970 Goiás (Brazil)

    2015-06-07

    Negative rotatable anisotropy is estimated via ferromagnetic resonance measurements in as-made, annealed, and ion-irradiated IrMn{sub 3}/Ni{sub 81}Fe{sub 19} bilayers. Opposite to previous observations, inverse correlation between rotatable anisotropy and coercivity is observed. The exchange-bias field, determined from hysteresis loop measurements, is higher than that obtained from ferromagnetic resonance for all samples. The results are discussed in terms of majority antiparallel coupling and magnetic-field-induced transitions from antiparallel to parallel states of uncompensated spins at ferromagnet/antiferromagnet interface. We affirm that an observation of negative rotatable anisotropy evidences antiparallel coupling even in systems presenting conventional exchange bias.

  1. Anisotropy in Fracking: A Percolation Model for Observed Microseismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) using high pressures and a low viscosity fluid allow the extraction of large quantiles of oil and gas from very low permeability shale formations. The initial production of oil and gas at depth leads to high pressures and an extensive distribution of natural fractures which reduce the pressures. With time these fractures heal, sealing the remaining oil and gas in place. High volume fracking opens the healed fractures allowing the oil and gas to flow the horizontal productions wells. We model the injection process using invasion percolation. We utilize a 2D square lattice of bonds to model the sealed natural fractures. The bonds are assigned random strengths and the fluid, injected at a point, opens the weakest bond adjacent to the growing cluster of opened bonds. Our model exhibits burst dynamics in which the clusters extends rapidly into regions with weak bonds. We associate these bursts with the microseismic activity generated by fracking injections. A principal object of thi...

  2. Radial anisotropy ambient noise tomography of volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordret, Aurélien; Rivet, Diane; Shapiro, Nikolai; Jaxybulatov, Kairly; Landès, Matthieu; Koulakov, Ivan; Sens-Schönfelder, Christoph

    2016-04-01

    The use of ambient seismic noise allows us to perform surface-wave tomography of targets which could hardly be imaged by other means. The frequencies involved (~ 0.5 - 20 s), somewhere in between active seismic and regular teleseismic frequency band, make possible the high resolution imaging of intermediate-size targets like volcanic edifices. Moreover, the joint inversion of Rayleigh and Love waves dispersion curves extracted from noise correlations allows us to invert for crustal radial anisotropy. We present here the two first studies of radial anisotropy on volcanoes by showing results from Lake Toba Caldera, a super-volcano in Indonesia, and from Piton de la Fournaise volcano, a hot-spot effusive volcano on the Réunion Island (Indian Ocean). We will see how radial anisotropy can be used to infer the main fabric within a magmatic system and, consequently, its dominant type of intrusion.

  3. Cosmic-Ray Small-scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barquero, V.; Farber, R.; Xu, S.; Desiati, P.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-10-01

    Cosmic-ray anisotropy has been observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments over the past decade. However, no comprehensive or satisfactory explanation has been put forth to date. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays at Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium- and small-scale angular structure could be an effect of nondiffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation for the observed small-scale anisotropy observed at the TeV energy scale may be the effect of particle propagation in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-β compressible magnetohydrodynamic turbulence to study how the cosmic rays’ arrival direction distribution is perturbed when they stream along the local turbulent magnetic field. We utilize Liouville’s theorem for obtaining the anisotropy at Earth and provide the theoretical framework for the application of the theorem in the specific case of cosmic-ray arrival distribution. In this work, we discuss the effects on the anisotropy arising from propagation in this inhomogeneous and turbulent interstellar magnetic field.

  4. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trong-Kha Truong

    Full Text Available Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  5. Cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortical gray matter in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Trong-Kha; Guidon, Arnaud; Song, Allen W

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is typically used to study white matter fiber pathways, but may also be valuable to assess the microstructure of cortical gray matter. Although cortical diffusion anisotropy has previously been observed in vivo, its cortical depth dependence has mostly been examined in high-resolution ex vivo studies. This study thus aims to investigate the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo on a clinical 3 T scanner. Specifically, a novel multishot constant-density spiral DTI technique with inherent correction of motion-induced phase errors was used to achieve a high spatial resolution (0.625 × 0.625 × 3 mm) and high spatial fidelity with no scan time penalty. The results show: (i) a diffusion anisotropy in the cortical gray matter, with a primarily radial diffusion orientation, as observed in previous ex vivo and in vivo studies, and (ii) a cortical depth dependence of the fractional anisotropy, with consistently higher values in the middle cortical lamina than in the deep and superficial cortical laminae, as observed in previous ex vivo studies. These results, which are consistent across subjects, demonstrate the feasibility of this technique for investigating the cortical depth dependence of the diffusion anisotropy in the human cortex in vivo.

  6. Spitzer/IRS Observations of Seyfert 1.8 and 1.9 Galaxies: Probing the Dusty Torus at Intermediate Viewing Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, Steven; Crenshaw, Michael; Dietrich, Matthias; Elitzur, Moshe; Gull, Theodore; Teplitz, Harry; Turner, Jane

    2004-09-01

    According to the unified model for AGN, Seyfert 1.8 and 1.9 galaxies are viewed at inclinations between those of Seyfert 1s (face-on) and Seyfert 2s (edge-on) with respect to the source of obscuration, typically envisioned as a dusty torus. This view is supported by the weak broad emission-line components of the Balmer lines, with ratios that are consistent with significant (E(B-V} ~ 1 mag) reddening of the broad-line region. Mid-IR spectra are the only means with which to probe the circumnuclear gas in these intermediate Seyferts and constrain the physical structure of the torus, such as its size, scale height, and clumpiness. Seyfert 1.8s and 1.9s also tend to possess relatively weak high ionization narrow lines (e.g. [Fe~VII] 6087 A) compared to Seyfert 1s, suggesting that the dusty circumnuclear gas may also obscure the inner narrow line region. We request Spitzer IRS spectra of 12 Seyfert 1.8s and 1.9s in order to 1) determine the temperature of the dust, and hence its radial distance from the central engine, to test for a torus origin, 2) determine the scale height and clumpiness of the torus atmosphere via the silicate 10 feature and comparisons with clumpy torus models, and 3) penetrate the obscuring gas via mid-IR emission lines, such as [Ne~V] 14.3 microns and [O~IV] 25.9 microns, to reveal the hidden high-ionization inner narrow line region. We have selected targets with host galaxies that are close to face-on, to minimize contamination of the mid-IR spectra by dust in their galactic planes. Among the more than 60 Seyferts in the Spitzer/IRS reserved target catalog, there are only a handful of true Seyfert 1.8s and 1.9s, and all of these have inclined (b/a < 0.5 ) host galaxies.

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Anisotropy of ion temperature in a reversed-field-pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, K.; Hörling, P.; Fall, T.; Brzozowski, J. H.; Brunsell, P.; Hokin, S.; Tennfors, E.; Sallander, J.; Drake, J. R.; Inoue, N.; Morikawa, J.; Ogawa, Y.; Yoshida, Z.

    1997-03-01

    Anomalous heating of ions has been observed in the EXTRAP-T2 reversed-field-pinch (RFP) plasma. Ions are heated primarily in the parallel direction (with respect to the magnetic field), resulting in an appreciable anisotropy of the ion temperature. This observation suggests that the magnetohydrodynamic fluctuations are dissipated primarily by the ion viscosity.

  8. Shape-induced ultrahigh magnetic anisotropy and ferromagnetic resonance frequency of micropatterned thin Permalloy films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhuang, Y.; Vroubel, M.; Rejaei, B.; Burghartz, J.N.; Attenborough, K.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic anisotropy Hk>200 Oe was observed from bar-shaped Permalloy strips. The film was deposited on sputtered Cr seed layer by electroplating under ∼ 800 Oe external magnetic field. Tiny degradation of Hk was observed after 30 min postannealing at 400 °C in the absence of external magnetic field.

  9. Anisotropy of the microwave sky at 90 GHz results from Python II

    CERN Document Server

    Ruhl, J E; Platt, S R; Kovács, J; Novák, G S

    1995-01-01

    We report on additional observations of degree scale anisotropy at 90~GHz from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica. Observations during the first season with the Python instrument yielded a statistically significant sky signal; in this paper we report the confirmation of that signal with data taken in the second year, and on results from an interleaving set of fields.

  10. Anisotropy of the Microwave Sky at 90 GHz: Results from Python II

    OpenAIRE

    Ruhl, J. E.; Dragovan, M.; Platt, S. R.; Kovac, J.; Novak, G.

    1995-01-01

    We report on additional observations of degree scale anisotropy at 90~GHz from the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station in Antarctica. Observations during the first season with the Python instrument yielded a statistically significant sky signal; in this paper we report the confirmation of that signal with data taken in the second year, and on results from an interleaving set of fields.

  11. ANISOTROPY DETERMINATIONS IN EXCHANGE SPRING MAGNETS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LEWIS,L.H.; HARLAND,C.L.

    2002-08-18

    Ferromagnetic nanocomposites, or ''exchange spring'' magnets, possess a nanoscaled microstructure that allows intergrain magnetic exchange forces to couple the constituent grains and alter the system's effective magnetic anisotropies. While the effects of the anisotropy alterations are clearly seen in macroscopic magnetic measurement, it is extremely difficult to determine the detailed effects of the system's exchange coupling, such as the interphase exchange length, the inherent domain wall widths or the effective anisotropies of the system. Clarification of these materials parameters may be obtained from the ''micromagnetic'' phenomenological model, where the assumption of magnetic reversal initiating in the magnetically-soft regions of the exchange-spring maqet is explicitly included. This approach differs from that typically applied by other researchers and allows a quantitative estimate of the effective anisotropies of an exchange spring system. Hysteresis loops measured on well-characterized nanocomposite alloys based on the composition Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B + {alpha}-Fe at temperatures above the spin reorientation temperature were analyzed within the framework of the micromagnetic phenomenological model. Preliminary results indicate that the effective anisotropy constant in the material is intermediate to that of bulk {alpha}-Fe and bulk Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B and increases with decreasing temperature. These results strongly support the idea that magnetic reversal in nanocomposite systems initiates in the lower-anisotropy regions of the system, and that the soft-phase regions become exchange-hardened by virtue of their proximity to the magnetically-hard regions.

  12. Design of the detector to observe the energetic charged particles: a part of the solar X-ray spectrophotometer ChemiX onboard Interhelio-Probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, Oleksiy; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Siarkowski, Marek; Evgen Kurbatov, mgr..

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic particle radiation may damages payload's electronics, optics, and sensors during of long-term scientific space mission especially the interplanetary ones. That is why it's extremely important to prevent failures of digital electronics, CCDs, semiconductor detectors at the times of passing through regions of enhanced charged particle fluxes. Well developed models of the Earth's radiation belts allow to predict and to protect sensitive equipment against disastrous influence of radiation due to energetic particle contained in the Van Allen belts. In the contrary interplanetary probes flying far away from our planet undergoes passages through clouds of plasma and solar cosmic rays not predictable by present models. Especially these concerns missions planned for non-ecliptic orbits. The practical approach to protect sensitive modules may be to measure the in situ particle fluxes with high time resolution and generation of alarm flags, which will switch off sensitive units of particular scientific equipment. The ChemiX (Chemical composition in X-rays) instrument is being developed by the Solar Physics Division of Polish Space Research Centre for the Interhelio-Probe interplanetary mission. Charged particle bursts can badly affect the regular measurements of X-ray spectra of solar origin. In order to detect presence of these enhanced particle fluxes the Background Particle Monitor (BPM) was developed constituting now a vital part of ChemiX. The BPM measurements of particle fluxes will assist to determine level of X-ray spectra contamination. Simultaneously BPM will measure the energy spectra of ambient particles. We present overall structure, design, technical and a scientific characteristic of BPM, particle sorts, and energy ranges to be registered. We describe nearly autonomous modular structure of BPM consisting of detector head, analogue and digital electronics modules, and of module of secondary power supply [1-3]. Detector head consists of three

  13. Anisotropy of the Topopah Spring Member Tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, R.J. III; Boyd, P.J.; Haupt, R.W. [New England Research, Inc., White River Junction, VT (United States); Price, R.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1992-07-01

    Mechanical properties of the tuffaceous rocks within Yucca Mountain are needed for near and far-field modeling of the potential nuclear waste repository. If the mechanical properties are significantly anisotropic (i.e., direction-dependent), a more complex model is required. Relevant data from tuffs tested in earlier studies indicate that elastic and strength properties are anisotropic. This scoping study confirms the elastic anisotropy and concludes some tuffs are transversely isotropic. An approach for sampling and testing the rock to determine the magnitude of the anisotropy is proposed.

  14. Mobility anisotropy of two-dimensional semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Lang, Haifeng; Liu, Zhirong

    2016-01-01

    The carrier mobility of anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors under longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonon scattering was theoretically studied with the deformation potential theory. Based on Boltzmann equation with relaxation time approximation, an analytic formula of intrinsic anisotropic mobility was deduced, which shows that the influence of effective mass to the mobility anisotropy is larger than that of deformation potential constant and elastic modulus. Parameters were collected for various anisotropic 2D materials (black phosphorus, Hittorf's phosphorus, BC$_2$N, MXene, TiS$_3$, GeCH$_3$) to calculate their mobility anisotropy. It was revealed that the anisotropic ratio was overestimated in the past.

  15. Herschel/HIFI observations of interstellar OH+ and H2O+ towards W49N: a probe of diffuse clouds with a small molecular fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A; Sonnentrucker, P; Black, J H; Pearson, J; Yu, S; Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; De Luca, M; Herbst, E; Rimmer, P; Gerin, M; Bell, T A; Boulanger, F; Cernicharo, J; Coutens, A; Dartois, E; Kazmierczak, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Goldsmith, P F; Gry, C; Gupta, H; Hennebelle, P; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Ko\\los, R; Kre\\lowski, J; Mart\\in-Pintado, J; Menten, K M; Monje, R; Mookerjea, B; Perault, M; Persson, C; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Stutzki, J; Teyssier, D; Vastel, C; Cros, A; Klein, K; Lorenzani, A; Philipp, S; Samoska, L A; Shipman, R; Tielens, A G G M; Szczerba, R; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of absorption by interstellar hydroxyl cations and water cations, along the sight-line to the bright continuum source W49N. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument, in dual beam switch mode, to observe the 972 GHz N = 1 - 0 transition of OH+ and the 1115 GHz 1(11) - 0(00) transition of ortho-H2O+. The resultant spectra show absorption by ortho-H2O+, and strong absorption by OH+, in foreground material at velocities in the range 0 to 70 km/s with respect to the local standard of rest. The inferred OH+/H2O+ abundance ratio ranges from ~ 3 to ~ 15, implying that the observed OH+ arises in clouds of small molecular fraction, in the 2 - 8% range. This conclusion is confirmed by the distribution of OH+ and H2O+ in Doppler velocity space, which is similar to that of atomic hydrogen, as observed by means of 21 cm absorption measurements, and dissimilar from that typical of other molecular tracers. The observed OH+/H abundance ratio of a few E-8 suggests a cosmic ray ionization rate for atomic ...

  16. Reconstructing the Mid-Tertiary Southwestern North America Cordilleran Crust: Crustal Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, R. C.; Zandt, G.; McQuarrie, N.; Gilbert, H. J.; Hacker, B. R.

    2009-12-01

    The deployment of EarthScope USArray stations provides researchers with unprecedented quantities and coverage of publicly available seismic data that can be combined with other techniques to better understand the tectonic evolution of western North America. We utilize the receiver function method to map the crustal thickness and investigate the occurrence and orientation of lower crustal anisotropy for the southwestern U.S. Using the tectonic reconstruction of McQuarrie and Wernicke (2005), we then reconstruct the location and orientation of the anisotropy back to 36 Ma. We have completed the reconstruction for central and southern California, and found a dominant SW-NE oriented trend that we interpret as a fossilized fabric within underplated schists created from top-to-southwest sense of shear that existed along the length of coastal California during pre-transform, early-Tertiary subduction. Initial results from the Basin and Range show a generally consistent E-W anisotropy trend within the northern and central Basin and Range, orthogonal to modern faulting and mountain ranges. Within this area there is a correlation of generally stronger crustal anisotropy and thinner crust in the eastern Basin and Range. In the southern Basin and Range we observe more scatter in our anisotropy results, with a majority of stations exhibiting either a SW-NE or NNW-SSE orientation. Despite the variability in results, most anisotropy orientations appear to be orthogonal to nearby mountain ranges. These observations suggest that Tertiary extension in the Basin and Range is producing a lower crustal zone of anisotropy throughout the province. We are currently working to expand on these results by integrating elasticity tensors calculated from electron-backscatter diffraction measurements of samples of lower crustal rocks from the southwestern U.S.

  17. Follow-up observations at 16 and 33 GHz of extragalactic sources from WMAP 3-year data: I - Spectral properties

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    We present follow-up observations of 97 point sources from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 3-year data, contained within the New Extragalactic WMAP Point Source (NEWPS) catalogue between declinations of -4 and +60 degrees; the sources form a flux-density-limited sample complete to 1.1 Jy (approximately 5 sigma) at 33 GHz. Our observations were made at 16 GHz using the Arcminute Microkelvin Imager (AMI) and at 33 GHz with the Very Small Array (VSA). 94 of the sources have relia...

  18. Crystal preferred orientation of amphibole and implications for seismic anisotropy in the crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Haemyeong

    2016-04-01

    Strong seismic anisotropy is often observed in the middle to lower crust and it has been considered to be originated from the crystal preferred orientation (CPO) of anisotropic minerals such as amphibole. Amphibolite is one of the dominant rocks in the middle to lower crust. In this study, crystal preferred orientations of hornblende in amphibolites at Yeoncheon and Chuncheon areas in South Korea were determined by using the electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD)/SEM with HKL Channel 5 software. In Yeoncheon area, hornblende showed two types of CPOs. Type-I CPO is characterized as (100) poles of hornblende aligned subnormal to foliation and [001] axes aligned subparallel to lineation. Type-II CPO is characterized as (100) poles of hornblende aligned subnormal to foliation and (010) poles aligned subparallel to lineation (refer to Ko and Jung, 2015, Nature Communications). In Chuncheon area, three types of CPOs of hornblende were observed. In addition to the type-I and -II CPOs described above, type-III CPO of hornblende was observed in Chuncheon area and it is characterized as (100) poles of hornblende aligned subnormal to foliation and both [001] axes and (010) poles aligned as a girdle subparallel to foliation. Using the observed CPO and the single crystal elastic constant of hornblende, seismic anisotropy of hornblende was calculated. Seismic anisotropy of P-wave was strong in the range of 10.2 - 13.5 %. Seismic anisotropy of S-wave was also strong in the range of 6.9 - 11.2 %. These results show that hornblende deformed in nature can produce a strong CPO, resulting in a strong seismic anisotropy in the middle to lower crust. Taking into account of the CPO of plagioclase in the rock, seismic anisotropies of whole rock turned out to be maximum P-wave anisotropy (Vp) of 9.8% and maximum S-wave anisotropy (Vs) of 8.2%. Therefore, strong seismic anisotropy found in the middle to lower crust in nature can be attributed to the CPO of hornblende in amphibolite.

  19. Radial anisotropy beneath northeast Tibet, implications for lithosphere deformation at a restraining bend in the Kunlun fault and its vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lun; Li, Aibing; Murphy, Michael A.; Fu, Yuanyuan V.

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional shear wave velocity and radial anisotropy models of the crust and upper mantle beneath the NE Tibetan plateau are constructed from new measurements of Love wave dispersions (20-77s) and previously obtained Rayleigh wave dispersions (20-87s) using a two-plane-wave method. The mid-lower crust is characterized with positive anisotropy (VSH > VSV) with large strength beneath the Qinling and Qilian Mountains and small values beneath the Anyemaqen Mountain. The large positive anisotropy can be explained by horizontal alignment of anisotropic minerals in the mid-lower crust due to crustal flow. The mantle lithosphere above 90 km is largely isotropic while weak positive anisotropy appears beneath 90 km, which probably marks the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary (LAB). A low shear wave velocity anomaly and relatively negative radial anisotropy are imaged in the entire lithosphere beneath the restraining bend in the eastern Kunlun fault, consistent with a weak lithosphere experiencing vertical thickening under horizontal compression. The asthenosphere at the restraining bend is characterized by significant low velocity and positive radial anisotropy, reflecting that the asthenosphere here is probably hotter, has more melts, and deforms more easily than the surrounding region. We propose that the lithosphere at the restraining bend was vertically thickened and subsequently delaminated locally, and induced asthenosphere upwelling. This model explains the observations of velocity and anisotropy anomalies in the lithosphere and asthenosphere as well as geological observations of rapid rock uplift at the restraining bend of the Kunlun fault.

  20. Non-destructive label-free continuous monitoring of in vitro chondrogenesis via electrical conductivity and its anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Tong In; Kim, Changhwan; Karki, Bishal; Son, Youngsook; Lee, EunAh; Woo, Eung Je

    2015-02-01

    Non-destructive label-free continuous monitoring of in vitro tissue culture is an unmet demand in tissue engineering. Noting that different compositions of cartilage lead to different electrical tissue properties, we propose a new method to measure the electrical conductivity and its anisotropy during in vitro chondrogenesis. We used a conductivity tensor probe with 17 electrodes and a bio-impedance spectroscopy (BIS) device to measure the conductivity values and the anisotropy ratios at the bottom and top surfaces of the tissue samples during the culture period of 6 weeks. Clearly distinguishing glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), collagen, and also various mixtures of them, the measured conductivity value and the estimated tissue anisotropy provide diagnostic information of the depth-dependent tissue structure and compositions. Continuously monitoring the individual tissue during the entire chondrogenesis process without any adverse effect, the proposed method may significantly increase the productivity of cartilage tissue engineering.

  1. Steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy imaging under evanescent excitation for visualisation of FRET at the plasma membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Devauges

    Full Text Available We present a novel imaging system combining total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF microscopy with measurement of steady-state acceptor fluorescence anisotropy in order to perform live cell Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET imaging at the plasma membrane. We compare directly the imaging performance of fluorescence anisotropy resolved TIRF with epifluorescence illumination. The use of high numerical aperture objective for TIRF required correction for induced depolarization factors. This arrangement enabled visualisation of conformational changes of a Raichu-Cdc42 FRET biosensor by measurement of intramolecular FRET between eGFP and mRFP1. Higher activity of the probe was found at the cell plasma membrane compared to intracellularly. Imaging fluorescence anisotropy in TIRF allowed clear differentiation of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor from negative control mutants. Finally, inhibition of Cdc42 was imaged dynamically in live cells, where we show temporal changes of the activity of the Raichu-Cdc42 biosensor.

  2. Optical anisotropy of polyimide and polymethacrylate containing photocrosslinkable chalcone group in the side chain under irradiation of a linearly polarized UV light

    CERN Document Server

    Choi, D H

    2002-01-01

    Photocrosslinkable soluble polyimide and polymethacrylate compound were synthesized for studying the optically induced anisotropy of the thin films. Chalcone group was introduced into the side chain unit of two polymers. We observed a photodimerization behavior between the double bonds in the chalcone group and an optical anisotropy of these materials by irradiation of a linearly polarized UV light (LPL). Optical anisotropy of the thin film was also investigated by using polarized UV absorption spectroscopy.The dynamic property of optical anisotropy in photoreactive polyimide was compared to that in polymethacrylate containing chalcone group in the side chain.

  3. Probing viscoelastic surfaces with bimodal tapping-mode atomic force microscopy: Underlying physics and observables for a standard linear solid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solares, Santiago D

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents computational simulations of single-mode and bimodal atomic force microscopy (AFM) with particular focus on the viscoelastic interactions occurring during tip-sample impact. The surface is modeled by using a standard linear solid model, which is the simplest system that can reproduce creep compliance and stress relaxation, which are fundamental behaviors exhibited by viscoelastic surfaces. The relaxation of the surface in combination with the complexities of bimodal tip-sample impacts gives rise to unique dynamic behaviors that have important consequences with regards to the acquisition of quantitative relationships between the sample properties and the AFM observables. The physics of the tip-sample interactions and its effect on the observables are illustrated and discussed, and a brief research outlook on viscoelasticity measurement with intermittent-contact AFM is provided.

  4. Anisotropy indices and the effects on the hydric behaviour of natural stone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fort, Rafael; Alvarez de Buergo, Monica; Varas, Maria Jose; Gomez-Heras, Miguel

    2010-05-01

    anisotropy are those with the highest capillarity coefficient. It can also be observed that for each petrological variety, this capillarity coefficient is higher in the specimens classified as a high level anisotropy class. At the same time, when capillary water is absorbed along the direction perpendicular to the anisotropic planes, the absorption capacity diminishes, no matter the anisotropy level of the stone is. On the contrary, capillary coefficients are higher when measurements are performed in a parallel direction to that of the greatest anisotropy of the stone specimen, where absorption tends to be faster with higher coefficients according to the porosity size and its geometry. These increments are more significant in the stone varieties in which anisotropy is mainly due to fissuring or schistosity planes, or related to stromatolitic planes or oriented minerals accumulation. The arrangement and placing of rocks used as building materials with a significant anisotropy will highly condition the durability and lifetime of a considered element. For that reason, is essential to determine anisotropy indices to obtain the best and most adequate arrangement of stone elements in building works, minimizing water entry and thus, the material decay. Acknowledgements: to both MATERNAS (0505/MAT/0094) and GEOMATERIALES (2009-1629) research programmes, funded by the Regional Government of Madrid; to the CONSOLIDER-INGENIO programme (CSD2007-0058), funded by the Spanish Ministry of Education and Science; and to the Spanish Geological and Mining Institute (IGME) for the specimens preparation and hydric behaviour measurements.

  5. Probing the Interstellar Medium of z~1 Ultra-luminous Infrared Galaxies through Interferometric Observations of CO and Spitzer Mid-infrared Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Pope, Alexandra; Frayer, David; Armus, Lee; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Daddi, Emanuele; Desai, Vandana; Dickinson, Mark E; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared; Kirkpatrick, Allison

    2013-01-01

    We explore the relationship between gas, dust and star formation in a sample of 12 ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) at high redshift compared to a similar sample of local galaxies. We present new CO observations and/or Spitzer mid-IR spectroscopy for 6 70 micron selected galaxies at z~1 in order to quantify the properties of the molecular gas reservoir, the contribution of an active galactic nuclei (AGN) to the mid-IR luminosity and the star formation efficiency (SFE=LIR/L'CO). The mid-IR spectra show strong polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission and our spectral decomposition suggests that the AGN makes a minimal contribution (<25%) to the mid-IR luminosity. The 70 micron selected ULIRGs which we find to be spectroscopic close pairs, are observed to have high SFE, similar to local ULIRGs and high redshift submillimeter galaxies, consistent with enhanced IR luminosity due to an ongoing major merger. Combined with existing observations of local and high redshift ULIRGs, we further compare t...

  6. Herschel observations of Extra-Ordinary Sources: H2S as a Probe of Dense Gas and Possibly Hidden Luminosity Toward the Orion KL Hot Core

    CERN Document Server

    Crockett, N R; Neill, J L; Black, J H; Blake, G A; Kleshcheva, M

    2014-01-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H$_{2}$S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the HEXOS GT key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H$_{2}$$^{32}$S, H$_{2}$$^{34}$S, and H$_{2}$$^{33}$S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H$_{2}$S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T$_{\\rm rot}$=141$\\pm$12 K. This indicates H$_{2}$S is in LTE and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E$_{\\rm up}$>1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive an H$_{2}$$^{32}$S column density, N$_{\\rm ...

  7. Probing the gamma-ray emission from HESS J1834-087 using H.E.S.S. and Fermi LAT observations

    CERN Document Server

    :,; Aharonian, F; Benkhali, F Ait; Akhperjanian, A G; Angüner, E; Anton, G; Backes, M; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Bissaldi, E; Biteau, J; Böttcher, M; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Chadwick, P M; Chalme-Calvet, R; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Chrétien, M; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Cui, Y; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Edwards, T; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Giavitto, G; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Grondin, M -H; Grudzińska, M; Häffner, S; Hahn, J; Harris, J; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hervet, O; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Janiak, M; Jankowsky, F; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzyński, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Kieffer, M; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Kluźniak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Krakau, S; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemière, A; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Marx, R; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Méhault, J; Meintjes, P J; Menzler, U; Meyer, M; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Murach, T; Naumann, C L; de Naurois, M; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Oakes, L; Odaka, H; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Poon, H; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reichardt, I; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Rob, L; Romoli, C; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schüssler, F; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Spies, F; Stawarz, Ł; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Tavernet, J -P; Tavernier, T; Taylor, A M; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; van Soelen, B; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorster, M; Vuillaume, T; Wagner, S J; Wagner, P; Wagner, R M; Ward, M; Weidinger, M; Weitzel, Q; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Willmann, P; Wörnlein, A; Wouters, D; Yang, R; Zabalza, V; Zacharias, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S; Acero, F; Casandjian, J M; Cohen-Tanugi, J; Giordano, F; Guillemot, L; Lande, J; Pletsch, H; Uchiyama, Y

    2014-01-01

    Previous observations with HESS have revealed the existence of an extended very-high-energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) gamma-ray source, HESS J1834-087, coincident with the SNR W41. The origin of the gamma-ray emission has been further investigated with HESS and the Fermi-LAT. The gamma-ray data provided by 61h (HESS) and 4 yrs (Fermi LAT) of observations cover over 5 decades in energy (1.8GeV - 30TeV). The morphology and spectrum of the TeV and GeV sources have been studied and multi-wavelength data have been used to investigate the origin of the observed emission. The TeV source can be modeled with a sum of two components: one point-like and one significantly extended (sig_TeV = 0.17{\\deg}), both centered on SNR W41 and exhibiting spectra described by a power law of index 2.6. The GeV source detected with Fermi is extended (sig_GeV =0.15{\\deg}) and morphologically matches the VHE emission. Its spectrum can be described by a power-law with index 2.15 and joins smoothly the one of the whole TeV source. A break appears ...

  8. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S; Donati, F; Stepanow, S; Rusponi, S; Paul, W; Gangopadhyay, S; Rau, I G; Pacchioni, G E; Gragnaniello, L; Pivetta, M; Dreiser, J; Piamonteze, C; Lutz, C P; Macfarlane, R M; Jones, B A; Gambardella, P; Heinrich, A J; Brune, H

    2015-12-04

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0±0.3  meV/atom. This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment.

  9. Magnetic Anisotropy and Magnetization Switching in Ferromagnetic GaMnAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, W.; Daeubler, J.; Glunk, M.; Hummel, T.; Schoch, W.; Schwaiger, S.; Tabor, M.; Sauer, R.

    Characteristic features of diluted ferromagnetic semiconductors such as the anisotropic magnetoresistance or the spin polarization of charge carriers are intimately connected with a macroscopic magnetization. Since the orientation of the magnetization is controlled by magnetic anisotropy (MA), a detailed knowledge of this anisotropy is indispensable for the design of novel spintronic devices. In this article, angle-dependent magnetotransport is demonstrated to be an excellent tool for probing MA as an alternative to the standard ferromagnetic-resonance method. Moreover, its ability to trace the motion of the magnetization vector in a variable external magnetic field makes it ideally suitable for studying magnetization switching, a potential basic effect in future logical devices. The MA of a series of differently strained GaMnAs samples is analyzed by means of model calculations in a single-domain picture based on a series expansion of the resistivity tensor and a numerical minimization of the free enthalpy.

  10. Strain-activated structural anisotropy in BaFe2As2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiang; Harriger, Leland; Sefat, Athena; Birgeneau, R. J.; Wilson, Stephen D.

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution single crystal neutron diffraction measurements are presented probing the magnetostructural response to uniaxial pressure in the iron pnictide parent system BaFe2As2 . Scattering data reveal a strain-activated, anisotropic broadening of nuclear Bragg reflections, which increase upon cooling below the resolvable onset of global orthorhombicity. This anisotropy in lattice coherence continues to build until a lower temperature scale—the first-order onset of antiferromagnetism—is reached. Our data suggest that antiferromagnetism and strong magnetoelastic coupling drive the strain-activated lattice response in this material and that the development of anisotropic lattice correlation lengths under strain is a possible origin for the high temperature transport anisotropy in this compound.

  11. Origin of Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy and Large Orbital Moment in Fe Atoms on MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, S.; Donati, F.; Stepanow, S.; Rusponi, S.; Paul, W.; Gangopadhyay, S.; Rau, I. G.; Pacchioni, G. E.; Gragnaniello, L.; Pivetta, M.; Dreiser, J.; Piamonteze, C.; Lutz, C. P.; Macfarlane, R. M.; Jones, B. A.; Gambardella, P.; Heinrich, A. J.; Brune, H.

    2015-12-01

    We report on the magnetic properties of individual Fe atoms deposited on MgO(100) thin films probed by x-ray magnetic circular dichroism and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. We show that the Fe atoms have strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy with a zero-field splitting of 14.0 ±0.3 meV /atom . This is a factor of 10 larger than the interface anisotropy of epitaxial Fe layers on MgO and the largest value reported for Fe atoms adsorbed on surfaces. The interplay between the ligand field at the O adsorption sites and spin-orbit coupling is analyzed by density functional theory and multiplet calculations, providing a comprehensive model of the magnetic properties of Fe atoms in a low-symmetry bonding environment.

  12. Interpretation of the Global Anisotropy in the Radio Polarizations of Cosmologically Distant Sources

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pankaj Jain; S. Sarala

    2006-12-01

    We present a detailed statistical study of the observed anisotropy in radio polarizations from distant extragalactic objects. This anisotropy was earlier found by Birch (1982) and reconfirmed by Jain and Ralston (1999) in a larger data set. A very strong signal was seen after imposing the cut $|RM-\\overline{RM}| \\gt 6$ rad/m2, where RM is the rotation measure and $\\overline{RM}$ its mean value. In this paper, we show that there are several indications that this anisotropy cannot be attributed to bias in the data. We also find that a generalized statistic shows a very strong signal in the entire data without imposing the RM dependent cut. Finally we argue that an anisotropic background pseudoscalar field can explain the observations.

  13. MeV Ion Anisotropies in the Vicinity of Interplanetary Shocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, I. G.; Cane, H. V.; von Rosenvinge, T. T.

    2007-05-01

    The anticipated signatures of interplanetary shock acceleration to be found in energetic ion anisotropies in the vicinity of interplanetary shocks include near-isotropic particle distributions consistent with of diffusive shock acceleration, "pancake" distributions indicative of shock drift acceleration, and flow reversals suggestive of a particle acceleration region passing by the observing spacecraft. In practice, while clear examples of these phenomena exist, more typically, particle anisotropies near interplanetary shocks show considerable variation in time and space, both in individual events and from event to event. We investigate the properties of MeV/n ions in the vicinity of a number of interplanetary shocks associated with the largest energetic particle events of solar cycle 23, and previous cycles, including their intensity-time profiles, anisotropies, and relationship with local solar wind structures, using observations from the IMP 8, ISEE-3, Helios 1 and 3 spacecraft. The aim is to help to understand the role of shocks in major solar energetic particle events.

  14. The sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays in an expanding Local Interstellar Cloud

    CERN Document Server

    Mizoguchi, Y; Takita, M; Kota, J

    2009-01-01

    The sidereal anisotropy of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensity observed with the Tibet Air Shower (AS) experiment still awaits theoretical interpretation. The observed global feature of the anisotropy is well reproduced by a superposition of the bi-directional and uni-directional flows (BDF and UDF, respectively) of GCRs. If the orientation of the deduced BDF represents the orientation of the local interstellar magnetic field (LISMF), as indicated by best-fitting a model to the data, the UDF deviating from the BDF orientation implies a significant contribution from the streaming perpendicular to the LISMF. This perpendicular streaming is probably due to the drift anisotropy, because the contribution from the perpendicular diffusion is expected to be much smaller than the drift effect. The large amplitude deduced for the UDF indicates a large spatial gradient of the GCR density. We suggest that such a density gradient can be expected at the heliosphere sitting close to the boundary of the Local Interstellar Cl...

  15. Non Axi-symmetric Anisotropy of Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Turner, A J; Chapman, S C; Hnat, B; Mueller, W -C

    2011-01-01

    A key prediction of turbulence theories is frame-invariance, and in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence, axisymmetry of fluctuations with respect to the background magnetic field. Paradoxically the power in fluctuations in the turbulent solar wind are observed to be ordered with respect to the bulk macroscopic flow as well as the background magnetic field. Here, non- axisymmetry across the inertial and dissipation ranges is quantified using in-situ observations from Cluster. The observed inertial range non- axisymmetry is reproduced by a 'fly through' sampling of a Direct Numerical Simulation of MHD turbulence. Furthermore, 'fly through' sampling of a linear superposition of transverse waves with axisymmetric fluctuations generates the trend in non- axisymmetry with power spectral exponent. The observed non-axisymmetric anisotropy may thus simply arise as a sampling effect related to Taylor's hypothesis and is not related to the plasma dynamics itself.

  16. X-ray analysis of oxygen-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Pt/Co/AlO{sub x} trilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manchon, A. [SPINTEC, URA 2512 CEA/CNRS, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)], E-mail: aurelien.manchon@m4x.org; Pizzini, S.; Vogel, J.; Uhlir, V. [Institut Neel, CNRS/UJF, B.P. 166, 38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Lombard, L.; Ducruet, C.; Auffret, S.; Rodmacq, B.; Dieny, B. [SPINTEC, URA 2512 CEA/CNRS, CEA/Grenoble, 38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Hochstrasser, M. [Laboratory for Solid State Physics, ETH Zuerich, 8093 Zuerich (Switzerland); Panaccione, G. [Laboratory TASC, INFM-CNR, Area Science Park, S.S.14, Km 163.5, I-34012, Trieste (Italy)

    2008-07-15

    X-ray spectroscopy measurements have been performed on a series of Pt/Co/AlO{sub x} trilayers to investigate the role of Co oxidation in the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the Co/AlO{sub x} interface. It is observed that high temperature annealing modifies the magnetic properties of the Co layer, inducing an enhancement of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The microscopic structural properties are analyzed via X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, X-ray Magnetic Circular Dichroism and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy measurements. It is shown that annealing enhances the amount of interfacial oxide, which may be at the origin of a strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy.

  17. MAXIMA-1: A Measurement of the Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy on Angular Scales of 10' to 5 degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ade, P.; Balbi, A.; Bock, J.; Borrill, J.; Boscaleri, A.; de Bernardis, P.; Ferreira, P. G.; Hanany, S.; Hristov, V. V.; Jaffe, A. H.; Lange, A. E.; Lee, A. T.; Mauskopf, P. D.; Netterfield, C. B.; Oh, S.; Pascale, E.; Rabii, B.; Richards, P. L.; Smoot, G. F.; Stompor, R.; Winant,C. D.; Wu, J. H. P.

    2005-06-04

    We present a map and an angular power spectrum of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) from the first flight of MAXIMA. MAXIMA is a balloon-borne experiment with an array of 16 bolometric photometers operated at 100 mK. MAXIMA observed a 124 deg{sup 2} region of the sky with 10' resolution at frequencies of 150, 240 and 410 GHz. The data were calibrated using in-flight measurements of the CMB dipole anisotropy. A map of the CMB anisotropy was produced from three 150 and one 240 GHz photometer without need for foreground subtractions.

  18. Direct observation of the cyclic dimer in liquid acetic acid by probing the C=O vibration with ultrafast coherent Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütgens, Matthias; Friedriszik, Frank; Lochbrunner, Stefan

    2014-09-01

    We present a comparison of spontaneous Raman and ultrafast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectra of the C=O vibration of liquid acetic acid. The former technique cannot clearly reveal the number of contributions in the spectrum. However, the additional time and spectrally resolved CARS experiment supports strictly the existence of four modes, which proves the coexistence of more than one H-bonded configuration in liquid acetic acid. A comparably slowly dephasing mode which is obscured by a broad band in the linear Raman spectrum is assigned to the cyclic dimer and can be observed freed from all other contributions by ultrafast CARS.

  19. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: H{sub 2}S as a probe of dense gas and possibly hidden luminosity toward the Orion KL hot core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crockett, N. R.; Bergin, E. A.; Neill, J. L. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Black, J. H. [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Onsala (Sweden); Blake, G. A.; Kleshcheva, M. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, MS 150-21, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2014-02-01

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H{sub 2}S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H{sub 2} {sup 32}S, H{sub 2} {sup 34}S, and H{sub 2} {sup 33}S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H{sub 2}S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T {sub rot} = 141 ± 12 K. This indicates H{sub 2}S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E {sub up} ≳ 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N {sub tot}(H{sub 2} {sup 32}S) = 9.5 ± 1.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –2}, gas kinetic temperature, T {sub kin} = 120±{sub 10}{sup 13} K, and constrain the H{sub 2} volume density, n{sub H{sub 2}} ≳ 9 × 10 {sup 7} cm{sup –3}, for the H{sub 2}S emitting gas. These results point to an H{sub 2}S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H{sub 2}S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 ± 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H{sub 2}S of <4.9 × 10 {sup –3}.

  20. Plastic Anisotropy Prediction by Ultrasonic Texture Data

    OpenAIRE

    Serebryany, V. N.

    1996-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy parameters (R coefficient and height of ears of the drawn cup) have been calculated from ultrasonic orientation distribution function (ODF) coefficients on the basis of Taylor theory for low carbon steel and aluminium alloy sheets. The ODF coefficients were defined by Sayers method and using the iterative procedure on the basis of measurement of bulk longitudinal and shear wave time delays.

  1. Azimuthal anisotropy of jet quenching at LHC

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I P Lokhtin; S V Petrushanko; L I Sarycheva; A M Snigirev

    2003-05-01

    We analyze the azimuthal anisotropy of jet spectra due to energy loss of hard partons in quark–gluon plasma, created initially in nuclear overlap zone in collisions with non-zero impact parameter. The calculations are performed for semi-central Pb–Pb collisions at LHC energy.

  2. Magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Lindgård, Per-Anker;

    1970-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the energy of long- wavelength magnons in Tb-10%Ho has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The results agree with the `frozen-lattice' model, provided that the second-order magnetoelastic effect is taken into account. The planar anisotropy is almost...

  3. Anisotropy of a cubic ferromagnet at criticality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlis, A.; Sokolov, A. I.

    2016-10-01

    Critical fluctuations change the effective anisotropy of cubic ferromagnet near the Curie point. If the crystal undergoes phase transition into orthorhombic phase and the initial anisotropy is not too strong, reduced anisotropy of nonlinear susceptibility acquires at Tc the universal value δ4*=2/v* 3 (u*+v*) where u* and v* are coordinates of the cubic fixed point on the flow diagram of renormalization group equations. In the paper, the critical value of the reduced anisotropy is estimated within the pseudo-ɛ expansion approach. The six-loop pseudo-ɛ expansions for u*, v*, and δ4* are derived for the arbitrary spin dimensionality n . For cubic crystals (n =3 ) higher-order coefficients of the pseudo-ɛ expansions obtained turn out to be so small that use of simple Padé approximants yields reliable numerical results. Padé resummation of the pseudo-ɛ series for u*, v*, and δ4* leads to the estimate δ4*=0.079 ±0.006 , indicating that detection of the anisotropic critical behavior of cubic ferromagnets in physical and computer experiments is certainly possible.

  4. Anisotropy of Wood in the Microwave Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziherl, Sasa; Bajc, Jurij; Urankar, Bernarda; Cepic, Mojca

    2010-01-01

    Wood is transparent for microwaves and due to its anisotropic structure has anisotropic dielectric properties. A laboratory experiment that allows for the qualitative demonstration and quantitative measurements of linear dichroism and birefringence in the microwave region is presented. As the proposed experiments are based on the anisotropy (of…

  5. Effective anisotropy through traveltime and amplitude matching

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hui

    2014-08-05

    Introducing anisotropy to seismic wave propagation reveals more realistic physics of our Earth\\'s subsurface as compared to the isotropic assumption. However wavefield modeling, the engine of seismic inverse problems, in anisotropic media still suffers from computational burdens, in particular with complex anisotropy such as transversely isotropic (TI) and Orthorhombic anisotropy. We develop effective isotropic velocity and density models to package the effects of anisotropy such that the wave propagation behavior using these effective models approximate those of the original anisotropic model. We build these effective models through the high frequency asymptotic approximation based on the eikonal and transport equations. We match the geometrical behavior of the wave-fields, given by traveltimes, from the anisotropic and isotropic eikonal equations. This matching yields the effective isotropic velocity that approximates the kinematics of the anisotropic wavefield. Equivalently, we calculate the effective densities by equating the anisotropic and isotropic transport equations. The effective velocities and densities are then fed into the isotropic acoustic variable density wave equation to obtain cheaper anisotropic wavefields. We justify our approach by testing it on an elliptical anisotropic model. The numerical results demonstrate a good matching of both traveltime and amplitude between anisotropic and effective isotropic wavefields.

  6. Measuring the Alfvénic Nature of the Interstellar Medium: Velocity Anisotropy Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Leão, I. C.; de Medeiros, J. R.; Esquivel, A.

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) are strongly affected by turbulence, which shows increased anisotropy in the presence of a magnetic field. We expand upon the Esquivel & Lazarian method to estimate the Alfvén Mach number using the structure function anisotropy in velocity centroid data from Position-Position-Velocity maps. We utilize three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of fully developed turbulence, with a large range of sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers, to produce synthetic observations of velocity centroids with observational characteristics such as thermal broadening, cloud boundaries, noise, and radiative transfer effects of carbon monoxide. In addition, we investigate how the resulting anisotropy-Alfvén Mach number dependency found in Esquivel & Lazarian might change when taking the second moment of the Position-Position-Velocity cube or when using different expressions to calculate the velocity centroids. We find that the degree of anisotropy is related primarily to the magnetic field strength (i.e., Alfvén Mach number) and the line-of-sight orientation, with a secondary effect on sonic Mach number. If the line of sight is parallel to up to ≈45 deg off of the mean field direction, the velocity centroid anisotropy is not prominent enough to distinguish different Alfvénic regimes. The observed anisotropy is not strongly affected by including radiative transfer, although future studies should include additional tests for opacity effects. These results open up the possibility of studying the magnetic nature of the ISM using statistical methods in addition to existing observational techniques.

  7. Measuring the Alfvénic nature of the interstellar medium: Velocity anisotropy revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706-1582 (United States); Leão, I. C.; De Medeiros, J. R. [Departamento de Fsica Teórica e Experimental, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 (Brazil); Esquivel, A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Apartado Postal 70-543,04510 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-08-01

    The dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) are strongly affected by turbulence, which shows increased anisotropy in the presence of a magnetic field. We expand upon the Esquivel and Lazarian method to estimate the Alfvén Mach number using the structure function anisotropy in velocity centroid data from Position-Position-Velocity maps. We utilize three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations of fully developed turbulence, with a large range of sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers, to produce synthetic observations of velocity centroids with observational characteristics such as thermal broadening, cloud boundaries, noise, and radiative transfer effects of carbon monoxide. In addition, we investigate how the resulting anisotropy-Alfvén Mach number dependency found in Esquivel and Lazarian might change when taking the second moment of the Position-Position-Velocity cube or when using different expressions to calculate the velocity centroids. We find that the degree of anisotropy is related primarily to the magnetic field strength (i.e., Alfvén Mach number) and the line-of-sight orientation, with a secondary effect on sonic Mach number. If the line of sight is parallel to up to ≈45 deg off of the mean field direction, the velocity centroid anisotropy is not prominent enough to distinguish different Alfvénic regimes. The observed anisotropy is not strongly affected by including radiative transfer, although future studies should include additional tests for opacity effects. These results open up the possibility of studying the magnetic nature of the ISM using statistical methods in addition to existing observational techniques.

  8. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  9. Magnetization of superparamagnetics in the state of mechanical anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Ugulava, Archil; Chkhaidze, Simon; Kekutia, Shalva; Rostomashvili, Zurab

    2015-01-01

    The internal energy of magnetic anisotropy for some nanoparticles dominates over the thermal energy even at room temperature. Strong magnetic anisotropy of nanoparticles can significantly affect the process of magnetization of the magnetic fluid. This influence is substantial if the system of nanoparticles is in a state of mechanical anisotropy in which the anisotropy axes of the particles have the same direction. In this work, it is shown that the magnetization curve of the magnetic fluid in...

  10. Surface contribution to the anisotropy of magnetic nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Garanin, D. A.; Kachkachi, H.

    2002-01-01

    We calculate the contribution of the Neel surface anisotropy to the effective anisotropy of magnetic nanoparticles of spherical shape cut out of a simple cubic lattice. The effective anisotropy arises because deviations of atomic magnetizations from collinearity and thus the energy depends on the orientation of the global magnetization. The result is second order in the Neel surface anisotropy, scales with the particle volume and has cubic symmetry with preferred directions [+-1,+-1,+-1].

  11. 113Cd solid-state NMR for probing the coordination sphere in metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuttatheyil, Anusree Viswanath; Handke, Marcel; Bergmann, Jens; Lässig, Daniel; Lincke, Jörg; Haase, Jürgen; Bertmer, Marko; Krautscheid, Harald

    2015-01-12

    Spectroscopic techniques are a powerful tool for structure determination, especially if single-crystal material is unavailable. (113)Cd solid-state NMR is easy to measure and is a highly sensitive probe because the coordination number, the nature of coordinating groups, and the geometry around the metal ion is reflected by the isotropic chemical shift and the chemical-shift anisotropy. Here, a detailed investigation of a series of 27 cadmium coordination polymers by (113)Cd solid-state NMR is reported. The results obtained demonstrate that (113)Cd NMR is a very sensitive tool to characterize the cadmium environment, also in non-single-crystal materials. Furthermore, this method allows the observation of guest-induced phase transitions supporting understanding of the structural flexibility of coordination frameworks.

  12. The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Effect as Microwave Foreground and Probe of Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Holder, G P; Holder, Gilbert P.; Carlstrom, John E.

    1999-01-01

    The Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect from clusters of galaxies should yield a significant signal in cosmic microwave background(CMB) experiments at small angular scales ($\\ell \\ga 1000$). Experiments with sufficient frequency coverage should be able to remove much of this signal in order to recover the primary anisotropy. The SZ signal is interesting in its own right; the amplitude and angular dependence are sensitive to both cosmology and the evolution of the gas. Combining CMB measurements with planned non-targeted SZ surveys could isolate the cosmological effects, providing CMB experiments with a low-redshift test of cosmology as a consistency check. Improvements in the determination of the angular diameter distance as a function of redshift from SZ and X-ray observations of a large sample of clusters will also provide a probe of cosmology.

  13. Lamb wave dispersion and anisotropy profiling of composite plates via non-contact air-coupled and laser ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, M. S.; Yuan, F. G.

    2015-03-01

    Conventional ultrasound inspection has been a standard non-destructive testing method for providing an in-service evaluation and noninvasive means of probing the interior of a structure. In particular, measurement of the propagation characteristics of Lamb waves allows inspection of plates that are typical components in aerospace industry. A rapid, complete non-contact hybrid approach for excitation and detection of Lamb waves is presented and applied for non-destructive evaluation of composites. An air-coupled transducer (ACT) excites ultrasonic waves on the surface of a composite plate, generating different propagating Lamb wave modes and a laser Doppler vibrometer (LDV) is used to measure the out-of-plane velocity of the plate. This technology, based on direct waveform imaging, focuses on measuring dispersive curves for A0 mode in a composite laminate and its anisotropy. A two-dimensional fast Fourier transform (2D-FFT) is applied to out-of-plane velocity data captured experimentally using LDV to go from the time-spatial domain to frequency-wavenumber domain. The result is a 2D array of amplitudes at discrete frequencies and wavenumbers for A0 mode in a given propagation direction along the composite. The peak values of the curve are then used to construct frequency wavenumber and phase velocity dispersion curves, which are also obtained directly using Snell's law and the incident angle of the excited ultrasonic waves. A high resolution and strong correlation between numerical and experimental results are observed for dispersive curves with Snell's law method in comparison to 2D-FFT method. Dispersion curves as well as velocity curves for the composite plate along different directions of wave propagation are measured. The visual read-out of the dispersion curves at different propagation directions as well as the phase velocity curves provide profiling and measurements of the composite anisotropy. The results proved a high sensitivity of the air-coupled and laser

  14. Probing shock geometry via the charge to mass ratio dependence of heavy ion spectra from multiple spacecraft observations of the 2013 November 4 event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lulu; Li, Gang; Mason, Glenn M.; Cohen, Christina; Mewaldt, Richard; Desai, Mihir; Ebert, Rob; Al-Dayeh, Maher

    2016-12-01

    In large Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) events, ions can be accelerated at coronal mass ejection (CME)-driven shocks to very high energies. The spectra of heavy ions in many large SEP events show features such as roll-overs or spectral breaks. In some events when the spectra are plotted in terms of energy/nucleon, they can be shifted relative to each other to make the spectral breaks align. The amount of shift is charge to mass ratio (Q/A) dependent and varies from event to event. This can be understood if the spectra of heavy ions are organized by the diffusion coefficients (Cohen et al. 2005). In the work of Li et al. (2009), the Q/A dependence of the scaling is related to shock geometry when the CME-driven shock is close to the Sun. For events where multiple in-situ spacecraft observations exist, one may expect that different spacecraft are connected to different portions of the CME-driven shock that have different shock geometries, therefore yielding different Q/A dependence. In this work, we examine one SEP event which occurred on 2013 November 4. We study the Q/A dependence of the energy scaling for heavy ion spectra using helium, oxygen and iron ions. Observations from STEREO-A, STEREO-B and ACE are examined. We find that the scalings are different for different spacecraft. We suggest that this is because ACE, STEREO-A and STEREO-B are connected to different parts of the shock that have different shock geometries. Our analysis indicates that studying the Q/A scaling of in-situ particle spectra can serve as a powerful tool to remotely examine the shock geometry for large SEP events.

  15. USING COORDINATED OBSERVATIONS IN POLARIZED WHITE LIGHT AND FARADAY ROTATION TO PROBE THE SPATIAL POSITION AND MAGNETIC FIELD OF AN INTERPLANETARY SHEATH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Ming; Feng, Xueshang; Liu, Ying D. [State Key Laboratory of Space Weather, Center for Space Science and Applied Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Davies, Jackie A.; Harrison, Richard A. [Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory (RAL) Space, Harwell Oxford (United Kingdom); Owens, Mathew J.; Davis, Chris J., E-mail: mxiong@spacweather.ac.cn [Reading University, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) can be continuously tracked through a large portion of the inner heliosphere by direct imaging in visible and radio wavebands. White light (WL) signatures of solar wind transients, such as CMEs, result from Thomson scattering of sunlight by free electrons and therefore depend on both viewing geometry and electron density. The Faraday rotation (FR) of radio waves from extragalactic pulsars and quasars, which arises due to the presence of such solar wind features, depends on the line-of-sight magnetic field component B{sub ∥} and the electron density. To understand coordinated WL and FR observations of CMEs, we perform forward magnetohydrodynamic modeling of an Earth-directed shock and synthesize the signatures that would be remotely sensed at a number of widely distributed vantage points in the inner heliosphere. Removal of the background solar wind contribution reveals the shock-associated enhancements in WL and FR. While the efficiency of Thomson scattering depends on scattering angle, WL radiance I decreases with heliocentric distance r roughly according to the expression I∝r {sup –3}. The sheath region downstream of the Earth-directed shock is well viewed from the L4 and L5 Lagrangian points, demonstrating the benefits of these points in terms of space weather forecasting. The spatial position of the main scattering site r{sub sheath} and the mass of plasma at that position M{sub sheath} can be inferred from the polarization of the shock-associated enhancement in WL radiance. From the FR measurements, the local B{sub ∥sheath} at r{sub sheath} can then be estimated. Simultaneous observations in polarized WL and FR can not only be used to detect CMEs, but also to diagnose their plasma and magnetic field properties.

  16. Pn Anisotropy in Old Pacific Lithosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shintaku, N.; Forsyth, D. W.; Weeraratne, D. S.

    2012-12-01

    Pn is the high frequency, scattered P phase guided for great distances within old oceanic lithosphere, which is also known as Po. Two arrays of ocean bottom seismometers were deployed on old (~150-160Ma) seafloor in the northwestern Pacific south of Shatsky Rise for the PLATE experiment (Pacific Lithosphere Anisotropy and Thickness Experiment). More than 5 or 6 Pn phases per day are recorded on these ocean bottom seismometers generated by earthquakes in western Pacific subduction zones during one year of deployment; we used 512 Pn phases from earthquakes with locations reported in routine bulletins. Each array was deployed on a separate limb of a magnetic bight, formed at a ridge-ridge-ridge triple junction. The spreading rates on both limbs were ~ 70mm/yr, and the current plate motion direction in the hotspot coordinate frame is WNW. Our overall goal is to identify the pattern of fossil anisotropy in the old oceanic lithosphere, and dynamically generated anisotropy in underlying asthenosphere using both body waves and surface waves. Using high frequency waves (3-10 Hz), we look at variations of Pn velocities as a function of backazimuth. In the western array, where the spreading direction is parallel to the absolute plate motion direction, we find clear Pn anisotropy with velocities varying from ~8.5 km/s in the spreading direction to ~ 8.0 km/s perpendicular to the spreading direction. However, in the eastern array where the fossil spreading direction is perpendicular to the current plate motion, the velocity variations as a function of backazimuth are much less obvious. This may be due to heterogeneity of anisotropy in the oceanic lithosphere, with the fast direction changing from the fossil direction at shallow levels to the absolute direction at greater depth.

  17. Multi-scale characterization of topographic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, S. G.; Koons, P. O.; Osti, B.; Upton, P.; Tucker, G. E.

    2016-05-01

    We present the every-direction variogram analysis (EVA) method for quantifying orientation and scale dependence of topographic anisotropy to aid in differentiation of the fluvial and tectonic contributions to surface evolution. Using multi-directional variogram statistics to track the spatial persistence of elevation values across a landscape, we calculate anisotropy as a multiscale, direction-sensitive variance in elevation between two points on a surface. Tectonically derived topographic anisotropy is associated with the three-dimensional kinematic field, which contributes (1) differential surface displacement and (2) crustal weakening along fault structures, both of which amplify processes of surface erosion. Based on our analysis, tectonic displacements dominate the topographic field at the orogenic scale, while a combination of the local displacement and strength fields are well represented at the ridge and valley scale. Drainage network patterns tend to reflect the geometry of underlying active or inactive tectonic structures due to the rapid erosion of faults and differential uplift associated with fault motion. Regions that have uniform environmental conditions and have been largely devoid of tectonic strain, such as passive coastal margins, have predominantly isotropic topography with typically dendritic drainage network patterns. Isolated features, such as stratovolcanoes, are nearly isotropic at their peaks but exhibit a concentric pattern of anisotropy along their flanks. The methods we provide can be used to successfully infer the settings of past or present tectonic regimes, and can be particularly useful in predicting the location and orientation of structural features that would otherwise be impossible to elude interpretation in the field. Though we limit the scope of this paper to elevation, EVA can be used to quantify the anisotropy of any spatially variable property.

  18. In-plane magnetic anisotropy and temperature dependence of switching field in (Ga, Mn) as ferromagnetic semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamara, S; Terki, F; Dumas, R; Dehbaoui, M; Sadowski, J; Galéra, R M; Tran, Q-H; Charar, S

    2012-06-01

    We explore the magnetic anisotropy of GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor by Planar Hall Effect (PHE) measurements. Using low magnitude of applied magnetic field (i.e., when the magnitude H is smaller than both cubic Hc and uniaxial Hu anisotropy field), we have observed various shapes of applied magnetic field direction dependence of Planar Hall Resistance (PHR). In particular, in two regions of temperature. At T shape" signal and at T > Tc/2 the "zigzag-shape" signal of PHR. They reflect different magnetic anisotropy and provide information about magnetization reversal process in GaMnAs ferromagnetic semiconductor. The theoretical model calculation of PHR based on the free energy density reproduces well the experimental data. We report also the temperature dependence of anisotropy constants and magnetization orientations. The transition of easy axis from biaxial to uniaxiale axes has been observed and confirmed by SQUID measurements.

  19. What does anisotropy measure? Insights from increased and decreased anisotropy in selective fiber tracts in schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel A De Erausquin

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a common, severe and chronically disabling mental illness of unknown cause. Recent MRI studies have focused attention on white matter abnormalities in schizophrenia using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. Indices commonly derived from DTI include (a mean diffusivity, independent of direction, (b fractional anisotropy (FA or relative anisotropy (RA, (c axial diffusivity, and (d radial diffusivity. In cerebral white matter, contributions to these indices come from fiber arrangements, degree of myelination, and axonal integrity. Relatively pure deficits in myelin result in a modest increase in radial diffusivity, without affecting axial diffusivity and with preservation of anisotropy. Although schizophrenia is not characterized by gross abnormalities of white matter, it does involve a profound dysregulation of myelin-associated gene expression, reductions in oligodendrocyte numbers, and marked abnormalities in the ultrastructure of myelin sheaths. Since each oligodendrocyte myelinates as many as 40 axon segments, changes in the number of oligodendrocytes, and/or in the integrity of myelin sheaths, and/or axoglial contacts can have a profound impact on signal propagation and the integrity of neuronal circuits. Whereas a number of studies have revealed inconsistent decreases in anisotropy in schizophrenia, we and others have found increased fractional anisotropy in key subcortical tracts associated with the circuits underlying symptom generation in schizophrenia. We review data revealing increased anisotropy in dopaminergic tracts in the mesencephalon of schizophrenics and their unaffected relatives, and discuss the possible biological underpinnings and physiological significance of this finding.

  20. Extensive seismic anisotropy in the lower crust of Archean metamorphic terrain, South India, inferred from ambient noise tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ritima; Rai, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    We use Rayleigh and Love wave empirical Green's function (EGF) recovered from the cross correlation of seismic ambient noise to study the spatial distribution of radial anisotropy in the southern India crust. The corresponding dispersion curves in the period 2 to 32 s are measured from ambient noise data recorded at 57 sites, and the strength of anisotropy computed from the discrepancy between shear velocities obtained from Rayleigh (VSV) and Love (VSH) at various depths down to 40 km. In upper crust (up to a depth of 20 km) the region is characterized by anisotropy coefficients of - 2 to + 2% that could be explained due to a combination of fluid-filled open cracks and foliated metamorphic rocks. At deeper levels (beyond 20 km), except for the Archean metamorphic terrain, most part of south India has anisotropies of up to 5%. This may be due to rocks with varying degree of metamorphism. Beneath the Archean metamorphic terrain, the anisotropy is recorded up to 9% in the depth range of 20-40 km. This high anisotropy is unlikely to be the manifestation of any recent geodynamic process, considering that the region has low surface heat flow ( 30 mW/m2). We propose that the observed strong anisotropy in the metamorphic belt of southern India crust could best be explained as due to the presence of micaceous minerals or amphiboles in the deep crust that are formed possibly during the evolution of granulite terrain at 2.5 Ga.