WorldWideScience

Sample records for anisotropy probe observations

  1. Brute force reconstruction of the primordial fluctuation spectrum from five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primordial fluctuation spectrum is reconstructed from the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy. We divide the wave number space in the range of 1.23x10-3 Mpc-1 -2 Mpc-1 into about 50 bins, and derive probability distributions of fluctuation amplitudes on the respective scales using Monte Carlo simulations. Although the reconstructed spectrum is basically consistent with a power-law spectrum, we find a hint of fine structure at k≅0.002 Mpc-1 and 0.009 Mpc-1. The former is observed only in the temperature anisotropy, while the latter is both in the temperature and polarization anisotropies. The significance of these features are discussed, and it is shown that the deviation from a power-law spectrum at k≅0.009 Mpc-1 is at 2.8σ level.

  2. NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: FINAL MAPS AND RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground-reduced CMB maps are presented. We now implement an optimal C –1 weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained ΛCDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N eff = 3.84 ± 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is t 0 = 13.772 ± 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H 0 = 69.32 ± 0.80 km s–1 Mpc–1. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (ns = 0.9608 ± 0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (Ωk = -0.0027+0.0039-0.0038). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six-parameter ΛCDM model, based

  3. Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Final Maps and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L.; Jaorsik, N.; Hinshaw, G.; Odegard, N.; Smith, K. M.; Hill, R. S.; Gold, B.; Halpern, M; Komatsu, E.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Wollack, E.; Dunkley, J.; Kogut, A.; Limon,, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Tucker, G. S.; Wright, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail.We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground reduced are presented.We nowimplement an optimal C(exp -1)1 weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained Lambda-CDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N(sub eff) = 3.84 +/- 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is (sub 0) = 13.772 +/- 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H(sub 0) = 69.32 +/- 0.80 km/s/ Mpc. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (n(sub s) = 0.9608+/-0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (Omega = -0.0027+0.0039/-0.0038). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor of 68,000 for the standard six

  4. NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: FINAL MAPS AND RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bennett, C. L.; Larson, D.; Weiland, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Jarosik, N.; Page, L. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Hinshaw, G.; Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Odegard, N.; Hill, R. S. [ADNET Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Drive, Suite A100, Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Smith, K. M. [Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics, Waterloo, ON N2L 2Y5 (Canada); Gold, B. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Spergel, D. N. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Wollack, E.; Kogut, A. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Dunkley, J. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Tucker, G. S., E-mail: cbennett@jhu.edu [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope Street, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States); and others

    2013-10-01

    We present the final nine-year maps and basic results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mission. The full nine-year analysis of the time-ordered data provides updated characterizations and calibrations of the experiment. We also provide new nine-year full sky temperature maps that were processed to reduce the asymmetry of the effective beams. Temperature and polarization sky maps are examined to separate cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy from foreground emission, and both types of signals are analyzed in detail. We provide new point source catalogs as well as new diffuse and point source foreground masks. An updated template-removal process is used for cosmological analysis; new foreground fits are performed, and new foreground-reduced CMB maps are presented. We now implement an optimal C {sup –1} weighting to compute the temperature angular power spectrum. The WMAP mission has resulted in a highly constrained ΛCDM cosmological model with precise and accurate parameters in agreement with a host of other cosmological measurements. When WMAP data are combined with finer scale CMB, baryon acoustic oscillation, and Hubble constant measurements, we find that big bang nucleosynthesis is well supported and there is no compelling evidence for a non-standard number of neutrino species (N {sub eff} = 3.84 ± 0.40). The model fit also implies that the age of the universe is t {sub 0} = 13.772 ± 0.059 Gyr, and the fit Hubble constant is H {sub 0} = 69.32 ± 0.80 km s{sup –1} Mpc{sup –1}. Inflation is also supported: the fluctuations are adiabatic, with Gaussian random phases; the detection of a deviation of the scalar spectral index from unity, reported earlier by the WMAP team, now has high statistical significance (n{sub s} = 0.9608 ± 0.0080); and the universe is close to flat/Euclidean (Ω{sub k} = -0.0027{sup +0.0039}{sub -0.0038}). Overall, the WMAP mission has resulted in a reduction of the cosmological parameter volume by a factor

  5. SIGNIFICANT FOREGROUND UNRELATED NON-ACOUSTIC ANISOTROPY ON THE 1 DEGREE SCALE IN WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE 5-YEAR OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectral variation of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) as observed by WMAP was tested using foreground reduced WMAP5 data, by producing subtraction maps at the 1 deg. angular resolution between the two cosmological bands of V and W, for masked sky areas that avoid the Galactic disk. The resulting V - W map revealed a non-acoustic signal over and above the WMAP5 pixel noise, with two main properties. First, it possesses quadrupole power at the ∼1 μK level which may be attributed to foreground residuals. Second, it fluctuates also at all values of l> 2, especially on the 1 deg. scale (200 ∼< l ∼< 300). The behavior is random and symmetrical about zero temperature with an rms ∼7 μK, or 10% of the maximum CMB anisotropy, which would require a 'cosmic conspiracy' among the foreground components if it is a consequence of their existence. Both anomalies must be properly diagnosed and corrected if 'precision' cosmology is the claim. The second anomaly is, however, more interesting because it opens the question on whether the CMB anisotropy genuinely represents primordial density seeds.

  6. Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Data Processing, Sky Maps, and Basic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiland, J.L.; Hill, R.S.; Odegard, 3.; Larson, D.; Bennett, C.L.; Dunkley, J.; Jarosik, N.; Page, L.; Spergel, D.N.; Halpern, M.; Meyer, S.S.; Tucker, G.S.; Wright, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) is a Medium-Class Explorer (MIDEX) satellite aimed at elucidating cosmology through full-sky observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). The WMAP full-sky maps of the temperature and polarization anisotropy in five frequency bands provide our most accurate view to date of conditions in the early universe. The multi-frequency data facilitate the separation of the CMB signal from foreground emission arising both from our Galaxy and from extragalactic sources. The CMB angular power spectrum derived from these maps exhibits a highly coherent acoustic peak structure which makes it possible to extract a wealth of information about the composition and history of the universe. as well as the processes that seeded the fluctuations. WMAP data have played a key role in establishing ACDM as the new standard model of cosmology (Bennett et al. 2003: Spergel et al. 2003; Hinshaw et al. 2007: Spergel et al. 2007): a flat universe dominated by dark energy, supplemented by dark matter and atoms with density fluctuations seeded by a Gaussian, adiabatic, nearly scale invariant process. The basic properties of this universe are determined by five numbers: the density of matter, the density of atoms. the age of the universe (or equivalently, the Hubble constant today), the amplitude of the initial fluctuations, and their scale dependence. By accurately measuring the first few peaks in the angular power spectrum, WMAP data have enabled the following accomplishments: Showing the dark matter must be non-baryonic and interact only weakly with atoms and radiation. The WMAP measurement of the dark matter density puts important constraints on supersymmetric dark matter models and on the properties of other dark matter candidates. With five years of data and a better determination of our beam response, this measurement has been significantly improved. Precise determination of the density of atoms in the universe. The agreement between

  7. NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data, in conjunction with a number of additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter ΛCDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l cosmic microwave background anisotropy, the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, and the Hubble constant, the matter and energy densities, Ω b h 2, Ω c h 2, and ΩΛ, are each determined to a precision of ∼1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5σ level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional ΛCDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their ΛCDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are presented, for example: the fractional contribution of tensor modes is limited to r k = -0.0027+0.0039-0.0038; the summed mass of neutrinos is limited to Σm ν eff = 3.84 ± 0.40, when the full data are analyzed. The joint constraint on N eff and the primordial helium abundance, Y He, agrees with the prediction of standard big bang nucleosynthesis. We compare recent Planck measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with our seven-year measurements, and show their mutual agreement. Our analysis of the polarization pattern around temperature extrema is updated. This confirms a fundamental prediction of the standard cosmological model and provides a striking illustration of acoustic oscillations and adiabatic initial conditions in the early universe

  8. Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Cosmological Parameter Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, G.; Larson, D.; Komatsu, E.; Spergel, D. N.; Bennett, C. L.; Dunkley, J.; Nolta, M. R.; Halpern, M.; Hill, R. S.; Odegard, N.; Page, L.; Smith, K. L.; Weiland, J. L.; Gold, B.; Jarosik, N.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Tucker, G. S.; Wollack, E.; Wright, E. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data, in conjunction with a number of additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter Lambda-CDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l cosmic microwave background anisotropy, the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, and the Hubble constant, the matter and energy densities Omega(sub b)h(exp 2), Omega(sub c)h(exp 2)and Omega(sub Lambda), are each determined to a precision of approx. 1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5 sigma level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional Lambda-CDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their Lambda-CDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are presented, for example: the fractional contribution of tensor modes is limited to r sub kappa) = (0.0027 (sub +0.0039) (sup -0.0038;) the summed mass of neutrinos is limited to Sigma M(sub nu) sub eff) = 3.84 +/- 0+/-40, when the full data are analyzed. The joint constraint on N(sub eff) and the primordial helium abundance, Y(sub He), agrees with the prediction of standard big bang nucleosynthesis. We compare recent Planck measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with our seven-year measurements, and show their mutual agreement. Our analysis of the polarization pattern around temperature extrema is updated. This confirms a fundamental prediction of the standard cosmological model and provides a striking illustration of acoustic oscillations and adiabatic initial conditions in the early

  9. NINE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: COSMOLOGICAL PARAMETER RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinshaw, G.; Halpern, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Larson, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Weiland, J. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21218-2686 (United States); Komatsu, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild Str. 1, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Spergel, D. N. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8583 (Japan); Dunkley, J. [Oxford Astrophysics, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Nolta, M. R. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George St., University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada); Hill, R. S.; Odegard, N. [ADNET Systems, Inc., 7515 Mission Dr., Suite A100 Lanham, MD 20706 (United States); Page, L.; Jarosik, N. [Department of Physics, Jadwin Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-0708 (United States); Smith, K. M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544-1001 (United States); Gold, B. [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street S.E., Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Kogut, A.; Wollack, E. [Code 665, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Limon, M. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, 550 W. 120th St., Mail Code 5247, New York, NY 10027-6902 (United States); Meyer, S. S. [Departments of Astrophysics and Physics, KICP and EFI, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Tucker, G. S., E-mail: hinshaw@physics.ubc.ca [Department of Physics, Brown University, 182 Hope St., Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States); and others

    2013-10-01

    We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data, in conjunction with a number of additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter ΛCDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l cosmic microwave background anisotropy, the baryon acoustic oscillation scale, and the Hubble constant, the matter and energy densities, Ω {sub b} h {sup 2}, Ω {sub c} h {sup 2}, and Ω{sub Λ}, are each determined to a precision of ∼1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5σ level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional ΛCDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their ΛCDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are presented, for example: the fractional contribution of tensor modes is limited to r < 0.13 (95% CL); the spatial curvature parameter is limited to Ω{sub k} = -0.0027{sup +0.0039}{sub -0.0038}; the summed mass of neutrinos is limited to Σm {sub ν} < 0.44 eV (95% CL); and the number of relativistic species is found to lie within N {sub eff} = 3.84 ± 0.40, when the full data are analyzed. The joint constraint on N {sub eff} and the primordial helium abundance, Y {sub He}, agrees with the prediction of standard big bang nucleosynthesis. We compare recent Planck measurements of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect with our seven-year measurements, and show their mutual agreement. Our analysis of the polarization pattern around temperature extrema is updated. This confirms a fundamental prediction of the standard

  10. Amiba Observation of CMB Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Kin-Wang

    2003-03-01

    The Array for Microwave Background Anisotropies (AMiBA), a 13-element dual-channel 85-105 GHz interferometer array with full polarization capabilities, is being built to search for high redshift clusters of galaxies via the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect as well as to probe the polarization properties of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We discuss several important issues in the observation of the CMB anisotropies such as observing strategy, l space resolution and mosaicing, optimal estimation of the power spectra, and ground pickup removal.

  11. SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP ) OBSERVATIONS: SKY MAPS, SYSTEMATIC ERRORS, AND BASIC RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New full-sky temperature and polarization maps based on seven years of data from WMAP are presented. The new results are consistent with previous results, but have improved due to reduced noise from the additional integration time, improved knowledge of the instrument performance, and improved data analysis procedures. The improvements are described in detail. The seven-year data set is well fit by a minimal six-parameter flat ΛCDM model. The parameters for this model, using the WMAP data in conjunction with baryon acoustic oscillation data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and priors on H0 from Hubble Space Telescope observations, are Ωb h 2 = 0.02260 ± 0.00053, Ωc h 2 = 0.1123 ± 0.0035, ΩΛ = 0.728+0.015-0.016, ns = 0.963 ± 0.012, τ = 0.087 ± 0.014, and σ8 = 0.809 ± 0.024 (68% CL uncertainties). The temperature power spectrum signal-to-noise ratio per multipole is greater that unity for multipoles l ∼m h 2 = 0.1334+0.0056-0.0055, and the epoch of matter-radiation equality, zeq = 3196+134-133, using WMAP data alone. The new WMAP data, when combined with smaller angular scale microwave background anisotropy data, result in a 3σ detection of the abundance of primordial helium, YHe = 0.326 ± 0.075. When combined with additional external data sets, the WMAP data also yield better determinations of the total mass of neutrinos, ΣMν ≤ 0.58 eV(95%CL), and the effective number of neutrino species, Neff = 4.34+0.86-0.88. The power-law index of the primordial power spectrum is now determined to be ns = 0.963 ± 0.012, excluding the Harrison-Zel'dovich-Peebles spectrum by >3σ. These new WMAP measurements provide important tests of big bang cosmology.

  12. Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Observations: Data Processing, Sky Maps, and Basic Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, G.; Weiland, J. L.; Hill, R. S.; Odegard, N.; Larson, D.; Bennett, C. L.; Dunkley, J.; Gold, B.; Greason, M. R.; Jarosik, N.; Komatsu, E.; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Wollack, E.; Halpern, M.; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Tucker, G. S.; Wright, E. L.

    2010-01-01

    We present new full-sky temperature and polarization maps in five frequency bands from 23 to 94 GHz, based on data from the first five years of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky survey. The new maps are consistent with previous maps and are more sensitive. The five-year maps incorporate several improvements in data processing made possible by the additional years of data and by a more complete analysis of the instrument calibration and in-flight beam response. We present several new tests for systematic errors in the polarization data and conclude that W-band polarization data is not yet suitable for cosmological studies, but we suggest directions for further study. We do find that Ka-band data is suitable for use; in conjunction with the additional years of data, the addition of Ka band to the previously used Q- and V-band channels significantly reduces the uncertainty in the optical depth parameter, tau. Further scientific results from the five-year data analysis are presented in six companion papers and are summarized in Section 7 of this paper. With the five-year WMAP data, we detect no convincing deviations from the minimal six-parameter ACDM model: a flat universe dominated by a cosmological constant, with adiabatic and nearly scale-invariant Gaussian fluctuations. Using WMAP data combined with measurements of Type Ia supernovae and Baryon Acoustic Oscillations in the galaxy distribution, we find (68% CL uncertainties): OMEGA(sub b)h(sup 2) = 0.02267(sup +0.00058)(sub -0.00059), OMEGA(sub c)h(sup 2) = 0.1131 plus or minus 0.0034, OMEGA(sub logical and) = 0.726 plus or minus 0.015, ns = .960 plus or minus 0.013, tau = 0.84 plus or minus 0.016, and DELTA(sup 2)(sub R) = (22.445 plus or minus 0.096) x 10(exp -9) at k = 0.002 Mpc(exp -1). From these we derive sigma(sub 8) = 0.812 plus or minus 0.026, H(sub 0) = 70.5 plus or minus 1.3 kilometers per second Mpc(exp -1), OMEGA(sub b) = 0.0456 plus or minus 0.0015, OMEGA(sub c) = .228 plus or minus

  13. Nine-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Cosmological Parameter Results

    CERN Document Server

    Hinshaw, G; Komatsu, E; Spergel, D N; Bennett, C L; Dunkley, J; Nolta, M R; Halpern, M; Hill, R S; Odegard, N; Page, L; Smith, K M; Weiland, J L; Gold, B; Jarosik, N; Kogut, A; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2012-01-01

    We present cosmological parameter constraints based on the final nine-year WMAP data, in conjunction with additional cosmological data sets. The WMAP data alone, and in combination, continue to be remarkably well fit by a six-parameter LCDM model. When WMAP data are combined with measurements of the high-l CMB anisotropy, the BAO scale, and the Hubble constant, the densities, Omegabh2, Omegach2, and Omega_L, are each determined to a precision of ~1.5%. The amplitude of the primordial spectrum is measured to within 3%, and there is now evidence for a tilt in the primordial spectrum at the 5sigma level, confirming the first detection of tilt based on the five-year WMAP data. At the end of the WMAP mission, the nine-year data decrease the allowable volume of the six-dimensional LCDM parameter space by a factor of 68,000 relative to pre-WMAP measurements. We investigate a number of data combinations and show that their LCDM parameter fits are consistent. New limits on deviations from the six-parameter model are p...

  14. SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP ) OBSERVATIONS: ARE THERE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND ANOMALIES?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    statistical combination of the full-sky anisotropy fluctuations. It may be due, in part, to chance alignments between the primary and secondary anisotropy, but this only shifts the coincidence from within the last scattering surface to between it and the local matter density distribution. While this alignment appears to be remarkable, there was no model that predicted it, nor has there been a model that provides a compelling retrodiction. We examine claims of a hemispherical or dipole power asymmetry across the sky and find that the evidence for these claims is not statistically significant. We confirm the claim of a strong quadrupolar power asymmetry effect, but there is considerable evidence that the effect is not cosmological. The likely explanation is an insufficient handling of beam asymmetries. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for deviations from the ΛCDM model, which is generally an acceptable statistical fit to WMAP and other cosmological data

  15. Seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Are There Cosmic Microwave Background Anomalies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C. L.; Hill, R. S.; Hinshaw, G.; Larson, D.; Smith, K. M.; Dunkley, J.; Gold, B.; Halpern, M.; Jarosik, N.; Kogut, A.; Komatsu, E.; Limon, M.; Meyer, S. S.; Nolta, M. R.; Odegard, N.; Page, L.; Spergel, D. N.; Tucker, G. S.; Weiland, J. L.; Wollack, E.; Wright, E. L.

    2011-02-01

    statistical combination of the full-sky anisotropy fluctuations. It may be due, in part, to chance alignments between the primary and secondary anisotropy, but this only shifts the coincidence from within the last scattering surface to between it and the local matter density distribution. While this alignment appears to be remarkable, there was no model that predicted it, nor has there been a model that provides a compelling retrodiction. We examine claims of a hemispherical or dipole power asymmetry across the sky and find that the evidence for these claims is not statistically significant. We confirm the claim of a strong quadrupolar power asymmetry effect, but there is considerable evidence that the effect is not cosmological. The likely explanation is an insufficient handling of beam asymmetries. We conclude that there is no compelling evidence for deviations from the ΛCDM model, which is generally an acceptable statistical fit to WMAP and other cosmological data. WMAP is the result of a partnership between Princeton University and NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Scientific guidance is provided by the WMAP Science Team.

  16. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Planets and Celestial Calibration Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Wollack, E; Hinshaw, G; Greason, M R; Jarosik, N; Page, L; Bennett, C L; Dunkley, J; Gold, B; Halpern, M; Kogut, A; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    We present WMAP seven-year observations of bright sources which are often used as calibrators at microwave frequencies. Ten objects are studied in five frequency bands (23 - 94 GHz): the outer planets (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune) and five fixed celestial sources (Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, 3C274 and 3C58). The seven-year analysis of Jupiter provides temperatures which are within 1-sigma of the previously published WMAP five-year values, with slightly tighter constraints on variability with orbital phase, and limits (but no detections) on linear polarization. Scaling factors are provided which, when multiplied by the Wright Mars thermal model predictions at 350 micron, reproduce WMAP seasonally averaged observations of Mars within ~2%. An empirical model is described which fits brightness variations of Saturn due to geometrical effects and can be used to predict the WMAP observations to within 3%. Seven-year mean temperatures for Uranus and Neptune are also tabulated. Uncertainties in Uranus temperatu...

  17. SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP ) OBSERVATIONS: PLANETS AND CELESTIAL CALIBRATION SOURCES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present WMAP seven-year observations of bright sources which are often used as calibrators at microwave frequencies. Ten objects are studied in five frequency bands (23-94 GHz): the outer planets (Mars, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune) and five fixed celestial sources (Cas A, Tau A, Cyg A, 3C274, and 3C58). The seven-year analysis of Jupiter provides temperatures which are within 1σ of the previously published WMAP five-year values, with slightly tighter constraints on variability with orbital phase (0.2% ± 0.4%), and limits (but no detections) on linear polarization. Observed temperatures for both Mars and Saturn vary significantly with viewing geometry. Scaling factors are provided which, when multiplied by the Wright Mars thermal model predictions at 350 μm, reproduce WMAP seasonally averaged observations of Mars within ∼2%. An empirical model is described which fits brightness variations of Saturn due to geometrical effects and can be used to predict the WMAP observations to within 3%. Seven-year mean temperatures for Uranus and Neptune are also tabulated. Uncertainties in Uranus temperatures are 3%-4% in the 41, 61, and 94 GHz bands; the smallest uncertainty for Neptune is 8% for the 94 GHz band. Intriguingly, the spectrum of Uranus appears to show a dip at ∼30 GHz of unidentified origin, although the feature is not of high statistical significance. Flux densities for the five selected fixed celestial sources are derived from the seven-year WMAP sky maps and are tabulated for Stokes I, Q, and U, along with polarization fraction and position angle. Fractional uncertainties for the Stokes I fluxes are typically 1% to 3%. Source variability over the seven-year baseline is also estimated. Significant secular decrease is seen for Cas A and Tau A: our results are consistent with a frequency-independent decrease of about 0.53% per year for Cas A and 0.22% per year for Tau A. We present WMAP polarization data with uncertainties of a few percent for Tau

  18. Seven-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Galactic Foreground Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Gold, B; Weiland, J L; Hill, R S; Kogut, A; Bennett, C L; Hinshaw, G; Dunkley, J; Halpern, M; Jarosik, N; Komatsu, E; Larson, D; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Nolta, M R; Page, L; Smith, K M; Spergel, D N; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2010-01-01

    [Abridged] We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 microKelvin upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. We find no indication in the polarization data of an extra "haze" of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination (ILC) method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs with 62 newly detected sources. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, WMAP total intensity data show...

  19. SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP ) OBSERVATIONS: GALACTIC FOREGROUND EMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present updated estimates of Galactic foreground emission using seven years of WMAP data. Using the power spectrum of differences between multi-frequency template-cleaned maps, we find no evidence for foreground contamination outside of the updated (KQ85y7) foreground mask. We place a 15 μK upper bound on rms foreground contamination in the cleaned maps used for cosmological analysis. Further, the cleaning process requires only three power-law foregrounds outside of the mask. We find no evidence for polarized foregrounds beyond those from soft (steep-spectrum) synchrotron and thermal dust emission; in particular we find no indication in the polarization data of an extra 'haze' of hard synchrotron emission from energetic electrons near the Galactic center. We provide an updated map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) using the internal linear combination method, updated foreground masks, and updates to point source catalogs using two different techniques. With additional years of data, we now detect 471 point sources using a five-band technique and 417 sources using a three-band CMB-free technique. In total there are 62 newly detected point sources, a 12% increase over the five-year release. Also new are tests of the Markov chain Monte Carlo foreground fitting procedure against systematics in the time-stream data, and tests against the observed beam asymmetry. Within a few degrees of the Galactic plane, the behavior in total intensity of low-frequency foregrounds is complicated and not completely understood. WMAP data show a rapidly steepening spectrum from 20 to 40 GHz, which may be due to emission from spinning dust grains, steepening synchrotron, or other effects. Comparisons are made to a 1 deg 408 MHz map (Haslam et al.) and the 11 deg ARCADE 2 data (Singal et al.). We find that spinning dust or steepening synchrotron models fit the combination of WMAP and 408 MHz data equally well. ARCADE data appear inconsistent with the steepening synchrotron model

  20. Results from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, E.; Bennett, Charles L.; Komatsu, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) mapped the distribution of temperature and polarization over the entire sky in five microwave frequency bands. These full-sky maps were used to obtain measurements of temperature and polarization anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background with the unprecedented accuracy and precision. The analysis of two-point correlation functions of temperature and polarization data gives determinations of the fundamental cosmological parameters such as the age and composition of the universe, as well as the key parameters describing the physics of inflation, which is further constrained by three-point correlation functions. WMAP observations alone reduced the flat ? cold dark matter (Lambda Cold Dark Matter) cosmological model (six) parameter volume by a factor of > 68, 000 compared with pre-WMAP measurements. The WMAP observations (sometimes in combination with other astrophysical probes) convincingly show the existence of non-baryonic dark matter, the cosmic neutrino background, flatness of spatial geometry of the universe, a deviation from a scale-invariant spectrum of initial scalar fluctuations, and that the current universe is undergoing an accelerated expansion. The WMAP observations provide the strongest ever support for inflation; namely, the structures we see in the universe originate from quantum fluctuations generated during inflation.

  1. FIVE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP) OBSERVATIONS: BAYESIAN ESTIMATION OF COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIZATION MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a sampling method to estimate the polarized cosmic microwave background (CMB) signal from observed maps of the sky. We use a Metropolis-within-Gibbs algorithm to estimate the polarized CMB map, containing Q and U Stokes parameters at each pixel, and its covariance matrix. These can be used as inputs for cosmological analyses. The polarized sky signal is parameterized as the sum of three components: CMB, synchrotron emission, and thermal dust emission. The polarized Galactic components are modeled with spatially varying power-law spectral indices for the synchrotron, and a fixed power law for the dust, and their component maps are estimated as by-products. We apply the method to simulated low-resolution maps with pixels of side 7.2 deg, using diagonal and full noise realizations drawn from the WMAP noise matrices. The CMB maps are recovered with goodness of fit consistent with errors. Computing the likelihood of the E-mode power in the maps as a function of optical depth to reionization, τ, for fixed temperature anisotropy power, we recover τ = 0.091 ± 0.019 for a simulation with input τ = 0.1, and mean τ = 0.098 averaged over 10 simulations. A 'null' simulation with no polarized CMB signal has maximum likelihood consistent with τ = 0. The method is applied to the five-year WMAP data, using the K, Ka, Q, and V channels. We find τ = 0.090 ± 0.019, compared to τ = 0.086 ± 0.016 from the template-cleaned maps used in the primary WMAP analysis. The synchrotron spectral index, β, averaged over high signal-to-noise pixels with standard deviation σ(β) < 0.25, but excluding ∼6% of the sky masked in the Galactic plane, is -3.03 ± 0.04. This estimate does not vary significantly with Galactic latitude, although includes an informative prior.

  2. Surface anisotropy characterisation with meteosat observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzio, A.; Govaerts, Y. M.; Pinty, B.

    Surface albedo, or more precisely Directional Hemispherical Reflectance (DHR), is the integral the Bi-directional Reflectance Factor (BRF) of the surface over all angles of the upward hemisphere. The retrieval of the DHR trough space observations requires accounting for the scattering and absorption processes in the atmosphere as well as for the angular anisotropy of the surface, the two systems being radiatively coupled. The accuracy achieved in the albedo estimation depends thus on the density of the angular sampling and the reliability of the atmospheric correction. Pinty et al. demonstrated the possibility to derive reliable surface albedo from observations acquired by Meteosat, the European meteorological geostationary satellite. The purpose of this presentation is to analyse the accuracy of this new Meteosat Surface Albedo (MSA) product, including the effects due to instrument changes and associated calibration uncertainties. In particular, the consistency of the surface anisotropy characterisation is examined in detail. To this end, observations acquired by two adjacent geostationary spacecrafts, i.e., Meteosat-7 and Meteosat-5 have been processed with the MSA algorithm. These satellites are located respectively at 0 and 63 degrees East. Data acquired by these two instruments overlap over a large area encompassing most of Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. The consistency of the surface anisotropy retrieval is evaluated through a reconstruction of the Meteosat-5 (-7) observations with the Meteosat-7 (-5) surface anisotropy characterisation. No differences larger than the calibration uncertainties have been found, which indicates that the MSA algorithm accounts correctly for the surface anisotropy and instrument differences.

  3. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Attitude Estimation Filter Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Richard R.

    2005-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) spacecraft was launched in June of 2001. The sensor complement of WMAP consists of two Autonomous Star Trackers (ASTs), two Fine Sun Sensors (FSSs), and a gyro package which contains redundancy about one of the WMAP body axes. The onboard attitude estimation filter consists of an extended Kalman filter (EKF) solving for attitude and gyro bias errors which are then resolved into a spacecraft attitude quaternion and gyro bias. A pseudo-linear Kalman filter has been developed which directly estimates the spacecraft attitude quaternion, rate, and gyro bias. In this paper, the performance of the two filters is compared for the two major control modes of WMAP: inertial mode and observation mode.

  4. Anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino background after Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We search for the presence of cosmological neutrino background (CNB) anisotropies in recent Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) five-year data using their signature imprinted on modifications to the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy power spectrum. By parameterizing the neutrino background anisotropies with the speed viscosity parameter cvis, we find that the WMAP five-year data alone provide only a weak indication for CNB anisotropies with cvis2>0.06 at the 95% confidence level. When we combine CMB anisotropy data with measurements of galaxy clustering, the SN-Ia Hubble diagram, and other cosmological information, the detection increases to cvis2>0.16 at the same 95% confidence level. Future data from Planck, combined with a weak lensing survey such as the one expected with DUNE from space, will be able to measure the CNB anisotropy parameter at about 10% accuracy. We discuss the degeneracy between neutrino background anisotropies and other cosmological parameters such as the number of effective neutrinos species and the dark energy equation of state

  5. Interferometric Observation of Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    White, M; Dragovan, M; White, Martin; Carlstrom, John E.; Dragovan, Mark

    1999-01-01

    We present a formalism for analyzing interferometric observations of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy and polarization data. The formalism is based upon the ell-space expansion of the angular power spectrum favoured in recent years. Explicit discussions of maximum likelihood analysis, power spectrum reconstruction, parameter estimation, imaging and polarization are given. As an example, several calculations for the Degree Angular Scale Interferometer (DASI) and Cosmic Background Interferometer (CBI) experiments are presented.

  6. Anisotropies in the gravitational wave background as a probe of the cosmic string network

    CERN Document Server

    Kuroyanagi, Sachiko; Yonemaru, Naoyuki; Kumamoto, Hiroki

    2016-01-01

    Pulsar timing arrays are one of the powerful tools to test the existence of cosmic strings through searching for the gravitational wave background. The amplitude of the background connects to information on cosmic strings such as the tension and string network properties. In addition, one may be able to extract more information on properties of cosmic strings by measuring anisotropies in the gravitational wave (GW) background. In this paper, we provide estimates of the level of anisotropy expected in the GW background generated by cusps on cosmic strings. We find that the anisotropy level strongly depends on the initial loop size $\\alpha$, and thus we may be able to put constraint on $\\alpha$ by measuring the anisotropy of the GW background. We also find that certain regions of the parameter space can be probed by shifting the observation frequency of GWs.

  7. Probing pre-inflationary anisotropy with directional variations in the gravitational wave background

    CERN Document Server

    Furuya, Yu; Sendouda, Yuuiti

    2016-01-01

    We perform a detailed analysis on a primordial gravitational-wave background amplified during a Kasner-like pre-inflationary phase allowing for general triaxial anisotropies. It is found that the predicted angular distribution map of gravitational-wave intensity on large scales exhibits topologically distinctive patterns according to the degree of the pre-inflationary anisotropy, thereby serving as a potential probe for the pre-inflationary early universe with future all-sky observations of gravitational waves. We also derive an observational limit on the amplitude of such anisotropic gravitational waves from the B-mode polarisation of the cosmic microwave background.

  8. Performance of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe AST-201 Star Trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David K.; vanBezooijen, Roelof; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) was launched to create a full-sky map of the cosmic microwave background. MAP incorporates two modified Lockheed Martin AST-201 (Autonomous Star Tracker) star trackers. The AST-201 employs an eight element radiation hardened lens assembly which is used to focus an image on a charge coupled device (CCD). The CCD image is then processed by a star identification algorithm which outputs a three-axis attitude. A CCD-shift algorithm called Time Delayed Integration (TDI) was also included in each star tracker. In order to provide some radiation effect filtering during MAP's three to five phasing loop passes through the Van Allen radiation belts, a simple pixel filtering scheme was implemented, rather than using a more complex, but more robust windowing algorithm. The trackers also include a fiber optic data interface. This paper details the ground testing that was accomplished on the MAP trackers.

  9. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Calibration with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Using Cross-Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian, Amir; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John William; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, John R.; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Bertrand Doriese, W.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Moseley, Harvey; Wollack, Ed

    2011-01-01

    We present a new calibration method based on cross-correlations with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and apply it to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). ACT's observing strategy and mapmaking procedure allows an unbiased reconstruction of the modes in the maps over a wide range of multipoles. By directly matching the ACT maps to WMAP observations in the multipole range of 400 cosmological parameters estimated from the ACT power spectra. We also present a combined map based on ACT and WMAP data that has a high signal-to-noise ratio over a wide range of multipoles.

  10. Rotational Doppler Effect: A Probe for Molecular Orbitals Anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Quan; Travnikova, Oksana; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Kimberg, Victor; Sun, Yu-Ping; Thomas, T Darrah; Nicolas, Christophe; Patanen, Minna; Miron, Catalin

    2015-05-01

    The vibrationally resolved X-ray photoelectron spectra of X2Σg+(3σg−1) and B2Σu+(2σu−1) states of N2+ were recorded for different photon energies and orientations of the polarization vector. Clear dependencies of the spectral line widths on the X-ray polarization as well as on the symmetry of the final electronic states are observed. Contrary to the translational Doppler, the rotational Doppler broadening is sensitive to the photoelectron emission anisotropy. On the basis of theoretical modeling, we suggest that the different rotational Doppler broadenings observed for gerade and ungerade final states result from a Young's double-slit interference phenomenon. PMID:26263315

  11. Anisotropies of Gravitational-Wave Standard Sirens as a New Cosmological Probe without Redshift Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Nishizawa, Atsushi; Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-03-25

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary stars at cosmological distances are promising and powerful cosmological probes, referred to as the GW standard sirens. With future GW detectors, we will be able to precisely measure source luminosity distances out to a redshift z∼5. To extract cosmological information, previously proposed cosmological studies using the GW standard sirens rely on source redshift information obtained through an extensive electromagnetic follow-up campaign. However, the redshift identification is typically time consuming and rather challenging. Here, we propose a novel method for cosmology with the GW standard sirens free from the redshift measurements. Utilizing the anisotropies of the number density and luminosity distances of compact binaries originated from the large-scale structure, we show that, once GW observations will be well established in the future, (i) these anisotropies can be measured even at very high redshifts (z≥2), where the identification of the electromagnetic counterpart is difficult, (ii) the expected constraints on the primordial non-Gaussianity with the Einstein Telescope would be comparable to or even better than the other large-scale structure probes at the same epoch, and (iii) the cross-correlation with other cosmological observations is found to have high-statistical significance, providing additional cosmological information at very high redshifts. PMID:27058068

  12. Anisotropies of gravitational-wave standard sirens as a new cosmological probe without redshift information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishizawa, Atsushi; Namikawa, Toshiya; Taruya, Atsushi

    2016-03-01

    Gravitational waves (GWs) from compact binary stars at cosmological distances are promising and powerful cosmological probes, referred to as the GW standard sirens. With future GW detectors, we will be able to precisely measure source luminosity distances out to a redshift z 5. To extract cosmological information, previous studies using the GW standard sirens rely on source redshift information obtained through an extensive electromagnetic follow-up campaign. However, the redshift identification is typically time-consuming and rather challenging. Here we propose a novel method for cosmology with the GW standard sirens free from the redshift measurements. Utilizing the anisotropies of the number density and luminosity distances of compact binaries originated from the large-scale structure, we show that (i) this anisotropies can be measured even at very high-redshifts (z = 2), (ii) the expected constraints on the primordial non-Gaussianity with Einstein Telescope would be comparable to or even better than the other large-scale structure probes at the same epoch, (iii) the cross-correlation with other cosmological observations is found to have high-statistical significance. A.N. was supported by JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad No. 25-180.

  13. The Atacama Cosmology Telescope: Calibration with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe Using Cross-Correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajian, Amir; Acquaviva, Viviana; Ade, Peter A. R.; Aguirre, Paula; Amiri, Mandana; Appel, John William; Barrientos, L. Felipe; Battistelli, Elia S.; Bond, John R.; Brown, Ben; Burger, Bryce; Chervenak, Jay; Das, Sudeep; Devlin, Mark J.; Dicker, Simon R.; Bertrand Doriese, W.; Dunkley, Joanna; Dunner, Rolando; Essinger-Hileman, Thomas; Fisher, Ryan P.; Fowler, Joseph W.; Halpern, Mark; Hasselfield, Matthew; Moseley, Harvey; Wollack, Ed

    2011-01-01

    We present a new calibration method based on cross-correlations with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and apply it to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). ACT's observing strategy and mapmaking procedure allows an unbiased reconstruction of the modes in the maps over a wide range of multipoles. By directly matching the ACT maps to WMAP observations in the multipole range of 400 < I < 1000, we determine the absolute calibration with an uncertainty of 2% in temperature. The precise measurement of the calibration error directly impacts the uncertainties in the cosmological parameters estimated from the ACT power spectra. We also present a combined map based on ACT and WMAP data that has a high signal-to-noise ratio over a wide range of multipoles.

  14. THE ATACAMA COSMOLOGY TELESCOPE: CALIBRATION WITH THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE USING CROSS-CORRELATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new calibration method based on cross-correlations with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) and apply it to data from the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT). ACT's observing strategy and map-making procedure allows an unbiased reconstruction of the modes in the maps over a wide range of multipoles. By directly matching the ACT maps to WMAP observations in the multipole range of 400 < l < 1000, we determine the absolute calibration with an uncertainty of 2% in temperature. The precise measurement of the calibration error directly impacts the uncertainties in the cosmological parameters estimated from the ACT power spectra. We also present a combined map based on ACT and WMAP data that has a high signal-to-noise ratio over a wide range of multipoles.

  15. A SEARCH FOR CONCENTRIC CIRCLES IN THE 7 YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE TEMPERATURE SKY MAPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter, we search for concentric circles with low variance in cosmic microwave background sky maps. The detection of such circles would hint at new physics beyond the current cosmological concordance model, which states that the universe is isotropic and homogeneous, and filled with Gaussian fluctuations. We first describe a set of methods designed to detect such circles, based on matched filters and χ2 statistics, and then apply these methods to the best current publicly available data, the 7 year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) temperature sky maps. We compare the observations with an ensemble of 1000 Gaussian ΛCDM simulations. Based on these tests, we conclude that the WMAP sky maps are fully compatible with the Gaussian and isotropic hypothesis as measured by low-variance ring statistics.

  16. THE EFFECT OF ASYMMETRIC BEAMS IN THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE EXPERIMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We generate simulations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature field as observed by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) satellite, taking into account the detailed shape of the asymmetric beams and scanning strategy of the experiment, and use these to re-estimate the WMAP beam transfer functions. This method avoids the need of artificially symmetrizing the beams, as done in the baseline WMAP approach, and instead measures the total convolution effect by direct simulation. We find only small differences with respect to the nominal transfer functions, typically less than 1% everywhere, and less than 0.5% at l s = 0.964 ± 0.014, corresponding to a negative shift of -0.1σ compared to the previously released WMAP results. Our CMB sky simulations are made publicly available and can be used for general studies of asymmetric beam effects in the WMAP data.

  17. Anisotropy and probe-medium interactions in the microrheology of nematic fluids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordoba, Andres; Stieger, Tillmann; Mazza, Marco G.; Schoen, Martin; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical formalism is presented to analyze and interpret microrheology experiments in anisotropic fluids with nematic order. The predictions of that approach are examined in the context of a simple coarse-grained molecular model which is simulated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics calculations. The proposed formalism is used to study the effect of confinement, the type of anchoring at the probe-particle surface, and the strength of the nematic field on the rheological response functions obtained from probe-particle active microrheology. As expected, a stronger nematic field leads to increased anisotropy in the rheological response of the material. It is also found that the defect structures that arise around the probe particle, which are determined by the type of anchoring and the particle size, have a significant effect on the rheological response observed in microrheology simulations. Independent estimates of the bulk dynamic modulus of the model nematic fluid considered here are obtained from small-amplitude oscillatory shear simulations with Lees Edwards boundary conditions. The results of simulations indicate that the dynamic modulus extracted from particle-probe microrheology is different from that obtained in the absence of the particle, but that the differences decrease as the size of the defect also decreases. Importantly, the results of the nematic microrheology theory proposed here are in much closer agreement with simulations than those from earlier formalisms conceived for isotropic fluids. As such, it is anticipated that the theoretical framework advanced in this study could provide a useful tool for interpretation of microrheology experiments in systems such as liquid crystals and confined macromolecular solutions or gels.

  18. Constraints on CPT violation from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three year polarization data: A wavelet analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We perform a wavelet analysis of the temperature and polarization maps of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) delivered by the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe experiment in search for a parity-violating signal. Such a signal could be seeded by new physics beyond the standard model, for which the Lorentz and CPT symmetries may not hold. Under these circumstances, the linear polarization direction of a CMB photon may get rotated during its cosmological journey, a phenomenon also called cosmological birefringence. Recently, Feng et al. have analyzed a subset of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and BOOMERanG 2003 angular power spectra of the CMB, deriving a constraint that mildly favors a nonzero rotation. By using wavelet transforms we set a tighter limit on the CMB photon rotation angle Δα=-2.5±3.0 (Δα=-2.5±6.0) at the one (two) σ level, consistent with a null detection

  19. First Intrinsic Anisotropy Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Padin, S; Mason, B S; Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Shepherd, M C; Sievers, J L; Udomprasert, P S; Holzapfel, W L; Myers, S T; Carlstrom, J E; Leitch, E M; Joy, M; Bronfman, L; May, J

    2001-01-01

    We present the first results of observations of the intrinsic anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation with the Cosmic Background Imager from a site at 5080 m altitude in northern Chile. Our observations show a sharp decrease in C_l in the range l = 400 - 1500. Such a decrease in power at high l is one of the fundamental predictions of the standard cosmological model, and these are the first observations which cover a broad enough l-range to show this decrease in a single experiment. The power, C_l, at l ~ 600 is higher than measured by Boomerang and Maxima, with the differences being significant at the 2.7sigma and 1.9sigma levels, respectively. The C_l we have measured enable us to place limits on the density parameter, Omega(tot) = 0.7 (90% confidence).

  20. Seismic Ripple Anisotropy on the photosphere: observed, simulated, explained

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donea, Alina

    2016-05-01

    Based on observations of seismic ripples generated by solar flares, we performed simulations of different configurations/ morphologies of acoustic structures at the "epicenter" of the sunquake, The production of seismic waves is caused by spatially confined, high impacts into the solar photosphere, inflicted during the impulsive phase of solar flares.An interesting characteristic feature of the seismic response of most sunquakes is a considerable anisotropy in acoustic amplitude of the ripples from the vantage of the source, the acoustic emission is much stronger in some directions than others.We have produced a catalogue of simulations showing varying degrees of wave front anisotropy. Due to the large number of parameters that have potential for variation within the code, an innumerable number of cases have the capacity to be constructed. The governing limits of variation for each parameter will therefore be restricted to those of real life physical situations that have either been observed or strongly proposed. I will present the most conclusive cases of our work, which elucidate some of the unsolved clues about sunquakes and their ripples.

  1. Inflation model constraints from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe three-year data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinney, William H.; /SUNY, Buffalo; Kolb, Edward W.; /Fermilab /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Melchiorri, Alessandro; /Rome U. /INFN, Rome; Riotto, Antonio; /CERN

    2006-05-01

    We extract parameters relevant for distinguishing among single-field inflation models from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) three-year data set, and also from WMAP in combination with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) galaxy power spectrum. Our analysis leads to the following conclusions: (1) the Harrison-Zel'dovich model is consistent with both data sets at a 95% confidence level; (2) there is no strong evidence for running of the spectral index of scalar perturbations; (3) Potentials of the form V {infinity} {phi}{sup P} are consistent with the data for p = 2, and are marginally consistent with the WMAP data considered alone for p = 4, but ruled out by WMAP combined with SDSS. We perform a ''Monte Carlo reconstruction'' of the inflationary potential, and find that: (1) there is no evidence to support an observational lower bound on the amplitude of gravitational waves produced during inflation; (2) models such as simple hybrid potentials which evolve toward an inflationary late-time attractor in the space of flow parameters are strongly disfavored by the data, (3) models selected with even a weak slow-roll prior strongly cluster in the region favoring a ''red'' power spectrum and no running of the spectral index, consistent with simple single-field inflation models.

  2. The Anisotropic Line Correlation Function as a Probe of Anisotropies in Galaxy Surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Eggemeier, Alexander; Smith, Robert E; Niemeyer, Jens

    2015-01-01

    We propose an anisotropic generalisation of the line correlation function (ALCF) to separate and quantify phase information in the large-scale structure of galaxies. The line correlation function probes the strictly non-linear regime of structure formation and since phase information drops out of the power spectrum, the line correlation function provides a complementary tool to commonly used techniques based on two-point statistics. Furthermore, it is independent of linear bias as well as the Gaussian variance on the modulus of the density field and thus may also prove to be advantageous compared to the bispectrum or similar higher-order statistics for certain cases. For future applications it is vital, though, to be able to account for observational effects that cause anisotropies in the distribution of galaxies. Based on a number of numerical studies, we find that our ALCF is well suited to accomplish this task and we demonstrate how the Alcock-Paczynski effect and kinematical redshift-space distortions can...

  3. Observational probes of cosmic acceleration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, David H.; Mortonson, Michael J.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Hirata, Christopher; Riess, Adam G.; Rozo, Eduardo

    2013-09-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of “dark energy” with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein’s theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious efforts to understand its origin, with experiments that aim to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and the abundance of galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit “Stage IV” dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock-Paczynski effect, and direct measurements of the Hubble constant H0. We present extensive forecasts for constraints on the dark energy equation of state and parameterized deviations from General Relativity, achievable with Stage III and Stage IV experimental programs that incorporate supernovae, BAO, weak lensing, and cosmic microwave background data. We also show the level of precision required for clusters or other methods to provide constraints competitive with those of these fiducial programs. We emphasize the value of a balanced program that employs several of the most powerful methods in combination, both to cross-check systematic uncertainties and to take advantage of complementary information. Surveys to probe cosmic acceleration produce data sets that support a wide range of scientific investigations, and they continue the longstanding astronomical tradition of mapping the universe in ever greater detail over ever

  4. Observational probes of cosmic acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of “dark energy” with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein’s theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious efforts to understand its origin, with experiments that aim to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and the abundance of galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit “Stage IV” dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock–Paczynski effect, and direct measurements of the Hubble constant H0. We present extensive forecasts for constraints on the dark energy equation of state and parameterized deviations from General Relativity, achievable with Stage III and Stage IV experimental programs that incorporate supernovae, BAO, weak lensing, and cosmic microwave background data. We also show the level of precision required for clusters or other methods to provide constraints competitive with those of these fiducial programs. We emphasize the value of a balanced program that employs several of the most powerful methods in combination, both to cross-check systematic uncertainties and to take advantage of complementary information. Surveys to probe cosmic acceleration produce data sets that support a wide range of scientific investigations, and they continue the longstanding astronomical tradition of mapping the universe in ever greater detail over ever

  5. Direct probe of anisotropy in atom-molecule collisions via quantum scattering resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Klein, Ayelet; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Żuchowski, Piotr S; Pawlak, Mariusz; Janssen, Liesbeth M C; Moiseyev, Nimrod; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T; van der Avoird, Ad; Koch, Christiane P; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropy is a fundamental property of particle interactions. It occupies a central role in cold and ultra-cold molecular processes, where long range forces have been found to significantly depend on orientation in ultra-cold polar molecule collisions. Recent experiments have demonstrated the emergence of quantum phenomena such as scattering resonances in the cold collisions regime due to quantization of the intermolecular degrees of freedom. Although these states have been shown to be sensitive to interaction details, the effect of anisotropy on quantum resonances has eluded experimental observation so far. Here, we directly measure the anisotropy in atom-molecule interactions via quantum resonances by changing the quantum state of the internal molecular rotor. We observe that a quantum scattering resonance at a collision energy of $k_B$ x 270 mK appears in the Penning ionization of molecular hydrogen with metastable helium only if the molecule is rotationally excited. We use state of the art ab initio and ...

  6. ANOMALOUS PARITY ASYMMETRY OF THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE POWER SPECTRUM DATA AT LOW MULTIPOLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated non-Gaussianity of our early universe by comparing the parity asymmetry of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) power spectrum with simulations. We find that odd-parity preference of the WMAP data (2 ≤ l ≤ 18) is anomalous at 4-in-1000 level. We find it likely that low quadrupole power is part of this parity asymmetry rather than an isolated anomaly. Further investigation is required to find out whether the origin of this anomaly is a cosmological or a systematic effect. The data from Planck Surveyor, which has systematics distinct from WMAP, will help us to resolve the origin of the anomalous odd-parity preference.

  7. Anisotropy in Fracking: A Percolation Model for Observed Microseismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, J. Quinn; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2015-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (fracking), using high pressures and a low viscosity fluid, allow the extraction of large quantiles of oil and gas from very low permeability shale formations. The initial production of oil and gas at depth leads to high pressures and an extensive distribution of natural fractures which reduce the pressures. With time these fractures heal, sealing the remaining oil and gas in place. High volume fracking opens the healed fractures allowing the oil and gas to flow to horizontal production wells. We model the injection process using invasion percolation. We use a 2D square lattice of bonds to model the sealed natural fractures. The bonds are assigned random strengths and the fluid, injected at a point, opens the weakest bond adjacent to the growing cluster of opened bonds. Our model exhibits burst dynamics in which the clusters extend rapidly into regions with weak bonds. We associate these bursts with the microseismic activity generated by fracking injections. A principal object of this paper is to study the role of anisotropic stress distributions. Bonds in the y-direction are assigned higher random strengths than bonds in the x-direction. We illustrate the spatial distribution of clusters and the spatial distribution of bursts (small earthquakes) for several degrees of anisotropy. The results are compared with observed distributions of microseismicity in a fracking injection. Both our bursts and the observed microseismicity satisfy Gutenberg-Richter frequency-size statistics.

  8. On the Observation of the Cosmic Ray Anisotropy below 10$^{15}$ eV

    CERN Document Server

    Di Sciascio, G

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays is complementary to the study of their energy spectrum and chemical composition to understand their origin and propagation. It is also a tool to probe the structure of the magnetic fields through which cosmic rays travel. As cosmic rays are mostly charged nuclei, their trajectories are deflected by the action of galactic magnetic field they propagate through before reaching the Earth atmosphere, so that their detection carries directional information only up to distances as large as their gyro-radius. If cosmic rays below $10^{15}{\\rm\\,eV}$ are considered and the local galactic magnetic field ($\\sim3{\\rm\\,\\mu G}$) is accounted for, gyro-radii are so short that isotropy is expected. At most, a weak di-polar distribution may exist, reflecting the contribution of the closest CR sources. However, a number of experiments observed an energy-dependent \\emph{"large scale"} anisotropy in the sidereal time frame with an amplitude of about 10$^{-4...

  9. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Guidance, Navigation, and Control Hardware Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David K.; Davis, Gary T.; O'Donnell, James R., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The on-orbit success of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Guidance, Navigation, and Control System can partially be attributed to the performance of a hardware suite chosen to meet the complex attitude determination and control requirements of the mission. To meet these requirements, a diverse set of components was used. The set included two Lockheed Martin AST-201 star trackers, two Kearfott Two-Axis Rate Assemblies mounted to provide X, Y and redundant Z-axis rates, two Adcole Digital Sun Sensor heads sharing one set of electronics, twelve Adcole Coarse Sun Sensor eyes, three Ithaco E-sized Reaction Wheel Assemblies, a Propulsion Subsystem that employed eight Primex Rocket Engine Modules, and a pair of Goddard-designed Attitude Control Electronics which connect all of the components to the spacecraft processor. The performance of this hardware is documented, as are some of the spacecraft accommodations and lessons learned that came from working with this particular set of hardware.

  10. Local structure and magnetism of L10-type FeNi alloy films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy studied through 57Fe nuclear probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The local structure and magnetism of FeNi alloy films prepared by alternate deposition of Fe and Ni monatomic layers, where perpendicular magnetic anisotropy has been observed, were investigated through 57Fe nuclear probes using Mössbauer spectroscopy. It was confirmed that the films are composed of L10-type ordered FeNi phase and A1-type disordered FeNi phase. For the films grown at 40–70 °C, which have no perpendicular anisotropy, the A1-disordered phase is dominant, whereas for the films grown at 100–190 °C, which have a stronger perpendicular anisotropy, the relative amount of the L10-ordered phase reaches 40% or more. It was clearly shown that the magnetic anisotropy of these films is strongly correlated with the local environments of Fe in the films. The results imply that if a further increase in the ratio of the L10-ordered phase is successfully achieved, one would obtain films with a stronger magnetic anisotropy applicable to perpendicular magnetic recording. (paper)

  11. Effects of anisotropy on the frequency spectrum of gravity waves observed by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    In the investigation of gravity waves using mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere radar data, model gravity-wave spectra have been used. In these model spectra, one usually assumes azimuthal symmetry. The effect of spectral anisotropy on the observed spectrum is studied here. It is shown that for a general Garrett-Munk-type spectrum, the anisotropy does not affect the frequency spectrum observed by the vertically beamed radar. For the oblique beam, however, the observed frequency spectrum is changed. A general gravity wave spectrum including azimuthal anisotropy is considered.

  12. Mechanical anisotropy and adaptation of metastatic cells probed by magnetic microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhipeng; Shi, Yanhui; Jhiang, Sissy M.; Menq, Chia-Hsiang

    2010-02-01

    Metastatic cells have the ability to break through the basal lamina, enter the blood vessels, circulate through the vasculature, exit at distant sites, and form secondary tumors. This multi-step process, therefore, clearly indicates the inherent ability of metastatic cells to sense, process, and adapt to the mechanical forces in different surrounding environments. We describe a magnetic probing device that is useful in characterizing the mechanical properties of cells along arbitrary two-dimensional directions. Magnetic force, with the advantages of biocompatibility and specificity, was produced by magnetic poles placed in an octupole configuration and applied to fibronectin-coated magnetic microbeads attached on cell membrane. Cell deformation in response to the applied force was then recorded through the displacement of the microbeads. The motion of the beads was measured by computer processing the video images acquired by a high-speed CMOS camera. Rotating force vectors with constant magnitude while pointing to directions of all 360 degrees were applied to study the mechanical anisotropy of metastatic breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231. The temporal changes in magnitude and directionality of the cellular responses were then analyzed to investigate the cellular adaptation to force stimulation. This probing technology thus has the potential to provide us a better understanding of the mechano-signatures of cells.

  13. Anisotropy of the arrival direction of extensive air showers observed at Akeno

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anisotropy of the arrival direction of the primary cosmic ray of energy 1015 to 1018 eV is studied using approximately 300 000 showers observed in 1981 and 1982 at the EAS array at Akeno. The anisotropy of the second harmonics appears to be (1.1=-0.4)% in the region 1016 to 1017 eV. The showers with rich muon content seem to come preferentially from a direction of about 2300 in the right ascension. No statistically meaningful anisotropy is found for muon-poor showers. (author)

  14. Cosmological observables, IR growth of fluctuations, and scale-dependent anisotropies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    B. Giddings, Steven; Sloth, Martin Snoager

    2011-01-01

    observables, the observer's horizon provides an effective IR cutoff. IR growth contributes to enhanced statistical inhomogeneities/anisotropies at short scales, observation of which by a present day observer might be sought in 21 cm measurements. Such IR corrections are argued to grow large for a very late...

  15. IMPROVED CONSTRAINTS ON PRIMORDIAL NON-GAUSSIANITY FOR THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE 5-YEAR DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present constraints on the nonlinear coupling parameter fnl with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. We use an updated method based on the spherical Mexican hat wavelet (SMHW) which provides improved constraints on the fnl parameter. This paper is a continuation of a previous work by Curto et al., where several third-order statistics based on the SMHW were considered. In this paper, we use all the possible third-order statistics computed from the wavelet coefficient maps evaluated at 12 angular scales. The scales are logarithmically distributed from 6.9 arcmin to 500 arcmin. Our analysis indicates that fnl is constrained to -18 nl nl = 6 ± 5. Our result excludes at ∼99% CL the best-fitting value fnl = 87 reported by Yadav and Wandelt. We have also constrained fnl for the Q, V, and W frequency bands separately, finding compatibility with zero at 95% CL for the Q and V bands but not for the W band. We have performed some further tests to understand the cause of this deviation which indicate that systematics associated with the W radiometers could be responsible for this result. Finally, we have performed a Galactic north-south analysis for fnl. We have not found any asymmetry, i.e., the best-fitting fnl for the northern pixels is compatible with the best-fitting fnl for the southern pixels.

  16. Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 7-yr constraints on fNL with a fast wavelet estimator

    CERN Document Server

    Casaponsa, B; Curto, A; Martínez-González, E; Vielva, P

    2010-01-01

    A new method to constrain the local non-linear coupling parameter fNL based on a fast wavelet decomposition is presented. Using a multiresolution wavelet adapted to the HEALPix pixelization, we have developed a method that is 10^2 times faster than previous estimators based on isotropic wavelets and 10^3 faster than the KSW bispectrum estimator, at the resolution of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. The method has been applied to the WMAP 7-yr V+W combined map, imposing constraints on fNL of -69 < fNL < 65 at the 95 per cent CL. This result has been obtained after correcting for the contribution of the residual point sources which has been estimated to be fNL = 7 +/- 6. In addition, a Gaussianity analysis of the data has been carried out using the third order moments of the wavelet coefficients, finding consistency with Gaussianity. Although the constrainsts imposed on fNL are less stringent than those found with optimal estimators, we believe that a very fast method, as the one prop...

  17. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP): Guidance, Navigation, and Control Hardware Suite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, David K.; Davis, Gary T.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) was launched June 30, 2001 to create an all-sky map of the Cosmic Microwave Background. The mission's hardware suite included two Lockheed Martin AST-201 star trackers, two Kearfott Two-Axis Rate Assemblies (TARAs) mounted to provide X, Y and redundant Z-axis rates, two Adcole Digital Sun Sensor (DSS) heads sharing one set of electronics, twelve Adcole Coarse Sun Sensor (CSS) eyes, three Ithaco E-sized Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWAs), and a Propulsion Subsystem that employed eight PRIMEX Rocket Engine Modules (REMs). This hardware has allowed MAP to meet its various Orbit and Attitude Control Requirements, including performing a complex zero-momentum scan, meeting its attitude determination requirements, and maintaining a trajectory that places MAP in a lissajous orbit around the second Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L2) via phasing loops and a lunar gravity assist. Details of MAP's attitude determination, attitude control, and trajectory design are presented separately. This paper will focus on the performance of the hardware components mentioned above, as well as the significant lessons learned through the use of these components. An emphasis will be placed on spacecraft design modifications that were needed to accommodate existing hardware designs into the MAP Observatory design.

  18. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background as a Probe of its Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Miniati, Francesco; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-01-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB), at the level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter from a few tens of arcmin to several degree scales, together with complementary GLAST observations of gamma-ray emission from...

  19. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-ray Background as a Probe of its Origin

    CERN Document Server

    Miniati, Francesco; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-01-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic gamma-ray background (CGB), at the level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter from a few tens of arcmin to several degree scales, together with complementary GLAST observations of gamma-ray emission from galaxy clusters and the blazars luminosity function, can discriminate between a background that originates from unresolved blazars or cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks.

  20. Angular Anisotropies in the Cosmic Gamma-Ray Background as a Probe of Its Origin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miniati, Francesco; Koushiappas, Savvas M.; Di Matteo, Tiziana

    2007-09-01

    Notwithstanding the advent of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope, theoretical models predict that a significant fraction of the cosmic γ-ray background (CGB), at a level of 20% of the currently measured value, will remain unresolved. The angular power spectrum of intensity fluctuations of the CGB contains information on its origin. We show that probing the latter on scales from a few tens of arcminutes to several degrees, together with complementary GLAST observations of γ-ray emission from galaxy clusters and the blazar luminosity function, can discriminate between a background that originates from unresolved blazars or cosmic rays accelerated at structure formation shocks.

  1. Alignment Measurements of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Instrument in a Thermal/Vacuum Chamber Using Photogrammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Michael D.; Herrera, Acey A.; Crane, J. Allen; Packard, Edward A.; Aviado, Carlos; Sampler, Henry P.; Obenschain, Arthur (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory, scheduled for a late 2000 launch, is designed to measure temperature fluctuations (anisotropy) and produce a high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (photogrammetry (PG) system was chosen to perform the measurements since it is a non-contact measurement system, the measurements can be made relatively quickly and accurately, and the photogrammetric camera can be operated remotely. The hardware and methods developed to perform the MAP alignment measurements using PG proved to be highly successful. The PG measurements met the desired requirements, enabling the desired deformations to be measured and even resolved to an order of magnitude smaller than the imposed requirements. Viable data were provided to the MAP Project for a full analysis of the on-orbit performance of the Instrument's microwave system.

  2. Space-time anisotropy: theoretical issues and the possibility of an observational test

    CERN Document Server

    , Sergey; Brinzei, Nicoleta

    2008-01-01

    The specific astrophysical data collected during the last decade causes the need for the modification of the expression for the Einstein-Hilbert action, and several attempts sufficing this need are known. The modification suggested in this paper stems from the possible anisotropy of space-time and this means the natural change of the simplest scalar in the least action principle. To provide the testable support to this idea, the optic-metrical parametric resonance is regarded - an experiment on the galactic scale based on the interaction between the electromagnetic radiation of cosmic masers and periodical gravitational waves emitted by close double systems or pulsars. Since the effect depends on the space-time metric, the possible anisotropy could reveal itself through observations. To give the corresponding theory predicting the corrections to the expected results of the experiment, the specific mathematical formalism of Finsler geometry was chosen. It was found that in case the anisotropy of the space-time...

  3. Voyager 1 Observations of the Anisotropies of Enhanced MeV Ion Fluxes at 85 AU

    OpenAIRE

    Cummings, A. C.; Stone, E. C.; Burlaga, L. F.; Ness, N. F.; McDonald, F. B.; Webber, W. R.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the diffusive flow anisotropies observed in low-energy protons during intensity increases at Voyager 1 in 2001 and 2002. We propose that the unusual increased intensities after mid-2002 are due to particles accelerated by the solar wind termination shock or by the turbulent interface between the high-speed and low-speed solar wind flows.

  4. STAR FORMATION IN MASSIVE CLUSTERS VIA THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE AND THE SPITZER GLIMPSE SURVEY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) maximum entropy method foreground emission map combined with previously determined distances to giant H II regions to measure the free-free flux at Earth and the free-free luminosity of the Galaxy. We find a total flux fν = 54, 211 Jy and a flux from 88 sources of fν = 36, 043 Jy. The bulk of the sources are at least marginally resolved, with mean radii ∼60 pc, electron density ne ∼ 9 cm-3, and filling factor ΦHII∼0.005 (over the Galactic gas disk). The total dust-corrected ionizing photon luminosity is Q = 3.2 x 1053 ± 5.1 x 1052 photons s-1, in good agreement with previous estimates. We use GLIMPSE and Midcourse Space Experiment (MSX) 8 μm images to show that the bulk of the free-free luminosity is associated with bubbles having radii r ∼ 5-100 pc, with a mean of ∼20 pc. These bubbles are leaky, so that ionizing photons emitted inside the bubble escape and excite free-free emission beyond the bubble walls, producing WMAP sources that are larger than the 8 μm bubbles. We suggest that the WMAP sources are the counterparts of the extended low density H II regions described by Mezger. The 18 most luminous WMAP sources emit half the total Galactic ionizing flux. These 18 sources have 4 x 1051 s-1 ∼52 s-1, corresponding to 6 x 104 Msun ∼* ∼5 Msun; half to two thirds of this will be in the central massive star cluster. We convert the measurement of Q to a Galactic star formation rate (SFR) M-dot*=1.3±0.2 Msun yr-1, where the errors reflect only the error in free-free luminosity. We point out, however, that our inferred M-dot* is highly dependent on the exponent Γ ∼ 1.35 of the high-mass end of the stellar initial mass function. For 1.21 sun yr-1 * sun yr-1. We also determine a SFR of 0.14 Msun yr-1 for the Large Magellanic Cloud and 0.015 Msun yr-1 for the Small Magellanic Cloud.

  5. Observation of the anisotropy in arrival direction of cosmic rays with IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is a kilometer-scale detector currently under construction at the South Pole. In its final configuration the detector will comprise 5160 Digital Optical Modules (DOMs) deployed on 86 strings between 1.5-2.5 km deep within the ice. While still incomplete, the detector has already recorded tens of billions of cosmic ray muons with a median energy of 20 TeV. This large sample has been used to study the arrival direction distribution of the cosmic rays. We report the observation of an anisotropy in the cosmic rays arrival direction at two different angular scales. The observed large scale anisotropy seems to be a continuation of similar structures observed in the Northern Sky by several experiments. IceCube observes also significant features on the angular scale of 20o - 30o that might be part of the larger scale structure.

  6. Stable indications of relic gravitational waves in Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data and forecasts for the Planck mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relic gravitational waves are the cleanest probe of the violent times in the very early history of the Universe. They are expected to leave signatures in the observed cosmic microwave background anisotropies. We significantly improved our previous analysis [W. Zhao, D. Baskaran, and L. P. Grishchuk, Phys. Rev. D 79, 023002 (2009)] of the 5-year WMAP TT and TE data at lower multipoles l. This more general analysis returned essentially the same maximum likelihood result (unfortunately, surrounded by large remaining uncertainties): The relic gravitational waves are present and they are responsible for approximately 20% of the temperature quadrupole. We identify and discuss the reasons by which the contribution of gravitational waves can be overlooked in a data analysis. One of the reasons is a misleading reliance on data from very high multipoles l and another a too narrow understanding of the problem as the search for B modes of polarization, rather than the detection of relic gravitational waves with the help of all correlation functions. Our analysis of WMAP5 data has led to the identification of a whole family of models characterized by relatively high values of the likelihood function. Using the Fisher matrix formalism we formulated forecasts for Planck mission in the context of this family of models. We explore in detail various 'optimistic', 'pessimistic', and 'dream case' scenarios. We show that in some circumstances the B-mode detection may be very inconclusive, at the level of signal-to-noise ratio S/N=1.75, whereas a smarter data analysis can reveal the same gravitational wave signal at S/N=6.48. The final result is encouraging. Even under unfavorable conditions in terms of instrumental noises and foregrounds, the relic gravitational waves, if they are characterized by the maximum likelihood parameters that we found from WMAP5 data, will be detected by Planck at the level S/N=3.65.

  7. Small-scale cosmic microwave background anisotropies as probe of the geometry of the universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamionkowski, Marc; Spergel, David N.; Sugiyama, Naoshi

    1994-01-01

    We perform detailed calculations of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies in a cold dark matter (CDM)-dominated open universe with primordial adiabatic density perturbations for a variety of reionization histories. The CMB anisotropies depend primarily on the geometry of the universe, which in a matter-dominated universe is determined by Omega and the optical depth to the surface of last scattering. In particular, the location on the primary Doppler peak depends primarily on Omega and is fairly insensitive to the other unknown parameters, such as Omega(sub b), h, Lambda, and the shape of the power spectrum. Therefore, if the primordial density perturbations are adiabatic, measurements of CMB anisotropies on small scales may be used to determine Omega.

  8. Observation of Anisotropy in Cosmic-Ray Arrival Directions with the IceCube Observatory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNally, Frank

    We provide an update on the continued observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays in the southern hemisphere. With its in-ice and IceTop detector, the IceCube Observatory recorded more than 250 billion and 170 million events, respectively, between May 2009 and May 2014. In this large data set, we observe significant small-scale structure on angular scales down to 3°, the median angular resolution of the IceCube detector for cosmic rays. The expanded dataset also allows for a more detailed study of the anisotropy for various cosmic-ray median energies. The large-scale structure observed with the in-ice detector at median energies near 20 TeV changes at energies above 100 TeV, with the high-energy skymaps showing a strong deficit also present in the IceTop 2 PeV sample.

  9. Solar wind proton temperature anisotropy: Linear theory and WIND/SWE observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hellinger, Petr; Trávníček, Pavel; Kasper, J. C.; Lazarus, A. J.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 9 (2006), L09101/1-L09101/4. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA3042403 Grant ostatní: ESA(XE) PECS 98024; NASA (US) NAG-10915 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : proton temperature anisotropy * solar wind * in situ observations Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 2.602, year: 2006

  10. Detection of zero anisotropy at 5.2 AU during the November 1998 solar particle event: Ulysses Anisotropy Telescopes observations

    OpenAIRE

    Dalla, S.; Balogh, A.

    2000-01-01

    For the first time during the mission, the Anisotropy Telescopes instrument on board the Ulysses spacecraft measured constant zero anisotropy of protons in the 1.3-2.2 MeV energy range, for a period lasting more than three days. This measurement was made during the energetic particle event taking place at Ulysses between 25 November and 15 December 1998, an event characterised by constant high proton fluxes within a region delimited by two interplanetary forward shocks, at a distance of 5.2 A...

  11. OBSERVATION OF COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY WITH THE ICETOP AIR SHOWER ARRAY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at PeV energies. The analysis is based on data taken between 2009 and 2012 with the IceTop air shower array at the south pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10–3 level can, for the first time, be extended to PeV energies. We divide the data set into two parts with median energies of 400 TeV and 2 PeV, respectively. In the low energy band, we observe a strong deficit with an angular size of about 30° and an amplitude of (– 1.58 ± 0.46stat ± 0.52sys) × 10–3 at a location consistent with previous observations of cosmic rays with the IceCube neutrino detector. The study of the high energy band shows that the anisotropy persists to PeV energies and increases in amplitude to (– 3.11 ± 0.38stat ± 0.96sys) × 10–3.

  12. Observation of Cosmic Ray Anisotropy with the IceTop Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Aartsen, M G; Abdou, Y; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; Bell, M; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohaichuk, S; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Brown, A M; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Carson, M; Casey, J; Casier, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clark, K; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cru; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Clercq, C D; Ridder, S D; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; Vries-Uiterweerd, G d; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Ha; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Heereman, D; Heimann, P; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jlelati, O; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pieloth, D; Pirk, N; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rädel, L; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Salameh, T; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheel, M; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönherr, L; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Sheremata, C; Smith, M W E; Soiron, M; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Usner, M; Drift, D va de; Eijndhoven, N va; Overloop, A Va; Santen, J va; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Wasserman, R; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zierke, S; Zilles, A; Zoll, M

    2012-01-01

    We report on the observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at PeV energies. The analysis is based on data taken between 2009 and 2012 with the IceTop air shower array at the South Pole. IceTop, an integral part of the IceCube detector, is sensitive to cosmic rays between 100 TeV and 1 EeV. With the current size of the IceTop data set, searches for anisotropy at the 10^-3 level can, for the first time, be extended to PeV energies. We divide the data set into two parts with median energies of 400 TeV and 2 PeV, respectively. In the low energy band, we observe a strong deficit with an angular size of about 30 degrees and an amplitude of (-1.58 +/- 0.46 (stat) +/- 0.52 (sys)) x 10^(-3) at a location consistent with previous observations of cosmic rays with the IceCube neutrino detector. The study of the high energy band shows that the anisotropy persists to PeV energies and increases in amplitude to (-3.11 +/- 0.38 (stat) +/- 0.96 (sys)) x 10^(-3).

  13. MICROWAVE EMISSION FROM THE EDGEWORTH-KUIPER BELT AND THE ASTEROID BELT CONSTRAINED FROM THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objects in the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt and the main asteroid belt should emit microwaves that may give rise to extra anisotropy signals in the multipole of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) experiment. Constraints are derived from the absence of positive detection of such anisotropies for l ∼+. This limit is consistent with the mass extrapolated from the observable population with the size of a ∼> 15 km, assuming that the small-object population follows the power law in size dN/da ∼ a-q with the canonical index expected for collisional equilibrium, q ≅ 3.5, with which 23% of the mass is ascribed to objects smaller than are observationally accessible down to grains. A similar argument applied to the main asteroid belt indicates that the grain population should not increase more quickly than q ≅ 3.6 toward smaller radii, if the grain population follows the power law that continues to observed asteroids with larger radii. Both cases are at or only slightly above the limit that can be physically significant, implying the importance of further tightening the CMB anisotropy limit, which may be attained with observation at higher radio frequencies.

  14. Direct probe of anisotropy in atom-molecule collisions via quantum scattering resonances

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, Ayelet; Shagam, Yuval; Skomorowski, Wojciech; Żuchowski, Piotr. S.; Pawlak, Mariusz; Janssen, Liesbeth M. C.; Moiseyev, Nimrod; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y. T.; van der Avoird, Ad; Koch, Christiane P.; Narevicius, Edvardas

    2016-01-01

    Anisotropy is a fundamental property of particle interactions. It occupies a central role in cold and ultra-cold molecular processes, where long range forces have been found to significantly depend on orientation in ultra-cold polar molecule collisions. Recent experiments have demonstrated the emergence of quantum phenomena such as scattering resonances in the cold collisions regime due to quantization of the intermolecular degrees of freedom. Although these states have been shown to be sensi...

  15. Thermal Reflector System Design and Testing for the Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Neubert, Hans; Chen, Wayne

    2000-01-01

    Scheduled for a June 2001 launch, the Microwave Anisotropy Probe’s (MAP) mission is to study in detail the cosmic microwave background radiation temperature fluctuations of the universe. The cosmic microwave background is the remnant afterglow of the Big Bang, and the tiny temperature differences from place to place on the sky provides a wealth of information about the basic nature of our universe. The observatory consists of dual back-to-back Gregorian optics and dual differential pseudo-cor...

  16. In-vivo Mapping of Human Skin Anisotropy Using Multi-directional Ultrasonic Probe

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tokar, Daniel; Hradilová, Jana; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Praha: ČVUT Praha Fakulta jaderná a fyzikálně inženýrská, 2013 - (Hobza, T.), s. 165-172 ISBN 978-80-01-05383-6. [SPMS 2013. Nebřich (CZ), 24.06.2013-29.06.2013] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : anisotropy * human skin in-vivo * ultrasonic testing * viscoelasticity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  17. Statistical anisotropy of CMB as a probe of conformal rolling scenario

    CERN Document Server

    Ramazanov, S R

    2012-01-01

    Search for the statistical anisotropy in the CMB data is a powerful tool for constraining models of the early Universe. In this paper we focus on the recently proposed cosmological scenario with conformal rolling. We consider two sub-scenarios, one of which involves a long intermediate stage between conformal rolling and conventional hot epoch. Primordial scalar perturbations generated within these sub-scenarios have different direction-dependent power spectra, both characterized by a single parameter h^2. We search for the signatures of this anisotropy in the seven-year WMAP data using quadratic maximum likelihood method, first applied for similar purposes by Hanson and Lewis. We confirm the large quadrupole anisotropy detected in V and W bands, which has been argued to originate from systematic effects rather than from cosmology. We construct an estimator for the parameter h^2. In the case of the sub-scenario with the intermediate stage we set an upper limit h^2 < 0.045 at the 95% confidence level. The c...

  18. Cosmological observations as a probe of fundamental physics and astrophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Simone

    The unifying theme of this dissertation is using cosmological observations as a tool to discover new physics and astrophysics. The first part focuses on the effects of primordial non-Gaussianity on the large-scale distribution of dark matter halos. The statistical properties of the primordial fluctuation contain a wealth of information about the Universe's early moments, and these properties are imprinted on the late-time distribution of matter. The first chapter serves as an introduction to the effects of non-Gaussianity on halo bias, summarizing previous work and extending it to the cubic local model (the gNL model). Chapter 2 generalizes some of the techniques of Chapter 1, allowing for the calculation of halo bias with arbitrary initial conditions, while Chapter 3 shows the relationship between the seemingly different techniques existing in the literature. Detailed forecasts for upcoming surveys are presented in Chapter 4, including the effect of marginalization over shot-noise and Gaussian part of the bias, photometric redshifts uncertainties and multi-tracer analysis to reduce the effect of cosmic variance. The second part contains work on two secondary anisotropies of the Cosmic Microwave Background radiation (CMB), namely the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect and the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect. The late-time ISW effect arises because of decay of the large-scale gravitational potential due to the accelerated expansion and is therefore a powerful probe of dark energy. Chapter 5 presents a new detection of the ISW effect, using WISE galaxies and AGN as tracers of the gravitational potential, whose bias is measured in cross-correlation with CMB lensing maps. An appendix discusses the contamination of this measurement due to the linear part of the kSZ effect, the Doppler shift of photon energy due to scattering off coherently moving electrons. The last chapter explores the prospects of detecting the kSZ signal from sources for which accurate

  19. Anisotropies of wide-spread solar energetic electron events observed with STEREO and ACE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    STEREO, in combination with near-Earth observatories as ACE or Wind provides three well separated viewpoints, which are perfectly suited to investigate SEP events and their longitudinal dependences. We collected a list of 21 near-relativistic wide-spread electron events in the period from 2009 to mid 2013, where we request a minimum longitudinal separation angle of 80 degrees between the source active region at the Sun and the magnetic footpoint of one spacecraft observing the event. Anisotropies are investigated to disentangle source and transport mechanisms leading to the wide particle spreads. One favorable mechanism is efficient perpendicular transport in the IP medium leading to vanishing anisotropies at well-separated positions. Another scenario is a large particle spread close to the Sun either due to a coronal shock or due to coronal transport. Here, we expect significant anisotropy at 1 AU due to the wide injection range at the Sun and the afterwards focusing during the outwards propagation. For both of the above scenarios we find events in our sample, which suit the expected observations and even further events, which do not agree with these.

  20. International Conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes

    CERN Document Server

    Goodman, Charles; Walker, George; Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings of the "International Conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes" are presented in this volume. This conference was held in Telluride, Colorado, March 14 -17, 1988, and was the fourth in the Telluride series of nuclear physics conferences. A continuing theme in the Telluride conference series has been the complementarity of various intermediate-energy projectiles for elucidating the nucleon-nucleon interaction and nuclear structure. Earlier conferences have contributed significantly to an understanding of spin currents in nuclei, in particular the distribution of Gamow-Teller strength using charge-exchange reactions. The previous conference on "Antinucleon and Nucleon Nucleus Interactions" compared nuclear information from tra­ tional probes to recent results from antinucleon reactions. The 1988 conference on Spin Observables of Nuclear Probes, put special emphasis on spin observables and brought together experts using spin information to probe nuclear structure. Spin observabl...

  1. Effect of Stress and Saturation on Shear Wave Anisotropy: Laboratory Observations Using Laser Doppler Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, M.; Collet, O.; Bona, A.; Gurevich, B.

    2015-12-01

    Estimations of hydrocarbon and water resources as well as reservoir management during production are the main challenges facing the resource recovery industry nowadays. The recently discovered reservoirs are not only deep but they are also located in complicated geological formations. Hence, the effect of anisotropy on reservoir imaging becomes significant. Shear wave (S-wave) splitting has been observed in the field and laboratory experiments for decades. Despite the fact that S-wave splitting is widely used for evaluation of subsurface anisotropy, the effects of stresses as well fluid saturation on anisotropy have not been understood in detail. In this paper we present the laboratory study of the effect of stress and saturation on S-wave splitting for a Bentheim sandstone sample. The cubic sample (50mm3), porosity 22%, density 1890kg/m3) was placed into a true-triaxial cell. The sample was subjected to several combinations of stresses varying from 0 to 10MPa and applied to the sample in two directions (X and Y), while no stress was applied to the sample in the Z-direction. The sample's bedding was nearly oriented parallel to Y-Z plane. The ultrasonic S-waves were exited at a frequency of 0.5MHz by a piezoelectric transducer and were propagating in the Z-direction. Upon wave arrival onto the free surface the displacement of the surface was monitored by a Laser Doppler interferometer. Hodograms of the central point of the dry sample (Fig. 1) demonstrate how S-wave polarizations for both "fast" and "slow" S-waves change when increasing the stress in the X direction, while the stress in direction Y is kept constant at 3 MPa. Polarization of the fast S wave is shifted towards the X-axis (axis of the maximum stress). While both S-wave velocities increase with stress, the anisotropy level remains the same. No shift of polarization of fast wave was observed when the stress along the Y-axis was kept at 3 MPa, while the stress along the X-axis was increasing. However, in

  2. Detection of zero anisotropy at 5.2 AU during the November 1998 solar particle event: Ulysses Anisotropy Telescopes observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dalla

    Full Text Available For the first time during the mission, the Anisotropy Telescopes instrument on board the Ulysses spacecraft measured constant zero anisotropy of protons in the 1.3-2.2 MeV energy range, for a period lasting more than three days. This measurement was made during the energetic particle event taking place at Ulysses between 25 November and 15 December 1998, an event characterised by constant high proton fluxes within a region delimited by two interplanetary forward shocks, at a distance of 5.2 AU from the Sun and heliographic latitude of 17°S. We present the ATs results for this event and discuss their possible interpretation and their relevance to the issue of intercalibration of the two telescopes.

    Key words: Interplanetary physics (energetic particles - Solar physics, astrophysics and astronomy (energetic particles - Space plasma physics (instruments and techniques

  3. Multipoint observation of anisotropy and intermittency in solar-wind turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanova, E.; Perri, S.; Sorriso-Valvo, L.; Carbone, V.

    2015-04-01

    Using high-resolution magnetic-field Cluster observations, we have investigated the magnetic-field anisotropy via the second- and fourth-order structure functions over a wide range of scales reaching below the subproton scale. The magnetic-field increments have been computed from single- and two-spacecraft measurements. The two-satellite technique allows us to study the increments as a function of an actual space lag. Both single- and two-point analyses show that the magnetic field is anisotropic even at small time/spatial scales. The single-spacecraft data also shows that the degree of anisotropy does not change with the scale at proton and subproton scales. It is also pointed out that the degree of magnetic-field anisotropy tends to be overestimated in the single-spacecraft data analysis. This is particularly evident at small scales and it depends on the angle between the spacecraft separation and the flow direction. From the fourth-order moment of the probability density function of the magnetic-field increments we have also investigated the presence of intermittency in the fluctuations. Even though to a different degree, intermittency was present over the entire range of scales, with an indication of scale invariance at subproton scales.

  4. Faraday rotation limits on a primordial magnetic field from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe five-year data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A primordial magnetic field in the early universe will cause Faraday rotation of the linear polarization of the cosmic microwave background generated via Compton scattering at the surface of last scattering. This rotation induces a nonzero parity-odd (B-mode) polarization component. The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data puts an upper limit on the magnitude of the B-polarization power spectrum; assuming that the B-polarization signal is totally due to the Faraday rotation effect, the upper limits on the comoving amplitude of a primordial stochastic magnetic field range from 6x10-8 to 2x10-6 G on a comoving length scale of 1 Mpc, depending on the power spectrum of the magnetic field.

  5. CROSS-POWER SPECTRUM AND ITS APPLICATION ON WINDOW FUNCTIONS IN THE WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cross-power spectrum is a quadratic estimator between two maps that can provide unbiased estimate of the underlying power spectrum of the correlated signals, which is therefore used for extracting the power spectrum in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. In this paper, we discuss the limit of the cross-power spectrum and derive the residual from the uncorrelated signal, which is the source of error in power spectrum extraction. We employ the estimator to extract window functions by crossing pairs of extragalactic point sources. We demonstrate its usefulness in WMAP difference assembly maps where the window functions are measured via Jupiter and then extract the window functions of the five WMAP frequency band maps.

  6. Ultrafast magneto-photocurrents as probe of anisotropy relaxation in GaAs

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Christian B; Pierz, Klaus; Bieler, Mark

    2016-01-01

    We induce ultrafast photocurrents in a GaAs crystal exposed to a magnetic field by optical femtosecond excitation. The magneto-photocurrents are studied by time-resolved detection of the simultaneously emitted THz radiation. We find that their dynamics differ considerably from the dynamics of other photocurrents which are expected to follow the temporal shape of the optical intensity. We attribute this difference to the influence of carrier-anisotropy relaxation on the magneto-photocurrents. Our measurements show that the anisotropy relaxation for carrier densities ranging between $10^{16}$ cm$^{-3}$ and $5 \\times 10^{17}$ cm$^{-3}$ occurs on two different time scales. While the slow time constant is approximately 100 fs long and most likely governed by electron-phonon scattering, the fast time constant is on the order of 10 fs and presumably linked to the valence band. Our studies not only help to better understand the microscopic origins of optically induced currents but - being even more important - show t...

  7. The time and spatial behavior of solar flare proton anisotropies observed in deep space on Pioneers 10 and 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anisotropy of solar flare protons from the direction of the 'garden hose' magnetic field line has been analyzed for 24 events observed by the University of Chicago experiment on Pioneers 10 and 11 in 1972 and 1973. The anisotropy versus time profiles during individual events are in general consistent with diffusive propagation, but several cases are observed where the decay is better described by an exponential time decay. (orig./WBU)

  8. Quiet time interplanetary cosmic ray anisotropies observed from Pioneer 10 and 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of California at San Diego Cerenkov counters on the Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 spacecraft are capable of detecting protons and alpha particles with kinetic energy T> or =480 MeV/nucleon and electrons with T> or =6 MeV. With these instruments we have made measurements of cosmic ray anisotropies in interplanetary space, using the Pioneer 11 detector between April 17 and November 31, 1973 (during which interval the spacecraft moved from 1.1 to 2.7 AU), and the Pioneer 10 detector between March 1 and November 31, 1974 (during which interval the spacecraft moved from 6.0 AU to 6.8 AU). From the Pioneer 11 data the east-west anisotropy has been determined to be xi/sub phi/*approx. =0.41 +- 0.11%, and the north-south anisotropy xi/sub theta/*approx. =0. The ratio of the perpendicular and parallel components of the diffusion coefficient (kappa/sub perpendicular//kappa/sub parallel/) is on this basis estimated to be approx. =0.26 +- 0.08%. From the Pioneer 10 data, xi/sub phi/*approx. =0.59 +- 0.18%, xi/sub theta/*approx. =0.25 +- 0.08%, and we estimate that kappa/sub perpendicular//kappa/sub parallel/approx. =0.13 +- 0.04. The large value of xi/sub theta/* obtained from Pioneer 10 suggests that there was a substantial component of cosmic ray streaming from north to south. A comparison of the anisotropy and magnetic field data suggests that such a north-south anisotropy could be due at least in part to the gradient drift effect and perhaps in part to an additional streaming independent of the magnetic field polarity. To produce the observed value of xi/sub theta/* from the gradient drift effect the radial gradient at this distance should have a value of approx. =0.3 +- 0.3%/AU, which is not incompatible with the radial gradients obtained from direct measurements

  9. The Anisotropy of the Microwave Background to l = 3500 Deep Field Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Mason, B S; Readhead, A C S; Shepherd, M C; Sievers, J L; Udomprasert, P S; Cartwright, J K; Farmer, A J; Padin, S; Myers, S T; Bond, J R; Contaldi, C R; Pen, U L; Prunet, S; Pogosyan, D; Carlstrom, J E; Kovács, J; Leitch, E M; Pryke, C L; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Altamirano, P; Bronfman, L; Casassus, S; May, J; Joy, M

    2003-01-01

    We report measurements of anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation over the multipole range l ~ 200 - 3500 with the Cosmic Background Imager based on deep observations of three fields. These results confirm the drop in power with increasing l first reported in earlier measurements with this instrument, and extend the observations of this decline in power out to l \\~ 2000. The decline in power is consistent with the predicted damping of primary anisotropies. At larger multipoles, l = 2000 - 3500, the power is 3.1 sigma greater than standard models for intrinsic microwave background anisotropy in this multipole range, and 3.5 sigma greater than zero. This excess power is not consistent with expected levels of residual radio source contamination but, for sigma_8 >~ 1, is consistent with predicted levels due to a secondary Sunyaev-Zeldovich anisotropy. Further observations are necessary to confirm the level of this excess and, if confirmed, determine its origin.

  10. Strain-driven Anisotropy in Multiferroic Composites Probed with Soft X-ray Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Artificial multiferroic systems, in which novel properties emerge from elastic coupling between piezoelectric and magnetostrictive phases, show promise as a route to obtain room temperature magneto-electric coupling. We have used soft X-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM) to determine the influence of piezoelectric-ferroelectric BaTiO3 (BTO) on the magnetic properties of magnetostrictive ferrimagnetic CoFe2O4 and NiFe2O4 thin films. Circular and linear dichroism spectromicroscopy gives insight into the magneto-electric interaction in a model system of a BTO substrate with an epitaxial spinel cap layer. An induced dichroism in the ferrimagnetic films is structural in origin and directly corresponds to the ferroelectric domain structure of the BTO substrate as imaged at both the Ti L2,3 edges of BTO and the Fe L2,3 edges of the film. Temperature, angular, and polarization dependent studies reveal this strain-induced effect strongly influences the magnetic anisotropy of individual 250 nm wide magnetic domains of the spinel films. (author)

  11. Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy: Observations, Data Analysis, and Results for Sunyaev-Zel'Dovich Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiun-Huei Proty; Ho, Paul T. P.; Huang, Chih-Wei Locutus; Koch, Patrick M.; Liao, Yu-Wei; Lin, Kai-Yang; Liu, Guo-Chin; Molnar, Sandor M.; Nishioka, Hiroaki; Umetsu, Keiichi; Wang, Fu-Cheng; Altamirano, Pablo; Birkinshaw, Mark; Chang, Chia-Hao; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chang, Su-Wei; Chen, Ming-Tang; Chiueh, Tzihong; Han, Chih-Chiang; Huang, Yau-De; Hwang, Yuh-Jing; Jiang, Homin; Kesteven, Michael; Kubo, Derek Y.; Lancaster, Katy; Li, Chao-Te; Martin-Cocher, Pierre; Oshiro, Peter; Raffin, Philippe; Wei, Tashun; Wilson, Warwick

    2009-04-01

    We present observations, analysis, and results for the first-year operation of Array for Microwave Background Anisotropy (AMiBA), an interferometric experiment designed to study cosmology via the measurement of cosmic microwave background (CMB). AMiBA is the first CMB interferometer operating at 3 mm to have reported successful results, currently with seven close-packed antennas of 60 cm diameter giving a synthesized resolution of around 6'. During 2007, AMiBA detected the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects (SZEs) of six galaxy clusters at redshift 0.091 AMiBA and to calibrate the conversion from correlator time-lag data to visibilities. The detailed formalism for data analysis is given. We summarize our early tests including observations of planets and quasars, and present images, visibility profiles, the estimated central coordinates, sizes, and SZE amplitudes of the galaxy clusters. Scientific implications are summarized. We also discuss possible systematic effects in the results.

  12. Temporal and Spatial Turbulent Spectra of MHD Plasma and an Observation of Variance Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Schaffner, D A; Lukin, V S

    2014-01-01

    The nature of MHD turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind-tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment (SSX). The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparison amongst magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor Hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed as well as the role laboratory experiment can play in understanding turbulence typica...

  13. Spectra and anisotropy of magnetic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosheath: Cluster observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Alexandrova

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the spectral shape, the anisotropy of the wave vector distributions and the anisotropy of the amplitudes of the magnetic fluctuations in the Earth's magnetosheath within a broad range of frequencies [10−3, 10] Hz which corresponds to spatial scales from ~10 to 105 km. We present the first observations of a Kolmogorov-like inertial range of Alfvénic fluctuations δB2}~f−5/3 in the magnetosheath flanks, below the ion cyclotron frequency fci. In the vicinity of fci, a spectral break is observed, like in solar wind turbulence. Above the break, the energy of compressive and Alfvénic fluctuations generally follows a power law with a spectral index between −3 and −2. Concerning the anisotropy of the wave vector distribution, we observe a clear change in its nature in the vicinity of ion characteristic scales: if at MHD scales there is no evidence for a dominance of a slab (kł>>k or 2-D (k>>kł turbulence, above the spectral break, (f>fci, kcpi>1 the 2-D turbulence dominates. This 2-D turbulence is observed in six selected one-hour intervals among which the average ion β varies from 0.8 to 10. It is observed for both the transverse and compressive magnetic fluctuations, independently on the presence of linearly unstable modes at low frequencies or Alfvén vortices at the spectral break. We then analyse the anisotropy of the magnetic fluctuations in a time dependent reference frame based on the field B and the flow velocity V directions. Within the range of the 2-D turbulence, at scales [1,30]kcpi, and for any β we find that the magnetic fluctuations at a given frequency in the plane perpendicular to B have more energy along the

  14. Observation of the East-West Anisotropy of the Atmospheric Neutrino Flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The east-west anisotropy, caused by the deflection of primary cosmic rays in the Earth close-quote s magnetic field, is observed for the first time in the flux of atmospheric neutrinos. Using a 45thinspthinspktthinspyr exposure of the Super-Kamiokande detector, 552thinspthinspe -like and 633thinspthinspμ -like horizontally going events are selected in the momentum range between 400 and 3000 MeV/c . The azimuthal distributions of e -like and μ -like events agree with the expectation from atmospheric neutrino flux calculations, verifying that the flux of atmospheric neutrinos in the GeV energy range is reasonably well modeled by calculations that account for the geomagnetic field. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  15. Secondary anisotropies of the CMB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cosmic Microwave Background fluctuations provide a powerful probe of the dark ages of the universe through the imprint of the secondary anisotropies associated with the reionization of the universe and the growth of structure. We review the relation between the secondary anisotropies and the primary anisotropies that are directly generated by quantum fluctuations in the very early universe. The physics of secondary fluctuations is described, with emphasis on the ionization history and the evolution of structure. We discuss the different signatures arising from the secondary effects in terms of their induced temperature fluctuations, polarization and statistics. The secondary anisotropies are being actively pursued at present, and we review the future and current observational status

  16. Symmetry-Breaking Orbital Anisotropy Observed for Detwinned Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 above the Spin Density Wave Transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ming

    2011-08-19

    Nematicity, defined as broken rotational symmetry, has recently been observed in competing phases proximate to the superconducting phase in the cuprate high temperature superconductors. Similarly, the new iron-based high temperature superconductors exhibit a tetragonal to orthorhombic structural transition (i.e. a broken C{sub 4} symmetry) that either precedes or is coincident with a collinear spin density wave (SDW) transition in undoped parent compounds, and superconductivity arises when both transitions are suppressed via doping. Evidence for strong in-plane anisotropy in the SDW state in this family of compounds has been reported by neutron scattering, scanning tunneling microscopy, and transport measurements. Here we present an angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy study of detwinned single crystals of a representative family of electron-doped iron-arsenide superconductors, Ba(Fe{sub 1-x}Co{sub x}){sub 2}As{sub 2} in the underdoped region. The crystals were detwinned via application of in-plane uniaxial stress, enabling measurements of single domain electronic structure in the orthorhombic state. At low temperatures, our results clearly demonstrate an in-plane electronic anisotropy characterized by a large energy splitting of two orthogonal bands with dominant d{sub xz} and d{sub yz} character, which is consistent with anisotropy observed by other probes. For compositions x > 0, for which the structural transition (T{sub S}) precedes the magnetic transition (T{sub SDW}), an anisotropic splitting is observed to develop above T{sub SDW}, indicating that it is specifically associated with T{sub S}. For unstressed crystals, the band splitting is observed close to T{sub S}, whereas for stressed crystals the splitting is observed to considerably higher temperatures, revealing the presence of a surprisingly large in-plane nematic susceptibility in the electronic structure.

  17. Observation of anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays above TeV energies with IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IceCube neutrino telescope, completed in December 2010, is a cubic-kilometer scale detector buried under the South Pole ice. Between May 2009 and May 2010, IceCube recorded 32 billion of atmospheric muons generated in air showers produced by cosmic rays in the TeV energy range. This high statistics data sample can be used to look for anisotropy in the arrival directions of the cosmic ray particles at the per-mille level. IceCube observes, for the first time in the southern hemisphere, an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This study shows that the same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV; the anisotropy observed at 400 TeV shows substantial differences with respect to that at lower energy. In addition to the large-scale features observed at 20 TeV in the form of strong dipole and quadrupole moments, the data include several localized regions of excess and deficit on scales between 10° and 30°. The features observed at both large and small scales are statistically significant, but their origin is currently unknown.

  18. SPINNING DUST EMISSION: EFFECTS OF IRREGULAR GRAIN SHAPE, TRANSIENT HEATING, AND COMPARISON WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE RESULTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Planck is expected to answer crucial questions on the early universe, but it also provides further understanding on anomalous microwave emission. Electric dipole emission from spinning dust grains continues to be the favored interpretation of anomalous microwave emission. In this paper, we present a method to calculate the rotational emission from small grains of irregular shape with moments of inertia I1 ≥ I2 ≥ I3. We show that a torque-free rotating irregular grain with a given angular momentum radiates at multiple frequency modes. The resulting spinning dust spectrum has peak frequency and emissivity increasing with the degree of grain shape irregularity, which is defined by I1:I2:I3. We discuss how the orientation of the dipole moment μ in body coordinates affects the spinning dust spectrum for different regimes of internal thermal fluctuations. We show that the spinning dust emissivity for the case of strong thermal fluctuations is less sensitive to the orientation of μ than in the case of weak thermal fluctuations. We calculate spinning dust spectra for a range of gas density and dipole moment. The effect of compressible turbulence on spinning dust emission is investigated. We show that the emission in a turbulent medium increases by a factor from 1.2 to 1.4 relative to that in a uniform medium, as the sonic Mach number Ms increases from 2 to 7. Finally, spinning dust parameters are constrained by fitting our improved model to five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cross-correlation foreground spectra, for both the Hα-correlated and 100-μm-correlated emission spectra.

  19. EVOLUTION OF THE COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POWER SPECTRUM ACROSS WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE DATA RELEASES: A NONPARAMETRIC ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a nonparametric function estimation methodology, we present a comparative analysis of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) 1-, 3-, 5-, and 7-year data releases for the cosmic microwave background (CMB) angular power spectrum with respect to the following key questions. (1) How well is the power spectrum determined by the data alone? (2) How well is the ΛCDM model supported by a model-independent, data-driven analysis? (3) What are the realistic uncertainties on peak/dip locations and heights? Our results show that the height of the power spectrum is well determined by data alone for multipole l approximately less than 546 (1-year), 667 (3-year), 804 (5-year), and 842 (7-year data). We show that parametric fits based on the ΛCDM model are remarkably close to our nonparametric fits in l-regions where data are sufficiently precise. In contrast, the power spectrum for an HΛCDM model is progressively pushed away from our nonparametric fit as data quality improves with successive data realizations, suggesting incompatibility of this particular cosmological model with respect to the WMAP data sets. We present uncertainties on peak/dip locations and heights at the 95% (2σ) level of confidence and show how these uncertainties translate into hyperbolic 'bands' on the acoustic scale (lA ) and peak shift (φm) parameters. Based on the confidence set for the 7-year data, we argue that the low-l upturn in the CMB power spectrum cannot be ruled out at any confidence level in excess of about 10% (≈0.12σ). Additional outcomes of this work are a numerical formulation for minimization of a noise-weighted risk function subject to monotonicity constraints, a prescription for obtaining nonparametric fits that are closer to cosmological expectations on smoothness, and a method for sampling cosmologically meaningful power spectrum variations from the confidence set of a nonparametric fit.

  20. Temporal and spatial turbulent spectra of MHD plasma and an observation of variance anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence is analyzed through both temporal and spatial magnetic fluctuation spectra. A magnetically turbulent plasma is produced in the MHD wind tunnel configuration of the Swarthmore Spheromak Experiment. The power of magnetic fluctuations is projected into directions perpendicular and parallel to a local mean field; the ratio of these quantities shows the presence of variance anisotropy which varies as a function of frequency. Comparisons among magnetic, velocity, and density spectra are also made, demonstrating that the energy of the turbulence observed is primarily seeded by magnetic fields created during plasma production. Direct spatial spectra are constructed using multi-channel diagnostics and are used to compare to frequency spectra converted to spatial scales using the Taylor hypothesis. Evidence for the observation of dissipation due to ion inertial length scale physics is also discussed, as well as the role laboratory experiments can play in understanding turbulence typically studied in space settings such as the solar wind. Finally, all turbulence results are shown to compare fairly well to a Hall-MHD simulation of the experiment.

  1. Real space tests of the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe cosmic microwave background data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce and analyze a method for testing statistical isotropy and Gaussianity and apply it to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) cosmic microwave background (CMB) foreground reduced temperature maps. We also test cross-channel difference maps to constrain levels of residual foreground contamination and systematic uncertainties. We divide the sky into regions of varying size and shape and measure the first four moments of the one-point distribution within these regions, and using their simulated spatial distributions we test the statistical isotropy and Gaussianity hypotheses. By randomly varying orientations of these regions, we sample the underlying CMB field in a new manner, that offers a richer exploration of the data content, and avoids possible biasing due to a single choice of sky division. In our analysis we account for all two-point correlations between different regions and also show the impact on the results when these correlations are neglected. The statistical significance is assessed via comparison with realistic Monte Carlo simulations. We find the three-year WMAP maps to agree well with the isotropic, Gaussian random field simulations as probed by regions corresponding to the angular scales ranging from 6° to 30° at 68% confidence level (CL). We report a strong, anomalous (99.8% CL) dipole 'excess' in the V band of the three-year WMAP data and also in the V band of the WMAP five-year data (99.3% CL). Using our statistics, we notice large scale hemispherical power asymmetry, and find that it is not highly statistically significant in the WMAP three-year data (≲97%) at scales l≤40. The significance is even smaller if multipoles up to l=1024 are considered (∼90% CL). We give constraints on the amplitude of the previously proposed CMB dipole modulation field parameter. We find some hints of foreground contamination in the form of a locally strong, anomalous kurtosis excess in the Q+V +W co-added map, which however is not

  2. Generation and effects of EMIC waves observed by the Van Allen Probes on 18 March 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J.; Saikin, A.; Gamayunov, K. V.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Geoffrey, R.; Smith, C. W.; Torbert, R. B.; Kurth, W. S.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves play a crucial role in particle dynamics in the Earth's magnetosphere. The free energy for EMIC wave generation is usually provided by the temperature anisotropy of the energetic ring current ions. EMIC waves can in turn cause particle energization and losses through resonant wave-particle interactions. Using measurements from the Van Allen Probes, we perform a case study of EMIC waves and associated plasma conditions observed on 18 March 2013. From 0204 to 0211 UT, the Van Allen Probe-B detected He+-band EMIC wave activity in the post-midnight sector (MLT=4.6-4.9) at very low L-shells (L=2.6-2.9). The event occurred right outside the inward-pushed plasmapause in the early recovery phase of an intense geomagnetic storm - min. Dst = -132 nT at 2100 UT on 17 March 2013. During this event, the fluxes of energetic (> 1 keV), anisotropic O+ dominate both the H+ and He+ fluxes in this energy range. Meanwhile, O+ fluxes at low energies (pitch angle diffusion coefficient (Dαα) of the EMIC wave packets by using nominal ion composition, derived total ion density from the frequencies of upper hybrid resonance, and measured ambient and wave magnetic field. EMIC wave growth rates are also calculated to evaluate the role of loss-cone distributed ring current ions in the EMIC wave generation.

  3. Geomagnetic Storms and EMIC waves: Van Allen Probe observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dedong; Yuan, Zhigang; Yu, Xiongdong; Huang, Shiyong; Deng, Xiaohua; Zhou, Meng; Li, Haimeng

    2016-04-01

    Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves are believed to play a crucial role in the dynamics of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons, especially during geomagnetic storms. However, there is little consensus on which phase of the storm is more favorable for the generation of EMIC waves. Utilizing the data from magnetometer instrument of EMFISIS suite on board Van Allen Probe A, the occurrences of EMIC waves during geomagnetic storms are investigated in this paper. 76 storms were identified during the period under research, from 8 September 2012 to 30 April 2014, when the apogee of Van Allen Probe A covered all the MLT sectors. 50 of the 76 storms observed 124 EMIC wave events, of which 80 are found in the recovery phase, more than those observed in the main phase. Evolution of the distribution characteristics of EMIC waves respect to L and MLT in different geomagnetic phases is investigated, which is found to be consistent with that of the plasmasphere. These results are different from those derived by the observations of the CRRES satellite. The different results may result from the different orbit coverage of the two different satellite missions or from the different activity level of the magnetosphere during the different periods. Few EMIC waves in the dayside sector during the pre-onset periods are observed. It is implied that, to the generation of EMIC waves, the effect of solar wind dynamic pressure in the inner magnetosphere is not so significant as that in the outer magnetosphere.

  4. Ground based observations to probe the ionospheric and magnetospheric plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interactions between the solar wind plasma and the earth's magnetosphere can result in a series of complicated physical processes. One of the most important among them involves transfer of energy, which is believed to be partially dissipated into the magnetosphere and partially temporarily stored in it. Later this stored energy can explosively be released causing a variety of observable changes in the magnetospheric plasmas and fields and especially in ionsopheric particle populations. Ground-based, or near-ground-based, observations of particles, currents and fields have yielded important information when studying both local and global magnetospheric phenomena. A great variety of instruments and techniques have been developed to carry out measurements from ground of phenomena which are of such an extent, both in time and in space, that in situ satellite observations would only give a spatial and temporal snap-shot of them. An overview is given of some of these ground methods to probe the near-earth environment

  5. Probing the magnetic topology of coronal mass ejections by means of Ulysses/HI-SCALE energetic particle observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Malandraki

    Full Text Available In this work, solar flare energetic particle fluxes (Ee ≥ 42 keV observed by the HI-SCALE instrument onboard Ulysses, a spacecraft that is probing the heliosphere in 3-D, are utilized as diagnostics of the large-scale structure and topology of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF embedded within two well-identified interplanetary coronal mass ejection (ICME structures. On the basis of the energetic solar flare particle observations firm conclusions are drawn on whether the detected ICMEs have been detached from the solar corona or are still magnetically anchored to it when they arrive at 2.5 AU. From the development of the angular distributions of the particle intensities, we have inferred that portions of the ICMEs studied consisted of both open and closed magnetic field lines. Both ICMEs present a filamentary structure comprising magnetic filaments with distinct electron anisotropy characteristics. Subsequently, we studied the evolution of the anisotropies of the energetic electrons along the magnetic field loop-like structure of one ICME and computed the characteristic decay time of the anisotropy which is a measure of the amount of scattering that the trapped electron population underwent after injection at the Sun.

    Key words: Interplanetary physics (energetic particles; interplanetary magnetic fields

  6. Can modified gravity models reconcile the tension between CMB anisotropy and lensing maps in Planck-like observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Planck-2015 data seem to favour a large value of the lensing amplitude parameter, $A_{\\rm L}=1.22\\pm0.10$, in CMB spectra. This result is in $2\\sigma$ tension with the lensing reconstruction result, $A_{\\rm L}^{\\phi\\phi}=0.95\\pm0.04$. In this paper, we simulate several CMB anisotropy and CMB lensing spectra based on Planck-2015 best-fit cosmological parameter values and Planck blue book beam and noise specifications. We analyse several modified gravity models within the effective field theory framework against these simulations and find that models whose effective Newton constant is enhanced can modulate the CMB anisotropy spectra in a way similar to that of the $A_{\\rm L}$ parameter. However, in order to lens the CMB anisotropies sufficiently, like in the Planck-2015 results, the growth of matter perturbations is substantially enhanced and gives a high $\\sigma_8$ value. This in turn proves to be problematic when combining these data to other probes, like weak lensing from CFHTLenS, that favour a smaller ampl...

  7. Future supernovae observations as a probe of dark energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the potential impact of improved future supernovae data on our understanding of the dark energy problem. We carefully examine the relative utility of different fitting functions that can be used to parametrize the dark energy models, and provide concrete reasons why a particular choice (based on a parametrization of the equation of state) is better in almost all cases. We discuss the details of a representative sample of dark energy models and show how future supernova observations could distinguish among these. As a specific example, we consider the proposed 'SNAP' satellite which is planned to observe around 2000 supernovae. We show how a SNAP-class data set taken alone would be a powerful discriminator among a family of models that would be approximated by a constant equation of state for the most recent epoch of cosmic expansion. We show how this family includes most of the dark energy models proposed so far. We then show how an independent measurement of Ωm can allow SNAP to probe the evolution of the equation of state as well, allowing further discrimination among a larger class of proposed dark energy models. We study the impact of the satellite design parameters on this method to distinguish the models and compare SNAP to alternative measurements. We establish that if we exploit the full precision of SNAP it provides a very powerful probe

  8. Observation of an Anisotropy in the Galactic Cosmic Ray arrival direction at 400 TeV with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Ackermann, M; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Allen, M M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Degner, T; Demirörs, L; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, B; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huelsnitz, W; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Kroll, G; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, C C; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Richman, M; Rodrigues, J P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Stüer, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic ray induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between May 2009 and May 2010. The data include a total of 33$\\times 10^{9}$ muon events with a median angular resolution of $\\sim3^{\\circ}$ degrees. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high energy skymap shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3$\\sigma$. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  9. OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS AT 400 TeV WITH ICECUBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic-ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic-ray-induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between 2009 May and 2010 May. The data include a total of 33 × 109 muon events with a median angular resolution of ∼3°. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic-ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high-energy sky map shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of –6.3σ. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  10. Observation of an Anisotropy in the Galactic Cosmic Ray Arrival Direction at 400 TeV with IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; BenZvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Stamatikos, M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic ray induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between May 2009 and May 2010. The data include a total of 33 x 10(exp 9) muon events with a median angular resolution of approx. 3 degrees. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high energy skymap shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3 sigma. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  11. Observation of Anisotropy in the Galactic Cosmic Ray Arrival Directions at 400 TEV With IceCube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, R.; Abdou, Y.; Abu-Zayyad, T.; Ackermann, M.; Adams, J.; Aguilar, J. A.; Ahlers, M.; Allen, M. M.; Altmann, D.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Bai, X.; Baker, M.; Barwick, S. W.; Bay, R.; Bazo, Alba, J. L.; Beattie, K.; Beatty, J. J.; Bechet, S.; Becker, J. K.; Becker, K. H.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Benzvi, S.; Berdermann, J.; Stamatikos, M.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic ray induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between May 2009 and May 2010. The data include a total of 33x l0(epx 9) muon events with a median angular resolution of approx 3 degrees. A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic ray median energies of 20 and 400 Te V. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high energy skymap shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.30 sigma. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

  12. Momentum Imbalance Observables as a Probe of Gluon TMDs

    CERN Document Server

    Pisano, Cristian

    2015-01-01

    The unpolarized and linearly polarized gluon TMDs can be directly probed in heavy quark and jet pair production in unpolarized electron-proton collisions by looking at observables, like transverse momentum distributions and azimuthal asymmetries, depending on the momentum imbalance of the pair. Analytical expressions are presented for these observables and for analogous ones in Higgs plus jet and quarkonium plus photon production in unpolarized proton-proton scattering experiments. It is shown how the proposed measurements, to be performed at a future EIC and at the LHC, could provide important information on the size and shape of gluon TMDs, as well as on other fundamental properties such as their process and energy scale dependences.

  13. Relic gravitational waves in light of the 7-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data and improved prospects for the Planck mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The new release of data from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe improves the observational status of relic gravitational waves. The 7-year results enhance the indications of relic gravitational waves in the existing data and change to the better the prospects of confident detection of relic gravitational waves by the currently operating Planck satellite. We apply to WMAP7 data the same methods of analysis that we used earlier [W. Zhao, D. Baskaran, and L. P. Grishchuk, Phys. Rev. D 80, 083005 (2009)] with WMAP5 data. We also revised by the same methods our previous analysis of WMAP3 data. It follows from the examination of consecutive WMAP data releases that the maximum likelihood value of the quadrupole ratio R, which characterizes the amount of relic gravitational waves, increases up to R=0.264, and the interval separating this value from the point R=0 (the hypothesis of no gravitational waves) increases up to a 2σ level. The primordial spectra of density perturbations and gravitational waves remain blue in the relevant interval of wavelengths, but the spectral indices increase up to ns=1.111 and nt=0.111. Assuming that the maximum likelihood estimates of the perturbation parameters that we found from WMAP7 data are the true values of the parameters, we find that the signal-to-noise ratio S/N for the detection of relic gravitational waves by the Planck experiment increases up to S/N=4.04, even under pessimistic assumptions with regard to residual foreground contamination and instrumental noises. We comment on theoretical frameworks that, in the case of success, will be accepted or decisively rejected by the Planck observations.

  14. DETECTION OF ANOMALOUS MICROWAVE EMISSION IN THE PLEIADES REFLECTION NEBULA WITH WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE AND THE COSMOSOMAS EXPERIMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present evidence for anomalous microwave emission (AME) in the Pleiades reflection nebula, using data from the seven-year release of the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe and from the COSMOSOMAS (Cosmological Structures on Medium Angular Scales) experiment. The flux integrated in a 1° radius around R.A. = 56.024, decl. = 23.078 (J2000) is 2.15 ± 0.12 Jy at 22.8 GHz, where AME is dominant. COSMOSOMAS data show no significant emission, but allow one to set upper limits of 0.94 and 1.58 Jy (99.7% confidence level), respectively, at 10.9 and 14.7 GHz, which are crucial to pin down the AME spectrum at these frequencies, and to discard any other emission mechanisms which could have an important contribution to the signal detected at 22.8 GHz. We estimate the expected level of free-free emission from an extinction-corrected Hα template, while the thermal dust emission is characterized from infrared DIRBE data and extrapolated to microwave frequencies. When we deduct the contribution from these two components at 22.8 GHz, the residual flux, associated with AME, is 2.12 ± 0.12 Jy (17.7σ). The spectral energy distribution from 10 to 60 GHz can be accurately fitted with a model of electric dipole emission from small spinning dust grains distributed in two separated phases of molecular and atomic gas, respectively. The dust emissivity, calculated by correlating the 22.8 GHz data with 100 μm data, is found to be 4.36 ± 0.17 μK (MJy sr–1)–1, a value considerably lower than in typical AME clouds, which present emissivities of ∼20 μK (MJy sr–1)–1, although higher than the 0.2 μK (MJy sr–1)–1 of the translucent cloud LDN 1780, where AME has recently been claimed. The physical properties of the Pleiades nebula, in particular its low extinction AV ∼ 0.4, indicate that this is indeed a much less opaque object than those where AME has usually been studied. This fact, together with the broad knowledge of the stellar content of this region, provides an

  15. Observation of Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    CERN Document Server

    BenZvi, S Y; Westerhoff, S

    2015-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory, located 4100 m above sea level near Sierra Negra (19$^\\circ$ N) in Mexico, is sensitive to gamma rays and cosmic rays at TeV energies. The arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays at these energies shows significant anisotropy on several angular scales, with a relative intensity ranging between 10$^{-3}$ and 10$^{-4}$. We present the results of a study of cosmic-ray anisotropy based on more than 86 billion cosmic-ray air showers recorded with HAWC since June 2013. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map, which has a median energy of 2 TeV, exhibits several regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux. We present the energy dependence of the anisotropy and the cosmic-ray spectrum in the regions of significant excess.

  16. Transient Anisotropy in Degenerate Systems: Experimental Observation in a Cd-porphyrin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unterreiner A.-N.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available An unusual high transient anisotropy up to 0.65 in cadmium meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin in tetrahydrofuran was recorded which dacays on a 100 ps timescale. Opposite to previous work, this behaviour was explained by an incoherent mixing of excited state absorption, ground state bleach and stimulated emission.

  17. LARGE GAMMA ANISOTROPY OBSERVED IN THE CF-252 SPONTANEOUS-FISSION PROCESS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERPLOEG, H; BACELAR, JC; VANDENBERG, T; IACOB, VE; JONGMAN, [No Value; VANDERWOUDE, A

    1992-01-01

    The energy spectrum and the angular dependence relative to the fission direction of photons in the energy region between 2 and 40 MeV have been measured for the spontaneous fission of Cf-252. A large anisotropy was found in the energy region 8 to 12 MeV implying that photons in this region are emitt

  18. Seven-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Cosmological Interpretation

    OpenAIRE

    Komatsu, E.; Smith, K. M.; Dunkley, J.; Bennett, C. L.; Gold, B.; Hinshaw, G.; Jarosik, N.; D. Larson; Nolta, M. R.; Page, L; Spergel, D. N.; Halpern, M.; Hill, R S; Kogut, A.; Limon, M.

    2011-01-01

    (Abridged) The 7-year WMAP data and improved astrophysical data rigorously test the standard cosmological model and its extensions. By combining WMAP with the latest distance measurements from BAO and H0 measurement, we determine the parameters of the simplest LCDM model. The power-law index of the primordial power spectrum is n_s=0.968+-0.012, a measurement that excludes the scale-invariant spectrum by 99.5%CL. The other parameters are also improved from the 5-year results. Notable examples ...

  19. SEVEN-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE (WMAP ) OBSERVATIONS: COSMOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of seven-year data from WMAP and improved astrophysical data rigorously tests the standard cosmological model and places new constraints on its basic parameters and extensions. By combining the WMAP data with the latest distance measurements from the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) in the distribution of galaxies and the Hubble constant (H0) measurement, we determine the parameters of the simplest six-parameter ΛCDM model. The power-law index of the primordial power spectrum is ns = 0.968 ± 0.012 (68% CL) for this data combination, a measurement that excludes the Harrison-Zel'dovich-Peebles spectrum by 99.5% CL. The other parameters, including those beyond the minimal set, are also consistent with, and improved from, the five-year results. We find no convincing deviations from the minimal model. The seven-year temperature power spectrum gives a better determination of the third acoustic peak, which results in a better determination of the redshift of the matter-radiation equality epoch. Notable examples of improved parameters are the total mass of neutrinos, ΣMν eff = 4.34+0.86-0.88 (68% CL), which benefit from better determinations of the third peak and H0. The limit on a constant dark energy equation of state parameter from WMAP+BAO+H0, without high-redshift Type Ia supernovae, is w = -1.10 0.14 (68% CL). We detect the effect of primordial helium on the temperature power spectrum and provide a new test of big bang nucleosynthesis by measuring Yp = 0.326 ± 0.075 (68% CL). We detect, and show on the map for the first time, the tangential and radial polarization patterns around hot and cold spots of temperature fluctuations, an important test of physical processes at z = 1090 and the dominance of adiabatic scalar fluctuations. The seven-year polarization data have significantly improved: we now detect the temperature-E-mode polarization cross power spectrum at 21σ, compared with 13σ from the five-year data. With the seven-year temperature-B-mode cross power spectrum, the limit on a rotation of the polarization plane due to potential parity-violating effects has improved by 38% to Δα = -1.o1 ± 1.o4(statistical) ± 1.o5(systematic) (68% CL). We report significant detections of the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effect at the locations of known clusters of galaxies. The measured SZ signal agrees well with the expected signal from the X-ray data on a cluster-by-cluster basis. However, it is a factor of 0.5-0.7 times the predictions from 'universal profile' of Arnaud et al., analytical models, and hydrodynamical simulations. We find, for the first time in the SZ effect, a significant difference between the cooling-flow and non-cooling-flow clusters (or relaxed and non-relaxed clusters), which can explain some of the discrepancy. This lower amplitude is consistent with the lower-than-theoretically expected SZ power spectrum recently measured by the South Pole Telescope Collaboration.

  20. First Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations Determination of Cosmological Parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Spergel, D N; Peiris, H V; Komatsu, E; Nolta, M R; Bennett, C L; Halpern, M; Hinshaw, G; Jarosik, N C; Kogut, A J; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Page, L; Tucker, G S; Weiland, J L; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2003-01-01

    WMAP precision data enables accurate testingof cosmological models. We find that the emerging standard model of cosmology, a flat Lambda-dominated universe seeded by a nearly scale-invariant adiabatic Gaussian fluctuations, fits the WMAP data. With parameters fixed only by WMAP data, we can fit finer scale CMB measurements and measurements of large scale structure (galaxy surveys and the Lyman Alpha forest). This simple model is also consistent with a host of other astronomical measurements. We then fit the model parameters to a combination of WMAP data with other finer scale CMB experiments (ACBAR and CBI), 2dFGRS measurements and Lyman Alpha forest data to find the model's best fit cosmological parameters: h = 0.71^{+ 0.04}_{- 0.03}}, Omega_bh^2 = 0.0224+/-0.0009}, Omega_mh^2 = 0.135^{+ 0.008}_{- 0.009}}, tau = 0.17+/-0.06}, n_s(0.05 Mpc$^{-1}) = 0.93 \\pm 0.03}, and sigma_8 = 0.84+/-0.04}. WMAP's best determination of tau=0.17+/-0.04 arises directly from the TE data and not from this model fit, but they are...

  1. Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) Observations: Likelihoods and Parameters from the WMAP data

    CERN Document Server

    Dunkley, J; Nolta, M R; Spergel, D N; Larson, D; Hinshaw, G; Page, L; Bennett, C L; Gold, B; Jarosik, N; Weiland, J L; Halpern, M; Hill, R S; Kogut, A; Limon, M; Meyer, S S; Tucker, G S; Wollack, E; Wright, E L

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on cosmological constraints derived from analysis of WMAP data alone. A simple LCDM cosmological model fits the five-year WMAP temperature and polarization data. The basic parameters of the model are consistent with the three-year data and now better constrained: Omega_b h^2 = 0.02273+-0.00062, Omega_c h^2 = 0.1099+-0.0062, Omega_L = 0.742+-0.030, n_s = 0.963+0.014- 0.015, tau = 0.087+-0.017, sigma_8 = 0.796+-0.036. With five years of polarization data, we have measured the optical depth to reionization, tau>0, at 5 sigma significance. The redshift of an instantaneous reionization is constrained to be z_reion = 11.0+-1.4 with 68% confidence. This excludes a sudden reionization of the universe at z=6 at more than 3.5 sigma significance, suggesting that reionization was an extended process. Using two different methods for polarized foreground cleaning, and foreground marginalization, we get consistent estimates for the optical depth. This cosmological model also fits small-scale CMB data, and...

  2. Five-Year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP)Observations: Beam Maps and Window Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R.S.; Weiland, J.L.; Odegard, N.; Wollack, E.; Hinshaw, G.; Larson, D.; Bennett, C.L.; Halpern, M.; Kogut, A.; Page, L.; Dunkley, J.; Gold, B.; Jarosik, N.; Spergel, D.N.; Limon, M.; Nolta, M.R.; Tucker, G.S.; Wright, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    Cosmology and other scientific results from the WMAP mission require an accurate knowledge of the beam patterns in flight. While the degree of beam knowledge for the WMAP one-year and three-year results was unprecedented for a CMB experiment, we have significantly improved the beam determination as part of the five-year data release. Physical optics fits are done on both the A and the B sides for the first time. The cutoff scale of the fitted distortions on the primary mirror is reduced by a factor of approximately 2 from previous analyses. These changes enable an improvement in the hybridization of Jupiter data with beam models, which is optimized with respect to error in the main beam solid angle. An increase in main-beam solid angle of approximately 1% is found for the V2 and W1-W4 differencing assemblies. Although the five-year results are statistically consistent with previous ones, the errors in the five-year beam transfer functions are reduced by a factor of approximately 2 as compared to the three-year analysis. We present radiometry of the planet Jupiter as a test of the beam consistency and as a calibration standard; for an individual differencing assembly. errors in the measured disk temperature are approximately 0.5%.

  3. OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS AT MULTIPLE ANGULAR SCALES WITH IceCube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between 2009 May and 2010 May, the IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole recorded 32 billion muons generated in air showers produced by cosmic rays with a median energy of 20 TeV. With a data set of this size, it is possible to probe the southern sky for per-mil anisotropy on all angular scales in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays. Applying a power spectrum analysis to the relative intensity map of the cosmic ray flux in the southern hemisphere, we show that the arrival direction distribution is not isotropic, but shows significant structure on several angular scales. In addition to previously reported large-scale structure in the form of a strong dipole and quadrupole, the data show small-scale structure on scales between 150 and 300. The skymap exhibits several localized regions of significant excess and deficit in cosmic ray intensity. The relative intensity of the smaller-scale structures is about a factor of five weaker than that of the dipole and quadrupole structure. The most significant structure, an excess localized at (right ascension α = 122.04 and declination δ = -47.04), extends over at least 200 in right ascension and has a post-trials significance of 5.3σ. The origin of this anisotropy is still unknown.

  4. Anisotropy in the subducting slab: Observations from Philippine Sea plate events in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kate Huihsuan; Tseng, Yu-Lung; Furumura, Takashi; Kennett, Brian L. N.

    2015-12-01

    In the southernmost Ryukyu subduction zone, slab-guiding behavior from intermediate-depth earthquakes is well documented with a low-frequency (arrival followed by sustained high-frequency (3-10 Hz) wave trains. Such waves developed by propagating along a long path within the slab are expected to have high sensitivity to anisotropy within the slab. We determine shear wave splitting parameters from 178 intraplate events that are deeper than 100 km. The possible slab-anisotropy-associated polarization pattern shows the fast direction at N65°E and delay time of 0.13-0.45 s. This is stronger than the previously documented crust effect (direction of Philippine Sea plate with minor clockwise rotation due to the collision to Eurasian plate.

  5. Probing Unstable Massive Neutrinos with Current Cosmic Microwave Background Observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pattern of anisotropies in the cosmic microwave background depends upon the masses and lifetimes of the three neutrino species. A neutrino species of mass greater than 10eV with lifetime between 1013 and 1017 sec leaves a very distinct signature (due to the integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect): the anisotropies at large angles are predicted to be comparable to those on degree scales. Present data exclude such a possibility and hence this region of parameter space. For mν≅30 eV , τ≅1013 sec , we find an interesting possibility: the integrated Sachs-Wolfe peak produced by the decaying neutrino in low-Ω models mimics the acoustic peak expected in an Ω=1 model. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  6. Probing anisotropies of gravitational-wave backgrounds with a space-based interferometer: Geometric properties of antenna patterns and their angular power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the sensitivity to anisotropies of stochastic gravitational-wave backgrounds (GWBs) observed via space-based interferometer. In addition to the unresolved galactic binaries as the most promising GWB source of the planned Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), the extragalactic sources for GWBs might be detected in the future space missions. The anisotropies of the GWBs thus play a crucial role to discriminate various components of the GWBs. We study general features of antenna pattern sensitivity to the anisotropies of GWBs beyond the low-frequency approximation. We show that the sensitivity of space-based interferometer to GWBs is severely restricted by the data combinations and the symmetries of the detector configuration. The spherical harmonic analysis of the antenna pattern functions reveals that the angular power of the detector response increases with frequency and the detectable multipole moments with effective sensitivity heff∼10-20 Hz-1/2 may reach l∼8-10 at f∼f*=10 mHz in the case of the single LISA detector. However, the cross correlation of optimal interferometric variables is blind to the monopole (l=0) intensity anisotropy, and also to the dipole (l=1) in some case, irrespective of the frequency band. Besides, all the self-correlated signals are shown to be blind to the odd multipole moments (l=odd), independently of the frequency band

  7. Anisotropy of weakly vibrated granular flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortel, Geert H; van Hecke, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of weakly vibrated flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters-flow rate and vibration strength-this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as a function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggest that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a crucial role in determining the rheology of granular flows. PMID:26565148

  8. Anisotropy of Weakly Vibrated Granular Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Wortel, Geert; Van Hecke, Martin

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally probe the anisotropy of the fabric of weakly vibrated, flowing granular media. Depending on the driving parameters --- flow rate and vibration strength --- this anisotropy varies significantly. We show how the anisotropy collapses when plotted as function of the driving stresses, uncovering a direct link between stresses and anisotropy. Moreover, our data suggests that for small anisotropies, the shear stresses vanish. Anisotropy of the fabric of granular media thus plays a ...

  9. Magnetic anisotropy of the Kondo lattice CePd1-xRhx probed with polarized neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the magnetic anisotropy of the Kondo lattice system CePd1-xRhx at low temperatures by using polarized neutrons at the instrument POLI-HEIDI where the polarization analysis device CryoPad has been installed recently. The system CePd1-xRhx shows significant anisotropy for low Rh concentrations xC(x) changes sign at Rh concentration x=0.65 and a cluster glass phase emerges. Our data are consistent with previous measurements of the magnetisation. The measured polarization matrices allows us to quantify the average domain size in each direction of space and give us important hints of magnetic stray fields of the sample induced even in zero external magnetic field.

  10. Solar and sidereal anisotropy of cosmic rays observed at 30 m.w.e. underground and its relation to the interplanetary magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using the data from underground multidirectional muon telescope at Misato (30 m.w.e. depth), the diurnal variations in solar and sidereal time have been investigated as a function of the interplanetary magnetic field direction. Evidence for observed seasonal variations of solar diurnal anisotropy, thus for observed sidereal anisotropy in 6 hr or 18 hr ST is obtained for five directional components, and is shown to be strongly dependent on the interplanetary magnetic field direction as suggested by Swinson. (orig./WBU)

  11. Probing the Earth's core with magnetic field observations from Swarm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finlay, Christopher; Olsen, Nils; Kotsiaros, Stavros; Gillet, Nicolas; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    2016-07-01

    By far the largest part of the Earth's magnetic field is generated by motions taking place within our planet's liquid metal outer core. Variations of this core-generated field thus provide a unique means of probing the dynamics taking place in the deepest reaches of the Earth. In this contribution we present a new high resolution model of the core-generated magnetic field, and its recent time changes, derived from a dataset that includes more two years of observations from the Swarm mission. Resulting inferences regarding the underlying core flow, its dynamics, and the nature of the geodynamo process will be discussed. The CHAOS-6 geomagnetic field model, covering the interval 1999-2016, is derived from magnetic data collected by the three Swarm missions, as well as the earlier CHAMP and Oersted satellites, and monthly means data collected from 160 ground observatories. Advantage is taken of the constellation aspect of the Swarm mission by ingesting both scalar and vector field differences along-track and across track between the lower pair of Swarm satellites. The internal part of the model consists of a spherical harmonic (SH) expansion, time-dependent for degrees 20 and below. The model coefficients are estimated using a regularized, iteratively reweighted, least squares scheme involving Huber weights. At Earth's surface, CHAOS-6 shows evidence for positive acceleration of the field intensity in 2015 over a broad area around longitude 90deg E that is also seen at ground observatories such as Novosibirsk. At the core surface, we are able to map the secular variation (linear trend in the magnetic field) up to SH degree 16. The radial field acceleration at the core surface in 2015 is found be largest at low latitudes under the India-South East Asia region and under the region of northern South America, as well as at high northern latitudes under Alaska and Siberia. Surprisingly, there is also evidence for some acceleration in the central Pacific region, for example

  12. THE CONTRIBUTION OF THE KINEMATIC SUNYAEV-ZEL'DOVICH EFFECT FROM THE WARM-HOT INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM TO THE FIVE-YEAR WILKINSON MICROWAVE ANISOTROPY PROBE DATA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study the contribution of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect, generated by the warm-hot intergalactic medium, to the cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies in the five-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) data. We explore the concordance ΛCDM cosmological model, with and without this kSZ contribution, using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Our model requires a single extra parameter to describe this new component. Our results show that the inclusion of the kSZ signal improves the fit to the data without significantly altering the best-fit cosmological parameters except Ωb h 2. The improvement is localized at the l ∼> 500 multipoles. For the best-fit model, this extra component peaks at l ∼ 450 with an amplitude of 129 μK2, and represents 3.1% of the total power measured by WMAP. Nevertheless, at the 2σ level a null kSZ contribution is still compatible with the data. Part of the detected signal could arise from unmasked point sources and/or Poissonianly distributed foreground residuals. A statistically more significant detection requires the wider frequency coverage and angular resolution of the forthcoming Planck mission.

  13. Direct Observation of Field and Temperature Induced Domain Replication in Dipolar Coupled Perpendicular Anisotropy Films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauet, T.; Gunther, C.M.; Pfau, B.; Eisebitt, S.; Fischer, P.; Rick, R. L.; Thiele, J.-U.; Hellwig, O.; Schabes, M.E.

    2007-07-01

    Dipolar interactions in a soft/Pd/hard [CoNi/Pd]{sub 30}/Pd/[Co/Pd]{sub 20} multilayer system, where a thick Pd layer between two ferromagnetic units prevents direct exchange coupling, are directly revealed by combining magnetometry and state-of-the-art layer resolving soft x-ray imaging techniques with sub-100-nm spatial resolution. The domains forming in the soft layer during external magnetic field reversal are found to match the domains previously trapped in the hard layer. The low Curie temperature of the soft layer allows varying its intrinsic parameters via temperature and thus studying the competition with dipolar fields due to the domains in the hard layer. Micromagnetic simulations elucidate the role of [CoNi/Pd] magnetization, exchange, and anisotropy in the duplication process. Finally, thermally driven domain replication in remanence during temperature cycling is demonstrated.

  14. Observations with a mid-plane reciprocating probe in MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fast reciprocating probe has recently been installed on MAST. It has been used to measure the outboard, mid-plane scrape off layer (SOL) of L-mode plasmas, and to study the intermittent fluctuations in the SOL in L-mode and ELMy H-mode discharges. In this paper, the system and the experiments are introduced

  15. Probing anisotropies of gravitational-wave backgrounds with a space-based interferometer: geometric properties of antenna patterns and their angular power

    CERN Document Server

    Kudoh, H; Kudoh, Hideaki; Taruya, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the sensitivity to anisotropies of stochastic gravitational-wave backgrounds (GWBs) observed via space-based interferometer. In addition to the un-resolved Galactic binaries as the most promising GWB source of the planned Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), the extra-galactic sources for GWBs might be detected in the future space missions. The anisotropies of the GWBs thus play a crucial role to discriminate various components of the GWBs. We study general features of antenna pattern sensitivity to the anisotropies of GWBs beyond the low-frequency approximation. We show that the sensitivity of space-based interferometer to GWBs is severely restricted by the data combinations and the symmetries of the detector configuration. The spherical harmonic analysis of the antenna pattern functions reveals that the angular power of the detector response increases with frequency and the detectable multipole moments with effective sensitivity h_{eff}\\sim 10^{-20} Hz^{-1/2} may reach $\\ell \\sim $ 8 - 10 a...

  16. The effects of structure anisotropy on lensing observables in an exact general relativistic setting for precision cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study of relativistic, higher order, and nonlinear effects has become necessary in recent years in the pursuit of precision cosmology. We develop and apply here a framework to study gravitational lensing in exact models in general relativity that are not restricted to homogeneity and isotropy, and where full nonlinearity and relativistic effects are thus naturally included. We apply the framework to a specific, anisotropic galaxy cluster model which is based on a modified NFW halo density profile and described by the Szekeres metric. We examine the effects of increasing levels of anisotropy in the galaxy cluster on lensing observables like the convergence and shear for various lensing geometries, finding a strong nonlinear response in both the convergence and shear for rays passing through anisotropic regions of the cluster. Deviation from the expected values in a spherically symmetric structure are asymmetric with respect to path direction and thus will persist as a statistical effect when averaged over some ensemble of such clusters. The resulting relative difference in various geometries can be as large as approximately 2%, 8%, and 24% in the measure of convergence (1−κ) for levels of anisotropy of 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively, as a fraction of total cluster mass. For the total magnitude of shear, the relative difference can grow near the center of the structure to be as large as 15%, 32%, and 44% for the same levels of anisotropy, averaged over the two extreme geometries. The convergence is impacted most strongly for rays which pass in directions along the axis of maximum dipole anisotropy in the structure, while the shear is most strongly impacted for rays which pass in directions orthogonal to this axis, as expected. The rich features found in the lensing signal due to anisotropic substructure are nearly entirely lost when one treats the cluster in the traditional FLRW lensing framework. These effects due to anisotropic structures are thus likely to

  17. The effects of structure anisotropy on lensing observables in an exact general relativistic setting for precision cosmology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Troxel, M. A.; Ishak, Mustapha; Peel, Austin, E-mail: troxel@utdallas.edu, E-mail: mishak@utdallas.edu, E-mail: austin.peel@utdallas.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, TX 75080 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    The study of relativistic, higher order, and nonlinear effects has become necessary in recent years in the pursuit of precision cosmology. We develop and apply here a framework to study gravitational lensing in exact models in general relativity that are not restricted to homogeneity and isotropy, and where full nonlinearity and relativistic effects are thus naturally included. We apply the framework to a specific, anisotropic galaxy cluster model which is based on a modified NFW halo density profile and described by the Szekeres metric. We examine the effects of increasing levels of anisotropy in the galaxy cluster on lensing observables like the convergence and shear for various lensing geometries, finding a strong nonlinear response in both the convergence and shear for rays passing through anisotropic regions of the cluster. Deviation from the expected values in a spherically symmetric structure are asymmetric with respect to path direction and thus will persist as a statistical effect when averaged over some ensemble of such clusters. The resulting relative difference in various geometries can be as large as approximately 2%, 8%, and 24% in the measure of convergence (1−κ) for levels of anisotropy of 5%, 10%, and 15%, respectively, as a fraction of total cluster mass. For the total magnitude of shear, the relative difference can grow near the center of the structure to be as large as 15%, 32%, and 44% for the same levels of anisotropy, averaged over the two extreme geometries. The convergence is impacted most strongly for rays which pass in directions along the axis of maximum dipole anisotropy in the structure, while the shear is most strongly impacted for rays which pass in directions orthogonal to this axis, as expected. The rich features found in the lensing signal due to anisotropic substructure are nearly entirely lost when one treats the cluster in the traditional FLRW lensing framework. These effects due to anisotropic structures are thus likely to

  18. Observation by an air-shower array in Tibet of the multi-TeV cosmic-ray anisotropy due to terrestrial orbital motion around the Sun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amenomori, M; Ayabe, S; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng, C F; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, J Y; Lu, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mori, S; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saito, T; Sakata, M; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Utsugi, T; Wang, B S; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhaxisangzhu; Zhou, X X

    2004-08-01

    We report on the solar diurnal variation of the galactic cosmic-ray intensity observed by the Tibet III air shower array during the period from 1999 to 2003. In the higher-energy event samples (12 and 6.2 TeV), the variations are fairly consistent with the Compton-Getting anisotropy due to the terrestrial orbital motion around the Sun, while the variation in the lower-energy event sample (4.0 TeV) is inconsistent with this anisotropy. This suggests an additional anisotropy superposed at the multi-TeV energies, e.g., the solar modulation effect. This is the highest-precision measurement of the Compton-Getting anisotropy ever made. PMID:15323615

  19. Observation of Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Galactic Cosmic Rays at Multiple Angular Scales with IceCube

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R; Abu-Zayyad, T; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Altmann, D; Andeen, K; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Bay, R; Alba, J L Bazo; Beattie, K; Beatty, J J; Bechet, S; Becker, J K; Becker, K -H; Benabderrahmane, M L; BenZvi, S; Berdermann, J; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bertrand, D; Besson, D Z; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brown, A M; Buitink, S; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carson, M; Chirkin, D; Christy, B; Clem, J; Clevermann, F; Cohen, S; Colnard, C; Cowen, D F; D'Agostino, M V; Danninger, M; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; De Clercq, C; Demirörs, L; Denger, T; Depaepe, O; Descamps, F; Desiati, P; de Vries-Uiterweerd, G; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dierckxsens, M; Dreyer, J; Dumm, J P; Ehrlich, R; Eisch, J; Ellsworth, R W; Engdegård, O; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Feusels, T; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Foerster, M M; Fox, B D; Franckowiak, A; Franke, R; Gaisser, T K; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Goodman, J A; Gora, D; Grant, D; Griesel, T; Groß, A; Grullon, S; Gurtner, M; Ha, C; Hajismail, A; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hanson, K; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Herquet, P; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Hubert, D; Huelsnitz, W; a,; Hülß, J -P; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Hussain, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Johansson, H; Joseph, J M; Kampert, K -H; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kenny, P; Kiryluk, J; Kislat, F; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Köpke, L; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kowarik, T; Krasberg, M; Krings, T; Kroll, G; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lafebre, S; Laihem, K; Landsman, H; Larson, M J; Lauer, R; Lünemann, J; Madajczyk, B; Madsen, J; Majumdar, P; Marotta, A; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Meagher, K; Merck, M; Mészáros, P; Meures, T; Middell, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Montaruli, T; b,; Morse, R; Movit, S M; Nahnhauer, R; Nam, J W; Naumann, U; Nießen, P; Nygren, D R; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Olivo, M; O'Murchadha, A; Ono, M; Panknin, S; Paul, L; Heros, C Pérez de los; Petrovic, J; Piegsa, A; Pieloth, D; Porrata, R; Posselt, J; Price, C C; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Ribordy, M; Rizzo, A; Rodrigues, J P; Roth, P; Rothmaier, F; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Rutledge, D; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Sander, H -G; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Schmidt, T; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schultes, A; Schulz, O; Schunck, M; Seckel, D; Semburg, B; Seo, S H; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Silvestri, A; Slipak, A; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; c,; Stanev, T; Stephens, G; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stössl, A; Stoyanov, S; Strahler, E A; Straszheim, T; Stür, M; Sullivan, G W; Swillens, Q; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Toscano, S; Tosi, D; Turčan, D; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; Van Overloop, A; van Santen, J; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Walck, C; Waldenmaier, T; Wallraff, M; Walter, M; Weaver, Ch; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whitehorn, N; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wischnewski, R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, C; Xu, X W; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Zoll, M

    2011-01-01

    Between May 2009 and May 2010, the IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole recorded 32 billion muons generated in air showers produced by cosmic rays with a median energy of 20 TeV. With a data set of this size, it is possible to probe the southern sky for per-mille anisotropy on all angular scales in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays. Applying a power spectrum analysis to the relative intensity map of the cosmic ray flux in the southern hemisphere, we show that the arrival direction distribution is not isotropic, but shows significant structure on several angular scales. In addition to previously reported large-scale structure in the form of a strong dipole and quadrupole, the data show small-scale structure on scales between 15 degrees and 30 degrees. The skymap exhibits several localized regions of significant excess and deficit in cosmic ray intensity. The relative intensity of the smaller-scale structures is about a factor of 5 weaker than that of the dipole and quadrupole structure. ...

  20. Poly(acrylic acid) interpolymer complexation: use of a fluorescence time resolved anisotropy as a poly(acrylamide) probe

    OpenAIRE

    Swift, T.; Swanson, L; Rimmer, S.

    2014-01-01

    A low concentration poly(acrylamide) sensor has been developed which uses the segmental mobility of another polymer probe with a covalently attached fluorescent marker. Interpolymer complexation with poly(acrylic acid) leads to reduced segmental mobility which can be used to determine the concentration of polymer in solution. This technique could be useful in detecting the runoff of polymer dispersants and flocculants in fresh water supplies following water purification processes

  1. The effects of structure anisotropy on lensing observables in an exact general relativistic setting for precision cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Troxel, M A; Peel, Austin

    2013-01-01

    The study of relativistic, higher order and nonlinear effects has become necessary in recent years in the pursuit of precision cosmology. We develop and apply here a framework to study gravitational lensing in exact models in general relativity that are not restricted to homogeneity and isotropy, and where full nonlinearity and relativistic effects are included. We apply the framework to a specific, anisotropic galaxy cluster model which is based on a modified NFW halo density profile and described by the Szekeres metric. We examine the effects of increasing levels of anisotropy in the galaxy cluster on lensing observables like the convergence and shear for various lensing geometries, finding a strong nonlinear response in both the convergence and shear for rays passing through anisotropic regions of the cluster. Deviation from the expected values in a spherically symmetric structure are asymmetric with respect to path direction and thus will persist as a statistical effect when averaged over some ensemble of...

  2. High Speed Pump-Probe Apparatus for Observation of Transitional Effects in Ultrafast Laser Micromachining Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilya Alexeev

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A pump-probe experimental approach has been shown to be a very efficient tool for the observation and analysis of various laser matter interaction effects. In those setups, synchronized laser pulses are used to create an event (pump and to simultaneously observe it (probe. In general, the physical effects that can be investigated with such an apparatus are restricted by the temporal resolution of the probe pulse and the observation window. The latter can be greatly extended by adjusting the pump-probe time delay under the assumption that the interaction process remains fairly reproducible. Unfortunately, this assumption becomes invalid in the case of high-repetition-rate ultrafast laser material processing, where the irradiation history strongly affects the ongoing interaction process. In this contribution, the authors present an extension of the pump-probe setup that allows to investigate transitional and dynamic effects present during ultrafast laser machining performed at high pulse repetition frequencies.

  3. Probing the Cosmic X-Ray and MeV Gamma-Ray Background Radiation through the Anisotropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, Yoshiyuki [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Murase, Kohta [Inst. for Advanced Study, Princeton, NJ (United States). School of Natural Sciences; Madejski, Grzegorz M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Uchiyama, Yasunobu [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rikkyo Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    2013-09-24

    While the cosmic soft X-ray background is very likely to originate from individual Seyfert galaxies, the origin of the cosmic hard X-ray and MeV gamma-ray background is not fully understood. It is expected that Seyferts including Compton thick population may explain the cosmic hard X-ray background. At MeV energy range, Seyferts having non-thermal electrons in coronae above accretion disks or MeV blazars may explain the background radiation. We propose that future measurements of the angular power spectra of anisotropy of the cosmic X-ray and MeV gamma-ray backgrounds will be key to deciphering these backgrounds and the evolution of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). As AGNs trace the cosmic large-scale structure, spatial clustering of AGNs exists. We show that e-ROSITA will clearly detect the correlation signal of unresolved Seyferts at 0.5-2 keV and 2-10 keV bands and will be able to measure the bias parameter of AGNs at both bands. Once the future hard X-ray all sky satellites achieve the sensitivity better than 10-12 erg/cm2/s-1 at 10-30 keV or 30-50 keV - although this is beyond the sensitivities of current hard X-ray all sky monitors - angular power spectra will allow us to independently investigate the fraction of Compton-thick AGNs in all Seyferts. We also find that the expected angular power spectra of Seyferts and blazars in the MeV range are different by about an order of magnitude, where the Poisson term, so-called shot noise, is dominant. Current and future MeV instruments will clearly disentangle the origin of the MeV gamma-ray background through the angular power spectrum.

  4. Observation of a north-south anisotropy of atmospheric radiation at balloon altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, G. J.; Watts, J. W., Jr.; Meegan, C. A.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements have been made of an azimuthal asymmetry of atmospheric radiation at balloon altitudes and mid-latitudes. The measured asymmetry is 6% peak to peak in the north-south direction at energies above 500 keV. A lack of east-west asymmetry indicates that the arrival direction of the atmospheric radiation is highly decoupled from that of the primary radiation. Present models of secondary atmospheric radiation production and transport do not quantitatively agree with the observations.

  5. Observation of a north--south anisotropy of atmospheric radiation at balloon altitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements have been made of an azimuthal asymmetry of atmospheric radiation at balloon altitudes and mid-latitudes. The measured asymmetry is 6% peak to peak in the north--south direction at energies above 500 keV. A lack of east--west asymmetry indicates that the arrival direction of the atmospheric radiation is highly decoupled from that of the primary radiation. Present models of secondary atmospheric radiation production and transport do not quantitatively agree with the observations

  6. Probing intermolecular potentials with dynamic and kinetic observables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The connection between intermolecular potentials and a variety of dynamic and kinetic observables is studied through the use of functional sensitivity analysis. Equations were derived for the functional derivatives of inelastic cross sections, rate constants, energy level populations, and transport and relaxation cross sections with respect to a variation in the potential surface. Five different studies were performed. Three of these studies analyzed the relationship between a rigid-rotor potential and three different types of observables: inelastic cross sections, rate constants and rotational energy level populations. The He-H2, He-HT and He-HF systems were all examined in this manner. One study looked at the effect of changes in the He-H2 potential energy surface on a variety of transport and relaxation cross sections. This study was again performed using the rigid rotor approximation and had three different levels of observables: microscopic, thermally averaged and effective cross sections. Finally, a study of inelastic scattering was performed on the He-H2 system in which the three-dimensional potential was used. Certain general features and trends were noted throughout this work. The microscopic observables, i.e. collision cross sections and transport and relaxation cross sections, generally showed highly oscillatory sensitivity to the potential components in the asymptotic regime, with one or more dominant peaks in either the repulsive or well region. The thermally averaged cross sections and rate constants exhibited noticeably fewer oscillations but retained the dominant sensitivity structure. The bulk observables, i.e. energy level populations and effective cross sections, showed varying amounts of information loss

  7. Large-Scale Sidereal Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic-Ray Intensity Observed by the Tibet Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Feng Cun Feng; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Haibing, H; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren; Le, G M; Li, J Y; Lü, H; Lu, S L; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Onuma, H; Ouchi, T; Ozawa, S; Ren, J R; Saitô, T; Sakata, M; Sasaki, T; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takashima, M; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Utsugi, T; Wang, H; Wang, X; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue Liang; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S I; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Yi Zhang; Zhang, Y; Zhaxi Sang Zhu; Zhou, X X

    2005-01-01

    We present the large-scale sidereal anisotropy ofgalactic cosmic-ray intensity in the multi-TeV region observed with the Tibet-IIIair shower array during the period from 1999 through 2003. The sidereal daily variation of cosmic rays observed in this experiment shows an excess of relative intensity around $4\\sim7 $ hours local sidereal time, as well as a deficit around 12 hours local sidereal time. While the amplitude of the excess is not significant when averaged over all declinations, the excess in individual declinaton bands becomes larger and clearer as the viewing direction moves toward the south. The maximum phase of the excess intensity changes from $\\sim$7 at the northern hemisphere to $\\sim$4 hours at the equatorial region. We also show that both the amplitude and the phase of the first harmonic vector of the daily variation are remarkably independent of primary energy in the multi-TeV region. This is the first result determining the energy and declination dependences of the full 24-hour profiles of t...

  8. The Anisotropy of the Microwave Background to l = 3500 Mosaic Observations with the Cosmic Background Imager

    CERN Document Server

    Pearson, T J; Readhead, A C S; Shepherd, M C; Sievers, J L; Udomprasert, P S; Cartwright, J K; Farmer, A J; Padin, S; Myers, S T; Bond, J R; Contaldi, C R; Pen, U L; Prunet, S; Pogosyan, D; Carlstrom, J E; Kovács, J; Leitch, E M; Pryke, C L; Halverson, N W; Holzapfel, W L; Altamirano, P; Bronfman, L; Casassus, S; May, J; Joy, M

    2003-01-01

    Using the Cosmic Background Imager, a 13-element interferometer array operating in the 26-36 GHz frequency band, we have observed 40 sq deg of sky in three pairs of fields, each ~ 145 x 165 arcmin, using overlapping pointings (mosaicing). We present images and power spectra of the cosmic microwave background radiation in these mosaic fields. We remove ground radiation and other low-level contaminating signals by differencing matched observations of the fields in each pair. The primary foreground contamination is due to point sources (radio galaxies and quasars). We have subtracted the strongest sources from the data using higher-resolution measurements, and we have projected out the response to other sources of known position in the power-spectrum analysis. The images show features on scales ~ 6 - 15 arcmin, corresponding to masses ~ (5 - 80)*10^{14} Msun at the surface of last scattering, which are likely to be the seeds of clusters of galaxies. The power spectrum estimates have a resolution Delta-l = 200 an...

  9. Long term variation of the solar diurnal anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays observed with the Nagoya multi-directional muon detector

    CERN Document Server

    Munakata, K; Kato, C; Kota, J

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the three dimensional anisotropy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities observed independently with a muon detector at Nagoya in Japan and neutron monitors over four solar activity cycles. We clearly see the phase of the free-space diurnal anisotropy shifting toward earlier hours around solar activity minima in A>0 epochs, due to the reduced anisotropy component parallel to the mean magnetic field. The average parallel component is consistent with a rigidity independent spectrum, while the perpendicular component increases with GCR rigidity. We suggest that this harder spectrum of the perpendicular component is due to contribution from the drift streaming. We find that the bidirectional latitudinal density gradient is positive in A>0 epoch, while it is negative in A0 and A0. We also find, however, that parallel mean free path (radial gradient) appears to persistently increase (decreasing) in the last three cycles of weakening solar activity. We suggest that simple differences between these pa...

  10. Probing double neutron star evolution with pulsar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdman, Robert

    2016-07-01

    Pulsars in double neutron star (DNS) binary systems represent a distinct population among pulsar binaries. Within this class of system, the formation channel through which the second neutron star (NS) is formed can differ in ways that can leave distinct observable signatures. In particular, measured DNS properties provide clues about prior interactions and the progenitor supernova event that has left behind the second-formed NS. In this talk I will present results from long-term timing analysis and profile studies of several pulsars in DNS systems, including highly relativistic binaries such as PSR J0737-3039A from the double pulsar system and the recently discovered PSR J1913+1102. I will place them in the larger context of the DNS population, and demonstrate our attempt to distinguishing the different evolutionary channels that are possible for these systems. Doing so will also provide crucial complimentary information to current and future observations by ground-based gravitational-wave detectors such as Advanced LIGO and VIRGO, which are particularly sensitive to merging DNS systems.

  11. A Study on Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Rays Observed by Pierre Auger Observatory

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hang Bae

    2012-01-01

    We study the anisotropy in the arrival directions of PAO UHECRs, using the point source correlational angular distance distribution. The result shows that the anisotropy is characterized by one prominent excess region and one void region. The excess region is located near the Centaurus A direction, supporting that the Centaurus A is a promising UHECR source. The void region near the south pole direction may be used to limit the diffuse isotropic background contribution.

  12. Optical probe observations of non-uniformities in laser produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to its high spatial and temporal resolution optical probing is a very powerful technique for investigating the corona plasma of laser heated targets. The basic requirements of optical probing systems are discussed and a short description of a system presently in use is given. Various experimental observations made with this system on ablatively irradiated targets are presented. These show the presence of small scale density and magnetic field non-uniformities in the plasma corona. (author)

  13. Inertial-range anisotropies in the solar wind from 0.3 to 1 AU: Helios 1 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBride, Benjamin T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2010-07-01

    In this study we analyze the evolution of solar wind turbulence from 0.3 to 1 AU using a database of 387 intervals from the Helios 1 spacecraft. Our results uphold the conclusion made by Smith et al. (2006), who used data from 1 AU, that the magnetic variance anisotropy scales with both proton beta and the amplitude of fluctuations in the power spectrum all the way down to 0.3 AU. We confirm the result of Bieber et al. (1996) that ˜80% of the energy is contained in the wave vectors perpendicular to the mean magnetic field and in light of Dasso et al. (2005) we compute the fraction of energy in field-aligned wave vectors for high- and low-speed intervals separately. As Hamilton et al. found at 1 AU, we also see no clear reliance of the energy contained in parallel and perpendicular wave vectors based on wind speed at any heliocentric distance between 0.3 and 1 AU in the range of frequencies we study (5 to 20 mHz). These results combine to tell the story that the turbulent properties of the solar wind we analyze are fully consistent with the 1 AU observations and no discernable evolution can be found.

  14. On the suspected timing-offset-induced calibration error in the Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe time-ordered data

    CERN Document Server

    Roukema, Boudewijn F

    2010-01-01

    In the time-ordered data (TOD) files of the WMAP CMB observations, there is an undocumented timing offset of -25.6 ms between the spacecraft attitude and radio flux density timestamps. If the offset induced an error during calibration of the raw TOD, then this would add variance per pixel. This variance would be present in the calibrated TOD. Low-resolution map-making as a function of timing offset should show a minimum variance for the correct timing offset. Three years of the calibrated, filtered WMAP 3-year TOD are compiled into sky maps at HEALPix resolution N_side=8, individually for each of the K, Ka, Q, V and W band differencing assemblies (DA's), as a function of timing offset. The median per map of the temperature fluctuation variance per pixel is calculated and minimised against timing offset, over a range of +- 5 exposure times. Minima are clearly present. The timing offsets that minimise the median variance are -38 +- 9 ms (K, Ka), -30 +- 4 ms (Q), -27 +- 10 ms (V), and -29 +- 550 ms (W), i.e. an ...

  15. Observation of nanostructure by scanning near-field optical microscope with small sphere probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Oshikane, Toshihiko Kataoka, Mitsuru Okuda, Seiji Hara, Haruyuki Inoue and Motohiro Nakano

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Step and terrace structure has been observed in an area of 1 μm×1 μm on the cleaved surface of KCl–KBr solid-solution single crystal by scanning near-field optical microscope (SNOM with a small sphere probe of 500 nm diameter. Lateral spatial resolution of the SNOM system was estimated to be 20 nm from the observation of step width and the scanning-step interval. Vertical spatial resolution was estimated to be 5–2 nm from the observation of step height and noise level of photomultiplier tube (PMT. With applying a dielectric dipole radiation model to the probe surface, the reason why such a high spatial resolution was obtained in spite of the 500 nm sphere probe, was understood as the effect of the near-field term appeared in the radiation field equations.

  16. Long-term variation of the solar diurnal anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays observed with the Nagoya multi-directional muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze the three-dimensional anisotropy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities observed independently with a muon detector at Nagoya in Japan and neutron monitors over four solar activity cycles. We clearly see the phase of the free-space diurnal anisotropy shifting toward earlier hours around solar activity minima in A > 0 epochs, due to the reduced anisotropy component parallel to the mean magnetic field. This component is consistent with a rigidity-independent spectrum, while the perpendicular anisotropy component increases with GCR rigidity. We suggest that this harder spectrum of the perpendicular component is due to contribution from the drift streaming. We find that the bi-directional latitudinal density gradient is positive in the A > 0 epoch, while it is negative in the A < 0 epoch, in agreement with the drift model prediction. The radial density gradient of GCRs, on the other hand, varies with a ∼11 yr cycle with maxima (minima) in solar maximum (minimum) periods, but we find no significant difference between the radial gradients in the A > 0 and A < 0 epochs. The corresponding parallel mean free path is larger in A < 0 than in A > 0. We also find, however, that the parallel mean free path (radial gradient) appears to persistently increase (decrease) in the last three cycles of weakening solar activity. We suggest that simple differences between these parameters in A > 0 and A < 0 epochs are seriously biased by these long-term trends.

  17. Observation of Structural Anisotropy and the Onset of Liquid-like Motion during the Non-thermal Melting of InSb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaffney, K.J.; Lindenberg, A.M.; /SLAC, SSRL; Larsson, J.; /Lund Inst. Tech.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; /Jena U. /Duisburg U.; Blome, C.; /DESY; Synnergren, O.; /Lund Inst.; Sheppard, J.; /Oxford U.; Caleman, C.; /Uppsala U.; MacPhee, A.G.; Weinstein, D.; Lowney, D.P.; Allison, T.K.; Matthews, T.; Falcone, R.W.; /UC, Berkeley; Cavalieri, A.L.; /Michigan U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. Quantenopt.; Dritz, D.M.; Lee, S.H.; Bucksbau, P.H.p a Reis, D.A.; /Michigan U.; Rudati, J.; Macrander, A.T.; /ANL, APS; Fuoss, P.H.; /Argonne

    2005-09-30

    The melting dynamics of laser excited InSb have been studied with femtosecond x-ray diffraction. These measurements observe the delayed onset of diffusive atomic motion, signaling the appearance of liquid-like dynamics. They also demonstrate that the root mean-squared displacement in the [111] direction increases faster than in the [110] direction after the first 500 fs. This structural anisotropy indicates that the initially generated fluid differs significantly from the equilibrium liquid.

  18. Probing the possibility of a 12C13C abundance gradient from observations of interstellar CH+

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    I have performed high signal-to-noise (SN /equals/ 300 to 500) observations of interstellar CH/sup /plus// at Lick Observatory and at CTIO of the reddened, early-type stars HD 183143, HD 24432, and HD 157038 in an effort to probe the existence of a 12C13C abundance gradient in our Galaxy

  19. Estimation of classical parameters via continuous probing of complementary quantum observables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negretti, Antonio; Mølmer, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    We discuss how continuous probing of a quantum system allows estimation of unknown classical parameters embodied in the Hamiltonian of the system. We generalize the stochastic master equation associated with continuous observation processes to a Bayesian filter equation for the probability...

  20. Study of Small-Scale Anisotropy of Ultrahigh Energy Cosmic Rays Observed in Stereo by HiRes

    CERN Document Server

    Abbasi, R U; Amann, J F; Archbold, G; Atkins, R; Bellido, J A; Belov, K; Belz, J W; Ben-Zvi, S Y; Bergman, D R; Boyer, J H; Burt, G W; Cao, Z; Clay, R W; Connolly, B M; Dawson, B R; Deng, W; Fedorova, Y; Findlay, J; Finley, C B; Hanlon, W F; Hoffman, C M; Holzscheiter, M H; Hughes, G A; Jui, C C H; Kim, K; Kirn, M A; Knapp, B C; Loh, E C; Maestas, M M; Manago, N; Mannel, E J; Marek, L J; Martens, K; Matthews, J A J; Matthews, J N; O'Neill, A; Painter, C A; Perera, L P; Reil, K; Riehle, R; Roberts, M D; Sasaki, M; Schnetzer, S R; Seman, M; Simpson, K M; Sinnis, G; Smith, J D; Snow, R; Sokolsky, P; Song, C; Springer, R W; Stokes, B T; Thomas, J R; Thomas, S B; Thomson, G B; Tupa, D; Westerhoff, S; Wiencke, L R; Zech, A

    2004-01-01

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) experiment is an air fluorescence detector which, operating in stereo mode, has a typical angular resolution of 0.6 degrees and is sensitive to cosmic rays with energies above 10^18 eV. HiRes is thus an excellent instrument for the study of the arrival directions of ultrahigh energy cosmic rays. We present the results of a search for anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions on small scales (10^19 eV). The search is based on data recorded between 1999 December and 2004 January, with a total of 271 events above 10^19 eV. No small-scale anisotropy is found, and the strongest clustering found in the HiRes stereo data is consistent at the 52% level with the null hypothesis of isotropically distributed arrival directions.

  1. The jumps of physical quantities at fast shocks under pressure anisotropy: theory versus observations at the bow shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of the solar wind with magnetized planets leads to the formation of the so-called magnetosphere, a cavity generated by the geomagnetic field. The supersonic, superalfvenic, and magnetized solar wind flow interacting with blunt bodies produces a detached bow shock, separating the solar wind from the magnetosheath, the region between the shock wave and the magnetopause. On approach to a planetary obstacle, the solar wind becomes subsonic at the bow shock and then flows past the planet in the magnetosheath. At the bow shock, the plasma parameters and the magnetic field strength change from upstream to downstream, i.e., an increase of plasma density, temperature, pressure, and magnetic field strength, and a decrease of the velocity across the shock. In this PhD thesis we mainly concentrate on the variations of all physical quantities across the bow shock taking into account pressure anisotropy, which is an important feature in space plasma physics and observed by various spacecraft missions in the solar wind as well as in the magnetosheath. Dealing with anisotropic plasma conditions, one has to introduce the so-called pressure tensor, characterized by two scalar pressures, the pressure perpendicular (Pperp) and the pressure parallel (Pparallel) with respect to the magnetic field and in general one speaks of anisotropic conditions for Pperp is not Pparallel. Many spacecraft observations of the solar wind show Pparallel > Pperp, whereas observations of the magnetosheath show the opposite case, Pparallel perp. Therefore, dissipation of kinetic energy into thermal energy plays an important role in studying the variations of the relevant physical quantities across the shock. It has to be mentioned that planetary bow shocks are good examples for fast MHD shock waves. Therefore, the basic equations for describing the changes across the shock can be obtained by integrating the MHD equations in conservative form. We note that these equations, the so

  2. Magnetospheric Observations from JUNO and the Van Allen Probes on Oct 9, 2013 (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    During the Earth Flyby of JUNO on October 9, 2013, the two Van Allen probes will make observations of magnetospheric waves and particles from a near equatorial orbit with apogee near 5.8 RE in the dusk sector. Both the MagEIS and the RBSPICE instruments on the Van Allen probes will measure the radiation belt and the ring current population over an energy range similar to the JEDI instrument on JUNO, which will be used to provide an important calibration of JEDI during the flyby. Measurements at considerable higher energy obtained from the REPT and RPS instruments on the Van Allen probes can be used to investigate the sensitivity of several instruments and other critical components on JUNO to the type of high-energy penetrating particles, to which the satellite will be exposed after orbital insertion in the Jovian magnetosphere. Several other JUNO instruments such as MAG and WAVES will be operational during the flyby allowing comparison with similar measurement on the Van Allen probes. Highlights of the coordinated observations obtained during the JUNO Earth flyby will be presented.

  3. Temperature dependence of the perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in Ta/Co2FeAl/MgO structures probed by Anomalous Hall Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, M. S.; Petrisor, T.; Pop, O.; Colis, S.; Tiusan, C.

    2015-10-01

    We report a detailed study of the temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy in Ta/Co2FeAl/MgO structures by means of Anomalous Hall Effect measurements. The volume magnetic anisotropy, although negligible at room temperature, shows a non-negligible value at low temperatures and favors an in-plane easy magnetization axis. The surface magnetic anisotropy, which promotes the perpendicular magnetic easy axis, shows an increase from 0.76 ± 0.05 erg /cm2 at 300 K, up to 1.08 ± 0.04 erg /cm2 at 5 K, attributed to the evolution of the Co2FeAl layer saturation magnetization with temperature.

  4. Calculations of x-ray anisotropy for energies > 150 keV and its comparison with PVO/ISEE-3 observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of electron energy and angular distributions has been studied at different levels in the solar atmosphere by combining a smallangle analytical treatment with large-angle Monte Carlo calculations for electron energies greater than 500 keV. Using these distributions energy spectra and angular distributions of photons for energies greater than 150 keV have been computed as a function of height. The anisotropy ratio for these photon energies first decreases then increases with decrease in height (increase of column density). The results are compared with the observations of PVO/ISEE-3. The calculated characteristics of the x-ray flux ratio closely resemble the above observations. (author)

  5. Giant exchange anisotropy observed in Mn-Ir/Co-Fe bilayers containing ordered Mn3Ir phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exchange anisotropy of Mn73Ir27/Co70Fe30 bilayers fabricated on a 50-nm-thick Cu under layer by changing the substrate temperature (Tsub) during the deposition of Mn-Ir layer was investigated, correlating with the crystallographic structure of Mn-Ir layer. The unidirectional anisotropy constant (JK) of the bilayers remarkably varied as a function of Tsub. After the thermal annealing of bilayers at 320 deg. C in a magnetic field of 1 kOe, JK steeply increased from 0.3 to 1.3 erg/cm2, as Tsub was raised from room temperature to 170 deg. C. The blocking temperature was enhanced from 270 to 360 deg. C, simultaneously. The JK of 1.3 erg/cm2 is nearly ten times larger than the values reported in Mn-Ir/Co-Fe bilayers early in the research of them. The x-ray diffraction profiles showed that the ordered Mn3Ir phase was formed in the antiferromagnetic layer with increasing Tsub. From the coincidence of enhancing JK and increasing peak intensity of superlattice diffraction lines, the Mn3Ir phase was suggested to be an origin of the giant JK and the high blocking temperature

  6. Experimental observation of pump-probe spectra of caesium D2 line with a vapour cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Yan-Hua; Yang Hai-Jing; Zhang Tian-Cai; Wang Jun-Min

    2005-01-01

    Pump-probe spectra of caesium D2 line are experimentally investigated in a Cs atomic vapour cell with copropagating orthogonal linearly-polarized pump and probe laser beams. Absorption-reduction dips duo to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) in multi-A-type Zeeman sublevels of 6 S1/2 F=3-6 P3/2 F'=2 hyperfine transition and absorption-enhanced peaks due to electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in 6 S1/2 F=4-6 P3/2 F'=5 hyperfine transition are demonstrated. With detuned pump beam abnormal sign-reversed signals inside the EIT dip and the EIA peak are clearly observed.

  7. Observation of small-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of TeV cosmic rays with HAWC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abeysekara, A. U. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Alfaro, R.; Belmont, E. [Instituto de Física, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez, C.; Arceo, R. [CEFyMAP, Universidad Autónoma de Chiapas, Tuxtla Gutiérrez, Chiapas (Mexico); Álvarez, J. D.; Arteaga-Velázquez, J. C.; Cotti, U. [Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Morelia (Mexico); Ayala Solares, H. A. [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI (United States); Barber, A. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Baughman, B. M.; Berley, D.; Braun, J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Bautista-Elivar, N. [Universidad Politécnica de Pachuca, Pachuca, Hidalgo (Mexico); BenZvi, S. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Bonilla Rosales, M.; Carramiñana, A. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Caballero-Mora, K. S. [Centro de Investigación y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Castillo, M.; Cotzomi, J., E-mail: dan.fiorino@wipac.wisc.edu [Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Collaboration: HAWC Collaboration; and others

    2014-12-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 10{sup 10} events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10{sup –4} level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to ℓ = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  8. Observation of small-scale anisotropy in the arrival direction distribution of TeV cosmic rays with HAWC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on 4.9 × 1010 events recorded between 2013 June and 2014 February shows anisotropy at the 10–4 level on angular scales of about 10°. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to ℓ = 15 contribute significantly to the excesses.

  9. Observation of Small-scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Direction Distribution of TeV Cosmic Rays with HAWC

    CERN Document Server

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Leó, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hüntemeyer, P; Hui, C M; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-García, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Riviére, C; Rosa-González, D; Ruiz-Velasco, E; Ryan, J; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is sensitive to gamma rays and charged cosmic rays at TeV energies. The detector is still under construction, but data acquisition with the partially deployed detector started in 2013. An analysis of the cosmic-ray arrival direction distribution based on $4.9\\times 10^{10}$ events recorded between June 2013 and February 2014 shows anisotropy at the $10^{-4}$ level on angular scales of about $10^\\circ$. The HAWC cosmic-ray sky map exhibits three regions of significantly enhanced cosmic-ray flux; two of these regions were first reported by the Milagro experiment. A third region coincides with an excess recently reported by the ARGO-YBJ experiment. An angular power spectrum analysis of the sky shows that all terms up to $\\ell=15$ contribute significantly to the excesses.

  10. Atomic-scale observation of hydrogen-induced crack growth by atom-probe FIM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formation and propagation of a microcrack due to hydrogen in a Fe-0.29 wt.% Ti alloy was observed at the atomic scale by field ion microscopy. A microcrack (-20 nm in length) formed and became noticeably large when the tip was heated at 9500C in the presence of about 1 torr of Hg. Propagation was reported several times by reheating, until a portion of the tip ruptured and became detached from the tip. Compositional analysis, performed in situ using a high performance atom-probe, identified atomic hydrogen in quantity and some hydrogen molecules and FEH in the crack, but not elsewhere on the surface

  11. Probing New Physics Scales from Higgs and Electroweak Observables at $e^+ e^-$ Higgs Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Ge, Shao-Feng; Xiao, Rui-Qing

    2016-01-01

    New physics beyond the standard model (SM) can be formulated via dimension-6 effective operators, whose coefficients (cutoffs) characterize the scales of new physics. We study the probe of new physics scales from the electroweak precision observables (EWPO) and the Higgs observables (HO) at the future $e^+e^-$ Higgs Factory (such as CEPC). To optimize constraints of new physics from all available observables, we establish a scheme-independent approach. With this formulation, we treat the SM electroweak parameters and the coefficients of dimension-6 operators on equal footing, which can be fitted simultaneously by the same $\\chi^2$ function. As deviations from the SM are generally small, we can expand the new physics parameters up to linear order and perform an analytical $\\chi^2$ fit to derive the potential reach of the new physics scales. We find that the HO (from both Higgs produnction and decay rates) can probe the new physics scales up to 10TeV (and to 40TeV for the case of gluon-involved operator $\\mathc...

  12. Lab-frame observables for probing the top-Higgs interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Boudjema, Fawzi; Guadagnoli, Diego; Mohan, Kirtimaan A

    2015-01-01

    We investigate methods to explore the CP nature of the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling at the LHC, focusing on associated production of the Higgs with a $t \\bar{t}$ pair. We first discuss the constraints implied by low-energy observables and by the Higgs-rate information from available LHC data, emphasizing that they cannot provide conclusive evidence on the nature of this coupling. We then investigate kinematic observables that could probe the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling directly, in particular quantities that can be constructed out of just lab-frame kinematics. We define one such observable by exploiting the fact that $t \\bar{t}$ spin correlations do also carry information about the CP-nature of the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling. Finally, we introduce a CP-odd quantity and a related asymmetry, able to probe CP violation in the $ t\\bar{t}h $ coupling and likewise constructed out of lab-frame momenta only.

  13. Nano-fabricated perpendicular magnetic anisotropy electrodes for lateral spin valves and observation of Nernst-Ettingshausen related signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lateral spin valves (LSVs) are efficient structures for characterizing spin currents in spintronics devices. Most LSVs are based on ferromagnetic (FM) electrodes for spin-injection and detection. While there are advantages for using perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) FM, e.g., stability to nano-scaling, these have almost not been studied. This is mainly due to difficulties in fabricating PMA FMs in a lateral geometry. We present here an efficient method, based on ion-milling through an AlN mask, for fabrication of LSVs with multi-layered PMA FMs such as Co/Pd and Co/Ni. We demonstrate, using standard permalloy FMs, that the method enables efficient spin injection. We show the multi-layer electrodes retain their PMA properties as well as spin injection and detection in PMA LSVs. In addition, we find a large asymmetric voltage signal which increases with current. We attribute this to a Nernst-Ettingshausen effect caused by local Joule heating and the perpendicular magnetic easy axis

  14. The observed neutron star mass distribution as a probe of the supernova explosion mechanism

    CERN Document Server

    Pejcha, Ondrej; Kochanek, Christopher S

    2012-01-01

    The observed distribution of neutron star (NS) masses reflects the physics of core-collapse supernova explosions and the structure of the massive stars that produce them at the end of their evolution. We present a Bayesian analysis that directly compares the NS mass distribution observed in double NS systems to theoretical models of NS formation. We find that models with standard binary mass ratio distributions are strongly preferred over independently picking the masses from the initial mass function, although the strength of the inference depends on whether current assumptions for identifying the remnants of the primary and secondary stars are correct. Second, NS formation models with no mass fallback are favored because they reduce the dispersion in NS masses. The double NS system masses thus directly point to the mass coordinate where the supernova explosion was initiated, making them an excellent probe of the supernova explosion mechanism. If we assume no fallback and simply vary the mass coordinate sepa...

  15. Beyond Higgs couplings: probing the Higgs with angular observables at future e + e - colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Nathaniel; Gu, Jiayin; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Kechen

    2016-03-01

    We study angular observables in the {e}+{e}-to ZHto {ell}+{ell}-boverline{b} channel at future circular e + e - colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy sqrt{s}=240 GeV and 5 (30) ab-1 integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for he Higgs-strahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of both probing BSM corrections to the HZγ coupling and constraining the "blind spot" in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners.

  16. Beyond Higgs Couplings: Probing the Higgs with Angular Observables at Future $e^+ e^-$ Colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Craig, Nathaniel; Liu, Zhen; Wang, Kechen

    2015-01-01

    We study angular observables in the $e^+e^-\\to Z H\\to \\ell^+ \\ell^-\\,b\\bar{b}$ channel at future circular $e^+ e^-$ colliders such as CEPC and FCC-ee. Taking into account the impact of realistic cut acceptance and detector effects, we forecast the precision of six angular asymmetries at CEPC (FCC-ee) with center-of-mass energy $\\sqrt{s} =$ 240 GeV and 5 (30) ${\\rm ab}^{-1}$ integrated luminosity. We then determine the projected sensitivity to a range of operators relevant for the Higgs-strahlung process in the dimension-6 Higgs EFT. Our results show that angular observables provide complementary sensitivity to rate measurements when constraining various tensor structures arising from new physics. We further find that angular asymmetries provide a novel means of both probing BSM corrections to the $H Z \\gamma$ coupling and constraining the "blind spot" in indirect limits on supersymmetric scalar top partners.

  17. The DSLP Langmuir Probe experiment on-board Proba2: first observations and preliminary scientific results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stverak, Stepan; Travnicek, Pavel M.; Hercik, David; Hellinger, Petr; Lebreton, Jean-Pierre; Kozacek, Zdenek; Brinek, Jan

    2010-05-01

    The experiment Dual Segmented Langmuir Probe (DSLP) is one of the four scientific instruments on board the mini-satellite Proba-2 of the European Space Agency. The Proba 2 satellite was successfully launched on 2nd November 2009. First three months of the mission has been dedicated to overall commissioning phase of the Proba 2 payload including all scientific instruments. The main operational phase focused on nominal scientific data acquisition has started in February 2010. As a part of the Plasma Measurement Equipment, the DSLP instrument aims at mapping and studying characteristic macroscopic properties (e.g. density, temperature or flow dynamics) of ionospheric plasmas and their temporal and spatial variations. Furthermore, with use of Sun observations provided by SWAP and LYRA instruments, the DSLP experiment intends to identify observed ionospheric irregularities with possible solar-terrestrial connections related to sudden space weather events. Here we present first data samples acquired during the main operational phase and their preliminary scientific analysis.

  18. Real-time observation of DNA repair: 2-aminopurine as a molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rajagopal; Butcher, Christina E.; Oh, Dennis H.

    2008-02-01

    Triplex forming oligos (TFOs) that target psoralen photoadducts to specific DNA sequences have generated interest as a potential agent in gene therapy. TFOs also offer an opportunity to study the mechanism of DNA repair in detail. In an effort to understand the mechanism of DNA repair at a specific DNA sequence in real-time, we have designed a plasmid containing a psoralen reaction site adjacent to a TFO binding site corresponding to a sequence within the human interstitial collagenase gene. Two 2-aminopurine residues incorporated into the purine-rich strand of the TFO binding site and located within six nucleotides of the psoralen reaction site serve as molecular probes for excision repair events involving the psoralen photoadducts on that DNA strand. In duplex DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence is quenched. However, upon thermal or formamide-induced denaturation of duplex DNA to single stranded DNA, the 2-aminopurine fluorescence increases by eight fold. These results suggest that monitoring 2-aminopurine fluorescence from plasmids damaged by psoralen TFOs may be a method for measuring excision of single-stranded damaged DNA from the plasmid in cells. A fluorescence-based molecular probe to the plasmid may significantly simplify the real-time observation of DNA repair in both populations of cells as well as single cells.

  19. Gradual Diffusion and Punctuated Phase Space Density Enhancements of Highly Relativistic Electrons: Van Allen Probes Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Li, X.; Henderson, M. G.; Kanekal, S. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Fennell, J. F.; Hudson, M. K.

    2014-01-01

    The dual-spacecraft Van Allen Probes mission has provided a new window into mega electron volt (MeV) particle dynamics in the Earth's radiation belts. Observations (up to E (is) approximately 10MeV) show clearly the behavior of the outer electron radiation belt at different timescales: months-long periods of gradual inward radial diffusive transport and weak loss being punctuated by dramatic flux changes driven by strong solar wind transient events. We present analysis of multi-MeV electron flux and phase space density (PSD) changes during March 2013 in the context of the first year of Van Allen Probes operation. This March period demonstrates the classic signatures both of inward radial diffusive energization and abrupt localized acceleration deep within the outer Van Allen zone (L (is) approximately 4.0 +/- 0.5). This reveals graphically that both 'competing' mechanisms of multi-MeV electron energization are at play in the radiation belts, often acting almost concurrently or at least in rapid succession.

  20. Pulsating aurora observed on the ground and in-situ by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessard, M.; Cohen, I. J.; Denton, R. E.; Engebretson, M. J.; Kletzing, C.; Wygant, J. R.; Bounds, S. R.; Smith, C. W.; MacDowall, R. J.; Kurth, W. S.

    2013-12-01

    Early observations and theory related to pulsating aurora suggested that the electrons that drive this aurora originate from the equatorial region of the magnetosphere and that a likely process that can scatter these electrons would involve chorus waves. Recent satellite observations during pulsating auroral events have provided important "firsts", including evidence of strong correlations between pulsating auroral patches and in-situ lower-band chorus (THEMIS), as well as correlations with energetic electron precipitation in the vicinity of geosynchronous orbit (GOES). These results provide important information regarding particle dynamics, leading to a question about how the chorus might be driven. We present observations of the Van Allen Probes in conjunction with a pulsating aurora event, as confirmed by observations on the ground. The in-situ data again show the presence of lower-band chorus. However, magnetic and electric field data also show that the wave bursts coincide with an apparent poloidal field-line resonance, begging the question of whether the resonance might be responsible for driving the VLF waves.

  1. Observations of the White Light Corona from Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, R. A.; Thernisien, A. F.; Vourlidas, A.; Plunkett, S. P.; Korendyke, C. M.; Sheeley, N. R.; Morrill, J. S.; Socker, D. G.; Linton, M. G.; Liewer, P. C.; De Jong, E. M.; Velli, M. M.; Mikic, Z.; Bothmer, V.; Lamy, P. L.

    2011-12-01

    The SoloHI instrument on Solar Orbiter and the WISPR instrument on Solar Probe+ will make white light coronagraphic images of the corona as the two spacecraft orbit the Sun. The minimum perihelia for Solar Orbiter is about 60 Rsun and for SP+ is 9.5 Rsun. The wide field of view of the WISPR instrument (about 105 degrees radially) corresponds to viewing the corona from 2.2 Rsun to 20 Rsun. Thus the entire Thomson hemisphere is contained within the telescope's field and we need to think of the instrument as being a traditional remote sensing instrument and then transitioning to a local in-situ instrument. The local behavior derives from the fact that the maximum Thomson scattering will favor the electron plasma close to the spacecraft - exactly what the in-situ instruments will be sampling. SoloHI and WISPR will also observe scattered light from dust in the inner heliosphere, which will be an entirely new spatial regime for dust observations from a coronagraph, which we assume to arise from dust in the general neighborhood of about half way between the observer and the Sun. As the dust grains approach the Sun, they evaporate and do not contribute to the scattering. A dust free zone has been postulated to exist somewhere inside of 5 Rsun where all dust is evaporated, but this has never been observed. The radial position where the evaporation occurs will depend on the precise molecular composition of the individual grains. The orbital plane of Solar Orbiter will gradually increase up to about 35 degrees, enabling a very different view through the zodiacal dust cloud to test the models generated from in-ecliptic observations. In this paper we will explore some of the issues associated with the observation of the dust and will present a simple model to explore the sensitivity of the instrument to observe such evaporations.

  2. First Observation of Electron Transfer Mediated Decay in Aqueous Solutions: A Novel Probe of Ion Pairing

    CERN Document Server

    Unger, I; Thürmer, S; Aziz, E F; Cederbaum, L S; Muchová, E; Slavíček, P; Winter, B; Kryzhevoi, N V

    2016-01-01

    A major goal of many spectroscopic techniques is to provide comprehensive information on the local chemical environment. Electron transfer mediated decay (ETMD) is a sensitive probe of the environment since it is actively involved in this non-local radiationless decay process through electron and energy transfer steps. We report the first experimental observation of ETMD in the liquid phase. Using liquid-jet X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy we explore LiCl aqueous solution, and detect low-energy electrons unambiguously emerging from the ETMD processes of core-ionized Li+. We interpret the experimental results with molecular dynamics and high-level ab initio calculations. By considering various solvation-structure models we show that both water molecules and Cl- anions can participate in ETMD, with each process having its characteristic spectral fingerprint. Different ion associations lead to different spectral shapes. The potential application of the unique sensitivity of the ETMD spectroscopy to the local hy...

  3. Potential profile and photovoltaic effect in nanoscale lateral pn junction observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanoscale pn junctions have been investigated by Kelvin probe force microscopy and several particular features were found. Within the depletion region, a localized noise area is observed, induced by temporal fluctuations of dopant states. Electronic potential landscape is significantly affected by dopants with ground-state energies deeper than in bulk. Finally, the effects of light illumination were studied and it was found that the depletion region shifts its position as a function of light intensity. This is ascribed to charge redistribution within the pn junction as a result of photovoltaic effect and due to the impact of deepened-level dopants. - Highlights: • In pn nano-junctions, temporal potential fluctuations are found in depletion layer. • Fluctuations are due to frequent capture and emission of free carriers by dopants. • Depletion layer position shifts as a function of the intensity of irradiated light. • The depletion layer shifts are due to changes of deep-level dopants' charge states

  4. Variability of the Inner Proton Radiation Belt Observed by Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X.; Selesnick, R.; Baker, D. N.; Jaynes, A. N.; Kanekal, S. G.; Hudson, M. K.; Kress, B. T.

    2015-12-01

    Inner radiation belt protons with kinetic energy above 10 MeV are known to be highly stable, with a maximum intensity near L = 1.5 that varies little evenon solar-cycle time scales. However, for L = 2 and above, more rapid changes occur: (1) protons are trapped during solar particle events, (2) steady intensity changes near L = 2 may result from radial diffusion, (3) for L > 2 there are rapid losses during magnetic storms, and (4) the losses are replenished by albedo neutron decay. New measurements from Van Allen Probes describe each of the last three processes in detail (the first has not yet been observed). These data provide new constraints on theories of trapped proton dynamics and improved empirical estimates of transport coefficients for radiation belt modeling.

  5. Penetration of magnetosonic waves into the plasmasphere observed by the Van Allen Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fuliang; Zhou, Qinghua; He, Yihua; Yang, Chang; Liu, Si; Baker, D. N.; Spence, H. E.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.; Blake, J. B.

    2015-09-01

    During the small storm on 14-15 April 2014, Van Allen Probe A measured a continuously distinct proton ring distribution and enhanced magnetosonic (MS) waves along its orbit outside the plasmapause. Inside the plasmasphere, strong MS waves were still present but the distinct proton ring distribution was falling steeply with distance. We adopt a sum of subtracted bi-Maxwellian components to model the observed proton ring distribution and simulate the wave trajectory and growth. MS waves at first propagate toward lower L shells outside the plasmasphere, with rapidly increasing path gains related to the continuous proton ring distribution. The waves then gradually cross the plasmapause into the deep plasmasphere, with almost unchanged path gains due to the falling proton ring distribution and higher ambient density. These results present the first report on how MS waves penetrate into the plasmasphere with the aid of the continuous proton ring distributions during weak geomagnetic activities.

  6. Subpacket structures in EMIC rising tone emissions observed by the THEMIS probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Satoko; Omura, Yoshiharu; Shoji, Masafumi; Nosé, Masahito; Summers, Danny; Angelopoulos, Vassilis

    2015-09-01

    We report subpacket structures found in electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) rising tone emissions observed by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) probes. We investigate three typical cases in detail. The first case shows a continuous single rising tone with four obvious subpackets, and the second case is characterized by a patchy emission with multiple subpackets triggered in a broadband frequency. The third case looks like a smooth rising tone without any obvious subpacket in the fast Fourier transform spectrum, while its amplitude contains small peaks with increasing frequencies. The degree of polarization of each subpacket is generally higher than 0.8 with a left-handed polarization, and the wave direction of the subpackets is typically field aligned. We show that the time evolution of the observed frequency and amplitude can be reproduced consistently by nonlinear growth theory. We also compare the observed time span of each subpacket structure with the theoretical trapping time for second-order cyclotron resonance. They are consistent, indicating that an individual subpacket is generated through a nonlinear wave growth process which excites an element in accordance with the theoretically predicted optimum amplitude.

  7. Observations of liver cancer cells in scanning probe acoustic microscope: a preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaohui; Fang, Xiaoyue; Xi, Qing; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Ning; Ding, Mingyue

    2016-04-01

    Scanning probe acoustic microscope (SPAM) can be used to acquire the morphology image as well as the non-destructive internal structures acoustic image. However, the observations of the morphology image as well as the internal structures acoustic image of liver cancer cells in SPAM are few. In this paper, we cultured 4 different types of liver cancer cells on the silicon wafer and coverslip to observe their morphology images as well as acoustic images in SPAM, and made a preliminary study of the 8 types of cells specimens (hereinafter referred to as the silicon specimens and coverslips specimens). The experimental measurement results showed that some cellular pseudopodium were observed in the morphology images of the coverslip specimens while no such cellular pseupodium were appeared in the morphology images of the silicon specimens, which concluded that the living liver cancer cells were less likely to grow on the silicon wafer. SPAM provides a rapid and sensitive visual method for studying the morphology and internal structures of the cancer cells. The proposed method can be also used to obtain the morphology and internal information in both solid and soft material wafers, such as silicon and cells, with the resolution of nanometer scale.

  8. Probing Turbulence in the Interstellar Medium using Radio-Interferometric Observations of Neutral Hydrogen

    CERN Document Server

    Dutta, Prasun

    2011-01-01

    We develop a visibility based power spectrum estimator to probe the power spectrum directly from the interferometric observations and also estimate the errors in it. A numerical simulation of synthetic observations is also performed to access the efficacy and limitations of this estimator. We use this estimator to evaluate the power spectrum of three individual spiral galaxies, a dwarf galaxy sample and THINGS * spiral galaxies. In each case, the power spectrum is found to follow a power law PHI (U) = AU {\\alpha} over a specific length scale range. The estimated value for the slope {\\alpha} ranges from ~ ~1.5 to ~ -2.6 for the sample of dwarf galaxies. We interpret this bi-modality as arising due to 2D turbulence on length scales much larger than the scale-height of the galaxy disk and 3D otherwise. The power law slope also show a weak correlation with the surface density of star formation rate for these galaxies. We found for the external spiral galaxies the power spectrum is a power law up to a length scale...

  9. Changes in the Molar Ellipticities of HEWL Observed by Circular Dichroism and Quantitated by Time Resolved Fluorescence Anisotropy Under Crystallizing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, John

    2002-01-01

    Fluid models for simple colloids predict that as the protein concentration is increased, crystallization should occur at some sufficiently high concentration regardless of the strength of attraction. However, empirical measurements do not fully support this assertion. Measurements of the second virial coefficient (B22) indicate that protein crystallization occurs only over a discrete range of solution parameters. Furthermore, observations of a strong correlation between protein solubility and B22, has led to an ongoing debate regarding the relationship between the two. Experimental work in our lab, using Hen Egg White Lysozyme (HEWL), previously revealed that the rotational anisotropy of the protein under crystallizing conditions changes systematically with pH, ionic strength and temperature. These observations are now supported by recent work revealing that small changes in the molar ellipticity also occur systematically with changes in ionic strength and temperature. This work demonstrates that under crystallization conditions, the protein native state is characterized by a conformational heterogeneity that may prove fundamental to the relationship between protein crystallization and protein solubility.

  10. Cluster observations in the magnetosheath – Part 1: Anisotropies of the wave vector distribution of the turbulence at electron scales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-M. Bosqued

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available We analyse the power spectral density δB2 and δE2 of the magnetic and electric fluctuations measured by Cluster 1 (Rumba in the magnetosheath during 23 h, on four different days. The frequency range of the STAFF Spectral Analyser (f=8 Hz to 4 kHz extends from about the lower hybrid frequency, i.e. the electromagnetic (e.m. range, up to about 10 times the proton plasma frequency, i.e. the electrostatic (e.s. range. In the e.m. range, we do not consider the whistler waves, which are not always observed, but rather the underlying, more permanent fluctuations. In this e.m. range, δB2 (at 10 Hz increases strongly while the local angle ΘBV between the magnetic field B and the flow velocity V increases from 0° to 90°. This behaviour, also observed in the solar wind at lower frequencies, is due to the Doppler effect. It can be modelled if we assume that, for the scales ranging from kc/ωpe≃0.3 to 30 (c/ωpe is the electron inertial length, the intensity of the e.m. fluctuations for a wave number k (i varies like k−ν with ν>≃3, (ii peaks for wave vectors k perpendicular to B like |sinθkB|µ with µ>≃100. The shape of the observed variations of δB2 with f and with ΘBV implies that the permanent fluctuations, at these scales, statistically do not obey the dispersion relation for fast/whistler waves or for kinetic Alfvén waves: the fluctuations have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, i.e. their phase velocity is negligible with respect to V (Taylor hypothesis. The electrostatic waves around 1 kHz behave differently: δE2 is minimum for ΘBV>≃90°. This can be modelled, still with the Doppler effect, if we assume that, for the scales ranging from k λDe>≃0.1 to 1 (λDe is the Debye length, the intensity of the e.s. fluctuations (i varies like k−ν with ν>≃4, (ii peaks for k parallel to B like |cosθkB|µ with µ>≃100. These e.s. fluctuations may have a vanishing frequency in the plasma frame, or may be ion acoustic

  11. Improved Measurement of the Angular Power Spectrum of Temperature Anisotropy in the CMB from Two New Analyses of BOOMERANG Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Ruhl, J E; Bock, J J; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Boscaleri, A; Contaldi, C R; Crill, B P; De Bernardis, P; De Troia, G; Ganga, K; Giacometti, M; Hivon, E; Hristov, V V; Iacoangeli, A; Jaffe, A H; Jones, W C; Lange, A E; Masi, S; Mason, P; Mauskopf, P D; Melchiorri, A; Montroy, T; Netterfield, C B; Pascale, E; Piacentini, F; Pogosyan, D; Polenta, G; Prunet, S; Romeo, G

    2003-01-01

    We report the most complete analysis to date of observations of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) obtained during the 1998 flight of BOOMERANG. We use two quite different methods to determine the angular power spectrum of the CMB in 20 bands centered at l = 50 to 1000, applying them to 50% more data than has previously been analyzed. The power spectra produced by the two methods are in good agreement with each other, and constitute the most sensitive measurements to date over the range 300 < l < 1000. The increased precision of the power spectrum yields more precise determinations of several cosmological parameters than previous analyses of BOOMERANG data. The results continue to support an inflationary paradigm for the origin of the universe, being well fit by a 13.5 Gyr old, flat universe composed of approximately 5% baryonic matter, 30% cold dark matter, and 65% dark energy, with a scale invariant initial density perturbations.

  12. Probing extra dimension through gravitational wave observations of compact binaries and their electromagnetic counterparts

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Hao; Huang, Fa Peng; Wang, Yong-Qiang; Meng, Xin-He; Liu, Yu-Xiao

    2016-01-01

    The gravitational wave (GW) observations of compact binaries and their possible electromagnetic counterparts may be used to probe the nature of the extra dimension. It is widely accepted that gravitons and photons are the only two completely confirmed objects that can travel along the null geodesics in our four-dimensional space-time. But when one considers that there exists the fifth dimension and only the GW can propagate freely in the bulk, the causal propagations of the GW and electromagnetic wave (EMW) are in general different. In this paper, we compute the null geodesics of the GW and EMW in a five-dimensional anti-de Sitter space-time and our four-dimensional universe in the present of the curvature of universe $k$, respectively. We show that for general cases the horizon radius of the GW is longer than the EMW within the equal time. Taking the GW 150914 event detected by the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the X-ray event detected by the Fermi Gamma-ray Burst Mo...

  13. On the problem of electron-induced anisotropy effect in As2S3-based glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of electron-induced anisotropy was observed in glassy As2S3-based samples irradiated by accelerated electrons (E=2.8 MeV) in the perpendicular plane to the probe light. Spectral and compositional dependences of this effect and its time stability at room temperature were discussed. It was supposed that the microstructural mechanism of the anisotropy effect was connected with electron-induced formation of new oriented (relatively to the electron flow) defects in the form of broken chemical bonds

  14. Flow stress anisotropy in aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Jensen, D.; Hansen, N.

    1990-01-01

    The plastic anisotropy of cold-rolled high purity aluminum (99.996%) and commercially pure aluminum (99.6%) has been investigated. Sample parameters were the initial grain size and the degree of plastic strain (ϵ < 3.00). Flow stresses (0.2% offset) were measured at room temperature by uniaxial...... tension as a function of the angle between the tensile axis and the rolling direction. Textures were determined by neutron diffraction, and Taylor M-factors were calculated. The microstructures were studied by TEM. It was found that the flow stress varies significantly with orientation both at low and...... high strains. It is shown that for most experimental conditions, texture effects alone cannot explain the observed anisotropy, and microstructural anisotropy effects have to be taken into account. In those cases, a correlation between the microstructural anisotropy and the development of microbands is...

  15. Probing solute-solvent interaction in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium-based room temperature ionic liquids: A time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sudhir Kumar; Sarkar, Moloy

    2014-03-01

    Rotational diffusion of two organic solutes, coumarin153 (C153) and 4-aminophthalimide (AP) has been investigated in four ionic liquids (ILs), viz. 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoroacetate (EMIMTFA), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium ethylsulfate (EMIMESU), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate (EMIMTFB) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium tetracyanoborate (EMIMTCB), as a function of temperature. Between the two probes, AP can act as hydrogen-bond-donor to the solvents having hydrogen bond acceptor ability. The results indicate that the rotational dynamics of C153 is mainly governed by the viscosity of the medium. On the other hand, the rotational motion of AP is found to be significantly hindered in the ILs depending on the nature of anions of the ILs. Rotational coupling constant values for AP in the ILs follow the order TFA > ESU > TCB > TFB. The slower rotational motion of AP in these ILs has been attributed to the specific hydrogen bonding interaction between AP and anions of ILs. PMID:24158315

  16. Probing the dark ages: Observations of the high-redshift universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Daniel Keith

    This thesis attempts to describe some of the earliest phases in the collapse of galaxies from an observational standpoint. The work is composed of an assortment of projects which sample objects at very high redshift, probing the Universe 1-3 Gyr after the Big Bang. The first section of the thesis concerns high-redshift galaxies. Search techniques for identifying distant galaxies are extensively reviewed. Radio selection was once the primary vehicle to targeting the early Universe. Keck spectroscopy of high-redshift radio galaxies from the MIT-Greenbank radio catalog (S5GHz >~ 50 mJy) are discussed. We synthesize a composite radio galaxy spectrum, which we compare with other composite active galaxy spectra. Our data suggests a correlation between radio power and ionization state in high-redshift radio galaxies. The following three chapters detail individual galaxies confirmed at z > 5. These galaxies are among the half-dozen most distant sources known at the close of the 20th Century. Two of the galaxies were photometrically-selected from the Hubble Deep Field (HDF 4-473.0 at z = 5.60 and HDF 3-951.0 at z = 5.34 +/- 0.01). The third is TN J0924-2201, a radio galaxy at z = 5.19 selected on the basis of steep radio spectral index and faint K-band brightness. This source contains the most distant active galactic nucleus currently known, requiring early formation of supermassive blackholes within a Gyr after the Big Bang. The second section of the thesis concerns searches for high-redshift Lyα emission, identified either from deep, narrow-band imaging surveys or deep slit spectra. We discuss in detail one faint, high equivalent width line-emitter. Conventional wisdom would suggest identifying the 9185 Å line with Lyα at z = 6.55. We argue [O II] λ3727 at z = 1.46 is the more likely identification and discuss observational tests to distinguish Lyα-emitters at high redshift from foreground (active) sources. The final section of the thesis concerns high

  17. The work function of doped polyaniline nanoparticles observed by Kelvin probe force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work function of polyaniline nanoparticles in the emeraldine base state was determined by Kelvin probe force microscopy to be ∼270 meV higher than that of similar nanoparticles in the emeraldine salt state. Normal tapping mode atomic force microscopy could not be used to distinguish between the particles due to their similar morphologies and sizes. Moreover, other potential measurement systems, such as using zeta potentials, were not suitable for the measurement of surface charges of doped nanoparticles due to their encapsulation by interfering chemical groups. Kelvin probe force microscopy can be used to overcome these limitations and unambiguously distinguish between the bare and doped polyaniline nanoparticles. (paper)

  18. On the origin of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    OpenAIRE

    Follop, Ria; Rassat, Anais; Cooray, Asantha; Abdalla, Filipe B.

    2007-01-01

    Suggestions have been made that the microwave background observed by COBE and WMAP and dubbed Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may have an origin within our own Galaxy or Earth. To consider the signal that may be correlated with Earth, a correlate-by-eye exercise was attempted by overlaying the CMB map from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on a topographical map of Earth. Remarkably, several hot spots in the CMB map are found to be well aligned with either large cities on Earth or region...

  19. Van Allen Probes Observations of Quasi-Periodic Whistler Mode Waves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hospodarsky, G.; Wilkinson, D.; Němec, F.; Kurth, W.; Santolík, Ondřej; Kletzing, C.

    San Francisco: American Geophysical Union, 2015. SM21A-2481. [AGU Fall Meeting 2015. 14.12.2015-18.12.2015, San Francisco] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : whistler-mode waves * inner magnetosphere * Van Allen Probes Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm15/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/70218

  20. Energetic electron precipitation associated with pulsating aurora: EISCAT and Van Allen Probe observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Miyoshi, Y.; Oyama, S.; Saito, S.; Kurita, S.; Fujiwara, H.; Kataoka, R.; Ebihara, Y.; Kletzing, C.; Reeves, G.; Santolík, Ondřej; Clilverd, M.; Rodger, C. J.; Turunen, E.; Tsuchiya, F.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 4 (2015), s. 2754-2766. ISSN 2169-9380 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : pulsating aurora * EISCAT * Van Allen Probes * pitch angle scattering Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 3.440, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2014JA020690/abstract

  1. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely better...

  2. Flow stress anisotropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, G.

    1996-01-01

    stress Variation in the rolling plane, which may be as high as 20%, are presented. The traditional Taylor model is applied to the data to account for the effect of texture. However, texture effects alone are not enough to explain all of the observed anisotropy. New models which take the combined effects...... of texture and deformation microstructure into account are presented. The models are based on the Taylor and Sachs models but modified with an anisotropic critical shear stress to account for the effect of the microstructure. The agreement between experimental data and model predictions is definitely...

  3. Observations of the azimuthal dependence of normal mode coupling below 4 mHz at the South Pole and its nearby stations: Insights into the anisotropy beneath the Transantarctic Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Gang

    2016-08-01

    Normal mode coupling pair 0S26-0T26 and 0S27-0T27 are significantly present at the South Pole station QSPA after the 2011/03/11 Mw9.1 Tohoku earthquake. In an attempt to determine the mechanisms responsible for the coupling pairs, I first investigate mode observations at 43 stations distributed along the polar great-circle path for the earthquake and observations at 32 Antarctic stations. I rule out the effect of Earth's rotation as well as the effect of global large-scale lateral heterogeneity, but argue instead for the effect of small-scale local azimuthal anisotropy in a depth extent about 300 km. The presence of quasi-Love waveform in 2-5 mHz at QSPA and its nearby stations confirms the predication. Secondly, I analyze normal mode observations at the South Pole location after 28 large earthquakes from 1998 to 2015. The result indicates that the presence of the mode coupling is azimuthal dependent, which is related to event azimuths in -46° to -18°. I also make a comparison between the shear-wave splitting measurements of previous studies and the mode coupling observations of this study, suggesting that their difference can be explained by a case that the anisotropy responsible for the mode coupling is not just below the South Pole location but located below region close to the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM). Furthermore, more signals of local azimuthal anisotropy in normal-mode observations at QSPA and SBA, such as coupling of 0S12-0T11 and vertical polarization anomaly for 0T10, confirms the existence of deep anisotropy close to TAM, which may be caused by asthenospheric mantle flow and edge convection around cratonic keel of TAM.

  4. Impact of atmospheric refraction: How deeply can we probe exo-Earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    OpenAIRE

    Betremieux, Y.; Kaltenegger, L.

    2013-01-01

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density and pressure, probed during primary eclipses, as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction for all exoplanets, and tabulate the critical altitude, density and pressure for an exoplane...

  5. Observations of a doubly driven V system probed to a fourth level in laser-cooled rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    D'Echaniz, S R; Durrant, A V; Segal, D M; Marangos, J P; Vaccaro, J A; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2001-01-01

    Observations of a doubly driven V system probed to a fourth level in an N configuration are reported. A dressed state analysis is also presented. The expected three-peak spectrum is explored in a cold rubidium sample in a magneto-optic trap. Good agreement is found between the dressed state theory and the experimental spectra once light shifts and uncoupled absorptions in the rubidium system are taken into account.

  6. ELF/VLF wave propagation at subauroral latitudes: Conjugate observation between the ground and Van Allen Probes A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Calderon, Claudia; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Miyoshi, Yoshizumi; Keika, Kunihiro; Ozaki, Mitsunori; Schofield, Ian; Connors, Martin; Kletzing, Craig; Hanzelka, Miroslav; Santolik, Ondrej; Kurth, William S.

    2016-06-01

    We report simultaneous observation of ELF/VLF emissions, showing similar spectral and frequency features, between a VLF receiver at Athabasca (ATH), Canada, (L = 4.3) and Van Allen Probes A (Radiation Belt Storm Probes (RBSP) A). Using a statistical database from 1 November 2012 to 31 October 2013, we compared a total of 347 emissions observed on the ground with observations made by RBSP in the magnetosphere. On 25 February 2013, from 12:46 to 13:39 UT in the dawn sector (04-06 magnetic local time (MLT)), we observed a quasiperiodic (QP) emission centered at 4 kHz, and an accompanying short pulse lasting less than a second at 4.8 kHz in the dawn sector (04-06 MLT). RBSP A wave data showed both emissions as right-hand polarized with their Poynting vector earthward to the Northern Hemisphere. Using cross-correlation analysis, we did, for the first time, time delay analysis of a conjugate ELF/VLF event between ground and space, finding +2 to +4 s (ATH first) for the QP and -3 s (RBSP A first) for the pulse. Using backward tracing from ATH to the geomagnetic equator and forward tracing from the equator to RBSP A, based on plasmaspheric density observed by the spacecraft, we validate a possible propagation path for the QP emission which is consistent with the observed time delay.

  7. Observation of bifurcation property of radial electric field using a heavy ion beam probe in CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bifurcation nature of potential profile of a toroidal helical plasma is investigated in the Compact Helical System (CHS), using a heavy ion beam probe. The measurements reveal that there exist three main branches of potential profiles in electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heated plasmas with low density of ne∼0.5x1013cm-3. The branches with higher central potential exhibit a rather strong radial electric field shear that should result in fluctuation reduction and formation of transport barrier. Lissajous expression is useful to extract the bifurcation characteristics of potential structure. (author)

  8. Observing trans-Planckian ripples in the primordial power spectrum with future large scale structure probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth, Martin Snoager; Y. Y. Wong, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    -Planckian ripples can be made even if the amplitude is as low as 10^-4. Data from the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) and the proposed future 21 cm survey with the Fast Fourier Transform Telescope (FFTT) will be particularly useful in this regard. If the scale of inflation is close to its present upper bound......We revisit the issue of ripples in the primordial power spectra caused by trans-Planckian physics, and the potential for their detection by future cosmological probes. We find that for reasonably large values of the first slow-roll parameter epsilon (> 0.001), a positive detection of trans...

  9. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, K; Yano, F; Nishida, A; Takamizawa, H; Tsunomura, T; Nagai, Y; Hasegawa, M

    2009-11-01

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted. PMID:19775815

  10. Dopant distributions in n-MOSFET structure observed by atom probe tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K., E-mail: koji.inoue@hs3.ecs.kyoto-u.ac.jp [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Yano, F.; Nishida, A. [MIRAI-Selete, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Takamizawa, H. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Tsunomura, T. [MIRAI-Selete, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8569 (Japan); Nagai, Y. [The Oarai Center, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Hasegawa, M. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2009-11-15

    The dopant distributions in an n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET) structure were analyzed by atom probe tomography. The dopant distributions of As, P, and B atoms in a MOSFET structure (gate, gate oxide, channel, source/drain extension, and halo) were obtained. P atoms were segregated at the interface between the poly-Si gate and the gate oxide, and on the grain boundaries of the poly-Si gate, which had an elongated grain structure along the gate height direction. The concentration of B atoms was enriched near the edge of the source/drain extension where the As atoms were implanted.

  11. Impact of atmospheric refraction: How deeply can we probe exo-Earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    CERN Document Server

    Betremieux, Y

    2013-01-01

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density, probed during primary eclipses, as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction and show that most habitable exo-Earths cannot be probed down to their surface. We present 0.4-5.0micron model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  12. Cosmological Inflation: Theory and Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    In this article we review the theory of cosmological inflation with a particular focus on the beautiful connection it provides between the physics of the very small and observations of the very large. We explain how quantum mechanical fluctuations during the inflationary era become macroscopic density fluctuations which leave distinct imprints in the cosmic microwave background (CMB). We describe the physics of anisotropies in the CMB temperature and polarization and discuss how CMB observations can be used to probe the primordial universe.

  13. The metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy growth of A.sup.III./sup. B.sup.V./sup. heterostructures observed by reflection anisotropy spectroscopy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zíková, Markéta; Hospodková, Alice; Pangrác, Jiří; Vyskočil, Jan; Hulicius, Eduard; Oswald, Jiří; Komninou, Ph.; Kioseoglou, J.

    Warsaw: Polish Academy of Sciences, 2015. s. 13-13. ["Jaszowiec" International School and Conference on the Physics of Semiconductors /44./. 20.06.2015-25.06.2015, Wisla] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15286S; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011026 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : MOVPE * reflectance anisotropy spectroscopy * GaAs Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  14. On the problem of electron-induced anisotropy effect in As{sub 2}S{sub 3}-based glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balitska, V.O.; Shpotyuk, O.I. E-mail: karat@ipm.lviv.ua

    2000-05-02

    Effect of electron-induced anisotropy was observed in glassy As{sub 2}S{sub 3}-based samples irradiated by accelerated electrons (E=2.8 MeV) in the perpendicular plane to the probe light. Spectral and compositional dependences of this effect and its time stability at room temperature were discussed. It was supposed that the microstructural mechanism of the anisotropy effect was connected with electron-induced formation of new oriented (relatively to the electron flow) defects in the form of broken chemical bonds.

  15. Spectral Anisotropy of Els\\"asser Variables in Two Dimensional Wave-vector Space as Observed in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Limei; Zhang, Lei; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H K; Wang, Xin; Wang, Linghua; Wicks, Robert T

    2016-01-01

    Intensive studies have been conducted to understand the anisotropy of solar wind turbulence. However, the anisotropy of Els\\"asser variables ($\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$) in 2D wave-vector space has yet to be investigated. Here we first verify the transformation based on the projection-slice theorem between the power spectral density PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ and the spatial correlation function CF$_{2D} (r_\\parallel,r_\\perp )$. Based on the application of the transformation to the magnetic field and the particle measurements from the WIND spacecraft, we investigate the spectral anisotropy of Els\\"asser variables ($\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$), and the distribution of residual energy E$_{R}$, Alfv\\'en ratio R$_{A}$ and Els\\"asser ratio R$_{E}$ in the $(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp)$ space. The spectra PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ of $\\textbf{B}$, $\\textbf{V}$, and $\\textbf{Z}_{major}$ (the larger of $\\textbf{Z}^\\pm$) show a similar pattern that PSD$_{2D}(k_\\parallel,k_\\perp )$ is mainly distributed along a ridge inclined toward t...

  16. Observations of plasma response to RMP using fast movable magnetic probe on TEXTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma response to resonant magnetic perturbation fields (RMPs) is important for understanding the physical mechanism of instability control using RMP fields in the next generation of fusion devices, i.e. ITER. Such an investigation has been carried out in TEXTOR under different dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) configurations. The perturbed magnetic field is measured by the Fast Movable Magnetic Probe (FMMP) installed at the outer equatorial plane (low-field side). Preliminary results show that the perturbed plasma edge magnetic topology is different from the case simulated with a vacuum assumption. Plasma response to RMP depends strongly on both the location of the resonant rational flux surface and the frequency difference between the drift of the rational surface in the plasma and the external perturbation.

  17. Using ACE Observations of Interplanetary Particles and Magnetic Fields as Possible Contributors to Variations Observed at Van Allen Probes during Major events in 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. P.; Manweiler, J. W.; Gerrard, A. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Patterson, J. D.

    2013-12-01

    Observations from ACE EPAM including energy spectra of protons, helium, and oxygen will be prepared for coordinated use in estimating the direct and indirect access of energetic particles to inner and outer geomagnetic trapping zones. Complete temporal coverage from ACE at 12 seconds, 5 minutes, 17 minutes, hourly and daily cadences will be used to catalog interplanetary events arriving at Earth including interplanetary magnetic field sector boundaries, interplanetary shocks, and interplanetary coronal mass ejections, ICMEs. The first 6 months of 2013 have included both highly disturbed times, March 17 and May 22, and extended quiet periods of little or no variations. Among the specific questions that ACE and Van Allen Probes coordinated observations may aid in resolving are: 1. How much, if any, direct capture of interplanetary energetic particles occurs and what conditions account for it? 2. How much influence do interplanetary field and particle variations have on energization and/or loss of geomagnetically trapped populations? The poster will also present important links and describe methods and important details of access to numerically expressed ACE EPAM and Van Allen Probes RBSPICE observations that can be flexibly and easily accessed via the internet for student and senior researcher use.

  18. Higher order anisotropies in the Buda-Lund model -- disentangling flow and density field anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Lökös, Sándor; Csörgő, Tamás; Tomášik, Boris

    2016-01-01

    The Buda-Lund hydro model describes an expanding ellipsoidal fireball, and fits the observed elliptic flow and oscillating HBT radii successfully. Due to fluctuations in energy depositions, the fireball shape however fluctuates on an event-by-event basis. The transverse plane asymmetry can be translated into a series of multipole anisotropy coefficients. These anisotropies then result in measurable momentum-space anisotropies, to be measured with respect to their respective symmetry planes. In this paper we detail an extension of the Buda-Lund model to multipole anisotropies and investigate the resulting flow coefficients and oscillations of HBT radii.

  19. CMB Anisotropies: Their Discovery and Utilization

    CERN Document Server

    Smoot, George F

    2008-01-01

    This article is a written and modified version of a talk presented at the conference `A Century of Cosmology' held at San Servolo, Venice, Italy, in August 2007. The talk focuses on some of the cosmology history leading to the discovery and exploitation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation anisotropies. We have made tremendous advances first in the development of the techniques to observe these anisotropies and in observing and interpreting them to extract their contained cosmological information. CMB anisotropies are now a cornerstone in our understanding of the cosmos and our future progress in the field. This is an outcome that Dennis Sciama hoped for and encouraged.

  20. Probing equilibration in HICs and symmetry energy by using isospin-related observables

    CERN Document Server

    Li Qi

    2002-01-01

    The authors have studied the equilibration with respect to isospin degree of freedom in four systems sup 9 sup 6 Ru + sup 9 sup 6 Ru, sup 9 sup 6 Ru + sup 9 sup 6 Zr, sup 9 sup 6 Zr + sup 9 sup 6 Ru, sup 9 sup 6 Zr + sup 9 sup 6 Zr at 100 MeV/u and 400 MeV/u with isospin dependent QMD. It is proposed that the neutron-proton differential rapidity distribution is a sensitive probe to the degree of equilibration with respect to the isospin degree of freedom. By analyzing the average N/Z ratio of emitted nucleons, light charged particles (LCP) and intermediate mass fragments (IMF), it is found that there exists memory effect in multifragmentation process. The average N/Z ratio of IMF reduces largely as beam energy increases from 100 MeV/u to 400 MeV/u, which may result from the change of the behavior of the isotope distribution of IMF. The isotope distribution of IMF does also show certain memory effect at 100 MeV/u case but not at 400 MeV/u case. The authors also found the rapidity distribution of differential n...

  1. The Search for Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays Observed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye Detector in Monocular Mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Resolution Fly's Eye HiRes-I detector has now been in operation in monocular mode for over six years. During that time span, HiRes-I has accumulated a larger exposure to Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECRs) above 1019 eV than any other experiment built to date. This presents an unprecedented opportunity to search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of UHECRs. We present results of a search for dipole distributions oriented towards major astrophysical landmarks and a search for small-scale clustering. We conclude that the HiRes-I data set is, in fact, consistent with an isotropic source model

  2. First Rosetta Observations of the Cometary Plasma at Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC-MIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, H.; Lebreton, J. P.; Béghin, C.; Décréau, P.; Eriksson, A. I.; Geiswiller, J.; Grard, R.; Hamelin, M.; Mazelle, C. X.; Randriamboarison, O.; Schmidt, W.; Trotignon, J. G.; Wattieaux, G.; Winterhalter, D.; Aouad, Y.; Lagoutte, D.; Vallières, X.; Carr, C.; Cupido, E.

    2014-12-01

    The ROSETTA spacecraft arrived in the vicinity of the comet in early August. As part of the Rosetta Plasma Consortium (RPC), the Mutual Impedance Probe (RPC-MIP) is designed to measure the bulk plasma properties in the comet environment. MIP is an active RF probe. It consists of two transmitters, which can operate separately as a monopole or coupled as a transmitting dipole, and a receiving dipole. The operating range of MIP is 7 kHz to 3.5 MHz that allows covering the plasma density range expected during the mission from solar wind to deep coma densities. The baseline distance between the transmitter and the receiver is 40-60 cm, which allows probing plasmas with Debye lengths up to 20-25 cm. For longer Debye lengths, MIP uses one of the two Langmuir Probes of the RPC-LAP instrument located at about 4 m from the MIP receiving dipole, which allows probing plasma with Debye lengths up to about 2 m. The MIP receiving dipole (baseline 1 m) can also be used in a passive mode to measure the electrical activity in the comet environment in the same frequency range. In the active mode, MIP measures the coupling complex impedance between the transmitting monopole (or dipole) and the receiving dipole. To model the frequency response of MIP, a surface charge distribution method is used that takes into account the charge distribution induced on the spacecraft structures by the transmitter. The spacecraft surface is approximated by discrete elements smaller in size than the plasma Debye length. In our model, it is assumed that each spacecraft elementary surface carries a uniform charge distribution. The electric field measured by the receiver is the sum of the contributions from the transmitter itself and of all the elementary surfaces that represent the spacecraft. The frequency of the transmitted current is varied in frequency steps. Assuming a transmitted current I(f) of constant amplitude, the potential difference V(f) between the two receivers provides the mutual impedance

  3. CMB Anisotropies: Their Discovery and Utilization

    OpenAIRE

    Smoot, George F.

    2008-01-01

    This article is a written and modified version of a talk presented at the conference `A Century of Cosmology' held at San Servolo, Venice, Italy, in August 2007. The talk focuses on some of the cosmology history leading to the discovery and exploitation of Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Radiation anisotropies. We have made tremendous advances first in the development of the techniques to observe these anisotropies and in observing and interpreting them to extract their contained cosmologic...

  4. Probing the gamma-ray variability in 3C279 using broadband observations

    CERN Document Server

    Rani, B; Lee, S -S; Sokolovsky, K; Kang, S; Byun, D -Y; Mosunova, D; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present the results of a broadband radio-to-GeV observing campaign organized to get a better understanding of the radiation processes responsible for the $\\gamma$-ray flares observed in 3C 279. The total intensity and polarization observations of the source were carried out between December 28, 2013 and January 03, 2014 using the Fermi-LAT, Swift-XRT, Swift-UVOT, and KVN telescopes. A prominent flare observed in the optical/near-UV passbands was found to be correlated with a concurrent $\\gamma$-ray flare at a confidence level $>$95$\\%$, which suggests a co-spatial origin of the two. Moreover, the flaring activity in the two regimes was accompanied by no significant spectral variations. A peak in the X-ray light curve coincides with the peaks of the fractional polarization curves at 43 and 86 GHz radio bands. No prominent variation was noticed for the total intensity and the electric vector position angle (EVPA) observations at radio bands during this period. We noticed a possible hint of steepening of the ...

  5. Constraints on the symmetry energy from observational probes of the neutron star crust

    CERN Document Server

    Newton, William G; Gearheart, Michael; Murphy, Kyleah; Wen, De-Hua; Fattoyev, Farrukh; Li, Bao-An

    2015-01-01

    A number of observed phenomena associated with individual neutron star systems or neutron star populations find explanations in models in which the neutron star crust plays an important role. We review recent work examining the sensitivity to the slope of the symmetry energy $L$ of such models, and constraints extracted on $L$ from confronting them with observations. We focus on six sets of observations and proposed explanations: (i) The cooling rate of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, confronting cooling models which include enhanced cooling in the nuclear pasta regions of the inner crust, (ii) the upper limit of the observed periods of young X-ray pulsars, confronting models of magnetic field decay in the crust caused by the high resistivity of the nuclear pasta layer, (iii) glitches from the Vela pulsar, confronting the paradigm that they arise due to a sudden re-coupling of the crustal neutron superfluid to the crustal lattice after a period during which they were decoupled due to vortex pinning, (iv) Th...

  6. Constraints on the symmetry energy from observational probes of the neutron star crust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of observed phenomena associated with individual neutron star systems or neutron star populations find explanations in models in which the neutron star crust plays an important role. We review recent work examining the sensitivity to the slope of the symmetry energy L of such models, and constraints extracted on L from confronting them with observations. We focus on six sets of observations and proposed explanations: (i) The cooling rate of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, confronting cooling models which include enhanced cooling in the nuclear pasta regions of the inner crust; (ii) the upper limit of the observed periods of young X-ray pulsars, confronting models of magnetic field decay in the crust caused by the high resistivity of the nuclear pasta layer; (iii) glitches from the Vela pulsar, confronting the paradigm that they arise due to a sudden recoupling of the crustal neutron superfluid to the crustal lattice after a period during which they were decoupled due to vortex pinning; (iv) the frequencies of quasi-periodic oscillations in the X-ray tail of light curves from giant flares from soft gamma-ray repeaters, confronting models of torsional crust oscillations; (v) the upper limit on the frequency to which millisecond pulsars can be spun-up due to accretion from a binary companion, confronting models of the r-mode instability arising above a threshold frequency determined in part by the viscous dissipation timescale at the crust-core boundary; and (vi) the observations of precursor electromagnetic flares a few seconds before short gamma-ray bursts, confronting a model of crust shattering caused by resonant excitation of a crustal oscillation mode by the tidal gravitational field of a companion neutron star just before merger. (orig.)

  7. Constraints on the symmetry energy from observational probes of the neutron star crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, William G.; Hooker, Joshua; Gearheart, Michael; Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Li, Bao-An [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); Murphy, Kyleah [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); Umpqua Community College, Roseburg, Oregon (United States); Wen, De-Hua [Texas A and M University-Commerce, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Commerce (United States); South China University of Technology, Department of Physics, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-02-15

    A number of observed phenomena associated with individual neutron star systems or neutron star populations find explanations in models in which the neutron star crust plays an important role. We review recent work examining the sensitivity to the slope of the symmetry energy L of such models, and constraints extracted on L from confronting them with observations. We focus on six sets of observations and proposed explanations: (i) The cooling rate of the neutron star in Cassiopeia A, confronting cooling models which include enhanced cooling in the nuclear pasta regions of the inner crust; (ii) the upper limit of the observed periods of young X-ray pulsars, confronting models of magnetic field decay in the crust caused by the high resistivity of the nuclear pasta layer; (iii) glitches from the Vela pulsar, confronting the paradigm that they arise due to a sudden recoupling of the crustal neutron superfluid to the crustal lattice after a period during which they were decoupled due to vortex pinning; (iv) the frequencies of quasi-periodic oscillations in the X-ray tail of light curves from giant flares from soft gamma-ray repeaters, confronting models of torsional crust oscillations; (v) the upper limit on the frequency to which millisecond pulsars can be spun-up due to accretion from a binary companion, confronting models of the r-mode instability arising above a threshold frequency determined in part by the viscous dissipation timescale at the crust-core boundary; and (vi) the observations of precursor electromagnetic flares a few seconds before short gamma-ray bursts, confronting a model of crust shattering caused by resonant excitation of a crustal oscillation mode by the tidal gravitational field of a companion neutron star just before merger. (orig.)

  8. Spectral Anisotropy of Elsässer Variables in Two-dimensional Wave-vector Space as Observed in the Fast Solar Wind Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Limei; He, Jiansen; Zhang, Lei; Tu, Chuanyi; Marsch, Eckart; Chen, Christopher H. K.; Wang, Xin; Wang, Linghua; Wicks, Robert T.

    2016-01-01

    Intensive studies have been conducted to understand the anisotropy of solar wind turbulence. However, the anisotropy of Elsässer variables ({{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}+/- ) in 2D wave-vector space has yet to be investigated. Here we first verify the transformation based on the projection-slice theorem between the power spectral density {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) and the spatial correlation function {{CF}}2{{D}}({r}\\parallel ,{r}\\perp ). Based on the application of the transformation to the magnetic field and the particle measurements from the WIND spacecraft, we investigate the spectral anisotropy of Elsässer variables ({{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}+/- ), and the distribution of residual energy {E}{{R}}, Alfvén ratio {R}{{A}}, and Elsässer ratio {R}{{E}} in the ({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) space. The spectra {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) of {\\boldsymbol{B}}, {\\boldsymbol{V}}, and {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{major} (the larger of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}+/- ) show a similar pattern that {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) is mainly distributed along a ridge inclined toward the k⊥ axis. This is probably the signature of the oblique Alfvénic fluctuations propagating outwardly. Unlike those of {\\boldsymbol{B}}, {\\boldsymbol{V}}, and {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{major}, the spectrum {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{minor} is distributed mainly along the k⊥ axis. Close to the k⊥ axis, | {E}{{R}}| becomes larger while {R}{{A}} becomes smaller, suggesting that the dominance of magnetic energy over kinetic energy becomes more significant at small k∥. {R}{{E}} is larger at small k∥, implying that {{PSD}}2{{D}}({k}\\parallel ,{k}\\perp ) of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{minor} is more concentrated along the k⊥ direction as compared to that of {{\\boldsymbol{Z}}}{major}. The residual energy condensate at small k∥ is consistent with simulation results in which {E}{{R}} is spontaneously generated by Alfvén wave interaction.

  9. Probing dark matter decay and annihilation with Fermi LAT observations of nearby galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaoyuan [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). National Astronomical Observatories; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany); Vertongen, Gilles [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Institut d' Astrophysique de Paris, 75 - Paris (France); Weniger, Christoph [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik, Muenchen (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    Galaxy clusters are promising targets for indirect dark matter searches. Gamma-ray signatures from the decay or annihilation of dark matter particles inside these clusters could be observable with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Based on three years of Fermi LAT gamma-ray data, we analyze the flux coming from eight nearby clusters individually as well as in a combined likelihood analysis. Concentrating mostly on signals from dark matter decay, we take into account uncertainties of the cluster masses as determined by X-ray observations and model the cluster emission with extended sources. We do not find significant emission from any of the considered clusters and present limits on the dark matter lifetime and annihilation cross-section. We compare our lifetime limits derived from cluster observations with the limits that can be obtained from the extragalactic gamma-ray background, and find that in case of hadronic decay the cluster limits become competitive at dark matter masses below a few hundred GeV. Finally, we show that in presence of dark matter substructures down to 10{sup -6} solar masses the limits on the dark matter annihilation cross-section could improve by a factor of a few hundred, possibly going down to the thermal cross-section of 3 x 10{sup -26} cm{sup 3}s{sup -1} for dark matter masses observation of long-lived superparticles at the LHC are discussed. (orig.)

  10. Deeper and earlier penetrations of oxygen ions than protons into the inner magnetosphere Observed by Van Allen probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, K.; Seki, K.; Keika, K.; Lanzerotti, L. J.; Gkioulidou, M.; Mitchell, D. G.; Kletzing, C.

    2015-12-01

    It is observationally known that proton and oxygen ions are main components of the ring current during magnetic storms and that the proton and oxygen ions are considered to have different source and supply mechanisms. However, detailed properties of the ion supply and their dependence on ion species is far from well understood. To characterize the ion supply to the ring current during magnetic storms, we report studies of the properties of energetic proton and oxygen ion phase space densities (PSDs) during the April 23-25, 2013, geomagnetic storm observed by the Van Allen Probes mission. We used energetic ion (~50 - ~600keV protons, ~140 - ~1100keV oxygen) and magnetic field data obtained by the RBSPICE and EMFISIS, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes. We calculated ion PSDs for the specific first adiabatic invariant, mu (0.3 main phase of the magnetic storm. Protons with smaller mu values (mu = 0.3 and 0.5 keV/nT) penetrated earlier than those with larger mu values (mu = 1.0 keV/nT). This result appears consistent with the energy dependence of the Alfven layer. The timing of oxygen ion penetration is approximately the same for all mu values (mu = 0.8, 1.0 and 1.2 keV/nT). The observations also show that oxygen ions penetrated more deeply in L and earlier in time than protons for the same mu value (mu = 1.0keV/nT). These results suggest that the source of the transported oxygen ions is located closer to the Earth than the inner edge of protons. The results imply the importance of the contribution from subauroral oxygen ions to the storm-time ring current. We will also discuss the possibility of non-adiabatic acceleration of oxygen ions in the inner magnetosphere.

  11. The evolution of interstellar medium mass probed by dust emission: Alma observations at z = 0.3-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of submillimeter dust continuum emission to probe the mass of interstellar dust and gas in galaxies is empirically calibrated using samples of local star-forming galaxies, Planck observations of the Milky Way, and high-redshift submillimeter galaxies. All of these objects suggest a similar calibration, strongly supporting the view that the Rayleigh-Jeans tail of the dust emission can be used as an accurate and very fast probe of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies. We present ALMA Cycle 0 observations of the Band 7 (350 GHz) dust emission in 107 galaxies from z = 0.2 to 2.5. Three samples of galaxies with a total of 101 galaxies were stellar-mass-selected from COSMOS to have M * ≅ 1011 M ☉: 37 at z ∼ 0.4, 33 at z ∼ 0.9, and 31 at z = 2. A fourth sample with six infrared-luminous galaxies at z = 2 was observed for comparison with the purely mass-selected samples. From the fluxes detected in the stacked images for each sample, we find that the ISM content has decreased by a factor ∼6 from 1 to 2 × 1010 M ☉ at both z = 2 and 0.9 down to ∼2 × 109 M ☉ at z = 0.4. The infrared-luminous sample at z = 2 shows a further ∼4 times increase in M ISM compared with the equivalent non-infrared-bright sample at the same redshift. The gas mass fractions are ∼2% ± 0.5%, 12% ± 3%, 14% ± 2%, and 53% ± 3% for the four subsamples (z = 0.4, 0.9, and 2 and infrared-bright galaxies).

  12. Probing the Arctic - insights from combining surface station observations and model analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haiden, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The Arctic system is changing, and to understand the mechanisms and feedback processes contributing to these changes, an integrated spatial-temporal approach is needed. International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) observatories are predominantly located at coastal locations, which makes their data potentially relevant for both land and ocean areas. Numerical weather prediction (NWP) model analyses and forecasts provide a means of relating such point measurements to the atmospheric state over a larger area. Using ECMWF's re-analysis and forecasting system it is shown how comparison of station observations with NWP output provides insight into the flow-dependence of spatial representativeness. It also reveals systematic shortcomings in the model which need to be considered when the model is used as a tool to gain a better understanding of relevant physical processes. Well-known modelling challenges in the Arctic are discussed, such as the representation of low cloud, in particular at low temperatures, as well as ice/ocean/land-atmosphere interactions. The importance of surface-based observations, such as provided by IASOA observatories, is considered in light of the scientific plan for the Year of Polar Prediction 2017-19.

  13. New method for probing Kerr space-time based on imaging observation of in-falling gas blob

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Kotaro; Mineshige, Shin

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new observational method to probe the black hole space-time described by Einstein's theory. We consider a gas blob with an arc shape falling from the marginally stable orbit onto a black hole, carrying a finite amount of angular momentum. Previously, we proposed measuring the black hole spin from the flux variation data of the in-falling blob, assuming the Kerr space-time. We demonstrate here that we can independently measure the black hole spin solely by using the imaging data of the in-falling blob. We then introduce a Kerr-like hole (with one additional parameter which describes a stronger or weaker frame-dragging effect than that of the Kerr hole) and apply the two different methods of spin measurement: one based on the flux variation data and the other based on the imaging data. We obtain different spin values by the different methods for the Kerr-like hole. This is because these methods are sensitive to different components of the metric. We can in this way probe the black hole space-time through the comparison of the estimated spin values; that is, if the black hole space-time is described by the Kerr metric, all of them should coincide.

  14. Impact of atmospheric refraction: how deeply can we probe exo-earth's atmospheres during primary eclipse observations?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bétrémieux, Yan [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Kaltenegger, Lisa, E-mail: betremieux@mpia.de [Also at Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. (United States)

    2014-08-10

    Most models used to predict or fit exoplanet transmission spectra do not include all the effects of atmospheric refraction. Namely, the angular size of the star with respect to the planet can limit the lowest altitude, or highest density and pressure, probed during primary eclipses as no rays passing below this critical altitude can reach the observer. We discuss this geometrical effect of refraction for all exoplanets and tabulate the critical altitude, density, and pressure for an exoplanet identical to Earth with a 1 bar N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} atmosphere as a function of both the incident stellar flux (Venus, Earth, and Mars-like) at the top of the atmosphere and the spectral type (O5-M9) of the host star. We show that such a habitable exo-Earth can be probed to a surface pressure of 1 bar only around the coolest stars. We present 0.4-5.0 μm model transmission spectra of Earth's atmosphere viewed as a transiting exoplanet, and show how atmospheric refraction modifies the transmission spectrum depending on the spectral type of the host star. We demonstrate that refraction is another phenomenon that can potentially explain flat transmission spectra over some spectral regions.

  15. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow Kα core (σ ≅ 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at ∼ 10 rg. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R ≅ 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of Λ ≅ 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and low background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of Λ ≅ 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects

  16. Probing the Disk-Jet Connection of the Radio Galaxy 3C120 Observed With Suzaku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kataoka, Jun; Reeves, James N.; Iwasawa, Kazushi; Markowitz, Alex G.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Arimoto, Makoto; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Tsubuku, Yoshihiro; Ushio, Masayoshi; Watanabe, Shin; Gallo, Luigi C.; Madejski, Greg M.; Terashima, Yuichi; Isobe, Naoki; Tashiro, Makoto S.; Kohmura, Takayoshi; /Tokyo Inst. Tech. /NASA, Goddard /Garching, Max Planck

    2007-01-03

    Broad line radio galaxies (BLRGs) are a rare type of radio-loud AGN, in which the broad optical permitted emission lines have been detected in addition to the extended jet emission. Here we report on deep (40ksec x 4) observations of the bright BLRG 3C 120 using Suzaku. The observations were spaced a week apart, and sample a range of continuum fluxes. An excellent broadband spectrum was obtained over two decades of frequency (0.6 to 50 keV) within each 40 ksec exposure. We clearly resolved the iron K emission line complex, finding that it consists of a narrow K{sub {alpha}} core ({sigma} {approx_equal} 110 eV or an EW of 60 eV), a 6.9 keV line, and an underlying broad iron line. Our confirmation of the broad line contrasts with the XMM-Newton observation in 2003, where the broad line was not required. The most natural interpretation of the broad line is iron K line emission from a face-on accretion disk which is truncated at {approx} 10 r{sub g}. Above 10 keV, a relatively weak Compton hump was detected (reflection fraction of R {approx_equal} 0.6), superposed on the primary X-ray continuum of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 1.75. Thanks to the good photon statistics and low background of the Suzaku data, we clearly confirm the spectral evolution of 3C 120, whereby the variability amplitude decreases with increasing energy. More strikingly, we discovered that the variability is caused by a steep power-law component of {Lambda} {approx_equal} 2.7, possibly related to the non-thermal jet emission. We discuss our findings in the context of similarities and differences between radio-loud/quiet objects.

  17. Van Allen Probe Observations: Near-Earth injections of Mev Electrons Associated with Intense Substorm Electric Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, L.; Wygant, J. R.; Bonnell, J. W.; Cattell, C. A.; Kletzing, C.; Baker, D. N.; Li, X.; Malaspina, D.; Blake, J. B.; Fennell, J.; Claudepierre, S. G.; Takahashi, K.; Funsten, H. O.; Reeves, G. D.; Spence, H. E.; Angelopoulos, V.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Turner, D. L.; Thaller, S. A.; Breneman, A. W.; Kersten, K.; Tang, X.; Tao, X.

    2014-12-01

    With their unique orbit, the Van Allen Probes (RBSP) spacecraft are well suited to investigate near-Earth substorm injections that penetrate into the heart of outer radiation belts. Substorms are generally conceived to inject 10s-100s keV electrons but intense substorm electric fields have been shown capable of injecting ~MeV electrons as well at the geosynchronous altitude. An intriguing question is whether such MeV electron injections can penetrate to lower L shells and directly contribute to the relativistic electron population of the outer radiation belt. In this talk, we present RBSP observations of near-Earth substorm injection of MeV relativistic particles and associated intense dipolarization electric field at L ~5.5. The substorm injection occurred during a moderate storm (DST~-30 to -20) with steady solar wind conditions. RBSP-A observed dispersionless injection of electrons from 10s keV up to 3 MeV in the pre-mid night sector (MLT=22UT). The injection was associated with unusually large (60mV/m) dipolarization electric fields that lasted 1 minute. At about the same time, THEMIS-D observed energy-dispersive injection of electrons at energies as high as at least 720keV at L~6.8 in the pre-dawn sector. Injection of energetic protons (~1MeV) and proton drift echos were observed at RBSP-A as well. RBSP-A observed a broad spectrum of nonlinear electric field structures but no whistler waves at the injection. The properties of the observed dipolarization electric field constrain the acceleration mechanism responsible for the MeV electron injection. We will discuss the implications of these observations on the direct impact of substorms on the outer radiation belt.

  18. Observation of energy transfer between InAs quantum dots by pump-and-probe micro-photoluminescence measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using pump-and-probe micro-photoluminescence measurement, we observed the nonlinear photoluminescence (PL) of multilayer InAs quantum dots (QDs), which originated from energy transfer between dots. In double- and five-layered InAs QDs, the differential PL intensity, ΔI/Iprobe, became negative at certain pump intensity. With changes in the pump intensity, ΔI/Iprobe decreases or increases. This is explained by the generation of a non-radiative path and the saturation of non-radiative sites by the pump pulses. Our experimental results suggest that InAs QDs can act as AND- and NOT-gates by using suitable thresholds and control lights.

  19. Probing quantum gravity using photons from a flare of the active galactic nucleus Markarian 501 observed by the MAGIC telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, J; Anderhub, H; Antonelli, L A; Antoranz, P; Backes, M; Baixeras, C; Barrio, J A; Bartko, H; Bastieri, D; Becker, J K; Bednarek, W; Berger, K; Bernardini, E; Bigongiari, C; Biland, A; Bock, R K; Bordas, P; Bosch-Ramon, V; Bretz, T; Britvitch, I; Camara, M; Carmona, E; Chilingarian, A; Commichau, S; Contreras, J L; Cortina, J; Costado, M T; Covino, S; Dazzi, F; De Angelis, A; De Cea del Pozo, E; Delgado Mendez, C; de los Reyes, R; De Lotto, B; De Maria, M; De Sabata, F; Dominguez, A; Dorner, D; Doro, M; Errando, M; Fagiolini, M; Ferenc, D; Fernández, E; Firpo, R; Fonseca, M V; Font, L; Galante, N; García-López, R J; Garczarczyk, M; Gaug, M; Göbel, F; Hayashida, M; Herrero, A; Höhne, D; Hose, J; Hsu, C C; Huber, S; Jogler, T; Kranich, D; La Barbera, A; Laille, A; Leonardo, E; Lindfors, E; Lombardi, S; Longo, F; López, M; Lorenz, E; Majumdar, P; Maneva, G; Mankuzhiyil, N; Mannheim, K; Maraschi, L; Mariotti, M; Martínez, M; Mazin, D; Meucci, M; Meyer, M; Miranda, J M; Mirzoyan, R; Moles, M; Moralejo, A; Nieto, D; Nilsson, K; Ninkovic, J; Otte, N; Oya, I; Panniello, M; Paoletti, R; Paredes, J M; Pasanen, M; Pascoli, D; Pauss, F; Pegna, R; Pérez-Torres, M A; Persic, M; Peruzzo, L; Piccioli, A; Prada, F; Puchades, N; Raymers, A; Ribó, M; Rico, J; Rissi, M; Robert, A; Rügamer, S; Saggion, A; Saitô, T; Salvati, M; Sanchez-Conde, M; Sartori, P; Satalecka, K; Scalzotto, V; Scapin, V; Schmitt, R; Schweizer, T; Shayduk, M; Shinozaki, K; Sidro, N; Sierpowska-Bartosik, A; Sillanpää, A; Spanier, F; Stamerra, A; Stark, L S; Takalo, L; Tavecchio, F; Temnikov, P; Tescaro, D; Teshima, M; Tluczykont, M; Torres, D F; Turini, N; Vankov, H; Venturini, A; Vitale, V; Wagner, R M; Wittek, W; Zabalza, M; Zandanel, F; Zanin, R; Ellis, Jonathan Richard; Mavromatos, N E; Nanopoulos, D V; Sakharov, Alexander S; Sarkisyan-Grinbaum, E

    2008-01-01

    We use the timing of photons observed by the MAGIC gamma-ray telescope during a flare of the active galaxy Markarian 501 to probe a vacuum refractive index ~ 1-(E/M_QGn)^n, n = 1,2, that might be induced by quantum gravity. The peaking of the flare is found to maximize for quantum-gravity mass scales M_QG1 ~ 0.4x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 ~ 0.6x10^11 GeV, and we establish lower limits M_QG1 > 0.26x10^18 GeV or M_QG2 > 0.39x10^11 GeV at the 95% C.L. Monte Carlo studies confirm the MAGIC sensitivity to propagation effects at these levels. Thermal plasma effects in the source are negligible, but we cannot exclude the importance of some other source effect.

  20. Probing the symmetry energy at low density using observable from neck fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Filippo E.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Semi-peripheral collisions of 64Ni + 124Sn in direct and inverse kinematics, at 35 A MeV incident energy, are studied to characterize the dynamical origin and align-ments properties of fragments emission at midrapidity. This emission is partly due to the fragmentation of a transient neck joining the projectile and target in the early stages of the reaction. Recently we exploited observable from neck fragmentation to constraint the density dependence of the symmetry energy. In this contribution we focus on the density evolution of the mid-rapidity source. An experimental survey is suggested to check if data are consistent with the formation of neck fragments in a dilute density region in contact with the projectile-like and target-like spectators at normal saturation density.

  1. Primordial anisotropies in gauged hybrid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study primordial anisotropies generated in the model of gauged hybrid inflation in which the complex waterfall field is charged under a U(1)gauge field. Primordial anisotropies are generated either actively during inflation or from inhomogeneities modulating the surface of end of inflation during waterfall transition. We present a consistent δN mechanism to calculate the anisotropic power spectrum and bispectrum. We show that the primordial anisotropies generated at the surface of end of inflation do not depend on the number of e-folds and therefore do not produce dangerously large anisotropies associated with the IR modes. Furthermore, one can find the parameter space that the anisotropies generated from the surface of end of inflation cancel the anisotropies generated during inflation, therefore relaxing the constrains on model parameters imposed from IR anisotropies. We also show that the gauge field fluctuations induce a red-tilted power spectrum so the averaged power spectrum from the gauge field can change the total power spectrum from blue to red. Therefore, hybrid inflation, once gauged under a U(1) field, can be consistent with the cosmological observations

  2. Seismic anisotropy in the Sumatra subduction zone

    OpenAIRE

    R. Collings; Rietbrock, A.; Lange, Dietrich; F. Tilmann; S. Nippress; D. Natawidjaja

    2013-01-01

    An important tool for understanding deformation occurring within a subduction zone is the measurement of seismic anisotropy through observations of shear wave splitting (SWS). In Sumatra, two temporary seismic networks were deployed between December 2007 and February 2009, covering the fore arc between the fore-arc islands to the back arc. We use SKS and local SWS measurements to determine the type, amount, and location of anisotropy. Local SWS measurements from the fore-arc islands exhibit t...

  3. Type II supernovae as probes of environment metallicity: observations of host HII regions

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, J P; Dessart, L; Hamuy, M; Galbany, L; Morrell, N I; Stritzinger, M D; Phillips, M M; Folatelli, G; Boffin, H M J; de Jaeger, T; Kuncarayakti, H; Prieto, J L

    2016-01-01

    Spectral modelling of SNII atmospheres indicates a clear dependence of metal line strengths on progenitor metallicity. This motivates further work to evaluate the accuracy with which these SNe can be used as metallicity indicators. To assess this accuracy we present a sample of SNII HII-region spectroscopy, from which environment abundances are derived. These environment abundances are compared to the observed strength of metal lines in SN spectra. Combining our sample with measurements from the literature, we present oxygen abundances of 119 host HII regions, by extracting emission line fluxes and using abundance diagnostics. Then, following Dessart et al., these abundances are compared to equivalent widths of Fe 5018 A at various time and colour epochs. Our distribution of inferred SNII host HII-region abundances has a range of ~0.6 dex. We confirm the dearth of SNeII exploding at metallicities lower than those found (on average) in the Large Magellanic Cloud. The equivalent width of Fe 5018 A at 50 days po...

  4. Event Horizon Telescope Observations as Probes for Quantum Structure of Astrophysical Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Giddings, Steven B

    2016-01-01

    The need for a consistent quantum evolution for black holes has led to proposals that their semiclassical description is modified not just near the singularity, but at horizon or larger scales. If such modifications extend beyond the horizon, they influence regions accessible to distant observeration. Natural candidates for these modifications behave like metric fluctuations, with characteristic length and time scales set by the horizon radius. We investigate the possibility of using the Event Horizon Telescope to observe these effects, if they have a strength sufficient to make quantum evolution consistent with unitarity. We find that such quantum fluctuations can introduce a strong time dependence for the shape and size of the shadow that a black hole casts on its surrounding emission. For the black hole in the center of the Milky Way, detecting the rapid time variability of its shadow will require non-imaging timing techniques. However, for the much larger black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy, a vari...

  5. Anisotropy in rotating drums

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povall, Timothy; McBride, Andrew; Govender, Indresan

    2015-11-01

    An anisotropic relationship between the stress and the strain rate has been observed in two-dimensional simulations of rotating drums. The objective of this work is to investigate the structure of the constitutive relation using three-dimensional discrete-element-method simulations of a rotating drum containing identical rigid spheres for a range of rotational speeds. Anisotropy is quantified from the alignment of the stress and strain rate tensors, with the strain rate computed using a least-squares fit. It is shown that in certain regions there is a strong anisotropic relationship, regardless of the speed of rotation. The effective friction coefficient is examined in order to determine the phase space in which the μ (I) rheology is valid. Lastly, a depth-averaged approach through the flowing layer is employed to determine the relationship between the velocity tangential to the equilibrium surface and the height of the flowing layer. A power-law relationship that approaches linear at high speeds is observed. Supported by NRF/DST Scarce Skills (South Africa).

  6. Simulations of inner magnetosphere dynamics with an expanded RAM-SCB model and comparisons with Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordanova, V. K.; Yu, Y.; Niehof, J. T.; Skoug, R. M.; Reeves, G. D.; Kletzing, C. A.; Fennell, J. F.; Spence, H. E.

    2014-04-01

    Simulations from our newly expanded ring current-atmosphere interactions model with self-consistent magnetic field (RAM-SCB), now valid out to 9 RE, are compared for the first time with Van Allen Probes observations. The expanded model reproduces the storm time ring current buildup due to the increased convection and inflow of plasma from the magnetotail. It matches Magnetic Electron Ion Spectrometer (MagEIS) observations of the trapped high-energy (>50 keV) ion flux; however, it underestimates the low-energy (20 keV) energy are better reproduced using a high-resolution convection model. In agreement with Electric and Magnetic Field Instrument Suite and Integrated Science (EMFISIS) observations, RAM-SCB indicates that the large-scale magnetic field is depressed as close as ˜4.5 RE during even a moderate storm. Regions of electromagnetic ion cyclotron instability are predicted on the duskside from ˜6 to ˜9 RE, indicating that previous studies confined to geosynchronous orbit may have underestimated their scattering effect on the energetic particles.

  7. Modeling of current characteristics of Segmented Langmuir Probe on DEMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard

    2012-10-01

    We model current characteristics of a Segmented Langmuir probe mounted on DEMETER satellite. The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere on DEMETER at altitudes of 700 km.It also serves as a Mach probe and used to measure the plasma flow velocities in satellite frame of reference.The probe is partitioned into seven segments: six electrically insulated spherical caps and a Guard electrode (sphere). Comparisons are made between the model predictions and measurements for characteristics of various segments for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along DEMETER orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a 3 D PIC simulation code. The model accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment e.g. satellite charging, photoelectron and secondary electron emission. The supersonic flow of plasma results in different characteristics for different segments of the probe. This anisotropy in turn can be used to infer the velocity of the background plasma. It is observed in that a positive bias can significantly modify plasma sheath region and wake formation around the probe.Computed characteristics and their angular anisotropy are compared with measurements.

  8. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    CERN Document Server

    Fedele, D; Kama, M; Bruderer, S; Hogerheijde, M

    2016-01-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-$J$ CO rotational lines is a powerful tool to assess the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-$J$ ($J_{\\rm u} > 14$) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new {\\it Herschel}/HIFI and archival PACS observations of $^{12}$CO, $^{13}$CO and \\cii \\ emission in 4 Herbig AeBe (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and 3 T Tauri (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya) disks. In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all other systems, the {\\it Herschel} CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally-resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyze...

  9. Phase structure of the Born-Infeld-anti-de Sitter black holes probed by non-local observables

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Xiao-Xiong; Li, Li-Fang

    2016-01-01

    With the non-local observables such as two point correlation function and holographic entanglement entropy, we probe the phase structure of the Born-Infeld-anti-de Sitter black holes. We find for the case $bQ>0.5$, the phase structure is similar to that of the Reissner-Nordstr\\"om-AdS black hole, namely the black hole undergoes a Hawking-Page phase transition, a first order phase transition, and a second order phase transition. While for the case $bQ<0.5$, we find there is a new branch for the infinitesimally small black hole so that a pseudo phase transition emerges besides the original first order phase transition. For the first order phase transition and the pseudo phase transition, the equal area law is checked, and for the second order phase transition, the critical exponent of the analogous heat capacity is obtained in the neighborhood of the critical points. All the results show that the phase structure of the non-local observables is the same as that of the thermal entropy regardless of the size of...

  10. The anisotropy of granular materials

    OpenAIRE

    Alonso-Marroquin, F.; Luding, S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of the anisotropy on the elastoplastic response of two dimensional packed samples of polygons is investigated here, using molecular dynamics simulation. We show a correlation between fabric coefficients, characterizing the anisotropy of the granular skeleton, and the anisotropy of the elastic response. We also study the anisotropy induced by shearing on the subnetwork of the sliding contacts. This anisotropy provides an explanation to some features of the plastic deformation of gra...

  11. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10-7, where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  12. [Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) Anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silk, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    One of the main areas of research is the theory of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and analysis of CMB data. Using the four year COBE data we were able to improve existing constraints on global shear and vorticity. We found that, in the flat case (which allows for greatest anisotropy), (omega/H)0 less than 10(exp -7), where omega is the vorticity and H is the Hubble constant. This is two orders of magnitude lower than the tightest, previous constraint. We have defined a new set of statistics which quantify the amount of non-Gaussianity in small field cosmic microwave background maps. By looking at the distribution of power around rings in Fourier space, and at the correlations between adjacent rings, one can identify non-Gaussian features which are masked by large scale Gaussian fluctuations. This may be particularly useful for identifying unresolved localized sources and line-like discontinuities. Levin and collaborators devised a method to determine the global geometry of the universe through observations of patterns in the hot and cold spots of the CMB. We have derived properties of the peaks (maxima) of the CMB anisotropies expected in flat and open CDM models. We represent results for angular resolutions ranging from 5 arcmin to 20 arcmin (antenna FWHM), scales that are relevant for the MAP and COBRA/SAMBA space missions and the ground-based interferometer. Results related to galaxy formation and evolution are also discussed.

  13. Is there evidence for anomalous dipole anisotropy in the large-scale structure?

    CERN Document Server

    Bengaly,, C A P; Alcaniz, J S; Xavier, H S; Novaes, C P

    2016-01-01

    We probe the anisotropy of the large-scale structure (LSS) with the WISE-2MASS catalogue. This analysis is performed by a directional comparison of the galaxy number counts through the entire celestial sphere once systematic effects, such as star-galaxy separation and foregrounds contamination, are properly taken into account. We find a maximal hemispherical asymmetry whose dipolar component is $A = 0.0507 \\pm 0.0014$ toward the $(l,b) = (323^{\\circ},-5^{\\circ})$ direction. This result is consistent with previous estimations of our proper motion in low and intermediate redshifts, as those carried out with Type Ia Supernovae and similar LSS catalogues.Furthermore, this dipole amplitude obtained is statistically consistent with mock catalogues simulated according to the $\\Lambda$CDM matter density expected fluctuations, in addition to observational biases such as the incomplete celestial coverage, anisotropic sky exposure. Our results suggest, therefore, that there is no strong evidence for anomalous anisotropy...

  14. Probing the 2D temperature structure of protoplanetary disks with Herschel observations of high-J CO lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, D.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Kama, M.; Bruderer, S.; Hogerheijde, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    The gas temperature structure of protoplanetary disks is a key ingredient for interpreting various disk observations and for quantifying the subsequent evolution of these systems. The comparison of low- and mid-J CO rotational lines is a powerful tool for assessing the temperature gradient in the warm molecular layer of disks. Spectrally resolved high-J (Ju> 14) CO lines probe intermediate distances and heights from the star that are not sampled by (sub-)millimeter CO spectroscopy. This paper presents new Herschel/HIFI and archival PACS observations of 12CO, 13CO, and [C ii] emission in four Herbig AeBe disks (HD 100546, HD 97048, IRS 48, HD 163296) and three T Tauri disks (AS 205, S CrA, TW Hya). In the case of the T Tauri systems AS 205 and S CrA, the CO emission has a single-peaked profile, likely due to a slow wind. For all the other systems, the Herschel CO spectra are consistent with pure disk emission and the spectrally resolved lines (HIFI) and the CO rotational ladder (PACS) are analyzed simultaneously assuming power-law temperature and column density profiles, using the velocity profile to locate the emission in the disk. The temperature profile varies substantially from disk to disk. In particular, Tgas in the disk surface layers can differ by up to an order of magnitude among the four Herbig AeBe systems; HD 100546 is the hottest and HD 163296 the coldest disk in the sample. Clear evidence of a warm disk layer where Tgas>Tdust is found in all the Herbig Ae disks. The observed CO fluxes and line profiles are compared to predictions of physical-chemical models. The primary parameters affecting the disk temperature structure are the flaring angle, the gas-to-dust mass ratio, the scale height, and the dust settling.

  15. Mid-IR Observations of T Tauri stars: Probing the Star-Disk Connection in Rotational Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Kundurthy, P; Robberto, M; Beckwith, S V W; Herbst, T; Kundurthy, Praveen; Meyer, Michael R.; Robberto, Massimo; Beckwith, Steven V.W.; Herbst, Tom

    2006-01-01

    We present mid-IR N-band $(\\lambda_{eff} = 10.2\\micron)$ photometry of a carefully selected sample of T Tauri stars thought to be single from the Taurus-Auriga molecular cloud. Infrared excesses in these stars are generally attributed to circumstellar dust-disks. Combining observations at 2.16$\\micron$ (K$_{s}$-band) and 10.2$\\micron$ (N-band) we probe a region in the circumstellar dust-disk from a few stellar radii through the terrestrial planet zone (0.02-1.0AU). By analyzing the distribution of the $(K_{s}-N)$ color index with respect to previously measured photometric rotation periods we investigate what role circumstellar disks play in the rotational evolution of the central star. The resulting positive correlation between these two variables is consistent with the notion that a star-disk interaction facilitates the regulation of angular momentum during the T Tauri stage. We also demonstrate, how including non-single stars in such an analysis will \\textit{weaken} any correlation in the relation between $...

  16. Analysis of complex anisotropy decays from single-frequency polarized-phasor ellipse plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozer, Noga; Clayton, Andrew H. A.

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropy decay of a fluorescently-labelled macromolecule provides information on the internal and global dynamics of the macromolecule. Weber was a pioneer of fluorescent probes, polarization and polarized phase-modulation methods and revealed the power of combining or comparing these methods to disentangle complex modes of emission depolarization. In this paper we take a similar course and show that when measurements of dynamic depolarization are combined with steady-state anisotropy, complex anisotropy decays can be deduced from measurements at a single modulation frequency. Specifically, a double exponential anisotropy decay can be resolved by combining one of the polarized emission phasors with the steady-state anisotropy. The key is the polarized phasor ellipse plot which provides a convenient visualisation aid and reduces the dimensionality of the minimisation problem from three variables to one variable. We illustrate these concepts with an experimental measurement of the anisotropy decay of a small cytoplasmic fluorescent probe in live cells.

  17. Nonlinear photoinduced anisotropy and modifiable optical image display in a bacteriorhodopsin/polymer composite film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Lai; Luo, Jia; Zhu, Jiang; Lu, Ming; Zhao, You-yuan; Ma, De-wang; Ding, Jian-dong

    2007-04-01

    The nonlinear photoinduced anisotropy with large birefringence in a bacteriorhodopsin/polymer composite (bR/PC) film was observed. The contrast ratio, a ratio of the maximum to the minimum intensity of transmitted probe light through the bR/PC film within the linear gray scale range could reach ˜350:1. An all-optical image display in different colors was performed. The intensity of the transmitted signal could be modulated by adjusting the multibeam polarization states and intensities. Therefore, the positive image, negative image, and image erasure in display were demonstrated.

  18. Anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background in nonstandard cold dark matter models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittorio, Nicola; Silk, Joseph

    1992-01-01

    Small angular scale cosmic microwave anisotropies in flat, vacuum-dominated, cold dark matter cosmological models which fit large-scale structure observations and are consistent with a high value for the Hubble constant are reexamined. New predictions for CDM models in which the large-scale power is boosted via a high baryon content and low H(0) are presented. Both classes of models are consistent with current limits: an improvement in sensitivity by a factor of about 3 for experiments which probe angular scales between 7 arcmin and 1 deg is required, in the absence of very early reionization, to test boosted CDM models for large-scale structure formation.

  19. The expected anisotropy in solid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid inflation is an effective field theory of inflation in which isotropy and homogeneity are accomplished via a specific combination of anisotropic sources (three scalar fields that individually break isotropy). This results in specific observational signatures that are not found in standard models of inflation: a non-trivial angular dependence for the squeezed bispectrum, and a possibly long period of anisotropic inflation (to drive inflation, the ''solid'' must be very insensitive to any deformation, and thus background anisotropies are very slowly erased). In this paper we compute the expected level of statistical anisotropy in the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations of this model. To do so, we account for the classical background values of the three scalar fields that are generated on large (superhorizon) scales during inflation via a random walk sum, as the perturbation modes leave the horizon. Such an anisotropy is unavoidably generated, even starting from perfectly isotropic classical initial conditions. The expected level of anisotropy is related to the duration of inflation and to the amplitude of the squeezed bispectrum. If this amplitude is close to its current observational limit (so that one of the most interesting predictions of the model can be observed in the near future), we find that a level of statistical anisotropy F2 gives frozen and scale invariant vector perturbations on superhorizon scales

  20. Enhancement of rotatable anisotropy in ferrite doped FeNi thin film with oblique sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Cai; Jiang, Changjun; Zhao, Zhong

    2015-07-01

    Rotatable anisotropy of stripe domain (SD) was investigated in a ferrite doped FeNi thin film with different oblique angles. Rotation of SD under an in-plane magnetic field was observed by magnetic force microscopy, suggesting the existence of rotatable anisotropy. A rotatable anisotropy field Hrot was derived from the fitting curves of the in-plane resonance field versus the angle between the orientation of easy axis and applied field. As the oblique angle increases, an increase of Hrot from 305 Oe to 468 Oe was observed and the perpendicular anisotropy increased as well, indicating a correlation between rotatable anisotropy and perpendicular anisotropy.

  1. Detecting 3D vegetation structure with the Galileo space probe: Can a distant probe detect vegetation structure on Earth?

    CERN Document Server

    Doughty, Christopher E

    2016-01-01

    Sagan et al. (1993) used the Galileo space probe data and first principles to find evidence of life on Earth. Here we ask whether Sagan et al. (1993) could also have detected whether life on Earth had three-dimensional structure, based on the Galileo space probe data. We reanalyse the data from this probe to see if structured vegetation could have been detected in regions with abundant photosynthetic pigments through the anisotropy of reflected shortwave radiation. We compare changing brightness of the Amazon forest (a region where Sagan et al. (1993) noted a red edge in the reflectance spectrum, indicative of photosynthesis) as the planet rotates to a common model of reflectance anisotropy and found measured increase of surface reflectance of 0.019 versus a 0.007 predicted from only anisotropic effects. We hypothesize the difference was due to minor cloud contamination. However, the Galileo dataset had only a small change in phase angle (sun-satellite position) which reduced the observed anisotropy signal an...

  2. Probing the Frontiers of QCD

    CERN Document Server

    Horowitz, W A

    2010-01-01

    With the energy scales opened up by RHIC and LHC the age of high-pT physics is upon us. This has created new opportunities and novel mysteries, both of which will be explored in this thesis. The possibility now exists experimentally to exploit these high momentum particles to uniquely probe the unprecedented state of matter produced in heavy ion collisions. At the same time naive theoretical expectations have been dashed by data. The first puzzle we confront is that of the enormous intermediate-pT azimuthal anisotropy, or v2, of jets observed at RHIC. The second puzzle is the surprisingly similar suppression of light mesons and nonphotonic electrons, which precludes perturbative predictions predicated on gluon bremsstrahlung radiation as the dominant energy loss channel. Near qualitative agreement results from including collisional energy loss and integrating over the fluctuating jet pathlengths. Another conjecture for heavy quark energy loss comes via explicit construction using the AdS/CFT correspondence; t...

  3. Determination of anisotropy to enhance the durability of natural stone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anisotropy is a petrophysical property of natural stone and other construction materials that determines their quality and resistance to decay due to a variety of agents, such as water. A study was conducted on nine types of stone widely used in Spain's built heritage, using six previously defined anisotropy indices. These indices can be used to determine the degree of anisotropy, which helps explain the differential decay observed in stone materials quarried in the same bed and used to build the same structure. The conclusion reached is that anisotropy should be determined in the natural stone used both to restore the architectural heritage and in new construction, since the appropriate choice of material quality ensures greater resistance to decay and, therefore, increased durability. Materials with the lowest possible anisotropy should be selected, as this property governs their hydraulic behaviour: the lower the anisotropy in a material, the better its behaviour in relation to water and the longer its durability

  4. CMB anisotropy science: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Challinor, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background (CMB) provides us with our most direct observational window to the early universe. Observations of the temperature and polarization anisotropies in the CMB have played a critical role in defining the now-standard cosmological model. In this contribution we review some of the basics of CMB science, highlighting the role of observations made with ground-based and balloon-borne Antarctic telescopes. Most of the ingredients of the standard cosmological model are poorly understood in terms of fundamental physics. We discuss how current and future CMB observations can address some of these issues, focusing on two directly relevant for Antarctic programmes: searching for gravitational waves from inflation via B-mode polarization, and mapping dark matter through CMB lensing.

  5. Observed Coupling Between the International Space Station PCU Plasma and a FPMU Langmuir Probe Facilitated by the Geomagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, William; Koontz, Steven L.

    2010-01-01

    Electrical charging of the International Space Station (ISS) is a matter of serious concern resulting from the possibility of vehicle arcing and electrical shock hazard to crew during extravehicular activity (EVA). A Plasma Contactor Unit (PCU) was developed and integrated into ISS in order to control the ISS floating potential, thereby, minimize vehicle charging and associated hazards. One of the principle factors affecting ISS electrical charging is the ionosphere plasma state (i.e., electron temperature and density). To support ISS electrical charging studies a Floating Potential Monitoring Unit (FPMU) is also integrated into ISS in order to measure the ionosphere properties using Langmuir probes (LP). The FPMU was located on the Starboard side of ISS. The PCU is located near the center of ISS with its plasma exhaust pointed to port. From its integration on ISS in 2006 through November of 2009, the FPMU data exhibited nominal characteristics during PCU operation. On November 21, 2009 the FPMU was relocated from the Starboard location to a new Port location. After relocation significant enhanced noise was observed in both the LP current-voltage sweeps and the derived electron temperature data. The enhanced noise only occurred when the PCU was in discharge and at unique and repeatable locations of the ISS orbit. The cause of this enhanced noise was investigated. It was found that there is coupling occurring between the PCU plasma and the FPMU LP. In this paper we shall 1) present the on-orbit data and the presence of enhanced noise, 2) demonstrate that the coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU measurements is geomagnetically organized, 3) show that coupling of the PCU plasma and the FPMU is primarily due to and driven by particle-wave interaction and 4) show that the ionosphere conditions are adequate for Alfven waves to be generated by the PCU plasma.

  6. Probing Capacity

    CERN Document Server

    Asnani, Himanshu; Weissman, Tsachy

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of optimal probing of states of a channel by transmitter and receiver for maximizing rate of reliable communication. The channel is discrete memoryless (DMC) with i.i.d. states. The encoder takes probing actions dependent on the message. It then uses the state information obtained from probing causally or non-causally to generate channel input symbols. The decoder may also take channel probing actions as a function of the observed channel output and use the channel state information thus acquired, along with the channel output, to estimate the message. We refer to the maximum achievable rate for reliable communication for such systems as the 'Probing Capacity'. We characterize this capacity when the encoder and decoder actions are cost constrained. To motivate the problem, we begin by characterizing the trade-off between the capacity and fraction of channel states the encoder is allowed to observe, while the decoder is aware of channel states. In this setting of 'to observe or not to o...

  7. Time-Domain TeraHertz Spectroscopy and Observational Probes of Prebiotic Interstellar Gas and Ice Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Brett Andrew

    ruled out a gas-phase route to the synthesis of the simplest amino acid in the ISM. A molecular mystery in the case of the carrier of a series of transitions was resolved using observational data toward a large number of sources, confirming the identity of this important carbon-chemistry intermediate B11244 as l-C3H+ and identifying it in at least two new environments. Finally, the doubly-nitrogenated molecule carbodiimide HNCNH was identified in the ISM for the first time through maser emission features in the centimeter-wavelength regime. In the laboratory, a TeraHertz Time-Domain Spectrometer was constructed to obtain the experimental spectra necessary to search for solid-phase species in the ISM in the THz region of the spectrum. These investigations have shown a striking dependence on large-scale, long-range (i.e. lattice) structure of the ices on the spectra they present in the THz. A database of molecular spectra has been started, and both the simplest and most abundant ice species, which have already been identified, as well as a number of more complex species, have been studied. The exquisite sensitivity of the THz spectra to both the structure and thermal history of these ices may lead to better probes of complex chemical and dynamical evolution in interstellar environments.

  8. Large Friction Anisotropy of a Polydiacetylene Monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friction force microscopy measurements of a polydiacetylene monolayer film reveal a 300% friction anisotropy that is correlated with the film structure. The film consists of a monolayer of the red form of N-(2-ethanol)- 10,12 pentacosadiynamide, prepared on a Langmuir trough and deposited on a mica substrate. As confirmed by atomic force microscopy and fluorescence microscopy, the monolayer consists of domains of linearly oriented conjugated backbones with pendant hydrocarbon side chains above and below the backbones. Maximum friction occurs when the sliding direction is perpendicular to the backbone. We propose that the backbones impose anisotropic packing of the hydrocarbon side chains which leads to the observed friction anisotropy. Friction anisotropy is therefore a sensitive, optically-independent indicator of polymer backbone direction and monolayer structural properties

  9. Grain dependence of ferroelectric domain switching on SrBi2Ta2O9 thin films observed by Kelvin probe force microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied grain-shape dependence of Kelvin probe force microscopy of SrBi2Ta2O9 thin films on epitaxial La0.5Sr0.5CoO3/LaAlO3 substrates. By changing the growth condition in pulsed laser deposition, we have grown the SrBi2Ta2O9 thin films with various grain shapes. The shape and the orientation of SrBi2Ta2O9 the thin films with various growth conditions have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope. The large number of the long rectangular grains was observed accompanied with relatively larger (220) peaks than other peaks. From the Kelvin probe force microscope study, it has been observed that the long rectangular grains showed characteristics of easy ferroelectric domain switching at a low writing bias and weaker influence of surface charges

  10. Observation of Long-Range Elliptic Azimuthal Anisotropies in sqrt[s]=13 and 2.76 TeV pp Collisions with the ATLAS Detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

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Solovyev, V; Sommer, P; Song, H Y; Soni, N; Sood, A; Sopczak, A; Sopko, B; Sopko, V; Sorin, V; Sosa, D; Sosebee, M; Sotiropoulou, C L; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A M; South, D; Sowden, B C; Spagnolo, S; Spalla, M; Spangenberg, M; Spanò, F; Spearman, W R; Sperlich, D; Spettel, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spiller, L A; Spousta, M; St Denis, R D; Stabile, A; Staerz, S; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stamm, S; Stanecka, E; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stanitzki, M M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Steinberg, P; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoebe, M; Stoicea, G; Stolte, P; Stonjek, S; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Stramaglia, M E; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Stroynowski, R; Strubig, A; Stucci, S A; Stugu, B; Styles, N A; Su, D; Su, J; Subramaniam, R; Succurro, A; Suchek, S; Sugaya, Y; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, S; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, S; Svatos, M; Swiatlowski, M; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Ta, D; Taccini, C; Tackmann, K; Taenzer, J; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A A; Tam, J Y C; Tan, K G; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tannenwald, B B; Tapia Araya, S; Tapprogge, S; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tashiro, T; Tassi, E; Tavares Delgado, A; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, A C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, P T E; Taylor, W; Teischinger, F A; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Temple, D; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Teoh, J J; Tepel, F; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Terzo, S; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thomas, J P; Thomas-Wilsker, J; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, R J; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tibbetts, M J; Ticse Torres, R E; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Yu A; Timoshenko, S; Tiouchichine, E; Tipton, P; Tisserant, S; Todome, K; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tolley, E; Tomlinson, L; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trovatelli, M; Truong, L; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsirintanis, N; Tsiskaridze, S; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsui, K M; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuna, A N; Tupputi, S A; Turchikhin, S; Turecek, D; Turra, R; Turvey, A J; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ughetto, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Ungaro, F C; Unno, Y; Unverdorben, C; Urban, J; Urquijo, P; Urrejola, P; Usai, G; Usanova, A; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Valderanis, C; Valencic, N; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valery, L; Valkar, S; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; Van Den Wollenberg, W; Van Der Deijl, P C; van der Geer, R; van der Graaf, H; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; Van Nieuwkoop, J; van Vulpen, I; van Woerden, M C; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vanguri, R; Vaniachine, A; Vannucci, F; Vardanyan, G; Vari, R; Varnes, E W; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Veatch, J; Veloce, L M; Veloso, F; Velz, T; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Venturini, A; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Viazlo, O; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Vigne, R; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinogradov, V B; Vivarelli, I; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, M; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; von der Schmitt, H; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorobev, K; Vos, M; Voss, R; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Vykydal, Z; Wagner, P; Wagner, W; Wahlberg, H; Wahrmund, S; Wakabayashi, J; Walder, J; Walker, R; Walkowiak, W; Wang, C; Wang, F; Wang, H; Wang, H; Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, D; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, W-M; Yap, Y C; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yuen, S P Y; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zeng, J C; Zeng, Q; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, G; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, M; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    2016-04-29

    ATLAS has measured two-particle correlations as a function of the relative azimuthal angle, Δϕ, and pseudorapidity, Δη, in sqrt[s]=13 and 2.76 TeV pp collisions at the LHC using charged particles measured in the pseudorapidity interval |η|<2.5. The correlation functions evaluated in different intervals of measured charged-particle multiplicity show a multiplicity-dependent enhancement at Δϕ∼0 that extends over a wide range of Δη, which has been referred to as the "ridge." Per-trigger-particle yields, Y(Δϕ), are measured over 2<|Δη|<5. For both collision energies, the Y(Δϕ) distribution in all multiplicity intervals is found to be consistent with a linear combination of the per-trigger-particle yields measured in collisions with less than 20 reconstructed tracks, and a constant combinatoric contribution modulated by cos(2Δϕ). The fitted Fourier coefficient, v_{2,2}, exhibits factorization, suggesting that the ridge results from per-event cos(2ϕ) modulation of the single-particle distribution with Fourier coefficients v_{2}. The v_{2} values are presented as a function of multiplicity and transverse momentum. They are found to be approximately constant as a function of multiplicity and to have a p_{T} dependence similar to that measured in p+Pb and Pb+Pb collisions. The v_{2} values in the 13 and 2.76 TeV data are consistent within uncertainties. These results suggest that the ridge in pp collisions arises from the same or similar underlying physics as observed in p+Pb collisions, and that the dynamics responsible for the ridge has no strong sqrt[s] dependence. PMID:27176515

  11. Anisotropy in OLEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callens, M. K.; Yokoyama, D.; Neyts, K.

    2015-09-01

    Small-molecule OLEDs, deposited by thermal evaporation, allow for precise control over layer thicknesses. This enables optimisation of the optical behaviour of the stack which ultimately determines the outcoupling efficiency. In terms of optical outcoupling there are limits to the efficiency by which the generated electromagnetic radiation can be extracted from the stack. These limitations are linked to the refractive indices of the individual layers. Values for maximum outcoupling efficiency are sometimes calculated under the implicit assumptions that the OLED stack is planar, that all layers are isotropic with a certain refractive index and that the emitters are not preferentially oriented. In reality it is known that these assumptions are not always valid, be it intentional or unintentional. In our work we transcend these limiting assumptions and look at different forms of anisotropy in OLEDs. Anisotropy in OLEDs comes in three distinct flavours; 1. Geometrical anisotropy, as for example in gratings, lenses or other internal or external scattering centres, 2. Anisotropic emitters, where the orientation significantly influences the direction in which radiation is emitted and 3. Anisotropic optical materials, where their anisotropic nature breaks the customary assumption of isotropic OLED materials. We investigate the effect of these anisotropic features on the outcoupling efficiency and ultimately, on the external quantum efficiency (EQE).

  12. Observation of the dependence on the fluence and materials in femto-second laser ablation process by using the soft x-ray laser probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have succeeded in simultaneous observation of the ablation front and the expansion front with thin filmy structure in the femto-second laser ablation process of a gold target by using the 13.9 nm soft x-ray probe (incident angle to the sample ∼70deg) with soft x-ray interferometer. The dependence on the laser local fluence and materials was obtained by the comparison between gold and tungsten. (author)

  13. Test for anisotropy in the mean of the CMB temperature fluctuation in spherical harmonic space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashino, Daichi; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.

    2012-03-01

    The standard models of inflation predict statistically homogeneous and isotropic primordial fluctuations, which should be tested by observations. In this paper we illustrate a method to test the statistical isotropy of the mean of the cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations in the spherical harmonic space and apply the method to the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe seven-year observation data. A classical method to test a mean, like the simple Student’s t test, is not appropriate for this purpose because the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data contain anisotropic instrumental noise and suffer from the effect of the mask for the foreground emissions which breaks the statistical independence. Here we perform a band-power analysis with Monte Carlo simulations in which we take into account the anisotropic noise and the mask. We find evidence of a nonzero mean at 99.93% confidence level in a particular range of multipoles. The evidence against the zero-mean assumption as a whole is still significant at the 99% confidence level even if the fact is taken into account that we have tested multiple ranges.

  14. Faster than the Speed of Hearing: Nanomechanical Force Probes Enable the Electromechanical Observation of Cochlear Hair Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Doll, Joseph C.; Peng, Anthony W.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms responsible for our sense of hearing requires new tools for unprecedented stimulation and monitoring of sensory cell mechanotransduction at frequencies yet to be explored. We describe nanomechanical force probes designed to evoke mechanotransduction currents at up to 100kHz in living cells. High-speed force and displacement metrology is enabled by integrating piezoresistive sensors and piezoelectric actuators onto nanoscale cantilevers. The design, fabrication pro...

  15. Observing Fluorescent Probes in Living Cells using a Low-Cost LED Flashlight Retrofitted to a Common Vintage Light Microscope

    OpenAIRE

    Babbitt, G. A.; C. A. Hanzlik; Busse, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    While the application of molecular biological techniques based upon fluorescent probes has rapidly expanded over recent decades, the equipment cost of fluorescent microscopy has largely prevented its adoption in the college and high school classroom. We offer a simple solution to this problem by describing in detail how to build with simple tools, a fluorescent microscope using a common brand of colored LED flashlights and second-hand components of vintage Nikon microscopes. This extremely lo...

  16. Ultrafast Dynamics of the VO2 Insulator-to-Metal Transition Observed by Nondegenerate Pump-Probe Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haglund R. F.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-degenerate pump (1.5 eV-probe (0.4 eV transmission spectroscopy on vanadium dioxide films grown on glass and three different sapphire substrates shows systematic variations with substrate that correlate with VO2 grain size and laser fluence. Temperature dependent measurements showed changes in the electronic response that is proportional to the metallic fraction.

  17. Identification of the source of quasiperiodic VLF emissions using ground-based and Van Allen Probes satellite observations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Titova, E. E.; Kozelov, B. V.; Demekhov, A. G.; Manninen, J.; Santolík, Ondřej; Kletzing, C. A.; Reeves, G.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 15 (2015), s. 6137-6145. ISSN 0094-8276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP209/11/2280 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : energetic electrons * quasiperiodic emissions * Van Allen Probes * VLF waves Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 4.456, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/2015GL064911/full

  18. An approach to directly probe simultaneity

    CERN Document Server

    Kipreos, Edward T

    2016-01-01

    The theory of special relativity derives from the Lorentz transformation. The Lorentz transformation implies differential simultaneity and light speed isotropy. Experiments to probe differential simultaneity should be able to distinguish the Lorentz transformation from a kinematically-similar alternate transformation that predicts absolute simultaneity, the absolute Lorentz transformation. Here, we describe how published optical tests of light speed isotropy/anisotropy cannot distinguish between the two transformations. We show that the shared equations of the two transformations, from the perspective of the "stationary" observer, are sufficient to predict null results in optical resonator experiments and in tests of frequency changes in one-way light paths. In an influential 1910 exposition on differential simultaneity, Comstock described how a "stationary" observer would observe different clock readings for spatially-separated "moving" clocks. The difference in clock readings is an integral aspect of differ...

  19. Small-scale microwave background anisotropies due to tangled primordial magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Subramanian, K; Subramanian, Kandaswamy; Barrow, John D.

    2002-01-01

    An inhomogeneous cosmological magnetic field creates vortical perturbations that survive Silk damping on much smaller scales than compressional modes. This ensures that there is no sharp cut-off in anisotropy on arc-minute scales. As we had pointed out earlier, tangled magnetic fields, if they exist, will then be a potentially important contributor to small-angular scale CMBR anisotropies. Several ongoing and new experiments, are expected to probe the very small angular scales, corresponding to multipoles with l>1000. In view of this observational focus, we revisit the predicted signals due to primordial tangled magnetic fields, for different spectra and different cosmological parameters. We also identify a new regime, where the photon mean-free path exceeds the scale of the perturbation, which dominates the predicted signal at very high l. A scale-invariant spectrum of tangled fields which redshifts to a present value B_{0}=3\\times 10^{-9} Gauss, produces temperature anisotropies at the 10 micro Kelvin level...

  20. Hydraulic Conductivity Anisotropy of Heterogeneous Unsaturated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Dongmin; Zhu, Jianting

    2010-05-01

    The effects of saturation degree (or capillary pressure) on hydraulic conductivity anisotropy in unsaturated soils have not been fully understood. This study developed an approach based on a conceptualization of combining the neural network based pedo-transfer function (PTF) results with the thin layer concept to explore the capillary pressure-dependent anisotropy in relation to soil texture and soil bulk density. The main objective is to examine how anisotropy characteristics are related to the relationships between hydraulic parameters and the basic soil attributes such as texture and bulk density. The hydraulic parameters are correlated with the texture and bulk density based on the pedo-transfer function (PTF) results. It is demonstrated that non-monotonic behavior of the unsaturated soil anisotropy in relation to the capillary pressure is only observed when the saturated hydraulic conductivity and the shape parameter are both related to the mean particle diameter. When only one hydraulic parameter is related to the grain diameter or when both are not related to the same attribute simultaneously, the unsaturated soil anisotropy increases monotonically with the increasing capillary pressure head. Therefore, it is suggested that this behavior is mainly due to the coupled dependence of the layer saturated hydraulic conductivities and the shape factors on the texture and bulk density. The correlation between the soil grain diameter and bulk density decreases the anisotropy effects of the unsaturated layered soils. The study illustrates that the inter-relationships of soil texture, bulk density, and hydraulic properties may cause vastly different characteristics of anisotropic unsaturated soils.

  1. Large anisotropy of electron and hole g factors in infrared-emitting InAs/InAlGaAs self-assembled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belykh, V. V.; Yakovlev, D. R.; Schindler, J. J.; Zhukov, E. A.; Semina, M. A.; Yacob, M.; Reithmaier, J. P.; Benyoucef, M.; Bayer, M.

    2016-03-01

    A detailed study of the g -factor anisotropy of electrons and holes in InAs/In0.53Al0.24Ga0.23As self-assembled quantum dots emitting in the telecom spectral range of 1.5 -1.6 μ m (around 0.8 eV photon energy) is performed by time-resolved pump-probe ellipticity technique using a superconducting vector magnet. All components of the g -factor tensors are measured, including their spread in the quantum dot (QD) ensemble. Surprisingly, the electron g factor shows a large anisotropy changing from ge ,x=-1.63 to ge ,z=-2.52 between directions perpendicular and parallel to the dot growth axis, respectively, at an energy of 0.82 eV. The hole g -factor anisotropy at this energy is even stronger: | gh,x|=0.64 and | gh,z|=2.29 . On the other hand, the in-plane anisotropies of electron and hole g factors are small. The pronounced out-of-plane anisotropy is also observed for the spread of the g factors, determined from the spin dephasing time. The hole longitudinal g factors are described with a theoretical model that allows us to estimate the QD parameters. We find that the QD height-to-diameter ratio increases while the indium composition decreases with increasing QD emission energy.

  2. Oxygen pumping II: Probing the Inhomogeneous Metal Enrichment at the Epoch of Reionization with High Frequency CMB Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Monteagudo, Carlos; Verde, Licia; Jimenez, Raul

    2007-01-01

    At the epoch of reionization, when the high-redshift inter-galactic medium (IGM) is being enriched with metals, the 63.2 micron fine structure line of OI is pumped by the ~ 1300 AA soft UV background and introduces a spectral distortion in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB). Here we use a toy model for the spatial distribution of neutral oxygen, assuming metal bubbles surround dark matter halos, and compute the fluctuations of this distortion, and the angular power spectrum it imprints on the CMB. We discuss the dependence of the power spectrum on the velocity of the winds polluting the IGM with metals, the minimum mass of the halos producing these winds, and on the cosmic epoch when the OI pumping occurs. We find that, although the clustering signal of the CMB distortion is weak \\delta y_{rms} ~ 10^{-7} (roughly corresponding to a temperature anisotropy of few nK), it may be reachable in deep integrations with high-sensitivity infrared detectors. Even without a detection, these instruments should be able ...

  3. Tuning the Magnetic Anisotropy of Single Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, Benjamin W; Braun, Lukas; Pascual, Jose I; Franke, Katharina J

    2015-06-10

    The magnetism of single atoms and molecules is governed by the atomic scale environment. In general, the reduced symmetry of the surrounding splits the d states and aligns the magnetic moment along certain favorable directions. Here, we show that we can reversibly modify the magnetocrystalline anisotropy by manipulating the environment of single iron(II) porphyrin molecules adsorbed on Pb(111) with the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope. When we decrease the tip-molecule distance, we first observe a small increase followed by an exponential decrease of the axial anisotropy on the molecules. This is in contrast to the monotonous increase observed earlier for the same molecule with an additional axial Cl ligand ( Nat. Phys. 2013 , 9 , 765 ). We ascribe the changes in the anisotropy of both species to a deformation of the molecules in the presence of the attractive force of the tip, which leads to a change in the d level alignment. These experiments demonstrate the feasibility of a precise tuning of the magnetic anisotropy of an individual molecule by mechanical control. PMID:25942560

  4. Structural anisotropy in amorphous Fe-Tb thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used conventional and anomalous dispersion x-ray scattering to study the near-neighbor atomic environments in sputter-deposited amorphous Fe-Tb thin films with a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The as-deposited films show a clear structural anisotropy, with more Fe-Tb near neighbor pairs in the out-of-plane direction. Upon annealing, the magnetic anisotropy drops significantly, and we see a corresponding reduction in the structural anisotropy. The number of Fe-Tb near-neighbors increases in the in-plane direction, but does not change in the out-of-plane direction. Therefore, the distribution of Fe-Tb near neighbors becomes more uniform upon annealing. We conclude that the observed reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy is a result of this change in structure. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  5. Observing Fluorescent Probes in Living Cells using a Low-Cost LED Flashlight Retrofitted to a Common Vintage Light Microscope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Babbitt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available While the application of molecular biological techniques based upon fluorescent probes has rapidly expanded over recent decades, the equipment cost of fluorescent microscopy has largely prevented its adoption in the college and high school classroom. We offer a simple solution to this problem by describing in detail how to build with simple tools, a fluorescent microscope using a common brand of colored LED flashlights and second-hand components of vintage Nikon microscopes. This extremely low cost solution is qualitatively compared to an expensive modern Zeiss system.

  6. Anisotropy of successive air showers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochi, N.; Wada, T.; Yamashita, Y.; Ohashi, A.; Yamamoto, I.; Nakatsuka, T.; Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) Group

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the anisotropy of successive air shower (SAS) events, which we define as the detection of many air showers within a short time window, using data from six stations of the Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) group. On the criterion of 22 air showers within 20 minutes, five SAS events are found against 1.4 expected from the Poisson distribution in Okayama University station's data. From six stations' data, we find 24 SAS events in total. By plotting them in equatorial coordinates, it is revealed that SAS events are observed more frequently when the Galactic plane is around the zenith. This can be attributed to a hypothetical small flux of ultra-high-energy γ-rays from the direction of the Galactic plane superposed on conventional cosmic rays. If this hypothesis is true, the analytical procedure used here has potential to measure ultra-high-energy γ-ray sources by even small air shower arrays like ours.

  7. Anisotropy of successive air showers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the anisotropy of successive air shower (SAS) events, which we define as the detection of many air showers within a short time window, using data from six stations of the Large Area Air Shower (LAAS) group. On the criterion of 22 air showers within 20 minutes, five SAS events are found against 1.4 expected from the Poisson distribution in Okayama University station's data. From six stations' data, we find 24 SAS events in total. By plotting them in equatorial coordinates, it is revealed that SAS events are observed more frequently when the Galactic plane is around the zenith. This can be attributed to a hypothetical small flux of ultra-high-energy γ-rays from the direction of the Galactic plane superposed on conventional cosmic rays. If this hypothesis is true, the analytical procedure used here has potential to measure ultra-high-energy γ-ray sources by even small air shower arrays like ours

  8. Statistical anisotropy from inflationary magnetogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Provided the quantum fluctuations are amplified in the presence of a classical gauge field configuration the resulting curvature perturbations exhibit a mild statistical anisotropy which should be sufficiently weak not to conflict with current observational data. The curvature power spectra induced by weakly anisotropic initial states are computed here for the first time when the electric and the magnetic gauge couplings evolve at different rates as it happens, for instance, in the relativistic theory of van der Waals interactions. After recovering the results valid for coincident gauge couplings, the constraints imposed by the isotropy and the homogeneity of the initial states are discussed. The obtained bounds turn out to be more stringent than naively expected and cannot be ignored when discussing the underlying magnetogenesis scenarios.

  9. Observing the Cosmic Microwave Background Radiation: A Unique Window on the Early Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The cosmic microwave background radiation is the remnant heat from the Big Bang. It provides us with a unique probe of conditions in the early universe, long before any organized structures had yet formed. The anisotropy in the radiation's brightness yields important clues about primordial structure and additionally provides a wealth of information about the physics,of the early universe. Within the framework of inflationary dark matter models observations of the anisotropy on sub-degree angular scales will reveal the signatures of acoustic oscillations of the photon-baryon fluid at a redshift of approx. 1100. The validity of inflationary models will be tested and, if agreement is found, accurate values for most of the key cosmological parameters will result. If disagreement is found, we will need to rethink our basic ideas about the physics of the early universe. I will present an overview of the physical processes at work in forming the anisotropy and discuss what we have already learned from current observations. I will conclude with a brief overview of the recently launched Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) mission which will observe the anisotropy over the full sky with 0.21 degree angular resolution. At the time of this meeting, MAP will have just arrived at the L2 Lagrange point, marking the start of its observing campaign. The MAP hardware is being produced by Goddard in partnership with Princeton University.

  10. Inductively coupled NMR probe for versatile dynamic nuclear polarization operation at 7 T: Observation of 61 ± 2% 1H polarization at 4 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siaw, Ting Ann; Walker, Shamon A.; Armstrong, Brandon D.; Han, Song-I.

    2012-08-01

    We have performed dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) experiments at liquid helium temperatures using a low-power (probe for the detection of 1H NMR signal at 300 MHz, as such coils are well suited for higher frequency NMR detection. The Alderman-Grant coil is inductively coupled to the rest of the radiofrequency (rf) circuit, whose design allows probe components to be placed away from the sample area, and also enables easy switching of coils with different diameters and resonance frequencies. We have tested our DNP instrument on a frozen nitroxide model system consisting of 4-Amino TEMPO dissolved in a glycerol:water mixture. The largest nuclear spin polarization observed was 61 ± 2% with a sample containing 20 mM 4-Amino TEMPO dissolved in deuterated glycerol (d-glycerol):D2O:H2O (50:40:10), amounting to record polarization measured to date at an easily amenable temperature of 4 K.

  11. Markarian galaxies and the anisotropy of the Hubble constant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking into account all the observational data of Markarian galaxies, problems of redshifts can be studied with a sample from rather numerous sources. A test on their distribution in the sky confirms the significant anisotropy of the Hubble constant: this anisotropy was, in fact, observed for the first time by Rubin, Ford and Rubin, and confirmed by Le Denmat and Vigier with type I supernovae galaxies

  12. The intrinsic quasar luminosity function: Accounting for accretion disk anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasar luminosity functions are a fundamental probe of the growth and evolution of supermassive black holes. Measuring the intrinsic luminosity function is difficult in practice, due to a multitude of observational and systematic effects. As sample sizes increase and measurement errors drop, characterizing the systematic effects is becoming more important. It is well known that the continuum emission from the accretion disk of quasars is anisotropic—in part due to its disk-like structure—but current luminosity function calculations effectively assume isotropy over the range of unobscured lines of sight. Here, we provide the first steps in characterizing the effect of random quasar orientations and simple models of anisotropy on observed luminosity functions. We find that the effect of orientation is not insignificant and exceeds other potential corrections such as those from gravitational lensing of foreground structures. We argue that current observational constraints may overestimate the intrinsic luminosity function by as much as a factor of ∼2 on the bright end. This has implications for models of quasars and their role in the universe, such as quasars' contribution to cosmological backgrounds.

  13. Van Allen probes, NOAA, GOES, and ground observations of an intense EMIC wave event extending over 12 h in magnetic local time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, M. J.; Posch, J. L.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C. A.; Lessard, M. R.; Huang, C.-L.; Spence, H. E.; Smith, C. W.; Singer, H. J.; Omura, Y.; Horne, R. B.; Reeves, G. D.; Baker, D. N.; Gkioulidou, M.; Oksavik, K.; Mann, I. R.; Raita, T.; Shiokawa, K.

    2015-07-01

    Although most studies of the effects of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves on Earth's outer radiation belt have focused on events in the afternoon sector in the outer plasmasphere or plume region, strong magnetospheric compressions provide an additional stimulus for EMIC wave generation across a large range of local times and L shells. We present here observations of the effects of a wave event on 23 February 2014 that extended over 8 h in UT and over 12 h in local time, stimulated by a gradual 4 h rise and subsequent sharp increases in solar wind pressure. Large-amplitude linearly polarized hydrogen band EMIC waves (up to 25 nT p-p) appeared for over 4 h at both Van Allen Probes, from late morning through local noon, when these spacecraft were outside the plasmapause, with densities ~5-20 cm-3. Waves were also observed by ground-based induction magnetometers in Antarctica (near dawn), Finland (near local noon), Russia (in the afternoon), and in Canada (from dusk to midnight). Ten passes of NOAA-POES and METOP satellites near the northern foot point of the Van Allen Probes observed 30-80 keV subauroral proton precipitation, often over extended L shell ranges; other passes identified a narrow L shell region of precipitation over Canada. Observations of relativistic electrons by the Van Allen Probes showed that the fluxes of more field-aligned and more energetic radiation belt electrons were reduced in response to both the emission over Canada and the more spatially extended emission associated with the compression, confirming the effectiveness of EMIC-induced loss processes for this event.

  14. Daytime Thermal Anisotropy of Urban Neighbourhoods: Morphological Causation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Scott Krayenhoff

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface temperature is a key variable in boundary-layer meteorology and is typically acquired by remote observation of emitted thermal radiation. However, the three-dimensional structure of cities complicates matters: uneven solar heating of urban facets produces an “effective anisotropy” of surface thermal emission at the neighbourhood scale. Remotely-sensed urban surface temperature varies with sensor view angle as a consequence. The authors combine a microscale urban surface temperature model with a thermal remote sensing model to predict the effective anisotropy of simplified neighbourhood configurations. The former model provides detailed surface temperature distributions for a range of “urban” forms, and the remote sensing model computes aggregate temperatures for multiple view angles. The combined model’s ability to reproduce observed anisotropy is evaluated against measurements from a neighbourhood in Vancouver, Canada. As in previous modeling studies, anisotropy is underestimated. Addition of moderate coverages of small (sub-facet scale structure can account for much of the missing anisotropy. Subsequently, over 1900 sensitivity simulations are performed with the model combination, and the dependence of daytime effective thermal anisotropy on diurnal solar path (i.e., latitude and time of day and blunt neighbourhood form is assessed. The range of effective anisotropy, as well as the maximum difference from nadir-observed brightness temperature, peak for moderate building-height-to-spacing ratios (H/W, and scale with canyon (between-building area; dispersed high-rise urban forms generate maximum anisotropy. Maximum anisotropy increases with solar elevation and scales with shortwave irradiance. Moreover, it depends linearly on H/W for H/W < 1.25, with a slope that depends on maximum off-nadir sensor angle. Decreasing minimum brightness temperature is primarily responsible for this linear growth of maximum anisotropy. These

  15. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff Mathiasen, Anne-Gitte;

    2013-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time and space......). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company. Findings point to...... mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The development of...

  16. Mobile Probing and Probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duvaa, Uffe; Ørngreen, Rikke; Weinkouff, Anne-Gitte;

    2012-01-01

    Mobile probing is a method, which has been developed for learning about digital work situations, as an approach to discover new grounds. The method can be used when there is a need to know more about users and their work with certain tasks, but where users at the same time are distributed (in time...... and space). Mobile probing was inspired by the cultural probe method, and was influenced by qualitative interview and inquiry approaches. The method has been used in two subsequent projects, involving school children (young adults at 15-17 years old) and employees (adults) in a consultancy company....... Findings point to mobile probing being a flexible method for uncovering the unknowns, as a way of getting rich data to the analysis and design phases. On the other hand it is difficult to engage users to give in depth explanations, which seem easier in synchronous dialogs (whether online or face2face). The...

  17. Direct observations of L-I-H and H-I-L transitions with the X-point reciprocating probe in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reciprocating Langmuir probe was used to directly measure the behavior of turbulence and flows in the X-point region during transitions between low-(L) and high-confinement (H) mode in ASDEX Upgrade. The probe traverses the divertor horizontally in 140 ms, typically 2–5 cm below the X-point. Toroidal Mach number, density, floating potential (ϕf), and electron temperature (Te) are measured. In the regime accessible to the probe (Pinj19 m−2), the L-H transition features an intermediate phase (I-phase), characterized by limit-cycle oscillations at 0.5–3 kHz [Conway et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 065001 (2011)]. The probe measurements reveal that this pulsing affects both the density and the toroidal Mach number. It is present in both the low-(LFS) and high-field sides (HFS) of the scrape-off layer, while high-amplitude broadband turbulence usually dominates the private-flux region. Profile comparisons between L-mode and I-phase show lower density in pulsing regions and small shifts in Te, directed oppositely on LFS and HFS, which are compensated by shifts in ϕf to yield a surprisingly unchanged plasma potential profile. Directly observed L-I-phase transitions reveal that the onset of the pulsing is preceded by a fast 50% density drop in the HFS X-point region. Back transitions to L-mode occur essentially symmetrically, with the pulsing stopping first, followed by a fast recovery to L-mode density levels in the divertor

  18. A CMB Gibbs sampler for localized secondary anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Bull, Philip; Eriksen, Hans Kristian; Ferreira, Pedro G; Fuskeland, Unni; Gorski, Krzysztof M; Jewell, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-01

    As well as primary fluctuations, CMB temperature maps contain a wealth of additional information in the form of secondary anisotropies. Secondary effects that can be identified with individual objects, such as the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (SZ) effects due to galaxy clusters, are difficult to unambiguously disentangle from foreground contamination and the primary CMB, which currently inhibits their use as precision cosmological probes. We develop a Bayesian formalism for rigorously characterising anisotropies that are localised on the sky, taking the TSZ and KSZ effects as an example. Using a Gibbs sampling scheme, we are able to efficiently sample from the joint posterior distribution for a multi-component model of the sky with many thousands of correlated physical parameters. The posterior can then be exactly marginalised to estimate properties of the secondary anisotropies, fully taking into account degeneracies with the other signals in the CMB map. We show that this method is computationally...

  19. Analytic spectra of CMB anisotropies and polarization generated by scalar perturbations in synchronous gauge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature anisotropies and polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation not only serve as indispensable cosmological probes, but also provide a unique channel to detect relic gravitational waves (RGW) at very long wavelengths. Analytical studies of the anisotropies and polarization improve our understanding of various cosmic processes and help to separate the contribution of RGW from that of density perturbations. We present a detailed analytical calculation of CMB temperature anisotropies αk and polarization βk generated by scalar metric perturbations in synchronous gauge, parallel to our previous work with RGW as a generating source. This is realized primarily by an analytic time integration of Boltzmann's equation, yielding the closed forms of αk and βk. Approximations, such as the tight-coupling approximation for photons a priori to the recombination and the long-wavelength limit for scalar perturbations, are used. The residual gauge modes in scalar perturbations are analyzed and a proper joining condition of scalar perturbations at the radiation-matter equality is chosen, ensuring the continuity of energy perturbation. The resulting analytic expressions of the multipole moments of polarization aEl and of temperature anisotropies aTl are explicit functions of the scalar perturbations, recombination time, recombination width, photon-free streaming damping factor, baryon fraction, initial amplitude, primordial scalar spectral index and the running index. These results show that a longer recombination width yields higher amplitudes of polarization on large scales and more damping on small scales, and that a late recombination time shifts the peaks of CXX'l to larger angular scales. Calculations show that aEl is generated in the presence of the quadrupole α2 of temperature anisotropies via scattering, both having similar structures and being smaller than the total aTl, which consists of the contributions from the monopole, dipole

  20. Physics of the cosmic microwave background anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Bucher, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), especially of its frequency spectrum and its anisotropies, both in temperature and in polarization, have played a key role in the development of modern cosmology and our understanding of the very early universe. We review the underlying physics of the CMB and how the primordial temperature and polarization anisotropies were imprinted. Possibilities for distinguishing competing cosmological models are emphasized. The current status of CMB experiments and experimental techniques with an emphasis toward future observations, particularly in polarization, is reviewed. The physics of foreground emissions, especially of polarized dust, is discussed in detail, since this area is likely to become crucial for measurements of the B modes of the CMB polarization at ever greater sensitivity.

  1. Spectroscopic ellipsometry investigations of optical anisotropy in obliquely deposited hafnia thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokas, R. B.; Jena, Shuvendu; Haque, S. Maidul; Rao, K. Divakar; Thakur, S.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    In present work, HfO2 thin films have been deposited at various oblique incidences on Si substrates by electron beam evaporation. These refractory oxide films exhibited anisotropy in refractive index predictably due to special columnar microstructure. Spectroscopic ellipsometry being a powerful tool for optical characterization has been employed to investigate optical anisotropy. It was observed that the film deposited at glancing angle (80°) exhibits the highest optical anisotropy. Further, anisotropy was noticed to decrease with lower values of deposition angles while effective refractive index depicts opposite trend. Variation in refractive index and anisotropy has been explained in light of atomic shadowing during growth of thin films at oblique angles.

  2. Probing MACHOs by observation of M31 pixel lensing with the 1.5m Loiano telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Novati, S Calchi; De Paolis, F; Dominik, M; Giraud-Héraud, Yannick; Ingrosso, G; Jetzer, P; Mancini, L; Nucita, A A; Scarpetta, G; Strafella, F; Gould, A

    2007-01-01

    We analyse a series of pilot observations in order to study microlensing of (unresolved) stars in M31 with the 1.5m Loiano telescope, including observations on both identified variable source stars and reported microlensing events. We also look for previously unknown variability and discover a nova. We discuss an observing strategy for an extended campaign with the goal of determining whether MACHOs exist or whether all microlensing events are compatible with lens stars in M31.

  3. Seismic Anisotropy Beneath the Sumatra Subduction Zone

    OpenAIRE

    R. Collings; Rietbrock, A.; S. Mippress; Lange, D.; D. Natawidjaja; B. Suwargadi; Frederik Tilmann

    2011-01-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is located on the eastern side of the Sunda Arc between the Sunda Strait and the Andaman Islands, where the Indo-Australian plate is subducting beneath the Eurasian plate. An important tool in understanding the style and geometry of deformation within a subduction zone is the measurement of seismic anisotropy, through observations of shear wave splitting, which provides information about the mantle flow. In Sumatra two temporary seismic networks were deployed withi...

  4. Contribution of Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources to Microwave Anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Sokasian, A; Smoot, G F; Sokasian, Aaron; Gawiser, Eric; Smoot, George F.

    2001-01-01

    We estimate the contribution of extragalactic radio sources to fluctuations in sky temperature over the range of frequencies (10-300 GHz) used for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. CMB anisotropy observations at high resolution and low frequencies are especially sensitive to this foreground. We have compiled a catalog of 2207 bright radio sources, including 758 sources with flux measurements at 90 GHz. We develop a method to extrapolate the source spectra and predict skymaps of extragalactic radio sources at instrument resolutions of 10 arcmin to 10 degrees FWHM. Our results indicate that the brightest sources will dominate microwave anisotropy for a wide range of resolutions and frequencies. Our skymaps predict the location and flux of the brightest radio sources at each frequency, making it straightforward to develop a template for masking the pixels containing them. This masking should be sufficient to protect high resolution CMB anisotropy observations from unacceptable radio sour...

  5. Limits on the ions temperature anisotropy in turbulent intracluster medium

    CERN Document Server

    Santo-Lima, R; Pino, E M de Gouveia Dal; Lazarian, A

    2016-01-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium of galaxies (ICM) is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic MHD turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the isotropic (standard) one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields, in disagreement with previous cosmological MHD simulations which are able to explain the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropy can also drive kinetic instabilities which grow faster near the ions kinetic scales. Observations from the solar wind suggest that these micro- instabilities scatter the ions, thus relaxing the anisotropy. This work aims to compare this relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasilinear theory to estimate the scattering rate provided by...

  6. Analysis of plasmaspheric hiss wave amplitudes inferred from low-altitude POES electron data: Validation with conjunctive Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Santacruz, M.; Li, W.; Thorne, R. M.; Ma, Q.; Bortnik, J.; Ni, B.; Kletzing, C. A.; Kurth, W. S.; Hospodarsky, G. B.

    2015-10-01

    Plasmaspheric hiss plays an important role in controlling the overall structure and dynamics of the Earth's radiation belts. The interaction of plasmaspheric hiss with radiation belt electrons is commonly evaluated using diffusion codes, which rely on statistical models of wave observations that may not accurately reproduce the instantaneous global wave distribution or the limited in situ satellite wave measurements. This paper evaluates the performance and limitations of a novel technique capable of inferring wave amplitudes from low-altitude electron flux observations from the Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), which provide extensive coverage in shell and magnetic local time (MLT). We found that, within its limitations, this technique could potentially be used to build a dynamic global model of the plasmaspheric hiss wave intensity. The technique is validated by analyzing the conjunctions between the POES spacecraft and the Van Allen Probes from September 2012 to June 2014. The technique performs well for moderate-to-strong hiss activity (≥30 pT) with sufficiently high electron fluxes. The main source of these limitations is the number of counts of energetic electrons measured by the POES spacecraft capable of resonating with hiss waves. For moderate-to-strong hiss events, the results show that the wave amplitudes from the EMFISIS instruments on board the Van Allen Probes are well reproduced by the POES technique, which provides more consistent estimates than the parameterized statistical hiss wave model based on CRRES data.

  7. Dipole interactions with random anisotropy in a frozen ferrofluid

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Weili; Nagel, S. R.; Rosenbaum, T.F.; Rosensweig, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Glassy behavior (including hysteresis, irreversibility, a peak in the zero-field-cooled magnetization, and nonexponential relaxation) is observed in a quenched ferrofluid system consisting of 50-angstrom magnetite particles. An Arrott plot, M^2 vs H/M, shows clear features of random anisotropy similar to what is found in amorphous ferromagnets. We discuss the glassy behavior in terms of both the random anisotropy and the dipole interactions, and we contrast the unusual response of our system ...

  8. Contribution of Bright Extragalactic Radio Sources to Microwave Anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Sokasian, Aaron; Gawiser, Eric; Smoot, George F.

    1998-01-01

    We estimate the contribution of extragalactic radio sources to fluctuations in sky temperature over the range of frequencies (10-300 GHz) used for Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropy measurements. CMB anisotropy observations at high resolution and low frequencies are especially sensitive to this foreground. We have compiled a catalog of 2207 bright radio sources, including 758 sources with flux measurements at 90 GHz. We develop a method to extrapolate the source spectra and predict ...

  9. Contribution of Extragalactic Infrared Sources to CMB Foreground Anisotropy

    OpenAIRE

    Gawiser, Eric; Smoot, George F.

    1996-01-01

    We estimate the level of confusion to Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropy measurements caused by extragalactic infrared sources. CMB anisotropy observations at high resolution and high frequencies are especially sensitive to this foreground. We use data from the COBE satellite to generate a Galactic emission spectrum covering mm and sub-mm wavelengths. Using this spectrum as a template, we predict the microwave emission of the 5319 brightest infrared galaxies seen by IRAS. We simulate skym...

  10. Fracture toughness anisotropy in shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Michael R.; Meredith, Philip G.; Brantut, Nicolas; Crawford, Brian R.

    2016-03-01

    The use of hydraulic fracturing to recover shale gas has focused attention on the fundamental fracture properties of gas-bearing shales, but there remains a paucity of available experimental data on their mechanical and physical properties. Such shales are strongly anisotropic, so that their fracture propagation trajectories depend on the interaction between their anisotropic mechanical properties and the anisotropic in situ stress field in the shallow crust. Here we report fracture toughness measurements on Mancos shale determined in all three principal fracture orientations: Divider, Short Transverse, and Arrester, using a modified short-rod methodology. Experimental results for a range of other sedimentary and carbonate rocks are also reported for comparison purposes. Significant anisotropy is observed in shale fracture toughness measurements at ambient conditions, with values, as high as 0.72 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is normal to the bedding, and values as low as 0.21 MPa m1/2 where the crack plane is parallel to the bedding. For cracks propagating nonparallel to bedding, we observe a tendency for deviation toward the bedding-parallel orientation. Applying a maximum energy release rate criterion, we determined the conditions under which such deviations are more or less likely to occur under more generalized mixed-mode loading conditions. We find for Mancos shale that the fracture should deviate toward the plane with lowest toughness regardless of the loading conditions.

  11. Anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, K. D.; Spence, P.; Waterman, S.; Sommer, J. Le; Molines, J.-M.; Lilly, J. M.; England, M. H.

    2015-11-01

    The anisotropy of eddy variability in the global ocean is examined in geostrophic surface velocities derived from satellite observations and in the horizontal velocities of a 1/12° global ocean model. Eddy anisotropy is of oceanographic interest as it is through anisotropic velocity fluctuations that the eddy and mean-flow fields interact dynamically. This study is timely because improved observational estimates of eddy anisotropy will soon be available with Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) altimetry data. We find there to be good agreement between the characteristics and distributions of eddy anisotropy from the present satellite observations and model ocean surface. In the model, eddy anisotropy is found to have significant vertical structure and is largest close to the ocean bottom, where the anisotropy aligns with the underlying isobaths. The highly anisotropic bottom signal is almost entirely contained in the barotropic variability. Upper-ocean variability is predominantly baroclinic and the alignment is less sensitive to the underlying bathymetry. These findings offer guidance for introducing a parameterization of eddy feedbacks, based on the eddy kinetic energy and underlying bathymetry, to operate on the barotropic flow and better account for the effects of barotropic Reynolds stresses unresolved in coarse-resolution ocean models.

  12. Probing SZ Source Detection with Gasdynamical Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Bond, J R; Wadsley, J W; Gladders, M D; Ruetalo, Marcelo I.; Wadsley, James W.; Gladders, Michael D.

    2001-01-01

    The huge worldwide investment in CMB experiments should make the Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect a key probe of the cosmic web in the near future. For the promise to be realized, substantial development of simulation and analysis tools to relate observation to theory is needed. The high nonlinearity and dissipative/feedback gas physics lead to highly non-Gaussian patterns that are much more difficult to analyze than Gaussian primary anisotropies for which the procedures are reasonably well developed. Historical forecasts for what CMB experiments might see used semi-analytic tools, including large scale map constructions, with localized and simplified pressure structures distributed on a point process of (clustered) sources. Hydro studies beyond individual cluster/supercluster systems were inadequate, but now large-volume simulations with high resolution are beginning to shift the balance. We illustrate this by applying ``Gasoline'' (parallelized Tree+SPH) computations to construct SZ maps and derive statistical...

  13. Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy of cobalt thin films on different substrates using CW-MOKE technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shukla, Vijay, E-mail: shuklavs@rrcat.gov.in [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Mukherjee, C. [Mechanical and Optical Support Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Chari, R. [Laser Physics Applications Section, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Rai, S. [Indus Synchrotron Utilization Division, Raja Ramnna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Bindra, K.S. [Solid State Laser Division, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India); Banerjee, A. [BARC training school at RRCAT and Homi Bhabha National Institute, Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452013 (India)

    2014-12-15

    Cobalt thin films were deposited on GaAs, Si and Glass substrates by RF-magnetron sputtering. The structure was studied using atomic force microscopy, X-ray reflectivity and grazing incidence X-ray diffraction. Magnetic properties were determined with the magneto-optic Kerr effect. The deposited films have in-plane uniaxial anisotropy and after annealing the anisotropy reduces. The reduction in anisotropy may be due to release of stress and the remaining anisotropy after annealing may be due to shape anisotropy of the particulates. - Highlights: • Deposited cobalt thin films on different substrates and annealed at 300 °C. • Characterized as-grown and annealed films by GIXRD, AFM and MOKE. • Uniaxial magnetic anisotropy observed for all the samples. • Decrease in anisotropy on annealing may be due to release of stress during deposition.

  14. Microwave anisotropies from the Galactic halo

    CERN Document Server

    Walker, M; Mori, M; Walker, Mark; Ohishi, Michiko; Mori, Masaki

    2002-01-01

    Models in which a large fraction of the Galactic dark matter takes the form of cold gas clouds imply that there is thermal microwave emission from the Galactic dark halo. Such models can therefore be directly constrained by existing data on the microwave sky, and in particular the very sensitive observations of microwave anisotropies. To this end we have computed the anisotropy power-spectrum expected for a Galactic dark halo made of cold, dense gas clouds, including the effects of clustering with a CDM-like mass spectrum of mini-halo substructure. The power-spectrum displays two peaks: one, at l~50, is the Poisson noise for the mini-halos, and the second, much larger and at much higher l, is the Poisson noise of the individual clouds. The predicted fluctuation amplitude on degree-scales is a small (~1%) fraction of the observed (~70 micro-K) anisotropies if one considers small areas of sky at high Galactic latitude, increasing by a factor of a few for large areas of sky around 30 degrees latitude. Consequent...

  15. The Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Smoot, G F

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports a summary of the contents contents of six hours of lectures on the CMB anisotropy experiments given at the Strasbourg NATO school on the CMB and cosmology. (Its companion paper, astro-ph/9705101 reports the lectures on the CMB spectrum.) A context is set as a bridge from the theoretical CMB anisotropy lectures and the experimental situation. The COBE DMR results are reveiwed in detail and as pioneer for future space missions. Current and planned experiments are discussed in preference to reviewing already completed observations. The NASA MidEX mission MAP is discussed in some detail including figures. The ESA M3 mission Max Planck Surveyor is also reviewed in some detail though its final configuration is not yet fully settled. The recent history and current versions are presented. Tables and references for experiments are included.

  16. Design and fabrication of MEMS-controlled probes for studying the nano-interface under in situ TEM observation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic studies of nanometer scale phenomena, such as tribology, fusion bonding and deformation, are important for a MEMS/NEMS device. To better understand these nanometer scale phenomena, the combination of MEMS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) setup is an invaluable tool. This combination allows for the direct observation of a deformation process at the nano-scale when a MEMS for the investigation of a nano-interface (MINI) device with sharp opposing tips is placed under a TEM. This paper describes the design and fabrication of a MINI that can perform an in situ experiment under TEM observation. We designed the MINI to minimize the misalignment of the opposing tips in order to provide adequate observation possibilities of the nanocontacts. In addition, we developed processes for the fabrication of a MINI and characterized it inside the TEM. Furthermore, silicon–silicon, gold–gold and silicon–gold opposing tips were designed and fabricated for experiments of the nano-interface of homogeneous and heterogeneous material. The MEMS tips were used to show an approach-contact-retraction-fracture cycle of a gold nanocontact under real-time TEM observation.

  17. Herschel observations of Extra-Ordinary Sources: Methanol as a probe of physical conditions in Orion KL

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, S; Crockett, N R; Goldsmith, P F; Lis, D C; Pearson, J C; Schilke, P; Bell, T A; Comito, C; Blake, G A; Caux, E; Ceccarelli, C; Cernicharo, J; Daniel, F; Dubernet, M -L; Emprechtinger, M; Encrenaz, P; Gerin, M; Giesen, T F; Goicoechea, J R; Gupta, H; Herbst, E; Joblin, C; Johnstone, D; Langer, W D; Latter, W B; Lord, S D; Maret, S; Martin, P G; Melnick, G J; Menten, K M; Morris, P; Muller, H S P; Murphy, J A; Neufeld, D A; Ossenkopf, V; Perault, M; Phillips, T G; Plume, R; Qin, S -L; Schlemmer, S; Stutzki, J; Trappe, N; van der Tak, F F S; Vastel, C; Yorke, H W; Yu, S; Zmuidzinas, J

    2011-01-01

    We have examined methanol emission from Orion KL with of the {\\em Herschel}/HIFI instrument, and detected two methanol bands centered at 524 GHz and 1061 GHz. The 524 GHz methanol band (observed in HIFI band 1a) is dominated by the isolated $\\Delta$J$=$0, K$=-4\\rightarrow$-3, v$_t

  18. A sensitive fluorescence anisotropy method for detection of lead (II) ion by a G-quadruplex-inducible DNA aptamer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Dapeng [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Yin, Lei; Meng, Zihui [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing, 100081 (China); Yu, Anchi [Department of Chemistry, Renmin University of China, Beijing, 100872 (China); Guo, Lianghong [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China); Wang, Hailin, E-mail: hlwang@rcees.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100085 (China)

    2014-02-17

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •A fluorescence anisotropy approach for detection of Pb{sup 2+} was developed. •The strategy was based on binding-induced allosteric conformational change of aptamer probe. •The sensing mechanism was established by testing the photoinduced electron transfer interaction. -- Abstract: Sensitive and selective detection of Pb{sup 2+} is of great importance to both human health and environmental protection. Here we propose a novel fluorescence anisotropy (FA) approach for sensing Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution by a G-rich thrombin binding aptamer (TBA). The TBA labeled with 6-carboxytetramethylrhodamine (TMR) at the seventh thymine nucleotide was used as a fluorescent probe for signaling Pb{sup 2+}. It was found that the aptamer probe had a high FA in the absence of Pb{sup 2+}. This is because the rotation of TMR is restricted by intramolecular interaction with the adjacent guanine bases, which results in photoinduced electron transfer (PET). When the aptamer probe binds to Pb{sup 2+} to form G-quadruplex, the intramolecular interaction should be eliminated, resulting in faster rotation of the fluorophore TMR in solution. Therefore, FA of aptamer probe is expected to decrease significantly upon binding to Pb{sup 2+}. Indeed, we observed a decrease in FA of aptamer probe upon Pb{sup 2+} binding. Circular dichroism, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence lifetime measurement were used to verify the reliability and reasonability of the sensing mechanism. By monitoring the FA change of the aptamer probe, we were able to real-time detect binding between the TBA probe and Pb{sup 2+}. Moreover, the aptamer probe was exploited as a recognition element for quantification of Pb{sup 2+} in homogeneous solution. The change in FA showed a linear response to Pb{sup 2+} from 10 nM to 2.0 μM, with 1.0 nM limit of detection. In addition, this sensing system exhibited good selectivity for Pb{sup 2+} over other metal ions. The method is simple

  19. Anisotropy in solid inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the model of solid / elastic inflation, inflation is driven by a source that has the field theoretical description of a solid. To allow for prolonged slow roll inflation, the solid needs to be extremely insensitive to the spatial expansion. We point out that, because of this property, the solid is also rather inefficient in erasing anisotropic deformations of the geometry. This allows for a prolonged inflationary anisotropic solution, providing the first example with standard gravity and scalar fields only which evades the conditions of the so called cosmic no-hair conjecture. We compute the curvature perturbations on the anisotropic solution, and the corresponding phenomenological bound on the anisotropy. Finally, we discuss the analogy between this model and the f(φ)F2 model, which also allows for anisotropic inflation thanks to a suitable coupling between the inflaton φ and a vector field. We remark that the bispectrum of the curvature perturbations in solid inflation is enhanced in the squeezed limit and presents a nontrivial angular dependence, as had previously been found for the f(φ)F2 model

  20. Neutrino Anisotropies after Planck

    CERN Document Server

    Gerbino, Martina; Said, Najla

    2013-01-01

    We present new constraints on the rest-frame sound speed, c_eff^2, and the viscosity parameter, c_vis^2, of the Cosmic Neutrino Background from the recent measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background anisotropies provided by the Planck satellite. While broadly consistent with the ex- pectations of c_eff^2 = c_vis^2 = 1/3 in the standard scenario, the Planck dataset hints for a higher value of the viscosity parameter, with c_vis^2 = 0.60 +/- 0.18 at 68% c.l., and a lower value of the sound speed, with c_eff^2 = 0.304 +/- 0.013 at 68% c.l.. We find a correlation between the neutrino parameters and the lensing amplitude of the temperature power spectrum A_L. When the latter parameter is allowed to vary, we find a better consistency with the standard model with c_vis^2 = 0.51 +/- 0.22, c_eff^2 = 0.311 +/- 0.019 and A_L = 1.08 +/- 0.18 at 68% c.l.. This result indicates that the anomalous large value of A_L measured by Planck could be connected to non-standard neutrino properties. Including additional datasets ...

  1. Combining cluster observables and stacked weak lensing to probe dark energy: Self-calibration of systematic uncertainties

    CERN Document Server

    Oguri, Masamune

    2010-01-01

    We develop a new method of combining cluster observables (number counts and cluster-cluster correlation functions) and stacked weak lensing signals of background galaxy shapes, both of which are available in a wide-field optical imaging survey. Assuming that the clusters have secure redshift estimates, we show that the joint experiment enables a self-calibration of important systematic errors including the source redshift uncertainty and the cluster mass-observable relation, by adopting a single population of background source galaxies for the lensing analysis. It allows us to use the relative strengths of stacked lensing signals at different cluster redshifts for calibrating the source redshift uncertainty, which in turn leads to accurate measurements of the mean cluster mass in each bin. In addition, our formulation of stacked lensing signals in Fourier space simplifies the Fisher matrix calculations, as well as the marginalization over the cluster off-centering effect, the most significant uncertainty in s...

  2. Braneworld cosmological models with anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a cosmological Randall-Sundrum braneworld with anisotropy, i.e., of Bianchi type, the modified Einstein equations on the brane include components of the five-dimensional Weyl tensor for which there are no evolution equations on the brane. If the bulk field equations are not solved, this Weyl term remains unknown, and many previous studies have simply prescribed it as ad hoc. We construct a family of Bianchi braneworlds with anisotropy by solving the five-dimensional field equations in the bulk. We analyze the cosmological dynamics on the brane, including the Weyl term, and shed light on the relation between anisotropy on the brane and the Weyl curvature in the bulk. In these models, it is not possible to achieve geometric anisotropy for a perfect fluid or scalar field - the junction conditions require anisotropic stress on the brane. But the solutions can isotropize and approach a Friedmann brane in an anti-de Sitter bulk

  3. Braneworld cosmological models with anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Antonio; Maartens, Roy; Matravers, David; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2003-11-01

    For a cosmological Randall-Sundrum braneworld with anisotropy, i.e., of Bianchi type, the modified Einstein equations on the brane include components of the five-dimensional Weyl tensor for which there are no evolution equations on the brane. If the bulk field equations are not solved, this Weyl term remains unknown, and many previous studies have simply prescribed it as ad hoc. We construct a family of Bianchi braneworlds with anisotropy by solving the five-dimensional field equations in the bulk. We analyze the cosmological dynamics on the brane, including the Weyl term, and shed light on the relation between anisotropy on the brane and the Weyl curvature in the bulk. In these models, it is not possible to achieve geometric anisotropy for a perfect fluid or scalar field—the junction conditions require anisotropic stress on the brane. But the solutions can isotropize and approach a Friedmann brane in an anti de Sitter bulk.

  4. Braneworld cosmological models with anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Campos, A; Matravers, D; Sopuerta, C F; Campos, Antonio; Maartens, Roy; Matravers, David; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2003-01-01

    For a cosmological Randall-Sundrum braneworld with anisotropy, i.e., of Bianchi type, the modified Einstein equations on the brane include components of the five-dimensional Weyl tensor for which there are no evolution equations on the brane. If the bulk field equations are not solved, this Weyl term remains unknown, and many previous studies have simply prescribed it ad hoc. We construct a family of Bianchi braneworlds with anisotropy by solving the five-dimensional field equations in the bulk. We analyze the cosmological dynamics on the brane, including the Weyl term, and shed light on the relation between anisotropy on the brane and Weyl curvature in the bulk. In these models, it is not possible to achieve geometric anisotropy for a perfect fluid or scalar field -- the junction conditions require anisotropic stress on the brane. But the solutions can isotropize and approach a Friedmann brane in an anti-de Sitter bulk.

  5. Issues on generating primordial anisotropies at the end of inflation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We revisit the idea of generating primordial anisotropies at the end of inflation in models of inflation with gauge fields. To be specific we consider the charged hybrid inflation model where the waterfall field is charged under a U(1) gauge field so the surface of end of inflation is controlled both by inflaton and the gauge fields. Using δN formalism properly we find that the anisotropies generated at the end of inflation from the gauge field fluctuations are exponentially suppressed on cosmological scales. This is because the gauge field evolves exponentially during inflation while in order to generate appreciable anisotropies at the end of inflation the spectator gauge field has to be frozen. We argue that this is a generic feature, that is, one can not generate observable anisotropies at the end of inflation within an FRW background

  6. Contribution of extragalactic infrared sources to CMB foreground anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Gawiser, E; Gawiser, Eric; Smoot, George F

    1996-01-01

    We estimate the level of confusion of CMB anisotropy measurements caused by extragalactic infrared sources. CMB anisotropy observations at high resolution and high frequencies are especially sensitive to this foreground. We have combined IRAS data on bright infrared galaxies with information about the Galaxy from the DIRBE and FIRAS instruments of COBE. Using the spectrum of the Milky Way as a template, we predict the microwave emission of the 5319 brightest infrared galaxes. We simulate skymaps over the relevant range of frequencies (30-900 GHz) and instrument resolutions (10'-10 degrees Full Width Half Max). Analysis of the temperature anisotropy of these skymaps shows a level of extragalactic infrared foreground that is nearly consistent with previous estimates based on galaxy-evolution models. A reasonable observationalwindow is still available for medium- and small-angular scale CMB anisotropy measurements.

  7. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  8. Electric Field Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in a Ferromagnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamble, S. J.

    2010-02-24

    We report the first observation of a transient all electric field induced magnetic anisotropy in a thin film metallic ferromagnet. We generate the anisotropy with a strong (-10{sup 9} V/m) and short (70 fs) {rvec E}-field pulse. This field is large enough to distort the valence charge distribution in the metal, yet its duration is too brief to change the atomic positions. This pure electronic structure alteration of the sample generates a new type of transient anisotropy axis and strongly influences the magnetization dynamics. The successful creation of such an anisotropy opens the possibility for all {rvec E}-field induced magnetization reversal in thin metallic films - a greatly desired yet unachieved process.

  9. A New Maximum-Likelihood Technique for Reconstructing Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy at All Angular Scales

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus; Desiati, Paolo; Díaz-Vélez, Juan Carlos; Fiorino, Daniel W; Westerhoff, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    The arrival directions of TeV-PeV cosmic rays show weak but significant anisotropies with relative intensities at the level of one per mille. Due to the smallness of the anisotropies, quantitative studies require careful disentanglement of detector effects from the observation. We discuss an iterative maximum-likelihood reconstruction that simultaneously fits cosmic ray anisotropies and detector acceptance. The method does not rely on detector simulations and provides an optimal anisotropy reconstruction for ground-based cosmic ray observatories located in the middle latitudes. It is particularly well suited to the recovery of the dipole anisotropy, which is a crucial observable for the study of cosmic ray diffusion in our Galaxy. We also provide general analysis methods for recovering large- and small-scale anisotropies that take into account systematic effects of the observation by ground-based detectors.

  10. A New Maximum-likelihood Technique for Reconstructing Cosmic-Ray Anisotropy at All Angular Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlers, M.; BenZvi, S. Y.; Desiati, P.; Díaz–Vélez, J. C.; Fiorino, D. W.; Westerhoff, S.

    2016-05-01

    The arrival directions of TeV–PeV cosmic rays show weak but significant anisotropies with relative intensities at the level of one per mille. Due to the smallness of the anisotropies, quantitative studies require careful disentanglement of detector effects from the observation. We discuss an iterative maximum-likelihood reconstruction that simultaneously fits cosmic-ray anisotropies and detector acceptance. The method does not rely on detector simulations and provides an optimal anisotropy reconstruction for ground-based cosmic-ray observatories located in the middle latitudes. It is particularly well suited to the recovery of the dipole anisotropy, which is a crucial observable for the study of cosmic-ray diffusion in our Galaxy. We also provide general analysis methods for recovering large- and small-scale anisotropies that take into account systematic effects of the observation by ground-based detectors.

  11. On the interpretation of negative birefringence observed in strong-field optical pump-probe experiments: high-order Kerr and plasma grating effects

    CERN Document Server

    Karras, G; Houzet, J; Hertz, E; Billard, F; Lavorel, B; Faucher, O

    2013-01-01

    The analysis of negative birefringence optically induced in major air components (Loriot et al., [1, 2]) is revisited in light of the recently reported plasma grating-induced phase-shift effect predicted for strong field pump-probe experiments (Wahlstrand and Milchberg, [3]). The nonlinear birefrin- gence induced by a short and intense laser pulse in argon is measured by femtosecond time-resolved polarimetry. The experiments are performed with degenerate colors, where the pump and probe beam share the same spectrum, or with two different colors and non-overlapping spectra. The in- terpretation of the experimental results is substantiated using a numerical 3D+1 model accounting for nonlinear propagation effects, cross-beam geometry of the interacting laser pulses, and detec- tion technique. The model also includes the ionization rate of argon and high-order Kerr indices introduced by Loriot et al. enabling to assess the contribution of both terms to the observed effect. The results show that the ionization-ind...

  12. On the origin of the cosmic microwave background anisotropies

    CERN Document Server

    Follop, Ria; Cooray, Asantha; Abdalla, Filipe B

    2007-01-01

    Suggestions have been made that the microwave background observed by COBE and WMAP and dubbed Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may have an origin within our own Galaxy or Earth. To consider the signal that may be correlated with Earth, a correlate-by-eye exercise was attempted by overlaying the CMB map from Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe on a topographical map of Earth. Remarkably, several hot spots in the CMB map are found to be well aligned with either large cities on Earth or regions of high altitude. To further study the correlations between Earth and CMB, we performed a complicated cross-correlation analysis in the multipole space. The overall correlations are detected at more than 5 sigma confidence level. These results can be naively interpreted to suggest that large angular scale fluctuations in CMB are generated on Earth by a process that traces the altitude relative to a mean radius. Simply extending our analysis, we suggest that cross-correlations between CMB and any other map of a Solar sys...

  13. Physical modelling of elastic anisotropy in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furre, Anne-Kari

    1997-12-31

    During the last decades, anisotropy has become increasingly interesting in hydrocarbon prospecting. Knowledge of anisotropy in the subsurface can improve reservoir production and data interpretation. This thesis presents experimental studies of three different artificial anisotropic media: layered materials, isotropic matrix with stress-induced fractures, and layered media with controlled crack patterns at an oblique angle relative to layering. Layered media were constructed by varying grain size distributions for different layers, which resulted in acoustic and permeability anisotropy. The thin layer materials could be described by Backus modelling provided the wavelength was much larger than the layer periods. Frequency dependent scattering was observed for waves travelling normal to the layers. Saturated wave velocities were consistent with transverse isotropic Biot theory, but because the permeability anisotropy was small, no flow dependent attenuation anisotropy was observed. When sandstones were cemented under stress and then released, to simulate a vertical core or uplift process, predominantly horizontal cracks developed in the samples. On reloading to the cementing stress level, the velocities were below the initial values, which supports the theories of crack growth. In further triaxial tests on the same material a stress-dependent anisotropy occurred similar to what is often seen in natural samples taken from large depths. 70 refs., 200 figs., 56 tabs.

  14. Radar model fusion of asteroid (4179) Toutatis via its optical images observed by Chang'e-2 probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Xiao, Ting; Liu, Peng; Sun, Lei; Huang, Jiangchuan; Tang, Xianglong

    2016-06-01

    Asteroid (4179) Toutatis has been modeling by ground-based radar observations until Dec 13th, 2012, when distinct optical images of Toutatis were captured during the Chang'e-2 flyby at the shortest distance for the first time. The surface details on Toutatis in the optical images are abundant enough to reinforce the radar model descriptions. Under this context, we customized a method of frequency domain data fusion, which combines the topography information of radar model and the 3rd dimension information estimated from optical image by shape from shading algorithm, and gave out a new Toutatis' radar model. A model with abundant surface characteristics had been resulted.

  15. Broadband optical limiter based on nonlinear photoinduced anisotropy in bacteriorhodopsin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yuhua; Siganakis, Georgios; Moharam, M. G.; Wu, Shin-Tson

    2004-11-01

    Nonlinear photoinduced anisotropy in a bacteriorhodopsin film was theoretically and experimentally investigated and a broadband active optical limiter was demonstrated in the visible spectral range. A diode-pumped second harmonic yttrium aluminum garnet laser was used as a pumping beam and three different wavelengths at λ =442, 532, and 655nm from different lasers were used as probing beams. The pump and probe beams overlap at the sample. When the pumping beam is absent, the probing beam cannot transmit the crossed polarizers. With the presence of the pumping beam, a portion of the probing light is detected owing to the photoinduced anisotropy. Due to the optical nonlinearity, the transmitted probing beam intensity is clamped at a certain value, which depends on the wavelength, when the pumping beam intensity exceeds 5mW/mm2. Good agreement between theory and experiment is found.

  16. Probing the Climatological Impact of a Cosmic Ray-Cloud Connection through Low-Frequency Radio Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Magee, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    It has been proposed that cosmic ray events could have a causal relationship with cloud formation rates. Given the weak constraints on the role that cloud formation plays in climate forcing it is essential to understand the role such a relationship could have in shaping the Earth's climate. This issue has been previously investigated in the context of the long-term effect of cosmic ray events on climate. However, in order to establish whether or not such a relationship exists, measurements of short-timescale solar events, individual cosmic ray events, and spatially correlated cloud parameters could be of great significance. Here we propose such a comparison using observations from a pair of radio telescopes arrays, the Long Wavelength Array (LWA) and the Eight-meter-wavelength Transient Array (ETA). These low-frequency radio arrays have a unique ability to simultaneously conduct solar, ionospheric and cosmic rays observations and are thus ideal for such a comparison. We will outline plans for a comparison usi...

  17. Probing Very Bright-End of Galaxy Luminosity Function at z >~ 7 Using Hubble Space Telescope Pure Parallel Observations

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Haojing; Zamojski, Michel A; Windhorst, Rogier A; McCarthy, Patrick J; Fan, Xiaohui; Röttgering, Huub J A; Koekemoer, Anton M; Robertson, Brant E; Davé, Romeel; Cai, Zheng

    2010-01-01

    We report the first results from the Hubble Infrared Pure Parallel Imaging Extragalactic Survey, which utilizes the pure parallel orbits of the Hubble Space Telescope to do deep imaging along a large number of random sightlines. To date, our analysis includes 26 widely separated fields observed by the Wide Field Camera 3, which amounts to 122.8 sq. arcmin in total area. We have found three bright Y098-dropouts, which are candidate galaxies at z >~ 7.4. One of these objects shows a peculiar indication of variability and its nature is uncertain. The other two objects are among the brightest candidate galaxies at these redshifts known to date (L>2L*). Such very luminous objects could be the progenitors of the high-mass LBGs observed at lower redshifts. While our sample is still limited in size, it is much less subject to the uncertainty caused by "cosmic variance" than other samples because it is derived using fields along many random sightlines. We find that the existence of the brightest candidate at z~7.4 is ...

  18. Probing the accretion disk and central engine structure of NGC4258 with Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations

    CERN Document Server

    Reynolds, Christopher S; Markoff, Sera; Tueller, Jack; Wilms, Joern; Young, Andrew J

    2008-01-01

    [abridged] We present an X-ray study of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC4258 using data from Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and the Swift/BAT survey. We find that signatures of X-ray reprocessing by cold gas are very weak in the spectrum of this Seyfert-2 galaxy; a weak, narrow fluorescent-Kalpha emission line of cold iron is robustly detected in both the Suzaku and XMM-Newton spectra but at a level much below that of most other Seyfert-2 galaxies. We conclude that the circumnuclear environment of this AGN is very "clean" and lacks the Compton-thick obscuring torus of unified Seyfert schemes. From the narrowness of the iron line, together with evidence for line flux variability between the Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations, we constrain the line emitting region to be between $3\\times 10^3r_g$ and $4\\times 10^4r_g$ from the black hole. We show that the observed properties of the iron line can be explained if the line originates from the surface layers of a warped accretion disk. In particular, we ...

  19. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N., E-mail: niranjan@igcar.gov.in [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Radhika, R. [Crystal Growth Centre, Anna University, Chennai (India); Kozakov, A.T. [Research Institute of Physics, Southern Federal University, Rostov-on-Don (Russian Federation); Pandian, R. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India); Chakravarty, S. [UGC-DAE CSR, Kalpakkam (India); Ravindran, T.R.; Dash, S.; Tyagi, A.K. [Materials Science Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient.

  20. Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Friction anisotropy in boronated graphite is observed in macroscopic sliding condition. • Low friction coefficient is observed in basal plane and becomes high in prismatic direction. • 3D phase of boronated graphite transformed into 2D structure after friction test. • Chemical activity is high in prismatic plane forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces. - Abstract: Anisotropic friction behavior in macroscopic scale was observed in boronated graphite. Depending upon sliding speed and normal loads, this value was found to be in the range 0.1–0.35 in the direction of basal plane and becomes high 0.2–0.8 in prismatic face. Grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction analysis shows prominent reflection of (0 0 2) plane at basal and prismatic directions of boronated graphite. However, in both the wear tracks (1 1 0) plane become prominent and this transformation is induced by frictional energy. The structural transformation in wear tracks is supported by micro-Raman analysis which revealed that 3D phase of boronated graphite converted into a disordered 2D lattice structure. Thus, the structural aspect of disorder is similar in both the wear tracks and graphite transfer layers. Therefore, the crystallographic aspect is not adequate to explain anisotropic friction behavior. Results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy shows weak signature of oxygen complexes and functional groups in wear track of basal plane while these species dominate in prismatic direction. Abundance of these functional groups in prismatic plane indicates availability of chemically active sites tends to forming strong bonds between the sliding interfaces which eventually increases friction coefficient

  1. Hyperfine Structure in the (0,0,0) X˜2Σ + State of CaOH Observed by Pump/Probe Microwave-Optical Double Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurlock, C. T.; Fletcher, D. A.; Steimle, T. C.

    1993-06-01

    A pump/probe microwave-optical double resonance experiment has been performed on calcium monohydroxide, CaOH, using the technique of laser ablation/supersonic expansion for production of the compound. Frequencies associated with the three lowest pure rotational transitions in the (0,0,0) X˜2Σ + vibronic state were observed with a resolution of <80 kHz (FWHM) and were analyzed to give the spectroscopic parameters (in MHz): B = 10023.0841(7), D = 0.01154(5), γ = 34.7593(10), bF(H) = 2.602(3), c(H) = 2.053(10). The proton hyperfine interactions were interpreted in terms of a molecular orbital description for the X˜2Σ + state.

  2. Pump-probe imaging of nanosecond laser-induced bubbles in distilled water solutions: Observations of laser-produced-plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents the analysis of the laser-produced-plasma (LPP) formed by the focusing of a 9 ns laser pulse, λ=532 nm, with a NA=0.6 aspherical lens using energies between 100-1500 μJ, into distilled water with varying solutions of table salt. Observations of the filamentation plasma were made, which are explained by self-focusing of the laser pulse by the LPP through ponderomotive cavitation of the electron plasma in the center of the beam. The filamentation of the beam through a low density plasma wave guide explains why the transmission of the pump laser through the interaction region was notably higher on previous experiments that we performed [R. Evans et al., Opt. Express 16, 7481 (2008)], than a very similar set of experiments performed by Noack and Vogel [IEEE J. Quantum Electron. 35, 1156 (1999)].

  3. Probing the outer edge of an accretion disk: A Her X-1 turn-on observed with RXTE

    CERN Document Server

    Kuster, M; Staubert, R; Heindl, W A; Rothschild, R E; Shakura, N I; Postnov, K A

    2005-01-01

    We present the analysis of Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations of the turn-on phase of a 35 day cycle of the X-ray binary Her X-1. During the early phases of the turn-on, the energy spectrum is composed of X-rays scattered into the line of sight plus heavily absorbed X-rays. The energy spectra in the 3-17 keV range can be described by a partial covering model, where one of the components is influenced by photoelectric absorption and Thomson scattering in cold material plus an iron emission line at 6.5 keV. In this paper we show the evolution of spectral parameters as well as the evolution of the pulse profile during the turn-on. We describe this evolution using Monte Carlo simulations which self-consistently describe the evolution of the X-ray pulse profile and of the energy spectrum.

  4. Measuring Anisotropies in the Cosmic Neutrino Background

    CERN Document Server

    Lisanti, Mariangela; Tully, Christopher G

    2014-01-01

    Neutrino capture on tritium has emerged as a promising method for detecting the cosmic neutrino background (CvB). We show that relic neutrinos are captured most readily when their spin vectors are anti-aligned with the polarization axis of the tritium nuclei and when they approach along the direction of polarization. As a result, CvB observatories may measure anisotropies in the cosmic neutrino velocity and spin distributions by polarizing the tritium targets. A small dipole anisotropy in the CvB is expected due to the peculiar velocity of the lab frame with respect to the cosmic frame and due to late-time gravitational effects. The PTOLEMY experiment, a tritium observatory currently under construction, should observe a nearly isotropic background. This would serve as a strong test of the cosmological origin of a potential signal. The polarized-target measurements may also constrain non-standard neutrino interactions that would induce larger anisotropies and help discriminate between Majorana versus Dirac neu...

  5. Dynamical anisotropy of the optical propagation paths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenyan, Tatiana I.; Pisklin, Maksim V.; Suhareva, Natalia A.; Zotov, Aleksey M.

    2015-11-01

    Dynamics of laser beam intensity profile spatial modulations over a model tropospheric path with the controlled meteorological parameters was studied. Influence of the underlying surface temperature as well as the side wind load were considered. The increase of dynamic anisotropic disturbances saturation with the path length was observed. Spatio-temporal correlation characteristics of the directivity pattern in the signal beam registration plane were obtained. Proposed method of the experimental samples analysis on the base of chronogram with the following definition of the dynamic structure tensors array allows to estimate local and averaged projections of the flow velocities over the chosen spatio-temporal region and to restore their geometry in the zone of intersection with the signal beam. Additional characteristics suggested for the diagonalized local structure tensors such as local energy capacity and local structuredness are informative for the estimation of the inhomogeneities spatial dimensions, time of access through the section considered, the dynamics of energetic jets. The concepts of rotational and translational dynamic anisotropy are introduced to discriminate the types of the changes of the local ellipsoids axes orientation as well as their values. Rotational anisotropy shows itself in the changes of the local ellipsoids orientation, thus characterizing the illumination variation over the beam cross-section. Translational anisotropy describes the difference between the axes values for local ellipsoids.

  6. Research support for plasma diagnostics on Elmo Bumpy Torus - development of a multichannel Hall-probe based diamagnetic diagnostic instrument and observation and modeling of EBT electron rings. Final report, October 1, 1982-September 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Use of multiple Hall effect probes is a cost effective way to observe diamagnetic fields from the hot electron rings in the Elmo Bumpy Torus device at several locations simultaneously. A special diagnostic instrument has been developed having six Hall probe channels with the sensitivity and stability needed for the diamagnetic measurements. The instrument uses an AC carrier system with isolation transformers located remotely from the instrument and near the probe locations. Details of instrument design as well as operating instructions for it are included in this report

  7. Probing the Accretion Disk and Central Engine Structure of the NGC 4258 with Suzaku and XMM-Newton Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Christopher S.; Nowak, Michael A.; Markoff, Sera; Tueller, Jack; Wilms, Joern; Young, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    We present an X-ray study of the low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in NGC 4258 using data from Suzaku, XMM-Newton, and the Swift/Burst Alert Telescope survey. We find that signatures of X-ray reprocessing by cold gas are very weak in the spectrum of this Seyfert-2 galaxy; a weak, narrow fluorescent K(alpha) emission line of cod iron is robustly detected in both the Suzaku and XMM-Newton spectra but at a level much below that of most other Seyfert-2 galaxies. We conclude that the circumnuclear environment of this AGN is very "clean" and lacks the Compton-thick obscuring torus of unified Seyfert schemes. From the narrowness of the iron line, together with evidence of line flux variability between the Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations, we constrain the line emitting region to be between 3 x 10(exp 3)r(sub g) and 4 x 10(exp 4)r(sub g), from the black hole. We show that the observed properties of the iron line can be explained if the line originates from the surface layers of a warped accretion disk. In particular, we present explicit calculations of the expected iron line from a disk warped by Lens-Thirring precession from a misaligned central black hole. Finally, the Suzaku data reveal clear evidence of large amplitude 2-10 keV variability on timescales of 50 ksec and smaller amplitude flares on timescales as short as 5-10 ksec. If associated with accretion disk processes, such rapid variability requires an origin in the innermost regions of the disk (r approx. equals 10(r(sub g) or less). Analysis of the difference spectrum between a high- and low-flux states suggests that the variable component of the X-ray emission is steeper and more absorbed than the average AGN emission, suggesting that the primary X-ray source and absorbing screen have a spatial structure on comparable scales. We note the remarkable similarity between the circumnuclear environment of NGC 4258 and another well studied low-luminosity AGN, M81*.

  8. Sunyaev Zel'dovich Effect Observations of Strong Lensing Galaxy Clusters: Probing the Over-Concentration Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Gralla, Megan B; Gladders, Michael D; Marrone, Daniel P; Barrientos, L Felipe; Bayliss, Matthew; Bonamente, Massimiliano; Bulbul, Esra; Carlstrom, John E; Culverhouse, Thomas; Gilbank, David G; Greer, Christopher; Hasler, Nicole; Hawkins, David; Hennessy, Ryan; Joy, Marshall; Koester, Benjamin; Lamb, James; Leitch, Erik; Miller, Amber; Mroczkowski, Tony; Muchovej, Stephen; Oguri, Masamune; Plagge, Tom; Pryke, Clem; Woody, David

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the Sunyaev Zel'dovich (SZ) effect for a sample of ten strong lensing selected galaxy clusters using the Sunyaev Zel'dovich Array (SZA). The SZA is sensitive to structures on spatial scales of a few arcminutes, while the strong lensing mass modeling constrains the mass at small scales (typically < 30"). Combining the two provides information about the projected concentrations of the strong lensing clusters. The Einstein radii we measure are twice as large as expected given the masses inferred from SZ scaling relations. A Monte Carlo simulation indicates that a sample randomly drawn from the expected distribution would have a larger median Einstein radius than the observed clusters about 3% of the time. The implied overconcentration has been noted in previous studies with smaller samples of lensing clusters. It persists for this sample, with the caveat that this could result from a systematic effect such as if the gas fractions of the strong lensing clusters are substantially below what is ...

  9. Akari Observations of Brown Dwarfs. II CO2 as Probe of Carbon and Oxygen Abundances in Brown Dwarfs

    CERN Document Server

    Tsuji, Takashi; Sorahana, Satoko

    2011-01-01

    Recent observations with the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI have shown that the CO2 bands at 4.2 micron in three brown dwarfs are much stronger than expected from the unified cloudy model (UCM) based on recent solar C & O abundances. This result has been a puzzle, but we now find that this is simply an abundance effect: We show that these strong CO2 bands can be explained with the UCMs based on the classical C & O abundances (log Ac and log Ao), which are about 0.2 dex larger compared to the recent values. Since three other brown dwarfs could be well interpreted with the recent solar C & O abundances, we require at least two model sequences based on the different chemical compositions to interpret all the AKARI spectra. The reason for this is that the CO2 band is especially sensitive to C & O abundances, since the CO2 abundance depends approximately on AcAo^2 --- the cube of C & O abundances. For this reason, even low resolution spectra of very cool dwarfs, especially of CO2 cannot ...

  10. Probing the Kinematics of the Narrow-Line Region in Seyfert Galaxies with Slitless Spectroscopy: Observational Results

    CERN Document Server

    Ruiz, J R; Krämer, S B; Bower, G A; Gull, T R; Hutchings, J B; Kaiser, M E; Weistrop, D

    2004-01-01

    We present slitless spectra of 10 Seyfert galaxies observed with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope. The spectra cover the [OIII] 4959, 5007 emission lines at a spectral resolving power of ~9000 and a spatial resolution of 0.1". We compare the slitless spectra with previous HST narrow-band images to determine the velocity shifts and dispersions of the bright emission-line knots in the narrow-line regions (NLRs) of these Seyferts. Many knots are spatially resolved with sizes of tenths of arcsecs, corresponding to tens of pcs, and yet they appear to move coherently with radial velocities between zero and +/- 1200 km/s with respect to the systemic velocities of their hostgalaxies. The knots also show a broad range in velocity dispersion, ranging from ~30 km/s (the velocity resolution) to ~1000 km/s FWHM. Most of the Seyfert galaxies in this sample show an organized flow pattern, with radial velocities near zero at the nucleus (defined by the optical continuum peak) and increas...

  11. Time delay anisotropy in photoelectron emission from the isotropic ground state of helium

    CERN Document Server

    Heuser, Sebastian; Cirelli, Claudio; Sabbar, Mazyar; Boge, Robert; Lucchini, Matteo; Gallmann, Lukas; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli S; Dahlström, J Marcus; Lindroth, Eva; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando; Keller, Ursula

    2015-01-01

    Time delays of electrons emitted from an isotropic initial state and leaving behind an isotropic ion are assumed to be angle-independent. Using an interferometric method involving XUV attosecond pulse trains and an IR probe field in combination with a detection scheme, which allows for full 3D momentum resolution, we show that time delays between electrons liberated from the $1s^{2}$ spherically symmetric ground state of He depend on the emission direction of the electrons with respect to the linear polarization axis of the ionizing XUV light. Such time delays can exhibit values as large as 60 attoseconds. With the help of refined theoretical models we can attribute the observed anisotropy to the interplay between different final quantum states, which arise naturally when two photons are involved in the photoionization process. Since most measurement techniques tracing attosecond electron dynamics have involved at least two photons so far, this is a general, significant, and initially unexpected effect that m...

  12. Recovering hidden signals of statistical anisotropy from a masked or partial CMB sky

    CERN Document Server

    Aluri, Pavan K; Rotti, Aditya; Souradeep, Tarun

    2015-01-01

    Any isotropy violating phenomena on cosmic microwave background (CMB) induces off-diagonal correlations in the two-point function. These correlations themselves can be used to estimate the underlying anisotropic signals. Masking due to residual foregrounds, or availability of partial sky due to survey limitation, are unavoidable circumstances in CMB studies. But, masking induces additional correlations, and thus complicates the recovery of such signals. In this work, we discuss a procedure based on bipolar spherical harmonic (BipoSH) formalism to comprehensively addresses any spurious correlations induced by masking and successfully recover hidden signals of anisotropy in observed CMB maps. This method is generic, and can be applied to recover a variety of isotropy violating phenomena. Here, we illustrate the procedure by recovering the subtle Doppler boost signal from simulated boosted CMB skies, which has become possible with the unprecedented full-sky sensitivity of PLANCK probe.

  13. Magnetic dispersion and anisotropy in multiferroic BiFeO3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Masaaki [ORNL; Fishman, Randy Scott [ORNL; Hong, Tao [ORNL; Lee, C. H. [AIST, Japan; Ushiyama, T. [AIST, Japan; Yanagisawa, Y. [AIST, Japan; Tomioka, Y. [AIST, Japan; Ito, T. [AIST, Japan

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the full magnetic dispersion relations of multiferroic BiFeO3. In particular, two excitation gaps originating from magnetic anisotropies have been clearly observed. The direct observation of the gaps enables us to accurately determine the Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya (DM) interaction and the single ion anisotropy. The DM interaction supports a sizable magneto-electric coupling in this compound.

  14. XMM-NEWTON OBSERVATIONS OF THE DWARF NOVA RU Peg IN QUIESCENCE: PROBE OF THE BOUNDARY LAYER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an analysis of X-ray and UV data obtained with the XMM-Newton Observatory of the long-period dwarf nova RU Peg. RU Peg contains a massive white dwarf (WD), possibly the hottest WD in a dwarf nova (DN), it has a low inclination, thus optimally exposing its X-ray emitting boundary layer (BL), and has an excellent trigonometric parallax distance. We modeled the X-ray data using XSPEC assuming a multi-temperature plasma emission model built from the MEKAL code (i.e., CEVMKL). We obtained a maximum temperature of 31.7 keV, based on the European Photon Imaging Camera MOS1, 2 and pn data, indicating that RU Peg has an X-ray spectrum harder than most DNe, except U Gem. This result is consistent with and indirectly confirms the large mass of the WD in RU Peg. The X-ray luminosity we computed corresponds to a BL luminosity for a mass accretion rate of 2 × 10–11 Msun yr–1 (assuming Mwd = 1.3 Msun), in agreement with the expected quiescent accretion rate. The modeling of the O VIII emission line at 19 Å as observed by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer implies a projected stellar rotational velocity vrotsin i = 695 km s–1, i.e., the line is emitted from material rotating at ∼936-1245 km s–1 (i ∼ 34°-48°) or about 1/6 of the Keplerian speed; this velocity is much larger than the rotation speed of the WD inferred from the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum. Cross-correletion analysis yielded an undelayed (time lag ∼ 0) component and a delayed component of 116 ± 17 s where the X-ray variations/fluctuations lagged the UV variations. This indicates that the UV fluctuations in the inner disk are propagated into the X-ray emitting region in about 116 s. The undelayed component may be related to irradiation effects.

  15. Anisotropy and micromagnetics in complex oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Thomas Andrew

    maintained a [110] easy axis. To examine magnetocrystalline effects at further reduced length scales, a series of two-micron micromagnets of various shapes and orientations were patterned via argon ion implantation into LSMO thin films deposited on a SrTiO 3 substrates. The magnetic ground state was observed via x-ray photoemission electron microscopy (X-PEEM), directly probing the competition between magnetocrystalline and shape anisotropies. Analysis of the images showed that the domain patterns consisted of a superposition of Landau and vortex patterns. A metric, named the vortex fraction, was formulated to quantify this behavior as a function of temperature and radius in circular micromagnets. Vortex fractions were used to compare X-PEEM images to simulations performed by the Object Oriented Micromagnetics Framework (OOMMF) and MuMax3 micromagnetics simulation software; results allowed for the extraction of magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant at sub-micron length scales from X-PEEM data. These results illustrate the potential for tuning magnetic ground states for future spintronic devices.

  16. Probing vibrational anisotropy with nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlik, J. W.; Barabanschikov, A.; Oliver, A. G.; Alp, E. E.; Sturhahn, W.; Zhao, J.; Sage, J. T.; Scheidt, W. R. (X-Ray Science Division); (Univ. of Notre Dame); (Northeastern Univ.)

    2010-06-14

    A NRVS single-crystal study (NRVS=nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) has provided detailed information on the in-plane modes of nitrosyl iron porphyrinate [Fe(oep)(NO)] (see picture; oep=octaethylporphyrin). The axial nitrosyl ligand controls the direction of the in-plane iron motion.

  17. What have we learnt from Wilkinson microwave anisotropy probe?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Robert G Crittenden

    2004-10-01

    It has been a little over a year since WMAP produced its dramatic new glimpse of the cosmic microwave background. I review the results of the WMAP mission and the science that has arisen from it, focusing on the qualitatively new features of the data: the temperature-polarization correlation, correlations with large scale structure, the large-scale power deficit and its implications, and the search for non-Gaussianity.

  18. Cosmic Ray Small Scale Anisotropies and Local Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    López-Barquero, Vanessa; Xu, S; Desiati, P; Lazarian, A

    2015-01-01

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is observed in a wide energy range and at different angular scales by a variety of experiments. However, a comprehensive and satisfactory explanation has been elusive for over a decade now. The arrival distribution of cosmic rays on Earth is the convolution of the distribution of their sources and of the effects of geometry and properties of the magnetic field through which particles propagate. It is generally believed that the anisotropy topology at the largest angular scale is adiabatically shaped by diffusion in the structured interstellar magnetic field. On the contrary, the medium and small angular scale structure could be an effect of non diffusive propagation of cosmic rays in perturbed magnetic fields. In particular, a possible explanation of the observed small scale anisotropy observed at TeV energy scale, may come from the effect of particle scattering in turbulent magnetized plasmas. We perform numerical integration of test particle trajectories in low-$\\beta$ compressible mag...

  19. Pump-probe SAXS experiments on ultrafast demagnetization of magnetic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated the ultrafast optical demagnetization of domain patterns in magnetic multilayers with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in an infrared-pump x-ray-probe experiment. As a probe we used small angle x-ray scattering which, via x-ray magnetic circular dichroism at the Co M-edge, allows us to simultaneously obtain information on the magnitude of the local magnetization and the characteristic length scale of the magnetic domains. The free-electron laser source FLASH at Hamburg was tuned to deliver λ=20.9nm x-ray pulses of approx. 25 fs duration which were synchronized to an infrared fs laser for pump-probe experiments with sub-ps time resolution. In addition to ultrafast demagnetization, we observe sub-ps structural changes of the magnetic domain configuration. Models to explain this ultrafast structural change will be discussed.

  20. Laser-induced nuclear orientation and gamma anisotropy in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser optical pumping to induce nuclear orientation in several isotopes and one isomer of atomic sodium vapor is described. Essentially complete nuclear polarization, P > 90%, has been achieved in stable 23Na when pumping with modest laser intensities (I approx. = 10 mW/cm2). The volume of the sample cell was approximately 10 cc, and was filled with a sodium density of about 10'' atoms/cc. Complete coverage of the Doppler distribution was accomplished with the use of trace amounts (less than or equal to 1 torr) of argon buffer gas to induce velocity changing collisions. A theoretical model which accurately predicts the amount of polarization is developed. The orientation of nuclei which are unstable to gamma decay can manifest itself in anisotropic gamma ray emission. This anisotropy can be used to measure isotope and isomer shifts, from which nuclear properties can be derived. Gamma anisotropy was observed in two systems, 22Na and /sup 24m/Na. From the observed anisotropy in /sup 24m/Na, a negative sign for the g factor is determined. Values are derived for the magnetic moment, μ = 2.56 +- 0.64 nm, and the isomer shift, deltaν/sub 24m/ = 288 +- 191 MHz (D1 line). A model is described which relates various laser and fubber gas parameters to the observed gamma anisotropy lineshape. This model facilitates the extraction of physical parameters from knowledge of the laser frequency at which the anisotropy is a maximum

  1. Spin confinement by anisotropy modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bland, J.A.C. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jacb1@phy.cam.ac.uk; Lew, W.S.; Li, S.P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C.A.F. [Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Natali, M.; Chen, Y. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, CNRS-LPN, Marcoussis (France)

    2002-10-07

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a 'natural' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic domain wall-the 'anisotropy constrained' magnetic wall. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that the wall is asymmetric, has a small out-of-plane component and has no mobility under external perturbation. (author)

  2. Spin confinement by anisotropy modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bland, J. A. C.; Lew, W. S.; Li, S. P.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C. A. F.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.

    2002-10-01

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a `natural' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic domain wall-the `anisotropy constrained' magnetic wall. Micromagnetic simulations indicate that the wall is asymmetric, has a small out-of-plane component and has no mobility under external perturbation.

  3. Self-assembly of pluronic block copolymers in aqueous dispersions of single-wall carbon nanotubes as observed by spin probe EPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florent, Marc; Shvartzman-Cohen, Rina; Goldfarb, Daniella; Yerushalmi-Rozen, Rachel

    2008-04-15

    The self-assembly of Pluronic block copolymers in dispersions of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) was investigated by spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Nitroxide spin labeled block copolymers derived from Pluronic L62 and P123 were introduced in minute amounts into the dispersions. X-band EPR spectra of the SWNT dispersions and of native polymer solutions were measured as a function of temperature. All spectra, below and above the critical micelle temperature (CMT), were characteristic of the fast limit motional regime. The temperature dependence of the 14N isotropic hyperfine coupling, aiso, and the rotational correlation time, tauc, were determined. It was observed that, below the CMT, EPR does not distinguish between chains adsorbed on SWNT and free chains. Above CMT, substantial differences were observed: in the native solution, the Pluronics spin labels experience only one environment, Sm, assigned to spin labels in the corona of the Pluronic micelle, whereas in the SWNT dispersions, in addition to Sm, a second population of nonaggregated, individual chains, Si, is observed. The relative amounts of Sm and Si were found to depend on the relative concentrations of the Pluronic and SWNT. Furthermore, the aggregates formed in the SWNT dispersions do not show the typical increase in chain-end mobility as a function of temperature, observed in the post-CMT regime of the native Pluronic solutions. This suggests a larger dynamical coupling among aggregated chains in the presence of the SWNT as compared to the native micelles. The overall findings are consistent with the formation of a new type of aggregates, composed of a SWNT-polymer hybrid. PMID:18331068

  4. Skyrmion Dynamics in Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy Nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Topological solitons in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) nanostructures have a rich excitation spectrum that is directly linked to their topological properties, as described by their Skyrmion number. They have been predicted to exhibit intriguing dynamics well as ultra-fast switching. We provide here direct imaging of dynamics of PMA topological solitons in CoB/Pt nanostructures with picosecond time resolution, using Scanning Transmission soft X-ray Microscopy. Specifically, we observe breathing-like and translational dynamical behaviour. We thereby establish a link between the dynamics of PMA solitons and their underlying topology, while also providing a much wider scope for dynamical experiments in magnetic elements. (author)

  5. Spacetime anisotropy affects cosmological entanglement

    CERN Document Server

    Pierini, Roberto; Mancini, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Most existing cosmological entanglement studies are focused on the isotropic Robertson-Walker (RW) spacetime. Here we go beyond this limitation and study the influence of anisotropy on entanglement generated by dynamical spacetime. Since the isotropic spacetime is viewed as a background medium and the anisotropy is incorporated as perturbation, we decompose entanglement entropy into isotropic and anisotropic contributions. The latter is shown to be non-negligible by analyzing two cosmological models with weak and conformal coupling. We also show the possibility of using entanglement to infer about universe features.

  6. Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy in CoFeB/Pd Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    COEY, JOHN; FOWLEY, CIARAN; OGUZ, KAAN; Rode, Karsten; Kurt, Huseyin

    2010-01-01

    PUBLISHED Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is observed in ultrathin (0.6 nm) amorphous Co40Fe40B20 when sputtered on an MgO (001) buffer layer and capped with Pd. The layers are superparamagnetic with a blocking temperature of similar to 230 K, below which they show an exponential temperature dependence of coercivity. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy is observed in the as-deposited state and the mechanism is different from that of CoFeB/Pt, which requires postannealing. These ultrathin l...

  7. Electrical conductivity anisotropy in partially molten peridotite under shear deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baohua; Yoshino, Takashi; Yamazaki, Daisuke; Manthilake, Geeth; Katsura, Tomoo

    2014-11-01

    The electrical conductivity of partially molten peridotite was measured during deformation in simple shear at 1 GPa in a DIA type apparatus with a uniaxial deformation facility. To detect development of electrical anisotropy during deformation of partially molten system, the electrical conductivity was measured simultaneously in two directions of three principal axes: parallel and normal to the shear direction on the shear plane, and perpendicular to the shear plane. Impedance spectroscopy measurement was performed at temperatures of 1523 K for Fe-bearing and 1723 K for Fe-free samples, respectively, in a frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 1 MHz. The electrical conductivity of partially molten peridotite parallel to shear direction increased to more than one order of magnitude higher than those normal to shear direction on the shear plane. This conductivity difference is consistent with the magnitude of the conductivity anisotropy observed in the oceanic asthenosphere near the Eastern Pacific Rise. On the other hand, conductivity perpendicular to the shear plane decreased gradually after the initiation of shear and finally achieved a value close to that of olivine. The magnitude and development style of conductivity anisotropy was almost the same for both Fe-bearing and Fe-free melt-bearing systems, and also independent of shear strain. However, such conductivity anisotropy was not developed in melt-free samples during shear deformation, suggesting that the conductivity anisotropy requires a presence of partial melting under shear stress. Microstructural observations of deformed partially molten peridotite samples demonstrated that conductivity anisotropy was attributed to the elongation of melt pockets parallel to the shear direction. Horizontal electrical conductivity anisotropy revealed by magnetotelluric surveys in the oceanic asthenosphere can be well explained by the realignment of partial melt induced by shear stress.

  8. Observational Probes of Cosmic Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Weinberg, David H; Eisenstein, Daniel J; Hirata, Christopher; Riess, Adam G; Rozo, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    The accelerating expansion of the universe is the most surprising cosmological discovery in many decades, implying that the universe is dominated by some form of "dark energy" with exotic physical properties, or that Einstein's theory of gravity breaks down on cosmological scales. The profound implications of cosmic acceleration have inspired ambitious experimental efforts to measure the history of expansion and growth of structure with percent-level precision or higher. We review in detail the four most well established methods for making such measurements: Type Ia supernovae, baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO), weak gravitational lensing, and galaxy clusters. We pay particular attention to the systematic uncertainties in these techniques and to strategies for controlling them at the level needed to exploit "Stage IV" dark energy facilities such as BigBOSS, LSST, Euclid, and WFIRST. We briefly review a number of other approaches including redshift-space distortions, the Alcock-Paczynski test, and direct meas...

  9. Kinematic deprojection and mass inversion of spherical systems of known velocity anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Mamon, Gary A

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, the mass-anisotropy degeneracy inherent in the spherical stationary non-streaming Jeans equation has been handled by assuming a mass profile and fitting models to the observed kinematical data. Here, the opposite approach is considered: The equation of anisotropic kinematic projection is inverted for known arbitrary anisotropy to yield the space radial velocity dispersion profile in terms of an integral involving the radial profiles of anisotropy and of the observational data. Then, through the Jeans equation, the mass profile of a spherical system is derived in terms of double integrals of observable quantities. Single integral formulas are provided for several simple anisotropy models (isotropic, radial, circular, general constant, Osipkov-Merritt, Mamon-Lokas and Diemand-Moore-Stadel). Tests of the mass inversion on NFW models with the first four of these anisotropy models yield accurate results in the case of perfect observational data, and typically better than 70% accurate mass profiles f...

  10. Plasma Membrane Lesions In Anthracycline-Resistant Tumor Cells Probed Using A Fluorescent Dye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Thomas G.; Doroshow, James H.

    1989-06-01

    Human cancer cells selected for resistance to several structurally unrelated cytotoxic drugs are known to display plasma membrane alterations such as amplified levels of a variety of glycoproteins, modifications in lipid composition, alterations in membrane fluidity and increased cellular fragility to osmotic shock. We have studied the plasma membrane fluidity of HL60 human leukemia cells and MCF-7 human breast cancer cells that have been selected for acquired resistance against the cytocidal effects of the anthracycline anticancer drug Adriamycin. Fluidity measurements were accomplished by evaluating the fluorescence anisotropy of the plasma membrane specific probe trimethylamino-1,6-dipihenylhexatriene (TMA.DPH) bound to whole, living cells. TMA.DPH anisotropy values for MCF-7 sensitive and 12-fold resistant cells were 0.306 and 0.285, respectively, while anisotropy values for HL-60 sensitive and 80-fold resistant cells lines were 0.310 and 0.295, respectively. In all cases, cell viability exceeded 97% and anisotropy values were subject to a day-to-day uncertainty of +/-2%. Our results demonstrate that increased plasma membrane fluidity apparently accompanies the development of resistance in both cell lines. Because it is known that increased membrane fluidity results in significantly decreased Adriamycin binding in artificial membrane systems, we propose here that decreased drug associations with fluidized, plasma membrane lipid bilayer regions may be a mechanism which contributes, in part, to the reduced rates of drug accumulation observed in HL60 and MCF-7 cells resistant to Adriamycin.

  11. DFT calculations of magnetic anisotropy energy of Ge1−xMnxTe ferromagnetic semiconductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of the energy of magnetic anisotropy for diluted ferromagnetic semiconductor Ge1−xMnxTe were performed using OpenMX package with fully relativistic pseudopotentials. The influence of hole concentration and magnetic ion neighbourhood on magnetic anisotropy energy is presented. Analysis of microscopic mechanism of magnetic anisotropy is provided, in particular the role of spin–orbit coupling, spin polarization and spatial changes of electron density are discussed. The calculations are in accordance with the experimental observation of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in rhombohedral Ge1−xMnxTe (1 1 1) thin layers. (paper)

  12. Intermediate inflation in light of the three-year WMAP observations

    CERN Document Server

    Barrow, J D; Pahud, C; Barrow, John D; Liddle, Andrew R

    2006-01-01

    The three-year observations from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe have been hailed as giving the first clear indication of a spectral index n_s0 is given (within the slow-roll approximation) by a version of the intermediate inflation model with expansion rate H(t) \\propto t^{-1/3}. We assess the status of this model in light of the WMAP3 data.

  13. Persistent Longitudinal Variations of Plasma Density and DC Electric Fields in the Low Latitude Ionosphere Observed with Probes on the C/NOFS Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, R.; Freudenreich, H.; Klenzing, J.; Rowland, D.; Liebrecht, C.; Bromund, K.; Roddy, P.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous measurements using in situ probes on consecutive orbits of the C/N0FS satellite reveal that the plasma density is persistently organized by longitude, in both day and night conditions and at all locations within the satellite orbit, defined by its perigee and apogee of 401 km and 867 km, respectively, and its inclination of 13 degrees. Typical variations are a factor of 2 or 3 compared to mean values. Furthermore, simultaneous observations of DC electric fields and their associated E x B drifts in the low latitude ionosphere also reveal that their amplitudes are also strongly organized by longitude in a similar fashion. The drift variations with longitude are particularly pronounced in the meridional component perpendicular to the magnetic field although they are also present in the zonal component as well. The longitudes of the peak meridional drift and density values are significantly out of phase with respect to each other. Time constants for the plasma accumulation at higher altitudes with respect to the vertical drift velocity must be taken into account in order to properly interpret the detailed comparisons of the phase relationship of the plasma density and plasma velocity variations. Although for a given period corresponding to that of several days, typically one longitude region dominates the structuring of the plasma density and plasma drift data, there is also evidence for variations organized about multiple longitudes at the same time. Statistical averages will be shown that suggest a tidal "wave 4" structuring is present in both the plasma drift and plasma density data. We interpret the apparent association of the modulation of the E x B drifts with longitude as well as that of the ambient plasma density as a manifestation of tidal forces at work in the low latitude upper atmosphere. The observations demonstrate how the high duty cycle of the C/NOFS observations and its unique orbit expose fundamental processes at work in the low latitude

  14. Exhaustive Study of Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropies in Quintessential Scenarios

    CERN Document Server

    Brax, P; Riazuelo, A; Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jerome; Riazuelo, Alain

    2000-01-01

    Recent high precision measurements of the CMB anisotropies performed by the BOOMERanG and MAXIMA-1 experiments provide an unmatched set of data allowing to probe different cosmological models. Among these scenarios, motivated by the recent measurements of the luminosity distance versus redshift relation for type Ia supernovae, is the quintessence hypothesis. It consists in assuming that the acceleration of the Universe is due to a scalar field whose final evolution is insensitive to the initial conditions. Within this framework we investigate the cosmological perturbations for two well-motivated potentials: the Ratra-Peebles and the SUGRA tracking potentials. We show that the solutions of the perturbed equations possess an attractor and that, as a consequence, the insensitivity to the initial conditions is preserved at the perturbed level. Then, we study the predictions of these two models for structure formation and CMB anisotropies and investigate the general features of the multipole moments in the presenc...

  15. Pump probe spectroscopy of quasiparticle dynamics in cuprate superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pump probe spectroscopy is used to examine the picosecond response of a BSCCO thin film, and two YBCO crystals in the near infrared. The role of pump fluence and temperature have been closely examined in an effort to clarify the mechanism by which the quasiparticles rejoin the condensate. BSCCO results suggest that the recombination behavior is consistent with the d-wave density of states in that quasiparticles appear to relax to the nodes immediately before they rejoin the condensate. The first substantial investigation of polarized pump probe response in detwinned YBCO crystals is also reported. Dramatic doping dependent anisotropies along the a and b axes are observed in time and temperature resolved studies. Among many results, we highlight the discovery of an anomalous temperature and time dependence of a- axis response in optimally doped YBCO. We also report on the first observation of the photoinduced response in a magnetic field. We find the amplitude of the response, and in some cases, the dynamics considerably changed with the application of a 6T field. Finally, we speculate on two of the many theoretical directions stimulated by our results. We find that the two-fluid model suggests a mechanism to explain how changes at very low energies are visible to a high-energy probe. Also discussed are basic recombination processes which may play a role in the observed decay

  16. CMB Anisotropies by Collapsing Textures

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa, Kepa; Urrestilla, Jon

    2013-01-01

    CMB photons passing through a collapsing texture knot receive an energy shift, creating characteristic cold and hot spots on the sky. We calculate the anisotropy pattern produced by collapsing texture knots of arbitrary shape. The texture dynamics are solved numerically on a Minkowski background.

  17. Ultrasonic characterization of CFRP anisotropy

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kling, M.; Tokar, Daniel; Převorovský, Zdeněk

    Praha: ČVUT v Praze, 2015 - (Hobza, T.), s. 71-80 ISBN 978-80-01-05841-1. [Stochastic and Physical Monitoring Systems 2015. Praha (CZ), 22.06.2015-27.06.2015] Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : anisotropy * carbon fiber -reinforced plastic * ultrasonic testing * signal processing Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  18. Fourier-transform infrared anisotropy in cross and parallel sections of tendon and articular cartilage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bidthanapally Aruna

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging (FTIRI is used to investigate the amide anisotropies at different surfaces of a three-dimensional cartilage or tendon block. With the change in the polarization state of the incident infrared light, the resulting anisotropic behavior of the tissue structure is described here. Methods Thin sections (6 μm thick were obtained from three different surfaces of the canine tissue blocks and imaged at 6.25 μm pixel resolution. For each section, infrared imaging experiments were repeated thirteen times with the identical parameters except a 15° increment of the analyzer's angle in the 0° – 180° angular space. The anisotropies of amide I and amide II components were studied in order to probe the orientation of the collagen fibrils at different tissue surfaces. Results For tendon, the anisotropy of amide I and amide II components in parallel sections is comparable to that of regular sections; and tendon's cross sections show distinct, but weak anisotropic behavior for both the amide components. For articular cartilage, parallel sections in the superficial zone have the expected infrared anisotropy that is consistent with that of regular sections. The parallel sections in the radial zone, however, have a nearly isotropic amide II absorption and a distinct amide I anisotropy. Conclusion From the inconsistency in amide anisotropy between superficial to radial zone in parallel section results, a schematic model is used to explain the origins of these amide anisotropies in cartilage and tendon.

  19. Excitonic intraband relaxation and polarization anisotropies in PTCDA on femtosecond and picosecond timescales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on investigations of optical excitations in polycrystalline organic molecular crystals with quasi-1D-stacked crystal structure and negative exciton dispersion. As model system, we choose thin films of the perylene derivative 3,4,9,10-perylenetetracarboxylic dianhydride (PTCDA). Using pump-probe spectroscopy, we show how the relaxation from the absorbing state towards the border of the Brillouin zone occurs on a 120 fs timescale. Time-resolved luminescence anisotropy gives evidence that as a result of the coherent coupling between adjacent stacks, populations of the Davydov-split states that are prepared during photo-excitation relax into the emitting states in less than 5 ps. The behavior of the luminescence anisotropy can be explained by the orientation of the two PTCDA molecules in the unit cell. However, a full understanding of the ultrafast pump-probe anisotropy requires novel explanations beyond current models

  20. Cosmic ray anisotropy and its time variations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic ray anisotropy is analysed on the base of the data of the worldwide network of neutron monitors for the period of 1958-1972. 11-year variation of anisotropy phase and amplitude is investigated. Three-dimensional cosmic ray anisotropy in interplanetary space is calculated. (orig./WBU)

  1. Cosmic microwave anisotropies from BPS semilocal strings

    CERN Document Server

    Urrestilla, Jon; Hindmarsh, Mark; Kunz, Martin; Liddle, Andrew R

    2007-01-01

    We present the first ever calculation of cosmic microwave background CMB anisotropy power spectra from semilocal cosmic strings, obtained via simulations of a classical field theory. Semilocal strings are a type of non-topological defect arising in some models of inflation motivated by fundamental physics, and are thought to relax the constraints on the symmetry breaking scale as compared to models with (topological) cosmic strings. We derive constraints on the model parameters, including the string tension parameter mu, from fits to cosmological data, and find that in this regard BPS semilocal strings resemble textures more than topological strings. The observed microwave anisotropy at l=10 is reproduced if Gmu = 4.9x10^{-6} (G is Newton's constant). However as with other defects the spectral shape does not match observations, and in models with inflationary perturbations plus semilocal strings the 95% confidence level upper bound is Gmu<1.9x10^{-6} when CMB data, Hubble Key Project and Big Bang Nucleosyn...

  2. Global imaging of the Earth's deep interior: seismic constraints on (an)isotropy, density and attenuation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trampert, J.; Fichtner, A.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic tomography is the principal tool to probe the deep interior of the Earth. Models of seismic anisotropy induced by crystal alignment provide insight into the underlying convective motion, and variations of density allow us to discriminate between thermal and compositional heterogeneities. Thi

  3. Anisotropy of magnetoviscous effect in structure-forming ferrofluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreekumari, Aparna; Ilg, Patrick

    2015-07-01

    The magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with change in magnetic field strength, and the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect, change in viscosity with orientation of magnetic field, have been a focus of interest for four decades. A satisfactory understanding of the microscopic origin of anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect in magnetic fluids is still a matter of debate and a field of intense research. Here, we present an extensive simulation study to understand the relation between the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect and the underlying change in microstructures of ferrofluids. Our results indicate that field-induced chainlike structures respond very differently depending on their orientation relative to the direction of an externally applied shear flow, which leads to a pronounced anisotropy of viscosity. In this work, we focus on three exemplary values of dipolar interaction strengths which correspond to weak, intermediate, and strong interactions between dipolar colloidal particles. We compare our simulation results with an experimental study on cobalt-based ferrofluids as well as with an existing theoretical model called the chain model. A nonmonotonic behavior in the anisotropy of the magnetoviscous effect is observed with increasing dipolar interaction strength and is explained in terms of microstructure formation.

  4. Influence of temperature on the Zircaloy-4 plastic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to improve the comportment modelling of PWR fuel pin, and more precisely their canning tubes, Framatome and the CEA have undertake an important study program of Zircaloy-4 mechanical properties. It includes in particular the study of the plasticity between 20 and 400 degree Celsius. This material being not isotropic because of the zirconium hexagonal crystal network and the texture presented by the canning tubes, its plastic anisotropy has been measured. The obtained results for the canning in *slack* and recrystallized before irradiation Zircaloy-4 are presented and the deformation systems able to explain the observed anisotropy is researched. (O.L.). 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  5. Re-entrant behaviour in a random anisotropy magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous Gd7-xDyxNi3 is a model random anisotropy system in which the exchange J can be varied whilst maintaining a constant single ion anisotropy D. Investigation of the magnetic phase diagram as x, and hence D/J, increases reveals a re-entrant transition from correlated speromagnet to speromagnet for x4 the paramagnetic-speromagnetic transition is direct. A multicritical point is observed at x=4, at which the exponent γ increases suddenly from 1.35 to 2. ((orig.))

  6. Friction anisotropy dependence on lattice orientation of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Liu, LianQing; Xi, Ning; Wang, YueChao; Dong, ZaiLi; Wejinya, Uchechukwu C.

    2014-04-01

    The observation of friction anisotropy on graphene by friction measurement at atomic scale has been reported in this paper. Atomic-scale friction measurement revealed friction anisotropy with a periodicity of 60°, which is consistent with the hexagonal periodicity of the graphene. Both experiments and theory show that the value of the friction force is related to the graphene lattice orientation, and the friction force along armchair orientation is also larger than the one along zigzag orientation. These results will play a critical role in the use of graphene to manufacture nanoscale devices.

  7. Probing the high latitude ionosphere from ground-based observations: The state of current knowledge and capabilities during IPY (2007–2009)

    OpenAIRE

    Alfonsi, Lu.; Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Sezione Roma2, Roma, Italia; Kavanagh, A. J.; Space Plasma Environment and Radio Science Group, Department of Communication Systems, InfoLab 21, Lancaster University, Lancaster LA1 4WA, UK; Amata, E.; Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario I.N.A.F., Via del fosso del cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome, Italy; Cilliers, P.; Hermanus Magnetic Observatory (HMO), P.O. Box 32, Hermanus, South Africa; Correia, E.; Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), São José dos Campos, Brazil and Centro de Rádio Astronomia e Astrofísica Mackenzie (CRAAM), Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Rua da Consolação 930, CEP: 01302-907 São Paulo, Brazil; Freeman, M.; British Antarctic Survey, High Cross Madingley Road, Cambridge, UK; Kauristie, K.; Finnish Meteorological Institute, Erik Palménin aukio 1, Helsinki, Finland; Liu, R.; Polar Research Institute of China, Shanghai 200136, China; Luntama, J.-P.; Finnish Meteorological Institute, Erik Palménin aukio 1, Helsinki, Finland; Mitchell, C. N.; Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY, UK; Zherebtsov, G. A.; Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics, Siberian Branch, Russian Academy of Science, Irkutsk, Russia

    2008-01-01

    During the International Polar Year (IPY), one area of great interest is co-coordinated, multi-instrument probing of the ionosphere at high latitudes. This region is important not only for the applications that rely upon our understanding of it, but also because it contains the footprints of processes that have their origin in the interplanetary space. Many different techniques are now available for probing the ionosphere, from radar measurements to the analysis of very low frequency (V...

  8. Jc anisotropy in 122 and 1111 pnictide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have successfully grown epitaxial, superconducting films in two families of iron pnictides, Ba(Fe1-xCox)2As2 (122) and LaFeAs(O1-x,Fx) (1111). Detailed investigations of their critical current density Jc with respect to temperature as well as both the applied magnetic field magnitude and orientation are shown in this contribution. Both films grow very clean and without observable correlated defects parallel to the c-axis, as confirmed by TEM. This is also reflected in the absence of a c-axis peak in Jc(θ). In contrast to cuprate high-Tc superconductors such as YBCO or even Bi2223, the pnictides have very low anisotropies in their Jc(θ) behaviour as well as in their characteristic and critical fields, such as Hirr and Hc2. Both families show the same anisotropy behaviour, 122 having slightly lower anisotropies.

  9. The large scale microwave background anisotropy in decaying particle cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the large-scale anisotropy of the microwave background radiation in cosmological models with decaying particles. The observed value of the quadrupole moment combined with other constraints gives an upper limit on the redshift of the decay z/sub d/ < 3-5. 12 refs., 2 figs

  10. Is inner core seismic anisotropy a marker of plastic flow of cubic iron?

    CERN Document Server

    Lincot, A; Cardin, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates whether observations of seismic anisotropy are compatible with a cubic structure of the inner core Fe alloy. We assume that anisotropy is the result of plastic deformation within a large scale flow induced by preferred growth at the inner core equator. Based on elastic moduli from the literature, bcc- or fcc-Fe produce seismic anisotropy well below seismic observations ($\\textless{}0.4\\%$). A Monte-Carlo approach allows us to generalize this result to any form of elastic anisotropy in a cubic system. Within our model, inner core global anisotropy is not compatible with a cubic structure of Fe alloy. Hence, if the inner core material is indeed cubic, large scale coherent anisotropic structures, incompatible with plastic deformation induced by large scale flow, must be present.

  11. Magnetoresistance Anisotropy in WTe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoutam, Laxman Raju; Wang, Yonglei; Xiao, Zhili; Das, Saptarshi; Luican Mayer, Adina; Divan, Ralu; Crabtree, George W.; Kwok, Wai Kwong

    We report the angle dependence of the magnetoresistance in WTe2. Being a layered material, WTe2 is considered to be electronically two-dimensional (2D). Our results demonstrate that it is in fact 3D with an anisotropy of effective mass as small as 2. We measured the magnetic field dependence of the sample resistance R(H) at various angles between the applied magnetic field with respect to the c-axis of the crystal and found that they can be scaled based on the mass anisotropy, which changes from ~2 to ~5 with decreasing temperature in the Fermi liquid state. We will also discuss the origin of the turn-on temperature behavior in this material.

  12. Microwave Anisotropies from Random Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P G

    1996-01-01

    I report on recent developments in the theory of cosmic background radiation perturbations. I describe ways of modeling alternatives to the canonical Gaussian theories within the standard framework of cosmological perturbation theory. Some comments are made on using these techniques to resolve the uncertainties in theories of structure formation with topological defects. (To appear in the proceedings of the XXXIth Moriond meeting, ``Microwave Background Anisotropies'')

  13. Fine structure constant variation or spacetime anisotropy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent observations on the quasar absorption spectra supply evidence for the variation of the fine structure constant α. In this paper, we propose another interpretation of the observational data on the quasar absorption spectra: a scenario with spacetime inhomogeneity and anisotropy. Maybe the spacetime is characterized by the Finsler geometry instead of the Riemann one. The Finsler geometry admits fewer symmetries than the Riemann geometry does. We investigate the Finslerian geodesic equations in the Randers spacetime (a special Finsler spacetime). It is found that the cosmological redshift in this spacetime deviates from the one in general relativity. The modification term to the redshift could be generally revealed as a monopole plus dipole function of spacetime locations and directions. We suggest that this modification corresponds to the spatial monopole and dipole of α variation in the quasar absorption spectra. (orig.)

  14. Probing magnetochirality

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rupamanjari Ghosh

    2002-08-01

    Magnetochiral anisotropy refers to the phenomenon that when light is passed through a chiral medium placed in an external magnetic field, the refractive index, or equivalently, the absorption encountered by the light differs depending on whether it travels parallel or antiparallel to the magnetic field. It is a very small effect, the change in refractive index because of this effect alone being of the order of 10-11. This effect has recently been measured in an active ring laser interferometer in which the detection scheme convincingly eliminates the contributions from natural optical activity, the Faraday effect and other stray anisotropies in the system. The phenomenon is important in the context of fundamental interactions between light and matter and the governing symmetry principles, and also in biochemistry as one possible explanation for the homochirality of life.

  15. Dark matter and Modified Newtonian Dynamics in a sample of high-redshift galaxy clusters observed with Chandra

    OpenAIRE

    Blaksley, Carl; Bonamente, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    We compare the measurement of the gravitational mass of 38 high-redshift galaxy clusters observed by Chandra using Modified Newtonian Dynamics (MOND) and standard Newtonian gravity. Our analysis confirms earlier findings that MOND cannot explain the difference between the baryonic mass and the total mass inferred from the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium. We also find that the baryon fraction at $r_{2500}$ using MOND is consistent with the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) valu...

  16. Anisotropy effects in magnetic hyperthermia: A comparison between spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khurshid, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu; Nemati, Z.; Phan, M. H.; Mukherjee, P.; Srikanth, H., E-mail: khurshid@usf.edu, E-mail: sharihar@usf.edu [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); Alonso, J. [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33620 (United States); BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Fdez-Gubieda, M. L.; Barandiarán, J. M. [BCMaterials Edificio No. 500, Parque Tecnológico de Vizcaya, Derio 48160 (Spain); Depto. Electricidad y Electrónica, Universidad del País Vasco, Leioa 48940 (Spain)

    2015-05-07

    Spherical and cubic exchange-coupled FeO/Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles, with different FeO:Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} ratios, have been prepared by a thermal decomposition method to probe anisotropy effects on their heating efficiency. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy reveal that the nanoparticles are composed of FeO and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} phases, with an average size of ∼20 nm. Magnetometry and transverse susceptibility measurements show that the effective anisotropy field is 1.5 times larger for the cubes than for the spheres, while the saturation magnetization is 1.5 times larger for the spheres than for the cubes. Hyperthermia experiments evidence higher values of the specific absorption rate (SAR) for the cubes as compared to the spheres (200 vs. 135 W/g at 600 Oe and 310 kHz). These observations point to an important fact that the saturation magnetization is not a sole factor in determining the SAR and the heating efficiency of the magnetic nanoparticles can be improved by tuning their effective anisotropy.

  17. Characteristics of trapped proton anisotropy at Space Station Freedom altitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, T. W.; Colborn, B. L.; Watts, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    The ionizing radiation dose for spacecraft in low-Earth orbit (LEO) is produced mainly by protons trapped in the Earth's magnetic field. Current data bases describing this trapped radiation environment assume the protons to have an isotropic angular distribution, although the fluxes are actually highly anisotropic in LEO. The general nature of this directionality is understood theoretically and has been observed by several satellites. The anisotropy of the trapped proton exposure has not been an important practical consideration for most previous LEO missions because the random spacecraft orientation during passage through the radiation belt 'averages out' the anisotropy. Thus, in spite of the actual exposure anisotropy, cumulative radiation effects over many orbits can be predicted as if the environment were isotropic when the spacecraft orientation is variable during exposure. However, Space Station Freedom will be gravity gradient stabilized to reduce drag, and, due to this fixed orientation, the cumulative incident proton flux will remain anisotropic. The anisotropy could potentially influence several aspects of Space Station design and operation, such as the appropriate location for radiation sensitive components and experiments, location of workstations and sleeping quarters, and the design and placement of radiation monitors. Also, on-board mass could possible be utilized to counteract the anisotropy effects and reduce the dose exposure. Until recently only omnidirectional data bases for the trapped proton environment were available. However, a method to predict orbit-average, angular dependent ('vector') trapped proton flux spectra has been developed from the standard omnidirectional trapped proton data bases. This method was used to characterize the trapped proton anisotropy for the Space Station orbit (28.5 degree inclination, circular) in terms of its dependence on altitude, solar cycle modulation (solar minimum vs. solar maximum), shielding thickness

  18. Seismic anisotropy in granite at the Underground Research Laboratory, Manitoba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Shear-Wave Experiment at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory was probably the first controlled-source shear-wave survey in a mine environment. Taking place in conjunction with the excavation of the Mine-by test tunnel at 420 m depth, the shear-wave experiment was designed to measure the in situ anisotropy of the rockmass and to use shear waves to observe excavation effects using the greatest variety of raypath directions of any in situ shear-wave survey to date. Inversion of the shear-wave polarizations shows that the anisotropy of the in situ rockmass is consistent with hexagonal symmetry with an approximate fabric orientation of strike 023degree and dip 35degree. The in situ anisotropy is probably due to microcracks with orientations governed by the in situ stress field and to mineral alignment within the weak gneissic layering. However, there is no unique interpretation as to the cause of the in situ anisotropy as the fabric orientation agrees approximately with both the orientation expected from extensive-dilatancy anisotropy and that of the gneissic layering. Eight raypaths with shear waves propagating wholly or almost wholly through granodiorite, rather than granite, do not show the expected shear-wave splitting and indicate a lower in situ anisotropy, which may be due to the finer grain size and/or the absence of gneissic layering within the granodiorite. These results suggest that shear waves may be used to determine crack and mineral orientations and for remote monitoring of a rockmass. This has potential applications in mining and waste monitoring

  19. Communication: nanosecond folding dynamics of an alpha helix: time-dependent 2D-IR cross peaks observed using polarization-sensitive dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R; van Dijk, Chris N; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Woutersen, S

    2015-01-28

    We present a simple method to measure the dynamics of cross peaks in time-resolved two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy. By combining suitably weighted dispersed pump-probe spectra, we eliminate the diagonal contribution to the 2D-IR response, so that the dispersed pump-probe signal contains the projection of only the cross peaks onto one of the axes of the 2D-IR spectrum. We apply the method to investigate the folding dynamics of an alpha-helical peptide in a temperature-jump experiment and find characteristic folding and unfolding time constants of 260 ± 30 and 580 ± 70 ns at 298 K. PMID:25637962

  20. Communication: Nanosecond folding dynamics of an alpha helix: Time-dependent 2D-IR cross peaks observed using polarization-sensitive dispersed pump-probe spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panman, Matthijs R.; van Dijk, Chris N.; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Woutersen, S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method to measure the dynamics of cross peaks in time-resolved two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy. By combining suitably weighted dispersed pump-probe spectra, we eliminate the diagonal contribution to the 2D-IR response, so that the dispersed pump-probe signal contains the projection of only the cross peaks onto one of the axes of the 2D-IR spectrum. We apply the method to investigate the folding dynamics of an alpha-helical peptide in a temperature-jump experiment and find characteristic folding and unfolding time constants of 260 ± 30 and 580 ± 70 ns at 298 K.

  1. Heliospheric influence on the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a theory of using Liouville's theorem to map the anisotropy of TeV cosmic rays seen at Earth using the particle distribution function in the local interstellar medium (LISM). The ultimate source of cosmic ray anisotropy is the energy, pitch angle, and spatial dependence of the cosmic ray distribution function in the LISM. Because young nearby cosmic ray sources can make a special contribution to the cosmic ray anisotropy, the anisotropy depends on the source age, distance and magnetic connection, and particle diffusion of these cosmic rays, all of which make the anisotropy sensitive to the particle energy. When mapped through the magnetic and electric field of a magnetohydrodynamic model heliosphere, the large-scale dipolar and bidirectional interstellar anisotropy patterns become distorted if they are seen from Earth, resulting in many small structures in the observations. Best fits to cosmic ray anisotropy measurements have allowed us to estimate the particle density gradient and pitch angle anisotropies in the LISM. It is found that the heliotail, hydrogen deflection plane, and the plane perpendicular to the LISM magnetic field play a special role in distorting cosmic ray anisotropy. These features can lead to an accurate determination of the LISM magnetic field direction and polarity. The effects of solar cycle variation, the Sun's coronal magnetic field, and turbulence in the LISM and heliospheric magnetic fields are minor but clearly visible at a level roughly equal to a fraction of the overall anisotropy amplitude. The heliospheric influence becomes stronger at lower energies. Below 1 TeV, the anisotropy is dominated by small-scale patterns produced by disturbances in the heliosphere

  2. On Temporal Variations of the Multi-TeV Cosmic Ray Anisotropy using the Tibet III Air Shower Array

    CERN Document Server

    Amenomori, M; Chen, D; Cui, S W; Danzengluobu,; Ding, L K; Ding, X H; Fan, C; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Z Y; Gao, X Y; Geng, Q X; Gou, Q B; Guo, H W; He, H H; He, M; Hibino, K; Hotta, N; Hu, Haibing; Hu, H B; Huang, J; Huang, Q; Jia, H Y; Jiang, L; Kajino, F; Kasahara, K; Katayose, Y; Kato, C; Kawata, K; Labaciren,; Le, G M; Li, A F; Li, H C; Li, J Y; Liu, C; Lou, Y -Q; Lu, H; Meng, X R; Mizutani, K; Mu, J; Munakata, K; Nagai, A; Nanjo, H; Nishizawa, M; Ohnishi, M; Ohta, I; Ozawa, S; Saito, T; Saito, T Y; Sakata, M; Sako, T K; Shibata, M; Shiomi, A; Shirai, T; Sugimoto, H; Takita, M; Tan, Y H; Tateyama, N; Torii, S; Tsuchiya, H; Udo, S; Wang, B; Wang, H; Wang, Y; Wang, Y G; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yamamoto, Y; Yan, C T; Yang, X C; Yasue, S; Ye, Z H; Yu, G C; Yuan, A F; Yuda, T; Zhang, H M; Zhang, J L; Zhang, N J; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Ying; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the large-scale two-dimensional sidereal anisotropy of multi-TeV cosmic rays by Tibet Air Shower Array, with the data taken from 1999 November to 2008 December. To explore temporal variations of the anisotropy, the data set is divided into nine intervals, each in a time span of about one year. The sidereal anisotropy of magnitude about 0.1% appears fairly stable from year to year over the entire observation period of nine years. This indicates that the anisotropy of TeV Galactic cosmic rays remains insensitive to solar activities since the observation period covers more than a half of the 23rd solar cycle.

  3. Exotic skyrmion crystals in chiral magnets with compass anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. P.; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, J. -M.

    2016-01-01

    The compass-type anisotropy appears naturally in diverse physical contexts with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) such as transition metal oxides and cold atomic gases etc, and it has been receiving substantial attention. Motivated by recent studies and particularly recent experimental observations on helimagnet MnGe, we investigate the critical roles of this compass-type anisotropy in modulating various spin textures of chiral magnets with strong SOC, by Monte Carlo simulations based on a classical Heisenberg spin model with Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and compass anisotropy. A phase diagram with emergent spin orders in the space of compass anisotropy and out-of-plane magnetic field is presented. In this phase diagram, we propose that a hybrid super-crystal structure consisting of alternating half-skyrmion and half-anti-skyrmion is the possible zero-field ground state of MnGe. The simulated evolution of the spin structure driven by magnetic field is in good accordance with experimental observations on MnGe. Therefore, this Heisenberg spin model successfully captures the main physics responsible for the magnetic structures in MnGe, and the present work may also be instructive to research on the magnetic states in other systems with strong SOC. PMID:27377149

  4. Exotic skyrmion crystals in chiral magnets with compass anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. P.; Zhang, Dan-Wei; Liu, J.-M.

    2016-07-01

    The compass-type anisotropy appears naturally in diverse physical contexts with strong spin-orbit coupling (SOC) such as transition metal oxides and cold atomic gases etc, and it has been receiving substantial attention. Motivated by recent studies and particularly recent experimental observations on helimagnet MnGe, we investigate the critical roles of this compass-type anisotropy in modulating various spin textures of chiral magnets with strong SOC, by Monte Carlo simulations based on a classical Heisenberg spin model with Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and compass anisotropy. A phase diagram with emergent spin orders in the space of compass anisotropy and out-of-plane magnetic field is presented. In this phase diagram, we propose that a hybrid super-crystal structure consisting of alternating half-skyrmion and half-anti-skyrmion is the possible zero-field ground state of MnGe. The simulated evolution of the spin structure driven by magnetic field is in good accordance with experimental observations on MnGe. Therefore, this Heisenberg spin model successfully captures the main physics responsible for the magnetic structures in MnGe, and the present work may also be instructive to research on the magnetic states in other systems with strong SOC.

  5. Variability of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultrarelativistic electrons during and following intense geomagnetic storms: Van Allen Probes observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Z.; Ni, B.; Gu, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhou, C.

    2015-12-01

    Fifteen month of pitch angle resolved Van Allen Probes Relativistic Electron-Proton Telescope (REPT) measurements of differential electron flux are analyzed to investigate the characteristics of the pitch angle distribution of radiation belt ultrarelativistic(> 2 MeV) electrons during storm conditions and during the long-storm decay. By modeling the ultrarelativistic electron pitch angle distribution as ,where is the equatorial pitch angle we examine the spatiotemporal variations of n value. The results show that in general n values increases with the level of geomagnetic activity. In principle the ultrarelativistic electrons respond to geomagnetic storms by becoming peaked at 90° pitch angle with n-values of 2 - 3 as a supportive signature of chorus acceleration outside the plasmasphere. High n-values also exists inside the plasmasphere, being localized adjacent to the plasmapause and energy dependent, which suggests a significant contribution from electronmagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves scattering. During quiet periods, n values generally evolve to become small, i.e., 0-1. The slow and long-term decays of the ultrarelativistic electrons after geomagnetic storms, while prominent, produce energy and L-shell-dependent decay time scales in association with the solar and geomagnetic activity and wave-particle interaction processes. At lower L shells inside the plasmasphere, the decay time scales for electrons at REPT energies are generally larger, varying from tens of days to hundreds of days, which can be mainly attributed to the combined effect of hiss-induced pitch angle scattering and inward radial diffusion. As L shell increases to L~3.5, a narrow region exists (with a width of ~0.5 L), where the observed ultrarelativistic electrons decay fastest, possibly resulting from efficient EMIC wave scattering. As L shell continues to increase, generally becomes larger again, indicating an overall slower loss process by waves at high L shells. Our investigation based

  6. IMPRINT OF A 2 MILLION YEAR OLD SOURCE ON THE COSMIC-RAY ANISOTROPY

    OpenAIRE

    Savchenko, V.; Kachelrieß, M; Semikoz, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    We study numerically the anisotropy of the cosmic ray (CR) flux emitted by a single source calculating the trajectories of individual CRs. We show that the contribution of a single source to the observed anisotropy is determined solely by the fraction the source contributes to the total CR intensity, its age and its distance, and does not depend on the CR energy at late times. Therefore the observation of a constant dipole anisotropy indicates that a single source dominates the CR flux in the...

  7. Comparison of cerebral oxygen saturation in premature infants by near-infrared spatially resolved spectroscopy: observations on probe-dependent bias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Line C; Leung, Terence S; Greisen, Gorm

    2008-01-01

    oxygenation index (c-TOI) was measured using NIRO 300 (Hamamatsu Photonics KK). c-TOI was measured at several positions in each infant. c-TOI varied over time, increasing in the first third and decreasing in the last third of the study period (p<10(-6)). Two probes were used in the study, and a highly...

  8. CMB Anisotropies from a Gradient Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad

    2014-01-01

    A pure gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect at linear level. We confirm this by showing that its contribution to the dipolar power asymmetry of CMB anisotropies vanishes, if Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To this end, the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit is extended to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. At second order, a gradient mode generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce a quadrupole moment. For instance in a matter-dominated model it is equal to 5/18 times the square of the linear gradient part. This quadrupole can be cancelled by superposing a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a non-linear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  9. Lichtinduzierte Generierung und Charakterisierung optischer Anisotropie

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Carl Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Eine Nutzung der optischen Anisotropie dünner Schichten ist vor allem für die Displaytechnologie, die optische Datenspeicherung und für optische Sicherheitselemente von hoher Bedeutung. Diese Doktorarbeit befasst sich mit theoretischen und experimentellen Untersuchung von dreidimensionaler Anisotropie und dabei insbesondere mit der Untersuchung von lichtinduzierter dreidimensionaler Anisotropie in organischen dünnen Polymer-Schichten. Die gewonnenen Erkentnisse und entwickelten Methoden könne...

  10. Seismic Anisotropy in the Deep Mantle, Boundary Layers and the Geometry of Mantle Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karato, S.

    An attempt is made to explore the geodynamical significance of seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle on the basis of mineral physics. The mineral physics observations used include the effects of deformation mechanisms on lattice and shape preferred orientation, the effects of pressure on elastic anisotropy and the nature of lattice preferred orientation in deep mantle minerals in dislocation creep regime. Many of these issues are still poorly constrained, but a review of recent results shows that it is possible to interpret deep mantle seismic anisotropy in a unified fashion, based on the solid state processes without invoking partial melting. The key notions are (i) the likely regional variation in the magnitude of anisotropy as deformation mechanisms change from dislocation to diffusion creep (or superplasticity), associated with a change in the stress level and/or grain-size in the convecting mantle with a high Rayleigh number, and (ii) the change in elastic anisotropy with pressure in major mantle minerals, particularly in (Mg, Fe)O. The results provide the following constraints on the style of mantle convection (i) the SH > SV anisotropy in the bottom transition zone and the SV > SH anisotropy in the top lower mantle can be attributed to anisotropy structures (lattice preferred orientation and/or laminated structures) caused by the horizontal flow in this depth range, suggesting the presence of a mid-mantle boundary layer due to (partially) layered convection, (ii) the observed no significant seismic anisotropy in the deep mantle near subduction zones implies that deformation associated with subducting slabs is due mostly to diffusion creep (or superplasticity) and therefore slabs are weak in the deep mantle and hence easily deformed when encountered with resistance forces, and (iii) the SH > SV anisotropy in the cold thick portions of the D" layer is likely to be due to horizontally aligned shape preferred orientation in perovskite plus magnesiow

  11. Modeling of current characteristics of segmented Langmuir probe on DEMETER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imtiaz, Nadia; Marchand, Richard [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E1 (Canada); Lebreton, Jean-Pierre [Laboratoire de Physique et Chimie de l' Environnement et de l' Espace (LPC2E), CNRS-Université d' Orléans, Orléans Cedex (France)

    2013-05-15

    We model the current characteristics of the DEMETER Segmented Langmuir probe (SLP). The probe is used to measure electron density and temperature in the ionosphere at an altitude of approximately 700 km. It is also used to measure the plasma flow velocity in the satellite frame of reference. The probe is partitioned into seven collectors: six electrically insulated spherical segments and a guard electrode (the rest of the sphere and the small post). Comparisons are made between the predictions of the model and DEMETER measurements for actual ionospheric plasma conditions encountered along the satellite orbit. Segment characteristics are computed numerically with PTetra, a three-dimensional particle in cell simulation code. In PTetra, space is discretized with an unstructured tetrahedral mesh, thus, enabling a good representation of the probe geometry. The model also accounts for several physical effects of importance in the interaction of spacecraft with the space environment. These include satellite charging, photoelectron, and secondary electron emissions. The model is electrostatic, but it accounts for the presence of a uniform background magnetic field. PTetra simulation results show different characteristics for the different probe segments. The current collected by each segment depends on its orientation with respect to the ram direction, the plasma composition, the magnitude, and the orientation of the magnetic field. It is observed that the presence of light H{sup +} ions leads to a significant increase in the ion current branch of the I-V curves of the negatively polarized SLP. The effect of the magnetic field is demonstrated by varying its magnitude and direction with respect to the reference magnetic field. It is found that the magnetic field appreciably affects the electron current branch of the I-V curves of certain segments on the SLP, whereas the ion current branch remains almost unaffected. PTetra simulations are validated by comparing the computed

  12. The emission anisotropy of isolated K MO transitions in 40 MeV Ni+Ni collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The emission anisotropy of isolated MO transitions was measured for the first time in 40 MeV Ni+Ni collisions by detecting K MO x-rays, emitted at 90deg and 0deg with respect to the beam direction, in coincidence with characteristic Ni K x-rays. A tenfold increase in the anisotropy was observed for the selected transitions over that associated with the total spectrum. Recent calculations agree with this large anisotropy. (author)

  13. Anomalous Nernst Effect with Magnetocrystalline Anisotropy (110)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesman, Carlos; Costa Neto, Jose; Department of Physics-UFRN Team

    2014-03-01

    When a ferromagnetic material is submitted to a temperature gradient and the magnetic field generates voltage on the edges of the samples, this is called the Anomalous Nernst Effect (ANE). The Heusler alloys that currently exhibit this effect are the most promising for spintronics and spin caloritronics. In this study we perform a theoretical investigation of voltage curves associated to the ANE, when the material displays magnetocrystalline anisotropy for experimental results in two configurations, ANE versus applied magnetic field and planar angle variations of ANE. We analyzed three types of magnetocrystalline anisotropy: cubic anisotropy (100) with C4 symmetry, uniaxial anisotropy with C2 symmetry and cubic anisotropy (110). The aim was to prove that cubic anisotropy (110) is equivalent to anisotropy (100) combined with uniaxial anisotropy. Theoretical fitting of experimental ANE data demonstrates this total equivalence and that a new interpretation with the use of cubic anisotropy (110) may be due to the atomic arrangement of the so-called full-Heusler. Comparative analyses of Co2FeAl and Co2MnGe alloys will be presented. CNPq, CAPES, FAPERN.

  14. The regimes of the East-West and the radial anisotropies of cosmic rays in the heliosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observations obtained over the last 23 y suggest that there are two distinct physical states of the heliosphere. One state covers the period 1957-70 when the diurnal anisotropy consists of the azimuthal component only. One may define this period as the regime of the East-West (co-rotation) anisotropy. The period 1971-79 is characterized by the appearance of a radial anisotropy, which attains a maximum amplitude in 1976, when the solar activity is minimum. There appears to exist an inverse correlation between the amplitude of the radial anisotropy and solar activity. The amplitude of the East-West anisotropy varies with time during this latter period and may also be rigidity-dependent. In 1976 the amplitude of the East-West anisotropy is zero for the underground muon data obtained at Embudo and has a lower value for the neutron monitor data obtained at Deep River. On the other hand, the amplitude of the radial anisotropy depends weakly upon the primary rigidity. The period 1971-79 thus defines the regime of the radial anisotropy. The physical state of the heliosphere is very stable during the regime of the East-West anisotropy and extremely dynamic during the regime of the radial anisotropy. The heliosphere appears to switch from one physical state to another following the onset of the solar polar field reversal. (author)

  15. Large-Angular Scales CMB Anisotropy from Excited Initial Mode

    CERN Document Server

    Sojasi, A; Yusofi, E

    2015-01-01

    According to the inflationary cosmology, the CMB anisotropy gives an opportunity to test predictions of the new physics hypothesis. Initial state of quantum fluctuations is one of the important options at high energy scale, which can affect on the observables such as CMB power spectrum. In this study a quasi-de Sitter inflationary background with approximate de Sitter mode function built over the Bunch-Davies mode is applied to investigate the scale-dependency of the CMB anisotropy. Indeed, considering the recent Planck constraint on spectral index, motivated us to examine the effect of new excited mode function (instead of pure de Sitter mode) on the CMB anisotropy in large-angular scales. In so doing, it was revealed that the angular scale-invariance in the CMB temperature fluctuations is broken and in the limit $ \\ell<200 $ the tiny deviation is appeared. Also, it was shown that the power spectrum of CMB anisotropy is dependent on the slow-roll parameter $\\epsilon $.

  16. Large-Angular-Scale Anisotropy in the Cosmic Background Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorenstein, M. V.; Smoot, G. F.

    1980-05-01

    We report the results of an extended series of airborne measurements of large-angular-scale anisotropy in the 3 K cosmic background radiation. Observations were carried out with a dual-antenna microwave radiometer operating at 33 GHz (.089 cm wavelength) flown on board a U-2 aircraft to 20 km altitude. In eleven flights, between December 1976 and May 1978, the radiometer measured differential intensity between pairs of directions distributed over most of the northern hemisphere with an rms sensitivity of 47 mK Hz{sup 1�}. The measurements how clear evidence of anisotropy that is readily interpreted as due to the solar motion relative to the sources of the radiation. The anisotropy is well fit by a first order spherical harmonic of amplitude 360{+ or -}50km sec{sup -1} toward the direction 11.2{+ or -}0.5 hours of right ascension and 19 {+ or -}8 degrees declination. A simultaneous fit to a combined hypotheses of dipole and quadrupole angular distributions places a 1 mK limit on the amplitude of most components of quadrupole anisotropy with 90% confidence. Additional analysis places a 0.5 mK limit on uncorrelated fluctuations (sky-roughness) in the 3 K background on an angular scale of the antenna beam width, about 7 degrees.

  17. Anisotropy signature in reverse-time migration extended images

    KAUST Repository

    Sava, Paul C.

    2014-11-04

    Reverse-time migration can accurately image complex geologic structures in anisotropic media. Extended images at selected locations in the Earth, i.e., at common-image-point gathers, carry rich information to characterize the angle-dependent illumination and to provide measurements for migration velocity analysis. However, characterizing the anisotropy influence on such extended images is a challenge. Extended common-image-point gathers are cheap to evaluate since they sample the image at sparse locations indicated by the presence of strong reflectors. Such gathers are also sensitive to velocity error that manifests itself through moveout as a function of space and time lags. Furthermore, inaccurate anisotropy leaves a distinctive signature in common-image-point gathers, which can be used to evaluate anisotropy through techniques similar to the ones used in conventional wavefield tomography. It specifically admits a V-shaped residual moveout with the slope of the "V" flanks depending on the anisotropic parameter η regardless of the complexity of the velocity model. It reflects the fourth-order nature of the anisotropy influence on moveout as it manifests itself in this distinct signature in extended images after handling the velocity properly in the imaging process. Synthetic and real data observations support this assertion.

  18. DNA probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The creation of DNA probes for detection of specific nucleotide segments differs from ligand detection in that it is a chemical rather than an immunological reaction. Complementary DNA or RNA is used in place of the antibody and is labelled with 32P. So far, DNA probes have been successfully employed in the diagnosis of inherited disorders, infectious diseases, and for identification of human oncogenes. The latest approach to the diagnosis of communicable and parasitic infections is based on the use of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) probes. The genetic information of all cells is encoded by DNA and DNA probe approach to identification of pathogens is unique because the focus of the method is the nucleic acid content of the organism rather than the products that the nucleic acid encodes. Since every properly classified species has some unique nucleotide sequences that distinguish it from every other species, each organism's genetic composition is in essence a finger print that can be used for its identification. In addition to this specificity, DNA probes offer other advantages in that pathogens may be identified directly in clinical specimens

  19. Determining the Mechanism of Seismic Anisotropy at Volcanoes: Focus on Tungurahua Volcano, Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. H.; Palacios, P.; Kendall, M.; Mader, H. M.

    2014-12-01

    The measurement of seismic anisotropy using the method of shear wave splitting (SWS) has potential as a stress monitoring tool at volcanoes and is increasingly being used by researchers. Even though anisotropy, caused by preferentially aligned microcracks, can be a valid proxy for determining the stress regime in the subsurface, there are many other reasons that SWS may be observed. Anisotropy in the crust may be due to aligned macroscopic fractures, layering, or aligned minerals. Apparent SWS may also be observed due to site effects and phase conversions near the surface. Temporal changes in SWS may be an artefact of migrating sources passing through a heterogeneous anisotropic field. At Tungurahua Volcano in Ecuador, we have analysed SWS from local VT earthquakes from 2008 to 2012, spanning the onset of major eruptive activity in 2010. We have found significant site effects at several of the seismic stations, and corrections indicate how influential these effects can be. We explore both lateral and vertical variation in anisotropy, before targeting temporal variations associated with volcanic activity. Comparison with local geology and ground deformation allows us to identify regions where seismic anisotropy is controlled by local stress and is likely to change due to volcanic activity. Preliminary results suggest that apparent temporal changes in SWS measurements are due to sampling regions controlled by different mechanisms of anisotropy, demonstrating how important it is to identify the cause of anisotropy before seeking temporal variations caused by changing stress.

  20. Measuring nanoscale forces with living probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olof, S N; Grieve, J A; Phillips, D B; Rosenkranz, H; Yallop, M L; Miles, M J; Patil, A J; Mann, S; Carberry, D M

    2012-11-14

    Optical trapping techniques have been used to investigate fundamental biological processes ranging from the identification of the processive mechanisms of kinesin and myosin to understanding the mechanics of DNA. To date, these investigations have relied almost exclusively on the use of isotropic probes based on colloidal microspheres. However, there are many potential advantages in utilizing more complex probe morphologies: use of multiple trapping points enables control of the interaction volume; increasing the distance between the optical trap and the sample minimizes photodamage in sensitive biological materials; and geometric anisotropy introduces the potential for asymmetric surface chemistry and multifunctional probes. Here we demonstrate that living cells of the freshwater diatom Nitzschia subacicularis Hustedt can be exploited as advanced probes for holographic optical tweezing applications. We characterize the optical and material properties associated with the high shape anisotropy of the silica frustule, examine the trapping behavior of the living algal cells, and demonstrate how the diatoms can be calibrated for use as force sensors and as force probes in the presence of rat B-cell hybridoma (11B11) cells. PMID:23092335

  1. Crystal growth and anisotropy of high temperature thermoelectric properties of yttrium borosilicide single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, M. Anwar; Tanaka, Isao; Tanaka, Takaho; Khan, A. Ullah; Mori, Takao

    2016-01-01

    We studied thermoelectric properties of YB41Si1.3 single crystals grown by the floating zone method. The composition of the grown crystal was confirmed by electron probe micro-analysis. We have determined the growth direction for the first time for these borosilicides, and discovered relatively large anisotropy in electrical properties. We measured the electrical resistivity and Seebeck coefficient along [510] (the growth direction) and [052] directions and we found that this crystal exhibits strong electrical anisotropy with a maximum of more than 8 times. An interesting layered structural feature is revealed along [510] with dense boron cluster layers and yttrium layers, with conductivity enhanced along this direction. We obtained 3.6 times higher power factor along [510] compared to that along [052]. Although the ZT of the present system is low, anisotropy in the thermoelectric properties of a boride was reported for the first time, and can be a clue in developing other boride systems also.

  2. Vertical seismic profile at Pike's Peak, Saskatchewan, Canada: turning rays and velocity anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newrick, Rachel T.; Lawton, Don C.

    2003-12-01

    First-arrival traveltimes from a multi-offset vertical seismic profile (VSP) were used to estimate velocity anisotropy in the presence of a vertical velocity gradient. A numerical model consisting of two layers with vertical velocity gradients of 3.1 and 1.2 s-1, respectively, and global anisotropy parameters of ε=0.12±0.02 and δ=0.30±0.06 yielded first-arrival traveltimes that matched the observed traveltimes well. Shallow receivers were found to be crucial for constraining the vertical velocity field and for determining the parameters of anisotropy at depth.

  3. Fluorescence anisotropy of acridinedione dyes in glycerol: Prolate model of ellipsoid

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V K Indirapriyadharshini; P Ramamurthy

    2007-03-01

    Time-dependent reorientations of resorcinol-based acridinidione (ADR) dyes in glycerol were studied using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence studies. The difference between fluorescence anisotropy decays recorded at 460 nm when exciting at 250 nm and those obtained when exciting at 394 nm are reported. When exciting at 394 nm, the fluorescence anisotropy decay is bi-exponential, while on exciting at 250 nm a mono-exponential fluorescence anisotropy decay is observed. We interpret this in terms of different directions of the absorption dipole at 394 and 250 nm with the emission dipole respectively, which is experimentally validated and further analysed as a prolate model of ellipsoid.

  4. Direct observation of potential profiles with a 200 keV heavy ion beam probe and evaluation of loss cone structure in toroidal helical plasmas on the Compact Helical System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents direct experimental observations of potential profiles of a toroidal helical plasma in the Compact Helical System, using a 200 keV heavy ion beam probe. Electron cyclotron heated plasmas show a positive potential profile in a low density regime (n-bare = 3x1012 cm-3), while neutral beam injection heated plasmas (n-bare = 8x1012 cm-3) exhibit a negative potential profile. A loss cone structure evaluated from the observed potential is discussed to understand the behavior of high energy particle in a toroidal helical plasma. (author)

  5. Monte Carlo simulations of medium-scale CMB anisotropy

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, A J

    1996-01-01

    Recent detections of cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy at half-degree angular scales show considerable scatter in the reported amplitude even at similar angular resolution. We use Monte Carlo techniques to simulate the current set of medium-scale CMB observations, including all relevant aspects of sky coverage and measurement technique. The scatter in the reported amplitudes is well within the range expected for the standard cold dark matter (CDM) cosmological model, and results primarily from the restricted sky coverage of each experiment. Within the context of standard CDM current observations of CMB anisotropy support the detection of a ``Doppler peak'' in the CMB power spectrum consistent with baryon density 0.01 < Omega_b < 0.13 (95% confidence) for Hubble constant H_0 = 50 km/s/Mpc. The uncertainties are approximately evenly divided between instrument noise and cosmic variance arising from the limited sky coverage.

  6. Non-elliptic wavevector anisotropy for magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Y.

    2015-11-01

    A model of non-elliptic wavevector anisotropy is developed for the inertial-range spectrum of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence and is presented in the two-dimensional wavevector domain spanning the directions parallel and perpendicular to the mean magnetic field. The non-elliptic model is a variation of the elliptic model with different scalings along the parallel and the perpendicular components of the wavevectors to the mean magnetic field. The non-elliptic anisotropy model reproduces the smooth transition of the power-law spectra from an index of -2 in the parallel projection with respect to the mean magnetic field to an index of -5/3 in the perpendicular projection observed in solar wind turbulence, and is as competitive as the critical balance model to explain the measured frequency spectra in the solar wind. The parameters in the non-elliptic spectrum model are compared with the solar wind observations.

  7. Small-angle CMB temperature anisotropies induced by cosmic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We use Nambu-Goto numerical simulations to compute the cosmic microwave background (CMB) temperature anisotropies induced at arcminute angular scales by a network of cosmic strings in a Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) expanding universe. We generate 84 statistically independent maps on a 7.2 deg. field of view, which we use to derive basic statistical estimators such as the one-point distribution and two-point correlation functions. At high multipoles, the mean angular power spectrum of string-induced CMB temperature anisotropies can be described by a power law slowly decaying as l-p, with p=0.889 (+0.001,-0.090) (including only systematic errors). Such a behavior suggests that a nonvanishing string contribution to the overall CMB anisotropies may become the dominant source of fluctuations at small angular scales. We therefore discuss how well the temperature gradient magnitude operator can trace strings in the context of a typical arcminute diffraction-limited experiment. Including both the thermal and nonlinear kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effects, the Ostriker-Vishniac effect, and the currently favored adiabatic primary anisotropies, we find that, on such a map, strings should be 'eye visible', with at least of order ten distinctive string features observable on a 7.2 deg. gradient map, for tensions U down to GU≅2x10-7 (in Planck units). This suggests that, with upcoming experiments such as the Atacama Cosmology Telescope (ACT), optimal non-Gaussian, string-devoted statistical estimators applied to small-angle CMB temperature or gradient maps may put stringent constraints on a possible cosmic string contribution to the CMB anisotropies.

  8. CMB anisotropies from a gradient mode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-03-01

    A linear gradient mode must have no observable dynamical effect on short distance physics. We confirm this by showing that if there was such a gradient mode extending across the whole observable Universe, it would not cause any hemispherical asymmetry in the power of CMB anisotropies, as long as Maldacena's consistency condition is satisfied. To study the effect of the long wavelength mode on short wavelength modes, we generalize the existing second order Sachs-Wolfe formula in the squeezed limit to include a gradient in the long mode and to account for the change in the location of the last scattering surface induced by this mode. Next, we consider effects that are of second order in the long mode. A gradient mode Φ = qṡx generated in Single-field inflation is shown to induce an observable quadrupole moment. For instance, in a matter-dominated model it is equal to Q = 5(qṡx)2/18. This quadrupole can be canceled by superposition of a quadratic perturbation. The result is shown to be a nonlinear extension of Weinberg's adiabatic modes: a long-wavelength physical mode which looks locally like a coordinate transformation.

  9. Therapeutic Observation on "Green Tortoise Probing Cave" Operation plus Stuck Needle Method in Treating Transverse Process Syndrome of the Third Lumbar Vertebra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁业安; 王玲玲

    2009-01-01

    @@ Transverse process syndrome of the third lumbar vertebra is a common cause of lumbago and sciatica.It is manifested by localized soreness,distention and pain on unilateral or bilateral aspect of the third lumbar transverse process.There is also fixed tenderness point at the tip of the transverse process.This condition frequently occurs in young adults who are engaged in physical work.In recent years,the author used green tortoise probing cave method and stuck needle method for treating 72 cases of transverse process syndrome of the third lumbar vertebra,it is now report as follows.

  10. Electric Field Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy in a Single Molecule

    OpenAIRE

    Zyazin, Alexander S.; Berg, Johan W. G. van den; Osorio, Edgar A; Van Der Zant, Herre S J; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos P.; Leijnse, Martin; Wegewijs, Maarten R; May, Falk; Hofstetter, Walter; Danieli, Chiara; Cornia, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We have measured quantum transport through an individual Fe$_4$ single-molecule magnet embedded in a three-terminal device geometry. The characteristic zero-field splittings of adjacent charge states and their magnetic field evolution are observed in inelastic tunneling spectroscopy. We demonstrate that the molecule retains its magnetic properties, and moreover, that the magnetic anisotropy is significantly enhanced by reversible electron addition / subtraction controlled with the gate voltag...

  11. Fe-implanted 6H-SiC: Direct evidence of Fe{sub 3}Si nanoparticles observed by atom probe tomography and {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diallo, M. L.; Fnidiki, A., E-mail: abdeslem.fnidiki@univ-rouen.fr; Lardé, R.; Cuvilly, F.; Blum, I. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Lechevallier, L. [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, Université et INSA de Rouen - UMR CNRS 6634 - Normandie Université. F-76801 Saint Etienne du Rouvray (France); Département de GEII, Université de Cergy-Pontoise, rue d' Eragny, Neuville sur Oise, 95031 Cergy-Pontoise (France); Debelle, A.; Thomé, L. [Centre de Spectrométrie Nucléaire et de Spectrométrie de Masse (CSNSM), CNRS-IN2P3-Univ. Paris-Sud 11, Bât. 108, 91405 Orsay (France); Viret, M. [Service de Physique de l' Etat Condensé (DSM/IRAMIS/SPEC), UMR 3680 CNRS, Bât. 772, Orme des Merisiers, CEA Saclay 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Marteau, M.; Eyidi, D.; Declémy, A. [Institut PPRIME, UPR 3346 CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ENSMA, SP2MI, téléport 2, 11 Bvd M. et P. Curie 86962 Futuroscope, Chasseneuil (France)

    2015-05-14

    In order to understand ferromagnetic ordering in SiC-based diluted magnetic semiconductors, Fe-implanted 6H-SiC subsequently annealed was studied by Atom Probe Tomography, {sup 57}Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and SQUID magnetometry. Thanks to its 3D imaging capabilities at the atomic scale, Atom Probe Tomography appears as the most suitable technique to investigate the Fe distribution in the 6H-SiC host semiconductor and to evidence secondary phases. This study definitely evidences the formation of Fe{sub 3}Si nano-sized clusters after annealing. These clusters are unambiguously responsible for the main part of the magnetic properties observed in the annealed samples.

  12. High spatial resolution Kelvin probe force microscopy with coaxial probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is a widely used technique to measure the local contact potential difference (CPD) between an AFM probe and the sample surface via the electrostatic force. The spatial resolution of KPFM is intrinsically limited by the long range of the electrostatic interaction, which includes contributions from the macroscopic cantilever and the conical tip. Here, we present coaxial AFM probes in which the cantilever and cone are shielded by a conducting shell, confining the tip–sample electrostatic interaction to a small region near the end of the tip. We have developed a technique to measure the true CPD despite the presence of the shell electrode. We find that the behavior of these probes agrees with an electrostatic model of the force, and we observe a factor of five improvement in spatial resolution relative to unshielded probes. Our discussion centers on KPFM, but the field confinement offered by these probes may improve any variant of electrostatic force microscopy. (paper)

  13. Measuring the Alfvenic Nature of the Interstellar Medium: Velocity Anisotropy Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Leao, I C; de Medeiros, J R; Esquivel, A

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) are strongly affected by turbulence, which shows increased anisotropy in the presence of a magnetic field. We expand upon the Esquivel & Lazarian method to estimate the Alfven Mach number using the structure function anisotropy in velocity centroid data from position-position-velocity maps. We utilize 3D magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of fully developed turbulence, with a large range of sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers, to produce synthetic observations of velocity centroids with observational characteristics such as thermal broadening, cloud boundaries, noise, and radiative transfer effects of carbon monoxide. In addition, we investigate how the resulting anisotropy-Alfven Mach number dependency found in Esquivel & Lazarian (2011) might change when taking the second moment of the position-position-velocity cube or when using different expressions to calculate the velocity centroids. We find that the degree of anisotropy is related primarily to the m...

  14. Polarization-modulation setup for ultrafast infrared anisotropy experiments to study liquid dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tros, Martijn; Woutersen, Sander

    2015-06-01

    An infrared pump-probe setup using rapid polarization modulation has been developed to perform time-resolved vibrational anisotropy measurements. A photo-elastic modulator is used as a rapidly switchable half-wave plate, enabling the measurement of transient absorptions for parallel and perpendicular polarizations of the pump and probe pulses on a shot-to-shot basis. In this way, infrared intensity fluctuations are nearly completely canceled, significantly enhancing the accuracy of the transient-anisotropy measurement. The method is tested on the OD-stretch vibration of HDO in H2O, for which the signal-to-noise ratio is found to be 4 times better than with conventional methods. PMID:26030569

  15. Modification of magnetic anisotropy in metallic glasses using high-energy ion beam irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K V Amrute; U R Mhatre; S K Sinha; D C Kothari; R Nagarajan; D Kanjilal

    2002-05-01

    Heavy ion irradiation in the electronic stopping power region induces macroscopic dimensional change in metallic glasses and introduces magnetic anisotropy in some magnetic materials. The present work is on the irradiation study of ferromagnetic metallic glasses, where both dimensional change and modification of magnetic anisotropy are expected. Magnetic anisotropy was measured using Mössbauer spectroscopy of virgin and irradiated Fe40Ni40B20 and Fe40Ni38Mo4B18 metallic glass ribbons. 90 MeV 127I beam was used for the irradiations. Irradiation doses were 5 × 1013 and 7.5 × 1013 ions/cm2. The relative intensity ratios 23 of the second and third lines of the Mössbauer spectra were measured to determine the magnetic anisotropy. The virgin samples of both the materials display in-plane magnetic anisotropy, i.e., the spins are oriented parallel to the ribbon plane. Irradiation is found to cause reduction in magnetic anisotropy. Near-complete randomization of magnetic moments is observed at high irradiation doses. Correlation is found between the residual stresses introduced by ion irradiation and the change in magnetic anisotropy.

  16. Anisotropy of cosmic rays associated with high velocity streams of interplanetary plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a detailed comparison of the solar wind parameters with the time variation in the phases and the amplitudes of the cosmic ray anisotropy as observed by a sea level neutron monitor, a characteristic change in the cosmic ray anisotropy was found to associate with the interplanetary streams with fast-rise and slow-decay time profiles in the solar wind velocity. (orig./WBU)

  17. Magnetic anisotropy and reversal in epitaxial Fe/MgO(001) films revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Zhan, Qing-feng; Vandezande, Stijn; Temst, Kristiaan; Van Haesendonck, Chris

    2008-01-01

    We investigate the magnetization reversal in Fe/MgO(001) films with fourfold in-plane magnetic anisotropy and an additional uniaxial anisotropy whose orientation and strength are tuned using different growth geometries and post growth treatments. The previously adopted mechanism of 180^{o} domain wall nucleation clearly fails to explain the observed 180^{o} magnetization reversal. A new reversal mechanism with two successive domain wall nucleations consistently predicts the switching fields f...

  18. High Redshift Intergalactic Medium: Probes and Physical Models

    CERN Document Server

    Sethi, S K

    2004-01-01

    Recent years have seen major advances in understanding the state of the intergalactic medium (IGM) at high redshift. Some aspects of this understanding are reviewed here. In particular, we discuss: (1) Different probes of IGM like Gunn-Peterson test, CMBR anisotropies, and neutral hydrogen emission from reionization, and (2) some models of reionization of the universe.

  19. Anisotropy of rare-earth magnets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R.Skomski; D.J.Sellmyer

    2009-01-01

    Rare-earth intermetallics such as Nd2FeI4B and Sm-Co are widely used as high-performance permanent magnets,because they combine high magnetocrystalline anisotropy with reasonable magnetization and Curie temperature.The anisotropy is a combined effect of spin-orbit coupling and electrostatic crystal-field interactions.The main contribution comes from the rare-earth 4f electrons,which are well-screened from the crystalline environment but exhibit a strong spin-orbit coupling.In this limit,the magnetocrystalline anisotropy has a very transparent physical interpretation,the anisotropy energy essentially being equal to the energy of Hund's-rules 4f ion in the crystal field.The corresponding expression for the lowest-order uniaxial anisotropy constant K1 is used to discuss rare-earth substitutions,which have recently attracted renewed interest due to shifts in the rare-earth production and demand.Specific phenomena reviewed in this article are the enhancement of the anisotropy of Sm2Fe17 due to interstitial nitrogen,the use of Sm-Co magnets for high-temperature applications,and the comparison of rare-earth single-ion anisotropy with other single-ion and two-ion mechanisms.

  20. The BEAN experiment - An EISCAT study of ion temperature anisotropies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. W. McCrea

    Full Text Available Results are presented from a novel EISCAT special programme, SP-UK-BEAN, intended for the direct measurement of the ion temperature anisotropy during ion frictional heating events in the high-latitude F-region. The experiment employs a geometry which provides three simultaneous estimates of the ion temperature in a single F-region observing volume at a range of aspect angles from 0° to 36°. In contrast to most previous EISCAT experiments to study ion temperature anisotropies, field-aligned observations are made using the Sodankylä radar, while the Kiruna radar measures at an aspect angle of the order of 30°. Anisotropic effects can thus be studied within a small common volume whose size and altitude range is limited by the radar beamwidth, rather than in volumes which overlap but cover different altitudes. The derivation of line-of-sight ion temperature is made more complex by the presence of an unknown percentage of atomic and molecular ions at the observing altitude and the possibility of non-Maxwellian distortion of the ion thermal velocity distribution. The first problem has been partly accounted for by insisting that a constant value of electron temperature be maintained. This enables an estimate of the ion composition to be made, and facilitates the derivation of more realistic line-of-sight ion temperatures and temperature anisotropies. The latter problem has been addressed by assuming that the thermal velocity distribution remains bi-Maxwellian. The limitations of these approaches are discussed. The ion temperature anisotropies and temperature partition coefficients during two ion heating events give values intermediate between those expected for atomic and for molecular species. This result is consistent with an analysis which indicates that significant proportions of molecular ions (up to 50% were present at the times of greatest heating.

  1. Preparation and Fluorescence Anisotropy Study of a Ribonuclease-Lucifer Yellow Conjugate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, C. C.; Sumida, J.; Pusey, M. L.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We have prepared a chemical derivative of ribonuclease A (RNase) with lucifer yellow (LY). The rotational dynamics of the LY-RNase conjugate were characterized by steady state and time resolved fluorescence techniques. Steady state anisotropy measurements were performed at varying viscosities at 10C and 20C, and the rotational correlation time of both RNase and the covalently linked LY probe were determined by time resolved frequency domain measurements. Our data suggest that the fluorophore is rigidly bound at 10C.

  2. Influence of interface exchange coupling in perpendicular anisotropy [Pt/Co]50/TbFe bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Mangin, S.; Hauet, Thomas; Fischer, P.; Kim, D. H.; Kortright, J.B.; Chesnel, K.; Arenholz, E.; Fullerton, Eric E.

    2008-01-01

    International audience We present the magnetization evolution of perpendicular anisotropy TbFe and ͓Co/ Pt͔ 50 thin films either in direct contact resulting in antiferromagnetic interfacial coupling or separated by a thick decoupling Pt layer. Magnetometry and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism spectroscopy determine the spatially averaged magnetic properties. Resonant magnetic x-ray small-angle scattering and magnetic soft x-ray transmission microscopy probed the domain configurations and ...

  3. Report on 3- and 4-Point Correlation Statistics in COBE DMR Anisotropy Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinshaw, Gary; Gorski, Krzystof M.; Bennett, Charles L.; Banday, Anthony J.

    1996-01-01

    As part of the work performed under this contract, we have computed the 3- and 4-point correlation functions of the COBE-DMR 2-year and 4-year anisotropy maps. The results of our work showed that the 3-point correlation function is consistent with zero and that the 4-point function is not a very sensitive probe of non-Gaussian behavior in the COBE-DMR data.

  4. Probing The New Cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Zentner, A R

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in observational techniques have transformed cosmology into a field inundated with ever-expanding, high-quality data sets and driven cosmology toward a standard model where the classic cosmological parameters are accurately measured. I briefly discuss some of the methods used to determine cosmological parameters, particularly primordial nucleosynthesis, the magnitude- redshift relation of supernovae, and cosmic microwave background anisotropy. I demonstrate how cosmological data can be used to complement particle physics and constrain extensions to the Standard Model. Specifically, I present bounds on light particle species and the properties of unstable, weakly-interacting, massive particles. Despite the myriad successes of the emerging standard cosmological model, unanswered questions linger. Numerical simulations of structure formation predict galactic central densities that are considerably higher than observed. They also reveal hundreds of satellites orbiting Milky Way-like galaxies while th...

  5. A subnanomolar fluorescent probe for protein kinase CK2 interaction studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enkvist, Erki; Viht, Kaido; Bischoff, Nils;

    2012-01-01

    -1502 with PromoFluor-647 gave the fluorescent probe ARC-1504 that possessed subnanomolar affinity towards both CK2α and the holoenzyme. The probe was used in a fluorescence anisotropy-based binding assay to measure the concentration of CK2α and characterize non-labelled ligands binding to the active...

  6. Downscaling Smooth Tomographic Models: Separating Intrinsic and Apparent Anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodin, Thomas; Capdeville, Yann; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, a number of tomographic models based on full waveform inversion have been published. Due to computational constraints, the fitted waveforms are low pass filtered, which results in an inability to map features smaller than half the shortest wavelength. However, these tomographic images are not a simple spatial average of the true model, but rather an effective, apparent, or equivalent model that provides a similar 'long-wave' data fit. For example, it can be shown that a series of horizontal isotropic layers will be seen by a 'long wave' as a smooth anisotropic medium. In this way, the observed anisotropy in tomographic models is a combination of intrinsic anisotropy produced by lattice-preferred orientation (LPO) of minerals, and apparent anisotropy resulting from the incapacity of mapping discontinuities. Interpretations of observed anisotropy (e.g. in terms of mantle flow) requires therefore the separation of its intrinsic and apparent components. The "up-scaling" relations that link elastic properties of a rapidly varying medium to elastic properties of the effective medium as seen by long waves are strongly non-linear and their inverse highly non-unique. That is, a smooth homogenized effective model is equivalent to a large number of models with discontinuities. In the 1D case, Capdeville et al (GJI, 2013) recently showed that a tomographic model which results from the inversion of low pass filtered waveforms is an homogenized model, i.e. the same as the model computed by upscaling the true model. Here we propose a stochastic method to sample the ensemble of layered models equivalent to a given tomographic profile. We use a transdimensional formulation where the number of layers is variable. Furthermore, each layer may be either isotropic (1 parameter) or intrinsically anisotropic (2 parameters). The parsimonious character of the Bayesian inversion gives preference to models with the least number of parameters (i.e. least number of layers, and

  7. Radio Synchrotron Fluctuation Statistics as a Probe of Magnetized Interstellar Turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, C. A.; Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Gaensler, B. M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.

    2016-05-01

    We investigate how observations of synchrotron intensity fluctuations can be used to probe the sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers of interstellar turbulence, based on mock observations performed on simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We find that the structure function slope and a diagnostic of anisotropy that we call the integrated quadrupole ratio modulus both depend on the Alfvénic Mach number. However, these statistics also depend on the orientation of the mean magnetic field in the synchrotron emitting region relative to our line of sight, and this creates a degeneracy that cannot be broken by observations of synchrotron intensity alone. We conclude that the polarization of synchrotron emission could be analyzed to break this degeneracy, and suggest that this will be possible with the Square Kilometre Array.

  8. Magnetic Domain Confinement by Anisotropy Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. P.; Lew, W. S.; Bland, J. A.; Lopez-Diaz, L.; Vaz, C. A.; Natali, M.; Chen, Y.

    2002-02-01

    The spin configuration in a magnet is in general a ``natural'' consequence of both the intrinsic properties of the material and the sample dimensions. We demonstrate that this limitation can be overcome in a homogeneous ferromagnetic film by engineering an anisotropy contrast. Substrates with laterally modulated single-crystal and polycrystalline surface regions were used to induce selective epitaxial growth of a ferromagnetic Ni film. The resulting spatially varying magnetic anisotropy leads to regular perpendicular and in-plane magnetic domains, separated by a new type of magnetic wall-the ``anisotropy constrained'' magnetic wall.

  9. Apparent resistivity of azimuthal anisotropy layered media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮爱国; 毛桐恩; 李清河; 葛双成

    2002-01-01

    The electric field, equations of boundary conditions and calculation formula of apparent resistivity are derived for azimuthal anisotropy layered media with DC method based on anisotropic Ohm(s law. Taking Schlumberger symmetric system as an example and using recurrence formula of nuclear function, the paper theoretically simulates a model of four layers with the same anisotropy coefficient for each layer. The deep sounding curves of resistivity and the pattern of contours are obtained for the model. The results shows the theoretical formula of this paper is correct, the deep sounding curves not only exhibit the difference of resistivity among layers but also indicate the anisotropy characteristics of layers.

  10. Direct observation of the leakage current in epitaxial diamond Schottky barrier devices by conductive-probe atomic force microscopy and Raman imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The origin of the high leakage current measured in several vertical-type diamond Schottky devices is conjointly investigated by conducting probe atomic force microscopy and confocal micro-Raman/photoluminescence imaging analysis. Local areas characterized by a strong decrease of the local resistance (5–6 orders of magnitude drop) with respect to their close surrounding have been identified in several different regions of the sample surface. The same local areas, also referenced as electrical hot-spots, reveal a slightly constrained diamond lattice and three dominant Raman bands in the low-wavenumber region (590, 914 and 1040 cm−1). These latter bands are usually assigned to the vibrational modes involving boron impurities and its possible complexes that can electrically act as traps for charge carriers. Local current–voltage measurements performed at the hot-spots point out a trap-filled-limited current as the main conduction mechanism favouring the leakage current in the Schottky devices. (paper)

  11. Shear wave splitting analyses in Tian Shan: Geodynamic implications of complex seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherie, Solomon G.; Gao, Stephen S.; Liu, Kelly H.; Elsheikh, Ahmed A.; Kong, Fansheng; Reed, Cory A.; Yang, Bin B.

    2016-06-01

    The Tian Shan is a tectonically complex intracontinental orogenic belt situated between the Tarim Basin and the Kazakh Shield. The vast majority of the previous shear wave splitting (SWS) measurements were presented as station averages, which are only valid when the anisotropy structure can be approximated by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry, i.e., a model of simple anisotropy. A variety of anisotropy-forming hypotheses have been proposed based on the station-averaged measurements. In this study, we measure the splitting parameters at 25 stations that recorded high-quality data from a wide back azimuthal range for the purpose of identifying and characterizing complex anisotropy. Among the 25 stations, 15 of them show systematic azimuthal variations in the observed splitting parameters with a 90° periodicity that is consistent with a model of two-layered anisotropy. The fast orientations of the upper layer range from 50° to 90° measured clockwise from the north, which are subparallel to the strike of the orogenic belt, and the splitting times are between 0.9 and 1.9 s. The corresponding values for the lower layer are -45° to -85° and 1.2-2.2 s, respectively. The remaining 10 stations demonstrate azimuthally invariant splitting parameters with strike-parallel fast orientations, and can be represented by a single layer of anisotropy with a horizontal axis of symmetry. We propose that the strike-parallel anisotropy is caused by lithospheric shortening, and anisotropy in the lower layer is associated with WNW-ward flow of asthenospheric material sandwiched between the subducting Tarim lithosphere and the thick Kazakh lithospheric root.

  12. Magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction in nanocrystalline Fe–Al alloys obtained by melt spinning technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García, J.A.; Carrizo, J. [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Elbaile, L., E-mail: elbaile@uniovi.es [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Lago-Cachón, D.; Rivas, M. [Depto. de Física de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Calvo Sotelo s/n, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Castrillo, D. [Depto. de Ciencias de los Materiales de la Universidad de Oviedo, c/Independencia, 33004 Oviedo (Spain); Pierna, A.R. [Depto. de Ingeniería Química y Medio Ambiente, EUPSS, UPV/EHU, San Sebastián (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    A study about the magnetic anisotropy and magnetostriction in ribbons of composition Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} obtained by the melt spinning technique is presented. The hysteresis loops indicate that the easy magnetization direction lies in both cases on the plane of the ribbon. Torque magnetometry measurements show that the in-plane magnetic anisotropy constant results 10100 J m{sup −3} and 490 J m{sup −3} for the Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} respectively. After a thermal treatment of 2 h at 473 K to remove the residual stresses, the in-plane magnetic anisotropy constants falls down to 2500 J m{sup −3} in the first composition and remains the same in the second one, while the easy direction remains the same. Measurements of the magnetostriction and the residual stresses of both ribbons allow us to explain the above mentioned results about the magnetic anisotropy and to conclude that the residual stresses via magnetostriction are the main source of magnetic anisotropy in the case of Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} ribbon but they do not influence this property in the ribbon of composition Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30}. - Highlights: • The origin of magnetic anisotropy of Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} and Fe{sub 70}Al{sub 30} ribbons has been studied. • The magnetic anisotropy lies in the plane of the ribbons. • A huge difference in magnetic anisotropy between two ribbons has been observed. • Magnetostriction and residual stresses explain the magnetic anisotropy in Fe{sub 81}Al{sub 19} ribbon.

  13. Kurtosis fractional anisotropy, its contrast and estimation by proxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Brian; Jespersen, Sune Nørhøj

    2016-01-01

    The diffusion kurtosis observed with diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) may vary with direction. This directional variation is summarized in the scalar kurtosis fractional anisotropy (KFA). Recent studies suggest that kurtosis anisotropy offers microstructural contrast not contained in other commonly used dMRI markers. We compare KFA to other dMRI contrasts in fixed rat brain and in human brain. We then investigate the observed contrast differences using data obtained in a physical phantom and simulations based on data from the phantom, rat spinal cord, and human brain. Lastly, we assess a strategy for rapid estimation of a computationally modest KFA proxy by evaluating its correlation to true KFA for varying number of sampling directions and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) levels. We also map this proxy's b-value dependency. We find that KFA supplements the contrast of other dMRI metrics - particularly fractional anisotropy (FA) which vanishes in near orthogonal fiber arrangements where KFA does not. Simulations and phantom data support this interpretation. KFA therefore supplements FA and could be useful for evaluation of complex tissue arrangements. The KFA proxy is strongly correlated to true KFA when sampling is performed along at least nine directions and SNR is high. PMID:27041679

  14. Mechanical behaviour of ferritic ODS steels - Temperature dependancy and anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, B.; Steckmeyer, A.; Rouffie, A.-L.; Malaplate, J.; Garnier, J.; Ratti, M.; Wident, P.; Ziolek, L.; Tournie, I.; Rabeau, V.; Gentzbittel, J. M.; Kruml, T.; Kubena, I.

    2012-11-01

    Ferritic 14%Cr and 18%Cr ODS steels produced at CEA in round bars or plates were tested mechanically. The present paper reports results obtained in tension, impact, fatigue, creep and toughness tests. These tests were carried out at various temperatures and in different directions. These materials show a pronounced anisotropy at all tested temperatures. No matter the loading, the transversal direction is always found to be far less resistant than the longitudinal one. This anisotropy is mainly observed in terms of damage mechanisms, with intergranular fracture preferentially occurring along the extrusion direction. This intergranular fracture mode leads to very low and anisotropic toughness values and to the absence of tertiairy creep stage, pointing out the unstable nature of fracture, even at high temperature. The unrealistically high values of the Norton exponent measured in creep suggests the existence of a threshold stress, which is consistent with the mainly kinematic nature of the stress as revealed by fatigue tests.

  15. Deciphering the Dipole Anisotropy of Galactic Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Ahlers, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Recent measurements of the dipole anisotropy in the arrival directions of Galactic cosmic rays (CRs) indicate a strong energy dependence of the dipole amplitude and phase in the TeV-PeV range. We argue here that these observations can be well understood within standard diffusion theory as a combined effect of (i) one or more local sources at Galactic longitude 120deg < l < 300deg dominating the CR gradient below 0.1-0.3 PeV, (ii) the presence of a strong ordered magnetic field in our local environment, (iii) the relative motion of the solar system, and (iv) the limited reconstruction capabilities of ground-based observatories. We show that an excellent candidate of the local CR source responsible for the dipole anisotropy at 1-100 TeV is the Vela supernova remnant.

  16. Backscatter, anisotropy, and polarization of solar hard X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, T.; Ramaty, R.

    1978-01-01

    The problems of anisotropy, polarization, center-to-limb variation of the X-ray spectrum, and Compton backscatter are investigated in a study of solar hard X-rays. Effect of backscatter are found particularly important for anisotropic sources which emit hard X-rays predominantly toward the photosphere; for such anisotropic primary X-ray sources, the observed X-ray flux near 30 keV does not depend significantly on the position of the flare. In addition, the degree of polarization of the sum of the primary and reflected X-rays with energies in the 15 to 30 keV range may be as high as 30%. Determination of the height and anisotropy of the primary X-ray sources from study of the albedo patch is also discussed.

  17. Optimization of artificial flockings by means of anisotropy measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Makiguchi, Motohiro

    2010-01-01

    An effective procedure to determine the optimal parameters appearing in artificial flockings is proposed in terms of optimization problems. We numerically examine genetic algorithms (GAs) to determine the optimal set of such parameters such as the weights for three essential interactions in BOIDS by Reynolds (1987) under `zero-collision' and `no-breaking-up' constraints. As a fitness function (the energy function) to be maximized by the GA, we choose the so-called the $\\textyen gamma$-value of anisotropy which can be observed empirically in typical flocks of starling. We confirm that the GA successfully finds the solution having a large $\\textyen gamma$-value leading-up to a strong anisotropy. The numerical experience shows that the procedure might enable us to make more realistic and efficient artificial flocking of starling even in our personal computers.

  18. Edge anisotropy and the geometric perspective on flow networks

    CERN Document Server

    Molkenthin, Nora; Tupikina, Liubov; Marwan, Norbert; Donges, Jonathan F; Feudel, Ulrike; Kurths, Jürgen; Donner, Reik V

    2016-01-01

    Spatial networks have recently attracted great interest in various fields of research. While the traditional network-theoretic viewpoint is commonly restricted to their topological characteristics (often disregarding existing spatial constraints), this work takes a geometric perspective, which considers vertices and edges as objects in a metric space and quantifies the corresponding spatial distribution and alignment. For this purpose, we introduce the concept of edge anisotropy and define a class of measures characterizing the spatial directedness of connections. Specifically, we demonstrate that the local anisotropy of edges incident to a given vertex provides useful information about the local geometry of geophysical flows based on networks constructed from spatio-temporal data, which is complementary to topological characteristics of the same flow networks. Taken both structural and geometric viewpoints together can thus assist the identification of underlying flow structures from observations of scalar v...

  19. Exhaustive study of cosmic microwave background anisotropies in quintessential scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brax, Philippe; Martin, Jérôme; Riazuelo, Alain

    2000-11-01

    Recent high-precision measurements of the CMB anisotropies performed by the BOOMERanG and MAXIMA-1 experiments provide an unmatched set of data allowing us to probe different cosmological models. Among these scenarios, motivated by the recent measurements of the luminosity distance versus redshift relation for type Ia supernovas, is the quintessence hypothesis. It consists of assuming that the acceleration of the Universe is due to a scalar field whose final evolution is insensitive to the initial conditions. Within this framework we investigate the cosmological perturbations for two well-motivated potentials: the Ratra-Peebles and the SUGRA tracking potentials. We show that the solutions of the perturbed equations possess an attractor and that, as a consequence, the insensitivity to the initial conditions is preserved at the perturbed level. Then, we study the predictions of these two models for structure formation and CMB anisotropies and investigate the general features of the multipole moments in the presence of quintessence. We also compare the CMB multipoles calculated with the help of a full Boltzmann code with the BOOMERanG and MAXIMA-1 data. We pay special attention to the location of the second peak and demonstrate that it significantly differs from the location obtained in the cosmological constant case. Finally, we argue that the SUGRA potential is compatible with all the recent data with standard values of the cosmological parameters. In particular, it fits the MAXIMA-1 data better than a cosmological constant or the Ratra-Peebles potential.

  20. Lithospheric deformation inferred from electrical anisotropy of magnetotelluric data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Y.; Wei, W.; Jin, S.; Ye, G.; Unsworth, M. J.; Zhang, L.

    2013-12-01

    In our research, a comprehensive procedure of analyzing and modeling electrical anisotropy for MT data is suggested, based on the field examples of the Great Slave Lake shear zone (GSLsz) in western Canada, the North China Craton (NCC) and the Altyn Tagh fault in northern Tibet. Diverse dimensionality tools are used to distinguish heterogeneity and anisotropy from MT data. In addition to the phase splits and phase tensor polarizations, a combination of the phase tensor and induction arrows is applied to judge anisotropy. The skin depths of specific period band are considered to determine whether these features result from anisotropy or heterogeneity. Specific resistivity structures in the 2-D isotropic inversion models can indicate electrical anisotropy as well, like the dike-like media or a series of conductive ';blobs' can be observed in the 2-D isotropic inversion models of the GSLsz and NCC data. Anisotropic inversions can be undertaken using an improved inversion code based on isotropic code but incorporating a trade-off parameter for electrical anisotropy named anisotropic tau. A series of anisotropic tau have been applied to test its effect and to get a best trade-off between anisotropy and heterogeneity. Then, 2-D and 3-D forward modeling works are undertaken to test the robustness of the major anisotropic features. The anisotropic structures inferred from the inversion models are replaced by various alternating isotropic or anisotropic structures to see if they are required. The fitting of the response curves compared with the field data and corresponding r.m.s misfits can help us choose the best model that can generally illustrate the underground structure. Finally, the analysis and modeling result of the MT data from North China Craton is taken as an example to demonstrate how the electrical anisotropy can be linked with the lithospheric deformation. According to the reliable models we got, there may be an anisotropic layer at the mid-lower crustal to

  1. I-Love-Q anisotropically: Universal relations for compact stars with scalar pressure anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagi, Kent; Yunes, Nicolás

    2015-06-01

    Certain physical quantities that characterize neutron stars and quark stars (e.g. their mass, spin angular momentum, and quadrupole moment) have recently been found to be interrelated in a manner that is approximately insensitive to their internal structure. Such approximately universal relations are useful to break degeneracies in data analysis and model selection for future radio, x-ray, and gravitational wave observations. Although the pressure inside compact stars is most likely nearly isotropic, certain scenarios have been put forth that suggest otherwise, for example due to magnetic fields or phase transitions in their interior. We investigate here whether pressure anisotropy affects the approximate universal relations and, if so, whether it prevents their use in future astrophysical observations. We achieve this by numerically constructing slowly rotating and tidally deformed, anisotropic, compact stars in general relativity to third order in stellar rotation relative to the mass shedding limit. We adopt simple models for pressure anisotropy where the matter stress-energy tensor is diagonal for a spherically symmetric spacetime but the tangential pressure differs from the radial one. We find that the equation-of-state variation increases as one increases the amount of anisotropy, but within the anisotropy range studied in this paper (motivated from anisotropy due to crystallization of the core and pion condensation), anisotropy affects the universal relations only weakly. The relations become less universal by a factor of 1.5-3 relative to the isotropic case when anisotropy is maximal, but even then they remain approximately universal to 10%. We find evidence that this increase in variability is strongly correlated to an increase in the eccentricity variation of isodensity contours, which provides further support for the emergent approximate symmetry explanation of universality. Whether one can use universal relations in actual observations ultimately

  2. Strain-tunable extraordinary magnetocrystalline anisotropy in Sr2CrReO6 epitaxial films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucy, J. M.; Ball, M. R.; Restrepo, O. D.; Hauser, A. J.; Soliz, J. R.; Freeland, J. W.; Woodward, P. M.; Windl, W.; Yang, F. Y.

    2014-11-01

    We report the discovery of extraordinarily large anisotropy fields and strain-tunable magnetocrystalline anisotropy in Sr2CrReO6 epitaxial films. We determine the strain-induced tetragonal distortions and octahedral rotations in Sr2CrReO6 epitaxial films grown on (LaAlO3)0.3(Sr2AlTaO6)0.7 (LSAT), SrTiO3 (STO), and SrCr0.5Nb0.5O3/LSAT substrates using x-ray diffraction and density functional theory. The structural distortions drive dramatic changes in magnetocrystalline anisotropy. We use magnetometry measurements and first principles calculations to determine the atomic origins of the large anisotropy observed. These techniques elucidate the interplay between structural deformations and magnetic behavior and lay the groundwork for the study of other strongly correlated systems in this class of ferromagnetic oxides.

  3. Strong crustal seismic anisotropy in the Kalahari Craton based on Receiver Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thybo, Hans; Soliman, Mohammad Youssof Ahmad; Artemieva, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Earlier seismic studies of the Kalahari Craton in southern Africa infer deformation of upper mantle by flow with fast direction of seismic anisotropy being parallel to present plate motion, and/or report anisotropy frozen into the lithospheric mantle. We present evidence for very strong seismic...... is uniform within tectonic units and parallel to orogenic strike in the Limpopo and Cape fold belts. It is further parallel to the strike of major dyke swarms which indicates that a large part of the observed anisotropy is controlled by lithosphere fabrics and macroscopic effects. The directions of...... suggests that the crust and lithospheric mantle may have been coupled since cratonisation. If so, the apparent match between mantle anisotropy and the present plate motion is coincidental....

  4. Magnetic anisotropy around the successive two transitions in SmRu4P12

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have succeeded in growing single crystals of the filled skutterudite compound SmRu4P12. To clarify the magnetic anisotropy, we have measured the specific heat C and the magnetization M as functions of temperature T, magnetic field H, and magnetic fields directions. In the H dependence of M at T=15.5K, between the two characteristic temperatures TMI=17.5 and T*=14K, we have observed clear magnetic anisotropy under high magnetic fields. The anisotropy decreases with decreasing H, and becomes within the experimental uncertainty below 1T. TMI determined by the specific heat under magnetic fields is basically field independent up to 8T, while T* exhibits evident anisotropy. These results could be a clue to understand the ordered state in this material

  5. Spin kinetic Monte Carlo method for nanoferromagnetism and magnetization dynamics of nanomagnets with large magnetic anisotropy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Bang-gui; ZHANG Kai-cheng; LI Ying

    2007-01-01

    The Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) method based on the transition-state theory, powerful and famous for sim-ulating atomic epitaxial growth of thin films and nanostruc-tures, was used recently to simulate the nanoferromagnetism and magnetization dynamics of nanomagnets with giant mag-netic anisotropy. We present a brief introduction to the KMC method and show how to reformulate it for nanoscale spin systems. Large enough magnetic anisotropy, observed exper-imentally and shown theoretically in terms of first-principle calculation, is not only essential to stabilize spin orientation but also necessary in making the transition-state barriers dur-ing spin reversals for spin KMC simulation. We show two applications of the spin KMC method to monatomic spin chains and spin-polarized-current controlled composite nano-magnets with giant magnetic anisotropy. This spin KMC method can be applied to other anisotropic nanomagnets and composite nanomagnets as long as their magnetic anisotropy energies are large enough.

  6. Stress, strain rate and anisotropy in Kyushu, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, M. K.; Aoki, Y.; Unglert, K.; Ohkura, T.; Umakoshi, K.; Shimizu, H.; Iguchi, M.; Tameguri, T.; Ohminato, T.; Mori, J.

    2016-04-01

    Seismic anisotropy, the directional dependence of wave speeds, may be caused by stress-oriented cracks or by strain-oriented minerals, yet few studies have quantitatively compared anisotropy to stress and strain over large regions. Here we compare crustal stress and strain rates on the Island of Kyushu, Japan, as measured from inversions of focal mechanisms, GPS and shear wave splitting. Over 85,000 shear wave splitting measurements from local and regional earthquakes are obtained from the NIED network between 2004 and 2012, and on Aso, Sakurajima, Kirishima and Unzen volcano networks. Strain rate measurements are made from the Japanese Geonet stations. JMA-determined S arrival times processed with the MFAST shear wave splitting code measure fast polarisations (Φ), related to the orientation of the anisotropic medium and time delays (dt), related to the path length and the percent anisotropy. We apply the TESSA 2-D delay time tomography and spatial averaging code to the highest quality events, which have nearly vertical incidence angles, separating the 3455 shallow (depth = 40 km) earthquakes. Using square grids with 30 km sides for all the inversions, the best correlations are observed between splitting from shallow earthquakes and stress. Axes of maximum horizontal stress (SHmax) and Φ correlate with a coefficient c of 0.56, significant at the 99% confidence level. Their mean difference is 31.9°. Axes of maximum compressional strain rate and SHmax are also well aligned, with an average difference of 28°, but they do not correlate with each other, meaning that where they differ, the difference is not systematic. Anisotropy strength is negatively correlated with the stress ratio parameter determined from focal mechanism inversion (c = - 0.64; significant at the 99% confidence level). The anisotropy and stress results are consistent with stress-aligned microcracks in the crust in a dominantly strike-slip regime. Eigenvalues of maximum horizontal strain rate

  7. Constraining depth-dependent anisotropy: A new approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, M.; Okeler, A.

    2014-12-01

    Splitting of shear waves is commonly used to infer anisotropy of the Earth's interior. However, most data, such as SKS splitting, provide depth-integrated measure of anisotropy along the ray path, and it is difficult to separate contributions from different layers within the Earth. There have been efforts to focus on specific depth range by analyzing differences in splitting between two ray paths, but these studies only report observed differences or rely upon forward modeling with limited parameter-space search. We have developed a new approach to examine the P-to-S converted phases that allows one to construct depth-dependent multi-layer anisotropy models through combination of inversion and grid search. In addition to the conventional fast splitting direction and delay time, the technique allows one to investigate the tilt of the symmetry axis and dip of the discontinuity associated with the P-to-S conversion. Furthermore, the formulation is such that it naturally extends to include and examine multiple layers with different anisotropic properties. With these flexibilities, we can address anisotropic contributions from different layers in two separate procedures. The first scheme takes advantage of data with similar ray paths (e.g., SKS and SKKS waves recorded at the same station). The rays sample different structure when their ray paths differ (e.g., near the core-mantle boundary), but they sample the same structure when the paths are similar (e.g., in the upper part of the mantle and crust). Using our new approach, we can set up the problem as a two-layer anisotropy model where the layer with ray paths sampling different regions (e.g., lowermost mantle) is allowed to vary laterally. The second type of problem that can be addressed by the new approach is layer-by-layer investigation of anisotropy from top to bottom. This procedure combines the new method with receiver function analysis to obtain anisotropic properties of each layer using P-to-S converted waves

  8. Shell effects and fission fragments angular anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of the shell corrections attenuation effect with growth of the fissionable nuclei temperature on the angular anisotropy of the fission fragments is considered. The experimental data on the anisotropy of the fission fragments angular distributions of the compound nucleus, formed in the 4He + 238U reactions, are analyzed within the frames of the transition states model in the fission barriers saddle point and statistic theory of nuclear reactions. The obvious kind of the shell corrections attenuation function is obtained

  9. Conductivity-type anisotropy in molecular solids

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrick, J. R.; Dodabalapur, A.; Torsi, L.; Lovinger, A, J.; Kwock, E. W.; Miller, T. M.; Galvin, M; Berggren, Magnus; Katz, H. E.

    1997-01-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of perylenetetracarboxylic dianyhydride (PTCDA), an organic molecular solid, exhibits substantial anisotropies in its electronic transport properties. Only electrons transport in the directions along molecular planes, while mainly holes transport in the direction normal to molecular planes. A series of measurements on both field effect transistors with PTCDA active layers and light emitting diodes with PTCDA transport layers documents the anisotropy seen in the elec...

  10. The Cosmic Microwave Background Anisotropy Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Smoot, George F.

    1997-01-01

    This paper reports a summary of the contents contents of six hours of lectures on the CMB anisotropy experiments given at the Strasbourg NATO school on the CMB and cosmology. (Its companion paper, astro-ph/9705101 reports the lectures on the CMB spectrum.) A context is set as a bridge from the theoretical CMB anisotropy lectures and the experimental situation. The COBE DMR results are reveiwed in detail and as pioneer for future space missions. Current and planned experiments are discussed in...

  11. Magnetic anisotropy in rare-earth metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mourits; Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Lindgård, Per-Anker; Mackintosh, A.R.

    1970-01-01

    The magnetic field dependence of the energy of long- wavelength magnons in Tb-10%Ho has been studied by inelastic neutron scattering. The results agree with the `frozen-lattice' model, provided that the second-order magnetoelastic effect is taken into account. The planar anisotropy is almost...... entirely the result of magnetoelastic effects. The temperature dependences of the anisotropy parameters have been deduced from the results...

  12. Cap-Induced Magnetic Anisotropy in Ultra-thin Fe/MgO(001) Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown-Heft, Tobias; Pendharkar, Mihir; Lee, Elizabeth; Palmstrom, Chris

    Magnetic anisotropy plays an important role in the design of spintronic devices. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (PMA) is preferred for magnetic tunnel junctions because the resulting energy barrier between magnetization states can be very high and this allows enhanced device scalability suitable for magnetic random access memory applications. Interface induced anisotropy is often used to control magnetic easy axes. For example, the Fe/MgO(001) system has been predicted to exhibit PMA in the ultrathin Fe limit. We have used in-situ magneto optic Kerr effect and ex-situ SQUID to study the changes in anisotropy constants between bare Fe/MgO(001) films and those capped with MgO, Pt, and Ta. In some cases in-plane anisotropy terms reverse sign after capping. We also observe transitions from superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic behavior induced by capping layers. Perpendicular anisotropy is observed for Pt/Fe/MgO(001) films after annealing to 300°C. These effects are characterized and incorporated into a magnetic simulation that accurately reproduces the behavior of the films. This work was supported in part by the Semiconductor Research Corporation programs (1) MSR-Intel, and (2) C-SPIN.

  13. Cosmological spatial curvature probed by microwave polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If there is a large-scale anisotropy in the expansion of the universe, the microwave background radiation is expected to be linearly polarized. This communication shows that spatial curvature is capable of rotating the polarization of the microwaves relative to its direction at last scattering, which is directly correlated with the expansion anisotropy (and so also the observed intensity anisotropy). In Friedmann-Robertson-Walker models of the universe with additional small expansion anisotropy, the observed rotation relative to the intensity anisotropy would be appreciable and constant over the celestial sphere in the closed (type IX) model, but in the flat and open models, it must either vanish (types I and V) or vary ina complicated way over the celestial sphere (type VII/sub h/). These facts suggest a clear observational test of the closure of the universe. Also, an ambiguity inherent in the homogeneity of the universe does not allow prediction of the direction of rotation; thus homogeneous universes possess a property which might be called ''handedness.''

  14. Helicon mode driven by O+ thermal anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary results from an investigation of the helicon instability in a plasma composed of protons, electrons and singly charged oxygen ions, are presented. The velocity distribution function for each plasma component is modeled by a bi-Lorentzian distribution, which allows each particle species to possess a power law tail of arbitrary spectral index. This permits us to model accurately the shape of the power law tails observed on particle species in the plasma sheet region, where the helicon mode is believed to play an important role. The presence of a hard power law tail on the oxygen component is found to dramatically enhance the maximum growth rate of the instability when the oxygen ions possess a small T(parallel)>T(perpendicular) anisotropy. Above a certain value of T(parallel)/T(perpendicular), however, this behavior is reversed. The growth rate decreases as the spectral index of the protons is decreased. The relevance of these effects to the central plasma sheet region is briefly discussed

  15. Direct observation of electrical properties of grain boundaries in sputter-deposited CdTe using scan-probe microwave reflectivity based capacitance measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuteja, Mohit; Koirala, Prakash; MacLaren, Scott; Collins, Robert; Rockett, Angus

    2015-10-01

    Polycrystalline CdTe in 12% efficient solar cells has been studied using scanning microwave impedance microscopy (sMIM). The CdS/CdTe junctions were grown on transparent-conducting-oxide-coated soda lime glass using rf sputter deposition. sMIM based capacitance measurements were performed on the exposed surface of CdCl2 treated CdTe adjacent to thermal-evaporation-deposited Cu/Au back contacts. The sMIM instrument was operated at ˜3 GHz, and capacitance measurements were performed as a function of ac and dc voltage biases applied to the tip, with and without sample illumination. Although dc capacitance measurements are affected by sample topography, the differential capacitance measurement was shown to be topography independent. It was found that the grain boundaries exhibit a depleted carrier concentration as compared to the grain bulk. This depletion effect is enhanced under photo-generated carrier separation or under sufficiently large probe tip biases opposite to the majority carrier charge.

  16. Synergy Between probes and Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard E.

    2005-01-01

    There are many ways in which the science return from a planetary mission is considerably enhanced by interactions between entry probes and a mission orbiter. Mission configuration aspects that are desirable include delivery of entry probes by the orbiter, and communication between probe and orbiter. Both of these mission aspects could greatly enhance access to key scientific sites that might not otherwise be accessible using delivery from say, a flyby, or employing direct communication from probes to Earth. Examples for Venus and Jupiter will be discussed. A second class of orbiter-probe interaction could better be termed direct probe-orbiter science collaboration. That would include, determining the global context of the entry probe sites from the orbiter, obtaining ground truth from the probe for remote sensing observations from the orbiter, observing the global and vertical distribution of key atmospheric trace species, and measuring the global and vertical distribution of clouds and winds. The importance of each of these items will be illustrated by particular examples.

  17. Characterization of near-field optical probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vohnsen, Brian; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    1999-01-01

    Radiation and collection characteristics of four different near-field optical-fiber probes, namely, three uncoated probes and an aluminium-coated small-aperture probe, are investigated and compared. Their radiation properties are characterized by observation of light-induced topography changes in a...... characterization....

  18. Does deformation saturate seismic anisotropy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatham, D. J.; Lloyd, G. E.; Butler, R. W.; Casey, M.

    2006-12-01

    The progressive simple shear deformation that characterizes ductile fault zones in the crust involves both rotation and intensification of the strain ellipsoid. These mathematic predictions have been confirmed repeatedly by finite strain determinations in outcrop studies of natural shear zones and used to test geodynamic models of mountain belts. Seismic anisotropy (SA) methods offer the opportunity to pursue these approaches in situ. First however, we must calibrate the magnitude and orientation of the SA ellipsoid against naturally deformed tectonites of known strain state and microstructure. Here we present data from a field analogue of mafic ductile crust in an amphibolite-facies shear zone developed in a deformed mafic dyke embedded within the Lewisian Gneiss (Badcall, NW Scotland). Deflection of pre-existing linear and planar elements and attenuation of the dyke into the shear zone are used to determine the strain gradient. Specimens collected along this gradient were used to establish the geometric fabric intensity defined by different minerals (hornblende grain alignment and ellipticity of plagioclase clots). Finally, petrophysical properties were calculated for the specimens using the SEM-EBSD measured populations of lattice preferred orientations (LPO) for all mineral phases. It is the hornblende-plagioclase LPO, combined in their modal proportions and modulated by the individual mineral single crystal elastic properties, which define the SA profile across the shear zone. Hornblende develops a strong preferred dimensional orientation and hence LPO at shear strains of about 2, whereas the plagioclase LPO remains close to random regardless of bulk strain. The modelled SA of the samples is dominated therefore by the amphibole LPO. Although the values of bulk shear strain vary across the shear zone (0 at the margins to greater than 12 in the centre), the calculated intensity of SA saturates at a shear strain of about 2. These results, if typical of large

  19. Magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin bismuth iron garnet films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultrathin bismuth iron garnet Bi3Fe5O12 films were grown epitaxially on (001)-oriented gadolinium gallium garnet substrates. Film thickness varied from two to three dozens of unit cells. Bi3Fe5O12 films grow pseudomorphically on substrates up to a thickness of 20 nm, and then a lattice relaxation occurs. Magnetic properties of the films were studied as a function of bismuth iron garnet thickness. The magnetization and cubic anisotropy decrease with decreasing film thickness. The uniaxial magnetocrystalline anisotropy is constant for all film thicknesses. For two unit cell thick films, the easy magnetization axis changes from in-plane to perpendicular to the plane direction. Such a reorientation takes place as a result of the competition of constant uniaxial perpendicular anisotropy with weakening film magnetization. - Highlights: ► Ultrathin Bi3Fe5O12 films were grown epitaxially on structure-matching substrates. ► Magnetic properties of Bi3Fe5O12 were studied down to the thickness of 2.5 nm. ► Reorientation of easy magnetization axis as a function of film thickness was observed

  20. Anisotropy is Everywhere, to See, to Measure, and to Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Nick; Quadros, Eda

    2015-07-01

    Anisotropy is everywhere. Isotropy is rare. Round stones are collectors' items, and any almost cubic blocks are photographed, as they are the exception. The reasons for rock masses to frequently exhibit impressive degrees of anisotropy, with properties varying with direction of observation and measurement, are clearly their varied geological origins. Origins may provide distinctive bedding cycles in sedimentary rocks, distinctive flows and flow-tops in basalts, foliation in gneisses, schistosity in schists and cleavage in slates, and faults through all the above. We can add igneous dykes, sills, weathered horizons, and dominant joint sets. Each of the above are rich potential or inevitable sources of velocity, modulus, strength and permeability anisotropy—and inhomogeneity. The historic and present-day stress anisotropy provides a wealth of effects concerning the preferentially oriented jointing, with its reduced roughness and greater continuity. High stress may also have induced oriented micro-cracks. All the above reinforce disbelief in the elastic-isotropic-continuum or intact-medium-based assumptions promoted by commercial software companies and used by so many for modelling rock masses. RQD and Q are frequently anisotropic as well, and Q is anisotropic not just because of RQD. The authors, therefore, question whether the a priori assumption of homogeneous-isotropic-elastic behaviour has any significant place in the scientific practice of realistic rock mechanics.

  1. Effects of spacetime anisotropy on the galaxy rotation curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Zhe; Li, Xin [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Chinese Academy of Sciences, Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Beijing (China); Li, Ming-Hua; Lin, Hai-Nan; Wang, Sai [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China)

    2013-05-15

    The observations on galaxy rotation curves show significant discrepancies from the Newtonian theory. This issue could be explained by the effect of the anisotropy of the spacetime. Conversely, the spacetime anisotropy could also be constrained by the galaxy rotation curves. Finsler geometry is a kind of intrinsically anisotropic geometry. In this paper, we study the effect of the spacetime anisotropy at galactic scales in the Finsler spacetime. It is found that the Finslerian model has close relations with the Milgrom's MOND. By performing the best-fit procedure to the galaxy rotation curves, we find that the anisotropic effects of the spacetime become significant when the Newtonian acceleration GM/r{sup 2} is smaller than the critical acceleration a{sub 0}. Interestingly, the critical acceleration a{sub 0}, although varies between different galaxies, is in the order of magnitude cH{sub 0}/2{pi} {proportional_to} 10{sup -10}ms{sup -2}. (orig.)

  2. Magnetic anisotropy studies in Ce/Fe and U/Fe multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, M.F.; Case, G.S.; Bland, J.; Lucas, C.A.; Herring, A.; Stirling, W.G. [Liverpool Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Physics; Boni, P.; Tixier, S. [Lab. for Neutron Scattering, ETH and PSI, Villigen (Switzerland); Ward, R.C.C.; Wells, M.R. [Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom). Clarendon Lab.; Langridge, S. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton, Didcot (United Kingdom)

    2002-02-16

    Multilayer samples of Ce/Fe, fabricated by sputtering and characterized by X-ray diffraction and reflectivity were studied by polarized neutron reflectivity and Moessbauer spectroscopy. Corresponding studies on sputtered U/Fe multilayers have been initiated. In Fe/Ce a paramagnetic phase, identified as amorphous Fe was observed at Fe thicknesses below 20 A. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was observed for Fe thicknesses below 17 A and studies in applied fields enabled magnetic anisotropies to be evaluated for Fe thicknesses up to 40 A. The Ce/Fe interface anisotropy was evaluated as K{sub s}=(0.98{+-}0.15) x 10{sup -3} Jm{sup -2}, among the largest values reported. Neutron reflectivity results did not observe magnetic moments on Ce layers. Preliminary measurements on U/Fe multilayers have not observed induced moments on the U layers. (orig.)

  3. Seismic Anisotropy Along the Eurasian-Arabian Plate Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandvol, E. A.; Skobeltsyn, G.; Turkelli, N.; Polat, G.; Yetirmishli, G.; Godoladze, T.; Mellors, R. J.; Gok, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Anatolian plateau and Caucasus are part of the orogenic belt that formed as the result of the closure of the Neo Tethys Ocean and the ensuing continental collision of Arabian and Eurasian plates. Multiple tomographic studies of both P and S wave velocities all show a broad low velocity zone beneath East Anatolian and North Iranian plateaus. The low velocity zone appears to range from the Moho to a depth 150 km, which suggests asthenospheric material underlying a very thin lithosphere of eastern Anatolia. This low velocity zone coincides with widespread Late Miocene - Quaternary calc-alkaline volcanic products of mantle origin. This very shallow asthenosphere strongly implies that any present day anisotropy is likely to reflect very recent mantle deformation. In order to image seismic anisotropy and improve understanding of the nature of mantle deformation in young continental collision zone we analyzed data from the IRIS station KIV and the regional seismic networks of Turkey, Azerbaijan and Georgia to determine shear wave splitting fast polarization directions and delay times in the region. Our results show that the fast polarization directions are quite uniformly parallel to NE-SW across the East Anatolian Plateau and the westernmost part of the Greater Caucasus. The observed delay times decrease northward with the shortest located in the western Greater Caucasus. However, to the east, the fast polarization direction rotates clockwise until it becomes parallel to the EW topographic? trend in the Lesser Caucasus where the delay times are the largest in the region. The situation becomes more complex north of the Lesser Caucasus, in the central and eastern parts of the Greater Caucasus, where the fast polarization directions shift abruptly to the NNE-SSW. Furthemore, we find relatively strong evidence of layered anisotropy using a new method we have developed to image multi-layered polarization anisotropy from teleseismic core phases such as SKS.

  4. Fe monolayers on InAs(0 0 1): An in situ study of surface, interface and volume magnetic anisotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnetic anisotropy of epitaxial Fe films with thicknesses in the range of 2-142 monolayers (ML) grown on {4x2} reconstructed InAs(0 0 1) was investigated by in situ ferromagnetic resonance. The easy magnetization direction was found to be parallel to the [11-bar 0]-direction for Fe films below 4 ML, while it rotates by 450 toward the [100]-direction. It is observed that both surface-interface and volume contribution to the perpendicular anisotropy favor an easy axis perpendicular to the film plane. The cubic surface-interface anisotropy is relatively large with easy axes along -directions in contrast to the volume contribution which favors easy axes along the -directions. The volume contribution is found to be larger than the Fe bulk cubic anisotropy. A thickness independent uniaxial anisotropy has been found in films with a thickness of 2 up to 142 ML.

  5. Caractérisation et effet de l'anisotropie sur le comportement de sols reconstitués

    OpenAIRE

    NGUYEN THANH, Loc; Szymkiewicz, Fabien; Reiffsteck, Philippe; Bourgeois, Emmanuel; Mestat, Philippe

    2011-01-01

    L'anisotropie du comportement des sols peut être déterminante pour prévoir la réponse d'un massif de sol en interaction avec un ouvrage de génie civil. Une démarche d'observation et de mise en évidence de l'anisotropie a été mise en oeuvre afin de cerner l'influence de ce phénomène. Deux types principaux d'anisotropie des sols ont été étudiés : l'anisotropie induite, qui est celle des sols initialement homogènes et isotropes ayant subi des surcharges historiques, et l'anisotropie inhérente, q...

  6. Large Voltage-Induced Changes in the Perpendicular Magnetic Anisotropy of an MgO-Based Tunnel Junction with an Ultrathin Fe Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Takayuki; Kozioł-Rachwał, Anna; Skowroński, Witold; Zayets, Vadym; Shiota, Yoichi; Tamaru, Shingo; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige

    2016-04-01

    We study the voltage control of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in an ultrathin Fe layer sandwiched between the Cr buffer and MgO tunneling barrier layers. A high-interface magnetic anisotropy energy of 2.1 mJ /m2 is achieved in the Cr/ultrathin Fe /MgO structure. A large voltage-induced perpendicular magnetic anisotropy change is observed under the negative-bias voltage applications for the case of the Fe layer thinner than 0.6 nm. The amplitude of the voltage-induced anisotropy energy change exhibits a strong Fe-thickness dependence and it reaches as high as 290 fJ /Vm . The observed high values of the surface anisotropy and voltage-induced anisotropy energy change demonstrate the feasibility of voltage-driven spintronic devices.

  7. Sweetspot: Near-infrared observations of 13 type Ia supernovae from a new NOAO survey probing the nearby smooth Hubble flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present 13 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) observed in the rest-frame near-infrared (NIR) from 0.02 < z < 0.09 with the WIYN High-resolution Infrared Camera on the WIYN 3.5 m telescope. With only one to three points per light curve and a prior on the time of maximum from the spectrum used to type the object, we measure an H-band dispersion of spectroscopically normal SNe Ia of 0.164 mag. These observations continue to demonstrate the improved standard brightness of SNe Ia in an H band, even with limited data. Our sample includes two SNe Ia at z ∼ 0.09, which represent the most distant rest-frame NIR H-band observations published to date. This modest sample of 13 NIR SNe Ia represent the pilot sample for SweetSpot—a 3 yr NOAO Survey program that will observe 144 SNe Ia in the smooth Hubble flow. By the end of the survey we will have measured the relative distance to a redshift of z ∼ 0.05%-1%. Nearby Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) observations such as these will test the standard nature of SNe Ia in the rest-frame NIR, allow insight into the nature of dust, and provide a critical anchor for future cosmological SN Ia surveys at higher redshift.

  8. Anisotropy in Fracking: A Percolation Model for Observed Microseismicity

    OpenAIRE

    Norris, J. Quinn; Turcotte, Donald L.; Rundle, John B.

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) using high pressures and a low viscosity fluid allow the extraction of large quantiles of oil and gas from very low permeability shale formations. The initial production of oil and gas at depth leads to high pressures and an extensive distribution of natural fractures which reduce the pressures. With time these fractures heal, sealing the remaining oil and gas in place. High volume fracking opens the healed fractures allowing the oil and gas to flow the horizon...

  9. Anisotropy in Fracking: A Percolation Model for Observed Microseismicity

    CERN Document Server

    Norris, J Quinn; Rundle, John B

    2014-01-01

    Hydraulic fracturing (fracking) using high pressures and a low viscosity fluid allow the extraction of large quantiles of oil and gas from very low permeability shale formations. The initial production of oil and gas at depth leads to high pressures and an extensive distribution of natural fractures which reduce the pressures. With time these fractures heal, sealing the remaining oil and gas in place. High volume fracking opens the healed fractures allowing the oil and gas to flow the horizontal productions wells. We model the injection process using invasion percolation. We utilize a 2D square lattice of bonds to model the sealed natural fractures. The bonds are assigned random strengths and the fluid, injected at a point, opens the weakest bond adjacent to the growing cluster of opened bonds. Our model exhibits burst dynamics in which the clusters extends rapidly into regions with weak bonds. We associate these bursts with the microseismic activity generated by fracking injections. A principal object of thi...

  10. Evaluating post-perovskite as a cause of D'' anisotropy in regions of palaeosubduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacki, Andy; Walker, Andrew M.; Wookey, James; Kendall, J.-Michael

    2013-03-01

    Seismic anisotropy in the Earth's lowermost mantle (D'') is often attributed to the alignment of MgSiO3 post-perovskite (ppv) by the movement of dislocations in response to mantle flow. However, ppv's plastic yield surface is not known; nor do we know if this is the main deformation mechanism. We make use of a heterogeneous, generally anisotropic model of elasticity in D'' derived from a 3-D model of mantle flow, which is obtained by inversion of geophysical observables. Unlike previous approaches, completely general, 3-D flow and full anisotropy are permitted, yielding more information to compare with observations than has been possible before. We model observations of anisotropy in D'' by calculating the shear wave splitting predicted in ScS waves for a series of models of ppv plasticity. We find that observations in regions of the lowermost mantle beneath subduction zones are best fit by a model which accommodates slip on (010). Our results show that, within one standard deviation, slip on (010)-or a mechanism giving the same style of anisotropy-explains D'' anisotropy beneath these regions.

  11. The upper mantle anisotropy in Yunnan area, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮爱国; 王椿镛

    2002-01-01

    Shear wave phase SKS of 11 earthquakes, collected from 23 stations of Yunnan Digital Seismic Network, is analyzed by fitting the theoretical transverse component with the observed one for determining the orientation and extent of polarization seismic anisotropy of upper mantle. Shear wave splitting is obviously observed in all stations except Heqing station (HQ). The results show that the polarization of fast split S-wave of upper mantle in Yunnan area is north-northeast in general and the time delay between fast and slow split shear waves is 0.5~2.0 s. It suggests that the influence of faults upon anisotropy analysis could not be neglected in such a geologically complex area. As the transitional zone between Qinghai-Tibetan plateau and the block of southern China, in Yunnan area the orientation of fast shear wave polarization indicating the subduction of Indian plate into Eurasian plate is the fundamental background of earth dynamics. While the southeast or south-southeast movement of Sichuan-Yunnan rhomb block, formed by the uplift of Qinghai-Tibetan plateau, plays an important role in the composition of complicated structural and stress environment of Yunnan area. The divergence between the fast direction and the movement of upper mantle indicates in Yunnan area there exists complex coupling effect between lower velocity layer or asthenosphere and crustal block. The distribution of structure driving force looks like a palm extending to northeast. According to the time delay between fast and slow split shear waves, it is deduced that the thickness of anisotropy layer is 60~225 km with variation range roughly equal to that of 104~260 km of the buried depth of lower velocity layer of the earth in Yunnan area. So it suggests the top of anisotropy zone starts from the bottom of crust or from the lower velocity layer varying with specific locations related to the tremendous variation of the Moho discontinuity in Yunnan area. Furthermore, it is deduced that the

  12. Anisotropy of seasonal snow measured by polarimetric phase differences in radar time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinss, S.; Löwe, H.; Proksch, M.; Lemmetyinen, J.; Wiesmann, A.; Hajnsek, I.

    2015-11-01

    Snow settles under the force of gravity and recrystallizes by vertical temperature gradients. Both effects are assumed to form oriented ice crystals which induce an anisotropy in mechanical, thermal, and dielectric properties of the snow pack. On microscopic scales, the anisotropy could be hitherto determined only from stereology or computer tomography of samples taken from snow pits. In this paper we present an alternative method and show how the anisotropy of a natural snow pack can be observed contact- and destruction-free with polarimetric radar measurements. The copolar phase differences (CPD) of polarized microwaves transmitted through dry snow were analyzed for four winter seasons (2009-2013) from the SnowScat Instrument, installed at a test site near the town of Sodankylä, Finnland. An electrodynamic model was established based on anisotropic optics and on Maxwell-Garnett-type mixing formulas to provide a link between the structural anisotropy and the measured CPD. The anisotropy values derived from the CPD were compared with in-situ anisotropy measurements obtained by computer tomography. In addition, we show that the CPD measurements obtained from SnowScat show the same temporal evolution as space-borne CPD measurements from the satellite TerraSAR-X. The presented dataset provides a valuable basis for the future development of snow models capable of including the anisotropic structure of snow.

  13. Variation in the strain anisotropy of Zircaloy with temperature and strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strain anisotropy was investigated at temperatures in the range 293 to 1117K in circular tensile specimens prepared from rolled Zircaloy-2 plate so that their tensile axes were parallel to and transverse to the rolling direction. The strain anisotropy factor for both types of specimen increased markedly in the high alpha phase region above 923K reaching a maximum at circa 1070K. Above this temperature in the alpha-plus-beta phase region the strain anisotropy decreased rapidly as the proportion of beta phase increased and was almost non-existent at 1173K. The strain anisotropy was markedly strain dependent, particularly in the high alpha phase region. The study was extended to Zircaloy-4 pressurized water reactor (PWR) 17 x 17 type fuel rod tubing specimens which were strained under biaxial conditions using cooling conditions which promoted uniform diametral strain over most of their lengths (circa 250 mm). In these circumstances the strain anisotropy is manifest by a reduction in length. Measurement of this change along with that in diameter and wall thickness produced data from which the strain anisotropy factor was calculated. The results, although influenced by additional factors discussed in the paper, were similar to those observed in the uniaxial Zircaloy-2 tensile tests. (author)

  14. Limits on the ion temperature anisotropy in the turbulent intracluster medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Lima, R.; Yan, H.; de Gouveia Dal Pino, E. M.; Lazarian, A.

    2016-08-01

    Turbulence in the weakly collisional intracluster medium (ICM) of galaxies is able to generate strong thermal velocity anisotropies in the ions (with respect to the local magnetic field direction), if the magnetic moment of the particles is conserved in the absence of Coulomb collisions. In this scenario, the anisotropic pressure magnetohydrodynamic (AMHD) turbulence shows a very different statistical behaviour from the standard MHD one and is unable to amplify seed magnetic fields. This is in contrast to previous cosmological MHD simulations that are successful in explaining the observed magnetic fields in the ICM. On the other hand, temperature anisotropies can also drive plasma instabilities that can relax the anisotropy. This work aims to compare the relaxation rate with the growth rate of the anisotropies driven by the turbulence. We employ quasi-linear theory to estimate the ion scattering rate resulting from the parallel firehose, mirror and ion-cyclotron instabilities, for a set of plasma parameters resulting from AMHD simulations of the turbulent ICM. We show that the ICM turbulence can sustain only anisotropy levels very close to the instability thresholds. We argue that the AMHD model that bounds the anisotropies at the marginal stability levels can describe the Alfvénic turbulence cascade in the ICM.

  15. Anisotropy of seasonal snow measured by polarimetric phase differences in radar time series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Leinss

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Snow settles under the force of gravity and recrystallizes by vertical temperature gradients. Both effects are assumed to form oriented ice crystals which induce an anisotropy in mechanical, thermal, and dielectric properties of the snow pack. On microscopic scales, the anisotropy could be hitherto determined only from stereology or computer tomography of samples taken from snow pits. In this paper we present an alternative method and show how the anisotropy of a natural snow pack can be observed contact- and destruction-free with polarimetric radar measurements. The copolar phase differences (CPD of polarized microwaves transmitted through dry snow were analyzed for four winter seasons (2009–2013 from the SnowScat Instrument, installed at a test site near the town of Sodankylä, Finnland. An electrodynamic model was established based on anisotropic optics and on Maxwell–Garnett-type mixing formulas to provide a link between the structural anisotropy and the measured CPD. The anisotropy values derived from the CPD were compared with in-situ anisotropy measurements obtained by computer tomography. In addition, we show that the CPD measurements obtained from SnowScat show the same temporal evolution as space-borne CPD measurements from the satellite TerraSAR-X. The presented dataset provides a valuable basis for the future development of snow models capable of including the anisotropic structure of snow.

  16. The plastic anisotropy of an Al-Li-Cu-Zr alloy extrusion in unidirectional deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyttle, M. T.; Wert, J. A.

    1996-11-01

    The plastic anisotropy resulting from the initial deformation microstructure and various aging treatments applied to several regions of an AA2090 near-net-shape extrusion has been investigated. Yield behavior was measured by uniaxial compression in multiple orientations of each region. Two models of the plastic anisotropy were generated: the Taylor/Bishop-Hill model, based on crystallographic texture, and the plastic inclusion model, developed by Hosford and Zeisloft,[5] which incorporates anisotropic-precipitate effects. In overaged conditions, the Taylor/Bishop-Hill model adequately describes the observed plastic anisotropy. As the strengthening increment due to second-phase particles increases, there is a concurrent increase in the magnitude of the precipitate contribution to anisotropy. This anisotropy can not be accurately predicted solely by crystallographic texture. By incorporation of terms describing the precipitate anisotropy, the plastic inclusion model correctly predicts the yield strength variation in all regions tested. Examination of the fundamental interaction between matrix and precipitation strengthening reveals that there is a stronger basis for taking the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) of the precipitates as a constant, rather than their effective yield strength. This consideration provides a more consistent and accurate form of the plastic inclusion model.

  17. Design of the detector to observe the energetic charged particles: a part of the solar X-ray spectrophotometer ChemiX onboard Interhelio-Probe mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudnik, Oleksiy; Sylwester, Janusz; Kowalinski, Miroslaw; Bakala, Jaroslaw; Siarkowski, Marek; Evgen Kurbatov, mgr..

    2016-07-01

    Cosmic particle radiation may damages payload's electronics, optics, and sensors during of long-term scientific space mission especially the interplanetary ones. That is why it's extremely important to prevent failures of digital electronics, CCDs, semiconductor detectors at the times of passing through regions of enhanced charged particle fluxes. Well developed models of the Earth's radiation belts allow to predict and to protect sensitive equipment against disastrous influence of radiation due to energetic particle contained in the Van Allen belts. In the contrary interplanetary probes flying far away from our planet undergoes passages through clouds of plasma and solar cosmic rays not predictable by present models. Especially these concerns missions planned for non-ecliptic orbits. The practical approach to protect sensitive modules may be to measure the in situ particle fluxes with high time resolution and generation of alarm flags, which will switch off sensitive units of particular scientific equipment. The ChemiX (Chemical composition in X-rays) instrument is being developed by the Solar Physics Division of Polish Space Research Centre for the Interhelio-Probe interplanetary mission. Charged particle bursts can badly affect the regular measurements of X-ray spectra of solar origin. In order to detect presence of these enhanced particle fluxes the Background Particle Monitor (BPM) was developed constituting now a vital part of ChemiX. The BPM measurements of particle fluxes will assist to determine level of X-ray spectra contamination. Simultaneously BPM will measure the energy spectra of ambient particles. We present overall structure, design, technical and a scientific characteristic of BPM, particle sorts, and energy ranges to be registered. We describe nearly autonomous modular structure of BPM consisting of detector head, analogue and digital electronics modules, and of module of secondary power supply [1-3]. Detector head consists of three

  18. Herschel/HIFI observations of interstellar OH+ and H2O+ towards W49N: a probe of diffuse clouds with a small molecular fraction

    CERN Document Server

    Neufeld, D A; Sonnentrucker, P; Black, J H; Pearson, J; Yu, S; Phillips, T G; Lis, D C; De Luca, M; Herbst, E; Rimmer, P; Gerin, M; Bell, T A; Boulanger, F; Cernicharo, J; Coutens, A; Dartois, E; Kazmierczak, M; Encrenaz, P; Falgarone, E; Geballe, T R; Giesen, T; Godard, B; Goldsmith, P F; Gry, C; Gupta, H; Hennebelle, P; Hily-Blant, P; Joblin, C; Ko\\los, R; Kre\\lowski, J; Mart\\in-Pintado, J; Menten, K M; Monje, R; Mookerjea, B; Perault, M; Persson, C; Plume, R; Salez, M; Schlemmer, S; Schmidt, M; Stutzki, J; Teyssier, D; Vastel, C; Cros, A; Klein, K; Lorenzani, A; Philipp, S; Samoska, L A; Shipman, R; Tielens, A G G M; Szczerba, R; Zmuidzinas, J

    2010-01-01

    We report the detection of absorption by interstellar hydroxyl cations and water cations, along the sight-line to the bright continuum source W49N. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument, in dual beam switch mode, to observe the 972 GHz N = 1 - 0 transition of OH+ and the 1115 GHz 1(11) - 0(00) transition of ortho-H2O+. The resultant spectra show absorption by ortho-H2O+, and strong absorption by OH+, in foreground material at velocities in the range 0 to 70 km/s with respect to the local standard of rest. The inferred OH+/H2O+ abundance ratio ranges from ~ 3 to ~ 15, implying that the observed OH+ arises in clouds of small molecular fraction, in the 2 - 8% range. This conclusion is confirmed by the distribution of OH+ and H2O+ in Doppler velocity space, which is similar to that of atomic hydrogen, as observed by means of 21 cm absorption measurements, and dissimilar from that typical of other molecular tracers. The observed OH+/H abundance ratio of a few E-8 suggests a cosmic ray ionization rate for atomic ...

  19. Velocity anisotropy in tidally limited star clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Tiongco, Maria; Varri, Anna Lisa

    2015-01-01

    We explore the long-term evolution of the anisotropy in the velocity space of star clusters starting with different structural and kinematical properties. We show that the evolution of the radial anisotropy strength and its radial variation within a cluster contain distinct imprints of the cluster initial structural properties, dynamical history, and of the external tidal field of its host galaxy. Initially isotropic and compact clusters with small initial values of the ratio of the half-mass to Jacobi radius, $r_h/r_J$, develop a strong radial anisotropy during their long-term dynamical evolution. Many clusters, if formed with small values of $r_h/r_J$, should now be characterized by a significant radial anisotropy increasing with the distance from the cluster centre, reaching its maximum at a distance between 0.2 $r_J$ and 0.4 $r_J$, and then becoming more isotropic or mildly tangentially anisotropic in the outermost regions. A similar radial variation of the anisotropy can also result from an early violent...

  20. Herschel observations of extra-ordinary sources: H2S as a probe of dense gas and possibly hidden luminosity toward the Orion KL hot core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present Herschel/HIFI observations of the light hydride H2S obtained from the full spectral scan of the Orion Kleinmann-Low nebula (Orion KL) taken as part of the Herschel Observations of EXtra-Ordinary Sources GT (guaranteed time) key program. In total, we observe 52, 24, and 8 unblended or slightly blended features from H2 32S, H2 34S, and H2 33S, respectively. We only analyze emission from the so-called hot core, but emission from the plateau, extended ridge, and/or compact ridge are also detected. Rotation diagrams for ortho and para H2S follow straight lines given the uncertainties and yield T rot = 141 ± 12 K. This indicates H2S is in local thermodynamic equilibrium and is well characterized by a single kinetic temperature or an intense far-IR radiation field is redistributing the population to produce the observed trend. We argue the latter scenario is more probable and find that the most highly excited states (E up ≳ 1000 K) are likely populated primarily by radiation pumping. We derive a column density, N tot(H2 32S) = 9.5 ± 1.9 × 1017 cm–2, gas kinetic temperature, T kin = 120±1013 K, and constrain the H2 volume density, nH2 ≳ 9 × 10 7 cm–3, for the H2S emitting gas. These results point to an H2S origin in markedly dense, heavily embedded gas, possibly in close proximity to a hidden self-luminous source (or sources), which are conceivably responsible for Orion KL's high luminosity. We also derive an H2S ortho/para ratio of 1.7 ± 0.8 and set an upper limit for HDS/H2S of <4.9 × 10 –3.