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Sample records for anisoles

  1. Developmental immunotoxicity testing of 4-methyl anisole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonk, Elisa C M; Verhoef, Aart; Gremmer, Eric R; van Loveren, Henk; Piersma, Aldert H

    2015-07-01

    The developmental immunotoxicity of 4-methyl anisole (4MA) was investigated in the rat. Four study designs were used, with either premating or post-weaning onset of exposure, continued to postnatal day 50, and with or without additional oral gavage of pups from postnatal day 10 onward. Reduced litter size (benchmark dose lower confidence limit (BMDL) 80mg/kg bw/day) was the most sensitive developmental parameter, with pup relative organ weight effects observed at similar BMDLs, in the absence of maternal toxicity. Eosinophil numbers were reduced at lower doses (BMDL 16mg/kg bw/day). KLH challenge resulted in increased IL-13 and TNF-α responses, and variably reduced IgG production (BMDL 27mg/kg bw/day). T4 levels were reduced by 11% at maximum with a BMDL of 73mg/kg bw/day. Differences between exposure cohorts were limited and were considered to be without biological significance. This study shows that 4MA induces developmental immunotoxicity at doses below those inducing developmental and general toxicity. These observations being independent of the study designs applied suggest that the post-weaning period, included in all designs, is the most relevant sensitive period for inducing 4MA mediated developmental immunotoxicity. Moreover, this study stresses the importance of including developmental immunotoxicity testing by default in regulatory toxicology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Enhanced solar light absorption of graphene by interaction with anisole

    KAUST Repository

    Kahaly, M. Upadhyay

    2014-10-01

    We study suspended graphene in contact with the organic molecule anisole to analyse the implications of the interaction for the optical absorption, using first principle calculations. Because of a weak interaction multiple orientations of the molecule with respect to the graphene sheet are possible. A substantial enhancement of the optical absorption independent of the specific orientation is observed, which is promising for energy harvesting. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis of 4-Methylene-2-cyclohexenones and Their Aromatization Reaction toward para-Methoxylmethyl Anisole Derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jeong Mi; Lee, Ka Young; Kim, Jae Nyoung

    2004-01-01

    We and other groups have reported the selective introduction of nucleophiles at the secondary benzylic position of the Baylis-Hillman acetates via the corresponding DABCO salts. Thus, we envisioned that we could prepare 4-methylene- 2-cyclohexenone skeleton and para-methoxymethyl anisoles by combining the DABCO salt concept and the aromatization reaction with iodine in methanol. Suitably substituted anisoles are useful as the starting materials for the fragrances, dyes and pesticides, as antioxidants in oils and fats, or as stabilizers of plastics. Moreover, paramethoxymethyl anisoles have been used for the kinetic acetalization of diol or amino alcohol systems in the presence of DDQ5 during the synthesis of (+)-FR900482, taxotere side chain,5c cyclopropyl lactone oxylipins, and erythromycin A.

  4. Highly Selective Liquid-Phase Benzylation of Anisole with Solid-Acid Zeolite Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poreddy, Raju; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Riisager, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Zeolites were evaluated as solid acid catalysts for the liquid-phase benzylation of anisole with benzyl alcohol, benzyl bromide, and benzyl chloride at 80 °C. Among the examined zeolites, H-mordenite-10 (H-MOR-10) demonstrated particular high activity (>99 %) and excellent selectivity (>96...

  5. Non-covalent interactions in anisole-(CO2)(n) (n=1, 2) complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Becucci, M.; Mazzoni, F.; Pietraperzia, G.; Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Hobza, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 34 (2017), s. 22749-22758 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : density functional theory * anisole-water complex * equation of state Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 4.123, year: 2016

  6. ASETILASI PADA FENOL DAN ANISOL MENGGUNAKAN ANHIDRIDA ASAM ASETAT BERKATALIS Zr4+-ZEOLIT BETA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DA Retnoningrum

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Zeolit beta pada umumnya memiliki keasaman tinggi dan berpotensi aktif sebagai katalis heterogen dalam asilasi Friedel-Crafts senyawa aromatik. Untuk meningkatkan stabilitas dan selektivitasnya, zeolit beta perlu diaktivasi dan dimodifikasi terlebih dahulu dengan mengembankan logam aktif zirkonium dengan metode pertukaran ion. Karakterisasi katalis meliputi analisis kristalinitas katalis dengan XRD, sifat permukaan katalis dengan Surface Area Analyzer dan uji keasaman dengan pengadsorbsi piridin. Dalam penelitian ini, dipelajari aktivitas dan selektivitas katalis Zr4+-zeolit beta dalam reaksi asetilasi fenol dan anisol. Reaksi dilakukan pada berbagai variasi suhu yaitu 100 dan 130C dengan waktu reaksi yaitu pada jam ke 4, 8 dan 12. Hasil asetilasi kemudian dianalisis menggunakan GC, FTIR dan analisis produk menggunakan GC-MS. Asetilasi fenol dengan katalis Zr4+-zeolit beta menghasilkan produk fenil etanoat dengan kadar 95,87% dan selektivitas 100%. Hasil ini didapatkan pada suhu reaksi 130C dan waktu reaksi 8 jam. Asetilasi pada cincin benzena baik pada fenol maupun anisol tidak terjadi, hal ini karena asetilasi pada cincin benzena lebih sukar dibandingkan asetilasi pada gugus OH fenol. Perlu adanya kondisi lain untuk melakukan asetilasi pada cincin benzena. Asetilasi anisol pada waktu reaksi 24 jam dan temperatur 130C didapatkan produk dengan kadar 74%.Beta zeolite generally has a high acidity and potentially active as heterogeneous catalyst in the Friedel-Crafts acylation of aromatic compounds. To improve its stability and selectivity, beta zeolite needs to be activated and modified in advance with zirconium to elicit active metal using ion exchange method. Characterization of catalyst include catalyst’s crystallinity using XRD analysis, the nature of the catalyst surface with the Surface Area Analyzer and the acidity test using pyridine adsorption. In the current study the activity and the selectivity of catalyst Zr4+-beta zeolite

  7. Predicting fluorescence quantum yield for anisole at elevated temperatures and pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Tran, K. H.; Morin, C.; Bonnety, J.; Legros, G.; Guibert, P.

    2017-07-01

    Aromatic molecules are promising candidates for using as a fluorescent tracer for gas-phase scalar parameter diagnostics in a drastic environment like engines. Along with anisole turning out an excellent temperature tracer by Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence (PLIF) diagnostics in Rapid Compression Machine (RCM), its fluorescence signal evolution versus pressure and temperature variation in a high-pressure and high-temperature cell have been reported in our recent paper on Applied Phys. B by Tran et al. Parallel to this experimental study, a photophysical model to determine anisole Fluorescence Quantum Yield (FQY) is delivered in this paper. The key to development of the model is the identification of pressure, temperature, and ambient gases, where the FQY is dominated by certain processes of the model (quenching effect, vibrational relaxation, etc.). In addition to optimization of the vibrational relaxation energy cascade coefficient and the collision probability with oxygen, the non-radiative pathways are mainly discussed. The common non-radiative rate (intersystem crossing and internal conversion) is simulated in parametric form as a function of excess vibrational energy, derived from the data acquired at different pressures and temperatures from the literature. A new non-radiative rate, namely, the equivalent Intramolecular Vibrational Redistribution or Randomization (IVR) rate, is proposed to characterize anisole deactivated processes. The new model exhibits satisfactory results which are validated against experimental measurements of fluorescence signal induced at a wavelength of 266 nm in a cell with different bath gases (N2, CO2, Ar and O2), a pressure range from 0.2 to 4 MPa, and a temperature range from 473 to 873 K.

  8. Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of MoCo/USY Catalyst on Hydrodeoxygenation Reaction of Anisole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugrahaningtyas, K. D.; Suharbiansah, R. S. R.; Rahmawati, F.

    2018-03-01

    This research aims to prepare, characterize, and study the catalytic activity of Molybdenum (Mo) and Cobalt (Co) metal with supporting material Ultra Stable Y-Zeolite (USY), to produce catalysts with activity in hydrotreatment reaction and in order to eliminate impurities compounds that containing unwanted groups heteroatoms. The bimetallic catalysts MoCo/USY were prepared by wet impregnation method with weight variation of Co metal 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, and Mo metal 8% (w/w), respectively. Activation method of the catalyst included calcination, oxidation, reduction and the crystallinity was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), the acidity of the catalyst was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gravimetry method, minerals present in the catalyst was analyzed using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), and surface of the catalyst was analyzed using Surface Area Analyzer (SAA). Catalytic activity test (benzene yield product) of MoCo/USY on hydrodeoxigenation reaction of anisole aimed to determine the effect of Mo-Co/USY for catalytic activity in the reaction hydrodeoxigenation (HDO) anisole. Based on characterization and test of catalytic activity, it is known that catalytic of MoCo/USY 2% (catalyst B) shows best activities with acidity of 10.209 mmol/g, specific area of catalyst of 426.295 m2/g, pore average of 14.135 Å, total pore volume 0.318 cc/g, and total yield of HDO products 6.06%.

  9. Physical properties of {anisole + n-alkanes} at temperatures between (293.15 and 303.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Jimaz, Adel S.; Al-Kandary, Jasem A.; Abdul-latif, Abdul-Haq M.; Al-Zanki, Adnan M.

    2005-01-01

    Density ρ, viscosity η, and refractive index n D , values of {anisole + hexane, or heptane, or octane, or nonane, or decane, or dodecane} binary mixtures over the entire range of mole fraction at temperatures (293.15, 298.15, and 303.15) K, have been investigated at atmospheric pressure. The excess molar volume V E , has been calculated from the experimental measurements. These results were fitted to Redlich and Kister polynomial equation to estimate the binary interaction parameters. The viscosity data were correlated with equations of Grunberg and Nissan, and McAllister. The refractive indices data were used to calculate the specific refractivity R 12 , and also correlated with Lorentz-Lorenz equation. While the excess molar volumes of {anisole + hexane} are negative, and {anisole + heptane} are sigmoidal S-shaped, the remaining binary mixtures are positive. The effects of n-alkanes chain length as well as the temperature on the excess molar volume have been studied. The calculated values have been qualitatively used to explain the intermolecular interaction between the mixing components

  10. Photodissociation of anisole and absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hong; Pratt, S T

    2013-11-21

    We have studied the photodissociation dynamics of anisole (C6H5OCH3) at 193 nm and determined the absolute photoionization cross-section of the phenoxy radical at 118.2 nm (10.486 eV) relative to the known cross-section of the methyl radical. Even at this energy, there is extensive fragmentation of the phenoxy radical upon photoionization, which is attributed to ionizing transitions that populate low-lying excited electronic states of the cation. For phenoxy radicals with less than ∼1 eV of internal energy, we find a cross-section for the production of the phenoxy cation of 14.8 ± 3.8 Mb. For radicals with higher internal energy, dissociative ionization is the dominant process, and for internal energies of ∼2.7-3.7 eV, we find a total cross-section (photoionization plus dissociative ionization) of 22.3 ± 4.1 Mb. The results are discussed relative to the recently reported photoionization cross-section of phenol.

  11. Alternative sorptive extraction method for gas chromatography determination of halogenated anisoles in water and wine samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montes, R.; Rodriguez, I.; Rubi, E.; Bollain, M.H.; Cela, R.

    2007-01-01

    An alternative sorptive microextraction method for the determination of five halogenated anisoles in water and wine matrices is proposed. Analytes were concentrated in an inexpensive and disposable piece of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), desorbed with a small volume of organic solvent, and determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) or tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of several factors on the efficiency of extraction and desorption steps was investigated in detail and the observed behaviour justified on the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics of the solid-phase microextraction technique. Under optimised conditions, analytes were first extracted in the headspace (HS) mode, at room temperature, for 2.5 h and then desorbed with 1 mL of n-pentane. This extract was further evaporated to 50 μL. The overall extraction yield of the procedure ranged from 40 to 55% and the limits of quantification remained between 0.5 and 20 ng L -1 , depending on the compound considered and the detection technique. Precision and linearity of the method were excellent for all species with both GC-ECD and GC-MS/MS detection. Matrix effects were evaluated with different water and wine samples; moreover, the suitability of the PDMS sorbent for storage of analytes, under different conditions, was demonstrated

  12. Alternative sorptive extraction method for gas chromatography determination of halogenated anisoles in water and wine samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montes, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain); Rodriguez, I. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)], E-mail: qnisaac@usc.es; Rubi, E.; Bollain, M.H.; Cela, R. [Departamento de Quimica Analitica, Nutricion y Bromatologia, Instituto de Investigacion y Analisis Alimentario, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, Santiago de Compostela 15782 (Spain)

    2007-09-05

    An alternative sorptive microextraction method for the determination of five halogenated anisoles in water and wine matrices is proposed. Analytes were concentrated in an inexpensive and disposable piece of bulk polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), desorbed with a small volume of organic solvent, and determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD) or tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). The influence of several factors on the efficiency of extraction and desorption steps was investigated in detail and the observed behaviour justified on the basis of thermodynamics and kinetics of the solid-phase microextraction technique. Under optimised conditions, analytes were first extracted in the headspace (HS) mode, at room temperature, for 2.5 h and then desorbed with 1 mL of n-pentane. This extract was further evaporated to 50 {mu}L. The overall extraction yield of the procedure ranged from 40 to 55% and the limits of quantification remained between 0.5 and 20 ng L{sup -1}, depending on the compound considered and the detection technique. Precision and linearity of the method were excellent for all species with both GC-ECD and GC-MS/MS detection. Matrix effects were evaluated with different water and wine samples; moreover, the suitability of the PDMS sorbent for storage of analytes, under different conditions, was demonstrated.

  13. Contributions of BrCl, Br2, BrOCl, Br2O, and HOBr to regiospecific bromination rates of anisole and bromoanisoles in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivey, John D; Bickley, Mark A; Victor, Daniel A

    2015-04-21

    When bromide-containing waters are chlorinated, conventional wisdom typically assumes HOBr is the only active brominating agent. Several additional and often-overlooked brominating agents (including BrCl, Br2, BrOCl, Br2O) can form in chlorinated waters, albeit at generally lower concentrations than HOBr. The extent to which these additional brominating agents influence bromination rates of disinfection byproduct precursors is, however, poorly understood. Herein, the influence of BrCl, Br2, BrOCl, Br2O, and HOBr toward rates of sequential bromination of anisole was quantified. Conditions affecting bromine speciation (e.g., pH, concentrations of chloride, bromide, and chlorine) were varied, and regiospecific second-order rate constants were calculated for reactions of each brominating agent with anisole, 2-bromoanisole, and 4-bromoanisole. The regioselectivity of anisole bromination changed with pH, consistent with the participation of more than one brominating agent. Under conditions representative of chlorinated drinking water, contributions to bromination rates decreased as BrCl > BrOCl > HOBr > Br2O (Br2 negligible). The second-order rate constant determined for net bromination of anisole by HOBr is up to 3000-times less than reported in previous studies (which assumed HOBr was the only active brominating agent). Accordingly, models that assume HOBr is the only kinetically relevant brominating agent in solutions of free bromine may be insufficient for reactions involving modestly nucleophilic organic compounds.

  14. Enthalpy of formation of anisole: implications for the controversy on the O-H bond dissociation enthalpy in phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Ricardo G; Agapito, Filipe; Diogo, Hermínio P; da Piedade, Manuel E Minas

    2014-11-20

    Significant discrepancies in the literature data for the enthalpy of formation of gaseous anisole, ΔfHmo(PhOCH3, g), have fueled an ongoing controversy regarding the most reliable enthalpy of formation of the phenoxy radical and of the gas phase O-H bond dissociation enthalpy, DHo(PhO-H), in phenol. In the present work ΔfHmo(PhOCH3, g) was reassessed using a combination of calorimetric determinations and high-level (W2-F12) ab initio calculations. Static-bomb combustion calorimetry led to the standard molar enthalpy of formation of liquid anisole at 298.15 K, ΔfHmo(PhOCH3, l) = −(117.1 ± 1.4) kJ·mol(-1). The corresponding enthalpy of vaporization was obtained as, ΔvapHmo(PhOCH3) = 46.41 ± 0.26 kJ·mol(-1), by Calvet-drop microcalorimetry. These results give ΔfHmo(PhOCH3, g) = −(70.7 ± 1.4) kJ·mol(-1), in excellent agreement with ΔfHmo(PhOCH3, g) = −(70.8 ± 3.2) kJ·mol(-1), obtained from the W2-F12 calculations. The ΔfHmo(PhOCH3, g) here recommended leads to ΔfHmo(PhO•, g) = 55.5 ± 2.4 kJ·mol(-)1 and DH°(PhO-H) = 368.1 ± 2.6 kJ·mol(-1).

  15. Nonradiative inter- and intramolecular energy transfer from the aromatic donor anisole to a synthesized photoswitchable acceptor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Munmun; Bhattacharya, Sudeshna; Misra, Tapas; Mukhopadhyay, Rupa; De, Asish; Chowdhury, Joydeep; Ganguly, Tapan

    2010-02-01

    We report steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements on acetonitrile (ACN) solutions of the model compounds, energy donor anisole (A) and a photoswitchable acceptor N,N'-1,2-phenylene di-p-tosylamide (B) and the multichromophore (M) where A and B are connected by a spacer containing both rigid triple (acetylenic) and flexible methylene bonds. Both steady state and time correlated single photon counting measurements demonstrate that though intermolecular energy transfer, of Forster type, between the donor and acceptor moieties occurs with rate 10(8)s(-1) but when these two reacting components are linked by a spacer (multichromophore, M) the observed transfer rate ( approximately 10(11)s(-1)) enhances. This seemingly indicates that the imposition of the spacer by inserting a triple bond may facilitate in the propagation of electronic excitation energy through bond. The time resolved fluorescence measurements along with the theoretical predictions using Configuration interaction singles (CIS) method by using 6-31G (d,p) basis set, implemented in the Gaussian package indicate the formations of the two excited conformers of B. The experimental findings made from the steady state and time resolved fluorescence measurements demonstrate that, though two different isomeric species of the acceptor B are formed in the excited singlet states, the prevailing singlet-singlet nonradiative energy transfer route was found from the donor A to the relatively longer-lived isomeric species of B. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Isobaric (vapour + liquid) equilibria of binary systems containing butyl acetate for the separation of methoxy aromatic compounds (anisole and guaiacol) from biomass fast pyrolysis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Hao; Xia, Shuqian; Wu, Meng; Ma, Peisheng

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The two binary systems related to pyrolysis oil have been reported. • The VLE data were correlated well by the activity coefficient models. • The UNIFAC (Do) model was applied to predict the experimental VLE data. • The interaction parameter (ACOCH 3 –CH 3 COO) was obtained and proved to be reliable. • The obtained interaction parameters by NRTL model were used in the separation process design for the ternary mixture. - Abstract: Developing value-added chemicals from pyrolysis oil has been gaining increasing attention. Thus effective separation and purification of the pyrolysis oil are important and the phase equilibrium data are essential for the design and simulation of the processes. In this study, isobaric vapour–liquid equilibrium (VLE) for the two binary mixtures (butyl acetate + anisole) and (butyl acetate + guaiacol) have been determined at 101.33 kPa, a knowledge of which is essential for the separation of methoxy aromatic compounds (anisole and guaiacol) from biomass fast pyrolysis oil using butyl acetate as a solvent. All the experimental values were confirmed to be thermodynamically consistent using the van Ness method. The NRTL, UNIQUAC, and Wilson activity coefficient models were applied to regress the experimental values. The calculated results agreed well with the measured values. Furthermore, the results were calculated by the UNIFAC (Do) method (modified UNIFAC model) in which aromatic methoxyl is treated as a group (ACOCH 3 ). The new interaction parameter (ACOCH 3 –CH 3 COO) was obtained and proved to be reliable. Based on the preceding results, a feasible separation process for the ternary mixture (butyl acetate + anisole + guaiacol) has been designed to obtain the required products

  17. Investigation of the ionization mechanism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using an ethanol/bromobenzene/chlorobenzene/anisole mixture as a dopant in liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Amad, Maan H.; Sioud, Salim

    2012-01-01

    RATIONALE An ethanol-based multicomponent dopant consisting of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v/v/v) has been used as a dopant for atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study the mechanism of ionization of PAHs assisted by the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant is investigated. METHODS The reactant background cluster ions of the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant observed in the positive ion APPI were studied. These studies were performed to investigate the mechanism behind the generation of a molecular radical cation (M +•) for PAHs by APPI assisted by the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant. Full scan and MS/MS analyses were conducted using an LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The effect of acidification of the mobile phase on the dopant cluster ion formation was also investigated. RESULTS With the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant, a single type of molecular radical cation M +• was observed for the studied PAHs. The characteristic ion signal of the multicomponent dopant mixture consisted of mainly anisole photoions at m/z 108.05697 and its adduct ions at m/z 124.05188 and 164.07061. The anisole ion response at m/z 108.05697 was stable in the presence of acetonitrile, methanol, water and 0.1% formic acid mobile phase composition. CONCLUSIONS The abundance formation of anisole photoions shows the universality of this multicomponent dopant in ionizing compounds with ionization energy ranging from 7.1-8.2 eV. Since the ionization energy of anisole is 8.2 eV and is lower than those of chlorobenzene (9.07 eV) and bromobenzene (9.0 eV), the mechanism of formation of anisole photoions even with its very minute amounts was not only governed by its photoionization by the krypton lamp photon energy (10.0 eV and 10.6 eV), but also by charge transfer from bromobenzene and chlorobenzene radical cations. PAH molecules were mainly ionized by charge transfer reaction from

  18. Investigation of the ionization mechanism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using an ethanol/bromobenzene/chlorobenzene/anisole mixture as a dopant in liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Amad, Maan H.

    2012-09-23

    RATIONALE An ethanol-based multicomponent dopant consisting of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v/v/v) has been used as a dopant for atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). In this study the mechanism of ionization of PAHs assisted by the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant is investigated. METHODS The reactant background cluster ions of the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant observed in the positive ion APPI were studied. These studies were performed to investigate the mechanism behind the generation of a molecular radical cation (M +•) for PAHs by APPI assisted by the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant. Full scan and MS/MS analyses were conducted using an LTQ Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The effect of acidification of the mobile phase on the dopant cluster ion formation was also investigated. RESULTS With the ethanol-based multicomponent dopant, a single type of molecular radical cation M +• was observed for the studied PAHs. The characteristic ion signal of the multicomponent dopant mixture consisted of mainly anisole photoions at m/z 108.05697 and its adduct ions at m/z 124.05188 and 164.07061. The anisole ion response at m/z 108.05697 was stable in the presence of acetonitrile, methanol, water and 0.1% formic acid mobile phase composition. CONCLUSIONS The abundance formation of anisole photoions shows the universality of this multicomponent dopant in ionizing compounds with ionization energy ranging from 7.1-8.2 eV. Since the ionization energy of anisole is 8.2 eV and is lower than those of chlorobenzene (9.07 eV) and bromobenzene (9.0 eV), the mechanism of formation of anisole photoions even with its very minute amounts was not only governed by its photoionization by the krypton lamp photon energy (10.0 eV and 10.6 eV), but also by charge transfer from bromobenzene and chlorobenzene radical cations. PAH molecules were mainly ionized by charge transfer reaction from

  19. Halogenated methyl-phenyl ethers (anisoles) in the environment: determination of vapor pressures, aqueous solubilities, Henry's law constants, and gas/water- (Kgw), n-octanol/water- (Kow) and gas/n-octanol (Kgo) partition coefficients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeifer, O; Lohmann, U; Ballschmiter, K

    2001-11-01

    Halogenated methyl-phenyl ethers (methoxybenzenes, anisoles) are ubiquitous organics in the environment although they are not produced in industrial quantities. Modelling the fate of organic pollutants such as halogenated anisoles requires a knowledge of the fundamental physico-chemical properties of these compounds. The isomer-specific separation and detection of 60 of the 134 possible congeners allowing an environmental fingerprinting are reported in this study. The vapor pressure p0(L) of more than 60 and further physico-chemical properties of 26 available congeners are given. Vapor pressures p0(L), water solubilities S(L)W, and n-octanol/water partition coefficients Kow were determined by capillary HR-GC (High Resolution Gas Chromatography) on a non-polar phase and by RP-HPLC (Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography) on a C18 phase with chlorobenzenes as reference standards. From these experimental data the Henry's law constants H, and the gas/water Kgw and gas/n-octanol Kgo partition coefficients were calculated. We found that vapor pressures, water solubilities, and n-octanol/water partition coefficients of the halogenated anisoles are close to those of the chlorobenzenes. A similar environmental fate of both groups can, therefore, be predicted.

  20. Thermodynamic properties of (tetradecane + benzene, + toluene, + chlorobenzene, + bromobenzene, + anisole) binary mixtures at T = (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mutalik, Venkatesh; Manjeshwar, Lata S.; Sairam, Malladi; Aminabhavi, Tejraj M.

    2006-01-01

    Density ρ, viscosity η, and refractive index n D , values for (tetradecane + benzene, + toluene, + chlorobenzene, + bromobenzene, + anisole) binary mixtures over the entire range of mole fraction have been measured at temperatures (298.15, 303.15, and 308.15) K at atmospheric pressure. The speed of sound u has been measured at T = 298.15 K only. Using these data, excess molar volume V E , deviations in viscosity Δη, Lorentz-Lorenz molar refraction ΔR, speed of sound Δu, and isentropic compressibility Δk s have been calculated. These results have been fitted to the Redlich and Kister polynomial equation to estimate the binary interaction parameters and standard deviations. Excess molar volumes have exhibited both positive and negative trends in many mixtures, depending upon the nature of the second component of the mixture. For the (tetradecane + chlorobenzene) binary mixture, an incipient inversion has been observed. Calculated thermodynamic quantities have been discussed in terms of intermolecular interactions between mixing components

  1. Enhanced solar light absorption of graphene by interaction with anisole

    KAUST Repository

    Kahaly, M. Upadhyay; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2014-01-01

    of the molecule with respect to the graphene sheet are possible. A substantial enhancement of the optical absorption independent of the specific orientation is observed, which is promising for energy harvesting. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spectroscopic Properties of Anisole at the Air-Ice Interface: A Combined Experimental-Computational Approach

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malongwe, J. K.; Nachtigallová, Dana; Corrochano, P.; Klán, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 23 (2016), s. 5755-5764 ISSN 0743-7463 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-12386S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * absorption spectra * aqueous solutions Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.833, year: 2016

  3. Effect of α-tocopherol, butylated-hydroxytoluene and hydroxy-anisole on the activation and binding of aflatoxin B1 to macromolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ch'ih, J.J.; Biedrzycka, D.; Devlin, T.M.

    1987-01-01

    The anti-oxidants, α-tocopherol(TPA), butylated-hydroxy-toluene(BHT) and hydroxyanisole(BHA) inhibit the carcinogenic and toxic effects of a variety of chemical compounds, their effect on aflatoxin B 1 (AFB 1 ) activation and binding was examined utilizing rat liver microsomes and cells. With a NADPH generating system, oxygen, microsomes, [ 3 H]-AFB 1 , 2.2 pmoles/h/mg protein was activated and bound to macromolecules. In hepatocytes, 3.4 and 1.4 pmoles of AFB 1 per 10 6 cells were taken up and bound to macromolecules, whereas the nucleic acid fraction contained 0.19 pmoles of bound AFB 1 . Moderate decreases of AFB 1 activation and binding were observed when TPA was present in both cell-free and hepatocytes systems. Only in hepatocytes, BHT inhibited the AFB 1 uptake and binding to nucleic acids. BHA, however, inhibited microsomal activation of AFB 1 by 73%; maximum inhibition was reached at 1 mM. AFB 1 uptake, and binding to nucleic acids were inhibited by 65% and 79% by BHA. GSH-transferase activity of cells treated with these agents was not altered. The effect of BHA at various concentrations on AFB activation was compared with cytochrome P-450 inhibitors; the ED 50 of SKF 525A, BHA and metyrapone was 9 uM, 80 uM and 380 uM respectively. The data suggest that TPA, BHA and BHT exert their effect by different mechanisms

  4. LIQUID-LIQUID EQUILIBRIA FOR BINARY MIXTURES OF WATER + ACETOPHENONE, 1-OCTANOL, ANISOLE, AND TOLUENE FROM 370?550 K. (R828130)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  5. Binding Energies of the pi-Stacked Anisole Dimer: New Molecular Beam-Laser Spectroscopy Experiments and CCSD(T) Calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Mazzoni, F.; Pasquini, M.; Pietraperzia, G.; Becucci, M.; Müller-Dethlefs, K.; Hobza, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 18 (2015), s. 6740-6746 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0058 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : binding energy * noncovalent interactions * pi stacking * laser spectroscopy * CCSD(T) calculations Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.771, year: 2015

  6. Structure and energetics of the anisole-Ar-n (n=1, 2, 3) complexes: high-resolution resonant two-photon and threshold ionization experiments, and quantum chemical calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazzoni, F.; Becucci, M.; Řezáč, Jan; Nachtigallová, Dana; Michels, F.; Hobza, Pavel; Müller-Dethlefs, K.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 19 (2015), s. 12530-12537 ISSN 1463-9076 R&D Projects: GA ČR GBP208/12/G016 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) ED2.1.00/03.0058 Program:ED Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : intermolecular interactions * noncovalent interactions * van der Waals Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.449, year: 2015

  7. Evaluation of Gravimetric Tar Determination in Particle Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus; Henriksen, Ulrik B.; Bentzen, Jens Dall

    2000-01-01

    A comparison of tar determination of particles from a down-draft gasifier using soxhlet extractions (with anisole, dichloromethane and acetone) and pyrolysis of the particles.......A comparison of tar determination of particles from a down-draft gasifier using soxhlet extractions (with anisole, dichloromethane and acetone) and pyrolysis of the particles....

  8. EFSA Panel on food contact materials, enzymes, flavourings and processing aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 2 (FGE.23Rev2): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) asked the Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (the Panel) to provide scientific advice to the Commission on the implications for human health of chemically defined flavouring substances used in or on foodstuffs...... in the Member States. In particular, the Panel was requested to evaluate 19 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 2 (FGE.23Rev2), using the Procedure as referred to in the Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. These 19 flavouring substances belong to chemical groups 15, 16, 22......-no: 03.022] Industry has informed that it occurs as a mixture of E- & Z-isomers, however, the composition of the mixture has to be specified. Two of the flavouring substances are classified into structural class I, seven are classified into structural class II and 10 are classified into structural class...

  9. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific O pinion Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 4 (FGE.23Rev4): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beltoft, Vibe Meister; Binderup, Mona-Lise; Frandsen, Henrik Lauritz

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision i...... also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 21 candidate substances. © European Food Safety Authority, 2013......The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 21 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 4, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. This revision...

  10. EFSA Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids (CEF); Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 3 (FGE.23Rev3): Aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives from chemical groups 15, 16, 22, 26 and 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to evaluate 20 flavouring substances in the Flavouring Group Evaluation 23, Revision 3, using the Procedure in Commission Regulation (EC) No 1565/2000. None...... of the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered. Specifications including complete purity criteria and identity for the materials of commerce have been provided for all 20 candidate substances....

  11. EFSA ; Scientific Opinion on Flavouring Group Evaluation 59, Revision 1 (FGE.59Rev1): Consideration of aliphatic and aromatic ethers evaluated by JECFA (61st meeting and 63rd meeting) structurally related to aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic ethers including anisole derivatives evaluated by EFSA in FGE.23 Rev2 (2010)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, John Christian; Nørby, Karin Kristiane; Beltoft, Vibe Meister

    The Panel on Food Contact Materials, Enzymes, Flavourings and Processing Aids of the European Food Safety Authority was requested to consider evaluations of flavouring substances assessed since 2000 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (the JECFA), and to decide whether further......, “No safety concern at estimated levels of intake as flavouring substances” based on the MSDI approach. Besides the safety assessment of these flavouring substances, the specifications for the materials of commerce have also been considered and for two substances, are information on the composition...

  12. Molecule of the Month

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    having solutions coloured red in methanol, violet in etha- nol, blue in isopropyl alcohol, green in acetone and green- ish-yellow in anisole. The electronic ... concentrated sulfuric acid to obtain a symmetric triphenylpyrelium. Box 1. Compounds ...

  13. Biotransformations with plant tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carew, D P; Bainbridge, T

    1976-01-01

    Suspension cultures of Catharanthus roseus, Apocynum cannabinum and Conium maculatum were examined for their capacity to transform aniline, anisole, acetanilide, benzoic acid and coumarin. None of the cultures transformed acetanilide but each produced acetanilide when fed aniline. All three cultures converted benzoic acid to its para-hydroxy derivative. Coumarin was selectively hydroxylated at the 7-position by Catharanthus and Conium and anisole was O-demethylated only by older Catharanthus tissue.

  14. Cu(ll) mediated ATRP of MMA by using a novel tetradentate amine ligand with oligo(ethylene glycol) pendant groups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becer, C.R.; Hoogenboom, R.; Founier, D.; Schubert, U.S.

    2007-01-01

    A novel tetradentate amine ligand namely N,N,N,N,N;,N;-hexaoligo(ethylene glycol) triethylenetetramine (HOEGTETA) was employed in the homogenous ATRP of MMA in anisole using CuBr and CuBr2 as the catalyst and ethyl 2-bromoisobutyrate (EBiB) as an initiator. The effect of the polymerization

  15. The effect of the position of oxygen group to the aromatic ring to emission performance in a heavy-duty diesel engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhou, L.; Boot, M.D.; Goey, de L.P.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the soot-NOx trade-off and fuel efficiency of various aromatic oxygenates is investigated in a modern DAF heavy-duty diesel engine. All oxygenates were blended to diesel fuel such that the blend oxygen concentration was 2.59 wt.-%. The oxygenates in question, anisole, benzyl alcohol

  16. Application of Lavandula officinalis L. antioxidant of essential oils in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemically synthesized compounds such as butylated hydroxy-anisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) are used as antioxidants in food products. The safety of some of these compounds have been a great concern. So, there is a great interest in finding antioxidants from natural sources for food. Lipids, known as ...

  17. Processing of C60 thin films by Matrix-Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Fæster, Søren

    2011-01-01

    Thin films of fullerenes (C60) were deposited onto silicon using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The deposition was carried out from a frozen homogeneous dilute solution of C60 in anisole (0.67 wt%), and over a broad range of laser fluences, from 0.15 J/cm2 up to 3.9 J/cm2. MAPLE...

  18. Identification of Insecticidal Constituents from the Essential Oil from the Aerial Parts Stachys riederi var. japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Meirong; Liu, Qi Zhi; Liu, Zhi Long

    2018-05-17

    The essential oil of Stachys riederi var. japonica (Family: Lamiaceae) was extracted by hydrodistillation and determined by GC and GC-MS. A total of 40 components were identified, representing 96.01% of the total oil composition. The major compounds in the essential oil were acetanisole (15.43%), anisole (9.43%), 1,8-cineole (8.07%), geraniol (7.89%), eugenol (4.54%), caryophyllene oxide (4.47%), caryophyllene (4.21%) and linalool (4.07%). Five active constituents (acetanisole, anisole, 1,8-cineole, eugenol and geraniol) were identified by bioactivity-directed fractionation. The essential oil possessed fumigant toxicity against maize weevils ( Sitophilus zeamais ) and booklice ( Liposcelis bostrychophila ), with LC 50 values of 15.0 mg/L and 0.7 mg/L, respectively. Eugenol and anisole exhibited stronger fumigant toxicity than the oil against booklice. 1,8-Cineole showed stronger toxicity, and anisole as well as eugenol exhibited the same level of fumigant toxicity as the essential oil against maize weevils. The essential oil also exhibited contact toxicity against S. zeamais adults and L. bostrychophila , with LC 50 values of 21.8 µg/adult and 287.0 µg/cm², respectively. The results indicated that the essential oil of S. riederi var. japonica and its isolates show potential as fumigants, and for their contact toxicity against grain storage insects.

  19. A new approach to the synthesis of no-carrier-added fluorine-18 labeled fluorocatechols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, P.K.; Kilbourn, M.R.

    1990-01-01

    A new method of synthesizing fluorine-18 labelled fluorocatechols has been developed using a salicylaldehyde as a 'synthon' for a catechol. 2-Methoxy-4-nitrobenzaldehyde was treated with [ 18 F]fluoride ion, followed by cleavage of the anisole to yield the free phenol. The phenol was oxidized to the desired fluorocatechol

  20. Oxidation kinetics and soot formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K.

    1983-01-01

    The research objective is to clarify the role of aromaticity in the soot nucleation process by determining the relative importance of phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions in the complex combustion of aromatic compounds. Three sets of chemical flow reactor experiments have been designed to determine the relative importance of the phenyl radical/molecular oxygen and benzene/atomic oxygen reactions. The essential elements of these experiments are 1) the use of cresols and anisole formed during the high temperature oxidation of toluene as chemical reaction indicators; 2) the in situ photolysis of molecular oxygen to provide an oxygen atom perturbation in the reacting aromatic system; and 3) the high temperature pyrolysis of phenol, the cresols and possibly anisole.

  1. An empirical, quantitative approach to predict the reactivity of some substituted aromatic compounds towards reactive radical species (Cl2-*, Br2-*, *NO2, SO3-*, SO4-*) in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minero, Claudio; Maurino, Valter; Pelizzetti, Ezio; Vione, Davide

    2006-07-01

    The Hammett approach, applied to the reaction of various classes of aromatic compounds with the radicals Cl2-*, Br2-*, *NO2, SO3-*, and SO4-* yielded good predictive models, supported by high values of the correlation coefficient r2 in the case of phenols with Cl2-* and of phenolates with *NO2 and SO3-*. Lower but statistically significant correlation coefficients could be obtained for benzoates with Cl2-*, phenolates with Br2-*, and benzoates and anisoles with SO4-*.

  2. Catalytic constructive deoxygenation of lignin-derived phenols: new C-C bond formation processes from imidazole-sulfonates and ether cleavage reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckie, Stuart M; Harkness, Gavin J; Clarke, Matthew L

    2014-10-09

    As part of a programme aimed at exploiting lignin as a chemical feedstock for less oxygenated fine chemicals, several catalytic C-C bond forming reactions utilising guaiacol imidazole sulfonate are demonstrated. These include the cross-coupling of a Grignard, a non-toxic cyanide source, a benzoxazole, and nitromethane. A modified Meyers reaction is used to accomplish a second constructive deoxygenation on a benzoxazole functionalised anisole.

  3. Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms: The interplay between hot atom chemistry and gas kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaspar, P.P.; Garmestani, K.; Ferrieri, R.A.; Wolf, A.P.

    1990-01-01

    Recent results from the chemistry of recoiling carbon and silicon atoms illustrate the power of an experimental approach to the solution of complex mechanistic problems that combines the study of the reactions of recoiling atoms with conventional gas kinetic techniques. Included will be the reactions of 11 C atoms with anisole, addressing the question whether an aromatic pi-electron system can compete as a reactive site with carbon-hydrogen bonds

  4. AC – AC Converters for UPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusalin Lucian R. Păun

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper propose a new control technique forsingle – phase AC – AC converters used for a on-line UPSwith a good dynamic response, a reduced-partscomponents, a good output characteristic, a good powerfactorcorrection(PFC. This converter no needs anisolation transformer. A power factor correction rectifierand an inverter with the proposed control scheme has beendesigned and simulated using Caspoc2007, validating theconcept.

  5. Steam reforming of different biomass tar model compounds over Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artetxe, Maite; Alvarez, Jon; Nahil, Mohamad A.; Olazar, Martin; Williams, Paul T.

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Order of reactivity: anisole > furfural > indene > phenol > toluene > methyl naphthalene. • Higher coke deposition for oxygenates (1.5–2.8%) than for aromatics (0.5–0.8%). • Amorphous coke is deposited for oxygenates and filamentous carbon for aromatics. • Ni content of 20 wt.% shows the higher conversion (90%) and H_2 potential (63%). - Abstract: This work focuses on the removal of the tar derived from biomass gasification by catalytic steam reforming on Ni/Al_2O_3 catalysts. Different tar model compounds (phenol, toluene, methyl naphthalene, indene, anisole and furfural) were individually steam reformed (after dissolving each one in methanol), as well as a mixture of all of them, at 700 °C under a steam/carbon (S/C) ratio of 3 and 60 min on stream. The highest conversions and H_2 potential were attained for anisole and furfural, while methyl naphthalene presented the lowest reactivity. Nevertheless, the higher reactivity of oxygenates compared to aromatic hydrocarbons promoted carbon deposition on the catalyst (in the 1.5–2.8 wt.% range). When the concentration of methanol is decreased in the feedstock and that of toluene or anisole is increased, the selectivity to CO is favoured in the gaseous products, thus increasing coke deposition on the catalyst and decreasing catalyst activity for the steam reforming reaction. Moreover, an increase in Ni loading in the catalyst from 5 to 20% enhances carbon conversion and H_2 formation in the steam reforming of a mixture of all the model compounds studied, but these values decrease for a Ni content of 40%. Coke formation also increased by increasing Ni loading, attaining its maximum value for 40% Ni (6.5 wt.%).

  6. N-Chloro and N-bromosaccharins: valuable reagents for halogenation of electron rich aromatics and cohalogenation of alkenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Soraia P. L. de

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Chloro- and N-bromosaccharins react with electron rich aromatic compounds (anisole, acetanilide, N,N-dimethylaniline producing halogenated compounds. The reaction with N-bromosaccharin gives para- substituted compounds only, whereas N-chlorosaccharin produces orto and para mixtures (para isomer predominantly, ca. 4-5 : 1. The reactions of the N-halosaccharins with alkenes (cyclohexene, styrene, a-methylstyrene, and 1-hexene give the corresponding halohydrins.

  7. Experimental and Modeling Study of Solvent Diffusion in PDMS for Nanoparticle-Polymer Cosuspension Imprint Lithography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasio, Michelle; Lu, Kathy; Davis, Richey

    2015-09-15

    This study is the first that focuses on solvent migration in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp during the imprint lithography of ZnO-poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) hybrid suspensions. Using suspensions with varying solids loading levels and ZnO/PMMA ratios, the uptake of the anisole solvent in the stamp is evaluated as a function of time. Laser confocal microscopy is employed as a unique technique to measure the penetration depth of the solvent into the stamp. The suspension solids loading affects the anisole saturation depth in the PDMS stamp. For the suspensions with low solids loading, the experimental data agree with the model for non-Fickian diffusion through a rubbery-elastic polymer. For the suspensions with high solids loading, the data agree more with a sigmoidal diffusion curve, reflecting the rubbery-viscous behavior of a swelling polymer. This difference is due to the degree of swelling in the PDMS. Higher solids loadings induce more swelling because the rate of anisole diffusing into the stamp is increased, likely due to the less dense buildup of the solids as the suspension dries.

  8. Heteropoly acid encapsulated into zeolite imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) cage as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for Friedel–Crafts acylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammar, Muhammad; Jiang, Sai; Ji, Shengfu, E-mail: jisf@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2016-01-15

    A new strategy has been developed for the encapsulation of the phosphotungstic heteropoly acid (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40} denoted as PTA) into zeolite imidazolate framework (ZIF-67) cage and the PTA@ZIF-67(ec) catalysts with different PTA content were prepared. The structure of the catalysts was characterized by XRD, BET, SEM, FT-IR, ICP-AES and TG. The catalytic activity and recovery properties of the catalysts for the Friedel-Crafts acylation of anisole with benzoyl chloride were evaluated. The results showed that 14.6–31.7 wt% PTA were encapsulated in the ZIF-67 cage. The PTA@ZIF-67(ec) catalysts had good catalytic activity for Friedel-Crafts acylation. The conversion of anisole can reach ~100% and the selectivity of the production can reach ~94% over 26.5 wt% PTA@ZIF-67(ec) catalyst under the reaction condition of 120 °C and 6 h. After reaction, the catalyst can be easily separated from the reaction mixture by the centrifugation. The recovered catalyst can be reused five times and the selectivity can be kept over 90%. - Graphical abstract: The PTA@ZIF-67 catalysts with different PTA content were prepared by encapsulating the PTA into ZIF-67 cage and the as-synthesized catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity for the Friedel–Craft acylation of anisole with benzoyl chloride.

  9. Excess molar volumes and refractive indices of (methoxybenzene+benzene, or toluene, or o-xylene, or m-xylene, or p-xylene, or mesitylene) binary mixtures between T=(288.15 to 303.15)K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandary, Jasem A.; Al-Jimaz, Adel S.; Abdul-Latif, Abdul-Haq M.

    2006-01-01

    Densities ρ and refractive indices n D for (anisole+benzene, or toluene, or o-xylene, or m-xylene or p-xylene or mesitylene) binary mixtures over the entire range of mole fraction, at temperatures (288.15, 293.15, 298.15, and 303.15)K and atmospheric pressure, have been measured. The excess molar volume V E and molar refraction deviation ΔR m , have been calculated and fitted to the Redlich-Kister polynomial relation to estimate the binary coefficients and standard errors. The excess molar volumes are positive for (anisole+mesitylene) binary mixtures and negative for (anisole+benzene, or toluene, or xylene isomers) binary mixtures at various temperatures. Partial molar volumes V-bar i and partial excess molar volumes V-bar i E have been also derived from the experimental data. The calculated values have been used to explain the dependency of intermolecular interaction between the mixing components on the alkyl substitution on benzene ring

  10. Multicomponent mixed dopant optimization for rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry

    KAUST Repository

    Sioud, Salim

    2012-05-04

    RATIONALE To enhance the ionization efficiencies in atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry a dopant with favorable ionization energy such as chlorobenzene is typically used. These dopants are typically toxic and difficult to mix with water-soluble organic solvents. In order to achieve a more efficient and less toxic dopant, a multicomponent mixed dopant was explored. METHODS A multicomponent mixed dopant for non-targeted rapid screening of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was developed and optimized using ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry. Various single and multicomponent mixed dopants consisting of ethanol, chlorobenzene, bromobenzene, anisole and toluene were evaluated. RESULTS Fourteen out of eighteen PAHs were successfully separated and detected at low pg/μL levels within 5 min with high mass accuracy ≤4 ppm. The optimal mixed multicomponent dopant consisted of ethanol/chlorobenzene/bromobenzene/anisole (98.975:0.1:0.9:0.025, v/v %) and it improved the limit of detection (LOD) by 2- to 10-fold for the tested PAHs compared to those obtained with pure chlorobenzene. CONCLUSIONS A novel multicomponent dopant that contains 99% ethanol and 1% mixture of chlorobenzene, bromobenzene and anisole was found to be an effective dopant mixture to ionize PAHs. The developed UPLC multicomponent dopant assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization high-resolution mass spectrometry offered a rapid non targeted screening method for detecting the PAHs at low pg/;μL levels within a 5 min run time with high mass accuracy a;circ4 ppm. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Bifunctional Molybdenum Polyoxometalates for the Combined Hydrodeoxygenation and Alkylation of Lignin-Derived Model Phenolics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Eric; Crisci, Anthony; Murugappan, Karthick; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-05-22

    Reductive catalytic fractionation of biomass has recently emerged as a powerful lignin extraction and depolymerization method to produce monomeric aromatic oxygenates in high yields. Here, bifunctional molybdenum-based polyoxometalates supported on titania (POM/TiO 2 ) are shown to promote tandem hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and alkylation reactions, converting lignin-derived oxygenated aromatics into alkylated benzenes and alkylated phenols in high yields. In particular, anisole and 4-propylguaiacol were used as model compounds for this gas-phase study using a packed-bed flow reactor. For anisole, 30 % selectivity for alkylated aromatic compounds (54 % C-alkylation of the methoxy groups by methyl balance) with an overall 72 % selectivity for HDO at 82 % anisole conversion was observed over H 3 PMo 12 O 40 /TiO 2 at 7 h on stream. Under similar conditions, 4-propylguaiacol was mainly converted into 4-propylphenol and alkylated 4-propylphenols with a selectivity to alkylated 4-propylphenols of 42 % (77 % C-alkylation) with a total HDO selectivity to 4-propylbenzene and alkylated 4-propylbenzenes of 4 % at 92 % conversion (7 h on stream). Higher catalyst loadings pushed the 4-propylguaiacol conversion to 100 % and resulted in a higher selectivity to propylbenzene of 41 %, alkylated aromatics of 21 % and alkylated phenols of 17 % (51 % C-alkylation). The reactivity studies coupled with catalyst characterization revealed that Lewis acid sites act synergistically with neighboring Brønsted acid sites to simultaneously promote alkylation and hydrodeoxygenation activity. A reaction mechanism is proposed involving activation of the ether bond on a Lewis acid site, followed by methyl transfer and C-alkylation. Mo-based POMs represent a versatile catalytic platform to simultaneously upgrade lignin-derived oxygenated aromatics into alkylated arenes. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Lewis Acid Assisted Nickel-Catalyzed Cross-Coupling of Aryl Methyl Ethers by C−O Bond-Cleaving Alkylation: Prevention of Undesired β-Hydride Elimination

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xiangqian

    2016-04-10

    In the presence of trialkylaluminum reagents, diverse aryl methyl ethers can be transformed into valuable products by C-O bond-cleaving alkylation, for the first time without the limiting β-hydride elimination. This new nickel-catalyzed dealkoxylative alkylation method enables powerful orthogonal synthetic strategies for the transformation of a variety of naturally occurring and easily accessible anisole derivatives. The directing and/or activating properties of aromatic methoxy groups are utilized first, before they are replaced by alkyl chains in a subsequent coupling process.

  13. Catalytic behavior of gallium-containing mesoporous silicas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Bachari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The vapor phase tert-butylation of anisole with tert-butanol reaction has been inspected over a series of Ga-FSM-16 with different Si/Ga ratios = 75, 35, 5 synthesized by intercalating kanemite using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTMABr and gallium nitrate. The resulting samples were characterized by means of inductively coupled plasma (ICP technique, BET, BJH, XRD and a temperature–programed–desorption (TPD of pyridine. In addition, the influence of molar ratio, influence of temperature, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV and time on stream on the selectivity of products was investigated and the results are discussed.

  14. Laser-assisted deposition of thin C60 films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Canulescu, Stela; Fæster, Søren

    Metal and metal oxide films with controlled thickness from a fraction of a monolayer up more than 1000 nm and known stoichiometry can be produced by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) relatively easily, and (PLD) is now a standard technique in all major research laboratories within materials science...... of the matrix material, anisole, with a concentration of 0.67 wt% C60. At laser fluences below 1.5 J/cm2, a dominant fraction of the film molecules are C60 transferred to the substrate without any fragmentation. High-resolution SEM images of MAPLE deposited films reveal large circular features on the surface...

  15. Deposition of matrix-free fullerene films with improved morphology by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Fæster, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Thin films of C60 were deposited by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) from a frozen target of anisole with 0.67 wt% C60. Above a fluence of 1.5 J/cm2 the C60 films are strongly non-uniform and are resulting from transfer of matrix-droplets containing fullerenes. At low fluence...... the fullerene molecules in the films are intact, the surface morphology is substantially improved and there are no measurable traces of the matrix molecules in the film. This may indicate a regime of dominant evaporation at low fluence which merges into the MAPLE regime of liquid ejection of the host matrix...

  16. Role of charge transfer and spin-orbit coupling in fluorescence quenching : a case study with oxonine and substituted benzenes

    OpenAIRE

    Föll, Rudolf E.; Kramer, Horst E. A.; Steiner, Ulrich

    1990-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching of oxonine in methanol was investigated by means of a computerized dye laser flash spectrometer for the ∆G°et, dependence of the quenching rate constant (kq) and the efficiencies of induced dye triplet formation (ηT), reduced dye radical formation (ηR), and induced internal conversion. A total of 34 substituted benzenes including 20 monohalogenated benzenes, toluenes, and anisoles were used as quenchers spanning a range of -0.85 ≤ ∆G°et ≤ 1.4 eV for a possible photoelec...

  17. Supercritical fluid synthesis inthe preparation of β+-emitting labelled compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacobson, G.; Markides, K.E.; Laangstroem, B.

    1994-01-01

    A system for synthesis in supercritical fluids has been developed for the microscale synthesis of pharmaceuticals labelled with 11 C. Supercritical ammonia was selected as the reaction medium and the following variables were studied in detail: trapping efficiency, cell design, substrate concentration, operation design, and temperature and pressure conditions. Alkylation of phenol by [ 11 C]methyl iodide to yield [methyl- 11 C]anisole was used as a model reaction for evaluation of the system. The results show an increased radiochemical yield in the highly compressible near-critical region. (au) (40 refs.)

  18. Hydrogen bonding in (substituted benzene)·(water)n clusters with n≤4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, H.-D.; Buchhold, K.; Djafari, S.; Reimann, B.; Lommatzsch, U.; Brutschy, B.

    1998-01-01

    Infrared ion-depletion spectroscopy, a double resonance method combining vibrational predissociation with resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy, has been applied to study mixed clusters of the type (substituted benzene)·(H 2 O) n with n≤4. The UV chromophores were p-difluorobenzene, fluorobenzene, benzene, toluene, p-xylene and anisole. From the IR depletion spectra in the region of the OH stretching vibrations it could be shown that the water molecules are attached as subclusters to the chromophores. Size and configuration of the subclusters could be deduced from the IR depletion spectra. In the anisole·(H 2 O) 1 a nd 2 complexes the water clusters form an ordinary hydrogen bond to the oxygen atom of the methoxy group. In all other mixed complexes a π-hydrogen bond is formed between one of the free OH groups of a water subcluster and the π-system of the chromophore. According to the strength of this interaction the frequency of the respective absorption band exhibits a characteristic red-shift which could be related to the total atomic charges in the aromatic ring. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Near-kHz 3D tracer-based LIF imaging of a co-flow jet using toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, V A; Troutman, V A; Hanson, R K

    2014-01-01

    This work demonstrates tracer-based, high-repetition-rate planar (15 kHz) and three-dimensional (940 Hz) laser-induced fluorescence imaging. An off-the-shelf, pulsed, frequency-quadrupled Nd:YAG laser at 266 nm is used as the excitation light source, and a high-frame-rate intensified relay optic with a slow P46 phosphor coupled to a CMOS camera is used to image the fluorescence. Four different tracers are investigated (3-pentanone, acetone, anisole, and toluene) and relative signal levels are measured in the potential core of a laminar co-flow jet. Resulting SNR values range from 6 to 44 for the different tracers, and relative signal levels and SNR for each tracer are provided as an engineering-basis for tracer-based imaging diagnostic design. It was found that signal levels from anisole (relative to toluene) are about ten times less than suggested by other literature, owing to uncertainty in the reported absorption cross sections. Using toluene as a tracer and a custom-made piezo-actuated steering optic to scan the laser sheet, 3D LIF imaging at 940 Hz is demonstrated by visualizing a co-flow jet mixing with ambient air. (paper)

  20. Reactive oxygen species and associated reactivity of peroxymonosulfate activated by soluble iron species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J; Yu, Miao; Teel, Amy L

    2017-10-01

    The activation of peroxymonosulfate by iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) was compared using nitrobenzene as a hydroxyl radical probe, anisole as a hydroxyl radical+sulfate radical probe, and hexachloroethane as a reductant+nucleophile probe. In addition, activated peroxymonosulfate was investigated for the treatment of the model groundwater contaminants perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The relative activities of hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical in the degradation of the probe compounds and PCE and TCE were isolated using the radical scavengers tert-butanol and isopropanol. Iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA effectively activated peroxymonosulfate to generate hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical, but only a minimal flux of reductants or nucleophiles. Iron (III)-EDTA was a more effective activator than iron (II) and iron (III), and also provided a non-hydroxyl radical, non-sulfate radical degradation pathway. The contribution of sulfate radical relative to hydroxyl radical followed the order of anisole>TCE>PCE >nitrobenzene; i.e., sulfate radical was less dominant in the oxidation of more oxidized target compounds. Sulfate radical is often assumed to be the primary oxidant in activated peroxymonosulfate and persulfate systems, but the results of this research demonstrate that the reactivity of sulfate radical with the target compound must be considered before drawing such a conclusion. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Reactive oxygen species and associated reactivity of peroxymonosulfate activated by soluble iron species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J.; Yu, Miao; Teel, Amy L.

    2017-10-01

    The activation of peroxymonosulfate by iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA for in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) was compared using nitrobenzene as a hydroxyl radical probe, anisole as a hydroxyl radical + sulfate radical probe, and hexachloroethane as a reductant + nucleophile probe. In addition, activated peroxymonosulfate was investigated for the treatment of the model groundwater contaminants perchloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE). The relative activities of hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical in the degradation of the probe compounds and PCE and TCE were isolated using the radical scavengers tert-butanol and isopropanol. Iron (II), iron (III), and iron (III)-EDTA effectively activated peroxymonosulfate to generate hydroxyl radical and sulfate radical, but only a minimal flux of reductants or nucleophiles. Iron (III)-EDTA was a more effective activator than iron (II) and iron (III), and also provided a non-hydroxyl radical, non-sulfate radical degradation pathway. The contribution of sulfate radical relative to hydroxyl radical followed the order of anisole > > TCE > PCE > > nitrobenzene; i.e., sulfate radical was less dominant in the oxidation of more oxidized target compounds. Sulfate radical is often assumed to be the primary oxidant in activated peroxymonosulfate and persulfate systems, but the results of this research demonstrate that the reactivity of sulfate radical with the target compound must be considered before drawing such a conclusion.

  2. Reactivity Of Radiolytically-Produced Nitrogen Oxide Radicals Toward Aromatic Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elias, Gracy

    2010-01-01

    The nitration of aromatic compounds in the gas phase is an important source of toxic, carcinogenic, and mutagenic species in the atmosphere and has therefore received much attention. Gas phase nitration typically occurs by free-radical reactions. Condensed-phase free-radical reactions, and in particular nitrite and nitrate radical chemistry, have been studied far less. These condensed-phase free-radical reactions may be relevant in fog and cloud water in polluted areas, in urban aerosols with low pH, in water treatment using advanced oxidation processes such as electron beam (e-beam) irradiation, and in nuclear waste treatment applications. This study discusses research toward an improved understanding of nitration of aromatic compounds in the condensed phase under conditions conducive to free-radical formation. The results are of benefit in several areas of environmental chemistry, in particular nuclear waste treatment applications. The nitration reactions of anisole and toluene as model compounds were investigated in γ-irradiated acidic nitrate, neutral nitrate, and neutral nitrite solutions. Cs-7SB, 1-(2,2,3,3,-tetrafluoropropoxy)-3-(4-sec-butylphenoxy)-2-propanol, is used as a solvent modifier in the fission product extraction (FPEX) formulation for the extraction of Cs and Sr from dissolved nuclear fuel. The formulation also contains the ligands calix(4)arene-bis-(tert-octylbenzo-crown-6) (BOBCalixC6) for Cs extraction and 4,4(prime),(5(prime))-di-(t-butyldicyclohexano)-18-crown-6 (DtBuCH18C6) for Sr extraction, all in Isopar L, a branched-chain alkane diluent. FPEX solvent has favorable extraction efficiency for Cs and Sr from acidic solution and was investigated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for changes in extraction efficiency after γ-irradiation. Extraction efficiency decreased after irradiation. The decrease in solvent extraction efficiency was identical for Cs and Sr, even though they are complexed by different ligands. This suggests that

  3. Benchmark thermodynamic properties of methylanisoles: Experimental and theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emel’yanenko, Vladimir N.; Zaitseva, Ksenia V.; Agapito, Filipe; Martinho Simões, José A.; Verevkin, Sergey P.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermochemistry of 2-, 3-, and 4-methylanisoles was studied. • Liquid state enthalpies of formation were measured by calorimetry. • Vaporisation enthalpies were derived from by transpiration method. • Ab initio enthalpies of formation are in excellent agreement with experiment. • A new paradigm for obtaining thermochemistry of liquid compounds was suggested. - Abstract: Accurate standard molar enthalpy of formation values in the liquid phase can be obtained by combining high-level quantum chemistry values of gas-phase enthalpies of formation with experimentally determined enthalpies of vaporisation. The procedure is illustrated for 2-, 3-, and 4-methyl-anisoles. Using the W1-F12 and G4 quantum-chemical methods, the gas-phase enthalpies of formation of these compounds at T = 298.15 K were computed. Molar enthalpies of vaporisation for these isomers were measured by the transpiration method. Combining the experimental and the high-level ab initio values, the standard molar enthalpies of formation in the liquid phase for all three isomers were derived and compared with those determined for 2- and 4-methyl-anisoles by using combustion calorimetry

  4. Photodynamic activity of polycyclic hydrocarbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Epstein, S S

    1963-01-01

    Exposure of Paramecium caudatum to suspensions of 3,4-benzopyrene, followed by long wave ultraviolet irradiation, results in cell death at times related, inter alia, to carcinogen concentration. Prior to death, the cells exhibit progressive immobilization and blebbing. This photodynamic response is a sensitized photo-oxidation, as it is oxygen-dependent and inhibited by anti-oxidants, such as butylated hydroxy anisole and ..cap alpha..-tocopherol. Protection is also afforded by other agents, including Tweens, tryptophan and certain fractions of plasma proteins. No evidence was found for the involvement of peroxides or sulfhydryl groups. The correlations between photodynamic toxicity and carcinogenicity in a large series of polycyclic hydrocarbons is under investigation. Assays of air extracts for photodynamic toxicity are in progress. Significant toxicity has been found in oxygenated besides aromatic fractions.

  5. Rapid and Reliable HPLC Method for the Simultaneous Determination of Dihydroxyacetone, Methylglyoxal and 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Leptospermum Honeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Pappalardo

    Full Text Available A reliable determination of dihydroxyacetone, methylglyoxal and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural is essential to establishing the commercial value and antimicrobial potential of honeys derived from the Leptospermum species endemic to Australia and New Zealand. We report a robust method for quantitation of all three compounds in a single HPLC run. Honey samples (n = 6 that are derivatized with o-(2,3,4,5,6-Pentafluorobenzyl hydroxylamine were quantitated against a stable anisole internal standard. Linear regression analysis was performed using calibration standards for each compound (n = 6 and results indicated a high degree of accuracy (R2 = 0.999 for this method. The reliability of some commercial methylglyoxal solutions were found to be questionable. Effective quantitation of methylglyoxal content in honey is critical for researchers and industry, and the use of some commercial standards may bias data. Two accurate methylglyoxal standards are proposed, including a commercial standard and a derivative that can be prepared within the laboratory.

  6. Formation and reactions of radical cations of substituted benzenes in aqueous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holcman, J.

    1977-08-01

    Radical cations of anisole, methylated benzenes, ethylbenzene, isopropylbenzene, tert-butylbenzene and N,N-dimethylaniline were studied in aqueous media by pulse radiolytic technique. Absorption spectra and reaction kinetics of the radical cations were recorded. The radical cations are formed from the corresponding OH adducts by the elimination of OH - , either by a simple dissociation or by an acid catalyzed reaction. The rate constants of the formation of the radical cations and their reactions with water, OH - and Fe 2+ , or the reaction of a proton loss, were measured. The rate constants for the reaction with water and OH - , together with the rate constants for the dissociation of the OH adducts, are correlated with the ionization potential of the parent compound. These correlations offer a possibility of predicting the acid-base properties of radical cations of substituted benzenes, or the estimation of their ionization potential. (author)

  7. Mesoporous ZSM-5 Zeolites in Acid Catalysis: Top-Down vs. Bottom-Up Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pit Losch

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A top-down desilication of Al-rich ZSM-5 zeolites and a bottom-up mesopores creating method were evaluated in this study. Three liquid–solid and one gas–solid heterogeneously-catalysed reactions were chosen to establish relationships between zeolites textural properties and their catalytic behavior in acid-catalysed model reactions that are influenced by shape selectivity: Diels-Alder cyclization between isoprene and methylacrylate, Methanol-to-Olefins (MTO reaction, chlorination of iodobenzene with trichloroisocyanuric acid (TCCA, and Friedel-Crafts acylation of anisole by carboxylic acids with differing sizes. It is found amongst others that no optimal mesoporosity for all the different reactions can be easily obtained, but depending on the chosen application, a specific treatment has to be set to achieve high activity/selectivity and stability.

  8. Graphene oxide for acid catalyzed-reactions: Effect of drying process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, H. P.; Hua, W. M.; Yue, Y. H.; Gao, Z.

    2017-03-01

    Graphene oxides (GOs) were prepared by Hummers method through various drying processes, and characterized by XRD, SEM, FTIR, XPS and N2 adsorption. Their acidities were measured using potentiometric titration and acid-base titration. The catalytic properties were investigated in the alkylation of anisole with benzyl alcohol and transesterification of triacetin with methanol. GOs are active catalysts for both reaction, whose activity is greatly affected by their drying processes. Vacuum drying GO exhibits the best performance in transesterification while freezing drying GO is most active for alkylation. The excellent catalytic behavior comes from abundant surface acid sites as well as proper surface functional groups, which can be obtained by selecting appropriate drying process.

  9. Porous Polystyrene Monoliths and Microparticles Prepared from Core Cross-linked Star (CCS) Polymers-Stabilized Emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qijing; Shi, Ting; Han, Fei; Li, Zihan; Lin, Chao; Zhao, Peng

    2017-08-17

    A hydrophobic CCS polymer of poly(benzyl methacrylate) (PBzMA) was prepared in toluene by reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT)-mediated dispersion polymerization. The CCS polymer, with poly(benzyl methacrylate) as the arm and crosslinked N, N'-bis(acryloyl)cystamine (BAC) as the core, was confirmed by characterization with gel permeation chromatography (GPC) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Three kinds of oils (toluene, anisole and styrene) were chosen to study the emulsification properties of PBzMA CCS polymer. The oils can be emulsified by CCS polymer to form water-in-oil (w/o) emulsions. Moreover, w/o high internal phase emulsions (HIPEs) can be obtained with the increase of toluene and styrene volume fractions from 75% to 80%. Porous polystyrene monolith and microparticles were prepared from the emulsion templates and characterized by the scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). With the internal phase volume fraction increased, open-pore porous monolith was obtained.

  10. Low Density Solvent-Based Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction for the Determination of Synthetic Antioxidants in Beverages by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çabuk, Hasan; Köktürk, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    A simple and efficient method was established for the determination of synthetic antioxidants in beverages by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Butylated hydroxy toluene, butylated hydroxy anisole, and tert-butylhydroquinone were the antioxidants evaluated. Experimental parameters including extraction solvent, dispersive solvent, pH of sample solution, salt concentration, and extraction time were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the extraction recoveries ranged from 53 to 96%. Good linearity was observed by the square of correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9975 to 0.9997. The relative standard deviations ranged from 1.0 to 5.2% for all of the analytes. Limits of detection ranged from 0.85 to 2.73 ng mL−1. The method was successfully applied for determination of synthetic antioxidants in undiluted beverage samples with satisfactory recoveries. PMID:23853535

  11. Low Density Solvent-Based Dispersive Liquid-Liquid Microextraction for the Determination of Synthetic Antioxidants in Beverages by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Çabuk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and efficient method was established for the determination of synthetic antioxidants in beverages by using dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction combined with high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection. Butylated hydroxy toluene, butylated hydroxy anisole, and tert-butylhydroquinone were the antioxidants evaluated. Experimental parameters including extraction solvent, dispersive solvent, pH of sample solution, salt concentration, and extraction time were optimized. Under optimal conditions, the extraction recoveries ranged from 53 to 96%. Good linearity was observed by the square of correlation coefficients ranging from 0.9975 to 0.9997. The relative standard deviations ranged from 1.0 to 5.2% for all of the analytes. Limits of detection ranged from 0.85 to 2.73 ng mL−1. The method was successfully applied for determination of synthetic antioxidants in undiluted beverage samples with satisfactory recoveries.

  12. Growth of thin fullerene films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Fæster, Søren

    C60 fullerene thin films of average thickness of more than 100 nm on silicon substrates can be produced in vacuum by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A 355 nm Nd:YAG laser was directed onto a frozen target of anisole with a concentration of 0.67 wt% C60. At laser fluences below 1.......5 J/cm2 the dominant fraction of the film molecules are C60 transferred to the substrate without any fragmentation. For high fluences high-resolution SEM images of MAPLE deposited films reveal large circular features on the surface with high amount of material concentrated at edges. These features......, observed over a wide range of laser fluences, are caused by ejection of large matrix-fullerene liquid droplets into the gas-phase and subsequent deposition. At similar laser energies, but using an unfocused laser beam, MAPLE favours evaporation of matrix and organic molecules, resulting in films...

  13. Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation for growth of fullerene thin films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Canulescu, Stela; Schou, Jørgen; Fæster Nielsen, Søren

    C60 fullerene thin films of average thickness of more than 100 nm can be produced in vacuum by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). A 355 nm Nd:YAG laser was directed onto a frozen target of anisole with a concentration of 0.67 wt% C60. At laser fluences below 1.5 J/cm2, a dominant...... fraction of the film molecules are C60 transferred to the substrate without any fragmentation. Highresolution SEM images of MAPLE deposited films reveal large circular droplets on the surface with high amount of material concentrated at edges (Fig. 1A). These features, observed over a wide range of laser...... fluences, are caused by ejection of large matrix-fullerene liquid droplets into the gas-phase and subsequent deposition. At similar laser energies, but using an unfocused laser beam, MAPLE favours evaporation of matrix and organic molecules, resulting in production of films with smooth surfaces and minimal...

  14. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization with polydimethylsiloxane as extraction phase and sample plate material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaikkinen, A. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kotiaho, T. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 55, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kostiainen, R. [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland); Kauppila, T.J., E-mail: tiina.kauppila@helsinki.fi [Division of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, P.O. Box 56, FIN-00014 University of Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-12-03

    Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) is an ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry (MS) that can be used to ionize polar as well as neutral and completely non-polar analytes. In this study polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used as a solid phase extraction sorbent for DAPPI-MS analysis. Pieces of PDMS polymer were soaked in an aqueous sample, where the analytes were sorbed from the sample solution to PDMS. After this, the extracted analytes were desorbed directly from the polymer by the hot DAPPI spray solvent plume, without an elution step. Swelling and extracting the PDMS with a cleaning solvent prior to extraction diminished the high background in the DAPPI mass spectrum caused by PDMS oligomers. Acetone, hexane, pentane, toluene, diisopropylamine and triethylamine were tested for this purpose. The amines were most efficient in reducing the PDMS background, but they also suppressed the signals of low proton affinity analytes. Toluene was chosen as the optimum cleaning solvent, since it reduced the PDMS background efficiently and gave intensive signals of most of the studied analytes. The effects of DAPPI spray solvents toluene, acetone and anisole on the PDMS background and the ionization of analytes were also compared and extraction conditions were optimized. Anisole gave a low background for native PDMS, but toluene ionized the widest range of analytes. Analysis of verapamil, testosterone and anthracene from purified, spiked wastewater was performed to demonstrate that the method is suited for in-situ analysis of water streams. In addition, urine spiked with several analytes was analyzed by the PDMS method and compared to the conventional DAPPI procedure, where sample droplets are applied on PMMA surface. With the PDMS method the background ion signals caused by the urine matrix were lower, the S/N ratios of analytes were 2-10 times higher, and testosterone, anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene that were not detected from PMMA in urine

  15. Mechanism of [m+h]+ formation in atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry: identification of propionitrile in acetonitrile with high mass accuracy measurement and tandem mass spectrometry and evidence for its involvement in the protonation phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Amin; Jeanville, Patrick; Colizza, Kevin; J-Rivera, Lauren Elizabeth

    2008-11-01

    The role of propionitrile in the production of [M+H]+ under atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) was investigated. In dopant-assisted APPI using acetone and anisole, protonated acetone and anisole radical cations were the most prominent ions observed. In dopant-free or direct APPI in acetonitrile, however, a major ion in acetonitrile was detected and identified as propionitrile, using high accuracy mass measurement and collision induced dissociation studies. Vaporizing ca. 10(-5) M althiazide and bendroflumethazide under direct APPI in acetonitrile produced their corresponding protonated species [M+H]+. In addition to protonated acetonitrile, its dimers, and acetonitrile/water clusters, protonated propionitrile, propionitrile dimer, and propionitrile/water clusters were also observed. The role of propionitrile, an impurity in acetonitrile and/or a possible product of ion-molecule reaction, in the production of [M+H]+ of althiazide and bendroflumethazide was further investigated in the absence of dopant using propionitrile-d5. The formation of [M+D]+ species was observed, suggesting a possible role of propionitrile in the protonation process. Additionally, an increase in the [M+H]+ signal of althiazide and bendroflumethazide was observed as a function of propionitrile concentration in acetonitrile. Theoretical data from the literature supported the assumption that one possible mechanism, among others, for the formation of [M+H]+ could be attributed to photo-initiated isomerization of propionitrile. The most stable isomers of propionitrile, based on their calculated ionization energy (IE) and relative energy (DeltaE), were assumed to undergo proton transfer to the analytes, and mechanisms were proposed.

  16. Evaluation of the optimization space for atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) in comparison with APCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredenhagen, Andreas; Kühnöl, Jürgen

    2014-08-01

    The usefulness of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) is difficult to evaluate for unknowns due to the fragmented literature. Specifically, the variation of dopants with a wide set of compounds or the use of APPI in the negative mode have rarely been explored. Thirty compounds were selected that were not suitable for ESI with a wide variety of functional groups and investigated with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) and APPI in the positive and negative ion modes. The influence of the mobile phase (eluents containing acetonitrile or methanol) and--for APPI--four different dopants (acetone, chlorobenzene, toluene, and toluene/anisole) were explored. Stepwise variation of the organic mobile phase allowed to elucidate the ionization mechanism. Atmospheric pressure photoionization was especially useful for compounds, where the M(●+) and not the [M + H](+) was formed. The dopants chlorobenzene and anisole promoted the formation of molecular ions M(●+) for about half of the compounds, and its formation was also positively influenced by the use of mobile phases containing methanol. In the negative ion mode, APPI offered no advantage toward APCI. Best results were generally achieved with the dopant chlorobenzene, establishing that this dopant is suitable for a wide set of compounds. For one quarter of the compounds, significantly better results were achieved with mobile phases containing methanol for both APPI and APCI than those with acetonitrile, but only in the positive mode. With either of the methods--APPI or APCI--about 10% of the compounds were not detected. Strategies to get results quickly with difficult unknowns will be discussed. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization with polydimethylsiloxane as extraction phase and sample plate material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaikkinen, A.; Kotiaho, T.; Kostiainen, R.; Kauppila, T.J.

    2010-01-01

    Desorption atmospheric pressure photoionization (DAPPI) is an ambient ionization technique for mass spectrometry (MS) that can be used to ionize polar as well as neutral and completely non-polar analytes. In this study polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) was used as a solid phase extraction sorbent for DAPPI-MS analysis. Pieces of PDMS polymer were soaked in an aqueous sample, where the analytes were sorbed from the sample solution to PDMS. After this, the extracted analytes were desorbed directly from the polymer by the hot DAPPI spray solvent plume, without an elution step. Swelling and extracting the PDMS with a cleaning solvent prior to extraction diminished the high background in the DAPPI mass spectrum caused by PDMS oligomers. Acetone, hexane, pentane, toluene, diisopropylamine and triethylamine were tested for this purpose. The amines were most efficient in reducing the PDMS background, but they also suppressed the signals of low proton affinity analytes. Toluene was chosen as the optimum cleaning solvent, since it reduced the PDMS background efficiently and gave intensive signals of most of the studied analytes. The effects of DAPPI spray solvents toluene, acetone and anisole on the PDMS background and the ionization of analytes were also compared and extraction conditions were optimized. Anisole gave a low background for native PDMS, but toluene ionized the widest range of analytes. Analysis of verapamil, testosterone and anthracene from purified, spiked wastewater was performed to demonstrate that the method is suited for in-situ analysis of water streams. In addition, urine spiked with several analytes was analyzed by the PDMS method and compared to the conventional DAPPI procedure, where sample droplets are applied on PMMA surface. With the PDMS method the background ion signals caused by the urine matrix were lower, the S/N ratios of analytes were 2-10 times higher, and testosterone, anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene that were not detected from PMMA in urine

  18. Measured and Predicted Vapor Liquid Equilibrium of Ethanol-Gasoline Fuels with Insight on the Influence of Azeotrope Interactions on Aromatic Species Enrichment and Particulate Matter Formation in Spark Ignition Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, Matthew A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); McCormick, Robert L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Burke, Stephen [Colorado State University; Rhoads, Robert [University of Colorado; Windom, Bret [Colorado State University

    2018-04-03

    A relationship has been observed between increasing ethanol content in gasoline and increased particulate matter (PM) emissions from direct injection spark ignition (DISI) vehicles. The fundamental cause of this observation is not well understood. One potential explanation is that increased evaporative cooling as a result of ethanol's high HOV may slow evaporation and prevent sufficient reactant mixing resulting in the combustion of localized fuel rich regions within the cylinder. In addition, it is well known that ethanol when blended in gasoline forms positive azeotropes which can alter the liquid/vapor composition during the vaporization process. In fact, it was shown recently through a numerical study that these interactions can retain the aromatic species within the liquid phase impeding the in-cylinder mixing of these compounds, which would accentuate PM formation upon combustion. To better understand the role of the azeotrope interactions on the vapor/liquid composition evolution of the fuel, distillations were performed using the Advanced Distillation Curve apparatus on carefully selected samples consisting of gasoline blended with ethanol and heavy aromatic and oxygenated compounds with varying vapor pressures, including cumene, p-cymene, 4-tertbutyl toluene, anisole, and 4-methyl anisole. Samples collected during the distillation indicate an enrichment of the heavy aromatic or oxygenated additive with an increase in initial ethanol concentration from E0 to E30. A recently developed distillation and droplet evaporation model is used to explore the influence of dilution effects versus azeotrope interactions on the aromatic species enrichment. The results suggest that HOV-cooling effects as well as aromatic species enrichment behaviors should be considered in future development of predictive indices to forecast the PM potential of fuels containing oxygenated compounds with comparatively high HOV.

  19. Striving towards improved Friedel-Crafts acylation catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, N.M.; Deacon, G.B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Lanthanum, ytterbium and scandium salts of trifluoromethanesulfonic acid have been shown to act as promising Lewis acid catalysts for the Friedel-Craft acylation reactions. In our study catalytic acylation of anisole by acetic anhydride in nitroethane was investigated. Yields were determined after extraction of para-methoxyacetophenone from the reaction mixture by G.L.C using the external standardisation method. Anhydrous lanthanoid tris-triflate salts [Ln(O 3 SCF 3 ) 3 , Ln La, Y, Nd, Eu and Yb] were initially investigated as catalysts. Ytterbium tris-triflate was found to be the most effective giving ∼90% of the acylation product. The hydrated lanthanide tris-nitrate salts [Ln(NO 3 ) 3 .nH 2 O, Ln = La, Nd, Eu and Yb] were also investigated using in situ dehydration with acetic anhydride. These were found to have low solubility in the reaction mixture and gave poor yields of para-methoxyacetophenone. The formation of side products was suggested by the low total recovery of anisole and para-methoxyacetophenone. The blocking of coordination sites of these catalysts by tetraglyme resulted in a 50% reduction in acylation activity compared with the simple salt. Addition of Li(O 3 SCF 3 ) to Ln(O 3 SCF 3 ) 3 catalysts (ratio of 4:1)had only a slight accelerating effect on the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction and the yield was only marginally greater than that in the absence of the added salt. In contrast Li(ClO 4 ) dramatically decreased reaction times and improved the yield of para-methoxyace-tophenone, as recently reported

  20. Designed cellulose nanocrystal surface properties for improving barrier properties in polylactide nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espino-Pérez, Etzael; Bras, Julien; Almeida, Giana; Plessis, Cédric; Belgacem, Naceur; Perré, Patrick; Domenek, Sandra

    2018-03-01

    Nanocomposites are an opportunity to increase the performance of polymer membranes by fine-tuning their morphology. In particular, the understanding of the contribution of the polymer matrix/nanofiller interface to the overall transport properties is key to design membranes with tailored selective and adsorptive properties. In that aim, cellulose nanocrystals (CNC)/polylactide (PLA) nanocomposites were fabricated with chemically designed interfaces, which were ensuring the compatibility between the constituents and impacting the mass transport mechanism. A detailed analysis of the mass transport behaviour of different permeants in CNC/PLA nanocomposites was carried out as a function of their chemical affinity to grafted CNC surfaces. Penetrants (O 2 and cyclohexane), which were found to slightly interact with the constituents of the nanocomposites, provided information on the small tortuosity effect of CNC on diffusive mass transport. The mass transport of water (highly interacting with CNC) and anisole (interacting only with designed CNC surfaces) exhibited non-Fickian, Case II behaviour. The water vapour caused significant swelling of the CNC, which created a preferential pathway for mass transport. CNC surface grafting could attenuate this phenomenon and decrease the water transport rate. Anisole, an aromatic organic vapour, became reversibly trapped at the specifically designed CNC/PLA interface, but without any swelling or creation of an accelerated pathway. This caused the decrease of the overall mass transport rate. The latter finding could open a way to the creation of materials with specifically designed barrier properties by designing nanocomposites interfaces with specific interactions towards permeants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rapid determination of nanowires electrical properties using a dielectrophoresis-well based system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Marios; Hoettges, Kai F.; Krylyuk, Sergiy; Katz, Michael B.; Davydov, Albert; Rigas, Grigorios-Panagiotis; Stolojan, Vlad; Hughes, Michael P.; Shkunov, Maxim

    2017-03-01

    The use of high quality semiconducting nanomaterials for advanced device applications has been hampered by the unavoidable growth variability of electrical properties of one-dimensional nanomaterials, such as nanowires and nanotubes, thus highlighting the need for the characterization of efficient semiconducting nanomaterials. In this study, we demonstrate a low-cost, industrially scalable dielectrophoretic (DEP) nanowire assembly method for the rapid analysis of the electrical properties of inorganic single crystalline nanowires, by identifying key features in the DEP frequency response spectrum from 1 kHz to 20 MHz in just 60 s. Nanowires dispersed in anisole were characterized using a three-dimensional DEP chip (3DEP), and the resultant spectrum demonstrated a sharp change in nanowire response to DEP signal in 1-20 MHz frequency range. The 3DEP analysis, directly confirmed by field-effect transistor data, indicates that nanowires of higher quality are collected at high DEP signal frequency range above 10 MHz, whereas lower quality nanowires, with two orders of magnitude lower current per nanowire, are collected at lower DEP signal frequencies. These results show that the 3DEP platform can be used as a very efficient characterization tool of the electrical properties of rod-shaped nanoparticles to enable dielectrophoretic selective deposition of nanomaterials with superior conductivity properties.

  2. Superior acidic catalytic activity and stability of Fe-doped HTaWO6 nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, He

    2017-07-26

    Fe-doped HTaWO6 (H1-3xFexTaWO6, x = 0.23) nanotubes as highly active solid acid catalysts were prepared via an exfoliation-scrolling-exchange process. The specific surface area and pore volume of undoped nanotubes (20.8 m2 g-1, 0.057 cm3 g-1) were remarkably enhanced through Fe3+ ion-exchange (>100 m2 g-1, 0.547 cm3 g-1). Doping Fe ions into the nanotubes endowed them with improved thermal stability due to the stronger interaction between the intercalated Fe3+ ions and the host layers. This interaction also facilitated the preservation of effective Brønsted acid sites and the generation of new acid sites. The integration of these functional roles resulted in Fe-doped nanotubes with high acidic catalytic activities in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of anisole and the esterification of acetic acid. Facile accessibility to active sites, generation of effective Brønsted acid sites, high stability of the tubular structure and strong acid sites were found to synergistically contribute to the excellent acidic catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the activity of cycled nanocatalysts can be easily recovered through annealing treatment.

  3. The role of catalysts in the decomposition of phenoxy compounds in coal: A density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang-Tao; Wang, Ming-Fei; Gao, Zhi-Hua; Zuo, Zhi-Jun; Huang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The pyrolysis mechanisms of anisole (C6H5OCH3), as a coal-based model compound, on CaO, ZnO and γ-Al2O3 catalysts were studied using density functional theory (DFT). In contrast to the products of pyrolysis (C6H6, H2 and CO), the products of catalytic pyrolysis on CaO, ZnO, and γ-Al2O3 are C6H5OH and C2H4; CO, C5H6 and C2H4; and C6H5OH and C2H4, respectively. Our results indicate that CaO, ZnO and γ-Al2O3 catalysts not only decrease the energy barrier of C6H5OCH3 decomposition but also alter the pyrolysis process and the products. It is also found that the pyrolysis gas H2 alters the products on CaO (C6H5OH and CH4), but it does not affect the products on ZnO and γ-Al2O3. In sum, these catalysts are beneficial for phenoxy compound decomposition.

  4. TEORÍA DE LA REGIOQUÍMICA EN LA NITRACIÓN CON NITRATO DE ACETILO Y CON ÁCIDO NÍTRICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Sánchez-Viesca

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aun cuando las estructuras de los productos de nitración obtenidos con diferentes reactivos son bien conocidas, no se tiene una teoría completa de la regioquímica. Aunque los grupos funcionales han sido debidamente clasificados en cuanto a la orientación que ejercen en las reacciones de sustitución electrofílica, no se ha explicado en diferentes casos la preponderancia existente en la formación de uno de los isómeros posibles. Por otra parte, es conocida la preferente orientación a la posición orto cuando se emplea nitrato de acetilo como agente nitrante. Sin embargo, no se ha dado una explicación causal de este fenómeno. En la presente comunicación se da una teoría de la regioquímica en la nitración de la acetanilida, tanto al emplear mezcla sulfonítrica como cuando se usa nitrato de acetilo. La teoría propuesta se confirmó al comparar con los resultados experimentales descritos, en este mismo tipo de reacciones, al emplear tanto tolueno como anisol.

  5. Ultrapressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay using atmospheric pressure photoionization (UPLC-APPI-MS/MS) for quantification of 4-methoxydiphenylmethane in pharmacokinetic evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhan, Nashid; Fitzpatrick, Sean; Shim, Yun M; Paige, Mikell; Chow, Diana Shu-Lian

    2016-09-05

    4-Methoxydiphenylmethane (4-MDM), a selective augmenter of Leukotriene A4 Hydrolase (LTA4H), is a new anti-inflammatory compound for potential treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Currently, there is no liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) method for the quantification of 4-MDM. A major barrier for developing the LC-MS/MS method is the inability of electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) to ionize 4-MDM due to its hydrophobicity and lack of any functional group for ionization. With the advent of atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) technique, many hydrophobic compounds have been demonstrated to ionize by charge transfer reactions. In this study, a highly sensitive ultrapressure liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry assay using atmospheric pressure photoionization (UPLC-APPI-MS/MS) for the quantifications of 4-MDM in rat plasma has been developed and validated. 4-MDM was extracted from the plasma by solid phase extraction (SPE) and separated chromatographically using a reverse phase C8 column. The photoionization (PI) was achieved by introducing anisole as a dopant to promote the reaction of charge transfer. The assay with a linear range of 5 (LLOQ)-400ngmL(-1) met the regulatory requirements for accuracy, precision and stability. The validated assay was employed to quantify the plasma concentrations of 4-MDM after an oral dosing in Sprague Dawley (SD) rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Functionalized 3-(benzofuran-2-yl-5-(4-methoxyphenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole scaffolds: A new class of antimicrobials and antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javarappa Rangaswamy

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A new class of functionalized 3-(benzofuran-2-yl-5-(4-methoxyphenyl-4,5-dihydro-1H-pyrazole scaffolds (4a–q was synthesized by a four step reaction in good yields. Initially, o-alkyl derivative of salicyaldehyde (1 readily furnished corresponding 2-acetyl benzofuran (2 on treatment with potassium tert-butoxide (t-BuOK in the presence of molecular sieves. Further, Claisen–Schmidt condensation reaction with 4-methoxy benzaldehyde and hydrazine hydrate followed by coupling of benzoyl chlorides afforded target compounds (4a–q. Representative of the synthesized compounds was characterized by IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, mass, elemental analysis and evaluated for antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The results gathered are allowed to conclude that, all newly synthesized analogues exhibit a certain degree of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. Among the analogues, compounds (4h and (4j showed an excellent antimicrobial activity in the well plate method. Meanwhile, compounds (4e–f, (4l and (4p showed good antioxidant activity, whereas compound (4g and (4q displayed dominant antioxidant efficacy compared to standard butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA.

  7. Which hydrogen atom of toluene protonates PAH molecules in (+)-mode APPI MS analysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Arif; Ghosh, Manik Kumer; Choi, Myung Chul; Choi, Cheol Ho; Kim, Sunghwan

    2013-03-01

    A previous study (Ahmed, A. et al., Anal. Chem. 84, 1146-1151( 2012) reported that toluene used as a solvent was the proton source for polyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds (PAHs) that were subjected to (+)-mode atmospheric-pressure photoionization. In the current study, the exact position of the hydrogen atom in the toluene molecule (either a methyl hydrogen or an aromatic ring hydrogen) involved in the formation of protonated PAH ions was investigated. Experimental analyses of benzene and anisole demonstrated that although the aromatic hydrogen atom of toluene did not contribute to the formation of protonated anthracene, it did contribute to the formation of protonated acridine. Thermochemical data and quantum mechanical calculations showed that the protonation of anthracene by an aromatic ring hydrogen atom of toluene is endothermic, while protonation by a methyl hydrogen atom is exothermic. However, protonation of acridine by either an aromatic ring hydrogen or a methyl hydrogen atom of toluene is exothermic. The different behavior of acridine and anthracene was attributed to differences in gas-phase basicity. It was concluded that both types of hydrogen in toluene can be used for protonation of PAH compounds, but a methyl hydrogen atom is preferred, especially for non-basic compounds.

  8. Liquid chromatography-dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization-mass spectrometry: Application to the analysis of aldehydes in atmospheric aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Jiménez, José; Hautala, Sanna; Parshintsev, Jevgeni; Laitinen, Totti; Hartonen, Kari; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku; Riekkola, Marja-Liisa

    2013-01-01

    A complete methodology based on LC-anisole-toluene dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization-IT-MS was developed for the determination of aldehydes in atmospheric aerosol particles. For the derivatization, ultrasound was used to accelerate the reaction between the target analytes and 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. The developed methodology was validated for three different samples, gas phase, ultrafine (Dp = 30 ± 4 nm; where Dp stands for particle diameter) and all-sized particles, collected on Teflon filters. The method quantitation limits ranged from 5 to 227 pg. The accuracy and the potential matrix effects were evaluated using standard addition methodology. Recoveries ranged between 91.7 and 109.9%, and the repeatability and the reproducibility of the method developed between 0.5 and 8.0% and between 2.9 and 11.1%, respectively. The results obtained by the developed methodology compared to those provided by the previously validated method revealed no statistical differences. The method developed was applied to the determination of aldehydes in 16 atmospheric aerosol samples (30 nm and all-sized samples) collected at the Station for Measuring Forest Ecosystem-Atmosphere Relations II during spring 2011. The mean concentrations of aldehydes, and oxidation products of terpenes were between 0.05 and 82.70 ng/m(3). © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Infrared laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaikkinen, Anu; Shrestha, Bindesh; Kauppila, Tiina J; Vertes, Akos; Kostiainen, Risto

    2012-02-07

    In this paper we introduce laser ablation atmospheric pressure photoionization (LAAPPI), a novel atmospheric pressure ion source for mass spectrometry. In LAAPPI the analytes are ablated from water-rich solid samples or from aqueous solutions with an infrared (IR) laser running at 2.94 μm wavelength. Approximately 12 mm above the sample surface, the ablation plume is intercepted with an orthogonal hot solvent (e.g., toluene or anisole) jet, which is generated by a heated nebulizer microchip and directed toward the mass spectrometer inlet. The ablated analytes are desolvated and ionized in the gas-phase by atmospheric pressure photoionization using a 10 eV vacuum ultraviolet krypton discharge lamp. The effect of operational parameters and spray solvent on the performance of LAAPPI is studied. LAAPPI offers ~300 μm lateral resolution comparable to, e.g., matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization. In addition to polar compounds, LAAPPI efficiently ionizes neutral and nonpolar compounds. The bioanalytical application of the method is demonstrated by the direct LAAPPI analysis of rat brain tissue sections and sour orange (Citrus aurantium) leaves. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  10. Investigation of the behaviour of solid acid catalysts for acylations and cyanisations of aromatics. Final report; Untersuchungen zur Wirkungsweise von festen sauren Katalysatoren bei Acylierungen und Cyanierungen von Aromaten. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemnitz, E.

    2002-01-01

    The present state of the art in the field of FRIEDEL-CRAFTS-ACYLATIONS is characterized by the application of homogenous catalysts (at least stochiometric amounts) like AlCl{sub 3} or FeCl{sub 3}. Problems arising from this application are corrosions, difficult product separations from the catalyst and the origin of acid waste water. Hence, the aim of this project was the development of suitable solid catalysts which overcome the problems ascribed above. Sulfated zirconia (SZ) was found to be an excellent solid Br.o/nsted-acid to be used especially in their aerogel or cryogel form. Thus with this catalyst system, in the benzoylation of anisol nearly 100% conversion may be achieved. In this way it could be proved, that with SZ a solid Br.o/nsted-acid might be available which gives reasonable hope to substitute in a near future, at least for some reactions, the classical homogeneous catalysts and to overcome their problems in use. (orig.)

  11. Surface planarization effect of siloxane derivatives in organic semiconductor layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakanoue, Kei [Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Harada, Hironobu; Ando, Kento [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Yahiro, Masayuki [Institute of Systems, Information Technologies and Nanotechnologies, 2-1-22, Sawara-ku, Fukuoka 814-0001 (Japan); Fukai, Jun, E-mail: jfukai@chem-eng.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The ability of siloxane surface control additives (SCAs) to planarize organic semiconductor films with a thickness of tens of nanometers printed on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces with stripe-patterned bank structures using a liquid-phase method is demonstrated. Three types of SCAs with different molecular structures are examined in organic solutions of toluene, anisole and tetralin containing N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-bis(phenyl)-benzidine as a solute and typical organic semiconductor. While there is an optimum SCA and concentration for each solution, one type of SCA is comprehensively effective for all solutions. This SCA increased contact angle, which is contrary to the typical behavior of SCAs. Scanning electron microscope images of the thin films near the banks reveal that this SCA did not change the contact area between the film and substrate surface, which is related to the effectiveness of the SCA. SCAs did not affect the current–voltage characteristics of green organic light-emitting diodes, but did increase external quantum efficiencies, suggesting that SCAs can be used to improve the quality of solution-deposited films for use in optical devices. - Highlights: • Surface control additives planarize organic semiconductor films coated on surfaces. • The most effective additive increases the contact angle of solutions during drying. • The effect of additives is deduced from solutal Marangoni forces. • Additives have little effect on organic light-emitting diode performance.

  12. A Multifunctional and Possible Skin UV Protectant, (3R-5-Hydroxymellein, Produced by an Endolichenic Fungus Isolated from Parmotrema austrosinense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Zhao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Lichens are considered a great bio-resource because they produce large numbers of secondary metabolites with many biological activities; however, they have not been cultivated under artificial conditions to date. As a result, lichen substances from natural sources are limited and have not been widely utilized in commercial applications. Accordingly, interest in lichen-associated fungi, especially endogenic fungi, has increased. Ultraviolet (UV radiation in sunlight is harmful to human health, resulting in demand for effective UV filtering agents for use in sunscreen. In this study, we purified (3R-5-hydroxymellein, which has UVA absorption activity, from the secondary metabolites of an endolichenic fungus (ELF000039. The antioxidant properties were then assessed by in vitro tests. The antioxidant activity of (3R-5-hydroxymellein was high when compared to the recognized antioxidants ascorbic acid (ASA and butyl hydroxyl anisole (BHA. Moreover, the compound exhibited no cytotoxicity toward mouse melanoma cell lines, B16F1 and B16F10, or the normal cell line, HaCaT. Furthermore, (3R-5-hydroxymellein recovered the damage caused by UVB irradiation and inhibited melanin synthesis. Taken together, these results suggest that (3R-5-hydroxymellein could have an interesting and vital profile to go further development as a multifunctional skin UV protectant.

  13. Solid phase extraction of magnetic carbon doped Fe3O4 nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Li, Jia-yuan; Qiao, Jun-qin; Lian, Hong-zhen; Chen, Hong-yuan

    2014-01-17

    Carbon decorated Fe3O4 nanoparticles (Fe3O4/C) are promising magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) sorbents in environmental and biological analysis. Fe3O4/C based MSPE method shows advantages of easy operation, rapidness, high sensitivity, and environmental friendliness. In this paper, the MSPE mechanism of Fe3O4/C nanoparticles has been comprehensively investigated, for the first time, through the following three efforts: (1) the comparison of extraction efficiency for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) between the Fe3O4/C sorbents and activated carbon; (2) the chromatographic retention behaviors of hydrophobic and hydrophilic compounds on Fe3O4/C nanoparticles as stationary phase; (3) related MSPE experiments for several typical compounds such as pyrene, naphthalene, benzene, phenol, resorcinol, anisole and thioanisole. It can be concluded that there are hybrid hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding interaction or dipole-dipole attraction between Fe3O4/C sorbents and analytes. It is the existence of carbon and oxygen-containing functional groups coated on the surface of Fe3O4/C nanoparticles that is responsible for the effective extraction process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Using heavy atom rare gas matrix to control the reactivity of 4-methoxybenzaldehyde: A comparison with benzaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kus, Nihal [Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Department of Physics, Anadolu University, 26470 Eskisehir (Turkey); Sharma, Archna; Reva, Igor; Fausto, Rui [Department of Chemistry, University of Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal); Lapinski, Leszek [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-04-14

    Different patterns of photochemical behavior were observed for 4-methoxybenzaldehyde (p-anisaldehyde) isolated in xenon and in argon matrices. Monomers of the compound isolated in solid Xe decarbonylate upon middle ultraviolet irradiation, yielding methoxybenzene (anisole), and CO. On the other hand, p-anisaldehyde isolated in an Ar matrix and subjected to identical irradiation, predominantly isomerizes to the closed-ring isomeric ketene (4-methoxycyclohexa-2,4-dien-1-ylidene) methanone. Experimental detection of a closed-ring ketene photoproduct, generated from an aromatic aldehyde, constitutes a rare observation. The difference between the patterns of photochemical transformations of p-anisaldehyde isolated in argon and xenon environments can be attributed to the external heavy-atom effect, where xenon enhances the rate of intersystem crossing from the singlet to the triplet manifold in which decarbonylation (via p-methoxybenzoyl radical) takes place. The parent compound, benzaldehyde, decarbonylates (to benzene + CO) when subjected to middle ultraviolet irradiation in both argon and xenon matrices. This demonstrates the role of the methoxy p-anisaldehyde substituent in activation of the reaction channel leading to the formation of the ketene photoproduct.

  15. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Bio-oil Model Compounds over Pt/HY Catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heejin; Kim, Hannah; Yu, Mi Jin; Ko, Chang Hyun; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Jae, Jungho; Park, Sung Hoon; Jung, Sang-Chul; Park, Young-Kwon

    2016-06-01

    The hydrodeoxygenation of a model compound of lignin-derived bio-oil, guaiacol, which can be obtained from the pyrolysis of biomass to bio-oil, has attracted considerable research attention because of its huge potential as a substitute for conventional fuels. In this study, platinum-loaded HY zeolites (Pt/HY) with different Si/Al molar ratios were used as catalysts for the hydrodeoxygenation of guaiacol, anisole, veratrole, and phenol to a range of hydrocarbons, such as cyclohexane. The cyclohexane (major product) yield increased with increasing number of acid sites. To produce bio-oil with the maximum level of cyclohexane and alkylated cyclohexanes, which would be suitable as a substitute for conventional transportation fuels, the Si/Al molar ratio should be optimized to balance the Pt particle-induced hydrogenation with acid site-induced methyl group transfer. The fuel properties of real bio-oil derived from the fast pyrolysis of cork oak was improved using the Pt/HY catalyst.

  16. Simultaneous determination of pesticide residues and antioxidants in blended oil using a liquid-liquid extraction combined with dispersive solid phase extraction method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yong; Tian, Wen; Pei, Fei; Li, Peng; Shao, XiaoLong; Fan, Yan; Hu, Qiuhui

    2017-08-15

    This article developed a method to detect two antioxidants (butylated hydroxyl anisole (BHA), butylated hydroxyl toluene (BHT)) and twelve pesticides (dichlorvos, pirimicarb, prothiofos, fenitrothion, ethoprophos, malathion, beta-Cypermethrin, profenofos, diazinon, propoxur, procymidon, captan) in blended oil samples after their extraction simultaneously. The establishment of the method was based on two-step process of screening and optimization experiment design. With a Plackett-Burman (PB) design, significant parameters were found by screening experiment and single factor experiment accompanied by a central composite design (CCD) experiment were used to make important parameters optimal. The coefficients of determination (r 2 ) was between 0.9931 and 0.9996 while the limits of quantification (LOQs) and limits of detection (LODs) were found in scope of 0.002-0.04mg·kg -1 and 0.0006-0.0012mg·kg -1 . Recovery values of analytes were above 74%, at the same time the relative standard deviations (RSDs) under 10% at the concentrations ranging from 0.05mg·kg -1 to 0.20mg·kg -1 . To sum up, this method with shorter time and fewer consumption of reagents could be employed in various occasions to detect antioxidants and pesticides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Stabilization of 2D assemblies of silver nanoparticles by spin-coating polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Longyu; Pfirman, Aubrie; Chumanov, George, E-mail: gchumak@clemson.edu

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Spin-coating of polymers onto 2D assemblies of Ag NPs was used to stabilize the assemblies against aggregation. • The polymer filled the space between the particles leaving the metal surface uncoated and accessible to various chemical reactions. • Etching nanoparticles produced crater-like structures. - Abstract: Silver nanoparticles self-assembled on poly(4-vinylpyridine) modified surfaces were spin-coated with poly(methyl methacrylate), poly(butyl methacrylate) and polystyrene from anisole and toluene solutions. The polymers filled the space between the particles thereby providing stabilization of the assemblies against particle aggregation when dried or chemically modified. The polymers did not coat the top surface of the nanoparticles offering the chemical accessibility to the metal surface. This was confirmed by converting the stabilized nanoparticles into silver sulfide and gold clusters. Etching the nanoparticles resulted in crater-like polymeric structures with the cavities extending down to the underlying substrate. Electrochemical reduction of silver inside the craters was performed. The approach can be extended to other nanoparticle assemblies and polymers.

  18. Scattering Study of Conductive-Dielectric Nano/Micro-Grained Single Crystals Based on Poly(ethylene glycol, Poly(3-hexyl thiophene and Polyaniline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira Agbolaghi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Two types of rod-coil block copolymers including poly(3-hexylthiophene-block-poly(ethylene glycol (P3HT-b-PEG and PEG-block-polyaniline (PANI were synthesized using Grignard metathesis polymerization, Suzuki coupling, and interfacial polymerization. Afterward, two types of single crystals were grown by self-seeding methodology to investigate the coily and rod blocks in grafted brushes and ordered crystalline configurations. The conductive P3HT fibrillar single crystals covered by the dielectric coily PEG oligomers were grown from toluene, xylene, and anisole, and characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM and grazing wide angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS. Longer P3HT backbones resulted in folding, whereas shorter ones had a high tendency towards backbone lamination. The effective factors on folding of long P3HT backbones in the single crystal structures were the solvent quality and crystallization temperature. Better solvents due to decelerating the growth condition led to a higher number of foldings. Via increasing the crystallization temperature, the system decreased the folding number to maintain its stability. Poorer solvents also reflected a higher stacking in hexyl side chain and π-π stacking directions. The dielectric lamellar PEG single crystals sandwiched between the PANI nanorods were grown from amyl acetate, and analyzed using the interface distribution function (IDF of SAXS and AFM. The molecular weights of PANI and PEG blocks and crystallization temperature were focused while studying the grown single crystals.

  19. Reaction-time-resolved measurements of laser-induced fluorescence in a shock tube with a single laser pulse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabeti, S.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C.

    2017-11-01

    Shock tubes allow for the study of ultra-fast gas-phase reactions on the microsecond time scale. Because the repetition rate of the experiments is low, it is crucial to gain as much information as possible from each individual measurement. While reaction-time-resolved species concentration and temperature measurements with fast absorption methods are established, conventional laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements with pulsed lasers provide data only at a single reaction time. Therefore, fluorescence methods have rarely been used in shock-tube diagnostics. In this paper, a novel experimental concept is presented that allows reaction-time-resolved LIF measurements with one single laser pulse using a test section that is equipped with several optical ports. After the passage of the shock wave, the reactive mixture is excited along the center of the tube with a 266-nm laser beam directed through a window in the end wall of the shock tube. The emitted LIF signal is collected through elongated sidewall windows and focused onto the entrance slit of an imaging spectrometer coupled to an intensified CCD camera. The one-dimensional spatial resolution of the measurement translates into a reaction-time-resolved measurement while the species information can be gained from the spectral axis of the detected two-dimensional image. Anisole pyrolysis was selected as the benchmark reaction to demonstrate the new apparatus.

  20. PIV study of flow through porous structure using refractive index matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Häfeli, Richard; Altheimer, Marco; Butscher, Denis; Rudolf von Rohr, Philipp

    2014-05-01

    An aqueous solution of sodium iodide and zinc iodide is proposed as a fluid that matches the refractive index of a solid manufactured by rapid prototyping. This enabled optical measurements in single-phase flow through porous structures. Experiments were also done with an organic index-matching fluid (anisole) in porous structures of different dimensions. To compare experiments with different viscosities and dimensions, we employed Reynolds similarity to deduce the scaling laws. One of the target quantities of our investigation was the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Different models for the dissipation rate estimation were evaluated by comparing isotropy ratios. As in many other studies also, our experiments were not capable of resolving the velocity field down to the Kolmogorov length scale, and therefore, the dissipation rate has to be considered as underestimated. This is visible in experiments of different relative resolutions. However, being near the Kolmogorov scale allows estimating a reproducible, yet underestimated spatial distribution of dissipation rate inside the porous structure. Based on these results, the model was used to estimate the turbulent diffusivity. Comparing it to the dispersion coefficient obtained in the same porous structure, we conclude that even at the turbulent diffusivity makes up only a small part of mass transfer in axial direction. The main part is therefore attributed to Taylor dispersion.

  1. All-printed capacitors with continuous solution dispensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yang; Plötner, Matthias; Berndt, Andreas; Kumar, Amit; Voit, Brigitte; Pospiech, Doris; Fischer, Wolf-Joachim

    2017-09-01

    Printed electronics have been introduced into the commercial markets in recent years. Various printing technologies have emerged aiming to process printed electronic devices with low cost, environmental friendliness, and compatibility with large areas and flexible substrates. The aim of this study is to propose a continuous solution dispensing technology for processing all-printed thin-film capacitors on glass substrates using a leading-edge printing instrument. Among all printing technologies, this study provides concrete proof of the following outstanding advantages of this technology: high tolerance to inks, high throughput, low cost, and precise pattern transfers. Ag nanoparticle ink based on glycol ethers was used to print the electrodes. To obtain dielectric ink, a copolymer powder of poly(methyl methacrylate-co-benzoylphenyl methacrylate) containing crosslinkable side groups was dissolved in anisole. Various layouts were designed to support multiple electronic applications. Scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the all-printed capacitor layers formed using the proposed process. Additionally, the printed capacitors were electrically characterized under direct current and alternating current. The measured electrical properties of the printed capacitors were consistent with the theoretical results.

  2. Surface planarization effect of siloxane derivatives in organic semiconductor layers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakanoue, Kei; Harada, Hironobu; Ando, Kento; Yahiro, Masayuki; Fukai, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The ability of siloxane surface control additives (SCAs) to planarize organic semiconductor films with a thickness of tens of nanometers printed on indium tin oxide (ITO) surfaces with stripe-patterned bank structures using a liquid-phase method is demonstrated. Three types of SCAs with different molecular structures are examined in organic solutions of toluene, anisole and tetralin containing N,N′-bis(3-methylphenyl)-N,N′-bis(phenyl)-benzidine as a solute and typical organic semiconductor. While there is an optimum SCA and concentration for each solution, one type of SCA is comprehensively effective for all solutions. This SCA increased contact angle, which is contrary to the typical behavior of SCAs. Scanning electron microscope images of the thin films near the banks reveal that this SCA did not change the contact area between the film and substrate surface, which is related to the effectiveness of the SCA. SCAs did not affect the current–voltage characteristics of green organic light-emitting diodes, but did increase external quantum efficiencies, suggesting that SCAs can be used to improve the quality of solution-deposited films for use in optical devices. - Highlights: • Surface control additives planarize organic semiconductor films coated on surfaces. • The most effective additive increases the contact angle of solutions during drying. • The effect of additives is deduced from solutal Marangoni forces. • Additives have little effect on organic light-emitting diode performance.

  3. Reversed-phase single drop microextraction followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection for the quantification of synthetic phenolic antioxidants in edible oil samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farajmand, Bahman; Esteki, Mahnaz; Koohpour, Elham; Salmani, Vahid

    2017-04-01

    The reversed-phase mode of single drop microextraction has been used as a preparation method for the extraction of some phenolic antioxidants from edible oil samples. Butylated hydroxyl anisole, tert-butylhydroquinone and butylated hydroxytoluene were employed as target compounds for this study. High-performance liquid chromatography followed by fluorescence detection was applied for final determination of target compounds. The most interesting feature of this study is the application of a disposable insulin syringe with some modification for microextraction procedure that efficiently improved the volume and stability of the solvent microdrop. Different parameters such as the type and volume of solvent, sample stirring rate, extraction temperature, and time were investigated and optimized. Analytical performances of the method were evaluated under optimized conditions. Under the optimal conditions, relative standard deviations were between 4.4 and 10.2%. Linear dynamic ranges were 20-10 000 to 2-1000 μg/g (depending on the analytes). Detection limits were 5-670 ng/g. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used for quantification of the antioxidants in some edible oil samples prepared from market. Relative recoveries were achieved from 88 to 111%. The proposed method had a simplicity of operation, low cost, and successful application for real samples. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Deuterium isotope effects during formation of phenols by hepatic monoxygenases. Evidence for an alternative to the arene oxide pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomaszewski, J.E.; Jerina, D.M.; Daly, J.W.

    1975-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro metabolisms of normal and deuterated aromatic substrates have been investigated in rats. Significant isotope effects (k/ sub H//k/sub D/ equals 1.3-1.75) were associated with in vivo formation of meta-hydroxylated metabolites from 1:1 mixtures of normal and perdeuterio-(arylring) nitrobenzene, methyl phenyl sulfide, and methyl phenyl sulfone. Since isotope effects of this magnitude are incompatible with arene oxides as intermediates in the formation of phenols, the results provide evidence that multiple pathways are responsible for the formation of phenols in mammals. Significant isotope effects were not associated with the formation of the other phenolic isomers of nitrobenzene, methyl phenyl sulfone, or methyl phenyl sulfide or with the formation of phenolic products from anisole, bromobenzene, chlorobenzene, fluorobenzene, benzonitrile, naphthalene, zoxazolamine, acetanilide, biphenyl, diphenylhydantoin, benzene, o- and p-xylene, toluene, and mesitylene. Significant isotope effects might not be observable with the latter substrates if the kinetic parameters for oxidation of substrate change or if the arene oxide pathway greatly predominates. Furthermore, extensive in vivo metabolism of any substrate would make isotope effects unobservable by the procedure employed, namely the analysis of isotope content in metabolites formed from 1:1 mixtures of normal and deuterated substrates. (U.S.)

  5. Antioxidants Inhibit Formation of 3-Monochloropropane-1,2-diol Esters in Model Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chang; Jia, Hanbing; Shen, Mingyue; Wang, Yuting; Nie, Shaoping; Chen, Yi; Zhou, Yongqiang; Wang, Yuanxing; Xie, Mingyong

    2015-11-11

    The capacities of six antioxidants to inhibit the formation of 3-monochloropropane-1,2 diol (3-MCPD) esters were examined in this study. Inhibitory capacities of the antioxidants were investigated both in chemical models containing the precursors (tripalmitoyl glycerol, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol, monopalmitoyl glycerol, and sodium chloride) of 3-MCPD esters and in oil models (rapeseed oil and sodium chloride). Six antioxidants, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA), tert-butyl hydroquinone (TBHQ), propyl gallate (PG), L-ascorbyl palmitate (AP), and α-tocopherol (VE), were found to exhibit inhibiting capacities on 3-MCPD ester formation both in chemical models and in oil models. TBHQ provided the highest inhibitory capacity both in chemical models and in oil models; 44% of 3-MCPD ester formation was inhibited in the presence of TBHQ (66 mg/kg of oil) after heating of rapeseed oil at 230 °C for 30 min, followed by PG and AP. BHT, BHA, and VE appeared to have weaker inhibitory abilities in both models. VE exhibited the lowest inhibition rate; 22% of 3-MCPD esters were inhibited in the presence of VE (172 mg/kg of oil) after heating of rapeseed oil at 230 °C for 30 min. In addition, the inhibition rates of PG and VE decreased dramatically with an increase in temperature or heating time. The results suggested that some antioxidants, such as TBHQ, PG, and AP, could be the potential inhibitors of 3-MCPD esters in practice.

  6. Engineering of RuMb: Toward a Green Catalyst for Carbene Insertion Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Matthew W; Vargas, David A; Lehnert, Nicolai

    2017-05-15

    The small, stable heme protein myoglobin (Mb) was modified through cofactor substitution and mutagenesis to develop a new catalyst for carbene transfer reactions. The native heme was removed from wild-type Mb and several Mb His64 mutants (H64D, H64A, H64V), and the resulting apoproteins were reconstituted with ruthenium mesoporphyrin IX (RuMpIX). The reconstituted proteins (RuMb) were characterized by UV-vis and circular dichroism spectroscopy and were used as catalysts for the N-H insertion of aniline derivatives and the cyclopropanation of styrene derivatives. The best catalysts for each reaction were able to achieve turnover numbers (TON) up to 520 for the N-H insertion of aniline, and 350 TON for the cyclopropanation of vinyl anisole. Our results show that RuMb is an effective catalyst for N-H insertion, with the potential to further increase the activity and stereoselectivity of the catalyst in future studies. Compared to native Mb ("FeMb"), RuMb is a more active catalyst for carbene transfer reactions, which leads to both heme and protein modification and degradation and, hence, to an overall much-reduced lifetime of the catalyst. This leads to lower TONs for RuMb compared to the iron-containing analogues. Strategies to overcome this limitation are discussed. Finally, comparison is also made to FeH64DMb and FeH64AMb, which have not been previously investigated for carbene transfer reactions.

  7. Full evaporation headspace gas chromatography for sensitive determination of high boiling point volatile organic compounds in low boiling matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mana Kialengila, Didi; Wolfs, Kris; Bugalama, John; Van Schepdael, Ann; Adams, Erwin

    2013-11-08

    Determination of volatile organic components (VOC's) is often done by static headspace gas chromatography as this technique is very robust and combines easy sample preparation with good selectivity and low detection limits. This technique is used nowadays in different applications which have in common that they have a dirty matrix which would be problematic in direct injection approaches. Headspace by nature favors the most volatile compounds, avoiding the less volatile to reach the injector and column. As a consequence, determination of a high boiling solvent in a lower boiling matrix becomes challenging. Determination of VOCs like: xylenes, cumene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA), N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), 1,3-dimethyl-2-imidazolidinone (DMI), benzyl alcohol (BA) and anisole in water or water soluble products are an interesting example of the arising problems. In this work, a headspace variant called full evaporation technique is worked out and validated for the mentioned solvents. Detection limits below 0.1 μg/vial are reached with RSD values below 10%. Mean recovery values ranged from 92.5 to 110%. The optimized method was applied to determine residual DMSO in a water based cell culture and DMSO and DMA in tetracycline hydrochloride (a water soluble sample). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. New Linear Partitioning Models Based on Experimental Water: Supercritical CO2 Partitioning Data of Selected Organic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burant, Aniela; Thompson, Christopher; Lowry, Gregory V; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2016-05-17

    Partitioning coefficients of organic compounds between water and supercritical CO2 (sc-CO2) are necessary to assess the risk of migration of these chemicals from subsurface CO2 storage sites. Despite the large number of potential organic contaminants, the current data set of published water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients is very limited. Here, the partitioning coefficients of thiophene, pyrrole, and anisole were measured in situ over a range of temperatures and pressures using a novel pressurized batch-reactor system with dual spectroscopic detectors: a near-infrared spectrometer for measuring the organic analyte in the CO2 phase and a UV detector for quantifying the analyte in the aqueous phase. Our measured partitioning coefficients followed expected trends based on volatility and aqueous solubility. The partitioning coefficients and literature data were then used to update a published poly parameter linear free-energy relationship and to develop five new linear free-energy relationships for predicting water-sc-CO2 partitioning coefficients. A total of four of the models targeted a single class of organic compounds. Unlike models that utilize Abraham solvation parameters, the new relationships use vapor pressure and aqueous solubility of the organic compound at 25 °C and CO2 density to predict partitioning coefficients over a range of temperature and pressure conditions. The compound class models provide better estimates of partitioning behavior for compounds in that class than does the model built for the entire data set.

  9. Superior acidic catalytic activity and stability of Fe-doped HTaWO6 nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, He; Zhang, Haitao; Fei, Linfeng; Ma, Hongbin; Zhao, Guoying; Mak, CheeLeung; Zhang, Xixiang; Zhang, Suojiang

    2017-01-01

    Fe-doped HTaWO6 (H1-3xFexTaWO6, x = 0.23) nanotubes as highly active solid acid catalysts were prepared via an exfoliation-scrolling-exchange process. The specific surface area and pore volume of undoped nanotubes (20.8 m2 g-1, 0.057 cm3 g-1) were remarkably enhanced through Fe3+ ion-exchange (>100 m2 g-1, 0.547 cm3 g-1). Doping Fe ions into the nanotubes endowed them with improved thermal stability due to the stronger interaction between the intercalated Fe3+ ions and the host layers. This interaction also facilitated the preservation of effective Brønsted acid sites and the generation of new acid sites. The integration of these functional roles resulted in Fe-doped nanotubes with high acidic catalytic activities in the Friedel-Crafts alkylation of anisole and the esterification of acetic acid. Facile accessibility to active sites, generation of effective Brønsted acid sites, high stability of the tubular structure and strong acid sites were found to synergistically contribute to the excellent acidic catalytic efficiency. Additionally, the activity of cycled nanocatalysts can be easily recovered through annealing treatment.

  10. New URJC-1 Material with Remarkable Stability and Acid-Base Catalytic Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Leo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Emerging new metal-organic structures with tunable physicochemical properties is an exciting research field for diverse applications. In this work, a novel metal-organic framework Cu(HIT(DMF0.5, named URJC-1, with a three-dimensional non-interpenetrated utp topological network, has been synthesized. This material exhibits a microporous structure with unsaturated copper centers and imidazole–tetrazole linkages that provide accessible Lewis acid/base sites. These features make URJC-1 an exceptional candidate for catalytic application in acid and base reactions of interest in fine chemistry. The URJC-1 material also displays a noteworthy thermal and chemical stability in different organic solvents of different polarity and boiling water. Its catalytic activity was evaluated in acid-catalyzed Friedel–Crafts acylation of anisole with acetyl chloride and base-catalyzed Knoevenagel condensation of benzaldehyde with malononitrile. In both cases, URJC-1 material showed very good performance, better than other metal organic frameworks and conventional catalysts. In addition, a remarkable structural stability was proven after several consecutive reaction cycles.

  11. Synthesis of Amino Acid Analogues of 5H-Dibenz[b,f]azepine and Evaluation of their Radical Scavenging Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Vijay Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for the synthesis of tyrosine, phenyl alanine, hydroxy proline and threonine free amino acid analogues of 5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine is proposed. 5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine was prepared by known method. The key intermediate 3-chloro-1-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-ylpropan-1-one was obtained by N-acylation of 5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine with 3-chloro propionyl chloride. Further coupling of respective free amino acid to produce 2-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-yl-3-oxopropylamino3-(4 hydroxyphenyl propanoic acid, 2-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-yl-3-oxopropylamino-3-phenyl propanoicacid,1-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f]azepine-5-yl-3-oxopropyl-3-hydroxypyrolidine-2-carboxylic acid and 2-(3-(5H-dibenz[b,f] azepine-yl-3-oxopropyl amino-3-hydroxy butanoic acid. The synthesized compounds were evaluated for their potential over 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl hydrazyl (DPPH free radical scavenging activity. Butylated hydroxy anisole (BHA and ascorbic acid (AA were used as the reference antioxidant compounds and also the comparative study with synthesized compounds was done. Under our experimental conditions tyrosine, hydroxy proline and threonine analogues possess a direct scavenging effect on trapping the stable free radical DPPH. Hydroxy proline analogues showed a significant radical scavenging activity among the synthesized analogues

  12. Secondary deuterium isotope effects and transition state structure in the aromatic claisen rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMichael, K.D.; Korver, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    Kinetic experiments were carried out simultaneously on separate methyl salicylate solutions of allyl phenyl ether and its deuterated phenyl analogues at 170 to 195 0 C. Gas chromatographic analysis for allyl phenyl ether using an internal standard (anisole) and mechanical integration produced concentration/time data which were fitted to the exponential form of the first-order rate equation by a standard and nonlinear least-square program. At least 15 points were obtained for each run, covering 10 to 85% reaction. The derived isotope effects show no temperature dependence. Averages for 6 runs with each compound are k/sub H//k/sub α-D 2 / = 1.18 and K/sub H//k/sub γ-D 2 / = 0.95. An equilibrium α effect of 1.30 and a γ effect of 0.87 may be calculated for both deuterium atoms at 185 0 C. These results show that the C--H vibration frequencies are approximately (1.18 - 1)/(1.27 - 1) or 57 to 77% of the way from those of allyl phenyl ether to those of the cyclohexadiene intermediate. The C--H frequencies of the γ carbon in the transition state are about (0.95 - 1)/(0.88 - 1) or 22 to 62% of the way to those of the intermediate. The structure of the transition state, as far as these bonding frequencies are concerned, is consistent with the Claisen rearrangement

  13. Salen- Zr(IV) complex grafted into amine-tagged MIL-101(Cr) as a robust multifunctional catalyst for biodiesel production and organic transformation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Hassan M. A.; Betiha, Mohamed A.; Mohamed, Shaimaa K.; El-Sharkawy, E. A.; Ahmed, Emad A.

    2017-08-01

    The synthesis of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), porous coordination polymers with functional groups has received immense interest due to the functional groups can offer desirable properties and allow post-synthetic modification. Herein, for the first time, Zr(IV)-Sal Schiff base complex incorporated into amino-functionalized MIL-101(Cr) framework by salicylaldehyde condensing to amino group, and coordinating Zr(IV) ion have been successfully synthesized. The worthiness of the synthesized material as a catalyst has been examined for the esterification of oleic acid (free fatty acid) with methanol producing biodiesel (methyl oleate), Knoveonagel condensation reaction of aldehydes and Friedel-Crafts acylation of anisole. Our findings demonstrated that Salen-Zr(IV) grafted to framework of NH2-MIL-101(Cr) as a solid acid catalyst exhibited distinct catalytic performance for the production of biodiesel by esterification of oleic acid with methanol, Knoveonagel condensation and Friedel-Crafts acylation. These could be attributed to high surface area which allow high distribution of Zr(IV) species lead to a sufficient contact with the reactants species. Furthermore, the catalyst showed excellent recycling efficiency due to the strong interaction between the Zr(IV) ions and chelating groups in the NH2-MIL-101(Cr)-Sal.

  14. Responses of the L51781Y tk/sup +//tk/sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay: III. 72 coded chemicals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.; Cattanach, P.; Edwards, I.; McBride, D.; Riach, C.; Caspary, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Seventy-two chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L51781Y tk/sup +///sup -/ mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay, using procedures based upon those described previously. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before planting in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 ..mu..g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Significant responses were obtained with allyl isothiocyanate, p-benzoquinone dioxime, benzyl acetate, 2-biphenylamine HCl, bis(2-chloro-1-methylethyl)ether, cadmium chloride, chlordane, chlorobenzene, chlorobenzilate, 2-chloroethanol, chlorothalonil, cytarabine x HCl, p,p'-DDE, diazinon, 2,6-dichloro-p-phenylenediamine, N,N-diethylthiourea, diglycidylresorcinol ether, 2,4-dimethoxy aniline x HCl, disperse yellow 3, endosulfan, 1,2-epoxyhexadecane, ethyl acrylate, ethyl benzene, ethylene thiourea, F D and C yellow Number 6, furan, heptachlor, isophorone, mercuric chloride, 4,4'-methylenedianiline x 2 HCl, methyl viologen, nickel sulfate x 6H/sub 2/O, 4,4'-oxydianiline, pentachloroethane, piperonyl butoxide, propyl gallate, quinoline, rotenone, 2,4,5,6-tetrachloro-4-nitro-anisole, 1,1,1,2-tetrachloroethane, trichlorfon, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, 2,4,5-trimethoxybenzaldehyde, 1,1,3-trimethyl-2-thiourea, 1-vinyl-3-cyclopetene dioxide, vinyl toluene, and ziram. The assay was incapable of providing a clear indication of whether some chemicals were mutagens; these benzyl alcohol, 1,4-dichlorobenzene, phenol, succinic acid-2,2-dimethyl hydrazide, and toluene.

  15. Synthesis and vibrational spectra of cooper(II) and erbium(III) complexes with 2-diazo[2'-(oxymethyldiphenylphosphinyl)phenyl]-4-tert-butylphenol (HL) - [CuL2]·2H2O and Er(NO3)3·2HL·2H2O. Crystal structure of [CuL2]·2H2O

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivadze, A.Yu.; Minacheva, L.Kh.; Ivanova, I.S.; Pyatova, E.N.; Sergienko, V.S.; Baulin, V.E.

    2008-01-01

    Paper describes synthesis of CuL 2 ·2H 2 O (I) complex cupric salt and of Er(NO 3 ) 3 ·2HL·2H 2 O (II) erbium nitrate complex (HL=2-diazo-[2'(oxymethyl-diphenyl-phosphinyl)phenyl]-4-tert-butylphenol). One interprets the fundamental frequencies within the IR-spectra of (I) and (II) compounds. One has performed X-ray diffraction analysis of I compound. The crystals are monoclinic ones, a=15.157(3), b=17.080(2), c=22.451(9) A, β=106.09(3) Deg, V=5584(3) A 3 , Z=4, C2/c sp.gr., R=0.0546 as to 1152 reflections with I>2σ(I). The copper atom coordination polyhedron (C 2 symmetry) may be described as a symmetrically-prolonged square bipyramid (4+2). Cu polyhedron central square is formed by substituted phenol oxygen atom and by one of diazo-group nitrogen atoms of either of two deprotonated ligands, namely: L - (Cu-N 1.969(6), Cu-O 1.899(5) A). The angles between lying opposite O and N atoms constitute 157.6 Deg, while the rest equatorial angles range within 90.6 Deg-95.9 Deg. The axial positions are occupied by O(2) and O(2A) anisole atoms (Cu-O 2.737(6) A, O(2)Cu(1)O(2A) angle constitutes 132.3 Deg). Within crystal I the complex molecules and the crystallization molecules of water are combined by by the hydrogen bond system. According to the IR-spectra data, within complex II in contrast to compound I erbium atom coordination by HL ligand involves oxygen phosphoryl atom [ru

  16. In vitro antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic activities of Bauhinia variegata Linn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajani, G.P.; Ashok, Purnima

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the ethanolic and aqueous extracts of Bauhinia variegata Linn. for in vitro antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic activity. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic and aqueous extracts of the stem bark and root of B. variegata Linn. were prepared and assessed for in vitro antioxidant activity by various methods namely total reducing power, scavenging of various free radicals such as 1,2-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), super oxide, nitric oxide, and hydrogen peroxide. The percentage scavenging of various free radicals were compared with standard antioxidants such as ascorbic acid and butylated hydroxyl anisole (BHA). The extracts were also evaluated for antihyperlipidemic activity in Triton WR-1339 (iso-octyl polyoxyethylene phenol)-induced hyperlipidemic albino rats by estimating serum triglyceride, very low density lipids (VLDL), cholesterol, low-density lipids (LDL), and high-density lipid (HDL) levels. Result: Significant antioxidant activity was observed in all the methods, (P < 0.01) for reducing power and (P < 0.001) for scavenging DPPH, super oxide, nitric oxide, and hydrogen peroxide radicals. The extracts showed significant reduction (P < 0.01) in cholesterol at 6 and 24 h and (P < 0.05) at 48 h. There was significant reduction (P < 0.01) in triglyceride level at 6, 24, and 48 h. The VLDL level was also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced from 24 h and maximum reduction (P < 0.01) was seen at 48 h. There was significant increase (P < 0.01) in HDL at 6, 24, and 48 h. Conclusion: From the results, it is evident that alcoholic and aqueous extracts of B. variegata Linn. can effectively decrease plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, LDL, and VLDL and increase plasma HDL levels. In addition, the alcoholic and aqueous extracts have shown significant antioxidant activity. By the virtue of its antioxidant activity, B. variegata Linn. may show antihyperlipidemic activity. PMID:20177495

  17. Cockchafer larvae smell host root scents in soil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Weissteiner

    Full Text Available In many insect species olfaction is a key sensory modality. However, examination of the chemical ecology of insects has focussed up to now on insects living above ground. Evidence for behavioral responses to chemical cues in the soil other than CO(2 is scarce and the role played by olfaction in the process of finding host roots below ground is not yet understood. The question of whether soil-dwelling beetle larvae can smell their host plant roots has been under debate, but proof is as yet lacking that olfactory perception of volatile compounds released by damaged host plants, as is known for insects living above ground, occurs. Here we show that soil-dwelling larvae of Melolontha hippocastani are well equipped for olfactory perception and respond electrophysiologically and behaviorally to volatiles released by damaged host-plant roots. An olfactory apparatus consisting of pore plates at the antennae and about 70 glomeruli as primary olfactory processing units indicates a highly developed olfactory system. Damage induced host plant volatiles released by oak roots such as eucalyptol and anisol are detected by larval antennae down to 5 ppbv in soil air and elicit directed movement of the larvae in natural soil towards the odor source. Our results demonstrate that plant-root volatiles are likely to be perceived by the larval olfactory system and to guide soil-dwelling white grubs through the dark below ground to their host plants. Thus, to find below-ground host plants cockchafer larvae employ mechanisms that are similar to those employed by the adult beetles flying above ground, despite strikingly different physicochemical conditions in the soil.

  18. Primary investigation on contamination pattern of legacy and emerging halogenated organic pollutions in freshwater fish from Liaohe River, Northeast China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren Guofa, E-mail: rgf2008@shu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhao, Wang [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Zhiqiang, Yu [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Yang, Wang [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Shengtao, Ma [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Minghong, Wu [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); Guoying, Sheng [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Jiamo, Fu [Institute of Environmental Pollution and Health, School of Environment and Chemical Engineering, Shanghai University, 99 Shangda Road, Baoshan Disrict, Shanghai 200072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Environment Protection and Resource Utilization, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2013-01-15

    Legacy halogenated compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and emerging organo-halogen pollutants such as Dechlorane Plus (DP), were detected in fish from an old industrial region in Northeast China. PCBs and PBDEs were detected in all of the samples, with concentrations ranging from 38.15 to 170.51 ng/g lipid weight, and 9.40-39.69 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. DP was detected in more than 90% of the samples with concentrations ranging from not detected (ND) to 470 pg g/g lipid weight. Compared with similar data in other areas of the world, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in fish from Liaohe River were at medium or low level. An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China. Other halogenated pollutions, such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, octachlorostyrene, chlorinated anisole, chlorinated thioanisole, triclosan-methyl, and other pesticides, have also been identified in the fish samples. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DP was reported in fish samples from river close to an old industrial base in China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first report on the unusually high fraction of PCB-209 in samples from China. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer GC Multiplication-Sign GC-TOFMS was used to identify non-targeted halogenated pollutants. - An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China, which might indicate that there were distinct sources of pure PCB-209 in the region of Liaohe River.

  19. Retrospective monitoring of triclosan and methyl-triclosan in fish. Results from the German Environmental Specimen Bank

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehmer, W; Ruedel, H; Wenzel, A [Fraunhofer IME, Schmallenberg (Germany); Schroeter-Kermani, C [Umweltbundesamt, Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    During the last years there were several reports on the appearance of the biocides triclosan (TCS; 5- chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)phenol; CAS No. 3380-34-5) and chlorophene (CP; 4-Chloro-2- (phenylmethyl)phenol; CAS No. 120-32-1) in the environment. TCS is used in numerous personal care products like toothpaste and soaps, but also in textiles and shoes. The current annual consumption in Germany is estimated to be 40 t (0.5 g per capita and year). During use large amounts of TCS and CP are disposed into waste water. Modern waste water treatment plants (WWTP) eliminate approximately 95 % of TCS, mainly by biodegradation and adsorption to sludge. It was observed that during waste water treatment methyl-triclosan (MTCS; 5-chloro-2-(2,4-dichlorophenoxy)anisole; CAS No. 4640-01-1) is formed, probably due to microbial methylation. In a WWTP effluent up to 1 % MTCS in relation to TCS was detected. The environmental half-life of TCS is assumed to be low, mainly because it is susceptible to photodegradation at environmental pH levels while MTCS is stable under these conditions. The logPow values of 4.7 for TCS and 5.2 for MTCS (estimated with KowWin Vers. 1,67, respectively) indicate potential for bioaccumulation. Based in order to investigate the exposure of aquatic organisms towards CP, TCS and MTCS in Germany a retrospective monitoring of breams (Abramis brama) from representative rivers was initiated. Samples from the period 1994 to 2003 were taken from the archive of the German Environmental Specimen Bank (ESB) to evaluate temporal changes and regional differences of the occurrence of the target compounds.

  20. Primary investigation on contamination pattern of legacy and emerging halogenated organic pollutions in freshwater fish from Liaohe River, Northeast China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Guofa; Wang Zhao; Yu Zhiqiang; Wang Yang; Ma Shengtao; Wu Minghong; Sheng Guoying; Fu Jiamo

    2013-01-01

    Legacy halogenated compounds, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and emerging organo-halogen pollutants such as Dechlorane Plus (DP), were detected in fish from an old industrial region in Northeast China. PCBs and PBDEs were detected in all of the samples, with concentrations ranging from 38.15 to 170.51 ng/g lipid weight, and 9.40–39.69 ng/g lipid weight, respectively. DP was detected in more than 90% of the samples with concentrations ranging from not detected (ND) to 470 pg g/g lipid weight. Compared with similar data in other areas of the world, PCBs, PBDEs and DP in fish from Liaohe River were at medium or low level. An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China. Other halogenated pollutions, such as dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites, octachlorostyrene, chlorinated anisole, chlorinated thioanisole, triclosan-methyl, and other pesticides, have also been identified in the fish samples. - Highlights: ► DP was reported in fish samples from river close to an old industrial base in China. ► The first report on the unusually high fraction of PCB-209 in samples from China. ► GC × GC–TOFMS was used to identify non-targeted halogenated pollutants. - An unusually high percentage of PCB-209 was first reported in the fish samples collected from China, which might indicate that there were distinct sources of pure PCB-209 in the region of Liaohe River.

  1. The ionization mechanisms in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2014-11-01

    A novel, gas-tight API interface for gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to study the ionization mechanism in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI). Eight analytes (ethylbenzene, bromobenzene, naphthalene, anthracene, benzaldehyde, pyridine, quinolone, and acridine) with varying ionization energies (IEs) and proton affinities (PAs), and four common APPI dopants (toluene, acetone, anisole, and chlorobenzene) were chosen. All the studied compounds were ionized by direct APPI, forming mainly molecular ions. Addition of dopants suppressed the signal of the analytes with IEs above the IE of the dopant. For compounds with suitable IEs or Pas, the dopants increased the ionization efficiency as the analytes could be ionized through dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions, such as charge exchange, proton transfer, and other rather unexpected reactions, such as formation of [M + 77](+) in the presence of chlorobenzene. Experiments with deuterated toluene as the dopant verified that in case of proton transfer, the proton originated from the dopant instead of proton-bound solvent clusters, as in conventional open or non-tight APPI sources. In direct APLI using a 266 nm laser, a narrower range of compounds was ionized than in direct APPI, because of exceedingly high IEs or unfavorable two-photon absorption cross-sections. Introduction of dopants in the APLI system changed the ionization mechanism to similar dopant-mediated gas-phase reactions with the dopant as in APPI, which produced mainly ions of the same form as in APPI, and ionized a wider range of analytes than direct APLI.

  2. Ionization of EPA contaminants in direct and dopant-assisted atmospheric pressure photoionization and atmospheric pressure laser ionization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauppila, Tiina J; Kersten, Hendrik; Benter, Thorsten

    2015-06-01

    Seventy-seven EPA priority environmental pollutants were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) equipped with an optimized atmospheric pressure photoionization (APPI) and an atmospheric pressure laser ionization (APLI) interface with and without dopants. The analyzed compounds included e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), nitro compounds, halogenated compounds, aromatic compounds with phenolic, acidic, alcohol, and amino groups, phthalate and adipatic esters, and aliphatic ethers. Toluene, anisole, chlorobenzene, and acetone were tested as dopants. The widest range of analytes was ionized using direct APPI (66/77 compounds). The introduction of dopants decreased the amount of compounds ionized in APPI (e.g., 54/77 with toluene), but in many cases the ionization efficiency increased. While in direct APPI the formation of molecular ions via photoionization was the main ionization reaction, dopant-assisted (DA) APPI promoted ionization reactions, such as charge exchange and proton transfer. Direct APLI ionized a much smaller amount of compounds than APPI (41/77 compounds), showing selectivity towards compounds with low ionization energies (IEs) and long-lived resonantly excited intermediate states. DA-APLI, however, was able to ionize a higher amount of compounds (e.g. 51/77 with toluene), as the ionization took place entirely through dopant-assisted ion/molecule reactions similar to those in DA-APPI. Best ionization efficiency in APPI and APLI (both direct and DA) was obtained for PAHs and aromatics with O- and N-functionalities, whereas nitro compounds and aliphatic ethers were the most difficult to ionize. Halogenated aromatics and esters were (mainly) ionized in APPI, but not in APLI.

  3. Knock Resistance and Fine Particle Emissions for Several Biomass-Derived Oxygenates in a Direct-Injection Spark-Ignition Engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Burton, Jonathan; Sindler, Petr; Christensen, Earl; Fouts, Lisa; Chupka, Gina M.; McCormick, Robert L.

    2016-04-01

    Several high octane number oxygenates that could be derived from biomass were blended with gasoline and examined for performance properties and their impact on knock resistance and fine particle emissions in a single cylinder direct-injection spark-ignition engine. The oxygenates included ethanol, isobutanol, anisole, 4-methylanisole, 2-phenylethanol, 2,5-dimethyl furan, and 2,4-xylenol. These were blended into a summertime blendstock for oxygenate blending at levels ranging from 10 to 50 percent by volume. The base gasoline, its blends with p-xylene and p-cymene, and high-octane racing gasoline were tested as controls. Relevant gasoline properties including research octane number (RON), motor octane number, distillation curve, and vapor pressure were measured. Detailed hydrocarbon analysis was used to estimate heat of vaporization and particulate matter index (PMI). Experiments were conducted to measure knock-limited spark advance and particulate matter (PM) emissions. The results show a range of knock resistances that correlate well with RON. Molecules with relatively low boiling point and high vapor pressure had little effect on PM emissions. In contrast, the aromatic oxygenates caused significant increases in PM emissions (factors of 2 to 5) relative to the base gasoline. Thus, any effect of their oxygen atom on increasing local air-fuel ratio was outweighed by their low vapor pressure and high double-bond equivalent values. For most fuels and oxygenate blend components, PMI was a good predictor of PM emissions. However, the high boiling point, low vapor pressure oxygenates 2-phenylethanol and 2,4-xylenol produced lower PM emissions than predicted by PMI. This was likely because they did not fully evaporate and combust, and instead were swept into the lube oil.

  4. Mycoremediation of wood and soil from an old sawmill area contaminated for decades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentín, Lara; Oesch-Kuisma, Hanna; Steffen, Kari T.; Kähkönen, Mika A.; Hatakka, Annele; Tuomela, Marja, E-mail: marja.tuomela@helsinki.fi

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • We performed experiments with non-sterile soil and wood with aged contamination. • We isolated fungal strains from a saw mill site with chlorophenols contamination. •Fungal strains were screened for tolerance to native microbes and contamination. • The best fungi degraded chlorophenols and chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans. -- Abstract: We investigated the potential of white-rot and litter-decomposing fungi for the treatment of soil and wood from a sawmill area contaminated with aged chlorinated phenols, dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/F). Eight screening assays with emphasis on application of non-sterile conditions were carried out in order to select the strains with capability to withstand indigenous microbes and contamination. Nine fungi were then selected for degrading pentachlorophenol (PCP), and 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP) and mineralizing radiolabelled pentachlorophenol ({sup 14}C-PCP) in non-sterile soil or wood during 15 weeks of incubation. Soil indigenous microbes and fungal inoculated soil (fungal inoculum + indigenous microbes) achieved similar degradation of PCP and 2,3,4,6-TeCP and mineralization of {sup 14}C-PCP. However, the mineralization rate of {sup 14}C-PCP by indigenous microbes was much slower than that boosted by fungal inoculum. The litter-decomposing fungus (LDF) Stropharia rugosoannulata proved to be a suitable fungus for soil treatment. This fungus mineralized 26% of {sup 14}C-PCP and degraded 43% of 2,3,4,6-TeCP and 73% of PCP. Furthermore, S. rugosoannulata attained 13% degradation of PCDD/F (expressed as WHO-Toxic Equivalent). In wood, white-rot fungi grew and degraded chlorophenols better than LDF. No efficient indigenous degraders were present in wood. Interestingly, production of toxic chlorinated organic metabolites (anisoles and veratroles) by LDF in wood was negligible.

  5. Mycoremediation of wood and soil from an old sawmill area contaminated for decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentín, Lara; Oesch-Kuisma, Hanna; Steffen, Kari T.; Kähkönen, Mika A.; Hatakka, Annele; Tuomela, Marja

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • We performed experiments with non-sterile soil and wood with aged contamination. • We isolated fungal strains from a saw mill site with chlorophenols contamination. •Fungal strains were screened for tolerance to native microbes and contamination. • The best fungi degraded chlorophenols and chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans. -- Abstract: We investigated the potential of white-rot and litter-decomposing fungi for the treatment of soil and wood from a sawmill area contaminated with aged chlorinated phenols, dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PCDD/F). Eight screening assays with emphasis on application of non-sterile conditions were carried out in order to select the strains with capability to withstand indigenous microbes and contamination. Nine fungi were then selected for degrading pentachlorophenol (PCP), and 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP) and mineralizing radiolabelled pentachlorophenol ( 14 C-PCP) in non-sterile soil or wood during 15 weeks of incubation. Soil indigenous microbes and fungal inoculated soil (fungal inoculum + indigenous microbes) achieved similar degradation of PCP and 2,3,4,6-TeCP and mineralization of 14 C-PCP. However, the mineralization rate of 14 C-PCP by indigenous microbes was much slower than that boosted by fungal inoculum. The litter-decomposing fungus (LDF) Stropharia rugosoannulata proved to be a suitable fungus for soil treatment. This fungus mineralized 26% of 14 C-PCP and degraded 43% of 2,3,4,6-TeCP and 73% of PCP. Furthermore, S. rugosoannulata attained 13% degradation of PCDD/F (expressed as WHO-Toxic Equivalent). In wood, white-rot fungi grew and degraded chlorophenols better than LDF. No efficient indigenous degraders were present in wood. Interestingly, production of toxic chlorinated organic metabolites (anisoles and veratroles) by LDF in wood was negligible

  6. Synthetic Co-Attractants of the Aggregation Pheromone of the Date Palm Root Borer Oryctes agamemnon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasni, Narjes; Pinier, Centina; Imed, Cheraief; Ouhichi, Monêem; Couzi, Philippe; Chermiti, Brahim; Frérot, Brigitte; Saïd, Imen; Rochat, Didier

    2017-07-01

    Laboratory and field investigations to identify and evaluate plant co-attractants of the aggregation pheromone of the date palm pest Oryctes agamemnon are reported. Volatiles emitted by freshly cut palm core and palm core with feeding males, were collected, analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry and evaluated in olfactometers alone or combined with synthetic pheromone. A collection of palm odor without male effluvia was attractive alone and enhanced attraction to synthetic pheromone in an olfactometer similar to that to a collection of palm odor emitted with feeding males and containing natural pheromone. Behavioral responses to collections of palm volatiles were correlated to the amount of volatiles material in them. Enhancement of the attractiveness of the pheromone was not correlated to chemicals specific to beetle feeding. The chemicals common to the active collections extracts were benzoate esters, mostly ethyl benzoate, anisole derivatives and sesquiterpenes. Blends of the most abundant components of the extracts were evaluated for enhancement of the attractiveness of pheromone (1 μg) in olfactometers at 1 or 10 μg doses. The mixtures were further evaluated by field trapping in Tunisia at 3-10 mg/day using reference (6 mg/day) or experimental pheromone formulations. A mixture of ethyl benzoate, 4-methylanisole and farnesol (1:1:1 w/w at 6.5 mg/day) enhanced captures in pheromone baited traps in 2014 and 2015 and this mixture was as active as the natural palm bait. The practical prospect of the result for the management for O. agamemnon, and other palm beetles is discussed.

  7. Low-cost copper complexes as p-dopants in solution processable hole transport layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kellermann, Renate [Department for Materials Science and Engineering, Chair for Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Siemens AG – Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Taroata, Dan; Maltenberger, Anna; Hartmann, David; Schmid, Guenter [Siemens AG – Corporate Technology, Guenther-Scharowsky-Str. 1, Erlangen 91058 (Germany); Brabec, Christoph J. [Department for Materials Science and Engineering, Chair for Materials for Electronics and Energy Technology, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen 91058 (Germany)

    2015-09-07

    We demonstrate the usage of the Lewis-acidic copper(II)hexafluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(hfac){sub 2}) and copper(II)trifluoroacetylacetonate (Cu(tfac){sub 2}) as low-cost p-dopants for conductivity enhancement of solution processable hole transport layers based on small molecules in organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs). The materials were clearly soluble in mixtures of environmentally friendly anisole and xylene and spin-coated under ambient atmosphere. Enhancements of two and four orders of magnitude, reaching 4.0 × 10{sup −11} S/cm with a dopant concentration of only 2 mol% Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 1.5 × 10{sup −9} S/cm with 5 mol% Cu(tfac){sub 2} in 2,2′,7,7′-tetra(N,N-ditolyl)amino-9,9-spiro-bifluorene (spiro-TTB), respectively, were achieved. Red light emitting diodes were fabricated with reduced driving voltages and enhanced current and power efficiencies (8.6 lm/W with Cu(hfac){sub 2} and 5.6 lm/W with Cu(tfac){sub 2}) compared to the OLED with undoped spiro-TTB (3.9 lm/W). The OLED with Cu(hfac){sub 2} doped spiro-TTB showed an over 8 times improved LT{sub 50} lifetime of 70 h at a starting luminance of 5000 cd/m{sup 2}. The LT{sub 50} lifetime of the reference OLED with PEDOT:PSS was only 8 h. Both non-optimized OLEDs were operated at similar driving voltage and power efficiency.

  8. Molecular identification and potential of an isolate of white rot fungi in bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Mohammadi-sichani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:Elimination or reduction of petroleum hydrocarbons from natural resources such as water and soil is a serious problem of countries, particularly oil-rich countries of the world. Using white rotting fungi compost for bioremediation of soils contaminated by petroleum hydrocarbons is effective. The aim of this study is molecular identification and potential of anisolate of white rot fungi in bioremediation of petroleum contaminated soils. Materials and methods: Spent compost of white rotting fungi was inoculated with petroleum contaminated soil into 3%, 5% and 10% (w/w. Treatments were incubated at 25-23 °C for 3 months. Reduction of petroleum hydrocarbons in treated soil was determined by gas chromatography. Ecotoxicity of soil was evaluated by seed germination test. Results: Based on the genome sequence of 18s rRNA, it is revealed that this isolate is Ganoderma lucidum and this isolate is deposited as accession KX525204 in the Gene Bank database. Reduction of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil treated with compost (3, 5 and 10% ranged from 42% to 71%. The germination index (% in ecotoxicity tests ranged from 20.8% to 70.8%. Gas chromatography results also showed a decrease in soil Hydrocarbons compounds. Discussion and conclusion: The compost of Ganoderma lucidum, a white rot fungus, has a potential ability to remove petroleum hydrocarbons in contaminated soil. Removal of hydrocarbons was increased with increase in compost mixed with contaminated soil. Petroleum contaminated soil amended with spent compost of G.lucidum 10% during three months is appropriate to remove this pollutant.

  9. Accumulation of metals, polycyclic (halogenated) aromatic hydrocarbons, and biocides in zebra mussel and eel from the Rhine and Meuse rivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendriks, A.J. [RIZA, Lelystad (Netherlands). Inst. for Inland Water Management and Waste Water Treatment; Pieters, H.; Boer, J. de [DLO-Netherlands Inst. for Fisheries Research, IJmuiden (Netherlands)

    1998-10-01

    Concentrations of heavy metals and various groups of organic microcontaminants were measured in zebra mussel and eel from the Rhine-Meuse basin. Residues in mussel from the Rhine and Meuse were on average 2.3 and 2.9 times higher than in those from the reference location of IJsselmeer. Total body burdens of organic microcontaminants in mussel and eel varied between 0.05 to 0.07 mmol/kg fat weight in six out of seven samples. The largest contribution in mussels and eel came from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), respectively. Concentrations of bromodiphenyl-ethers, chlorobenzenes, chloronitrobenzenes, chloroterphenyls, and chlorobenzyltoluenes were lower. Total polybrominated biphenyl residues appear lower than total PCB levels. The largest chlorobiocide residues were noted for 4,4{prime}-DDE, toxaphene, trichlorophenylmethane, and {gamma}-hexachlorocyclohexane. An extraordinary high body burden of 1.2 mmol/kg fat weight, largely consisting of acenaphthene, was observed in one sample. Ratios of concentrations in organism fat and dry organic suspended solids varied between 1 and 10 for traditionally monitored organochlorines, independent of the octanol-water partition coefficient. The values did not deviate significantly from a value of about 3.3, expected for equilibrium partitioning of persistent chemicals. Lower values were observed for PAHs and some chloro(nitro)benzenes. Most ratios of concentrations in eel and mussel fat were within the range of 1 to 10, also largely independent of K{sub ow}. Yet, values tended to be higher at K{sub ow} > 10{sup 6}. Ratios below 1 were noted for pentabromodiphenylether, pentachloro(thio)anisol, chlorobenzyltoluenes, and some chloronitrobenzenes, chlorobiphenyls, and chlorobiocides. These field data confirm recent modeling efforts on bioconcentration and biomagnification. For heavy metals, atomic mass explained 67% of the variation in zebra mussel residues.

  10. Activity of essential oils and individual components against acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, Ilkay; Kartal, Murat; Kan, Yüksel; Sener, Bilge

    2008-01-01

    We have tested acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities of nineteen essential oils obtained from cultivated plants, namely one from Anethum graveolens L. (organic fertilizer), two from Foeniculum vulgare Mill. collected at fully-mature and flowering stages (organic fertilizer), two from Melissa officinalis L. (cultivated using organic and chemical fertilizers), two from Mentha piperita L. and M. spicata L. (organic fertilizer), two from Lavandula officinalis Chaix ex Villars (cultivated using organic and chemical fertilizers), two from Ocimum basilicum L. (green and purple-leaf varieties cultivated using only organic fertilizer), four from Origanum onites L., O. vulgare L., O. munitiflorum Hausskn., and O. majorana L. (cultivated using organic fertilizer), two from Salvia sclarea L. (organic and chemical fertilizers), one from S. officinalis L. (organic fertilizer), and one from Satureja cuneifolia Ten. (organic fertilizer) by a spectrophotometric method of Ellman using ELISA microplate-reader at 1 mg/ml concentration. In addition, a number of single components widely encountered in most of the essential oils [gamma-terpinene, 4-allyl anisole, (-)-carvone, dihydrocarvone, (-)-phencone, cuminyl alcohol, cumol, 4-isopropyl benzaldehyde, trans-anethole, camphene, iso-borneol, (-)-borneol, L-bornyl acetate, 2-decanol, 2-heptanol, methyl-heptanol, farnesol, nerol, iso-pulegol, 1,8-cineole, citral, citronellal, citronellol, geraniol, linalool, alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, piperitone, iso-menthone, menthofurane, linalyl oxide, linalyl ester, geranyl ester, carvacrol, thymol, menthol, vanilline, and eugenol] was also screened for the same activity in the same manner. Almost all of the essential oils showed a very high inhibitory activity (over 80%) against both enzymes, whereas the single components were not as active as the essential oils.

  11. Analytical and biological studies of kanji and extracts of its ingredient, daucus carota L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Latif, A.; Hussain, K.; Bukhari, N.; Karim, S.; Hussain, A.; Khurshid, F.

    2013-01-01

    A fermented beverage, Kanji, prepared from roots of Daucus carota L. subsp. sativus (Hoffm.) Arcang. var. vavilovii Mazk. (Apiaceae), despite long usage history has not been investigated for analytical studies and biological activities. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate different types of Kanji samples and various types of extracts/fractions of root of the plant for a number of analytical studies and in vitro antioxidant activities. The Kanji sample, Lab-made Kanji, having better analytical and biological profile was further investigated for preliminary clinical studies. The analytical studies indicated that Lab-made Kanji was having comparatively higher contents of phytochemicals than that of the commercial Kanji samples, different types of extracts and fractions (P < 0.05). All the Kanji samples and aqueous and ethanol extracts of fresh roots exhibited comparable antioxidant activities in DPPH assay (52.20 - 54.19%) that were higher than that of methanol extract (48.78%) of dried roots. The antiradical powers (1/ EC50) of Lab-made Kanji and aqueous extract were found to be higher than that of the ethanol and methanol extracts. In beta-carotene linoleate assay, the Kanji samples showed higher activity than that of the methanol extract, but comparable to that of the vitamin-E and butylated hydroxyl anisole (BHA) (P < 0.05). A preliminary clinical evaluation indicated that Kanji has no harmful effect on blood components, liver function and serum lipid profile. The results of the present study indicate that Kanji is an effective antioxidant beverage. (author)

  12. Consumer's evaluation of the effects of gamma irradiation and natural antioxidants on general acceptance of frozen beef burger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trindade, R.A.; Lima, A.; Andrade-Wartha, E.R.; Oliveira e Silva, A.M.; Mancini-Filho, J.; Villavicencio, A.L.C.H.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of addition of rosemary and oregano extracts on the sensory quality of irradiated beef burger was investigated. Batches of beef burgers were prepared with 400 ppm of rosemary or oregano extract and a group prepared with 200 ppm of synthetic butyl-hydroxytoluene (BHT)/butyl-hydroxy-anisol (BHA) was used as a control. Half of each formulation was irradiated at the maximum dose allowed for frozen meat (7 kGy). Samples were kept under frozen conditions (-20 deg. C) during the whole storage period, including during irradiation. Two analyses were performed after 20 and 90 days to verify the influence of the addition of the different types of antioxidants and the effect of irradiation and storage time on the acceptance of the product. Thirty-three and thirty-four untrained panelists were invited to participate in the first and second test, respectively. A structured hedonic scale ranging from 1 to 9 points was used in both analyses. BHT/BHA formulation obtained the highest score (6.73) and regarding the natural antioxidants, oregano received better acceptance (6.36). Irradiated samples formulated with oregano received a lower score, 6.03 in the first test and 5.06 in the second one, compared to the non-irradiated sample (6.36 and 5.79). In the second test (90 days), the sample formulated with BHT/BHA and which was irradiated received a higher score (6.59) when compared to the non-irradiated one (5.85). In both tests, the irradiated samples formulated with rosemary extract obtained a better score compared to the non-irradiated one, the scores being 5.00-3.82 and 5.00-3.76 in the first and second test, respectively. Our results allowed us to conclude that the natural antioxidants, rosemary and oregano extracts, present a good alternative for replacing synthetic additives in food industries, and that the irradiation process, in some cases, may help to enhance the sensory quality of food

  13. Oxygen speciation in upgraded fast pyrolysis bio-oils by comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omais, Badaoui; Crepier, Julien; Charon, Nadège; Courtiade, Marion; Quignard, Alain; Thiébaut, Didier

    2013-04-21

    Biomass fast pyrolysis is considered as a promising route to produce liquid for the transportation field from a renewable resource. However, the derived bio-oils are mainly oxygenated (45-50%w/w O on a wet basis) and contain almost no hydrocarbons. Therefore, upgrading is necessary to obtain a liquid with lower oxygen content and characterization of oxygenated compounds in these products is essential to assist conversion reactions. For this purpose, comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC × GC) can be investigated. Oxygen speciation in such matrices is hampered by the large diversity of oxygenated families and the complexity of the hydrocarbon matrix. Moreover, response factors must be taken into account for oxygenate quantification as the Flame Ionisation Detector (FID) response varies when a molecule contains heteroatoms. To conclude, no distillation cuts were accessible and the analysis had to cover a large range of boiling points (30-630 °C). To take up this analytical challenge, a thorough optimization approach was developed. In fact, four GC × GC column sets were investigated to separate oxygenated compounds from the hydrocarbon matrix. Both model mixtures and the upgraded biomass flash pyrolysis oil were injected using GC × GC-FID to reach a suitable chromatographic separation. The advantages and drawbacks of each column combination for oxygen speciation in upgraded bio-oils are highlighted in this study. Among the four sets, an original polar × semi-polar column combination was selected and enabled the identification by GC × GC-ToF/MS of more than 40 compounds belonging to eight chemical families: ketones, furans, alcohols, phenols, carboxylic acids, guaiacols, anisols, and esters. For quantification purpose, the GC × GC-FID chromatogram was divided into more than 60 blobs corresponding to the previously identified analyte and hydrocarbon zones. A database associating each blob to a molecule and its specific response factor (determined

  14. Pyrolysis of Cigarette Ingredients Labelled with Stable Isotopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stotesbury S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to know how tobacco additives behave when cigarettes are smoked, whether they transfer intact to the smoke or whether there is any decomposition during smoking. Pyrolysis-GC-MS is a technique that can be focussed upon the effects of combustion from a single material free from interference from the complex mixture of different components present in the smoke. However, because pyrolysis is a model technique, the results need to be validated by comparison with cigarette smoke chemistry. In a previous paper we presented such a method for modelling the smoke chemistry from a burning cigarette using pyrolysis-GC-MS. The transfer and the extent of degradation of anisole, p-anisaldehyde, benzaldehyde, isoamylisovalerate, methyl trans-cinnamate and vanillin within a burning cigarette were estimated using this pyrolysis method. When these data were compared with results from smoke studies from 14C-analogues of the materials, the high levels of transfer predicted by pyrolysis were found to be generally consistent with the smoke chemistry data. However, there were still two outstanding issues. Firstly, there was some ambiguity in the labelled study about whether vanillin actually transferred without degradation or not. Furthermore, the results from the 14C-labelled study showed a greater extent of degradation for p-anisaldehyde than that indicated from the pyrolysis experiments. The purpose of the current study was to present some new information obtained to address these questions by better understanding the effect upon the smoke chemistry from adding vanillin and p-anisaldehyde, and the relationship between the smoke chemistry and the pyrolysis results. Components were identified in the smoke from cigarettes loaded with p-anisaldehyde and vanillin labelled with 18O and 13C. The extent of degradation from each additive was estimated by identifying labelled degradation products in the smoke. Because there was a clear distinction between the

  15. Functionalization/passivation of porous graphitic carbon with di-tert-amylperoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, David S.; Gupta, Vipul; Olsen, Rebecca E.; Miller, Alex T.; Davis, Robert C.; Ess, Daniel; Zhu, Zihua; Vail, Michael A.; Dadson, Andrew; Linford, Matthew R.

    2011-11-18

    Porous graphitic carbon (PGC) particles were functionalized/passivated in situ in packed beds at elevated temperature with neat di-tert-amylperoxide (DTAP) in a column oven. The performance of these particles for high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was assayed before and after this chemistry with the following analytes: benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, n-propyl benzene, n-butyl benzene, p-xylene, phenol, 4-methylphenol, phenetole, 3,5-xylenol, and anisole. After the first functionalization/passivation, the retention factors, k, of these compounds decreased by about 5% and the number of theoretical plates (N) increased by ca. 15%. These values of k then remained roughly constant after a second functionalization/ passivation but a further increase in N was noticed. In addition, after each of the reactions, the peak asymmetries decreased by ca. 15%, for a total of ca. 30%. The columns were then subjected twice to methanol at 100 C for 5 h at 1 mL/min. After these stability tests, the values of k remained roughly constant, the number of plates increased, which is favorable, and the asymmetries rose and then declined, where they remained below the initial values for the unfunctionalized columns. Functionalized and unfunctionalized particles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and BET measurements, which showed no difference between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS), where ToF-SIMS suggested some chemical differences between the functionalized and unfunctionalized materials. In particular ToF-SIMS suggested that the expected five-carbon fragments from DTAP exist at higher concentrations on DTAP-functionalized PGC. First principle calculations on model graphitic surfaces suggest that the first addition of a DTAP radical to the surface proceeds in an approximately isothermal or slightly favorable fashion, but that subsequent DTAP

  16. Consumer's evaluation of the effects of gamma irradiation and natural antioxidants on general acceptance of frozen beef burger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trindade, R. A.; Lima, A.; Andrade-Wartha, E. R.; Oliveira e Silva, A. M.; Mancini-Filho, J.; Villavicencio, A. L. C. H.

    2009-04-01

    The effect of addition of rosemary and oregano extracts on the sensory quality of irradiated beef burger was investigated. Batches of beef burgers were prepared with 400 ppm of rosemary or oregano extract and a group prepared with 200 ppm of synthetic butyl-hydroxytoluene (BHT)/butyl-hydroxy-anisol (BHA) was used as a control. Half of each formulation was irradiated at the maximum dose allowed for frozen meat (7 kGy). Samples were kept under frozen conditions (-20 °C) during the whole storage period, including during irradiation. Two analyses were performed after 20 and 90 days to verify the influence of the addition of the different types of antioxidants and the effect of irradiation and storage time on the acceptance of the product. Thirty-three and thirty-four untrained panelists were invited to participate in the first and second test, respectively. A structured hedonic scale ranging from 1 to 9 points was used in both analyses. BHT/BHA formulation obtained the highest score (6.73) and regarding the natural antioxidants, oregano received better acceptance (6.36). Irradiated samples formulated with oregano received a lower score, 6.03 in the first test and 5.06 in the second one, compared to the non-irradiated sample (6.36 and 5.79). In the second test (90 days), the sample formulated with BHT/BHA and which was irradiated received a higher score (6.59) when compared to the non-irradiated one (5.85). In both tests, the irradiated samples formulated with rosemary extract obtained a better score compared to the non-irradiated one, the scores being 5.00-3.82 and 5.00-3.76 in the first and second test, respectively. Our results allowed us to conclude that the natural antioxidants, rosemary and oregano extracts, present a good alternative for replacing synthetic additives in food industries, and that the irradiation process, in some cases, may help to enhance the sensory quality of food.

  17. Thermal Decomposition Mechanisms of Lignin Model Compounds: From Phenol to Vanillin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheer, Adam Michael

    Lignin is a complex, aromatic polymer abundant in cellulosic biomass (trees, switchgrass etc.). Thermochemical breakdown of lignin for liquid fuel production results in undesirable polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that lead to tar and soot byproducts. The fundamental chemistry governing these processes is not well understood. We have studied the unimolecular thermal decomposition mechanisms of aromatic lignin model compounds using a miniature SiC tubular reactor. Products are detected and characterized using time-of-flight mass spectrometry with both single photon (118.2 nm; 10.487 eV) and 1 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) as well as matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy. Gas exiting the heated reactor (300 K--1600 K) is subject to a free expansion after a residence time of approximately 100 micros. The expansion into vacuum rapidly cools the gas mixture and allows the detection of radicals and other highly reactive intermediates. By understanding the unimolecular fragmentation patterns of phenol (C6H5OH), anisole (C6H 5OCH3) and benzaldehyde (C6H5CHO), the more complicated thermocracking processes of the catechols (HO-C 6H4-OH), methoxyphenols (HO-C6H4-OCH 3) and hydroxybenzaldehydes (HO-C6H4-CHO) can be interpreted. These studies have resulted in a predictive model that allows the interpretation of vanillin, a complex phenolic ether containing methoxy, hydroxy and aldehyde functional groups. This model will serve as a guide for the pyrolyses of larger systems including lignin monomers such as coniferyl alcohol. The pyrolysis mechanisms of the dimethoxybenzenes (H3C-C 6H4-OCH3) and syringol, a hydroxydimethoxybenzene have also been studied. These results will aid in the understanding of the thermal fragmentation of sinapyl alcohol, the most complex lignin monomer. In addition to the model compound work, pyrolyisis of biomass has been studied via the pulsed laser ablation of poplar wood. With the REMPI scheme, aromatic lignin decomposition

  18. Research on Volatile Organic Compounds From Bacillus subtilis CF-3: Biocontrol Effects on Fruit Fungal Pathogens and Dynamic Changes During Fermentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan Gao

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic changes of the levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs produced by Bacillus subtilis CF-3 and their biocontrol effects on common fungal pathogens were researched in this study. The results showed that the VOCs in 24-h fermentation liquid (24hFL of B. subtilis CF-3 inhibited mycelial growth of Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Penicillium expansum, Monilinia fructicola, and Alternaria alternata, with a mean inhibition rate of 59.97%. The inhibitory effect on M. fructicola and C. gloeosporioides was the highest; they were therefore selected as target fungal pathogens for further experiments. Based on headspace solid-phase microextraction combined with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (HS-SPME-GC-MS, 74 potential VOCs were identified during the fermentation: 15 alcohols, 18 ketones, 4 pyrazines, 4 esters, 10 acids, 5 phenols, 3 hydrocarbons, 3 amines, 2 aldehydes, 5 ethers, and 5 other components. At different fermentation times, the type and content of VOCs were different. Most of the potential VOCs (62 VOCs were identified in the 48hFL. The inhibition rates of all VOCs reached their peaks (73.46% on M. fructicola and 63.63% on C. gloeosporioides in the 24hFL. Among the identified VOCs, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol, 1-octanol, and benzothiazole showed significant positive correlations with the rates of M. fructicola and C. gloeosporioides inhibition. Benzoic acid and benzaldehyde showed a significant positive correlation with the rates of M. fructicola inhibition, and anisole and 3-methylbutanal showed a significant positive correlation with the rates of C. gloeosporioides inhibition. In vitro, 2,4-di-tert-butylphenol showed a strong inhibitory effect on both M. fructicola and C. gloeosporioides. In vivo, benzothiazole showed the strongest inhibitory effect on the mycelial extensions of both M. fructicola and C. gloeosporioides, which also led to an increased rate of healthy fruit. The results of the present study

  19. Bioblendstocks that Enable High Efficiency Engine Designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Robert L.; Fioroni, Gina M.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.; Zigler, Bradley T.; Farrell, John

    2016-11-03

    The past decade has seen a high level of innovation in production of biofuels from sugar, lipid, and lignocellulose feedstocks. As discussed in several talks at this workshop, ethanol blends in the E25 to E50 range could enable more highly efficient spark-ignited (SI) engines. This is because of their knock resistance properties that include not only high research octane number (RON), but also charge cooling from high heat of vaporization, and high flame speed. Emerging alcohol fuels such as isobutanol or mixed alcohols have desirable properties such as reduced gasoline blend vapor pressure, but also have lower RON than ethanol. These fuels may be able to achieve the same knock resistance benefits, but likely will require higher blend levels or higher RON hydrocarbon blendstocks. A group of very high RON (>150) oxygenates such as dimethyl furan, methyl anisole, and related compounds are also produced from biomass. While providing no increase in charge cooling, their very high octane numbers may provide adequate knock resistance for future highly efficient SI engines. Given this range of options for highly knock resistant fuels there appears to be a critical need for a fuel knock resistance metric that includes effects of octane number, heat of vaporization, and potentially flame speed. Emerging diesel fuels include highly branched long-chain alkanes from hydroprocessing of fats and oils, as well as sugar-derived terpenoids. These have relatively high cetane number (CN), which may have some benefits in designing more efficient CI engines. Fast pyrolysis of biomass can produce diesel boiling range streams that are high in aromatic, oxygen and acid contents. Hydroprocessing can be applied to remove oxygen and consequently reduce acidity, however there are strong economic incentives to leave up to 2 wt% oxygen in the product. This oxygen will primarily be present as low CN alkyl phenols and aryl ethers. While these have high heating value, their presence in diesel fuel

  20. From biomass to fuels: hydrotreating of oxygen-containing feeds on a CoMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viljava, T.-R.

    2001-07-01

    thus facilitating the adsorption of the reactant on the active site of the catalyst. Otherwise, the HDS rate declined due to strong competitive adsorption of the oxygen-containing compounds on the active sites of the catalyst, and due to the formation of less reactive sulfur compounds via methyl transfer from the methoxy groups to sulfur. In conclusion, simultaneous hydrotreating of sulfur- and oxygen-containing feeds leads to strong suppression of oxygen removal reactions and usually also to a decrease in the efficiency of sulfur removal. The effect of low molecular weight sulfiding agents, H{sub 2}S and CS{sub 2} on HDO of phenol and anisole was studied first in a batch and then in a flow reactor to see whether the addition of sulfiding agents might improve the stability of the presulfided catalyst without decreasing the rate and without affecting the selectivity of HDO. The HDO rate of phenol decreased noticeably in the presence of CS{sub 2}, in the batch reactor, and the selectivities of the HDO reaction paths were changed: the hydrogenation-hydrogenolysis route was less sensitive to the sulfur compound than was the CA{sub Arom}-O hydrogenolysis path. At higher concentrations of the sulfiding agent, also the hydrogenation route became inhibited. With anisole, there was an increase in the rate of demethylation to phenol, but oxygen removal was virtually unaffected. In the flow reactor studies, the formation of hydrogenated HDO products of phenol remained constant up to the highest concentration of H{sub 2}S in the feed, but a dramatic decrease in the yield of the aromatic reaction product occurred already at low concentrations of H{sub 2}S. Selective inhibition of one of the HDO paths confirmed the presence of at least two kinds of active sites on the catalyst. This means that addition of an inhibitor can be used to adjust the product distribution of HDO in process scale. However, the presulfided catalyst deactivated with time on stream also in the presence of

  1. Reagents for Astatination of Biomolecules. 5. Evaluation of hydrazone linkers in 211At- and 125I-labeled closo-decaborate(2-) conjugates of Fab′ as a means of decreasing kidney retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, D. Scott; Chyan, Ming-Kuan; Hamlin, Donald K.; Nguyen, Holly; Vessella, Robert L.

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of monoclonal antibody (MAb) fragments (e.g. Fab′, Fab or engineered fragments) as cancer-targeting reagents for therapy with the α-particle emitting radionuclide astatine-211 (211At) has been hampered by low in vivo stability of the label and a propensity of these proteins localize to kidneys. Fortunately, our group has shown that the low stability of the 211At label, generally a meta- or para-[211At]astatobenzoyl conjugate, on MAb Fab′ fragments can be dramatically improved by use of closo-decaborate(2-) conjugates. However, the higher stability of radiolabeled MAb Fab′ conjugates appears to result in retention of the radioactivity in kidneys. This investigation was conducted to evaluate whether the retention of radioactivity in kidney might be decreased by the use of acid-cleavable hydrazone between the Fab′ and the radiolabeled closo-decaborate(2-) moiety. Five conjugation reagents containing sulfhydryl-reactive maleimide groups, a hydrazone functionality and a closo-decaborate(2-) moiety were prepared. In four of the five conjugation reagents, a discrete polyethylene glycol (PEG) linker was used, and one substituent adjacent to the hydrazone was varied (phenyl, benzoate, anisole or methyl) to provide varying acid-sensitivity. In the initial studies, the five maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) conjugation reagents were radioiodinated (125I or 131I), then conjugated with an anti-PSMA Fab′ (107-1A4 Fab′). Biodistributions of the five radioiodinated Fab′ conjugates were obtained in nude mice at 1, 4 and 24 h post injection (pi). In contrast to closo-decaborate(2-) conjugated to 107-1A4 Fab′ through a non-cleavable linker, two conjugates containing either a benzoate or a methyl substituent on the hydrazone functionality displayed clearance rates from kidney, liver and spleen that were similar to those obtained with directly radioiodinated Fab′ (i.e. no conjugate). The maleimido-closo-decaborate(2-) conjugation reagent containing a benzoate

  2. [Branch-specific detection of phenols and assessment of ground water solubility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, F; Kerndorff, H; Kühn, S

    2000-01-01

    are possible. Input of phenols on agricultural lands can be caused by pesticides, sewage sludge or manure. The groundwater downstream of landfills often contains phenol, chlorophenols, cresols, and xylenols. The formation of phenol from other organic contaminants as benzene in groundwater has been reported. The potential for mobilization of phenols in the saturated zone can be estimated from their physical and chemical properties. Especially low molecular weight phenols are easily mobilized due to their high solubility in water and low potential for accumulation. These compounds are: phenol, cresols, xylenols, chlorophenols, hydroxybenzenes, nitrophenols, anisidines, aminophenols, anisol, 2-phenoxyethanol, and thiophenol. The stability of phenols under laboratory conditions varies. The complete mineralization depends mainly on the experimental set-up, i.e. nutrients, temperature, and type of inocula. The anaerobic degradation of phenols is generally slower than the aerobic. Phenol is readily biodegradable under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. In general, the biodegradability depends on the type, number and position of substitutes. Phenols with nitro-, alkyl-, or chlorosubstitutes are more recalcitrant than phenol itself. Our biodegradability test show that the decomposition of alkylphenols is determined by the length and branching of the alcyllic chain. Phenols with high contamination potential are chlorophenols, xylenols, and nitrophenols. These compounds are both mobile and recalcitrant in the saturated zone. Phenolic compounds of a medium contamination risk are dichlorophenols, trichlorophenols, cresols, and phenol because they are mobile but less stable in groundwater. These compounds are known contaminants in the groundwater at gasworks, landfills, and ammunition factories. Aminophenols, anisidines, tert-butylphenols, ethylphenols, hydroxybenzenes, and 2-phenoxyethanol also constite a potential hazard for groundwater; however, no contaminations with these

  3. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass for the production of synthetic natural gas[Dissertation 17100

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldner, M H

    2007-07-01

    , phenol, and anisole) that approximates hydrolyzed wood served as feed. The skeletal nickel catalysts turned out to be active but not stable, as they deactivated within a few hours. The attempt to stabilize them by co-doping of other metals (Ru, Mo, Cu) was not successful. Ru/TiO{sub 2} was not active enough, but Ru/C completely gasified the mixture at high space velocities over a period of more than 200 hours; the product gas composition corresponded at all times to the thermodynamic equilibrium composition. This catalyst was tested for its tolerance towards sulfate, which turned out to be low: the addition of a few ppm to the feed led to a deactivation within hours. The deactivation mechanism was identified as chemical poisoning. The poisoning species which is present in situ in the hydrothermal environment (sulfate vs. sulfide) is not clear. The experimental evidence can be explained by both hypotheses. A heating system for quartz capillaries rendered the visual examination of hydrothermal processes possible. Due to the required low amounts of feed material (a few hundred milligrams) and frequent capillary explosions, the usage of the system was discontinued. The conveying of solid containing slurries on the laboratory scale turned out to remain an unsolved problem. Thus, only liquid type biomass can be fed with the process demonstration unit that was built. A suitable feedstock was found with palm oil pyrolysis condensate, a problematic waste stream very common in Indonesia, that has a high organic content (exceeding 40 wt %). Preliminary gasification experiments with ethanol and salt separation experiments with sodium sulfate were successful. (author)

  4. Activation and deactivation of neutral palladium(II) phosphinesulfonato polymerization catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Rünzi, Thomas

    2012-12-10

    polymerization filtrates indicate the presence of (odd- and even-numbered alkyl)(anisyl)phosphine sulfonates (14) and their respective phosphine oxides (15). Furthermore, 2-(vinyl)anisole was detected in NMR tube and reactor polymerizations, which results from ethylene insertion into a palladium-anisyl bond and concomitant β-hydride elimination. In addition to these scrambling reactions, formation of alkanes or fully saturated polymer chains, bis(chelate)palladium complexes [κ2-P,O]2Pd, and palladium black was identified as an irreversible catalyst deactivation pathway. This deactivation proceeds by reaction of palladium alkyl complexes with palladium hydride complexes [κ2-P,O]Pd(H)(L) or by reaction with the free ligand H[P,O] generated by reductive elimination from [κ2-P,O]Pd(H)(L). The model hydride complex 1-H-P tBu3 has been synthesized in order to establish whether 1-H-PtBu3 or H[P,O] is responsible for the irreversible catalyst deactivation. However, upon reaction with 1-(13)CH 3-L or 1-CH2CH3-PPh3, both 1-H-PtBu3 and H[P,O] result in formation of methane or ethane, even though H[P,O] reacts faster than 1-H-PtBu3. DFT calculations show that reductive elimination to form H[P,O] and (alkyl)[P,O] from 1-H/(alkyl)-PtBu3 is kinetically accessible, as is the oxidative readdition of the P-H bond of H[P,O] and the P-anisyl bond of (alkyl)[P,O] to [Pd(PtBu3)2]. These calculations also indicate that for a reaction sequence comprising reductive elimination of H[P,O] from 1-H-PtBu3 and reaction of H[P,O] with 1-CH3-PtBu3, 1-CH3-dmso, or 1-CH2CH3-PPh3 to form methane or ethane, the rate-limiting step is reductive elimination of H[P,O] with a barrier of 124 kJ mol-1. However, a second reaction coordinate was found for the reaction of 1-H-PtBu3 with 1-CH3-P tBu3 or 1-CH3-dmso, which evolves into bimetallic transition-state geometries with a nearly linear H-(CH 3)-Pd alignment and which exhibits a barrier of 131 or 95 kJ mol -1 for the formation of methane. © 2012 American Chemical