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Sample records for anisn format dot

  1. Study and application of ANISN and DOT-II nuclear cores in reactor physics problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To solve time-independent neutrons and/or gamma rays transport problems in nuclear reactors, two codes available at IPEN were studied and applied to solve benchmark problems. The ANISN code solves the one-dimensional Boltzmann transport equation for neutrons or gamma rays, in plane, spherical, or cylindrical geometries. The DOT-II code solves the same equation in two-dimensional space for plane, cylindrical and circular geometries. General anisotropic scattering allowed in both codes. Moreover, pointwise convergence criteria, and alternate step function difference equations are also used in order to remove the oscillating flux distributions, sometimes found in discrete ordinates solutions. Basic theories and numerical techniques used in these codes are studied and summarized. Benchmark problems have been solved using these codes. Comparisons of the results show that both codes can be used with confidence in the analysis of nuclear problems. (author)

  2. ANISN-E, 1-D Transport Program ANISN with Exponential Model. ANISN-JR, 1-D Transport Program ANISN with ZZ JSD Data and Flux Plot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A - Nature of physical problem solved: The ANISN system treats neutron and gamma transport in one- dimensional plane, spherical and cylinder geometry. The multigroup cross sections prepared by the programs LIANE and SUPERTOG are processed by the program RETTOG, which produces a binary library with Legendre expansions. The binary library can be updated and edited with the program LGR/B. The photon multigroup cross sections are created with the program GAMLEG/A. If the bulk of the data is too large, the program TAPEMA produces a special group-by-group library. The volume sources are calculated from a reduced set of input data and punched in a format suitable for input to ANISN, using the program PRESOU. ANISN calculates fluxes by groups, space intervals, angle and any number of reaction rates. The energy and space dependent fluxes are stored on tape and can be reprocessed, edited and plotted with the program ANISEX, which also permits to calculate supplementary reaction rates. The program ANISN can condense cross sections into a reduced number of groups. The ANISN system is used as a reference system for the evaluation of approximation methods (space-diffusion or point kernel) or for the preparation of multigroup libraries for two-dimensional transport codes (DOT). In particular it is used for shielding problems with high attenuation in water reactors and fast reactors. ANISN-E solves the same problems as the original ANISN code. Some modifications concern weighted cross sections output and fixed distributed sources input/output. ANISN-E (CCC-0082/09): The CYBER 175 version of ANISN-E also contains the free-format input capability. ANISN-JR extends the applicability of the original ANISN code for shielding analyses by adding options of calculating the reaction rates distributions from detector response, generating the volume- flux weighted cross sections in arbitrary regions or zones and plotting the neutron or gamma-ray spectra and the reaction rates distributions

  3. Annealing-induced change in quantum dot chain formation mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Tyler D.; Colton, John S.; Farrer, Jeffrey K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brigham Young University, Provo UT 84602 (United States); Yang, Haeyeon [Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, South Dakota School of Mines and Technology, Rapid City, SD 57701 (United States); Kim, Dong Jun [IPG Photonics Corporation, Oxford, MA 01540 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot chains were grown using a modified Stranski-Krastanov method in which the InGaAs layer is deposited under a low growth temperature and high arsenic overpressure, which suppresses the formation of dots until a later annealing process. The dots are capped with a 100 nm GaAs layer. Three samples, having three different annealing temperatures of 460°C, 480°C, and 500°C, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Results indicate two distinct types of dot formation processes: dots in the 460°C and 480°C samples form from platelet precursors in a one-to-one ratio whereas the dots in the sample annealed at 500°C form through the strain-driven self-assembly process, and then grow larger via an additional Ostwald ripening process whereby dots grow into larger dots at the expense of smaller seed islands. There are consequently significant morphological differences between the two types of dots, which explain many of the previously-reported differences in optical properties. Moreover, we also report evidence of indium segregation within the dots, with little or no indium intermixing between the dots and the surrounding GaAs barrier.

  4. Annealing-induced change in quantum dot chain formation mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tyler D.; Colton, John S.; Farrer, Jeffrey K.; Yang, Haeyeon; Kim, Dong Jun

    2014-12-01

    Self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot chains were grown using a modified Stranski-Krastanov method in which the InGaAs layer is deposited under a low growth temperature and high arsenic overpressure, which suppresses the formation of dots until a later annealing process. The dots are capped with a 100 nm GaAs layer. Three samples, having three different annealing temperatures of 460°C, 480°C, and 500°C, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Results indicate two distinct types of dot formation processes: dots in the 460°C and 480°C samples form from platelet precursors in a one-to-one ratio whereas the dots in the sample annealed at 500°C form through the strain-driven self-assembly process, and then grow larger via an additional Ostwald ripening process whereby dots grow into larger dots at the expense of smaller seed islands. There are consequently significant morphological differences between the two types of dots, which explain many of the previously-reported differences in optical properties. Moreover, we also report evidence of indium segregation within the dots, with little or no indium intermixing between the dots and the surrounding GaAs barrier.

  5. Annealing-induced change in quantum dot chain formation mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler D. Park

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot chains were grown using a modified Stranski-Krastanov method in which the InGaAs layer is deposited under a low growth temperature and high arsenic overpressure, which suppresses the formation of dots until a later annealing process. The dots are capped with a 100 nm GaAs layer. Three samples, having three different annealing temperatures of 460°C, 480°C, and 500°C, were studied by transmission electron microscopy. Results indicate two distinct types of dot formation processes: dots in the 460°C and 480°C samples form from platelet precursors in a one-to-one ratio whereas the dots in the sample annealed at 500°C form through the strain-driven self-assembly process, and then grow larger via an additional Ostwald ripening process whereby dots grow into larger dots at the expense of smaller seed islands. There are consequently significant morphological differences between the two types of dots, which explain many of the previously-reported differences in optical properties. Moreover, we also report evidence of indium segregation within the dots, with little or no indium intermixing between the dots and the surrounding GaAs barrier.

  6. Formation and ordering of epitaxial quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Paola; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Bremner, Stephen P.; Ritchie, David A.

    2008-10-01

    Single quantum dots (QDs) have great potential as building blocks for quantum information processing devices. However, one of the major difficulties in the fabrication of such devices is the placement of a single dot at a pre-determined position in the device structure, for example, in the centre of a photonic cavity. In this article we review some recent investigations in the site-controlled growth of InAs QDs on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy. The method we use is ex-situ patterning of the GaAs substrate by electron beam lithography and conventional wet or dry etching techniques to form shallow pits in the surface which then determine the nucleation site of an InAs dot. This method is easily scalable and can be incorporated with marker structures to enable simple post-growth lithographic alignment of devices to each site-controlled dot. We demonstrate good site-control for arrays with up to 10 micron spacing between patterned sites, with no dots nucleating between the sites. We discuss the mechanism and the effect of pattern size, InAs deposition amount and growth conditions on this site-control method. Finally we discuss the photoluminescence from these dots and highlight the remaining challenges for this technique. To cite this article: P. Atkinson et al., C. R. Physique 9 (2008).

  7. Reentrant formation of magnetic polarons in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pientka, J. M.; Oszwałdowski, R.; Petukhov, A. G.; Han, J. E.; Žutić, Igor

    2012-10-01

    We propose a model of magnetic polaron formation in semiconductor quantum dots doped with magnetic ions. A wetting layer serves as a reservoir of photogenerated holes, which can be trapped by the adjacent quantum dots. For certain hole densities, the temperature dependence of the magnetization induced by the trapped holes is reentrant: it disappears for some temperature range and reappears at higher temperatures. We demonstrate that this peculiar effect is not an artifact of the mean-field approximation and persists after statistical spin fluctuations are accounted for. We predict fingerprints of reentrant magnetic polarons in photoluminescence spectra.

  8. LEPRICON, PWR Vessel Dose Analysis with DORT and ANISN Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Description of program or function: The LEPRICON system provides state-of-the-art routines to prepare input to and process results from the discrete ordinates codes CCC-484/DORT and CCC-254/ANISN to determine best estimates with uncertainties of group fluences in pressure vessels of pressurized water reactors. The system anticipates availability of results of dosimetry measurements performed in the reactor as well as sources operating during the time of exposure. 2 - Method of solution: Effects of time-dependent core source spatial distributions, when necessary, are treated by the use of an adjoint function coupled with a scaling technique. Sources are generated by combining the results of the diffusion theory code PDQ-7 pin-wise calculations with in-core assembly-wise instrumentation and are converted from X-Y to R-theta geometry. Fluxes calculated by the discrete ordinates codes are then synthesized to form 3-D distributions, and the resulting calculated dosimeter responses compared with the measurements, and adjustments performed in a generalized linear least-squares combination procedure. Through correlations generated from the input, adjustments to the originally calculated group fluxes at a selected point in the pressure vessel are then made, and the best estimates of the fluences accumulated during the time period analyzed are output along with their reduced uncertainties. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Much of the input data to the adjustment routine may be defaulted to 'built-in' values by proper choice of the input options. However, these values may not apply to every reactor, and a caveat must be issued that the user might have to alter some of the definitions of the flux bias factors to describe additional uncertainties peculiar to his own reactor. One may also override any default input if other values are judged more appropriate. The ISOPLOT4 source, sample input and output files are included on tape but were not tested by RSIC

  9. Dynamic Trap Formation and Elimination in Colloidal Quantum Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Voznyy, O.

    2013-03-21

    Using first-principles simulations on PbS and CdSe colloidal quantum dots, we find that surface defects form in response to electronic doping and charging of the nanoparticles. We show that electronic trap states in nanocrystals are dynamic entities, in contrast with the conventional picture wherein traps are viewed as stable electronic states that can be filled or emptied, but not created or destroyed. These traps arise from the formation or breaking of atomic dimers at the nanoparticle surface. The dimers\\' energy levels can reside within the bandgap, in which case a trap is formed. Fortunately, we are also able to identify a number of shallow-electron-affinity cations that stabilize the surface, working to counter dynamic trap formation and allowing for trap-free doping. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  10. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ted Thorbeck

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  11. Formation of strain-induced quantum dots in gated semiconductor nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorbeck, Ted, E-mail: tcthorbeck@wisc.edu [Quantum Measurement Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States); Joint Quantum Institute and Dept. of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland (United States); Zimmerman, Neil M. [Quantum Measurement Division, NIST, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)

    2015-08-15

    A long-standing mystery in the field of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is: Why are there so many unintentional dots (also known as disorder dots) which are neither expected nor controllable. It is typically assumed that these unintentional dots are due to charged defects, however the frequency and predictability of the location of the unintentional QDs suggests there might be additional mechanisms causing the unintentional QDs besides charged defects. We show that the typical strains in a semiconductor nanostructure from metal gates are large enough to create strain-induced quantum dots. We simulate a commonly used QD device architecture, metal gates on bulk silicon, and show the formation of strain-induced QDs. The strain-induced QD can be eliminated by replacing the metal gates with poly-silicon gates. Thus strain can be as important as electrostatics to QD device operation operation.

  12. Nuclear criticality for thermal reactors using the two-group neutron Albedo method and ANISN code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron Albedo method applied to criticality calculations in nuclear reactors is characterized by following the neutron currents, allowing the detailed analyses of the physics phenomena about interactions of the neutrons with the core-reflector group, by the determination of the probabilities of reflection, absorption and transmission. Under two-group neutron Albedo method, the effective neutron multiplication factor, keff, explicitly appears and therefore it is possible to obtain an explicit result from the variation of keff. In the present work, motivated for excellent results presented in previous studies applied to thermal reactors and shieldings, the methodology using Albedo's method was described for the criticality analysis of thermal reactors by using two energy neutron groups admitting variable reflection and absorption coefficients of the core to each reentrant current. The obtained results were compared to the results for keff obtained with the ANISN code and the Diffusion method, both presenting very good concordance. (author)

  13. Analysis of a water moderated critical assembly with anisn-Vitamin C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tightly packed water moderated 233UO2--ThO2 critical assembly was analyzed with the Vitamin C library and the 1-D S/s n/ code, ANISN (S8,P3). The purpose of the study was to provide validation of this calculational model as applied to water-cooled hybrid fusion blankets. The quantities compared were the core eigenvalue and various activation shapes. The calculated eigenvalue was 1.02 +- 0.01. The 233U fission and 232Th capture shapes were found to be in good agreement (+-5%) with experiment, except near water--metal boundaries where differences up to 24% were observed. No such error peaking was observed in the 232Th fast fission shape. We conclude that the model provides good volume averaged reaction rates in water-cooled systems. However, care must be exercised near water boundaries where thermally dependent reaction rates are significantly underestimated

  14. Sb mediated formation of Ge/Si quantum dots: Growth and properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tonkikh, A.A., E-mail: tonkikh@mpi-halle.de [Max-Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Institute for Physics of Microstructures RAS, Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Zakharov, N.D. [Max-Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany); Novikov, A.V.; Kudryavtsev, K.E. [Institute for Physics of Microstructures RAS, Nizhniy Novgorod (Russian Federation); Talalaev, V.G. [ZIK SiLi-nano, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Fuhrmann, B.; Leipner, H.S. [Interdisciplinary Center of Materials Science, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Werner, P. [Max-Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, 06120 Halle (Germany)

    2012-02-01

    The phenomenon of surfactant (Sb) mediated formation of Ge/Si(100) islands (quantum dots) by means of molecular beam epitaxy is discussed. The limited diffusivity of Si and Ge adatoms caused by the Sb layer leads to a reduction of the size of Ge islands, the increase in the island density, and the sharpening of the interfaces of Ge islands. Thereby, a thin Sb layer is considered to be a powerful tool that provides more freedom in designing Ge quantum dot features. Ge quantum dots, grown via a thin Sb layer and embedded coherently in a Si p-n junction, are revealed to be the origin of the intense photo- and electroluminescence in the spectral range of about 1.5 {mu}m at room temperature.

  15. Dynamical entanglement formation and dissipation effects in two double quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras-Pulido, L D [Centro de Investigacion CientIfica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada, Apartado Postal 2732, Ensenada, BC 22860 (Mexico); Rojas, F [Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Centro de Ciencias de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Ensenada, Baja California 22800 (Mexico)

    2006-11-01

    We study the static and dynamic formation of entanglement in charge states of a two double quantum dot array with two mobile electrons under the effect of an external driving field. We include dissipation via contact with a phonon bath. By using the density matrix formalism and an open quantum system approach, we describe the dynamical behaviour of the charge distribution (polarization), concurrence (measure of the degree of entanglement) and Bell state probabilities (two qubit states with maximum entanglement) of such a system, including the role of dot asymmetry and temperature effects. Our results show that it is possible to obtain entangled states as well as a most probable Bell state, which can be controlled by the driving field. We also evaluate how the entanglement formation based on charge states deteriorates as the temperature or asymmetry increases.

  16. ANISN-L, a CDC-7600 code which solves the one-dimensional, multigroup, time dependent transport equation by the method of discrete ordinates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, T. P.

    1973-09-20

    The code ANISN-L solves the one-dimensional, multigroup, time-independent Boltzmann transport equation by the method of discrete ordinates. In problems involving a fissionable system, it can calculate the system multiplication or alpha. In such cases, it is also capable of determining isotopic concentrations, radii, zone widths, or buckling in order to achieve a given multiplication or alpha. The code may also calculate fluxes caused by a specified fixed source. Neutron, gamma, and coupled neutron--gamma problems may be solved in either the forward or adjoint (backward) modes. Cross sections describing upscatter, as well as the usual downscatter, may be employed. This report describes the use of ANISN-L; this is a revised version of ANISN which handles both large and small problems efficiently on CDC-7600 computers. (RWR)

  17. InGaAs/GaAs (110) quantum dot formation via step meandering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diez-Merino, Laura; Tejedor, Paloma [Department of Nanostructures and Surfaces, Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, CSIC, Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz 3, 28049-Madrid (Spain)

    2011-07-01

    InGaAs (110) semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) offer very promising prospects as a material base for a new generation of high-speed spintronic devices, such as single electron transistors for quantum computing. However, the spontaneous formation of InGaAs QDs is prevented by two-dimensional (2D) layer-by-layer growth on singular GaAs (110) substrates. In this work we have studied, by using atomic force microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL), the growth of InGaAs/GaAs QDs on GaAs (110) stepped substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the modification of the adatom incorporation kinetics to surface steps in the presence of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen. The as-grown QDs exhibit lateral dimensions below 100 nm and emission peaks in the 1.35-1.37 eV range. It has been found that a step meandering instability derived from the preferential attachment of In adatoms to [110]-step edges relative to [11n]-type steps plays a key role in the destabilization of 2D growth that leads to 3D mound formation on both conventional and H-terminated vicinal substrates. In the latter case, the driving force for 3D growth via step meandering is enhanced by H-induced upward mass transport in addition to the lower energy cost associated with island formation on H-terminated substrates, which results in a high density array of InGaAs/GaAs dots selectively nucleated on the terrace apices with reduced lateral dimensions and improved PL efficiency relative to those of conventional MBE-grown samples.

  18. Indium segregation during III–V quantum wire and quantum dot formation on patterned substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroni, Stefano T.; Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Chung, Tung-Hsun; Juska, Gediminas; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Pelucchi, Emanuele [Tyndall National Institute, “Lee Maltings,” University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Vvedensky, Dimitri D. [The Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-28

    We report a model for metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy on non-planar substrates, specifically V-grooves and pyramidal recesses, which we apply to the growth of InGaAs nanostructures. This model—based on a set of coupled reaction-diffusion equations, one for each facet in the system—accounts for the facet-dependence of all kinetic processes (e.g., precursor decomposition, adatom diffusion, and adatom lifetimes) and has been previously applied to account for the temperature-, concentration-, and temporal-dependence of AlGaAs nanostructures on GaAs (111)B surfaces with V-grooves and pyramidal recesses. In the present study, the growth of In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.88}As quantum wires at the bottom of V-grooves is used to determine a set of optimized kinetic parameters. Based on these parameters, we have modeled the growth of In{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As nanostructures formed in pyramidal site-controlled quantum-dot systems, successfully producing a qualitative explanation for the temperature-dependence of their optical properties, which have been reported in previous studies. Finally, we present scanning electron and cross-sectional atomic force microscopy images which show previously unreported facetting at the bottom of the pyramidal recesses that allow quantum dot formation.

  19. Unconventional application of conventional enzymatic substrate: first fluorogenic immunoassay based on enzymatic formation of quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malashikhina, Natalia; Garai-Ibabe, Gaizka; Pavlov, Valeri

    2013-07-16

    In this study, a simple fluorogenic immunoassay based on in situ formation of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) is described. We discovered that alkaline phosphatase (ALP), the enzyme broadly used in enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA), is able to trigger formation of fluorescent CdS QDs. ALP-catalyzed hydrolysis of p-nitrophenyl phosphate (pNPP) leads to the formation of p-nitrophenol and inorganic phosphate. The latter stabilizes CdS QDs produced in situ through interaction of Cd(2+) with S(2-) ions. So, the specific interaction of analyte (antibody) with ALP-labeled antibody can be detected through formation of CdS QDs, monitored by recording emission spectra at λex = 290 nm. The fluorescence intensity showed to be dependent on the concentration of target antibody. This method allowed us to detect as low as 0.4 ng mL(-1) of analyte antibody with a linear range up to 10 ng mL(-1). The sensitivity of this novel assay showed to be 1 order of magnitude better than that of the standard method based on colorimetric p-nitrophenyl phosphate assay.

  20. Formation of uniform high-density and small-size Ge/Si quantum dots by scanning pulsed laser annealing of pre-deposited Ge/Si film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qayyum, Hamza; Lu, Chieh-Hsun; Chuang, Ying-Hung; Lin, Jiunn-Yuan; Chen, Szu-yuan

    2016-05-01

    The capability to fabricate Ge/Si quantum dots with small dot size and high dot density uniformly over a large area is crucial for many applications. In this work, we demonstrate that this can be achieved by scanning a pre-deposited Ge thin layer on Si substrate with a line-focused pulsed laser beam to induce formation of quantum dots. With suitable setting, Ge/Si quantum dots with a mean height of 2.9 nm, a mean diameter of 25 nm, and a dot density of 6×1010 cm-2 could be formed over an area larger than 4 mm2. The average size of the laser-induced quantum dots is smaller while their density is higher than that of quantum dots grown by using Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Based on the dependence of the characteristics of quantum dots on the laser parameters, a model consisting of laser-induced strain, surface diffusion, and Ostwald ripening is proposed for the mechanism underlying the formation of the Ge/Si quantum dots. The technique demonstrated could be applicable to other materials besides Ge/Si.

  1. Formation of uniform high-density and small-size Ge/Si quantum dots by scanning pulsed laser annealing of pre-deposited Ge/Si film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Qayyum

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The capability to fabricate Ge/Si quantum dots with small dot size and high dot density uniformly over a large area is crucial for many applications. In this work, we demonstrate that this can be achieved by scanning a pre-deposited Ge thin layer on Si substrate with a line-focused pulsed laser beam to induce formation of quantum dots. With suitable setting, Ge/Si quantum dots with a mean height of 2.9 nm, a mean diameter of 25 nm, and a dot density of 6×1010 cm−2 could be formed over an area larger than 4 mm2. The average size of the laser-induced quantum dots is smaller while their density is higher than that of quantum dots grown by using Stranski-Krastanov growth mode. Based on the dependence of the characteristics of quantum dots on the laser parameters, a model consisting of laser-induced strain, surface diffusion, and Ostwald ripening is proposed for the mechanism underlying the formation of the Ge/Si quantum dots. The technique demonstrated could be applicable to other materials besides Ge/Si.

  2. Formation of emission line dots and extremely metal-deficient dwarfs from almost dark galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Bekki, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations have discovered a number of extremely gas-rich very faint dwarf galaxies possibly embedded in low-mass dark matter halos. We investigate star formation histories of these gas-rich dwarf ("almost dark") galaxies both for isolated and interacting/merging cases. We find that although star formation rates (SFRs) are very low (<10^-5 M_sun/yr) in the simulated dwarfs in isolation for the total halo masses (M_h) of 10^8-10^9 M_sun, they can be dramatically increased to be ~ 10^{-4} M_sun/yr when they interact or merge with other dwarfs. These interacting faint dwarfs with central compact HII regions can be identified as isolated emission line dots ("ELdots") owing to their very low surface brightness envelopes of old stars. The remnant of these interacting and merging dwarfs can finally develop central compact stellar systems with very low metallicities (Z/Z_sun<0.1), which can be identified as extremely metal-deficient ("XMD") dwarfs. These results imply that although there would exist ma...

  3. Theory of multiple quantum dot formation in strained-layer heteroepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lin; Maroudas, Dimitrios

    2016-07-01

    We develop a theory for the experimentally observed formation of multiple quantum dots (QDs) in strained-layer heteroepitaxy based on surface morphological stability analysis of a coherently strained epitaxial thin film on a crystalline substrate. Using a fully nonlinear model of surface morphological evolution that accounts for a wetting potential contribution to the epitaxial film's free energy as well as surface diffusional anisotropy, we demonstrate the formation of multiple QD patterns in self-consistent dynamical simulations of the evolution of the epitaxial film surface perturbed from its planar state. The simulation predictions are supported by weakly nonlinear analysis of the epitaxial film surface morphological stability. We find that, in addition to the Stranski-Krastanow instability, long-wavelength perturbations from the planar film surface morphology can trigger a nonlinear instability, resulting in the splitting of a single QD into multiple QDs of smaller sizes, and predict the critical wavelength of the film surface perturbation for the onset of the nonlinear tip-splitting instability. The theory provides a fundamental interpretation for the observations of "QD pairs" or "double QDs" and other multiple QDs reported in experimental studies of epitaxial growth of semiconductor strained layers and sets the stage for precise engineering of tunable-size nanoscale surface features in strained-layer heteroepitaxy by exploiting film surface nonlinear, pattern forming phenomena.

  4. Determination of neutron flux distribution by using ANISN, a one-dimensional discrete S sub n ordinates transport code with anisotropic scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorai, S. K.

    1983-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to use a one-dimensional discrete coordinates transport code called ANISN in order to determine the energy-angle-spatial distribution of neutrons in a 6-feet cube rock box which houses a D-T neutron generator at its center. The project was two-fold. The first phase of the project involved adaptation of the ANISN code written for an IBM 360/75/91 computer to the UNIVAC system at JSC. The second phase of the project was to use the code with proper geometry, source function and rock material composition in order to determine the neutron flux distribution around the rock box when a 14.1 MeV neutron generator placed at its center is activated.

  5. Transport through a triple quantum dot system: Formation of resonance band and its application as a spin filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Zelong [Institute of Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Heilongjiang Institute of Technology, Harbin 150050 (China); Lü, Tianquan, E-mail: ltq@hit.edu.cn [Institute of Condensed-Matter Science and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2012-07-23

    A three-quantum-dot spin filter based on nonequilibrium Green's function technique is proposed with external magnetic flux, Rashba spin orbit interaction, and intradot coulomb interaction taken into consideration. Numerical results indicate a spin filter can be made efficient by adjusting external magnetic flux and Rashba spin orbit interaction. Moreover, the formation of a resonance band is discussed through calculation. It is observed that the possibility of transition from one peak to other three peaks in the conductance spectrum increases with increasing interdot coupling strength. -- Highlights: ► Investigation of the conductance through a triple quantum dot system. ► Proposal of an efficient spin-filter device. ► Discussion on the formation of the resonance band. ► Study on spin polarization with intradot Coulomb interaction taken into consideration.

  6. The (Un)Lonely Planet Guide: Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems from a `Blue Dots' Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution I summarize some recent successes, and focus on remaining challenges, in understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems in the context of the Blue Dots initiative. Because our understanding is incomplete, we cannot yet articulate a "design reference mission" engineering matrix suitable for an exploration mission where success is defined as obtaining a spectrum of a potentially habitable world around a nearby star. However, as progress accelerates, we can i...

  7. Assessing the occurrence of the dibromide radical (Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}) in natural waters: Measures of triplet-sensitised formation, reactivity, and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Laurentiis, Elisa; Minella, Marco; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Mailhot, Gilles; Sarakha, Mohamed [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Brigante, Marcello, E-mail: marcello.brigante@univ-bpclermont.fr [Clermont Universite, Universite Blaise Pascal, Institut de Chimie de Clermont-Ferrand, BP 10448, F-63000 Clermont-Ferrand (France); CNRS, UMR 6296, ICCF, F-63171 Aubiere (France); Vione, Davide, E-mail: davide.vione@unito.it [Universita degli Studi di Torino, Dipartimento di Chimica, Via P. Giuria 5, 10125 Torino (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Torino, Centro Interdipartimentale NatRisk, Via Leonardo da Vinci 44, 10095 Grugliasco (Italy)

    2012-11-15

    The triplet state of anthraquinone-2-sulphonate (AQ2S) is able to oxidise bromide to Br{sup {center_dot}}/Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}, with rate constant (2-4) Dot-Operator 10{sup 9} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} that depends on the pH. Similar processes are expected to take place between bromide and the triplet states of naturally occurring chromophoric dissolved organic matter ({sup 3}CDOM*). The brominating agent Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} could thus be formed in natural waters upon oxidation of bromide by both {sup {center_dot}}OH and {sup 3}CDOM*. Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} would be consumed by disproportionation into bromide and bromine, as well as upon reaction with nitrite and most notably with dissolved organic matter (DOM). By using the laser flash photolysis technique, and phenol as model organic molecule, a second-order reaction rate constant of {approx} 3 Dot-Operator 10{sup 2} L (mg C){sup -1} s{sup -1} was measured between Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} and DOM. It was thus possible to model the formation and reactivity of Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} in natural waters, assessing the steady-state [Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}}] Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -13}-10{sup -12} M. It is concluded that bromide oxidation by {sup 3}CDOM* would be significant compared to oxidation by {sup {center_dot}}OH. The {sup 3}CDOM*-mediated process would prevail in DOM-rich and bromide-rich environments, the latter because elevated bromide would completely scavenge {sup {center_dot}}OH. Under such conditions, {sup {center_dot}}OH-assisted formation of Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} would be limited by the formation rate of the hydroxyl radical. In contrast, the formation rate of {sup 3}CDOM* is much higher compared to that of {sup {center_dot}}OH in most surface waters and would provide a large {sup 3}CDOM* reservoir for bromide to react with. A further issue is that nitrite oxidation by Br{sub 2}{sup -{center_dot}} could be an important source of the nitrating agent {sup {center_dot

  8. Polyol-mediated C-dot formation showing efficient Tb3+/Eu3+ emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hailong; Kuzmanoski, Ana; Gössl, Dorothee M; Popescu, Radian; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Feldmann, Claus

    2014-07-18

    C-dots (3-5 nm in diameter) obtained by most simple heating of polyols (glycerol, diethylene glycol and PEG 400) show intense blue and green emission (50% quantum yield). Upon modification with TbCl3/EuCl3, energy transfer from the C-dots to the rare-earth metal results in line-type Tb(3+) (green)/Eu(3+) (red) emission with quantum yields up to 85%. PMID:24887063

  9. Quantum dot formation and dynamic scaling behavior of SnO2 nanocrystals induced by pulsed delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. W.; Lai, J. K. L.; Shek, C. H.

    2006-01-01

    Quantum dot formation and dynamic scaling behavior of SnO2 nanocrystals in coalescence regime for growth by pulsed-laser deposition is explored experimentally and theoretically, and the same is compared with that for continuous vapor deposition such as molecular-beam epitaxy. Using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, unusual quantum dots of SnO2 nanocrystals are studied. We present kinetic Monte-Carlo simulations for pulsed-laser deposition in the submonolayer regime and give a description of the island distance versus pulse intensity. We found that the scaling exponent for pulsed-laser deposition is 1.28±0.03, which is significantly lower as compared to that for molecular-beam epitaxy (1.62±0.03). Theoretical simulations reveal that this attractive difference can be pursued to the large fraction of multiple droplet coalescence under pulsed vapor delivery.

  10. UV-initiated formation of noble metal nanoparticles on zinc oxide quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Quantum dots (nanosized semiconductor particles) are a relatively new phenomenon. They exhibit unusual properties as a result of spatial electron confinement within the particles, including an increased band gap energy and blue-shifted fluorescence. Quantum dots and nanoparticles have attracted a lot of academic and industrial interest because of their special properties, including small size and potential as catalysts, 'tunable' fluorescence, and potential use in biomedical applications. Still, there are many properties of quantum dots that need further investigation if they are to be fully utilised. The interaction between nanosized noble metal colloids and zinc oxide quantum dots (Q-ZnO) under UV-irradiation provides valuable information about the electronic structure of Q-ZnO. In a sample containing Q-ZnO and Pt6+, Au+ or Ag+, electrons from excited Q-ZnO were transferred to the metal ions, and consequently, metal particles were reduced onto the Q-ZnO particles. The processes that occur can be followed spectroscopically. The results will be discussed during the presentation. A Transmission Electron Microscope image of a 3nm zinc oxide quantum dot, with lattice planes clearly visible is presented

  11. Formation and properties of selected quantum dots in maize amylopectin matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachatryan, Karen, E-mail: rrchacza@cyf-kr.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Agricultural University, Balicka Street 122, 30 149 Krakow (Poland); Khachatryan, Gohar; Fiedorowicz, Maciej [Department of Chemistry and Physics, Agricultural University, Balicka Street 122, 30 149 Krakow (Poland); Tomasik, Piotr [Krakow College of Health Promotion, Krowoderska Street 73, 31 158 Krakow (Poland)

    2014-09-01

    Highlights: • Synthesis of quantum dots in aqueous gel of amylopectin. • Generation of quantum dots in non-ionic polysaccharide. • Preparation of CdS, Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} and ZnS quantum dots of the size below 10 nm. • The amylopectin matrix is not suitable for generation of CaS and Cs{sub 2}S quantum dots. - Abstract: CdS, ZnS, Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3}, CaS and Cs{sub 2}S quantum dots (QDs) were generated in the amylopectin (Ap) matrix. They all emitted a light between 460 (ZnS) and 475 (CdS) nm. Sizes of Ga{sub 2}S{sub 3} and CdS QDs were 7–9 nm and 5–7 nm, respectively. Single ZnS QDs had 6–7 nm but they readily aggregated. The CaS and Cs{sub 2}S appeared mainly as 30–100 nm aggregates. There were no significant interactions between QDs and the Ap matrix. Presented method appeared unsuitable for the generation of CaS and Cs{sub 2}S QDs as they as well as their substrates [Ca(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}] hydrolyzed. Calcium compounds formed complexes with Ap and alkaline solution from CsOH could produce cesium salts of Ap as well as cause oxidation of Ap.

  12. The (Un)Lonely Planet Guide: Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems from a `Blue Dots' Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Meyer, Michael R

    2010-01-01

    In this contribution I summarize some recent successes, and focus on remaining challenges, in understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems in the context of the Blue Dots initiative. Because our understanding is incomplete, we cannot yet articulate a "design reference mission" engineering matrix suitable for an exploration mission where success is defined as obtaining a spectrum of a potentially habitable world around a nearby star. However, as progress accelerates, we can identify observational programs that would address fundamental scientific questions through hypothesis testing such that the null result is interesting.

  13. The (Un)Lonely Planet Guide: Formation and Evolution of Planetary Systems from a ``Blue Dots'' Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. R.

    2010-10-01

    In this contribution I summarize some recent successes, and focus on remaining challenges, in understanding the formation and evolution of planetary systems in the context of the Blue Dots initiative. Because our understanding is incomplete, we cannot yet articulate a design reference mission engineering matrix suitable for an exploration mission where success is defined as obtaining a spectrum of a potentially habitable world around a nearby star. However, as progress accelerates, we can identify observational programs that would address fundamental scientific questions through hypothesis testing such that the null result is interesting.

  14. Formation of quantum wires and dots on InP(001) by As/P exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the use of in situ scanning tunneling microscopy to study As/P exchange on InP(001) surfaces by molecular beam epitaxy. Results demonstrate that the exchange process can be controlled to selectively produce either quantum wires or quantum dots. 15 nm wide self-assembled nanowires are observed, and they are elongated along the dimer row direction of the InP(001)-2x4 surface with a length of over 1 μm and flat top 2x4 surfaces. In addition, when the nanowires are annealed with no arsenic overpressure, the surface reconstruction transforms from 2x4 to 4x2 and the nanowires transform into dots with a rectangular base and flat top. [copyright] 2001 American Institute of Physics

  15. Formation of visible single-mode light sources using quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baig, Sarfaraz; Xu, Jianfeng; Wu, Pengfei; Chen, Bing; Wang, Michael

    2008-08-01

    The market demands for innovative, efficient, small package and single-mode light sources are always high because of their broad applications in scientific, medical, industrial, and commercial fields. The high photoluminescence quantum yield, photophysical and photochemical stability, and tunable emission wavelength make quantum dots ideal for a new generation of solid state light sources. We report on the realization of various single-mode light sources in the visible spectral band by using semiconductor quantum dots. The effective use of a waveguide structure can help achieve the divergence control of the output light beam. This technique may benefit the development for next generation light emitting diodes, optical communication, intelligent optical sensors, microprocessors, and nanoscale optical imaging systems.

  16. Dipolariton formation in quantum dot molecules strongly coupled to optical resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Domínguez, Marlon S; Ramírez, Hanz Y

    2016-01-01

    In this theoretical work, we study a double quantum dot interacting strongly with a microcavity, while undergoing resonant tunneling. Effects of interdot tunneling on the light-matter hybridized states are determined, and tunability of their brightness degrees and associated dipole moments is demonstrated. These results predict dipolariton generation in artificial molecules coupled to optical resonators, and provide a promising scenario for control of emission efficiency and coherence times of exciton polaritons.

  17. Formation of GaN quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy using NH{sub 3} as nitrogen source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damilano, B., E-mail: bd@crhea.cnrs.fr; Brault, J.; Massies, J. [CRHEA-CNRS, Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Rue B. Grégory, Valbonne 06560 (France)

    2015-07-14

    Self-assembled GaN quantum dots (QDs) in Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N (0.3 ≤ x ≤ 1) were grown on c-plane sapphire and Si (111) substrates by molecular beam epitaxy using ammonia as nitrogen source. The QD formation temperature was varied from 650 °C to 800 °C. Surprisingly, the density and size of QDs formed in this temperature range are very similar. This has been explained by considering together experimental results obtained from reflection high-energy electron diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and photoluminescence to discuss the interplay between thermodynamics and kinetics in the QD formation mechanisms. Finally, possible ways to better control the QD optical properties are proposed.

  18. Formation of dot arrays with a pitch of 20 nm x 20 nm for patterned media using 30 keV EB drawing on thin calixarene resist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad, Zulfakri bin [Department of Nano-Material System, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Shirai, Masumi [Department of Nano-Material System, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Sone, Hayato [Department of Production Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Hosaka, Sumio [Department of Production Science and Technology, Graduate School of Engineering, Gunma University, 1-5-1 Tenjin-cho, Kiryu, Gunma 376-8515 (Japan); Kodera, Masatoshi [Department of Electronics, Information and Communication Engineering, Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan)

    2008-01-16

    We studied the possibility of achieving very fine-pitch dot arrays with a pitch of 20 nm x 20 nm using 30 keV electron beam (EB) drawing on negative calixarene resist. In order to form such patterns, we studied the dependence on resist thickness of the dot size and the packing. We propose EB drawing on an extremely thin film for very highly packed dot-array formation. Our experimental results demonstrate the possibility of forming highly packed dot-array patterns with a pitch of 20 nm x 20 nm and a resist thickness of about 13 nm, which corresponds to about 1.6 Tbits in{sup -2}.

  19. Formation of Ge quantum dots array in layer-cake technique for advanced photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, C Y; Chang, Y J; Chang, J E; Lee, M S; Li, P W [Department of Electrical Engineering, National Central University, ChungLi, 320, Taiwan (China); Chen, W Y; Hsu, T M, E-mail: pwli@ee.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Physics and Center for Nano Science and Technology, National Central University, ChungLi, 32001, Taiwan (China)

    2010-12-17

    We report a simple and manageable growth method for placing dense three-dimensional Ge quantum dot (QD) arrays in a uniform or a graded size distribution, based on thermally oxidizing stacked poly-SiGe in a layer-cake technique. The QD size and spatial density in each stack can be modulated by conditions of the Ge content in poly-Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x}, oxidation, and the underlay buffer layer. Size-dependent internal structure, strain, and photoluminescence properties of Ge QDs are systematically investigated. Optimization of the processing conditions could be carried out for producing dense Ge QD arrays to maximize photovoltaic efficiency.

  20. The Role of Groove Periodicity in the Formation of Site-Controlled Quantum Dot Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Schramm, Andreas; Hakkarainen, Teemu V; Tommila, Juha; Guina, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    Structural and optical properties of InAs quantum dot (QD) chains formed in etched GaAs grooves having different periods from 200 to 2000 nm in [010] orientation are reported. The site-controlled QDs were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy on soft UV-nanoimprint lithography-patterned GaAs(001) surfaces. Increasing the groove periods decreases the overall QD density but increases the QD size and the linear density along the groove direction. The effect of the increased QD size with larger pe...

  1. In(Ga)As quantum dot formation on group-III assisted catalyst-free InGaAs nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growth of GaAs and InxGa1-xAs nanowires by the group-III assisted molecular beam epitaxy growth method on (001)GaAs/SiO2 substrates is studied in dependence on growth temperature, with the objective of maximizing the indium incorporation. Nanowire growth was achieved for growth temperatures as low as 550 deg. C. The incorporation of indium was studied by low temperature micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The results show that the incorporation of indium achieved by lowering the growth temperature does not have the effect of increasing the indium concentration in the bulk of the nanowire, which is limited to 3-5%. For growth temperatures below 575 0C, indium rich regions form at the surface of the nanowires as a consequence of the radial growth. This results in the formation of quantum dots, which exhibit spectrally narrow luminescence.

  2. Formation, atomic structure, and electronic properties of GaSb quantum dots in GaAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timm, R.

    2007-12-14

    In this work, cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used for the first time to study the shape, size, strain, chemical composition, and electronic properties of capped GaSb/GaAs QDs at the atomic scale. By evaluating such structural results on a variety of nanostructures built using different epitaxy methods and growth conditions, details on the underlying QD formation processes can be revealed. A cross-over from flat quantum wells (QWs) to optically active QDs can be observed in samples grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) with increasing amount of GaSb, including self-assembled Sb accumulations within a still two-dimensional layer and tiny three-dimensional GaSb islands probably acting as precursor structures. The QWs consist of significantly intermixed material with stoichiometries of maximally 50% GaSb, additionally exhibiting small gaps filled with GaAs. A higher GaSb content up to nearly pure material is found in the QDs, being characterized by small sizes of up to 8 nm baselength and about 2 nm height. In spite of the intermixing, all nanostructures have rather abrupt interfaces, and no significant Sb segregation in growth direction is observed. This changes completely when molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is used as growth method, in which case individual Sb atoms are found to be distributed over several nm above the nanostructures. Massive group-V atomic exchange processes are causing this strong inter-mixing and Sb segregation during GaAs overgrowth. In combination with the large strain inherent to GaSb/GaAs QDs, this segregation upon overgrowth is assumed to be the reason for a unique structural phenomenon: All MBE-grown QDs, independent of the amount of deposited GaSb, exhibit a ring structure, consisting of a ring body of high GaSb content and a more or less extended central gap filled with GaAs. These rings have formed in a self-assembled way even when the initial GaSb layer was overgrown considerably fast

  3. Influence of reaction temperature on the formation process of ZnO quantum dots and the optical properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    庄晋艳; 李岚; 张晓松; 徐建萍; 魏军

    2009-01-01

    ZnO quantum dots (QDs)with the sizes of 3.0-5.6 nm are synthesized by solution-phase method at different temperatures. We find that temperature has great influence on the size of ZnO QDs. The growth process is the most sensitive to temperature, and the process is well explained by Lifshitz-Slyozov-Wagner (LSW) model. By photoluminescence (PL) spectra of the quantum dots at different temperatures and reactive time, we come to a conclusion that ultraviolet emission is mainly due to surface defects, and the or...

  4. Nano-dot formation using self-assembled 3-mercaptopropionic acid thin films prepared by facile atmospheric-vapor-adsorption method on Au(1 1 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Tohru; Kimura, Ryota; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Ohta, Toshiaki; Matsumoto, Mutsuyoshi

    2002-12-30

    Nanometer scale structures of self-assembled films consisting of 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) were formed by using electric stimuli between scanning tunng microscope (STM) Au tips and gold surfaces. The obtained structures were compared with those using bare gold surfaces and hexanethiol films on Au(1 1 1) under the same conditions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements revealed that self-assembled ultrathin films of the corresponding thiol molecules were fabricated on Au(1 1 1) by a facile atmospheric-vapor-adsorption (AVA) method without solvent. Comparison of nano-structure formation suggested that the self-assembled thin films of 3-mercatopropionic acid molecules gave nano-dots below the height of voltage pulses where gold atom emission from Au tips and surface evaporation of Au(1 1 1) take place. It was found that 3-mercaptopropionic acid films easily produced much better nano-dots on Au(1 1 1) than hexanethiol films probably due to the formation of hydrogen bonding networks and/or the reactions of 3-mercaptopropionic acid when electric pulses were applied to the films.

  5. CdSe quantum dot formation: alternative paths to relaxation of a strained CdSe layer and influence of the capping conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, I C; Aichele, T; Bougerol, C; André, R; Tatarenko, S; Bellet-Amalric, E; Van Daele, B; Van Tendeloo, G

    2007-07-01

    CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot formation is investigated by studying different steps of the growth. To precisely control the critical thickness of CdSe grown on a ZnSe buffer layer, the CdSe self-regulated growth rate in atomic layer epitaxy growth mode is determined by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) measurements for a temperature range between 180 and 280 °C. Then, the two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) transition of a strained CdSe layer on (001)-ZnSe induced by the use of amorphous selenium is studied. The formation of CdSe islands is found when 3 monolayers (ML) of CdSe are deposited. When only 2.5 ML of CdSe are deposited, another relaxation mechanism is observed, leading to the appearance of strong undulations on the surface. We also studied the evolution of the surface morphology when 2.7 ML are deposited, to study the boundary between those two phenomena. The influence of capping on quantum dot morphology is investigated. It is found that cadmium is redistributed within the layer during capping. Our results show that the cadmium distribution after capping depends on the capping temperature and on the strain of the CdSe layer. Cadmium incorporation after capping is also studied. It is found that the amount of incorporated cadmium depends on the strain of the CdSe layer before capping.

  6. CdSe quantum dot formation: alternative paths to relaxation of a strained CdSe layer and influence of the capping conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robin, I C [CEA-CNRS-UJF ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' Group Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique/CNRS UMR5588, Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble, BP87, 38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Aichele, T [CEA-CNRS-UJF ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' Group Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique/CNRS UMR5588, Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble, BP87, 38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Bougerol, C [CEA-CNRS-UJF ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' Group Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique/CNRS UMR5588, Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble, BP87, 38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Andre, R [CEA-CNRS-UJF ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' Group Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique/CNRS UMR5588, Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble, BP87, 38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Tatarenko, S [CEA-CNRS-UJF ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' Group Laboratoire de Spectrometrie Physique/CNRS UMR5588, Universite J. Fourier, Grenoble, BP87, 38402 St Martin d' Heres (France); Bellet-Amalric, E [CEA-CNRS-UJF ' Nanophysics and Semiconductors' Group, Departement de Recherche Fondamentale sur la Matiere Condensee/SP2M CEA Grenoble, 17 rue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Daele, B Van [IMEC, Kapeldreef 75, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Tendeloo, G van [EMAT University of Antwerp (RUCA), Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2007-07-04

    CdSe/ZnSe quantum dot formation is investigated by studying different steps of the growth. To precisely control the critical thickness of CdSe grown on a ZnSe buffer layer, the CdSe self-regulated growth rate in atomic layer epitaxy growth mode is determined by reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) measurements for a temperature range between 180 and 280 deg. C. Then, the two-dimensional-three-dimensional (2D-3D) transition of a strained CdSe layer on (001)-ZnSe induced by the use of amorphous selenium is studied. The formation of CdSe islands is found when 3 monolayers (ML) of CdSe are deposited. When only 2.5 ML of CdSe are deposited, another relaxation mechanism is observed, leading to the appearance of strong undulations on the surface. We also studied the evolution of the surface morphology when 2.7 ML are deposited, to study the boundary between those two phenomena. The influence of capping on quantum dot morphology is investigated. It is found that cadmium is redistributed within the layer during capping. Our results show that the cadmium distribution after capping depends on the capping temperature and on the strain of the CdSe layer. Cadmium incorporation after capping is also studied. It is found that the amount of incorporated cadmium depends on the strain of the CdSe layer before capping.

  7. Formation of long single quantum dots in high quality InSb nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dingxun; Li, Sen; Kang, N.; Caroff, Philippe; Wang, L. B.; Huang, Y. Q.; Deng, M. T.; Yu, C. L.; Xu, H. Q.

    2015-09-01

    We report on realization and transport spectroscopy study of single quantum dots (QDs) made from InSb nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The nanowires employed are 50-80 nm in diameter and the QDs are defined in the nanowires between the source and drain contacts on a Si/SiO2 substrate. We show that highly tunable QD devices can be realized with the MBE-grown InSb nanowires and the gate-to-dot capacitance extracted in the many-electron regimes is scaled linearly with the longitudinal dot size, demonstrating that the devices are of single InSb nanowire QDs even with a longitudinal size of ~700 nm. In the few-electron regime, the quantum levels in the QDs are resolved and the Landé g-factors extracted for the quantum levels from the magnetotransport measurements are found to be strongly level-dependent and fluctuated in a range of 18-48. A spin-orbit coupling strength is extracted from the magnetic field evolutions of a ground state and its neighboring excited state in an InSb nanowire QD and is on the order of ~300 μeV. Our results establish that the MBE-grown InSb nanowires are of high crystal quality and are promising for the use in constructing novel quantum devices, such as entangled spin qubits, one-dimensional Wigner crystals and topological quantum computing devices.

  8. Formation of long single quantum dots in high quality InSb nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dingxun; Li, Sen; Kang, N; Caroff, Philippe; Wang, L B; Huang, Y Q; Deng, M T; Yu, C L; Xu, H Q

    2015-09-28

    We report on realization and transport spectroscopy study of single quantum dots (QDs) made from InSb nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). The nanowires employed are 50-80 nm in diameter and the QDs are defined in the nanowires between the source and drain contacts on a Si/SiO2 substrate. We show that highly tunable QD devices can be realized with the MBE-grown InSb nanowires and the gate-to-dot capacitance extracted in the many-electron regimes is scaled linearly with the longitudinal dot size, demonstrating that the devices are of single InSb nanowire QDs even with a longitudinal size of ∼700 nm. In the few-electron regime, the quantum levels in the QDs are resolved and the Landég-factors extracted for the quantum levels from the magnetotransport measurements are found to be strongly level-dependent and fluctuated in a range of 18-48. A spin-orbit coupling strength is extracted from the magnetic field evolutions of a ground state and its neighboring excited state in an InSb nanowire QD and is on the order of ∼300 μeV. Our results establish that the MBE-grown InSb nanowires are of high crystal quality and are promising for the use in constructing novel quantum devices, such as entangled spin qubits, one-dimensional Wigner crystals and topological quantum computing devices. PMID:26308470

  9. Formation of self-assembled quantum dots of iron oxide thin films by spray pyrolysis from non-aqueous medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum dots (QDs) of iron oxide have been deposited onto ITO coated glass substrates by spray pyrolysis technique, using ferric chloride (FeCl3.7H2O) in non-aqueous medium as a starting material. The non-aqueous solvents namely methanol, ethanol, propanol, butanol and pentanol were used as solvents. The effect of solvents on the film structure and morphology was studied. The structural, morphological, compositional and optical properties were studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDAX), and optical absorption measurement techniques

  10. NMR structural studies of intramolecular (Y+) sub n ter dot (R+) sub n (Y minus ) sub n DNA triplexes in solution: Imino and amino proton and nitrogen markers of Gter dot TA base triple formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, I.; de los Santos, C.; Patel, D.J. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Gao, Xiaolian (Glaxo Research Inst., Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)); Live, D. (California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena (United States))

    1991-09-17

    The authors reported previously on NMR studies of (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n}DNA triple helices containing one oligopurine strand (R){sub n} and two oligopyrimidine strands (Y){sub n} stabilized by T{center dot}AT and C{sup +}{center dot}GC base triples. Recently, it has been established that guanosine can recognize a thymidine{center dot}adenosine base pair to form a G{center dot}TA triple in an otherwise (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n} triple-helix motif. The present study extends the NMR research to the characterization of structural features of a 31-mer deoxyoligonucleotide that folds intramolecularly into a 7-mer (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n} triplex with the strands linked through two T{sub 5} loops and that contains a central G{center dot}TA triple flanked by T{center dot}AT triples. The NMR data are consistent with the proposed pairing alignment for the G{center dot}TA triple where the guanosine in an anti orientation pairs through a single hydrogen bond from one of its 2-amino protons to the 4-carbonyl group of thymidine in the Watson-Crick TA pair. They detect a set of NOEs between adjacent triples that establishes that the G{center dot}TA triple stacks between flanking T{center dot}AT triples in the G{center dot}TA triplex. These results demonstrate the capabilities of the NMR approach in monitoring individual base triples and their pairing alignments, as well as establishing that the G{center dot}TA triple can be readily accommodated in an otherwise intramolecular (Y+){sub n}{center dot}(R+){sub n}(Y{minus}){sub n} triple helix in solution.

  11. Three-dimensional nanoscale study of Al segregation and quantum dot formation in GaAs/AlGaAs core-shell nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, L.; Blum, I.; Vurpillot, F.; Rigutti, L., E-mail: lorenzo.rigutti@univ-rouen.fr [Groupe de Physique des Matériaux, UMR CNRS 6634, University and INSA of Rouen, Normandie University, 76800 St. Etienne du Rouvray (France); Fontana, Y.; Conesa-Boj, S.; Francaviglia, L.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Heiss, M.; Morral, A. Fontcuberta i [Laboratoire des Matériaux Semiconducteurs, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Arbiol, J. [Institut de Ciència de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Campus de la UAB, 08193 Bellaterra, CAT (Spain); Institució Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), 08010 Barcelona, CAT (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    GaAs/Al-GaAs core-shell nanowires fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy contain quantum confining structures susceptible of producing narrow photoluminescence (PL) and single photons. The nanoscale chemical mapping of these structures is analyzed in 3D by atom probe tomography (APT). The study allows us to confirm that Al atoms tend to segregate within the AlGaAs shells towards the vertices of the hexagons defining the nanowire cross section. We also find strong alloy fluctuations remaining AlGaAs shell, leading occasionally to the formation of quantum dots (QDs). The PL emission energies predicted in the framework of a 3D effective mass model for a QD analyzed by APT and the PL spectra measured on other nanowires from the same growth batch are consistent within the experimental uncertainties.

  12. Quadra-Quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules: Basic Nanostructures for Quantum Dot Cellular Automata Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called 'Droplet Epitaxy' has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390'C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7'8'10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200'C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or, which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  13. MAIL3.1 : a computer program generating cross section sets for SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suyama, Kenya; Komuro, Yuichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Takada, Tomoyuki; Kawasaki, Hiromitsu; Ouchi, Keisuke

    1998-02-01

    This report is a user`s manual of the computer program MAIL3.1 which generates various types of cross section sets for neutron transport programs such as SIMCRI, ANISN-JR, KENO IV, KENO V, MULTI-KENO, MULTI-KENO-2 and MULTI-KENO-3.0. MAIL3.1 is a revised version of MAIL3.0 that was opened in 1990. It has all of abilities of MAIL3.0 and has two more functions as shown in following. 1. AMPX-type cross section set generating function for KENO V. 2. Enhanced function for user of 16 group Hansen-Roach library. (author)

  14. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod “renewable surface” flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  15. Effect of Bi isovalent dopants on the formation of homogeneous coherently strained InAs quantum dots in GaAs matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The distribution of hydrostatic strains in Bi3+-doped InAs quantum dots embedded in a GaAs matrix are calculated in the context of the deformation-potential model. The dependences of strains in the material of spherical InAs quantum dots with substitutional (Bi → As) and interstitial (Bi) impurities on the quantum-dot size are derived. The qualitative correlation of the model with the experiment is discussed. The data on the effect of doping on the morphology of self-assembled InAs:Bi quantum dots in a GaAs matrix are obtained.

  16. Quadra-quantum Dots and Related Patterns of Quantum Dot Molecules:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somsak Panyakeow

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Laterally close-packed quantum dots (QDs called quantum dot molecules (QDMs are grown by modified molecular beam epitaxy (MBE. Quantum dots could be aligned and cross hatched. Quantum rings (QRs created from quantum dot transformation during thin or partial capping are used as templates for the formations of bi-quantum dot molecules (Bi-QDMs and quantum dot rings (QDRs. Preferable quantum dot nanostructure for quantum computation based on quantum dot cellular automata (QCA is laterally close-packed quantum dot molecules having four quantum dots at the corners of square configuration. These four quantum dot sets are called quadra-quantum dots (QQDs. Aligned quadra-quantum dots with two electron confinements work like a wire for digital information transmission by Coulomb repulsion force, which is fast and consumes little power. Combination of quadra-quantum dots in line and their cross-over works as logic gates and memory bits. Molecular Beam Epitaxial growth technique called ‘‘Droplet Epitaxy” has been developed for several quantum nanostructures such as quantum rings and quantum dot rings. Quantum rings are prepared by using 20 ML In-Ga (15:85 droplets deposited on a GaAs substrate at 390°C with a droplet growth rate of 1ML/s. Arsenic flux (7–8×10-6Torr is then exposed for InGaAs crystallization at 200°C for 5 min. During droplet epitaxy at a high droplet thickness and high temperature, out-diffusion from the centre of droplets occurs under anisotropic strain. This leads to quantum ring structures having non-uniform ring stripes and deep square-shaped nanoholes. Using these peculiar quantum rings as templates, four quantum dots situated at the corners of a square shape are regrown. Two of these four quantum dots are aligned either or , which are preferable crystallographic directions of quantum dot alignment in general.

  17. Formation and properties of epitaxial CdSe, ZnSe quantum dots. Conventional molecular beam epitaxy and related techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahapatra, Suddhasatta

    2008-01-16

    This thesis systematically investigates three such alternative approaches, along with conventional MBE, with emphasis on the formation-mechanism of QDs, and optimization of their morphological and optical attributes. it is shown here that no distinct 3D islands are formed in MBE growth of CdSe on ZnSe. While CdSe heteroepitaxy occurs in the multilayer-mode at T{sub G}=300 C, a reentrant recovery of the layer-by-layer mode is reported in this thesis, for growth at T{sub G}<{proportional_to}240 C. In the second variant technique, formation of large and distinct islands is demonstrated by deposition of amorphous selenium (a-Se) onto a 2D CdSe epilayer at room temperature and its subsequent desorption at a higher temperature (T{sub D}=230 C). The process steps of the third variant technique, developed in course of this work, are very similar to those of the previous one-the only alteration being the substitution of selenium with tellurium as the cap-forming-material. (orig.)

  18. Formation and properties of epitaxial CdSe, ZnSe quantum dots. Conventional molecular beam epitaxy and related techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis systematically investigates three such alternative approaches, along with conventional MBE, with emphasis on the formation-mechanism of QDs, and optimization of their morphological and optical attributes. it is shown here that no distinct 3D islands are formed in MBE growth of CdSe on ZnSe. While CdSe heteroepitaxy occurs in the multilayer-mode at TG=300 C, a reentrant recovery of the layer-by-layer mode is reported in this thesis, for growth at TGD=230 C). The process steps of the third variant technique, developed in course of this work, are very similar to those of the previous one-the only alteration being the substitution of selenium with tellurium as the cap-forming-material. (orig.)

  19. Dot1-dependent histone H3K79 methylation promotes the formation of meiotic double-strand breaks in the absence of histone H3K4 methylation in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bani Ismail

    Full Text Available Epigenetic marks such as histone modifications play roles in various chromosome dynamics in mitosis and meiosis. Methylation of histones H3 at positions K4 and K79 is involved in the initiation of recombination and the recombination checkpoint, respectively, during meiosis in the budding yeast. Set1 promotes H3K4 methylation while Dot1 promotes H3K79 methylation. In this study, we carried out detailed analyses of meiosis in mutants of the SET1 and DOT1 genes as well as methylation-defective mutants of histone H3. We confirmed the role of Set1-dependent H3K4 methylation in the formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs in meiosis for the initiation of meiotic recombination, and we showed the involvement of Dot1 (H3K79 methylation in DSB formation in the absence of Set1-dependent H3K4 methylation. In addition, we showed that the histone H3K4 methylation-defective mutants are defective in SC elongation, although they seem to have moderate reduction of DSBs. This suggests that high levels of DSBs mediated by histone H3K4 methylation promote SC elongation.

  20. Substitutional impurity in the graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierański, K.; Szatkowski, J.

    2015-09-01

    The process of formation of the localized defect states due to substitutional impurity in sp2-bonded graphene quantum dot is considered using a simple tight-binding-type calculation. We took into account the interaction of the quantum dot atoms surrounding the substitutional impurity from the second row of elements. To saturate the external dangling sp2 orbitals of the carbon additionally 18 hydrogen atoms were introduced. The chemical formula of the quantum dot is H18C51X, where X is the symbol of substitutional atom. The position of the localized levels is determined relative to the host-atoms (C) εp energies. We focused on the effect of substitutional doping by the B, N and O on the eigenstate energies and on the total energy change of the graphene dots including for O the effect of lattice distorsion. We conclude that B, N, and O can form stable substitutional defects in graphene quantum dot.

  1. A colloidal quantum dot spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Jie; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-07-01

    Spectroscopy is carried out in almost every field of science, whenever light interacts with matter. Although sophisticated instruments with impressive performance characteristics are available, much effort continues to be invested in the development of miniaturized, cheap and easy-to-use systems. Current microspectrometer designs mostly use interference filters and interferometric optics that limit their photon efficiency, resolution and spectral range. Here we show that many of these limitations can be overcome by replacing interferometric optics with a two-dimensional absorptive filter array composed of colloidal quantum dots. Instead of measuring different bands of a spectrum individually after introducing temporal or spatial separations with gratings or interference-based narrowband filters, a colloidal quantum dot spectrometer measures a light spectrum based on the wavelength multiplexing principle: multiple spectral bands are encoded and detected simultaneously with one filter and one detector, respectively, with the array format allowing the process to be efficiently repeated many times using different filters with different encoding so that sufficient information is obtained to enable computational reconstruction of the target spectrum. We illustrate the performance of such a quantum dot microspectrometer, made from 195 different types of quantum dots with absorption features that cover a spectral range of 300 nanometres, by measuring shifts in spectral peak positions as small as one nanometre. Given this performance, demonstrable avenues for further improvement, the ease with which quantum dots can be processed and integrated, and their numerous finely tuneable bandgaps that cover a broad spectral range, we expect that quantum dot microspectrometers will be useful in applications where minimizing size, weight, cost and complexity of the spectrometer are critical.

  2. Tunable light emission by exciplex state formation between hybrid halide perovskite and core/shell quantum dots: Implications in advanced LEDs and photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rafael S; de la Fuente, Mauricio Solis; Suarez, Isaac; Muñoz-Matutano, Guillermo; Martinez-Pastor, Juan P; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We report the first observation of exciplex state electroluminescence due to carrier injection between the hybrid lead halide perovskite (MAPbI3-xClx) and quantum dots (core/shell PbS/CdS). Single layers of perovskite (PS) and quantum dots (QDs) have been produced by solution processing methods, and their photoluminescent properties are compared to those of bilayer samples in both PS/QD and QD/PS configurations. Exciplex emission at lower energies than the band gap of both PS and QD has been detected. The exciplex emission wavelength of this mixed system can be simply tuned by controlling the QD size. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been fabricated using those configurations, which provide light emission with considerably low turn-on potential. The "color" of the LED can also be tuned by controlling the applied bias. The presence of the exciplex state PS and QDs opens up a broad range of possibilities with important implications not only in tunable LEDs but also in the preparation of intermediate band gap photovoltaic devices with the potentiality of surpassing the Shockley-Queisser limit.

  3. Tunable light emission by exciplex state formation between hybrid halide perovskite and core/shell quantum dots: Implications in advanced LEDs and photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Rafael S; de la Fuente, Mauricio Solis; Suarez, Isaac; Muñoz-Matutano, Guillermo; Martinez-Pastor, Juan P; Mora-Sero, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    We report the first observation of exciplex state electroluminescence due to carrier injection between the hybrid lead halide perovskite (MAPbI3-xClx) and quantum dots (core/shell PbS/CdS). Single layers of perovskite (PS) and quantum dots (QDs) have been produced by solution processing methods, and their photoluminescent properties are compared to those of bilayer samples in both PS/QD and QD/PS configurations. Exciplex emission at lower energies than the band gap of both PS and QD has been detected. The exciplex emission wavelength of this mixed system can be simply tuned by controlling the QD size. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) have been fabricated using those configurations, which provide light emission with considerably low turn-on potential. The "color" of the LED can also be tuned by controlling the applied bias. The presence of the exciplex state PS and QDs opens up a broad range of possibilities with important implications not only in tunable LEDs but also in the preparation of intermediate band gap photovoltaic devices with the potentiality of surpassing the Shockley-Queisser limit. PMID:26844299

  4. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...

  5. The formation and transformation of the spatial weak-light bright and dark solitons in a quantum dot molecule with the interdot tunneling coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kuanhong; Wang, Denglong; She, Yanchao; Luo, Xiaoqin

    2013-11-01

    We study analytically the properties of the optical absorption and the spatial weak-light solitons in a quantum dot molecule system with the interdot tunneling coupling (ITC). It is shown that, for the linear case, there exists tunneling induced transparency (TIT) in the context of a weak ITC, while the TIT can be replaced by Autler-Townes splitting in the presence of a strong ITC. For the nonlinear case, it is probable to realize the spatial optical solitons even under weak light intensity. Interestingly, we find that there appears transformation behavior between the bright and dark solitons by properly turning both the ITC strength and the detuning of the probe field. Meanwhile, the transformation condition of the bright and dark solitons is obtained. Additionally it is also found that the amplitude of the solitons first descends and then rises with the increasing of ITC strength. Our results may have potential applications for nonlinear optical experiments and optical telecommunication engineering in solid systems.

  6. Quantum dot spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan

    Semiconductor quantum dots ("solid-state atoms") are promising candidates for quantum computers and future electronic and optoelectronic devices. Quantum dots are zero-dimensional electronic systems and therefore have discrete energy levels, similar to atoms or molecules. The size distribution...

  7. Quantum Dots: Theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukmirovic, Nenad; Wang, Lin-Wang

    2009-11-10

    This review covers the description of the methodologies typically used for the calculation of the electronic structure of self-assembled and colloidal quantum dots. These are illustrated by the results of their application to a selected set of physical effects in quantum dots.

  8. Ultrasmall silicon quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwanenburg, F.A.; Van Loon, A.A.; Steele, G.A.; Rijmenam, C.E.W.M.; Balder, T.; Fang, Y.; Lieber, C.M.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.

    2009-01-01

    We report the realization of extremely small single quantum dots in p-type silicon nanowires, defined by Schottky tunnel barriers with Ni and NiSi contacts. Despite their ultrasmall size the NiSi–Si–NiSi nanowire quantum dots readily allow spectroscopy of at least ten consecutive holes, and addition

  9. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placidi, E., E-mail: ernesto.placidi@ism.cnr.it; Arciprete, F. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F. [Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Magri, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche (FIM), Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, and Centro S3 CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Via Campi 213/A, 4100 Modena (Italy); Scuderi, M.; Nicotra, G. [CNR-IMM, Strada VIII, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-09-15

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  10. LUMINESCENCE OF CADMIUM SULFIDE QUANTUM DOTS IN FLUOROPHOSPHATE GLASSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. O. Lipatova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide quantum dots are perspective materials in optics, medicine, biology and optoelectronics. Fluorophosphate glasses, doped with cadmium sulfide quantum dots, were examined in the paper. Heat treatment led to the formation of quantum dots with diameters equal to 2.8 nm, 3.0 nm and 3.8 nm. In view of such changes in the quantum dots size the fundamental absorption edge shift and the luminescence band are being displaced to the long wavelengths. Luminescence lifetime has been found to be dependent on the registration wavelength in the range from 450 to 700 nm. Obtained fluorophosphate glasses with CdS quantum dots can find their application as fluorescent materials with intensive luminescence band and long excited-state natural lifetime.

  11. Synthesis of biocompatible multicolor luminescent carbon dots for bioimaging applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagaprasad Puvvada, B N Prashanth Kumar, Suraj Konar, Himani Kalita, Mahitosh Mandal and Amita Pathak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Water-soluble carbon dots (C-dots were prepared through microwave-assisted pyrolysis of an aqueous solution of dextrin in the presence of sulfuric acid. The C-dots produced showed multicolor luminescence in the entire visible range, without adding any surface-passivating agent. X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy studies revealed the graphitic nature of the carbon and the presence of hydrophilic groups on the surface, respectively. The formation of uniformly distributed C-dots and their luminescent properties were, respectively, revealed from transmission electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy. The biocompatible nature of C-dots was confirmed by a cytotoxicity assay on MDA-MB-468 cells and their cellular uptake was assessed through a localization study.

  12. RKKY interaction in a chirally coupled double quantum dot system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heine, A. W.; Tutuc, D.; Haug, R. J. [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Appelstr. 2, 30167 Hannover (Germany); Zwicknagl, G. [Institut für Mathematische Physik, TU Braunschweig, Mendelssohnstr. 3, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Schuh, D. [Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätstr. 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Wegscheider, W. [Laboratorium für Festkörperphysik, ETH Zürich, Schafmattstr. 16, 8093 Zürich, Switzerland and Institut für Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universität Regensburg, Universitätstr. 31, 93053 Regens (Germany)

    2013-12-04

    The competition between the Kondo effect and the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yoshida (RKKY) interaction is investigated in a double quantum dots system, coupled via a central open conducting region. A perpendicular magnetic field induces the formation of Landau Levels which in turn give rise to the so-called Kondo chessboard pattern in the transport through the quantum dots. The two quantum dots become therefore chirally coupled via the edge channels formed in the open conducting area. In regions where both quantum dots exhibit Kondo transport the presence of the RKKY exchange interaction is probed by an analysis of the temperature dependence. The thus obtained Kondo temperature of one dot shows an abrupt increase at the onset of Kondo transport in the other, independent of the magnetic field polarity, i.e. edge state chirality in the central region.

  13. Graphene quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Güçlü, Alev Devrim; Korkusinski, Marek; Hawrylak, Pawel

    2014-01-01

    This book reflects the current status of theoretical and experimental research of graphene based nanostructures, in particular quantum dots, at a level accessible to young researchers, graduate students, experimentalists and theorists. It presents the current state of research of graphene quantum dots, a single or few monolayer thick islands of graphene. It introduces the reader to the electronic and optical properties of graphite, intercalated graphite and graphene, including Dirac fermions, Berry's phase associated with sublattices and valley degeneracy, covers single particle properties of

  14. Entanglement creation in semiconductor quantum dot charge qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Buscemi, Fabrizio; Bertoni, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    We study theoretically the appearance of quantum correlations in two- and three-electron scattering in single and double dots. The key role played by transport resonances into entanglement formation between the single-particle states is shown. Both reflected and transmitted components of the scattered particle wavefunction are used to evaluate the quantum correlations between the incident carrier and the bound particle(s) in the dots. Our investigation provides a guideline for the analysis of decoherence effects due to the Coulomb scattering in semiconductor quantum dots structures.

  15. Optical properties of charged semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Praket P.

    The effect of n-type doping on the luminescence properties of II-VI quantum dots is studied. The addition of two shells of CdS on CdSe quantum dots prevents the creation of surface traps and makes the system stable under reducing environment. The injection of electrons into films of quantum dots leads to lower photoluminescence (PL) efficiency, with the extent of quenching dependent on both the number and the quantum states of the spectator charges in the nanocrystal. It is found that a 1Pe electron is an eightfold better PL quencher than the 1Se electron. Reduced threshold for stimulated emission is also observed in doped CdSe/CdS films. Time resolved photoluminescence measurements are used to extract the recombination rates of a charged exciton, called trion. It is observed that the negative trion has a radiative rate ˜2.2 +/- 0.4x faster than a neutral exciton, while its non-radiative recombination rate is slower than the biexciton non-radiative recombination rate by a factor of 7.5 +/- 1.7. The knowledge of the recombination rates of the trion enables us to calculate the quantum yield of a negative trion to be ˜10% for the nanocrystals investigated in our work. This is larger than the off state quantum yield from a single quantum dot photoluminescence trajectory and eliminates the formation of negative trion as the possible reason for the PL blinking of single quantum dots. Single quantum dot electrochemistry has also been achieved. It is shown that by varying the Fermi level of the system electrons can be reversibly injected into and extracted out of single CdSe/CdS and CdSe/ZnS nanoparticles to modulate the photoluminescence.

  16. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  17. Carbon nanotube quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sapmaz, S.

    2006-01-01

    Low temperature electron transport measurements on individual single wall carbon nanotubes are described in this thesis. Carbon nanotubes are small hollow cylinders made entirely out of carbon atoms. At low temperatures (below ~10 K) finite length nanotubes form quantum dots. Because of its small si

  18. Colloidal Double Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelboim, Ayelet; Meir, Noga; Kazes, Miri; Oron, Dan

    2016-05-17

    Pairs of coupled quantum dots with controlled coupling between the two potential wells serve as an extremely rich system, exhibiting a plethora of optical phenomena that do not exist in each of the isolated constituent dots. Over the past decade, coupled quantum systems have been under extensive study in the context of epitaxially grown quantum dots (QDs), but only a handful of examples have been reported with colloidal QDs. This is mostly due to the difficulties in controllably growing nanoparticles that encapsulate within them two dots separated by an energetic barrier via colloidal synthesis methods. Recent advances in colloidal synthesis methods have enabled the first clear demonstrations of colloidal double quantum dots and allowed for the first exploratory studies into their optical properties. Nevertheless, colloidal double QDs can offer an extended level of structural manipulation that allows not only for a broader range of materials to be used as compared with epitaxially grown counterparts but also for more complex control over the coupling mechanisms and coupling strength between two spatially separated quantum dots. The photophysics of these nanostructures is governed by the balance between two coupling mechanisms. The first is via dipole-dipole interactions between the two constituent components, leading to energy transfer between them. The second is associated with overlap of excited carrier wave functions, leading to charge transfer and multicarrier interactions between the two components. The magnitude of the coupling between the two subcomponents is determined by the detailed potential landscape within the nanocrystals (NCs). One of the hallmarks of double QDs is the observation of dual-color emission from a single nanoparticle, which allows for detailed spectroscopy of their properties down to the single particle level. Furthermore, rational design of the two coupled subsystems enables one to tune the emission statistics from single photon

  19. Electron correlations in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Tipton, D L J

    2001-01-01

    Quantum dot structures confine electrons in a small region of space. Some properties of semiconductor quantum dots, such as the discrete energy levels and shell filling effects visible in addition spectra, have analogies to those of atoms and indeed dots are sometimes referred to as 'artificial atoms'. However, atoms and dots show some fundamental differences due to electron correlations. For real atoms, the kinetic energy of electrons dominates over their mutual Coulomb repulsion energy and for this reason the independent electron approximation works well. For quantum dots the confining potential may be shallower than that of real atoms leading to lower electron densities and a dominance of mutual Coulomb repulsion over kinetic energy. In this strongly correlated regime the independent electron picture leads to qualitatively incorrect results. This thesis concentrates on few-electron quantum dots in the strongly correlated regime both for quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional dots in a square confining p...

  20. Fuzzy Dot Structure of BG-algebras

    OpenAIRE

    Tapan Senapati; Monoranjan Bhowmik; Madhumangal Pal

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the notions of fuzzy dot subalgebras is introduced together with fuzzy normal dot subalgebras and fuzzy dot ideals of BG-algebras. The homomorphic image and inverse image are investigated in fuzzy dot subalgebras and fuzzy dot ideals of BG-algebras. Also, the notion of fuzzy relations on the family of fuzzy dot subalgebras and fuzzy dot ideals of BG-algebras are introduced with some related properties.

  1. Optically induced magnetization in diluted magnetic quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Peter, A. [Government Arts College, Melur 625 106, Madurai (India)], E-mail: a_johnpeter@rediffmail.com; Lily Mary Eucharista, K. [Arul Anandar College, Karumathur 625 514, Madurai (India)

    2009-03-15

    We report the effect of intense laser field on donor impurities in a semimagnetic Cd{sub 1-x{sub in}}Mn{sub x{sub in}}Te/Cd{sub 1-x{sub out}}Mn{sub x{sub out}}Te quantum dot. The spin polaronic energy of different Mn{sup 2+} is evaluated for different dot radii using a mean field theory in the presence of laser field. Magnetization is calculated for various concentrations of Mn{sup 2+} ions with different dot sizes. Significant magnetization of Mn spins can be obtained through the formation of polarized exciton magnetic polarons (EMPs). A rapid decrease of the laser dressed donor ionization energy for different values of dot sizes with increasing field intensity is predicted. Also, it is found that the polarization of EMPs increases rapidly at higher excitation energies.

  2. Large-area ordered Ge-Si compound quantum dot molecules on dot-patterned Si (001) substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Hui; Zhou, Tong; Wang, Shuguang; Fan, Yongliang; Zhong, Zhenyang

    2014-08-29

    We report on the formation of large-area ordered Ge-Si compound quantum dot molecules (CQDMs) in a combination of nanosphere lithography and self-assembly. Truncated-pyramid-like Si dots with {11n} facets are readily formed, which are spatially ordered in a large area with controlled period and size. Each Si dot induces four self-assembled Ge-rich dots at its base edges that can be fourfold symmetric along directions. A model based on surface chemical potential accounts well for these phenomena. Our results disclose the critical effect of surface curvature on the diffusion and the aggregation of Ge adatoms and shed new light on the unique features and the inherent mechanism of self-assembled QDs on patterned substrates. Such a configuration of one Si QD surrounded by fourfold symmetric Ge-rich QDs can be seen as a CQDM with unique features, which will have potential applications in novel devices. PMID:25078348

  3. Fabrication and evaluation of series-triple quantum dots by thermal oxidation of silicon nanowire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Takafumi, E-mail: takafumi-uchida@frontier.hokudai.ac.jp; Jo, Mingyu; Tsurumaki-Fukuchi, Atsushi; Arita, Masashi; Takahashi, Yasuo [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo, 060-0814 Japan (Japan); Fujiwara, Akira [NTT Basic Research Laboratories, NTT Corporation, 3-1 Morinosato Wakamiya, Atsugi, 243-0198 Japan (Japan)

    2015-11-15

    Series-connected triple quantum dots were fabricated by a simple two-step oxidation technique using the pattern-dependent oxidation of a silicon nanowire and an additional oxidation of the nanowire through the gap of the fine gates attached to the nanowire. The characteristics of multi-dot single-electron devices are obtained. The formation of each quantum dot beneath an attached gate is confirmed by analyzing the electrical characteristics and by evaluating the gate capacitances between all pairings of gates and quantum dots. Because the gate electrode is automatically attached to each dot, the device structure benefits from scalability. This technique promises integrability of multiple quantum dots with individual control gates.

  4. Quantum Dot Sensitized Photoelectrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas Nann; Thomas J. Macdonald

    2011-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are promising alternatives to organic dyes as sensitisers for photocatalytic electrodes. This review article provides an overview of the current state of the art in this area. More specifically, different types of QDs with a special focus on heavy-metal free QDs and the methods for preparation and adsorption onto metal oxide electrodes (especially titania and zinc oxide) are discussed. Eventually, the key areas of necessary improvements are identified and assessed.

  5. Quantum Dot Sensitized Photoelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Nann

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantum Dots (QDs are promising alternatives to organic dyes as sensitisers for photocatalytic electrodes. This review article provides an overview of the current state of the art in this area. More specifically, different types of QDs with a special focus on heavy-metal free QDs and the methods for preparation and adsorption onto metal oxide electrodes (especially titania and zinc oxide are discussed. Eventually, the key areas of necessary improvements are identified and assessed.

  6. Plasmonic fluorescent quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Yongdong; Gao, Xiaohu

    2009-01-01

    Combining multiple discrete components into a single multifunctional nanoparticle could be useful in a variety of applications. Retaining the unique optical and electrical properties of each component after nanoscale integration is, however, a long-standing problem1,2. It is particularly difficult when trying to combine fluorophores such as semiconductor quantum dots with plasmonic materials such as gold, because gold and other metals can quench the fluorescence3,4. So far, the combination of...

  7. Nanocrystal quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Klimov, Victor I

    2010-01-01

    ""Soft"" Chemical Synthesis and Manipulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystals, J.A. Hollingsworth and V.I. Klimov Electronic Structure in Semiconductor Nanocrystals: Optical Experiment, D.J. NorrisFine Structure and Polarization Properties of Band-Edge Excitons in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, A.L. EfrosIntraband Spectroscopy and Dynamics of Colloidal Semiconductor Quantum Dots, P. Guyot-Sionnest, M. Shim, and C. WangMultiexciton Phenomena in Semiconductor Nanocrystals, V.I. KlimovOptical Dynamics in Single Semiconductor Quantum Do

  8. Quantum dot nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Henini

    2002-06-01

    These sophisticated technologies for the growth of high quality epitaxial layers of compound semiconductor materials on single crystal semiconductor substrates are becoming increasingly important for the development of the semiconductor electronics industry. This article is intended to convey the flavor of the subject by focusing on the technology and applications of self-assembled quantum dots (QDs and to give an introduction to some of the essential characteristics.

  9. Inter-dot coupling effects on transport through correlated parallel coupled quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shyam Chand; G Rajput; K C Sharma; P K Ahluwalia

    2009-05-01

    Transport through symmetric parallel coupled quantum dot system has been studied, using non-equilibrium Green function formalism. The inter-dot tunnelling with on-dot and inter-dot Coulomb repulsion is included. The transmission coefficient and Landaur–Buttiker like current formula are shown in terms of internal states of quantum dots. The effect of inter-dot tunnelling on transport properties has been explored. Results, in intermediate inter-dot coupling regime show signatures of merger of two dots to form a single composite dot and in strong coupling regime the behaviour of the system resembles the two decoupled dots.

  10. Intrinsic Photoluminescence Emission from Subdomained Graphene Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyewon; Chang, Yun Hee; Song, Sung Ho; Lee, Eui-Sup; Jin, Sung Hwan; Park, Chanae; Lee, Jinsup; Kim, Bo Hyun; Kang, Hee Jae; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2016-07-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) origin of bright blue emission arising from intrinsic states in graphene quantum dots (GQDs) is investigated. The bright PL of intercalatively acquired GQDs is attributed to favorably formed subdomains composed of four to seven carbon hexagons. Random and harsh oxidation which hinders the energetically favorable formation of subdomains causes weak and redshifted PL. PMID:27153519

  11. Intracellular distribution of nontargeted quantum dots after natural uptake and microinjection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damalakiene L

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Leona Damalakiene,1 Vitalijus Karabanovas,2 Saulius Bagdonas,1 Mindaugas Valius,3 Ricardas Rotomskis1,21Biophotonics Group, Laser Research Center, Faculty of Physics, 2Biomedical Physics Laboratory, Institute of Oncology, 3Proteomics Center, Institute of Biochemistry, Vilnius University, Vilnius, LithuaniaBackground: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanism of natural uptake of nonfunctionalized quantum dots in comparison with microinjected quantum dots by focusing on their time-dependent accumulation and intracellular localization in different cell lines.Methods: The accumulation dynamics of nontargeted CdSe/ZnS carboxyl-coated quantum dots (emission peak 625 nm was analyzed in NIH3T3, MCF-7, and HepG2 cells by applying the methods of confocal and steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. Intracellular colocalization of the quantum dots was investigated by staining with Lysotracker®.Results: The uptake of quantum dots into cells was dramatically reduced at a low temperature (4°C, indicating that the process is energy-dependent. The uptake kinetics and imaging of intracellular localization of quantum dots revealed three accumulation stages of carboxyl-coated quantum dots at 37°C, ie, a plateau stage, growth stage, and a saturation stage, which comprised four morphological phases: adherence to the cell membrane; formation of granulated clusters spread throughout the cytoplasm; localization of granulated clusters in the perinuclear region; and formation of multivesicular body-like structures and their redistribution in the cytoplasm. Diverse quantum dots containing intracellular vesicles in the range of approximately 0.5–8 µm in diameter were observed in the cytoplasm, but none were found in the nucleus. Vesicles containing quantum dots formed multivesicular body-like structures in NIH3T3 cells after 24 hours of incubation, which were Lysotracker-negative in serum-free medium and Lysotracker-positive in complete medium. The

  12. Templating growth of gold nanostructures with a CdSe quantum dot array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Neelima; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Yao, Yuan; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Yu, Shun; Roth, Stephan V.; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2015-05-01

    In optoelectronic devices based on quantum dot arrays, thin nanolayers of gold are preferred as stable metal contacts and for connecting recombination centers. The optimal morphology requirements are uniform arrays with precisely controlled positions and sizes over a large area with long range ordering since this strongly affects device performance. To understand the development of gold layer nanomorphology, the detailed mechanism of structure formation are probed with time-resolved grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering (GISAXS) during gold sputter deposition. Gold is sputtered on a CdSe quantum dot array with a characteristic quantum dot spacing of ~7 nm. In the initial stages of gold nanostructure growth, a preferential deposition of gold on top of quantum dots occurs. Thus, the quantum dots act as nucleation sites for gold growth. In later stages, the gold nanoparticles surrounding the quantum dots undergo a coarsening to form a complete layer comprised of gold-dot clusters. Next, growth proceeds dominantly via vertical growth of gold on these gold-dot clusters to form an gold capping layer. In this capping layer, a shift of the cluster boundaries due to ripening is found. Thus, a templating of gold on a CdSe quantum dot array is feasible at low gold coverage.

  13. Engineering the hole confinement for CdTe-based quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłopotowski, Ł.; Wojnar, P.; Kret, S.; Parlińska-Wojtan, M.; Fronc, K.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate an efficient method to engineer the quantum confinement in a system of two quantum dots grown in a vertical stack. We achieve this by using materials with a different lattice constant for the growth of the outer and inner barriers. We monitor the resulting dot morphology with transmission electron microscopy studies and correlate the results with ensemble quantum dot photoluminescence. Furthermore, we embed the double quantum dots into diode structures and study photoluminescence as a function of bias voltage. We show that in properly engineered structures, it is possible to achieve a resonance of the hole states by tuning the energy levels with electric field. At the resonance, we observe signatures of a formation of a molecular state, hybridized over the two dots.

  14. Engineering the hole confinement for CdTe-based quantum dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kłopotowski, Ł., E-mail: lukasz.klopotowski@ifpan.edu.pl; Wojnar, P.; Kret, S.; Fronc, K.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Parlińska-Wojtan, M. [Facility for Electron Microscopy and Sample Preparation, Center for Microelectronics and Nanotechnology, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, University of Rzeszów, ul. Pigonia 1, 35-959 Rzeszów (Poland)

    2015-06-14

    We demonstrate an efficient method to engineer the quantum confinement in a system of two quantum dots grown in a vertical stack. We achieve this by using materials with a different lattice constant for the growth of the outer and inner barriers. We monitor the resulting dot morphology with transmission electron microscopy studies and correlate the results with ensemble quantum dot photoluminescence. Furthermore, we embed the double quantum dots into diode structures and study photoluminescence as a function of bias voltage. We show that in properly engineered structures, it is possible to achieve a resonance of the hole states by tuning the energy levels with electric field. At the resonance, we observe signatures of a formation of a molecular state, hybridized over the two dots.

  15. Decoherence and Entanglement Simulation in a Model of Quantum Neural Network Based on Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altaisky Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of the simulation of a quantum neural network based on quantum dots using numerical method of path integral calculation. In the proposed implementation of the quantum neural network using an array of single-electron quantum dots with dipole-dipole interaction, the coherence is shown to survive up to 0.1 nanosecond in time and up to the liquid nitrogen temperature of 77K.We study the quantum correlations between the quantum dots by means of calculation of the entanglement of formation in a pair of quantum dots on the GaAs based substrate with dot size of 100 ÷ 101 nanometer and interdot distance of 101 ÷ 102 nanometers order.

  16. Quantum dots: Rethinking the electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Dimple

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate theoretically that the Quantum dots are quite interesting for the electronics industry. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometer-scale crystals, which have unique photo physical, quantum electrical properties, size-dependent optical properties, There small size means that electrons do not have to travel as far as with larger particles, thus electronic devices can operate faster. Cheaper than modern commercial solar cells while making use of a wider variety of photon energies, including "waste heat" from the sun's energy. Quantum dots can be used in tandem cells, which are multi junction photovoltaic cells or in the intermediate band setup. PbSe (lead selenide) is commonly used in quantum dot solar cells.

  17. Photonics of shungite quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Razbirin, Boris S.; Rozhkova, Natalia N.; Sheka, Elena F.

    2014-01-01

    Shungite quantum dots are associated with nanosize fragments of reduced graphene oxide similarly to synthetic graphene quantum dots thus forming a common class of GQDs. Colloidal dispersions of powdered shungite in water, carbon tetrachloride, and toluene form the ground for the GQD photonic peculiarities manifestation. Morphological study shows a steady trend of GQDs to form fractals and a drastic change in the colloids fractal structure caused by solvent was reliably established. Spectral s...

  18. Spin pumping through quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Rojek, Stephan; Governale, Michele; König, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    We propose schemes for generating spin currents into a semiconductor by adiabatic or non-adiabatic pumping of electrons through interacting quantum dots. The appeal of such schemes lies in the possibility to tune the pumping characteristics via gate voltages that control the properties of the quantum dot. The calculations are based on a systematic perturbation expansion in the tunnel-coupling strength and the pumping frequency, expressed within a diagrammatic real-time technique. Special focu...

  19. Fuzzy dot ideals and fuzzy dot H-ideals of BCH-algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Jia-yin

    2008-01-01

    The notions of fuzzy dot ideals and fuzzy dot H-ideals in BCH-algebras are intro duced,several appropriate examples are provided,and their some properties are investigated.The relations among fuzzy ideal,fuzzy H-ideal,fuzzy dot ideal and fuzzy dot H-ideals in BCH algebras are discussed,several equivalent depictions of fuzzy dot ideal are obtained. How to deal with the homomorphic image and inverse image of fuzzy dot ideals (fuzzy dot H-ideals) are studied. The relations between a fuzzy dot ideal (fuzzy dot H-ideal) in BCH-algebras and a fuzzy dot ideal (fuzzy dot H-ideal) in the product algebra of BCH-algebras are given.

  20. A high quality liquid-type quantum dot white light-emitting diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sher, Chin-Wei; Lin, Chin-Hao; Lin, Huang-Yu; Lin, Chien-Chung; Huang, Che-Hsuan; Chen, Kuo-Ju; Li, Jie-Ru; Wang, Kuan-Yu; Tu, Hsien-Hao; Fu, Chien-Chung; Kuo, Hao-Chung

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrates a novel package design to store colloidal quantum dots in liquid format and integrate them with a standard LED. The high efficiency and high quality color performance at a neutral white correlated color temperature is demonstrated. The experimental results indicate that the liquid-type quantum dot white light-emitting diode (LQD WLED) is highly efficient and reliable. The luminous efficiency and color rendering index (CRI) of the LQD WLED can reach 271 lm Wop-1 and 95, respectively. Moreover, a glass box is employed to prevent humidity and oxygen erosion. With this encapsulation design, our quantum dot box can survive over 1000 hours of storage time.

  1. Single to quadruple quantum dots with tunable tunnel couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takakura, T.; Noiri, A.; Obata, T.; Yoneda, J.; Yoshida, K. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Otsuka, T.; Tarucha, S. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN, Center for Emergent Matter Science, 3-1 Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2014-03-17

    We prepare a gate-defined quadruple quantum dot to study the gate-tunability of single to quadruple quantum dots with finite inter-dot tunnel couplings. The measured charging energies of various double dots suggest that the dot size is governed by the gate geometry. For the triple and quadruple dots, we study the gate-tunable inter-dot tunnel couplings. For the triple dot, we find that the effective tunnel coupling between side dots significantly depends on the alignment of the center dot potential. These results imply that the present quadruple dot has a gate performance relevant for implementing spin-based four-qubits with controllable exchange couplings.

  2. Studies on formation and structures of ultrafine Cu precipitates in Fe-Cu model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels using positron quantum dot confinement in the precipitates by their positron affinity. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H11-034 (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Masayuki; Nagai, Yasuyoshi; Tang, Zheng; Yubuta, Kunio [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Inst. for Materials Research; Suzuki, Masahide [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    Positron annihilation experiments on Fe-Cu model dilute alloys of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been performed after neutron irradiation in JMTR. Nanovoids whose inner surfaces were covered by Cu atoms were clearly observed. The nanovoids transformed to ultrafine Cu precipitates by dissociating their vacancies after annealing at around 400degC. The nanovoids and the ultrafine Cu precipitates are strongly suggested to be responsible for irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Effects of Ni, Mn and P addition on the nanovoid and Cu precipitate formations were also studied. The nanovoid formation was enhanced by Ni and P, but suppressed by Mn. The Cu precipitates after annealing around 400degC were almost free from these doping elements and hence were pure Cu in the chemical composition. Furthermore the Fermi surface of the 'embedded' Cu precipitates with a body centered cubic crystal structure was obtained from two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) in a Fe-Cu single crystal and was agreed well with that from a band structure calculation. Theoretical calculation of positron confinement in Fe-Cu model alloys showed that a positron quantum dot state induced by positron affinity is attained for the embedded precipitates larger than 1 nm. A new position sensitive detector with a function of one dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (1D-ACAR) has been developed that enables high resolution experiments over wide ranges of momentum distribution. (author)

  3. Quantum and classical thermoelectric transport in quantum dot nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jun; Yang, Ronggui

    2011-10-01

    Quantum dot nanocomposites are potentially high-efficiency thermoelectric materials, which could outperform superlattices and random nanocomposites in terms of manufacturing cost-effectiveness and material properties because of the reduction of thermal conductivity due to the phonon-interface scattering, the enhancement of Seebeck coefficient due to the formation of minibands, and the enhancement of electrical conductivity due to the phonon-bottleneck effect in electron-phonon scattering for quantum-confined electrons. In this paper, we investigate the thermoelectric transport properties of quantum dot nanocomposites through a two-channel transport model that includes the transport of quantum-confined electrons through the hopping mechanism and the semiclassical transport of bulk-like electrons. For the quantum-confined electrons whose wave functions are confined in the quantum dots with overlapping tail extending to the matrix, we develop a tight-binding model together with the Kubo formula and the Green's function method to describe the transport processes of these electrons. The formation of minibands due to the quantum confinement and the phonon-bottleneck effect on carrier-phonon scattering are considered. For transport of bulk-like electrons, a Boltzmann-transport-equation-based semiclassical model is used to describe the multiband transport processes of carriers. The intrinsic carrier scatterings as well as the carrier-interface scattering of these bulk-like electrons are considered. We then apply the two-channel transport model to predict thermoelectric transport properties of n-type PbSe/PbTe quantum dot nanocomposites with PbSe quantum dots uniformly embedded in the PbTe matrix. The dependence of thermoelectric transport coefficients on the size of quantum dots, interdot distance, doping concentration, and temperature are studied in detail. Due to the formation of minibands and the phonon-bottleneck effect on carrier-phonon scattering, we show that

  4. Three-Dimensional Dissipative Optical Solitons in a Dielectric Medium with Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gubin M.Yu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider the problem of formation of three-dimensional spatio-temporal dissipative solitons (laser bullets in a dense ensemble of two-level quantum dots. The principal possibility of effective laser bullets generation in an all-dielectric metamaterials with quantum dots is shown. The phenomenon arises due to the simultaneous appearance of strong local field effects and significant corrections to diffraction effects during the propagation of short optical pulses in such medium.

  5. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Faramarz Farahi; José Luís Santos; Tito Trindade; Manuel António Martins; Pedro Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties that make them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence based bioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application of quantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given to configurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in sol...

  6. Quantum-dot emitters in photonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Stobbe, Søren; Lodahl, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The spontaneous emission from self-assembled semiconductor quantum dots is strongly influenced by the environment in which they are placed. This can be used to determine fundamental optical properties of the quantum dots as well as to manipulate and control the quantum-dot emission itself....

  7. Beer's law in semiconductor quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Adamashvili, G T

    2010-01-01

    The propagation of a coherent optical linear wave in an ensemble of semiconductor quantum dots is considered. It is shown that a distribution of transition dipole moments of the quantum dots changes significantly the polarization and Beer's absorption length of the ensemble of quantum dots. Explicit analytical expressions for these quantities are presented.

  8. Crystal structure of Legionella DotD: insights into the relationship between type IVB and type II/III secretion systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noboru Nakano

    Full Text Available The Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system (T4BSS is a pivotal determinant of Legionella pneumophila pathogenesis. L. pneumophila translocate more than 100 effector proteins into host cytoplasm using Dot/Icm T4BSS, modulating host cellular functions to establish a replicative niche within host cells. The T4BSS core complex spanning the inner and outer membranes is thought to be made up of at least five proteins: DotC, DotD, DotF, DotG and DotH. DotH is the outer membrane protein; its targeting depends on lipoproteins DotC and DotD. However, the core complex structure and assembly mechanism are still unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of DotD at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of DotD is distinct from that of VirB7, the outer membrane lipoprotein of the type IVA secretion system. In contrast, the C-terminal domain of DotD is remarkably similar to the N-terminal subdomain of secretins, the integral outer membrane proteins that form substrate conduits for the type II and the type III secretion systems (T2SS and T3SS. A short β-segment in the otherwise disordered N-terminal region, located on the hydrophobic cleft of the C-terminal domain, is essential for outer membrane targeting of DotH and Dot/Icm T4BSS core complex formation. These findings uncover an intriguing link between T4BSS and T2SS/T3SS.

  9. MOVPE overgrowth of InN quantum dot like structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium nitride (InN) quantum dots could be used an alternative material for applications at the standard telecommunication wavelength of 1.55 μm. We showed that the density and size of InN quantum dots grown in Volmer-Weber growth mode can be controlled by growth temperature and total amount of InN on the surface. For light emitting devices those quantum dot like structures need to be overgrown. Therefore, we studied systematically the overgrowth process by MOVPE of InN quantum dots on GaN/sapphire with a density of 1010 cm-2. Different capping strategies were monitored by in-situ ellipsometry which allows investigations on a submonolayer scale of the InN/GaN system with 11% lattice mismatch. Additional characterisation was done by atomic force microscopy, x-ray and photoluminescence measurements. The main problem of indium segregation from InN QDs into the first capping layers and the formation of InGaN is observed by XRD with a gallium content of less than 20%. Thus for overgrowth a high growth rate is needed, but the material quality must still be maintained. Further investigations with InGaN capping layers to reduce the strain during overgrowth have been done.

  10. Surface processes during purification of InP quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mordvinova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a new simple and fast method for the synthesis of InP quantum dots by using phosphine as phosphorous precursor and myristic acid as surface stabilizer was reported. Purification after synthesis is necessary to obtain samples with good optical properties. Two methods of purification were compared and the surface processes which occur during purification were studied. Traditional precipitation with acetone is accompanied by a small increase in photoluminescence. It occurs that during the purification the hydrolysis of the indium precursor takes place, which leads to a better surface passivation. The electrophoretic purification technique does not increase luminescence efficiency but yields very pure quantum dots in only a few minutes. Additionally, the formation of In(OH3 during the low temperature synthesis was explained. Purification of quantum dots is a very significant part of postsynthetical treatment that determines the properties of the material. But this subject is not sufficiently discussed in the literature. The paper is devoted to the processes that occur at the surface of quantum dots during purification. A new method of purification, electrophoresis, is investigated and described in particular.

  11. Spatially correlated two-dimensional arrays of semiconductor and metal quantum dots in GaAs-based heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nevedomskiy, V. N., E-mail: nevedom@mail.ioffe.ru; Bert, N. A.; Chaldyshev, V. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Preobrazhernskiy, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    A single molecular-beam epitaxy process is used to produce GaAs-based heterostructures containing two-dimensional arrays of InAs semiconductor quantum dots and AsSb metal quantum dots. The twodimensional array of AsSb metal quantum dots is formed by low-temperature epitaxy which provides a large excess of arsenic in the epitaxial GaAs layer. During the growth of subsequent layers at a higher temperature, excess arsenic forms nanoinclusions, i.e., metal quantum dots in the GaAs matrix. The two-dimensional array of such metal quantum dots is created by the δ doping of a low-temperature GaAs layer with antimony which serves as a precursor for the heterogeneous nucleation of metal quantum dots and accumulates in them with the formation of AsSb metal alloy. The two-dimensional array of InAs semiconductor quantum dots is formed via the Stranski–Krastanov mechanism at the GaAs surface. Between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots, a 3-nm-thick AlAs barrier layer is grown. The total spacing between the arrays of metal and semiconductor quantum dots is 10 nm. Electron microscopy of the structure shows that the arrangement of metal quantum dots and semiconductor quantum dots in the two-dimensional arrays is spatially correlated. The spatial correlation is apparently caused by elastic strain and stress fields produced by both AsSb metal and InAs semiconductor quantum dots in the GaAs matrix.

  12. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiss, Dominik

    2009-10-15

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T{sub 1}=20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T{sub 1}{proportional_to}B{sup -5} has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T{sub 1}{proportional_to}T{sup -1}. The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T{sub 1}{sup h

  13. Spin storage in quantum dot ensembles and single quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis deals with the investigation of spin relaxation of electrons and holes in small ensembles of self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques. Furthermore, a method to detect the spin orientation in a single quantum dot was developed in the framework of this thesis. A spin storage device was used to optically generate oriented electron spins in small frequency selected quantum dot ensembles using circularly polarized optical excitation. The spin orientation can be determined by the polarization of the time delayed electroluminescence signal generated by the device after a continuously variable storage time. The degree of spin polarized initialization was found to be limited to 0.6 at high magnetic fields, where anisotropic effects are compensated. The spin relaxation was directly measured as a function of magnetic field, lattice temperature and s-shell transition energy of the quantum dot by varying the spin storage time up to 30 ms. Very long spin lifetimes are obtained with a lower limit of T1=20 ms at B=4 T and T=1 K. A strong magnetic field dependence T1∝B-5 has been observed for low temperatures of T=1 K which weakens as the temperature is increased. In addition, the temperature dependence has been determined with T1∝T-1. The characteristic dependencies on magnetic field and temperature lead to the identification of the spin relaxation mechanism, which is governed by spin-orbit coupling and mediated by single phonon scattering. This finding is qualitatively supported by the energy dependent measurements. The investigations were extended to a modified device design that enabled studying the spin relaxation dynamics of heavy holes in self-assembled quantum dots. The measurements show a polarization memory effect for holes with up to 0.1 degree of polarization. Furthermore, investigations of the time dynamics of the hole spin relaxation reveal surprisingly long lifetimes T1h in the microsecond range, therefore, comparable with electron spin

  14. Quantum dots formed in InSb/AlAs and AlSb/AlAs heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abramkin, D. S.; Rumynin, K. M.; Bakarov, A. K.; Kolotovkina, D. A.; Gutakovskii, A. K.; Shamirzaev, T. S.

    2016-06-01

    The crystal structure of new self-assembled InSb/AlAs and AlSb/AlAs quantum dots grown by molecularbeam epitaxy has been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. The theoretical calculations of the energy spectrum of the quantum dots have been supplemented by the experimental data on the steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy. Deposition of 1.5 ML of InSb or AlSb on the AlAs surface carried out in the regime of atomic-layer epitaxy leads to the formation of pseudomorphically strained quantum dots composed of InAlSbAs and AlSbAs alloys, respectively. The quantum dots can have the type-I and type-II energy spectra depending on the composition of the alloy. The ground hole state in the quantum dot belongs to the heavy-hole band and the localization energy of holes is much higher than that of electrons. The ground electron state in the type-I quantum dots belongs to the indirect X XY valley of the conduction band of the alloy. The ground electron state in the type-II quantum dots belongs to the indirect X valley of the conduction band of the AlAs matrix.

  15. Environmental conditions influence for real-time hologram formation on dichromated polyvinyl alcohol NiCl{sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O doped films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontanilla-Urdaneta, R C; Olivares-Perez, A; Fuentes-Tapia, I; Rios-Velasco, M A, E-mail: rfontanilla@inaoep.mx, E-mail: olivares@inaoep.mx, E-mail: ifuentes@inaoep.mx, E-mail: moni_arv@hotmail.com [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica (INAOE), Luis Enrique Erro No. 1 Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    The real-time holographic gratings recording are studied by the presence of a metallic salt. The experimental process refers to analysis of diffraction efficiency by the influence of humidity in the coating solution on holograms formation in presence of electrical potential. The diffraction efficiency is measured as a function of the exposure energy until reach the saturation. The influence of the hologram parameters to get the diffraction efficiency is studied at room conditions.

  16. Luminescent Surface Quaternized Carbon Dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bourlinos, Athanasios B.

    2012-01-10

    Thermal oxidation of a salt precursor made from the acid base combination of tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane and betaine hydrochloride results in light-emitting surface quaternized carbon dots that are water-dispersible, display anion exchange properties, and exhibit uniform size/surface charge. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. On triaxial ellipsoidal quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voon, L C Lew Yan; Willatzen, M [Mads Clausen Institute, University of Southern Denmark, Grundtvigs Alle 150, DK-6400 Soenderborg (Denmark)

    2004-02-25

    The bound-state problem for triaxial ellipsoidal infinite-barrier quantum dots has been solved. It is exactly solvable in terms of ellipsoidal coordinates and the eigenmodes are written in terms of Lame wavefunctions. The need for all eight types of functions is shown. This presents a generalization over previous work on spheres and spheroids. Splitting of degeneracy and level crossing are obtained.

  18. DOT strategies versus orbiter strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rutten, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope is a high-resolution solar imager coming on-line at La Palma. The definition of the DOT science niche, strategies, and requirements resemble Solar Orbiter considerations and deliberations. I discuss the latter in the light of the former, and claim that multi-line observation

  19. Vertical asymmetric double quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roßbach, R.; Reischle, M.; Beirne, G. J.; Schweizer, H.; Jetter, M.; Michler, P.

    2007-01-01

    Two layers of differently sized self-assembled InP-quantum dots (QDs) separated by a GaInP spacer layer with varying thickness were grown by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Photoluminescence measurements of the QD ensembles and of individual asymmetric double QDS show coupling due to the tunnelling of carriers.

  20. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Nam Hyeon; Park, Jeong Mi; Goo, Hyun Woo; Bang, Sun Woo [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy.

  1. Hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications : Mammographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To differentiate fine hyperdense dots mimicking microcalcifications from true microcalcifications on mammography. Mammograms showing hyperdense dots in ten patients (mean age, 59 years) were evaluated. Two radiologists were asked to differentiate with the naked eye the hyperdense dots seen on ten mammograms and proven microcalcifications seen on ten mammograms. Densitometry was also performed for all lesions and the contrast index was calculated. The shape and distribution of the hyperdense dots were evaluated and enquires were made regarding any history of breast disease and corresponding treatment. Biopsies were performed for two patients with hyperdense dots. Two radiologists made correct diagnoses in 19/20 cases(95%). The contrast index was 0.10-0.88 (mean 0.58) for hyperdense dots and 0.02-0.45 (mean 0.17) for true microcalcifications. The hyperdense dots were finer and homogeneously rounder than the microcalcifications. Distribution of the hyperdense dots was more superficial in subcutaneous fat (seven cases) and subareolar area (six cases). All ten patients with hyperdense dots had history of mastitis and abscesses and had been treated by open drainage (six cases) and/or folk remedy (four cases). In eight patients, herb patches had been attached. Biopsies of hyperdense dots did not show any microcalcification or evidence of malignancy. These hyperdense dots were seen mainly in older patients. Their characteristic density, shape, distribution and clinical history makes differential diagnosis from true microcalcifications easy and could reduce unnecessary diagnostic procedures such as surgical biopsy

  2. Ambient-Processed Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells via Individual Pre-Encapsulation of Nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Debnath, Ratan

    2010-05-05

    We report colloidal quantum dot solar cells fabricated under ambient atmosphere with an active area of 2.9 mm2 that exhibit 3.6% solar power conversion efficiency. The devices are based on PbS tuned via the quantum size effect to have a first excitonic peak at 950 nm. Because the formation of native oxides and sulfates on PbS leads to p-type doping and deep trap formation and because such dopants and traps dramatically influence device performance, prior reports of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have insisted on processing under an inert atmosphere. Here we report a novel ligand strategy in which we first encapsulate the quantum dots in the solution phase with the aid of a strongly bound N-2,4,6-trimethylphenyl-N-methyldithiocarbamate ligand. This allows us to carry out film formation and all subsequent device fabrication under an air atmosphere. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  3. Systematic safety evaluation on photoluminescent carbon dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kan; Gao, Zhongcai; Gao, Guo; Wo, Yan; Wang, Yuxia; Shen, Guangxia; Cui, Daxiang

    2013-03-01

    Photoluminescent carbon dots (C-dots) were prepared using the improved nitric acid oxidation method. The C-dots were characterized by tapping-mode atomic force microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. The C-dots were subjected to systematic safety evaluation via acute toxicity, subacute toxicity, and genotoxicity experiments (including mouse bone marrow micronuclear test and Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity test). The results showed that the C-dots were successfully prepared with good stability, high dispersibility, and water solubility. At all studied C-dot dosages, no significant toxic effect, i.e., no abnormality or lesion, was observed in the organs of the animals. Therefore, the C-dots are non-toxic to mice under any dose and have potential use in fluorescence imaging in vivo, tumor cell tracking, and others.

  4. Multi-band silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Geng-rong; Ma, Fei; Ma, Da-yan; Xu, Ke-wei

    2010-11-01

    Silicon quantum dots embedded in an amorphous matrix of silicon carbide were realized by a magnetron co-sputtering process and post-annealing. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, glancing x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the chemical composition and the microstructural properties. The results show that the sizes and size distribution of silicon quantum dots can be tuned by changing the annealing atmosphere and the atom ratio of silicon and carbon in the matrix. A physicochemical mechanism is proposed to demonstrate this formation process. Photoluminescence measurements indicate a multi-band configuration due to the quantum confinement effect of silicon quantum dots with different sizes. The PL spectra are further widened as a result of the existence of amorphous silicon quantum dots. This multi-band configuration would be extremely advantageous in improving the photoelectric conversion efficiency of photovoltaic solar cells.

  5. Spin transport through quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, A.T. da Cunha; Anda, Enrique V. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil)

    2003-07-01

    Full text: We investigate the spin polarized transport properties of a nanoscopic device constituted by a quantum dot connected to two leads. The electrical current circulates with a spin polarization that is modulated via a gate potential that controls the intensity of the spin-orbit coupling, the Rashba effect. We study a polarized field-effect transistor when one of its parts is constituted by a small quantum dot, which energies are controlled by another gate potential operating inside the confined region. The high confinement and correlation suffered by the charges inside the dot gives rise to novel phenomena. We show that through the manipulation of the gate potential applied to the dot it is possible to control, in a very efficient way, the intensity and polarization of the current that goes along the system. Other crucial parameters to be varied in order to understand the behavior of this system are the intensity of the external applied electric and magnetic field. The system is represented by the Anderson Impurity Hamiltonian summed to a spin-orbit interaction, which describes the Rashba effect. To obtain the current of this out-of-equilibrium system we use the Keldysh formalism.The solution of the Green function are compatible with the Coulomb blockade regime. We show that under the effect of a external magnetic field, if the dot is small enough the device operates as a complete spin filter that can be controlled by the gate potential. The behavior of this device when it is injected into it a polarized current and modulated by the Rashba effect is as well studied. (author)

  6. Star Formation in Luminous Quasars at 2

    CERN Document Server

    Harris, Kathryn; Schulz, Bernhard; Hatziminaoglou, Evanthia; Viero, Marco; Anderson, Nick; Bethermin, Matthieu; Chapman, Scott; Clements, David L; Cooray, Asantha; Efstathiou, Andreas; Feltre, Anne; Hurley, Peter; Ibar, Eduardo; Lacy, Mark; Oliver, Sebastian; Page, Mathew J; Perez-Fournon, Ismael; Petty, Sara M; Pitchford, Lura K; Rigopoulou, Dimitra; Scott, Douglas; Symeonidis, Myrto; Vieira, Joaquin; Wang, Lingyu

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the relation between star formation rates ($\\dot{M}_{s}$) and AGN properties in optically selected type 1 quasars at $2dot{\\rm{M}}_s$ remains approximately constant with redshift, at $300\\pm100~\\rm{M}_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$. Conversely, $\\dot{\\rm{M}}_s$ increases with AGN luminosity, up to a maximum of $\\sim600~\\rm{M}_{\\odot}$yr$^{-1}$, and with CIV FWHM. In context with previous results, this is consistent with a relation between $\\dot{\\rm{M}}_s$ and black hole accretion rate ($\\dot{\\rm{M}}_{bh}$) existing in only parts of the $z-\\dot{\\rm{M}}_{s}-\\dot{\\rm{M}}_{bh}$ plane, dependent on the free gas fraction, the trigger for activity, and the processes that may quench star formation. The relations between $\\dot{\\rm{M}}_s$ and both AGN luminosity and CIV FWHM are consistent with star formation rates in quasars scaling with black hole mass, though we cannot rule out a separate relation with black hole accretion rate. Star formation rates...

  7. Synthesis, Characterization and Application Of PbS Quantum Dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead Chalcogenides (PbS, PbSe, PbTe) quantum dots (QDs) are ideal for fundamental studies of strongly quantum confined systems with possible technological applications. Tunable electronic transitions at near--infrared wavelengths can be obtained with these QDs. Applications of lead chalcogenides encompass quite a good number of important field viz. the fields of telecommunications, medical electronics, optoelectronics etc. Very recently, it has been proposed that 'memristor'(Memory resistor) can be realized in nanoscale systems with coupled ionic and electronic transports. The hystersis characteristics of 'memristor' are observed in many nanoscale electronic devices including semiconductor quantum dot devices. This paper reports synthesis of PbS QDs by chemical route. The fabricated samples are characterized by UV-Vis, XRD, SEM, TEM, EDS, etc. Observed characteristics confirm nano formation. I-V characteristics of the sample are studied for investigating their applications as 'memristor'.

  8. Analysis of biodistribution attributes of radiopharmaceuticals by BioDOT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important component of radiopharmaceuticals quality evaluation is determination of biological distribution attributes by animal study. This is subjective, time consuming, and difficult to quantify. A user friendly graphical statistical analysis software (BioDOT) was developed using Visual Basic 6.0 for repeatable, objective evaluate of biological distribution attribute of radiopharmaceuticals in animal. The software measured the organs mass, organs radioactivity, radioactivity decay correction, radioactivity per gram of organs, and calculate radioactivity target to non-target ratios. Radiopharmaceuticals quality assessment by a BioDOT was used to estimate post injected biological distribution, and organs radioactivity and uniformity ratio was calculated. The software quantified percent injected dose of radiopharmaceutical in selected organs of the animal study. Total percent injected dose was quantified and correlated with the standard value of BP Pharmacopoeia. The method objectively measured distribution quality attributes of radiopharmaceuticals and generate full report in pdf format in less than 10 min per study. (author)

  9. DNA derived fluorescent bio-dots for sensitive detection of mercury and silver ions in aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First application of a DNA derived fluorescent bio-dot for metal sensing. • Bio-dot was conveniently obtained via a mild thermal hydro-thermal synthesis. • Bio-dot was directly used for fluorescent sensing without further modification. • Bio-dot showed good fluorescent sensing property for Hg(II) and Ag(I). • Formation of T–Hg–T and C–Ag–C structures played key roles in sensing. - Abstract: Inspired by the high affinity between heavy metal ions and bio-molecules as well as the low toxicity of carbon-based quantum dots, we demonstrated the first application of a DNA derived carbonaceous quantum dots, namely bio-dots, in metal ion sensing. The present DNA-derived bio-dots contain graphitic carbon layers with 0.242 nm lattice fringes, exhibit excellent fluorescence property and can be obtained via a facile hydrothermal preparation procedure. Hg(II) and Ag(I) are prone to be captured by the bio-dots due to the existence of residual thymine (T) and cytosine (C) groups, resulting in a quenched fluorescence while other heavy metal ions would cause negligible changes on the fluorescent signals of the bio-dots. The bio-dots could be used as highly selective toxic-free biosensors, with two detecting linear ranges of 0–0.5 μM and 0.5–6 μM for Hg(II) and one linear range of 0–10 μM for Ag(I). The detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were estimated to be 48 nM for Hg(II) and 0.31 μM for Ag(I), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) and Ag(I) could also be realized in the real water sample analyses, with satisfying recoveries ranging from 87% to 100%

  10. DNA derived fluorescent bio-dots for sensitive detection of mercury and silver ions in aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Ting [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhu, Xuefeng, E-mail: zhuxf@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Zhou, Shenghai [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Yang, Guang [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of the Ministry of Education and International Center for Dielectric Research, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Gan, Wei [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China); Yuan, Qunhui, E-mail: yuanqh@ms.xjb.ac.cn [Laboratory of Environmental Science and Technology, Xinjiang Technical Institute of Physics & Chemistry, Key Laboratory of Functional Materials and Devices for Special Environments, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Urumqi 830011 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • First application of a DNA derived fluorescent bio-dot for metal sensing. • Bio-dot was conveniently obtained via a mild thermal hydro-thermal synthesis. • Bio-dot was directly used for fluorescent sensing without further modification. • Bio-dot showed good fluorescent sensing property for Hg(II) and Ag(I). • Formation of T–Hg–T and C–Ag–C structures played key roles in sensing. - Abstract: Inspired by the high affinity between heavy metal ions and bio-molecules as well as the low toxicity of carbon-based quantum dots, we demonstrated the first application of a DNA derived carbonaceous quantum dots, namely bio-dots, in metal ion sensing. The present DNA-derived bio-dots contain graphitic carbon layers with 0.242 nm lattice fringes, exhibit excellent fluorescence property and can be obtained via a facile hydrothermal preparation procedure. Hg(II) and Ag(I) are prone to be captured by the bio-dots due to the existence of residual thymine (T) and cytosine (C) groups, resulting in a quenched fluorescence while other heavy metal ions would cause negligible changes on the fluorescent signals of the bio-dots. The bio-dots could be used as highly selective toxic-free biosensors, with two detecting linear ranges of 0–0.5 μM and 0.5–6 μM for Hg(II) and one linear range of 0–10 μM for Ag(I). The detection limits (at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3) were estimated to be 48 nM for Hg(II) and 0.31 μM for Ag(I), respectively. The detection of Hg(II) and Ag(I) could also be realized in the real water sample analyses, with satisfying recoveries ranging from 87% to 100%.

  11. Constructions from Dots and Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Marko A

    2010-01-01

    A graph is a data structure composed of dots (i.e. vertices) and lines (i.e. edges). The dots and lines of a graph can be organized into intricate arrangements. The ability for a graph to denote objects and their relationships to one another allow for a surprisingly large number of things to be modeled as a graph. From the dependencies that link software packages to the wood beams that provide the framing to a house, most anything has a corresponding graph representation. However, just because it is possible to represent something as a graph does not necessarily mean that its graph representation will be useful. If a modeler can leverage the plethora of tools and algorithms that store and process graphs, then such a mapping is worthwhile. This article explores the world of graphs in computing and exposes situations in which graphical models are beneficial.

  12. Nanoscaled redox active protein adsorption on Au-dot arrays: An electrochemical scanning probe microscopic investigation for application in nano-biodevices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yagati, Ajay Kumar; Jung, Mi; Kim, Sang-Uk [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Min, Junhong [College of Bionanotechnology, Kyungwon University, Bokjung-dong, Sujung-gu, Seongnam 461-701 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jeong-Woo, E-mail: jwchoi@sogang.ac.k [Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology, Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Interdisciplinary Program of Integrated Biotechnology Sogang University, 1 Shinsu-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul 121-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-11-30

    Highly dense and uniform protein dot arrays on Au-nanodots using size controllable method were fabricated on indium tin oxide (ITO) substrate in order to develop an electrochemical nanobiochip. Cysteine modified azurin was directly immobilized on the fabricated Au-nanodots without any linker materials. Atomic force microscopy was used for characterizing Au-dots formed on ITO substrate. Electrochemical scanning tunneling microscopy (ECSTM) revealed the monolayer formation with an in situ cyclic voltammetry to observe redox behaviour of both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots. I-V characteristics were obtained on both bare Au-dots and protein immobilized Au-dots structured on ITO conductive electrodes.

  13. Photoactivation of silicon quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lockwood, R., E-mail: rossl@ualberta.c [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G7 (Canada); McFarlane, S. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Rodriguez Nunez, J.R. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Wang, X.Y. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G7 (Canada); Veinot, J.G.C. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G2 (Canada); Meldrum, A. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G7 (Canada)

    2011-07-15

    We show that free-standing silicon quantum dots (QDs) can be photoactivated by blue or UV optical irradiation. The luminescence intensity increases by an order of magnitude for irradiation times of several minutes under moderate optical power. The cut-off energy for photoactivation is between 2.1 and 2.4 eV, not very different from the activation energy for hydrogen dissociation from bulk silicon surfaces. We propose the mechanism for this effect is associated with silicon-hydride bond breaking and the subsequent oxidation of dangling bonds. This phenomenon could be used to 'write' luminescent quantum dots into pre-determined arrays. - Research highlights: {yields}Laser light causes increased photoluminescence intensity in silicon quantum dots. {yields} The photoactivation process is effective for wavelengths of 514 nm and shorter. {yields} Hydrogen bound to the Si-QDs is replaced by oxygen in a two-step process. {yields} Patterning is possible but limited by physical dispersion of Si-QDs.

  14. Few-electron quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We review some electron transport experiments on few-electron, vertical quantum dot devices. The measurement of current versus source-drain voltage and gate voltage is used as a spectroscopic tool to investigate the energy characteristics of interacting electrons confined to a small region in a semiconducting material. Three energy scales are distinguished: the single-particle states, which are discrete due to the confinement involved; the direct Coulomb interaction between electron charges on the dot; and the exchange interaction between electrons with parallel spins. To disentangle these energies, a magnetic field is used to reorganize the occupation of electrons over the single-particle states and to induce changes in the spin states. We discuss the interactions between small numbers of electrons (between 1 and 20) using the simplest possible models. Nevertheless, these models consistently describe a large set of experiments. Some of the observations resemble similar phenomena in atomic physics, such as shell structure and periodic table characteristics, Hund's rule, and spin singlet and triplet states. The experimental control, however, is much larger than for atoms: with one device all the artificial elements can be studied by adding electrons to the quantum dot when changing the gate voltage. (author)

  15. Charge State Hysteresis in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, C. H.; Rossi, A; Lai, N. S.; Leon, R.; Lim, W. H.; Dzurak, A.S.

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots provide a two-dimensional analogy for real atoms and show promise for the implementation of scalable quantum computers. Here, we investigate the charge configurations in a silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor double quantum dot tunnel coupled to a single reservoir of electrons. By operating the system in the few-electron regime, the stability diagram shows hysteretic tunnelling events that depend on the history of the dots charge occupancy. We present a model which acc...

  16. Resonant electron transfer between quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Openov, Leonid A.

    1999-01-01

    An interaction of electromagnetic field with a nanostructure composed of two quantum dots is studied theoretically. An effect of a resonant electron transfer between the localized low-lying states of quantum dots is predicted. A necessary condition for such an effect is the existence of an excited bound state whose energy lies close to the top of the barrier separating the quantum dots. This effect may be used to realize the reversible quantum logic gate NOT if the superposition of electron s...

  17. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Farahi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantumdots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties thatmake them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence basedbioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application ofquantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given toconfigurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in solid membranes and immobilizedin optical fibers or planar waveguide platforms.

  18. Extracellular Synthesis of Luminescent CdS Quantum Dots Using Plant Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovaya, Mariya N; Burlaka, Olga M; Naumenko, Antonina P; Blume, Yaroslav B; Yemets, Alla I

    2016-12-01

    The present study describes a novel method for preparation of water-soluble CdS quantum dots, using bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cell suspension culture. Acting as a stabilizing and capping agent, the suspension cell culture mediates the formation of CdS nanoparticles. These semiconductor nanoparticles were determined by means of an UV-visible spectrophotometer, photoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and XRD. Followed by the electron diffraction analysis of a selected area, transmission electron microscopy indicated the formation of spherical, crystalline CdS ranging in diameter from 3 to 7 nm and showed wurtzite CdS quantum dots. In the present work, the toxic effect of synthesized CdS quantum dots on Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts as a very sensitive model was under study. The results of this research revealed that biologically synthesized CdS nanoparticles in low concentrations did not induce any toxic effects. PMID:26909780

  19. Extracellular Synthesis of Luminescent CdS Quantum Dots Using Plant Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovaya, Mariya N.; Burlaka, Olga M.; Naumenko, Antonina P.; Blume, Yaroslav B.; Yemets, Alla I.

    2016-02-01

    The present study describes a novel method for preparation of water-soluble CdS quantum dots, using bright yellow-2 (BY-2) cell suspension culture. Acting as a stabilizing and capping agent, the suspension cell culture mediates the formation of CdS nanoparticles. These semiconductor nanoparticles were determined by means of an UV-visible spectrophotometer, photoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and XRD. Followed by the electron diffraction analysis of a selected area, transmission electron microscopy indicated the formation of spherical, crystalline CdS ranging in diameter from 3 to 7 nm and showed wurtzite CdS quantum dots. In the present work, the toxic effect of synthesized CdS quantum dots on Nicotiana tabacum protoplasts as a very sensitive model was under study. The results of this research revealed that biologically synthesized CdS nanoparticles in low concentrations did not induce any toxic effects.

  20. Time Dependent Study of Multiple Exciton Generation in Nanocrystal Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damtie, Fikeraddis A.; Wacker, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    We study the exciton dynamics in an optically excited nanocrystal quantum dot. Multiple exciton formation is more efficient in nanocrystal quantum dots compared to bulk semiconductors due to enhanced Coulomb interactions and the absence of conservation of momentum. The formation of multiple excitons is dependent on different excitation parameters and the dissipation. We study this process within a Lindblad quantum rate equation using the full many-particle states. We optically excite the system by creating a single high energy exciton ESX in resonance to a double exciton EDX. With Coulomb electron-electron interaction, the population can be transferred from the single exciton to the double exciton state by impact ionisation (inverse Auger process). The ratio between the recombination processes and the absorbed photons provide the yield of the structure. We observe a quantum yield of comparable value to experiment assuming typical experimental conditions for a 4 nm PbS quantum dot.

  1. Activation of silicon quantum dots for emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Wei-Qi; Miao Xin-Jian; Huang Zhong-Mei; Liu Shi-Rong; Qin Chao-Jian

    2012-01-01

    The emission of silicon quantum dots is weak when their surface is passivated well. Oxygen or nitrogen on the surface of silicon quantum dots can break the passivation to form localized electronic states in the band gap to generate active centers where stronger emission occurs.From this point of view,we can build up radiative matter for emission.Emissions of various wavelengths can be obtained by controlling the surface bonds of silicon quantum dots.Our experimental results demonstrate that annealing is important in the treatment of the activation,and stimulated emissions at about 600 and 700 nm take place on active silicon quantum dots.

  2. Thermoelectric energy harvesting with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sothmann, Björn; Sánchez, Rafael; Jordan, Andrew N

    2015-01-21

    We review recent theoretical work on thermoelectric energy harvesting in multi-terminal quantum-dot setups. We first discuss several examples of nanoscale heat engines based on Coulomb-coupled conductors. In particular, we focus on quantum dots in the Coulomb-blockade regime, chaotic cavities and resonant tunneling through quantum dots and wells. We then turn toward quantum-dot heat engines that are driven by bosonic degrees of freedom such as phonons, magnons and microwave photons. These systems provide interesting connections to spin caloritronics and circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  3. POLARON IN CYLINDRICAL AND SPHERICAL QUANTUM DOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C.Fai

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Polaron states in cylindrical and spherical quantum dots with parabolic confinement potentials are investigated applying the Feynman variational principle. It is observed that for both kinds of quantum dots the polaron energy and mass increase with the increase of Frohlich electron-phonon coupling constant and confinement frequency. In the case of a spherical quantum dot, the polaron energy for the strong coupling is found to be greater than that of a cylindrical quantum dot. The energy and mass are found to be monotonically increasing functions of the coupling constant and the confinement frequency.

  4. Semiconductor quantum-dot lasers and amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Borri, Paola; Ledentsov, N. N.;

    2002-01-01

    -power surface emitting VCSELs. We investigated the ultrafast dynamics of quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifiers. The dephasing time at room temperature of the ground-state transition in semiconductor quantum dots is around 250 fs in an unbiased amplifier, decreasing to below 50 fs when the amplifier...... is biased to positive net gain. We have further measured gain recovery times in quantum dot amplifiers that are significantly lower than in bulk and quantum-well semiconductor optical amplifiers. This is promising for future demonstration of quantum dot devices with high modulation bandwidth...

  5. Quasibound states in graphene quantum-dot nanostructures generated by concentric potential barrier rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Zhao-Tan; Yu Cheng-Long; Dong Quan-Li

    2012-01-01

    We study the quasibound states in a graphene quantum-dot structure generated by the single-,double-,and triple-barrier electrostatic potentials.It is shown that the strongest quasibound states are mainly determined by the innermost barrier.Specifically,the positions of the quasibound states are determined by the barrier height,the number of the quasibound states is determined by the quantum-dot radius and the angular momentum,and the localization degree of the quasibound states is influenced by the width of the innermost barrier,as well as the outside barriers.Furthermore,according to the study on the double- and triple-barrier quantum dots,we find that an effective way to generate more quasibound states with even larger energy level spacings is to design a quantum dot defined by many concentric barriers with larger barrier-height differences.Last,we extend our results into the quantum dot of many barriers,which gives a complete picture about the formation of the quasibound states in the kind of graphene quantum dot created by many concentric potential barrier rings.

  6. Electrochemical Study and Applications of Selective Electrodeposition of Silver on Quantum Dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Yerga, Daniel; Rama, Estefanía Costa; Costa-García, Agustín

    2016-04-01

    In this work, selective electrodeposition of silver on quantum dots is described. The particular characteristics of the nanostructured silver thus obtained are studied by electrochemical and microscopic techniques. On one hand, quantum dots were found to catalyze the silver electrodeposition, and on the other hand, a strong adsorption between electrodeposited silver and quantum dots was observed, indicated by two silver stripping processes. Nucleation of silver nanoparticles followed different mechanisms depending on the surface (carbon or quantum dots). Voltammetric and confocal microscopy studies showed the great influence of electrodeposition time on surface coating, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) imaging confirmed the initial formation of Janus-like Ag@QD nanoparticles in this process. By use of moderate electrodeposition conditions such as 50 μM silver, -0.1 V, and 60 s, the silver was deposited only on quantum dots, allowing the generation of localized nanostructured electrode surfaces. This methodology can also be employed for sensing applications, showing a promising ultrasensitive electrochemical method for quantum dot detection. PMID:26910270

  7. Quantum Dot Spectrum Converters for Enhanced High Efficiency Photovoltaics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This research proposes to enhance solar cell efficiency, radiation resistance and affordability. The Quantum Dot Spectrum Converter (QDSC) disperses quantum dots...

  8. Electrochemical tuning of optical properties of graphitic quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Juan [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Material, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Li, Yan, E-mail: liyan2011@ustb.edu.cn [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Material, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhang, Bo-Ping [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Material, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Ning [Department of Material Physics and Chemistry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang, Jun; Pu, Chang; Xiang, Ying-Chang [Department of Inorganic Nonmetallic Material, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-10-15

    Graphitic quantum dots (GQDs), as a new class of quantum dots, possess unique properties. Among the various reported approaches for their fabrication, electrochemical method possesses numerous advantages compared with others. In particular, the formation process of the GQDs could be precisely controlled by this method through adjusting the electrochemical parameters and environment. In this study, GQDs with multi-color fluorescence (FL) were obtained by this method through tuning only the applied potential window of cycling voltammetry. The luminescence mechanism of those GQDs was discussed and explained by the ultraviolet (UV)–visible, photoluminescence (PL), and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) spectra. The influence of the applied potential window on the PL properties of GQDs and the relationship between the degree of surface oxidation and PL properties were also investigated. - Highlights: • We produced the graphite quantum dots (GQDs) by an electrochemical method. • We changed the applied potentials of cycling voltammetry (CV). • Varying of applied potentials changed surface oxygen-containing groups of GQDs. • Higher surface oxidation degree resulted in the red-shift of PL spectra.

  9. Profiteering from the Dot-com Bubble, Sub-Prime Crisis and Asian Financial Crisis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. McAleer (Michael); J. Suen (John); W-K. Wong (Wing-Keung)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThis paper explores the characteristics associated with the formation of bubbles that occurred in the Hong Kong stock market in 1997 and 2007, as well as the 2000 dot-com bubble of Nasdaq. It examines the profitability of Technical Analysis (TA) strategies generating buy and sell signals

  10. Quantum Gates Between Two Spins in a Triple Dot System with an Empty Dot

    CERN Document Server

    Coello, Jose Garcia

    2011-01-01

    We propose a scheme for implementing quantum gates and entanglement between spin qubits in the outer dots of a triple-dot system with an empty central dot. The voltage applied to the central dot can be tuned to realize the gate. Our scheme exemplifies the possibility of quantum gates outside the regime where each dot has an electron, so that spin-spin exchange interaction is not the only relevant mechanism. Analytic treatment is possible by mapping the problem to a t-J model. The fidelity of the entangling quantum gate between the spins is analyzed in the presence of decoherence stemming from a bath of nuclear spins, as well as from charge fluctuations. Our scheme provides an avenue for extending the scope of two qubit gate experiments to triple-dots, while requiring minimal control, namely that of the potential of a single dot, and may enhance the qubit separation to ease differential addressability.

  11. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Dots for "green" Quantum Dot Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Sun, Pengfei; Cong, Shan; Wu, Jiang; Gao, Lijun; Wang, Yun; Dai, Xiao; Yi, Qinghua; Zou, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    Considering the environment protection, "green" materials are increasingly explored for photovoltaics. Here, we developed a kind of quantum dots solar cell based on nitrogen-doped carbon dots. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots were prepared by direct pyrolysis of citric acid and ammonia. The nitrogen-doped carbon dots' excitonic absorption depends on the N-doping content in the carbon dots. The N-doping can be readily modified by the mass ratio of reactants. The constructed "green" nitrogen-doped carbon dots solar cell achieves the best power conversion efficiency of 0.79 % under AM 1.5 G one full sun illumination, which is the highest efficiency for carbon dot-based solar cells. PMID:26781285

  12. PREFACE: Quantum dots as probes in biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2013-05-01

    The recent availability of nanostructured materials has resulted in an explosion of research focused on their unique optical, thermal, mechanical and magnetic properties. Optical imagining, magnetic enhancement of contrast and drug delivery capabilities make the nanoparticles of special interest in biomedical applications. These materials have been involved in the development of theranostics—a new field of medicine that is focused on personalized tests and treatment. It is likely that multimodal nanomaterials will be responsible for future diagnostic advances in medicine. Quantum dots (QD) are nanoparticles which exhibit luminescence either through the formation of three-dimensional excitons or excitations of the impurities. The excitonic luminescence can be tuned by changing the size (the smaller the size, the higher the frequency). QDs are usually made of semiconducting materials. Unlike fluorescent proteins and organic dyes, QDs resist photobleaching, allow for multi-wavelength excitations and have narrow emission spectra. The techniques to make QDs are cheap and surface modifications and functionalizations can be implemented. Importantly, QDs could be synthesized to exhibit useful optomagnetic properties and, upon functionalization with an appropriate biomolecule, directed towards a pre-selected target for diagnostic imaging and photodynamic therapy. This special issue on Quantum dots in Biology is focused on recent research in this area. It starts with a topical review by Sreenivasan et al on various physical mechanisms that lead to the QD luminescence and on using wavelength shifts for an improvement in imaging. The next paper by Szczepaniak et al discusses nanohybrids involving QDs made of CdSe coated by ZnS and combined covalently with a photosynthetic enzyme. These nanohybrids are shown to maintain the enzymatic activity, however the enzyme properties depend on the size of a QD. They are proposed as tools to study photosynthesis in isolated

  13. Photoinduced electron transfers with carbon dots

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Li; Lu, Fushen; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Li, Heting; Qi, Gang; Zhou, Bing; Harruff, Barbara A.; Kermarrec, Fabien; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The photoluminescence in carbon dots (surface-passivated small carbon nanoparticles) could be quenched efficiently by electron acceptor or donor molecules in solution, namely that photo-excited carbon dots are both excellent electron donors and excellent electron acceptors, thus offering new opportunities for their potential uses in light energy conversion and related applications.

  14. Thick-shell nanocrystal quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Chen, Yongfen; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han; Vela, Javier

    2011-05-03

    Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots comprising an inner core having an average diameter of at least 1.5 nm and an outer shell, where said outer shell comprises multiple monolayers, wherein at least 30% of the quantum dots have an on-time fraction of 0.80 or greater under continuous excitation conditions for a period of time of at least 10 minutes.

  15. Optical Properties of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perinetti, U.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents different optical experiments performed on semiconductor quantum dots. These structures allow to confine a small number of electrons and holes to a tiny region of space, some nm across. The aim of this work was to study the basic properties of different types of quantum dots mad

  16. Detecting the chirality for coupled quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Huijuan [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Hu Lian [Institute for Condensed Matter Physics, School of Physics and Telecommunication Engineering, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China)], E-mail: huliancaohj@yahoo.com

    2008-04-21

    We propose a scheme to detect the chirality for a system consisting of three coupled quantum dots. The chirality is found to be determined by the frequency of the transition between chiral states under the chiral symmetry broken perturbation. The results are important to construct quantum gates and to demonstrate chiral entangle states in the triangle spin dots.

  17. Double Acceptor Interaction in Semimagnetic Quantum Dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Merwyn Jasper D. Reuben

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of geometry of the semimagnetic Quantum Dot on the Interaction energy of a double acceptor is computed in the effective mass approximation using the variational principle. A peak is observed at the lower dot sizes as a magnetic field is increased which is attributed to the reduction in confinement.

  18. Photoluminescence from germanium quantum dots formed by pulsed laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The time-resolved photoluminescence of GeOx films (x ≤ 2) containing Ge nanocrystals is carried out in the energy range of 1.4 - 3.2 eV and the relaxation time of 50 μs. The thin films are formed by the pulsed laser deposition from direct and particle flow of an erosive torch in an atmosphere of oxygen and argon. The dependence of photoluminescence properties of films on parameters of deposition and doping by gold is investigated. The results are explained in the framework of excitonic model of photoluminescence from Ge quantum dots whose sizes are determined by conditions of their formation

  19. COULOMB BLOCKADE EFFECT IN SELF-ASSEMBLED GOLD QUANTUM DOTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Fen Hu; Ru-Ling Yeh; Ru-Shi Liu

    2004-01-01

    Nanometer-scale Au quantum dots have been assembled on SiO2 by controlling the reaction of raw materials to form a citrate Au sol and an aminosilane/dithiol-treated patterned Si wafer. The detailed formation mechanism has been studied. Three gold colloidal particles (~15 nm), aligned in a chain to form a one-dimensional current path, was bridged across an 80-nm gap between source and drain metal electrodes. The device exhibited a Coulomb blockade effect at 33 K.

  20. Suspension Synthesis of Surfactant-Free Cuprous Oxide Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Dongzhi Lai; Tao Liu; Xinyun Gu; Ying Chen; Jin Niu; Lingmin Yi; Wenxing Chen

    2015-01-01

    Suspension methods were used to synthesize surfactant-free Cu2O quantum dots (Cu2O-QDs) in high precursor concentrations using sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations indicated that a large amount of Cu2O-QDs were synthesized with diameters ranging from 7 to 10 nm. We propose a mechanism where DMSO acts as a surface passivation agent, explaining the possible formation of Cu2O-QDs. Noticeably, the Cu2O-QDs exhibited high and stable catalyti...

  1. Suspension Synthesis of Surfactant-Free Cuprous Oxide Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongzhi Lai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Suspension methods were used to synthesize surfactant-free Cu2O quantum dots (Cu2O-QDs in high precursor concentrations using sodium hypophosphite as a reducing agent. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM observations indicated that a large amount of Cu2O-QDs were synthesized with diameters ranging from 7 to 10 nm. We propose a mechanism where DMSO acts as a surface passivation agent, explaining the possible formation of Cu2O-QDs. Noticeably, the Cu2O-QDs exhibited high and stable catalytic activity for the reduction of rhodamine B.

  2. Model-based clustered-dot screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Ho

    2006-01-01

    I propose a halftone screen design method based on a human visual system model and the characteristics of the electro-photographic (EP) printer engine. Generally, screen design methods based on human visual models produce dispersed-dot type screens while design methods considering EP printer characteristics generate clustered-dot type screens. In this paper, I propose a cost function balancing the conflicting characteristics of the human visual system and the printer. By minimizing the obtained cost function, I design a model-based clustered-dot screen using a modified direct binary search algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate the superior quality of the model-based clustered-dot screen compared to a conventional clustered-dot screen.

  3. Electron transport in quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    When I was contacted by Kluwer Academic Publishers in the Fall of 200 I, inviting me to edit a volume of papers on the issue of electron transport in quantum dots, I was excited by what I saw as an ideal opportunity to provide an overview of a field of research that has made significant contributions in recent years, both to our understanding of fundamental physics, and to the development of novel nanoelectronic technologies. The need for such a volume seemed to be made more pressing by the fact that few comprehensive reviews of this topic have appeared in the literature, in spite of the vast activity in this area over the course of the last decade or so. With this motivation, I set out to try to compile a volume that would fairly reflect the wide range of opinions that has emerged in the study of electron transport in quantum dots. Indeed, there has been no effort on my part to ensure any consistency between the different chapters, since I would prefer that this volume instead serve as a useful forum for the...

  4. Bound states in the continuum and spin filter in quantum-dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramos, J.P. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Católica del Norte, Casilla 1280, Antofagasta (Chile); Orellana, P.A., E-mail: pedro.orellana@usm.cl [Departamento de Física, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Vicuña Mackenna 3939, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-12-15

    In this paper we study the formation of bound states in the continuum in a quantum dot molecule coupled to leads and their potential application in spintronics. Based on the combination of bound states in the continuum and Fano effect, we propose a new design of a spin-dependent polarizer. By lifting the spin degeneracy of the carriers in the quantum dots by means of a magnetic field the system can be used as a spin-polarized device. A detailed analysis of the spin-dependent conductance and spin polarization as a function of the applied magnetic field and gate voltages is carried out.

  5. Near-infrared nano-spectroscopy and emission energy control of semiconductor quantum dots using a phase-change material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have proposed a method to achieve near-field imaging spectroscopy of single semiconductor quantum dots with high sensitivity by using an optical mask layer of a phase-change material. Sequential formation and elimination of an amorphous aperture allows imaging spectroscopy with high spatial resolution and high collection efficiency. We present numerical simulation and experimental result that show the effectiveness of this technique. Inspired by this optical mask effect, a new approach which can precisely control the emission energy of semiconductor quantum dots has been proposed. This method uses the volume expansion of a phase change material upon amorphization, which allows reversible emission energy tuning of quantum dots. A photoluminescence spectroscopy of single quantum dots and simulation were conducted to demonstrate and further explore the feasibility of this method

  6. Exciton dynamics in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell nanowires with shell quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corfdir, Pierre; Küpers, Hanno; Lewis, Ryan B.; Flissikowski, Timur; Grahn, Holger T.; Geelhaar, Lutz; Brandt, Oliver

    2016-10-01

    We study the dynamics of excitons in GaAs/(Al,Ga)As core-shell nanowires by continuous-wave and time-resolved photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy. Strong Al segregation in the shell of the nanowires leads to the formation of Ga-rich inclusions acting as quantum dots. At 10 K, intense light emission associated with these shell quantum dots is observed. The average radiative lifetime of excitons confined in the shell quantum dots is 1.7 ns. We show that excitons may tunnel toward adjacent shell quantum dots and nonradiative point defects. We investigate the changes in the dynamics of charge carriers in the shell with increasing temperature, with particular emphasis on the transfer of carriers from the shell to the core of the nanowires. We finally discuss the implications of carrier localization in the (Al,Ga)As shell for fundamental studies and optoelectronic applications based on core-shell III-As nanowires.

  7. Role of surface states and defects in the ultrafast nonlinear optical properties of CuS quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary, K. A. Ann; Unnikrishnan, N. V., E-mail: nvu100@yahoo.com [School of Pure and Applied Physics, Mahatma Gandhi University, Kottayam 686560 (India); Philip, Reji [Light and Matter Physics Group, Raman Research Institute, C.V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India)

    2014-07-01

    We report facile preparation of water dispersible CuS quantum dots (2–4 nm) and nanoparticles (5–11 nm) through a nontoxic, green, one-pot synthesis method. Optical and microstructural studies indicate the presence of surface states and defects (dislocations, stacking faults, and twins) in the quantum dots. The smaller crystallite size and quantum dot formation have significant effects on the high energy excitonic and low energy plasmonic absorption bands. Effective two-photon absorption coefficients measured using 100 fs laser pulses employing open-aperture Z-scan in the plasmonic region of 800 nm reveal that CuS quantum dots are better ultrafast optical limiters compared to CuS nanoparticles.

  8. Quantum Dots Investigated for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Castro, Stephanie L.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center has been investigating the synthesis of quantum dots of CdSe and CuInS2 for use in intermediate-bandgap solar cells. Using quantum dots in a solar cell to create an intermediate band will allow the harvesting of a much larger portion of the available solar spectrum. Theoretical studies predict a potential efficiency of 63.2 percent, which is approximately a factor of 2 better than any state-of-the-art devices available today. This technology is also applicable to thin-film devices--where it offers a potential four-fold increase in power-to-weight ratio over the state of the art. Intermediate-bandgap solar cells require that quantum dots be sandwiched in an intrinsic region between the photovoltaic solar cell's ordinary p- and n-type regions (see the preceding figure). The quantum dots form the intermediate band of discrete states that allow sub-bandgap energies to be absorbed. However, when the current is extracted, it is limited by the bandgap, not the individual photon energies. The energy states of the quantum dot can be controlled by controlling the size of the dot. Ironically, the ground-state energy levels are inversely proportional to the size of the quantum dots. We have prepared a variety of quantum dots using the typical organometallic synthesis routes pioneered by Ba Wendi et al., in the early 1990's. The most studied quantum dots prepared by this method have been of CdSe. To produce these dots, researchers inject a syringe of the desired organometallic precursors into heated triocytlphosphine oxide (TOPO) that has been vigorously stirred under an inert atmosphere (see the following figure). The solution immediately begins to change from colorless to yellow, then orange and red/brown, as the quantum dots increase in size. When the desired size is reached, the heat is removed from the flask. Quantum dots of different sizes can be identified by placing them under a "black light" and observing the various color differences in

  9. Fluorescent Quantum Dots for Biological Labeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Gene; Nadeau, Jay; Nealson, Kenneth; Storrie-Lomardi, Michael; Bhartia, Rohit

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescent semiconductor quantum dots that can serve as "on/off" labels for bacteria and other living cells are undergoing development. The "on/off" characterization of these quantum dots refers to the fact that, when properly designed and manufactured, they do not fluoresce until and unless they come into contact with viable cells of biological species that one seeks to detect. In comparison with prior fluorescence-based means of detecting biological species, fluorescent quantum dots show promise for greater speed, less complexity, greater sensitivity, and greater selectivity for species of interest. There are numerous potential applications in medicine, environmental monitoring, and detection of bioterrorism.

  10. Time-bin Entanglement from Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Weihs, Gregor; Predojević, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The desire to have a source of single entangled photon pairs can be satisfied using single quantum dots as emitters. However, we are not bound to pursue only polarization entanglement, but can also exploit other degrees of freedom. In this chapter we focus on the time degree of freedom, to achieve so-called time-bin entanglement. This requires that we prepare the quantum dot coherently into the biexciton state and also build special interferometers for analysis. Finally this technique can be extended to achieve time-bin and polarization hyper-entanglement from a suitable quantum dot.

  11. Quantum Dots-based Reverse Phase Protein Microarray

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shingyoji, Masato; Gerion, Daniele; Pinkel, Dan; Gray, Joe W.; Chen, Fanqing

    2005-07-15

    CdSe nanocrystals, also called quantum dots (Qdots) are a novel class of fluorophores, which have a diameter of a few nanometers and possess high quantum yield, tunable emission wavelength and photostability. They are an attractive alternative to conventional fluorescent dyes. Quantum dots can be silanized to be soluble in aqueous solution under biological conditions, and thus be used in bio-detection. In this study, we established a novel Qdot-based technology platform that can perform accurate and reproducible quantification of protein concentration in a crude cell lysate background. Protein lysates have been spiked with a target protein, and a dilution series of the cell lysate with a dynamic range of three orders of magnitude has been used for this proof-of-concept study. The dilution series has been spotted in microarray format, and protein detection has been achieved with a sensitivity that is at least comparable to standard commercial assays, which are based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP) catalyzed diaminobenzidine (DAB) chromogenesis. The data obtained through the Qdot method has shown a close linear correlation between relative fluorescence unit and relative protein concentration. The Qdot results are in almost complete agreement with data we obtained with the well-established HRP-DAB colorimetric array (R{sup 2} = 0.986). This suggests that Qdots can be used for protein quantification in microarray format, using the platform presented here.

  12. Synthesis of colloidal SnSe quantum dots by electron beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Zhen; Peng Liwei; Fang Yaoguo; Chen Zhiwen [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Pan Dengyu [Institute of Nanochemistry and Nanobiology, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China); Wu Minghong, E-mail: mhwu@staff.shu.edu.cn [Shanghai Applied Radiation Institute, Shanghai University, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2011-12-15

    Water-soluble orthorhombic colloidal SnSe quantum dots with an average diameter of 4 nm were successfully prepared by a novel irradiation route using an electronic accelerator as a radiation source and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a surfactant. The quantum dots exhibit a large direct bandgap of 3.89 eV, greatly blue shifted compared with that of bulk SnSe (1.0 eV) due to the quantum confinement effect. The quantum dots show blue photoluminescence at {approx}420 nm. The influence of CTAB on the growth of the quantum dots was investigated and a possible reaction/growth mechanism was proposed. - Highlights: > A rapid, facile and green strategy is developed to synthesize SnSe QDs. > The raw materials are green and easily obtained. > The surfactant CTAB plays an important role in the formation of SnSe quantum dots. > The obtained SnSe QDs is well-dispersed with the average size of around 4 nm.

  13. Synthesis of colloidal SnSe quantum dots by electron beam irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water-soluble orthorhombic colloidal SnSe quantum dots with an average diameter of 4 nm were successfully prepared by a novel irradiation route using an electronic accelerator as a radiation source and hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as a surfactant. The quantum dots exhibit a large direct bandgap of 3.89 eV, greatly blue shifted compared with that of bulk SnSe (1.0 eV) due to the quantum confinement effect. The quantum dots show blue photoluminescence at ∼420 nm. The influence of CTAB on the growth of the quantum dots was investigated and a possible reaction/growth mechanism was proposed. - Highlights: → A rapid, facile and green strategy is developed to synthesize SnSe QDs. → The raw materials are green and easily obtained. → The surfactant CTAB plays an important role in the formation of SnSe quantum dots. → The obtained SnSe QDs is well-dispersed with the average size of around 4 nm.

  14. Self-assembly of heterojunction quantum dots(HeQuaDs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyink, K. G.; Tomich, D. H.; Grazulis, L.; Pitz, J. J.; Mahalingam, K.; Shank, J.; Munshi, S.; Ulrich, B.

    2006-02-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been receiving considerable attention due to the unique properties, which arise due to the confinement of the electron and holes in a lower band gap material. The InAs on GaAs material system is one of the most studied combinations in which quantum dots form during epitaxy. These QDs form in a Stranski Krastanov manner via a self-assembly process in which the dots nucleate at a critical adatom coverage on a wetting layer of InAs. QDs may be vertically aligned by using the residual strain above a buried dot layer to enhance the nucleation of the second layer of dots. In this work, we show the formation of QDs, which are composed of multiple materials, can be formed through a marriage of these two concepts. In this particular demonstration, we formed InAs dots on GaAs andcrowned the QDs with GaSb and encapsulated the entire structure with GaAs. Atomic Force Microscopy shows additional nucleation between the InAs layers has been minimized and cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy shows the formation the composite structure. Transmission electron microscopy indicated a clear boundary between the GaSb and InAs regions. AFM analysis of the HeQuaD structure shows that GaSb material grows mainly on the two (1 1 0) inclined facets. Thus, the HeQuaD is elongated along the (1 1 0) direction. We have also obtained preliminary photoluminescence (PL) from a 3 layer GaS/InAs HeQuaD structure with a peak around 1.3 microns.

  15. Large quantum dots with small oscillator strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stobbe, Søren; Schlereth, T.W.; Höfling, S.;

    2010-01-01

    We have measured the oscillator strength and quantum efficiency of excitons confined in large InGaAs quantum dots by recording the spontaneous emission decay rate while systematically varying the distance between the quantum dots and a semiconductor-air interface. The size of the quantum dots...... is measured by in-plane transmission electron microscopy and we find average in-plane diameters of 40 nm. We have calculated the oscillator strength of excitons of that size assuming a quantum-dot confinement given by a parabolic in-plane potential and a hard-wall vertical potential and predict a very large...... oscillator strength due to Coulomb effects. This is in stark contrast to the measured oscillator strength, which turns out to be so small that it can be described by excitons in the strong confinement regime. We attribute these findings to exciton localization in local potential minima arising from alloy...

  16. Ge Quantum Dot Infrared Imaging Camera Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated proposes to develop a high performance Ge quantum dots-based infrared (IR) imaging camera on Si substrate. The high sensitivity, large...

  17. Spin current in double quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Hua; Zhang Guo-Feng; Yin Wen; Liang Jiu-Qing

    2004-01-01

    We have studied the dynamical behaviours of two electrons confined in a double quantum dot driven by rotating magnetic fields in terms of the theory of Lewis-Riesenfeld Hermitian invariants for the explicitly time-dependent Hamiltonian. The coherent spin oscillations in the dot provide a generation source for spin current. Exact solutions obtained allow us to investigate the dynamical properties of the spin localization for various initial localized states.

  18. Magnetic quantum dots and magnetic edge states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Starting with defining the magnetic edge state in a magnetic quantum dot, which becomes quite popular nowadays conjunction with a possible candidate for a high density memory device or spintronic materials, various magnetic nano-quantum structures are reviewed in detail. We study the magnetic edge states of the two dimensional electron gas in strong perpendicular magnetic fields. We find that magnetic edge states are formed along the boundary of the magnetic dot, which is formed by a nonuniform distribution of magnetic fields. These magnetic edge states circulate either clockwise or counterclockwise, depending on the number of missing flux quanta, and exhibit quite different properties, as compared to the conventional ones which are induced by electrostatic confinements in the quantum Hall system. We also find that a close relation between the quantum mechanical eigenstates and the classical trajectories in the magnetic dot. When a magnetic dot is located inside a quantum wire, the edge-channel scattering mechanism by the magnetic quantum dot is very different from that by electrostatic dots. Here, the magnetic dot is formed by two different magnetic fields inside and outside the dot. We study the ballistic edge-channel transport and magnetic edge states in this situation. When the inner field is parallel to the outer one, the two-terminal conductance is quantized and shows the features of a transmission barrier and a resonator. On the other hand, when the inner field is reversed, the conductance is not quantized and all channels can be completely reflected in some energy ranges. The difference between the above two cases results from the distinct magnetic confinements. We also describe successfully the edge states of magnetic quantum rings and others in detail

  19. Coherent scattering in a small quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballistic transport in an open small (100 nm) three-terminal quantum dot based on the high-mobility two-dimensional electron gas of the AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction has been analyzed. It has been shown that the gate oscillations of resistance of such a dot arise due to the coherent scattering of electrons on its quasidiscrete levels being suppressed by a weak magnetic field

  20. Exploring Extragalactic Emission: The Hα Dot Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampalli, Rayna; Salzer, John Joseph

    2016-01-01

    The Hα Dot Survey was established as a result of finding point sources of strong line emission in the data obtained for the ALFALFA Hα Survey (Van Sistine et al. 2015). In the latter survey, broad-band R and narrow-band Hα filters were used to examine target galaxies from the ALFALFA blind HI survey (Giovanelli et al. 2005, Haynes et al. 2011). In the process of reducing the ALFALFA Hα Survey data the "Hα Dots" were discovered (Kellar et al. 2008, 2012). Using specialized image analysis tools, a large population of dots has already been detected in the more than 1500 ALFALFA Hα narrow-band images taken with the 0.9m WIYN and 2.1m KPNO telescopes. Follow-up spectra of over 200 Hα Dots discovered from the 0.9m images reveal that these objects are a mix of nearby low-luminosity star-forming galaxies, compact starbursts and Seyfert 2 galaxies at intermediate redshifts, and high-redshift QSOs. Here we present the first list of Hα Dots detected using 2.1m telescope data. The 2.1m images yield a sample of Dots that average almost two magnitudes fainter than those detected with the 0.9m. The current REU project is designed to characterize the set of Hα Dots detected in the deeper 2.1m telescope images, while the broad goals of the Hα Dot Survey include the desire to understand better the chemical evolution of galaxies over cosmic time. This project was supported in part by the NSF REU grant 1358980, by the Maria Mitchell Association (Nantucket, MA), and by the Massachusetts Space Grant Consortium.

  1. Quantum-dot-in-perovskite solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ning, Zhijun

    2015-07-15

    © 2015 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved. Heteroepitaxy - atomically aligned growth of a crystalline film atop a different crystalline substrate - is the basis of electrically driven lasers, multijunction solar cells, and blue-light-emitting diodes. Crystalline coherence is preserved even when atomic identity is modulated, a fact that is the critical enabler of quantum wells, wires, and dots. The interfacial quality achieved as a result of heteroepitaxial growth allows new combinations of materials with complementary properties, which enables the design and realization of functionalities that are not available in the single-phase constituents. Here we show that organohalide perovskites and preformed colloidal quantum dots, combined in the solution phase, produce epitaxially aligned \\'dots-in-a-matrix\\' crystals. Using transmission electron microscopy and electron diffraction, we reveal heterocrystals as large as about 60 nanometres and containing at least 20 mutually aligned dots that inherit the crystalline orientation of the perovskite matrix. The heterocrystals exhibit remarkable optoelectronic properties that are traceable to their atom-scale crystalline coherence: photoelectrons and holes generated in the larger-bandgap perovskites are transferred with 80% efficiency to become excitons in the quantum dot nanocrystals, which exploit the excellent photocarrier diffusion of perovskites to produce bright-light emission from infrared-bandgap quantum-tuned materials. By combining the electrical transport properties of the perovskite matrix with the high radiative efficiency of the quantum dots, we engineer a new platform to advance solution-processed infrared optoelectronics.

  2. Coherent transport through interacting quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiltscher, Bastian

    2012-10-05

    The present thesis is composed of four different works. All deal with coherent transport through interacting quantum dots, which are tunnel-coupled to external leads. There a two main motivations for the use of quantum dots. First, they are an ideal device to study the influence of strong Coulomb repulsion, and second, their discrete energy levels can easily be tuned by external gate electrodes to create different transport regimes. The expression of coherence includes a very wide range of physical correlations and, therefore, the four works are basically independent of each other. Before motivating and introducing the different works in more detail, we remark that in all works a diagrammatic real-time perturbation theory is used. The fermionic degrees of freedom of the leads are traced out and the elements of the resulting reduced density matrix can be treated explicitly by means of a generalized master equation. How this equation is solved, depends on the details of the problem under consideration. In the first of the four works adiabatic pumping through an Aharonov-Bohm interferometer with a quantum dot embedded in each of the two arms is studied. In adiabatic pumping transport is generated by varying two system parameters periodically in time. We consider the two dot levels to be these two pumping parameters. Since they are located in different arms of the interferometer, pumping is a quantum mechanical effect purely relying on coherent superpositions of the dot states. It is very challenging to identify a quantum pumping mechanism in experiments, because a capacitive coupling of the gate electrodes to the leads may yield an undesired AC bias voltage, which is rectified by a time dependent conductance. Therefore, distinguishing features of these two transport mechanisms are required. We find that the dependence on the magnetic field is the key feature. While the pumped charge is an odd function of the magnetic flux, the rectified current is even, at least in

  3. Dot-dye-immunoassay for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Teles Rabello

    1992-06-01

    Full Text Available A new serological assay dot-dye-immunoassay (dot-DIA was evaluated for the diagnosis of schistosomiasis mansoni. This method consist of four steps: (a biding of antigens to a nitrocellulose membrane (NC; (b blocking of free sites of the NC; (c incubation in specific primary antibody; (d detection of primary antibody reactivity by color development using second antibody coupled to textile dyes. Sera from 82 individuals, 61 with Schistosoma mansoni eggs in the stool and 21 stool negative were tested by ELISA, dot-ELISA, and dotDIA. A high level of agreement between the methods tested was observed for all sera tested: ELISA x dot-ELISA: 95.1%, ELISA x dot-DIA: 92.7% and dot-ELISA x dot-DIA: 97.6%. In this study, dot-DIA proved to be a feasible, sensitive, rapid and practical test for the diagnosis of shcistosomiasis.

  4. Realistic model of a vertical pillar quantum dot: Analysis of individual dot data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maksym, P.A.; Nishi, Y.; Austing, D.G.; Hatano, T.; Kouwenhoven, L.P.; Aoki, H.; Tarucha, S.

    2009-01-01

    An accurate model of a vertical pillar quantum dot is described. The full three-dimensional structure of the device containing the dot is taken into account and this leads to an effective two-dimensional model in which electrons move in the two lateral dimensions, the confinement is parabolic, and t

  5. Submonolayer Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ting, David Z.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.; Chang, Yia-Chang

    2010-01-01

    A method has been developed for inserting submonolayer (SML) quantum dots (QDs) or SML QD stacks, instead of conventional Stranski-Krastanov (S-K) QDs, into the active region of intersubband photodetectors. A typical configuration would be InAs SML QDs embedded in thin layers of GaAs, surrounded by AlGaAs barriers. Here, the GaAs and the AlGaAs have nearly the same lattice constant, while InAs has a larger lattice constant. In QD infrared photodetector, the important quantization directions are in the plane perpendicular to the normal incidence radiation. In-plane quantization is what enables the absorption of normal incidence radiation. The height of the S-K QD controls the positions of the quantized energy levels, but is not critically important to the desired normal incidence absorption properties. The SML QD or SML QD stack configurations give more control of the structure grown, retains normal incidence absorption properties, and decreases the strain build-up to allow thicker active layers for higher quantum efficiency.

  6. Understanding electronic systems in semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciftja, Orion

    2013-11-01

    Systems of confined electrons are found everywhere in nature in the form of atoms where the orbiting electrons are confined by the Coulomb attraction of the nucleus. Advancement of nanotechnology has, however, provided us with an alternative way to confine electrons by using artificial confining potentials. A typical structure of this nature is the quantum dot, a nanoscale system which consists of few confined electrons. There are many types of quantum dots ranging from self-assembled to miniaturized semiconductor quantum dots. In this work we are interested in electrostatically confined semiconductor quantum dot systems where the electrostatic confining potential that traps the electrons is generated by external electrodes, doping, strain or other factors. A large number of semiconductor quantum dots of this type are fabricated by applying lithographically patterned gate electrodes or by etching on two-dimensional electron gases in semiconductor heterostructures. Because of this, the whole structure can be treated as a confined two-dimensional electron system. Quantum confinement profoundly affects the way in which electrons interact with each other, and external parameters such as a magnetic field. Since a magnetic field affects both the orbital and the spin motion of the electrons, the interplay between quantum confinement, electron-electron correlation effects and the magnetic field gives rise to very interesting physical phenomena. Thus, confined systems of electrons in a semiconductor quantum dot represent a unique opportunity to study fundamental quantum theories in a controllable atomic-like setup. In this work, we describe some common theoretical models which are used to study confined systems of electrons in a two-dimensional semiconductor quantum dot. The main emphasis of the work is to draw attention to important physical phenomena that arise in confined two-dimensional electron systems under various quantum regimes.

  7. Colloidal Quantum dot photovoltaics: Tuning optoelectronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Colloidal quantum dots combine processing from the solution phase with tunability of the bandgap. Via the size-effect the optical properties can be matched to the solar spectrum for a wide-range photon harvesting. To engineer photovoltaic devices, quantum dots are compressed from their colloidal form into a close-packed nanocrystal matrix, while undergoing a systematic layer-by-layer process. The resulting quantum dot solid is treated as semiconductor medium - one having electron-hole mobilites, free carrier densities and a dielectric constant. While the size-effect determined the band-gap before, it is now the nature of ligand and the treatment route, that influences mentioned electronic parameters. We took the view on the processing steps and found a concept for analysing trap states, moblility and device performance in real quantum dot solids. Our findings emphasize the interplay of mobility and trap-distribution with routes that take special care on the nanocrystal surface and hence conserve optoelectronic qualities of quantum dots for efficient photovoltaic cells. (author)

  8. Photoluminescence of carbon dots from mesoporous silica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D. K.; Razbirin, B. S.; Starukhin, A. N.; Eurov, D. A.; Kurdyukov, D. A.; Stovpiaga, E. Yu; Golubev, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    Photophysical properties of carbon dots were investigated under various excitation conditions and over a wide temperature region - from room to liquid helium temperatures. The carbon dots (CDs) were synthesized using mesoporous silica particles as a reactor and (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) as a precursor. The photoluminescence spectra of CDs exhibit a strong dependence on the excitation wavelength and demonstrate a significant inhomogeneous broadening. Lowering sample temperature reveals the doublet structure of the spectra, which is associated with the vibronic structure of radiative transitions. The vibration energy ∼1200 cm-1 is close to the energy of Csbnd O stretching vibration. Long-lived phosphorescence of carbon dots with its decay time ∼0.2 s at T = 80 K was observed. The fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra are shown to be spectrally separated. The long-lived component of the emission was ascribed to optically forbidden triplet-singlet transitions. The value of the singlet-triplet splitting was found to be about 0.3 eV. Photo-induced polarization of the luminescence of carbon dots was revealed. The degree of the linear polarization is dependent on the wavelengths of both excitation and emitted light. The effect indicates a hidden anisotropy of optical dipole transitions in the dots and demonstrates the loss of the dipole orientation during the electron energy relaxation.

  9. InGaN quantum dot growth in the limits of Stranski-Krastanov and spinodal decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Figge, Stephan; Tessarek, Christian; Aschenbrenner, Timo; Hommel, Detlef [Institute of Solid State Physics, Section Semiconductor Epitaxy, University of Bremen (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Most commonly used for the self-assembling of InGaN quantum dots is a Stranski-Krastanov growth scheme. Often neglected is the influence of spinodal decomposition, although it is frequently discussed with quantum well growth. In this publication we will expose the influence of both mechanisms on the formation process of quantum dots. This paper gives an insight in the theoretical background of quantum dot formation and covers the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. Stranski-Krastanov like growth has been verified by the surface evolution beyond the critical thickness as seen by atomic force microscopy on uncapped samples. The overgrowth of such samples led to dissolution of the quantum dots. Indium compositions within the miscibility gap below critical thickness yielded spinodal phase separation in meander like structures These structures are in agreement with the theory from Hilliard and Cahn. Based on spinodal decomposition overgrowth schemes have been developed which showed reliable quantum dot emission. Such layers have been implemented into device structures such as LEDs and laser structures. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Inorganic passivation and doping control in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Hoogland, Sjoerd H.

    2012-01-01

    We discuss strategies to reduce midgap trap state densities in colloidal quantum dot films and requirements to control doping type and magnitude. We demonstrate that these improvements result in colloidal quantum dot solar cells with certified 7.0% efficiency.

  11. Nanosized Carbon Dots from Organic Matter and Biomass

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yuanyuan; CHEN Tong; MA Yulong

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanoparticles (C-dots) were prepared by relfuxing the combustion soots of candles and corn stalk in nitric acid. The synthesized C-dots were characterized. The results showed a sharp increase in oxygen content and a sharp decrease in carbon content after oxidation. The C-dots had -OH and -CO2H groups introduced which made them hydrophilic. However, their difference was also obvious. The C-dots from candle soot had a 10-45 nm broad particle size distribution, and those from corn stalk soot had a 6-18 nm relatively small and narrow size distribution. The C-dots were mainly ofsp2 andsp3 carbon structure different from the C-dots of diamond-like structure from candle soot. Interestingly, two kinds of C-dots all exhibited unique photoluminescent properties. The obtained C-dots have potential applications in a broad range of areas.

  12. Origins and optimization of entanglement in plasmonically coupled quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Matthew; Larson, Jeffrey; Min, Misun; Wild, Stefan M.; Pelton, Matthew; Gray, Stephen K.

    2016-08-01

    A system of two or more quantum dots interacting with a dissipative plasmonic nanostructure is investigated in detail by using a cavity quantum electrodynamics approach with a model Hamiltonian. We focus on determining and understanding system configurations that generate multiple bipartite quantum entanglements between the occupation states of the quantum dots. These configurations include allowing for the quantum dots to be asymmetrically coupled to the plasmonic system. Analytical solution of a simplified limit for an arbitrary number of quantum dots and numerical simulations and optimization for the two- and three-dot cases are used to develop guidelines for maximizing the bipartite entanglements. For any number of quantum dots, we show that through simple starting states and parameter guidelines, one quantum dot can be made to share a strong amount of bipartite entanglement with all other quantum dots in the system, while entangling all other pairs to a lesser degree.

  13. Filtering algorithm for dotted interferences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterloh, K., E-mail: kurt.osterloh@bam.de [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Division VIII.3, Radiological Methods, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Buecherl, T.; Lierse von Gostomski, Ch. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany); Zscherpel, U.; Ewert, U. [Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing (BAM), Division VIII.3, Radiological Methods, Unter den Eichen 87, 12205 Berlin (Germany); Bock, S. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Lehrstuhl fuer Radiochemie, Walther-Meissner-Str. 3, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-09-21

    An algorithm has been developed to remove reliably dotted interferences impairing the perceptibility of objects within a radiographic image. This particularly is a major challenge encountered with neutron radiographs collected at the NECTAR facility, Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz (FRM II): the resulting images are dominated by features resembling a snow flurry. These artefacts are caused by scattered neutrons, gamma radiation, cosmic radiation, etc. all hitting the detector CCD directly in spite of a sophisticated shielding. This makes such images rather useless for further direct evaluations. One approach to resolve this problem of these random effects would be to collect a vast number of single images, to combine them appropriately and to process them with common image filtering procedures. However, it has been shown that, e.g. median filtering, depending on the kernel size in the plane and/or the number of single shots to be combined, is either insufficient or tends to blur sharp lined structures. This inevitably makes a visually controlled processing image by image unavoidable. Particularly in tomographic studies, it would be by far too tedious to treat each single projection by this way. Alternatively, it would be not only more comfortable but also in many cases the only reasonable approach to filter a stack of images in a batch procedure to get rid of the disturbing interferences. The algorithm presented here meets all these requirements. It reliably frees the images from the snowy pattern described above without the loss of fine structures and without a general blurring of the image. It consists of an iterative, within a batch procedure parameter free filtering algorithm aiming to eliminate the often complex interfering artefacts while leaving the original information untouched as far as possible.

  14. Coherence and dephasing in self-assembled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvam, Jørn Märcher; Leosson, K.; Birkedal, Dan

    2003-01-01

    We measured dephasing times in InGaAl/As self-assembled quantum dots at low temperature using degenerate four-wave mixing. At 0K, the coherence time of the quantum dots is lifetime limited, whereas at finite temperatures pure dephasing by exciton-phonon interactions governs the quantum dot...... coherence. The inferred homogeneous line widths are significantly smaller than the line widths usually observed in the photoluminescence from single quantum dots indicating an additional inhomogeneours broadening mechanism in the latter....

  15. Short-wave infrared colloidal quantum dot photodetectors on silicon

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Chen; Gassenq, Alban; Justo, Yolanda; Yakunin, Sergii; Heiss, Wolfgang; Hens, Zeger; Roelkens, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of colloidal quantum dots, PbS and HgTe, are explored for SWIR photodetectors application. The colloidal dots are prepared by hot injection chemical synthesis, with organic ligands around the dots keeping them stable in solution. For the purpose of achieving efficient carrier transport between the dots in a film, these long organic ligands are replaced by shorter, inorganic ligands. We report uniform, ultra-smooth colloidal QD films without cracks realized by dip-coat...

  16. Templating growth of gold nanostructures with a CdSe quantum dot array

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Neelima; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Yao, Yuan; Schwartzkopf, Matthias; Yu, Shun; Roth, Stephan V.; Müller-Buschbaum, Peter; Paul, Amitesh

    2015-01-01

    In optoelectronic devices based on quantum dot arrays, thin nanolayers of gold are preferred as stable metal contacts and for connecting recombination centers. The optimal morphology requirements are uniform arrays with precisely controlled positions and sizes over a large area with long range ordering since this strongly affects device performance. To understand the development of gold layer nanomorphology, the detailed mechanism of structure formation are probed with time-resolved grazing i...

  17. Quantum Dots in Photonic Crystal Waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sollner, Immo Nathanael

    This Thesis is focused on the study of quantum electrodynamics in photonic crystal waveguides. We investigate the interplay between a single quantum dot and the fundamental mode of the photonic crystal waveguide. We demonstrate experimental coupling eciencies for the spontaneous emission...... into the mode exceeding 98% for emitters spectrally close to the band-edge of the waveguide mode. In addition we illustrate the broadband nature of the underlying eects, by obtaining coupling eciencies above 90% for quantum dots detuned from the band edge by as far as 20nm. These values are in good agreement...... quantum-dot-waveguide coupling. Such a structure is ideally suited for a number of applications in quantum information processing and among others we propose an on-chip spin-photon interface, a single photon transistor, and a deterministic cNOT gate....

  18. Charged-Exciton Complexes in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang

    2001-01-01

    It is known experimentally that stable charged-exciton complexes can exist in low-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures. Much less is known about the properties of such charged-exciton complexes since three-body problems are very difficult to be solved, even numerically. Here we introduce the correlated hyperspherical harmonics as basis functions to solve the hyperangular equation for negatively and positively charged excitons (trions) in a harmonic quantum dot. By using this method, we have calculated the energy spectra of the low-lying states of a charged exciton as a function of the radius of quantum dot. Based on symmetry analysis, the level crossover as the dot radius increases can be fully explained as the results of symmetry constraint.``

  19. Barrier Li Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYi-Min; LIXiao-Zhu; YANWen-Hong; BAOCheng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The methods for the few-body system are introduced to investigate the states of the barrier Li quantum dots (QDs) in an arbitrary strength of magnetic field. The configuration, which consists of a positive ion located on the z-axis at a distaneed from the two-dimensional QD plane (the x-y plane) and three electrons in the dot plane bound by the positive ion, is called a barrier Li center. The system, which consists of three electrons in the dot plane bound by the ion,is called a barrier Li QD. The dependence of energy of the state of the barrier Li QD on an external magnetic field B and the distance d is obtained. The angular momentum L of the ground states is found to jump not only with the variation orB but also with d.

  20. Branch management into micropipeline joint dot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar Tyanev

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers problems related to hardware implementation of computational process with conditional jumps. Hardware refers to asynchronous pipeline organization at microoperational level. Exploration is dedicated to one of the tasks presented in (Tyanev, D., 2009 concerning to micropipeline controller design to control micropipeline stage into joint dot of branch algorithm. Joint dot is the point at which few preceding branches are combined. It appears inevitably into conditional jump structures and this is the reason for the actuality of its problem. Analysis of this new task is presented and request arbitration functioning principles are formulated for the incoming to joint dot requests. The arbiter is responsible for the fair choice on which depends steady peformance of separate pipeline brances. Paper also describes pipeline controller synthesis and analysis of its operation in two variants: about 2-phase and 4-phase data transfer protocol. The synthesized asynchronous arbiter scheme is invariant to the type of pipeline protocol.

  1. Photoluminescence studies of single InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Jensen, Jacob Riis; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    1999-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are considered a promising material system for future optical devices and quantum computers. We have studied the low-temperature photoluminescence properties of single InGaAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs. The high spatial resolution required for resolving single dots...

  2. Imaging vasculature and lymphatic flow in mice using quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballou, Byron; Ernst, Lauren A.; Andreko, Susan;

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dots are ideal probes for fluorescent imaging of vascular and lymphatic tissues. On injection into appropriate sites, red- and near-infrared-emitting quantum dots provide excellent definition of vasculature, lymphoid organs, and lymph nodes draining both normal tissues and tumors. We detail...... methods for use with commercially available quantum dots and discuss common difficulties....

  3. AHE measurements of very thin films and nanosized dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikuchi, N.; Murillo, R.; Lodder, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we present anomalous Hall effect analysis from very thin Co (0.5 nm) film, Co/Pt multilayers and large areas of nanosized dots as well as from a few magnetic dots having a diameter of 120 nm. The dot arrayis prepared from Co/Pt multilayer by using laser interference lithography (LIL) w

  4. Bright infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2013-01-01

    Record-brightness infrared LEDs based on colloidal quantum-dots have been achieved through control of the spacing between adjacent quantum-dots. By tuning the size of quantum-dots, the emission wavelengths can be tuned between 900nm and 1650nm. © 2013 Materials Research Society.

  5. Engineered Quantum Dot Single Photon Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Buckley, Sonia; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2012-01-01

    Fast, high efficiency, and low error single photon sources are required for implementation of a number of quantum information processing applications. The fastest triggered single photon sources to date have been demonstrated using epitaxially grown semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), which can be conveniently integrated with optical microcavities. Recent advances in QD technology, including demonstrations of high temperature and telecommunications wavelength single photon emission, have made QD single photon sources more practical. Here we discuss the applications of single photon sources and their various requirements, before reviewing the progress made on a quantum dot platform in meeting these requirements.

  6. Optical studies of capped quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Wuister, S.F.

    2005-01-01

    This thesis describes the synthesis and spectroscopy of CdSe and CdTe semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The first chapter gives an introduction into the unique size dependent properties of semiconductor quantum dots. Highly luminescent QDs of CdSe and CdTe were prepared via a high temperature method in a glovebox. These QDs are soluble in organics but can be transferred into water or ethanol after exchange of the surfactants by various thiols (HS-R). For CdTe the exchange with thiols has a be...

  7. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  8. Resonant tunneling in graphene pseudomagnetic quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Zenan; Bahamon, D A; Pereira, Vitor M; Park, Harold S; Campbell, D K; Neto, A H Castro

    2013-06-12

    Realistic relaxed configurations of triaxially strained graphene quantum dots are obtained from unbiased atomistic mechanical simulations. The local electronic structure and quantum transport characteristics of y-junctions based on such dots are studied, revealing that the quasi-uniform pseudomagnetic field induced by strain restricts transport to Landau level- and edge state-assisted resonant tunneling. Valley degeneracy is broken in the presence of an external field, allowing the selective filtering of the valley and chirality of the states assisting in the resonant tunneling. Asymmetric strain conditions can be explored to select the exit channel of the y-junction.

  9. Mitigation of quantum dot cytotoxicity by microencapsulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Romoser

    Full Text Available When CdSe/ZnS-polyethyleneimine (PEI quantum dots (QDs are microencapsulated in polymeric microcapsules, human fibroblasts are protected from acute cytotoxic effects. Differences in cellular morphology, uptake, and viability were assessed after treatment with either microencapsulated or unencapsulated dots. Specifically, QDs contained in microcapsules terminated with polyethylene glycol (PEG mitigate contact with and uptake by cells, thus providing a tool to retain particle luminescence for applications such as extracellular sensing and imaging. The microcapsule serves as the "first line of defense" for containing the QDs. This enables the individual QD coating to be designed primarily to enhance the function of the biosensor.

  10. Hydrophilic colloidal quantum dots with long peptide chain coats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dąbrowska, Anna; Nyk, Marcin; Worch, Remigiusz; Grzyb, Joanna

    2016-09-01

    Here, the transition of colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QDs) from hydrophobic to hydrophilic environments after coating the surface with long peptide chains of membrane scaffold proteins (MSP) is reported. The intermediate step included the solubilization of QDs with detergents, where n-octyl glucoside was the most promising ligand. Furthermore, size analysis by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, gel filtration and atomic force microscopy suggested that the obtained QD-MSP conjugates were primarily discoidal and were likely formed from single QDs tightly encircled by helix belts. In addition, Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy analysis confirmed the preservation of the secondary structure of most proteins during conjugate formation, with no signs of denaturation. The obtained QD-MSP conjugates were optimal in terms of stability in water environments, suggesting that it is possible to obtain QDs with single peptide coats and providing the first guidelines for future research in this direction. PMID:27289307

  11. Edge-state blockade of transport in quantum dot arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Mónica; Niklas, Michael; Platero, Gloria; Kohler, Sigmund

    2016-03-01

    We propose a transport blockade mechanism in quantum dot arrays and conducting molecules based on an interplay of Coulomb repulsion and the formation of edge states. As a model we employ a dimer chain that exhibits a topological phase transition. The connection to a strongly biased electron source and drain enables transport. We show that the related emergence of edge states is manifest in the shot noise properties as it is accompanied by a crossover from bunched electron transport to a Poissonian process. For both regions we develop a scenario that can be captured by a rate equation. The resulting analytical expressions for the Fano factor agree well with the numerical solution of a full quantum master equation.

  12. Chiroptical activity in colloidal quantum dots coated with achiral ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikau, Dzmitry; Savateeva, Diana; Gaponik, Nikolai; Govorov, Alexander O; Rakovich, Yury P

    2016-01-25

    We studied the chiroptical properties of colloidal solution of CdSe and CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with a cubic lattice structure which were initially prepared without use of any chiral molecules and coated with achiral ligands. We demonstrate circular dichroism (CD) activity around first and second excitonic transition of these CdSe based nanocrystals. We consider that this chiroptical activity is caused by imbalance in racemic mixtures of QDs between the left and right handed nanoparticles, which appears as a result of the formation of various defects or incorporation of impurities into crystallographic structure during their synthesis. We demonstrate that optical activity of colloidal solution of CdSe QDs with achiral ligands weakly depends on the QDs size and number of ZnS monolayers, but does not depend on the nature of achiral ligands or polarity of the solution. PMID:26832599

  13. Molecular beam epitaxy of InN dots on nitrided sapphire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Dengel, Radu-Gabriel; Stebounova, LarissaV.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2007-04-20

    A series of self-assembled InN dots are grown by radio frequency (RF) plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) directly on nitrided sapphire. Initial nitridation of the sapphire substrates at 900 C results in the formation of a rough AlN surface layer, which acts as a very thin buffer layer and facilitates the nucleation of the InN dots according to the Stranski-Krastanow growth mode, with a wetting layer of {approx}0.9 nm. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that well-confined InN nanoislands with the greatest height/width at half-height ratio of 0.64 can be grown at 460 C. Lower substrate temperatures result in a reduced aspect ratio due to a lower diffusion rate of the In adatoms, whereas the thermal decomposition of InN truncates the growth at T>500 C. The densities of separated dots vary between 1.0 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} and 2.5 x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2} depending on the growth time. Optical response of the InN dots under laser excitation is studied with apertureless near-field scanning optical microscopy and photoluminescence spectroscopy, although no photoluminescence is observed from these samples. In view of the desirable implementation of InN nanostructures into photonic devices, the results indicate that nitrided sapphire is a suitable substrate for growing self-assembled InN nanodots.

  14. Optical control of nonlinearly dressed states in an individual quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardelt, P.-L.; Koller, M.; Simmet, T.; Hanschke, L.; Bechtold, A.; Regler, A.; Wierzbowski, J.; Riedl, H.; Finley, J. J.; Müller, K.

    2016-04-01

    We report nonlinear resonance fluorescence of an individual semiconductor quantum dot. By driving a single semiconductor quantum dot via a two-photon transition, we probe the linewidth of two-photon excitation processes and show that, similar to their single-photon counterparts, they are close to being Fourier limited at low temperatures. The evolution of the population of excitonic states with increasing Rabi energy exhibits a clear S-shaped behavior, indicative of the nonlinear response via the two-photon excitation process. Numerical calculations of the nonlinear response using a four-level atomic system representing the manifold of excitonic and biexcitonic states in the quantum dot are in excellent agreement with our experiments and reveal the effect of interactions with LA phonons in the solid-state environment. Finally, we demonstrate the formation of dressed states emerging from a nonlinear two-photon interaction between the quantum dot and the optical excitation field. The nonlinear optical dressing induces a mixing of all four excitonic states that allows direct optical tuning of the polarization selection rules and energies of the dressed states in the artificial atom. We expect our results to play a pivotal role for the generation of nonclassical photon pairs desired for applications in quantum communication and fundamental experiments on quantum optical properties of photons.

  15. Dot Detection of Braille Images Using A Mixture of Beta Distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amany Al-Saleh

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Braille is a tactile format of written communication for people with low vision and blindness worldwide. Optical Braille Recognition (OBR offers many benefits to Braille users and people who work with them. Approach: This study presents an algorithm for detecting dots composing braille characters in an image of embossed braille material obtained by an optical scanner. We assumed that a mixture of Beta distributions could model the histogram of a scanned braille document. The core of the proposed method was the use of stability of thresholding with Beta distribution to initiate the process of thresholds estimation. Segmented Braille image was used to form a grid that contains recto dots and another one that contains verso dots. Results: Braille dots composing characters on both singlesided and double-sided documents were automatically identified from those grids with excellent accuracy. Conclusion: The experiment showed that the proposed method obtained very good results but it requires more testing on different scanned Braille document images.

  16. Nanodots formation with slow highly charged ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, Yasunori [Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo and RIKEN (Japan)

    2007-06-15

    We have been developing a compact electron beam ion source with a high-T{sub c}superconductor as a solenoid magnet, which can be operated at liquid nitrogen temperature, and can deliver slow highly-charged ions as high as q 42. With this ion source together with other ion sources, nanodot formation processes were studied for a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) plate as a target. The impact site was observed with both the scanning tunnelling microscope (STM) mode and non-contact atomic force microscope (NCAFM) mode. It was found that protrusion-like dots were observed for both modes at the same position, and one HCI induced one dot. The dot size (diameter) and height were observed to be more or less the same for both modes, i.e, an HCI impact induces topographic modification on the HOPG surface. The dot size and height were measured as functions of the charge state (q = 8-46) and the kinetic energy (E = 1-300 keV) of highly-charged ions. It was found that the dot size increased linearly with the charge state, although the dependence on the kinetic energy was very weak if any.

  17. Polaron-induced lattice distortion of (In,Ga)As/GaAs quantum dots by optically excited carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiemeyer, S; Bombeck, M; Göhring, H; Paulus, M; Sternemann, C; Nase, J; Wirkert, F J; Möller, J; Büning, T; Seeck, O H; Reuter, D; Wieck, A D; Bayer, M; Tolan, M

    2016-10-21

    We report on a high resolution x-ray diffraction study unveiling the effect of carriers optically injected into (In,Ga)As quantum dots on the surrounding GaAs crystal matrix. We find a tetragonal lattice expansion with enhanced elongation along the [001] crystal axis that is superimposed on an isotropic lattice extension. The isotropic contribution arises from excitation induced lattice heating as confirmed by temperature dependent reference studies. The tetragonal expansion on the femtometer scale is tentatively attributed to polaron formation by carriers trapped in the quantum dots. PMID:27622774

  18. Addition of Zn during the phosphine-based synthesis of indium phospide quantum dots: doping and surface passivation

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia E. Mordvinova; Vinokurov, Alexander A; Lebedev, Oleg I.; Kuznetsova, Tatiana A.; Dorofeev, Sergey G.

    2015-01-01

    Zinc-doped InP(Zn) colloidal quantum dots (QDs) with narrow size distribution and low defect concentration were grown for the first time via a novel phosphine synthetic route and over a wide range of Zn doping. We report the influence of Zn on the optical properties of the obtained quantum dots. We propose a mechanism for the introduction of Zn in the QDs and show that the incorporation of Zn atoms into the InP lattice leads to the formation of Zn acceptor levels and a luminescence tail in th...

  19. Carrier relaxation in (In,Ga)As quantum dots with magnetic field-induced anharmonic level structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtze, H.; Bayer, M.

    2016-07-01

    Sophisticated models have been worked out to explain the fast relaxation of carriers into quantum dot ground states after non-resonant excitation, overcoming the originally proposed phonon bottleneck. We apply a magnetic field along the quantum dot heterostructure growth direction to transform the confined level structure, which can be approximated by a Fock-Darwin spectrum, from a nearly equidistant level spacing at zero field to strong anharmonicity in finite fields. This changeover leaves the ground state carrier population rise time unchanged suggesting that fast relaxation is maintained upon considerable changes of the level spacing. This corroborates recent models explaining the relaxation by polaron formation in combination with quantum kinetic effects.

  20. Quantum dot-block copolymer hybrids with improved properties and their application to quantum dot light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorn, Matthias; Bae, Wan Ki; Kwak, Jeonghun; Lee, Hyemin; Lee, Changhee; Zentel, Rudolf; Char, Kookheon

    2009-05-26

    To combine the optical properties of CdSe@ZnS quantum dots (QDs) with the electrical properties of semiconducting polymers, we prepared QD/polymer hybrids by grafting a block copolymer (BCP) containing thiol-anchoring moieties (poly(para-methyl triphenylamine-b-cysteamine acrylamide)) onto the surfaces of QDs through the ligand exchange procedure. The prepared QD/polymer hybrids possess improved processability such as enhanced solubility in various organic solvents as well as the film formation properties along with the improved colloidal stability derived from the grafted polymer shells. We also demonstrated light-emitting diodes based on QD/polymer hybrids, exhibiting the improved device performance (i.e., 3-fold increase in the external quantum efficiency) compared with the devices prepared by pristine (unmodified) QDs.

  1. A study of the lunisolar secular resonance $2dot{omega}+dot{Omega}=0$

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra eCelletti

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of small bodies around the Earth has gained a renewed interest,since the awareness of the problems that space debris can cause in thenearby future. A relevant role in space debris is played by lunisolarsecular resonances, which might contribute to an increase of the orbitalelements, typically of the eccentricity. We concentrate our attention onthe lunisolar secular resonance described by the relation$2dot{omega}+dot{Omega}=0$, where $omega$ and $Omega$ denotethe argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node of the space debris.We introduce three different models with increasing complexity. We show that the growth in eccentricity, as observed in space debris located in the MEO region at the inclination about equal to $56^circ$, can be explained as a natural effect of the secular resonance $2dot{omega}+dot{Omega}=0$, while the chaotic variations of the orbital parameters are the result of interaction and overlapping of nearby resonances.

  2. A study of the lunisolar secular resonance 2dot{ω}+dot{Ω}=0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celletti, Alessandra; Gales, Catalin

    2016-03-01

    The dynamics of small bodies around the Earth has gained a renewed interest, since the awareness of the problems that space debris can cause in the nearby future. A relevant role in space debris is played by lunisolar secular resonances, which might contribute to an increase of the orbital elements, typically of the eccentricity. We concentrate our attention on the lunisolar secular resonance described by the relation 2dot{ω}+dot{Ω}=0, where ω and Ω denote the argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node of the space debris. We introduce three different models with increasing complexity. We show that the growth in eccentricity, as observed in space debris located in the MEO region at the inclination about equal to 56°, can be explained as a natural effect of the secular resonance 2dot{ω}+dot{Ω}=0, while the chaotic variations of the orbital parameters are the result of interaction and overlapping of nearby resonances.

  3. A study of the lunisolar secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$

    CERN Document Server

    Celletti, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of small bodies around the Earth has gained a renewed interest, since the awareness of the problems that space debris can cause in the nearby future. A relevant role in space debris is played by lunisolar secular resonances, which might contribute to an increase of the orbital elements, typically of the eccentricity. We concentrate our attention on the lunisolar secular resonance described by the relation $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, where $\\omega$ and $\\Omega$ denote the argument of perigee and the longitude of the ascending node of the space debris. We introduce three different models with increasing complexity. We show that the growth in eccentricity, as observed in space debris located in the MEO region at the inclination about equal to $56^\\circ$, can be explained as a natural effect of the secular resonance $2\\dot{\\omega}+\\dot{\\Omega}=0$, while the chaotic variations of the orbital parameters are the result of interaction and overlapping of nearby resonances.

  4. Electrically addressing a single self-assembled quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, D J P; Atkinson, P; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J

    2006-01-01

    We report on the use of an aperture in an aluminum oxide layer to restrict current injection into a single self-assembled InAs quantum dot, from an ensemble of such dots within a large mesa. The insulating aperture is formed through the wet-oxidation of a layer of AlAs. Under photoluminescence we observe that only one quantum dot in the ensemble exhibits a Stark shift, and that the same single dot is visible under electroluminescence. Autocorrelation measurements performed on the electroluminescence confirm that we are observing emission from a single quantum dot.

  5. The Influence of Formulating a Damping Solution on Dot Gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povilas Mikalainis

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Difference in dot gain using various additives to the damping solution was investigated on two offset web presses. Dot gain was measured using a densitometer and calculated considering CIE L*a*b* coordinates. It was found that while using a non alcohol additive instead of the alcohol one, dot gain became smaller and printing stability was lower. Changes in dot gain depend on the ink that may vary in colours. The influence of changes in dot gain on the colour was determined. Besides, it was found that differences in colour were unacceptable in many cases.Article in Lithuanian

  6. Synthesis of CdSe quantum dots for quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Neetu, E-mail: singh.neetu1985@gmail.com; Kapoor, Avinashi [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi-110 021 (India); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Mehra, R. M. [School of Engineering and Technology, Sharda University, Greater Noida-201 306, U.P. (India)

    2014-04-24

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) of size 0.85 nm were synthesized using chemical route. ZnO based Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cell (QDSSC) was fabricated using CdSe QDs as sensitizer. The Pre-synthesized QDs were found to be successfully adsorbed on front ZnO electrode and had potential to replace organic dyes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). The efficiency of QDSSC was obtained to be 2.06 % at AM 1.5.

  7. Synthesis of CdSe quantum dots for quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) of size 0.85 nm were synthesized using chemical route. ZnO based Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cell (QDSSC) was fabricated using CdSe QDs as sensitizer. The Pre-synthesized QDs were found to be successfully adsorbed on front ZnO electrode and had potential to replace organic dyes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). The efficiency of QDSSC was obtained to be 2.06 % at AM 1.5

  8. Ostwald's ripening of nanostructures with quantum dots

    CERN Document Server

    Vengrenovich, R D; Yarema, S V

    2001-01-01

    The scenario of quantum dots shaping during ripening three-dimensional islands obtained by heteroepitaxy in a Stranski-Krastanow mode, is offered. It is shown that throughout the growth of dislocations with their subsequent separation from the island bottom, the size distribution function becomes narrower with noticeable diminishing the dispersion. The possible reasons for signal attenuation of Ostwald's ripening islands are analyzed

  9. Ostwald's ripening of nanostructures with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scenario of quantum dots shaping during ripening three-dimensional islands obtained by heteroepitaxy in a Stranski-Krastanow mode, is offered. It is shown that throughout the growth of dislocations with their subsequent separation from the island bottom, the size distribution function becomes narrower with noticeable diminishing the dispersion. The possible reasons for signal attenuation of Ostwald's ripening islands are analyzed

  10. Saturating optical resonances in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Selvakumar V.; Rustagi, K. C.

    Optical bistability in quantum dots, recently proposed by Chemla and Miller, is studied in a two-resonance model. We show that for such classical electromagnetic resonances the applicability of a two-resonance model is far more restrictive than for those in atoms.

  11. Quantum dot devices for optical communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørk, Jesper

    2005-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are often described as "artificial atoms": They are small nanometre-sized structures in which electrons only are allowed to exist at certain discrete levels due to size quantization, thus allowing the engineering of fundamental properties such as the coupling to light. ...

  12. Single Molecule Applications of Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Elmelund; Jauffred, Liselotte; Brewer, Jonathan R.;

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescent nanocrystals composed of semiconductor materials were first introduced for biological applications in the late 1990s. The focus of this review is to give a brief survey of biological applications of quantum dots (QDs) at the single QD sensitivity level. These are described as follows: 1...

  13. Optical anisotropy in vertically coupled quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Ping; Langbein, Wolfgang Werner; Leosson, Kristjan;

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the polarization of surface and edge-emitted photoluminescence (PL) from structures with vertically coupled In0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs quantum dots (QD's) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The PL polarization is found to be strongly dependent on the number of stacked layers. While single...

  14. Decoherence in Nearly-Isolated Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folk, J.; M. Marcus, C.; Harris jr, J.

    2000-01-01

    Decoherence in nearly-isolated GaAs quantum dots is investigated using the change in average Coulomb blockade peak height upon breaking time-reversal symmetry. The normalized change in average peak height approaches the predicted universal value of 1/4 at temperatures well below the single...

  15. Producing Quantum Dots by Spray Pyrolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banger, Kulbinder; Jin, Michael H.; Hepp, Aloysius

    2006-01-01

    An improved process for making nanocrystallites, commonly denoted quantum dots (QDs), is based on spray pyrolysis. Unlike the process used heretofore, the improved process is amenable to mass production of either passivated or non-passivated QDs, with computer control to ensure near uniformity of size.

  16. System and method for making quantum dots

    KAUST Repository

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2015-05-28

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods of making quantum dots (QDs) (passivated or unpassivated) using a continuous flow process, systems for making QDs using a continuous flow process, and the like. In one or more embodiments, the QDs produced using embodiments of the present disclosure can be used in solar photovoltaic cells, bio-imaging, IR emitters, or LEDs.

  17. Amphoteric CdSe nanocrystalline quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad A

    2008-06-25

    The nanocrystal quantum dot (NQD) charge states strongly influence their electrical transport properties in photovoltaic and electroluminescent devices, optical gains in NQD lasers, and the stability of the dots in thin films. We report a unique electrostatic nature of CdSe NQDs, studied by electrophoretic methods. When we submerged a pair of metal electrodes, in a parallel plate capacitor configuration, into a dilute solution of CdSe NQDs in hexane, and applied a DC voltage across the pair, thin films of CdSe NQDs were deposited on both the positive and the negative electrodes. Extensive characterizations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman studies revealed that the films on both the positive and the negative electrodes were identical in every respect, clearly indicating that: (1) a fraction (<1%) of the CdSe NQDs in free form in hexane solution are charged and, more importantly, (2) there are equal numbers of positive and negative CdSe NQDs in the hexane solution. Experiments also show that the number of deposited dots is at least an order of magnitude higher than the number of initially charged dots, indicating regeneration. We used simple thermodynamics to explain such amphoteric nature and the charging/regeneration of the CdSe NQDs.

  18. Quantum Dot Devices for Optical Signal Processing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui

    with other semiconductor materials. The understanding of such properties is important in order to improve the performance of existing devices and to trigger the development of new semiconductor devices for dierent optical signal processing functionalities in the future. We present a detailed quantum dot...

  19. Competing interactions in semiconductor quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van den Berg; G.P. Brandino; O. El Araby; R.M. Konik; V. Gritsev; J.S. Caux

    2014-01-01

    We introduce an integrability-based method enabling the study of semiconductor quantum dot models incorporating both the full hyperfine interaction as well as a mean-field treatment of dipole-dipole interactions in the nuclear spin bath. By performing free-induction decay and spin-echo simulations w

  20. Enabling biomedical research with designer quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomczak, N.; Janczewski, D.; Dorokhin, D.V.; Han, M-Y; Vancso, G.J.; Navarro, Melba; Planell, Josep A.

    2012-01-01

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are a new class of semiconductor nanoparticulate luminophores, which are actively researched for novel applications in biology and nanomedicine. In this review, the recent progress in the design and applications of QD labels for in vitro and in vivo imaging of cells is presented.

  1. Quantum dot waveguides: ultrafast dynamics and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we analyze, based on numerical simulations, the dynamics of semiconductor devices incorporating quantum dots (QDs). In particular we emphasize the unique ultrafast carrier dynamics occurring between discrete QD bound states, and its influence on QD semiconductor optical amplifiers...

  2. Tunneling Processes in Optically Excited Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiu-Ping; WEI Hua-Rong; XU Li-Ping; GONG Jian-Ping; YAN Wei-Xian

    2011-01-01

    The single-electron tunneling processes in optically excited coupled quantum dots can be divided into two parts: the electron and the hole parts, which are analytically obtained in the framework of the Keldysh formalism. The tunneling process is selective tunneling, which results in dark tunneling states. The tunneling currents are co-determined by the resonance energies and probability distributions of the particular quantum channels defined by the electron-hole complex resonant states.%The single-electron tunneling processes in optically excited coupled quantum dots can be divided into two parts:the electron and the hole parts,which are analytically obtained in the framework of the Keldysh formalism.The tunneling process is selective tunneling,which results in dark tunneling states.The tunneling currents are co-determined by the resonance energies and probability distributions of the particular quantum channels defined by the electron-hole complex resonant states.Probing the fine-energy structure of the exciton complexes[1-10] in an optically excited quantum dot is an important way of exploring new mechanisms in nanostructures.Single electron tunneling (SET) devices consisting of a central quantum dot (QD) and a tunneling coupled source and drain have become important optoelectronic nano-devices.[11,12

  3. Inter-dot strain field effect on the optoelectronic properties of realistic InP lateral quantum-dot molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on numerical simulations of InP surface lateral quantum-dot molecules on In0.48Ga0.52 P buffer, using a model strictly derived by experimental results by extrapolation of the molecules shape from atomic force microscopy images. Our study has been inspired by the comparison of a photoluminescence spectrum of a high-density InP surface quantum dot sample with a numerical ensemble average given by a weighted sum of simulated single quantum-dot spectra. A lack of experimental optical response from the smaller dots of the sample is found to be due to strong inter-dot strain fields, which influence the optoelectronic properties of lateral quantum-dot molecules. Continuum electromechanical, k→·p→ bandstructure, and optical calculations are presented for two different molecules, the first composed of two dots of nearly identical dimensions (homonuclear), the second of two dots with rather different sizes (heteronuclear). We show that in the homonuclear molecule the hydrostatic strain raises a potential barrier for the electrons in the connection zone between the dots, while conversely the holes do not experience any barrier, which considerably increases the coupling. Results for the heteronuclear molecule show instead that its dots do not appear as two separate and distinguishable structures, but as a single large dot, and no optical emission is observed in the range of higher energies where the smaller dot is supposed to emit. We believe that in samples of such a high density the smaller dots result as practically incorporated into bigger molecular structures, an effect strongly enforced by the inter-dot strain fields, and consequently it is not possible to experimentally obtain a separate optical emission from the smaller dots

  4. Inter-dot strain field effect on the optoelectronic properties of realistic InP lateral quantum-dot molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barettin, Daniele, E-mail: Daniele.Barettin@uniroma2.it; Auf der Maur, Matthias [Department of Electronic Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133, Rome (Italy); De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Casalboni, Mauro [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Via del Politecnico 1 00133 Rome, Italy and INSTM, Unitá di ricerca dell' Universitá di Roma “Tor Vergata,” Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133, Rome (Italy); Pecchia, Alessandro [CNR-ISMN, via Salaria Km. 29.300, 00017 Monterotondo, Rome (Italy)

    2015-03-07

    We report on numerical simulations of InP surface lateral quantum-dot molecules on In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52 }P buffer, using a model strictly derived by experimental results by extrapolation of the molecules shape from atomic force microscopy images. Our study has been inspired by the comparison of a photoluminescence spectrum of a high-density InP surface quantum dot sample with a numerical ensemble average given by a weighted sum of simulated single quantum-dot spectra. A lack of experimental optical response from the smaller dots of the sample is found to be due to strong inter-dot strain fields, which influence the optoelectronic properties of lateral quantum-dot molecules. Continuum electromechanical, k{sup →}·p{sup →} bandstructure, and optical calculations are presented for two different molecules, the first composed of two dots of nearly identical dimensions (homonuclear), the second of two dots with rather different sizes (heteronuclear). We show that in the homonuclear molecule the hydrostatic strain raises a potential barrier for the electrons in the connection zone between the dots, while conversely the holes do not experience any barrier, which considerably increases the coupling. Results for the heteronuclear molecule show instead that its dots do not appear as two separate and distinguishable structures, but as a single large dot, and no optical emission is observed in the range of higher energies where the smaller dot is supposed to emit. We believe that in samples of such a high density the smaller dots result as practically incorporated into bigger molecular structures, an effect strongly enforced by the inter-dot strain fields, and consequently it is not possible to experimentally obtain a separate optical emission from the smaller dots.

  5. Inhomogeneous charging and screening effects in semiconductor quantum dot arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetzler, R [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Kunert, R [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Wacker, A [Fysiska Institutionen, Lunds Universitet, Box 118, 22100 Lund (Sweden); Schoell, E [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    The electronic properties of quantum dot (QD) arrays are strongly influenced by the Coulomb interaction of electrons within the dot as well as with those in neighbouring dots. In this paper, we investigate this behaviour taking into account screening by a free electron gas in the vicinity of the QDs. We find pronounced effects for standard capacitance[ndash]voltage (CV) measurements of QD structures embedded in a pn-diode. In particular, we show that the three-dimensional nature of the problem is crucial for devices with low dot-density, whereas the self-consistency between electron depletion in the bulk layer and dot occupation is important for high dot-densities. The Coulomb interaction between the dots induces a broadening of the peaks in the CV characteristic which is comparable with the effect of disordered QD arrays, where we considered realistic size and position fluctuations obtained by a kinetic Monte Carlo simulation.

  6. Growth and characterization of InP/In0.48Ga0.52P quantum dots optimized for single-photon emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the growth of self-assembled InP/InGaP quantum dots, as well as their optical and structural properties are presented and discussed. The QDs were grown on In0.48Ga0.52P, lattice matched to GaAs. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultra-low growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/μm2 is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Both excitonic and biexcitonic emissions are observed from single dots, appearing as doublets with a fine-structure splitting of 320 μeV. Hanbury Brown-Twiss correlation measurements for the excitonic emission under cw excitation show anti-bunching behavior with an autocorrelation value of g(2)(0)=0.2. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography. The formation of well-ordered chains of InP quantum dots on GaAs (001) substrates by using self-organized In0.48Ga0.52P surface undulations as a template is also demonstrated. The ordering requires neither stacked layers of quantum dots nor substrate misorientation. The structures are investigated by polarization-dependent photoluminescence together with transmission electron microscopy. Luminescence from the In0.48Ga0.52P matrix is polarized in one crystallographic direction due to anisotropic strain arising from a lateral compositional modulation. The photoluminescence measurements show enhanced linear polarization in the alignment direction of quantum dots. A polarization degree of 66% is observed. The optical anisotropy is achieved with a straightforward heterostructure, requiring only a single layer of QDs.

  7. A Quick and Parallel Analytical Method Based on Quantum Dots Labeling for ToRCH-Related Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Ding

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Quantum dot is a special kind of nanomaterial composed of periodic groups of II–VI, III–V or IV–VI materials. Their high quantum yield, broad absorption with narrow photoluminescence spectra and high resistance to photobleaching, make them become a promising labeling substance in biological analysis. Here, we report a quick and parallel analytical method based on quantum dots for ToRCH-related antibodies including Toxoplasma gondii, Rubella virus, Cytomegalovirus and Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 and 2 (HSV2. Firstly, we fabricated the microarrays with the five kinds of ToRCH-related antigens and used CdTe quantum dots to label secondary antibody and then analyzed 100 specimens of randomly selected clinical sera from obstetric outpatients. The currently prevalent enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA kits were considered as “golden standard” for comparison. The results show that the quantum dots labeling-based ToRCH microarrays have comparable sensitivity and specificity with ELISA. Besides, the microarrays hold distinct advantages over ELISA test format in detection time, cost, operation and signal stability. Validated by the clinical assay, our quantum dots-based ToRCH microarrays have great potential in the detection of ToRCH-related pathogens.

  8. Fluorescence behavior of glutathione capped CdTe@ZnS quantum dots chemically coordinated to zinc octacarboxy phthalocyanines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Core–shell CdTe@ZnS quantum dots capped with glutathione (CdTe@ZnS–GSH) were covalently linked to zinc octacarboxy phthalocyanine (ZnPc(COOH)8). The conjugate was characterized by UV/Vis, infrared and X-Ray photoelectron spectroscopies as well as transmission electron and atomic force microscopies. The fluorescence quantum yields of the core CdTe capped with thioglycolic acid increased upon formation of the core-shell. Upon conjugation with ZnPc(COOH)8, the fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe@ZnS–GSH decreased due to energy transfer from the latter to the Pc. The average fluorescence lifetime of the CdTe@ZnS–GSH QD also decreased upon conjugation from 26.2 to 13.3 ns. -- Graphical Abstract: CdTe@ZnS quantum dots capped with glutathione (CdTe@ZnS-GSH) and covalently linked to zinc octacarboxy phthalocyanine (ZnPc(COOH)8), showed decreased fluorescence quantum yield and lifetime of the CdTe@ZnS-GSH following conjugation due to energy transfer. Highlights: ► CdTe@ZnS quantum dots capped with glutathione were synthesized. ► The quantum dots were chemically linked to zinc octacarboxy phthalocyanine. ► The fluorescence quantum yields of the quantum dots decreased on conjugation. ► Fluorescence lifetimes also decreased due to energy transfer

  9. Quantum dot-sized organic fluorescent dots for long-term cell tracing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence techniques have been extensively employed to develop non-invasive methodologies for tracking and understanding complex biological processes both in vitro and in vivo, which is of high importance in modern life science research. Among a variety of fluorescent probes, inorganic semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) have shown advantages in terms of better photostability, larger Stokes shift and more feasible surface functionalization. However, their intrinsic toxic heavy metal components and unstable fluorescence at low pH greatly impede the applications of QDs in in vivo studies. In this work, we developed novel fluorescent probes that can outperform currently available QD based probes in practice. Using conjugated oligomer with aggregation-induced emission characteristics as the fluorescent domain and biocompatible lipid-PEG derivatives as the encapsulation matrix, the obtained organic dots have shown higher brightness, better stability in biological medium and comparable size and photostability as compared to their counterparts of inorganic QDs. More importantly, unlike QD-based probes, the organic fluorescent dots do not blink, and also do not contain heavy metal ions that could be potentially toxic when applied for living biosubstrates. Upon surface functionalization with a cell-penetrating peptide, the organic dots greatly outperform inorganic quantum dots in both in vitro and in vivo long-term cell tracing studies, which will be beneficial to answer crucial questions in stem cell/immune cell therapies. Considering the customized fluorescent properties and surface functionalities of the organic dots, a series of biocompatible organic dots will be developed to serve as a promising platform for multifarious bioimaging tasks in future.

  10. Double-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized using carbon black as the dot carbon source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Li, Feng; Ren, Wen-Cai; Cong, Hongtao; Liu, Chang; Qing Lu, Gao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2006-07-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were synthesized used carbon black as the dot carbon source by a semi-continuous hydrogen arc discharge process. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations revealed that most of the tubes were DWNTs with outer and inner diameters in the range of 2.67-4 nm and 1.96-3.21 nm, respectively. Most of the DWNTs were in a bundle form of about 10-30 nm in diameter with high purity (about 70%) from thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), resonant laser Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TEM characterizations. It was found that carbon black as the dot carbon source could be easy controlled to synthesize one type of nanotube. A simple process combining oxidation and acid treatment to purify the DWNT bundles was used without damaging the bundles. The structure of carbon black, as the key element for influencing purity, bundle formation and purification of DWNTs, is discussed.

  11. Functionalized manganese-doped zinc sulfide quantum dot-based fluorescent probe for zinc ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a simple strategy for the determination of zinc ion by using surface-modified quantum dots. The probe consists of manganese-doped quantum dots made from zinc sulfide and capped N-acetyl-L-cysteine. The particles exhibit bright yellow-orange emission with a peak at 598 nm which can be attributed to the 4T1→6A1 transition of Mn(II). This bright fluorescence is effectively quenched by modifying the sulfur anion which suppresses the radiative recombination process. The emission of the probe can then be restored by adding Zn(II) which causes the formation of a ZnS passivation layer around the QDs. The fluorescence enhancement caused is linear in the 1. 25 to 30 μM zinc concentration range, and the limit of detection is 0. 67 μM. (author)

  12. Optimization of process parameter for synthesis of silicon quantum dots using low pressure chemical vapour deposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dipika Barbadikar; Rashmi Gautam; Sanjay Sahare; Rajendra Patrikar; Jatin Bhatt

    2013-06-01

    Si quantum dots-based structures are studied recently for performance enhancement in electronic devices. This paper presents an attempt to get high density quantum dots (QDs) by low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) on SiO2 substrate. Surface treatment, annealing and rapid thermal processing (RTP) are performed to study their effect on size and density of QDs. The samples are also studied using Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence study (PL). The influence of Si–OH bonds formed due to surface treatment on the density of QDs is discussed. Present study also discusses the influence of surface treatment and annealing on QD formation.

  13. Blocking transport resonances via Kondo many-body entanglement in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Michael; Smirnov, Sergey; Mantelli, Davide; Margańska, Magdalena; Nguyen, Ngoc-Viet; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cleuziou, Jean-Pierre; Grifoni, Milena

    2016-08-01

    Many-body entanglement is at the heart of the Kondo effect, which has its hallmark in quantum dots as a zero-bias conductance peak at low temperatures. It signals the emergence of a conducting singlet state formed by a localized dot degree of freedom and conduction electrons. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to study the emergence of the Kondo entanglement by tuning many-body correlations with a gate voltage. Here we show another side of Kondo correlations, which counterintuitively tend to block conduction channels: inelastic co-tunnelling lines in the magnetospectrum of a carbon nanotube strikingly disappear when tuning the gate voltage. Considering the global SU(2) \\xotime SU(2) symmetry of a nanotube coupled to leads, we find that only resonances involving flips of the Kramers pseudospins, associated to this symmetry, are observed at temperatures and voltages below the corresponding Kondo scale. Our results demonstrate the robust formation of entangled many-body states with no net pseudospin.

  14. Novel cookie-with-chocolate carbon dots displaying extremely acidophilic high luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Siyu; Zhao, Xiaohuan; Zhu, Shoujun; Song, Yubin; Yang, Bai

    2014-10-01

    A fluorescent carbon dot with a cookie-with-chocolate film structure (about 5 × 5 μm2) showed a high fluorescence quantum yield (61.12%) at low pH. It was hydrothermally synthesized from l-serine and l-tryptophan. The formation mechanism of the film with carbon dots (CDs) was investigated. The film structure was formed by hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions between aromatic rings. The strong blue fluorescence of the CDs increased under strong acidic conditions owing to the changes in the N-groups. These cookie-like CDs are attractive for their potential use as effective fluorescent probes for the sensitive detection of aqueous H+ and Fe3+.A fluorescent carbon dot with a cookie-with-chocolate film structure (about 5 × 5 μm2) showed a high fluorescence quantum yield (61.12%) at low pH. It was hydrothermally synthesized from l-serine and l-tryptophan. The formation mechanism of the film with carbon dots (CDs) was investigated. The film structure was formed by hydrogen bonding and π-π stacking interactions between aromatic rings. The strong blue fluorescence of the CDs increased under strong acidic conditions owing to the changes in the N-groups. These cookie-like CDs are attractive for their potential use as effective fluorescent probes for the sensitive detection of aqueous H+ and Fe3+. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr03965c

  15. Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot spacing control

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Liangfeng

    2012-05-06

    Infrared light-emitting diodes are currently fabricated from direct-gap semiconductors using epitaxy, which makes them expensive and difficult to integrate with other materials. Light-emitting diodes based on colloidal semiconductor quantum dots, on the other hand, can be solution-processed at low cost, and can be directly integrated with silicon. However, so far, exciton dissociation and recombination have not been well controlled in these devices, and this has limited their performance. Here, by tuning the distance between adjacent PbS quantum dots, we fabricate thin-film quantum-dot light-emitting diodes that operate at infrared wavelengths with radiances (6.4 W sr \\'1 m \\'2) eight times higher and external quantum efficiencies (2.0%) two times higher than the highest values previously reported. The distance between adjacent dots is tuned over a range of 1.3 nm by varying the lengths of the linker molecules from three to eight CH 2 groups, which allows us to achieve the optimum balance between charge injection and radiative exciton recombination. The electroluminescent powers of the best devices are comparable to those produced by commercial InGaAsP light-emitting diodes. By varying the size of the quantum dots, we can tune the emission wavelengths between 800 and 1,850 nm.© 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  16. Interference effects in a double quantum dot system with inter-dot Coulomb correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron transport through a double quantum dot system is studied with the use of the Green function formalism based on the equation of motion method, and an interplay between interference and Coulomb blockade effects due to inter-dot correlations is discussed. A double structure with two Fano resonances (or antiresonances) is found in the conductance spectrum. Fano features are weakly influenced by the presence of Coulomb interaction but the conductance is strongly suppressed in the energy region with the Fermi level in the leads close to the aligned levels of both dots. This Coulomb blockade effect takes place when the coupling between the dots is of repulsive character. On the other hand, the conductance of an artificial molecule with attractive inter-dot coupling is only slightly modified in this energy region. As a sign of the coupling can be easily changed in a presence of an external magnetic field by changes of the magnetic flux there is the possibility to control variations of the conductance, which may be important from the application point of view

  17. Entangling distant quantum dots using classical interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Jonathan; Kyoseva, Elica S.; Trupke, Michael; Beige, Almut

    2008-10-01

    We show that it is possible to employ reservoir engineering to turn two distant and relatively bad cavities into one good cavity with a tunable spontaneous decay rate. As a result, quantum computing schemes, which would otherwise require the shuttling of atomic qubits in and out of an optical resonator, can now be applied to distant quantum dots. To illustrate this we transform a recent proposal to entangle two qubits via the observation of macroscopic fluorescence signals [J. Metz , Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 040503 (2006)] to the electron-spin states of two semiconductor quantum dots. Our scheme requires neither the coherent control of qubit-qubit interactions nor the detection of single photons. Moreover, the scheme is relatively robust against spin-bath couplings, parameter fluctuations, and the spontaneous emission of photons.

  18. Mesoscopic Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics with Quantum Dots

    CERN Document Server

    Childress, L I; Lukin, M D

    2003-01-01

    We describe an electrodynamic mechanism for coherent, quantum mechanical coupling between spacially separated quantum dots on a microchip. The technique is based on capacitive interactions between the electron charge and a superconducting transmission line resonator, and is closely related to atomic cavity quantum electrodynamics. We investigate several potential applications of this technique which have varying degrees of complexity. In particular, we demonstrate that this mechanism allows design and investigation of an on-chip double-dot microscopic maser. Moreover, the interaction may be extended to couple spatially separated electron spin states while only virtually populating fast-decaying superpositions of charge states. This represents an effective, controllable long-range interaction, which may facilitate implementation of quantum information processing with electron spin qubits and potentially allow coupling to other quantum systems such as atomic or superconducting qubits.

  19. Many electron effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R K Pandey; Manoj K Harbola; V Ranjan; Vijay A Singh

    2003-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit shell structures, very similar to atoms. Termed as ‘artificial atoms’ by some, they are much larger (1 100 nm) than real atoms. One can study a variety of manyelectron effects in them, which are otherwise difficult to observe in a real atom. We have treated these effects within the local density approximation (LDA) and the Harbola–Sahni (HS) scheme. HS is free of the selfinteraction error of the LDA. Our calculations have been performed in a three-dimensional quantum dot. We have carried out a study of the size and shape dependence of the level spacing. Scaling laws for the Hubbard ‘’ are established.

  20. Magnetoconductance fluctuations in open bismuth quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackens, B.; Minet, J. P.; Farhi, G.; Crahay, A.; Faniel, S.; Gustin, C.; Bayot, V.

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the low temperature (300 mK - 10 K) magnetoconductance of open circular bismuth quantum dots (diameter: 500 nm). The structures are fabricated using a combination of electron beam lithography, lift off and plasma etching techniques on bismuth thin films evaporated on heated SiO2 substrates. We observe reproducible magnetoconductance fluctuations (UCFs) up to 5T, qualitatively similar to conductance fluctuations evidenced in open quantum dots patterned in high mobility semiconductor heterostructures. In our samples, UCFs are superposed on a slowly varying negative magnetoconductance background. We also observe a sharp conductance maximum centered in B=0, which is reminescent of the spin-orbit induced anti-localisation phenomenon. The behavior of UCFs and of the conductance maximum is discussed as a function of the temperature, thickness and degree of cristallinity of the cavity.

  1. Barrier Li Quantum Dots in Magnetic Fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yi-Min; LI Xiao-Zhu; YAN Wen-Hong; BAO Cheng-Guang

    2003-01-01

    The methods for the few-body system are introduced to investigate the states of the barrier Li quantumdots (QDs) in an arbitrary strength of magnetic field. The configuration, which consists of a positive ion located on thez-axis at a distance d from the two-dimensional QD plane (the x-y plane) and three electrons in the dot plane boundby the positive ion, is called a barrier Li center. The system, which consists of three electrons in the dot plane bound bythe ion, is called a barrier Li QD. The dependence of energy of the state of the barrier Li QD on an external magneticfield B and the distance d is obtained. The angular momentum L of the ground states is found to jump not only withthe variation of B but also with d.

  2. Protease-activated quantum dot probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Emmanuel; Sun, Jiantang; Miller, Jordan S.; Yu, William W.; Colvin, Vicki L.; West, Jennifer L.; Drezek, Rebekah

    2006-04-01

    We demonstrate a novel quantum dot based probe with inherent signal amplification upon interaction with a targeted proteolytic enzyme. This probe may be useful for imaging in cancer detection and diagnosis. In this system, quantum dots (QDs) are bound to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via a proteolytically-degradable peptide sequence to non-radiatively suppress luminescence. A 71% reduction in luminescence was achieved with conjugation of AuNPs to QDs. Peptide cleavage results in release of AuNPs and restores radiative QD photoluminescence. Initial studies observed a 52% rise in luminescence over 47 hours of exposure to 0.2 mg/mL collagenase. These probes can be customized for targeted degradation simply by changing the sequence of the peptide linker.

  3. Facile labeling of lipoglycans with quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bacterial endotoxins or lipopolysaccharides (LPS) are among the most potent activators of the innate immune system, yet mechanisms of their action and in particular the role of glycans remain elusive. Efficient non-invasive labeling strategies are necessary for studying interactions of LPS glycans with biological systems. Here we report a new method for labeling LPS and other lipoglycans with luminescent quantum dots. The labeling is achieved by partitioning of hydrophobic quantum dots into the core of various LPS aggregates without disturbing the native LPS structure. The biofunctionality of the LPS-Qdot conjugates is demonstrated by the labeling of mouse monocytes. This simple method should find broad applicability in studies concerned with visualization of LPS biodistribution and identification of LPS binding agents.

  4. Efficient Luminescence from Perovskite Quantum Dot Solids

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Younghoon

    2015-11-18

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Nanocrystals of CsPbX3 perovskites are promising materials for light-emitting optoelectronics because of their colloidal stability, optically tunable bandgap, bright photoluminescence, and excellent photoluminescence quantum yield. Despite their promise, nanocrystal-only films of CsPbX3 perovskites have not yet been fabricated; instead, highly insulating polymers have been relied upon to compensate for nanocrystals\\' unstable surfaces. We develop solution chemistry that enables single-step casting of perovskite nanocrystal films and overcomes problems in both perovskite quantum dot purification and film fabrication. Centrifugally cast films retain bright photoluminescence and achieve dense and homogeneous morphologies. The new materials offer a platform for optoelectronic applications of perovskite quantum dot solids.

  5. Light emission from Si quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe M. Fauchet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Si quantum dots (QDs as small as ∼2 nm in diameter have been synthesized by a variety of techniques. Because of quantum confinement and the elimination of bulk or surface defects, these dots can emit light from the near infrared throughout the visible with quantum efficiencies in excess of 10%. The luminescence wavelength range has been extended to longer wavelengths by the addition of light-emitting rare earths such as erbium (Er. Light-emitting devices (LEDs have been fabricated and their performances are starting to approach those of direct band gap semiconductor or organic LEDs. A search for a Si QD-based laser is even under way. The state-of-the-art in the materials science, physics, and device development of luminescent Si QDs is reviewed and areas of future research are pointed out.

  6. Ratiometric Temperature Sensing with Semiconducting Polymer Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Fangmao; Wu, Changfeng; Jin, Yuhui; Chan, Yang-Hsiang; Zhang, Xuanjun; Chiu, Daniel T.

    2011-01-01

    This communication describes ultra-bright single-nanoparticle ratiometric temperature sensors based on semiconducting polymer dots (Pdots). We attached the temperature sensitive dye—Rhodamine B (RhB), whose emission intensity decreases with increasing temperature—within the matrix of Pdots. The as-prepared Pdot-RhB nanoparticle showed excellent temperature sensitivity and high brightness because it took advantage of the light harvesting and amplified energy transfer capability of Pdots. More ...

  7. The Silicon:Colloidal Quantum Dot Heterojunction

    KAUST Repository

    Masala, Silvia

    2015-10-13

    A heterojunction between crystalline silicon and colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) is realized. A special interface modification is developed to overcome an inherent energetic band mismatch between the two semiconductors, and realize the efficient collection of infrared photocarriers generated in the CQD film. This junction is used to produce a sensitive near infrared photodetector. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Adiabatic description of nonspherical quantum dot models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusev, A. A., E-mail: gooseff@jinr.ru; Chuluunbaatar, O.; Vinitsky, S. I. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Russian Federation); Dvoyan, K. G.; Kazaryan, E. M.; Sarkisyan, H. A. [Russian-Armenian (Slavonic) University (Armenia); Derbov, V. L.; Klombotskaya, A. S.; Serov, V. V. [Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-15

    Within the effective mass approximation an adiabatic description of spheroidal and dumbbell quantum dot models in the regime of strong dimensional quantization is presented using the expansion of the wave function in appropriate sets of single-parameter basis functions. The comparison is given and the peculiarities are considered for spectral and optical characteristics of the models with axially symmetric confining potentials depending on their geometric size, making use of the complete sets of exact and adiabatic quantum numbers in appropriate analytic approximations.

  9. Shot noise of coupled semiconductor quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Kiesslich, G.; Wacker, A; Schoell, E.

    2003-01-01

    The low-frequency shot noise properties of two electrostatically coupled semiconductor quantum dot states which are connected to emitter/collector contacts are studied. A master equation approach is used to analyze the bias voltage dependence of the Fano factor as a measure of temporal correlations in tunneling current caused by Pauli's exclusion principle and the Coulomb interaction. In particular, the influence of the Coulomb interaction on the shot noise behavior is discussed in detail and...

  10. SPECTRAL PROPERTIES OF SHUNGITE QUANTUM DOTS

    OpenAIRE

    RAZBIRIN B.S.; ROZHKOVA N.N.; Sheka, E. F.; Nelson, D. K.; Starukhin, A. N.; Goryunov, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    A low-temperature study has been performed for aqueous shungite, carbon tetrachloride, and toluene dispersions. Spectral characteristics for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) of shungite, attributed to individual fragments of reduced graphene oxide (rGO), reveal a dual character of the dispersions emitting centers: individual GQDs are responsible for the spectra position while fractal structure of GQD colloids provides large broadening of the spectra due to structural inhomogeneity of the colloida...

  11. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biomedicial Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lijia Shao; Feng Yan; Yanfang Gao

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometre-scale crystals, which have unique photophysical properties, such as size-dependent optical properties, high fluorescence quantum yields, and excellent stability against photobleaching. These properties enable QDs as the promising optical labels for the biological applications, such as multiplexed analysis of immunocomplexes or DNA hybridization processes, cell sorting and tracing, in vivo imaging and diagnostics in biomedicine. Meanwhile, QDs can...

  12. Quantum dots: synthesis, bioapplications, and toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Valizadeh, Alireza; Mikaeili, Haleh; Samiei, Mohammad; Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Zarghami, Nosratalah; Kouhi, Mohammad; Akbarzadeh, Abolfazl; Davaran, Soodabeh

    2012-01-01

    This review introduces quantum dots (QDs) and explores their properties, synthesis, applications, delivery systems in biology, and their toxicity. QDs are one of the first nanotechnologies to be integrated with the biological sciences and are widely anticipated to eventually find application in a number of commercial consumer and clinical products. They exhibit unique luminescence characteristics and electronic properties such as wide and continuous absorption spectra, narrow emission spectra...

  13. The pinning effect in quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monisha, P. J., E-mail: pjmonisha@gmail.com [School of Physics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad-500046 (India); Mukhopadhyay, Soma [Department of Physics, D V R College of Engineering and Technology, Hyderabad-502285 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The pinning effect is studied in a Gaussian quantum dot using the improved Wigner-Brillouin perturbation theory (IWBPT) in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. The electron ground state plus one phonon state is degenerate with the electron in the first excited state. The electron-phonon interaction lifts the degeneracy and the first excited states get pinned to the ground state plus one phonon state as we increase the confinement frequency.

  14. Depleted Bulk Heterojunction Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2011-05-26

    The first solution-processed depleted bulk heterojunction colloidal quantum dot solar cells are presented. The architecture allows for high absorption with full depletion, thereby breaking the photon absorption/carrier extraction compromise inherent in planar devices. A record power conversion of 5.5% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions is reported. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. The quantum dot nanoconjugate tool box (Invited Paper)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, I. D.; Wright, D. W.; Giorgio, T. D.; Blakely, R. D.; Pennycook, S. J.; Hercules, D.; Bentzen, L.; Smith, R. A.; McBride, J.; Vergne, M. J.; Rosenthal, S.

    2005-04-01

    The surface coating of quantum dots has been characterised using Z-stem. Quantum dots have been pegylated to increase stability in aqueous solution. The fluorescence intensity of the quantum dots was modulated pegylation. PEG was coupled using different ratios of EDC, PEG and NHS. Optimum coupling conditions were found to occur when 2000 equivalents of PEG were reacted with 1 equivalent of dot in the presence of 1500 equivalents of NHS and EDC. Angiotensin II was also conjugated to quantum dots and these conjugates were shown to be biologically active. Quantum dots have also been surface functionalised with other peptides such as NGR with subsequent demonstration of cell surface binding and can be characterized by flow cytometry.

  16. Templated self-assembly of SiGe quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dais, Christian

    2009-08-19

    This PhD thesis reports on the fabrication and characterization of exact aligned SiGe quantum dot structures. In general, SiGe quantum dots which nucleate via the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode exhibit broad size dispersion and nucleate randomly on the surface. However, to tap the full potential of SiGe quantum dots it is necessary to control the positioning and size of the dots on a nanometer length, e.g. for electronically addressing of individual dots. This can be realized by so-called templated self-assembly, which combines top-down lithography with bottom-up selfassembly. In this process the lithographically defined pits serve as pre-defined nucleation points for the epitaxially grown quantum dots. In this thesis, extreme ultraviolet interference lithography at a wavelength of e=13.4 nm is employed for prepatterning of the Si substrates. This technique allows the precise and fast fabrication of high-resolution templates with a high degree of reproducibility. The subsequent epitaxial deposition is either performed by molecular beam epitaxy or low-pressure chemical vapour deposition. It is shown that the dot nucleation on pre-patterned substrates depends strongly on the lithography parameters, e.g. size and periodicity of the pits, as well as on the epitaxy parameters, e.g. growth temperature or material coverage. The interrelations are carefully analyzed by means of scanning force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction measurements. Provided that correct template and overgrowth parameters are chosen, perfectly aligned and uniform SiGe quantum dot arrays of different period, size as well as symmetry are created. In particular, the quantum dot arrays with the so far smallest period (35 nm) and smallest size dispersion are fabricated in this thesis. Furthermore, the strain fields of the underlying quantum dots allow the fabrication of vertically aligned quantum dot stacks. Combining lateral and vertical dot alignment results in three

  17. Mode Competition in Dual-Mode Quantum Dots Semiconductor Microlaser

    CERN Document Server

    Chusseau, Laurent; Viktorovitch, P; Letartre, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the modeling of quantum dots lasers with the aim of assessing the conditions for stable cw dual-mode operation when the mode separation lies in the THz range. Several possible models suited for InAs quantum dots in InP barriers are analytically evaluated, in particular quantum dots electrically coupled through a direct exchange of excitation by the wetting layer or quantum dots optically coupled through the homogeneous broadening of their optical gain. A stable dual-mode regime is shown possible in all cases when quantum dots are used as active layer whereas a gain medium of quantum well or bulk type inevitably leads to bistable behavior. The choice of a quantum dots gain medium perfectly matched the production of dual-mode lasers devoted to THz generation by photomixing.

  18. Modified magnetic quantum dot with electric confining potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic properties of a modified magnetic quantum dot are studied. The modified magnetic quantum dot is a quantum structure that is formed by spatially inhomogeneous distributions of magnetic fields. Electrons are magnetically confined to the plane where the magnetic fields inside and outside the dot are different from each other. The energy spectrum exhibits quite different features depending on the directions of the magnetic fields inside and outside the dot. In particular, the case of opposite directions of the fields is more interesting than that of the same direction. An electrostatic potential is introduced to the system to study the effects of an electric confining potential on the eigenenergy of a single electron in the modified magnetic quantum dot. The additional potential raises the whole energy spectrum and changes its shape. The ground-state angular momentum transitions occurring in a bare modified magnetic quantum dot disappear on introduction of the additional parabolic potential

  19. Ac response of a coupled double quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xu Jie; W.Z. Shangguan; Zhan Shi-Chang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phase-breaking process on the ac response of a coupled double quantum dot is studied in this paper based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism. A general expression is derived for the ac current in the presence of electron-phonon interaction. The ac conductance is numerically computed and the results are compared with those in [Anatram M P and Datts S 1995 Phys. Rev. B 51 7632]. Our results reveal that the inter-dot electron tunnelling interplays with that between dots and electron reservoirs, and contributes prominently to the ac current when inter-dot tunnelling coupling is much larger than the tunnelling coupling between dots and electron reservoirs. In addition, the phase-breaking process is found to have a significant effect on the ac transport through the coupled double dot.

  20. Single quantum dots fundamentals, applications, and new concepts

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This book reviews recent advances in the exciting and rapid growing field of semiconductor quantum dots by contributions from some of the most prominent researchers in the field. Special focus is given to the optical and electronic properties of single quantum dots due to their potential applications in devices operating with single electrons and/or single photons. This includes quantum dots in electric and magnetic fields, cavity-quantum electrodynamics, nonclassical light generation, and coherent optical control of excitons. Single Quantum Dots also addresses various growth techniques as well as potential device applications such as quantum dot lasers, and new concepts like a single-photon source, and a single quantum dot laser.

  1. Quantum Dots and Their Multimodal Applications: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul H. Holloway

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting quantum dots, whose particle sizes are in the nanometer range, have very unusual properties. The quantum dots have band gaps that depend in a complicated fashion upon a number of factors, described in the article. Processing-structure-properties-performance relationships are reviewed for compound semiconducting quantum dots. Various methods for synthesizing these quantum dots are discussed, as well as their resulting properties. Quantum states and confinement of their excitons may shift their optical absorption and emission energies. Such effects are important for tuning their luminescence stimulated by photons (photoluminescence or electric field (electroluminescence. In this article, decoupling of quantum effects on excitation and emission are described, along with the use of quantum dots as sensitizers in phosphors. In addition, we reviewed the multimodal applications of quantum dots, including in electroluminescence device, solar cell and biological imaging.

  2. Controlled coupling of quantum dots to nanowire plasmons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The diameter of dielectric waveguides is limited by the wavelength of the guided light. In contrast, gold and silver nanowires can sustain propagating plasmon modes even for significantly smaller dimensions. Furthermore the strong eld localization of the nanowire plasmon modes leads to a strong interaction with nearby quantum emitters such as quantum dots. We use electron beam lithography, rst, to fabricate silver nanowires and, second, to position a few dots close to one nanowire end in a template-assisted process. Scanning a focused laser spot over the nanowire ends, we demonstrate both, the excitation of nanowire modes by quantum dots and the addressing of the same dots by plasmons. We use the fluorescence signals to quantify the quantum dots/plasmon coupling and show that part of the plasmon-induced dot fluorescence couples back to plasmonic modes. (author)

  3. Quantum dot spectroscopy using a single phosphorus donor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büch, Holger; Fuechsle, Martin; Baker, William; House, Matthew G.; Simmons, Michelle Y.

    2015-12-01

    Using a deterministic single P donor placed with atomic precision accuracy next to a nanoscale silicon quantum dot, we present a way to analyze the energy spectrum of small quantum dots in silicon by tunnel-coupled transport measurements. The energy-level structure of the quantum dot is observed as resonance features within the transport bias triangles when the donor chemical potential is aligned with states within the quantum dot as confirmed by a numeric rate equation solver SIMON. This technique allows us to independently extract the quantum dot level structure irrespective of the density of states in the leads. Such a method is useful for the investigation of silicon quantum dots in the few-electron regime where the level structure is governed by an intricate interplay between the spin- and the valley-orbit degrees of freedom.

  4. Study of inter-dot coupling in nano-patterned permalloy dots array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a series of studies on interdot coupling in the nanometer-scaled permalloy dots array. A standard electron beam lithography in conjunction with lift-off process was employed for patterning 30 nm thick of millions of permalloy dots array with diameter (D) of 500 nm and the aspect ratio S/D of spacing (S) to diameter ranging from 0.2 to 1.25. The magnetization reversal processes were identified to evolve through the vortex nucleation, movement, and annihilation based on magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging in the presence of external magnetic fields. The nucleation field, annihilation field, and moving rate of vortex core were analyzed using M-H loops measured by the alternating gradient magnetometer (AGM). These behaviors are associated with the dipole-dipole interaction in dots array with various interdot spacings.

  5. Electron States of Few-Electron Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴振宏; 孙金祚; 张立德; 李作宏; 黄士勇; 隋鹏飞

    2002-01-01

    We study few-electron semiconductor quantum dots using the unrestricted Hartree-Fock-Roothaan method based on the Gaussian basis. Our emphasis is on the energy level calculation for quantum dots. The confinement potential in a quantum dot is assumed to be in a form of three-dimensional spherical finite potential well. Some valuable results, such as the rearrangement of the energy level, have been obtained.

  6. Exciton dephasing in single InGaAs quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Østergaard, John Erland; Jensen, Jacob Riis;

    2000-01-01

    The homogeneous linewidth of excitonic transitions is a parameter of fundamental physical importance. In self-assembled quantum dot systems, a strong inhomogeneous broadening due to dot size fluctuations masks the homogeneous linewidth associated with transitions between individual states. The ho...... to fast dephasing. We present an investigation of the low-temperature homogeneous linewidth of individual PL lines from MBE-grown In0.5Ga0.5As/GaAs quantum dots....

  7. Exciton lifetime measurements on single silicon quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangghaleh, Fatemeh; Bruhn, Benjamin; Schmidt, Torsten; Linnros, Jan

    2013-06-01

    We measured the exciton lifetime of single silicon quantum dots, fabricated by electron beam lithography, reactive ion etching and oxidation. The observed photoluminescence decays are of mono-exponential character with a large variation (5-45 μs) from dot to dot, even for the same emission energy. We show that this lifetime variation may be the origin of the heavily debated non-exponential (stretched) decays typically observed for ensemble measurements.

  8. Region-Dot Conversion Fusion Algorithm and Application

    OpenAIRE

    Zhouxing Fu; Mei Wang; Jingyi Du; Hsiung-Cheng Lin; Ningbo Xu; Hongyang Zan

    2014-01-01

    The interior decoration materials and the new furniture using formaldehyde, ammonia, and other poisonous substances are known as the main sources of indoor air pollutions. However, it is still a big challenge to estimate accurately the overall air quality by using the current measuring tools. Accordingly, the region-dot fusion (RDF) algorithm is proposed to evaluate the air quality in this paper. For the conversion from a region to a dot, the region-dot function is firstly defined as the summ...

  9. Nonlinear transport in coupled quantum dots: A stationary probability approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG JianPing; DUAN SuQing; YAN WeiXian; ZHAO XianGeng

    2009-01-01

    The stationary tunneling current and differential conductance of the coupled quantum dots system with split-gates are calculated by generalizing the Beenaker's linear response theory for the description of the Coulomb-blockade oscillations of the conductance in the single quantum dot. The calculation of the charging diagram in parallel through the double dot as function of the two side-gate voltages shows a remarkable agreement with the recent experimental results by Hatano et al. (Science, 2005, 309: 268-271)

  10. Recent advances in carbon-based dots for electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yulong, Ying; Xinsheng, Peng

    2016-04-25

    Carbon-based dots represent a new type of quantum dot with unique and well-defined properties owing to their quantum confinement and edge effects, which are widely employed in sensing, light-emitting diodes, nanomedicine, photocatalysis, electrocatalysis, bioimaging, etc. In this review, we update the latest research results of carbon-based dots in this rapidly evolving field of electroanalysis, place emphases on their applications as sensors and give future perspectives for developing more smart sensors.

  11. Polarization anisotropic luminescence of tunable single lateral quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermannstädter, C.; Witzany, M.; Heldmaier, M.; Hafenbrak, R.; Jöns, K. D.; Beirne, G. J.; Michler, P.

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the photoluminescence polarization anisotropy of self-assembled individual lateral InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot molecules. In contrast to similarly grown single quantum dots, the dot molecules exhibit a remarkable degree of linear polarization, which remains almost unchanged when a lateral electric field is applied to tune the exciton wave function and, thus, the luminescence spectral properties. We discuss the nature of this polarization anisotropy and suggest possible causes based on the system's symmetry and heterostructure alloy composition.

  12. Reconfigurable quadruple quantum dots in a silicon nanowire transistor

    OpenAIRE

    Betz, A. C.; Tagliaferri, M. L. V.; Vinet, M.; Broström, M.; Sanquer, M.; Ferguson, A.J.; Gonzalez-Zalba, M. F.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel reconfigurable metal-oxide-semiconductor multi-gate transistor that can host a quadruple quantum dot in silicon. The device consist of an industrial quadruple-gate silicon nanowire field-effect transistor. Exploiting the corner effect, we study the versatility of the structure in the single quantum dot and the serial double quantum dot regimes and extract the relevant capacitance parameters. We address the fabrication variability of the quadruple-gate approach which, paired...

  13. On the Formation of Massive Stars by Accretion

    CERN Document Server

    Norberg, P; Norberg, Peder; Maeder, Andre

    2000-01-01

    (Abriged) At present, there are two scenarios for the formation of massive stars: 1) The accretion scenario and 2) The coalescence scenario, which implies the merging of intermediate mass stars. We examine here some properties of the first one. We calculate three different sets of birthlines, i.e. tracks followed by a continuously accreting star. First, three models with a constant accretion rate ($\\dot{M}_{\\rm{accr}}$ = $10^{-6}$, $10^{-5}$, $10^{-4}$ M$_{\\odot}$ yr$^{-1}$). Then several birthlines following the accretion models of Bernasconi and Maeder (\\cite{BM96}), which have $\\dot{M}_{\\rm{accr}}$ increasing only slightly with mass. Finally we calculate several birthlines for which $\\dot{M}_{accr} = \\dot{M}_{\\mathrm{ref}} ({\\frac{M}{M_{\\odot}}}) ^{\\phi}$, with values of $\\phi$ equal to 0.5, 1.0 and 1.5 and also for different values of $\\dot{M}_{\\mathrm{ref}}$. The best fit to the observations of PMS stars in the HR diagram is achieved for $\\phi$ between 1.0 or 1.5 and for $\\dot{M}_{\\mathrm{ref}} \\simeq 10...

  14. The role of strain-driven in migration in the growth of self-assembled InAs quantum dots on InP

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, S H; Lee, T W; Hwang, H D; Yoon, E J; Kim, Y D

    1999-01-01

    Self-assembled InAs quantum dots (SAQDs) were grown on InP by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The amount of excess InAs and the aspect ratio of the SAQD increased with temperature and V/III ratio. It is explained that the As/P exchange reaction at the surface played an important role in the kinetics of SAQD formation. Insertion of a lattice-matched InGaAs buffer layer suppressed the excess InAs formation, and lowered the aspect ratio. Moreover, the dots formed on InGaAs buffer layers were faceted, whereas those on InP were hemispherical, confirming the effect of the As/P exchange reaction. The shape of InAs quantum dots on InGaAs buffer layers was a truncated pyramid with four [136] facets and base edges parallel to directions.

  15. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    See, Gloria G. [Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Xu, Lu; Nuzzo, Ralph G. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Sutanto, Erick; Alleyne, Andrew G. [Mechanical Science and Engineering Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 154 Mechanical Engineering Building, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 208 North Wright Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1270 Digital Computer Laboratory, MC-278, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2015-08-03

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure.

  16. Nonequilibrium Electron Transport Through a Quantum Dot from Kubo Formula

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Rong; ZHANG Guang-Ming

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Kubo formula for an electron tunneling junction, we revisit the nonequilibrium transport properties through a quantum dot. Since the Fermi level of the quantum dot is set by the conduction electrons of the leads, we calculate the electron current from the left side by assuming the quantum dot coupled to the right lead as another side of the tunneling junction, and the other way round is used to calculate the current from the right side. By symmetrizing these two currents, an effective local density states on the dot can be obtained, and is discussed at high and low temperatures, respectively.

  17. Coupling of single quantum dots to a photonic crystal waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, Toke; Stobbe, Søren; Julsgaard, Brian;

    is coupled efficiently to a single enhanced mode. One popular approach has been to couple single quantum dots to a nanocavity but a limiting factor in this configuration is that in order to apply the photon it should subsequently be coupled out of the cavity, reducing the overall efficiency significantly....... An alternative approach is to couple the quantum dot directly to the propagating mode of a photonic waveguide. We demonstrate the coupling of single quantum dots to a photonic crystal waveguide using time-resolved spontaneous emission measurements. A pronounced effect is seen in the decay rates of dots coupled...

  18. An Exciton Bound to a Neutral Donor in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    解文方

    2002-01-01

    The binding energies for an exciton (X) trapped in a two-dimensional quantum dot by a neutral donor have been calculated using the method of few-body physics for the heavy hole (σ= 0.196) and the light hole (σr = 0.707).We find that the (D0, X) complex confined in a quantum dot has in general a larger binding energy than those in a two-dimensional quantum well and a three-dimensional bulk semiconductor, and the binding energy increases with the decrease of the dot radius. At dot radius R →∞, we compare our calculated result with the previous results.

  19. Core–shell quantum dots: Properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, D., E-mail: vasudevand@rediffmail.com [Electrodics and electrocatalysis division, CSIR-CECRI, Karaikudi 630006 (India); Gaddam, Rohit Ranganathan [Amity Institute of Nanotechnology, Amity University, Noida 201301 (India); Trinchi, Adrian; Cole, Ivan [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Clayton South MDC, 3169 (Australia)

    2015-07-05

    Fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanocrystals (NCs) that find numerous applications in areas, such as bio labelling, sensors, lasers, light emitting diodes and medicine. Core–shell quantum dots were developed to improve the photoluminescence efficiency of single quantum dots. Capping their surface with organic ligands as well as their extraction into aqueous media enables their use in sensing applications. The current review highlights the importance and applications of core shell quantum dots as well as their surface modifications and applications in the field of medicine and as sensors for chemical and biochemical analysis.

  20. Carbon Dot Based Sensing of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Upama Baruah; Neelam Gogoi; Achyut Konwar; Manash Jyoti Deka; Devasish Chowdhury; Gitanjali Majumdar

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate carbon dot based sensor of catecholamine, namely, dopamine and ascorbic acid. Carbon dots (CDs) were prepared from a green source: commercially available Assam tea. The carbon dots prepared from tea had particle sizes of ∼0.8 nm and are fluorescent. Fluorescence of the carbon dots was found to be quenched in the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid with greater sensitivity for dopamine. The minimum detectable limits were determined to be 33 μM and 98 μM for dopamine and ascor...

  1. Highly fluorescent xerogels with entrapped carbon dots for organic scintillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaranta, A., E-mail: quaranta@ing.unitn.it [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Carturan, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Campagnaro, A.; Dalla Palma, M. [University of Trento, Department of Industrial Engineering, via Mesiano, 77, 38123 Trento (Italy); Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); Giarola, M.; Daldosso, N. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy); Maggioni, G. [Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, INFN, Viale dell' Università, 2, 35020 Legnaro (PD) (Italy); University of Padova, Department of Physics and Astronomy “Galileo Galilei”, Via Marzolo, 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); Mariotto, G. [University of Verona, Department of Informatics, Strada le Grazie,15, 37134 Verona (Italy)

    2014-02-28

    Organically modified silicate thin film and bulk samples were prepared using [3-(2-aminoethylamino)propyl]trimethoxysilane (AEAP-TMOS) as precursor with the addition of different amounts of AEAP-TMOS functionalized C-dots, prepared by reaction of AEAP-TMOS and citric acid at high temperature. The synthesis of surface functionalized C-dots was followed by Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and the C-dots optical properties were characterized by optical absorption and UV–vis fluorescence. Thin xerogel films and bulk samples were studied by FTIR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopy. Intense blue-green emission was observed by UV excitation of functionalized C-dots. Carbon quantum dot (CQD) luminescence was preserved also in the xerogel matrices, and the energy transfer from the matrix to CQDs, which is a key characteristic for scintillation detectors, was investigated in the two systems. - Highlights: • Functionalized carbon dots were synthesized. • Carbon dots were dispersed in hybrid xerogel bulk and thin film. • Carbon dots exhibit a strong tunable blue luminescence. • Xerogels were characterized by FT-IR, Raman and fluorescence spectroscopies. • Energy transfer processes were evidenced between C-dots and xerogel matrix.

  2. 我是中国DotA的希望(一)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    少小帅

    2010-01-01

    我叫贾鹏我叫贾鹏,我是中国DotA的希望。他们一直这么评价我,而我对此深信不疑。在这个全民DotA的时代,我也不例外。我DotA玩的怎么样,我不好去评价,和我一起DotA的兄弟们是这么评价我的,"前期打得没的说!"邱涵说;"Gank打得没的说!"程龙说;

  3. Polarized quantum dot emission in electrohydrodynamic jet printed photonic crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tailored optical output, such as color purity and efficient optical intensity, are critical considerations for displays, particularly in mobile applications. To this end, we demonstrate a replica molded photonic crystal structure with embedded quantum dots. Electrohydrodynamic jet printing is used to control the position of the quantum dots within the device structure. This results in significantly less waste of the quantum dot material than application through drop-casting or spin coating. In addition, the targeted placement of the quantum dots minimizes any emission outside of the resonant enhancement field, which enables an 8× output enhancement and highly polarized emission from the photonic crystal structure

  4. Electric and Magnetic Interaction between Quantum Dots and Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tighineanu, Petru

    a future challenge for the droplet-epitaxy technique. A multipolar theory of spontaneous emission from quantum dots is developed to explain the recent observation that In(Ga)As quantum dots break the dipole theory. The analysis yields a large mesoscopic moment, which contains magnetic-dipole and electric......-matter interaction of both electric and magnetic character. Our study demonstrates that In(Ga)As quantum dots lack parity symmetry and, as consequence, can be employed for locally probing the parity symmetry of complex photonic nanostructures. This opens the prospect for interfacing quantum dots with optical...

  5. Second-harmonic imaging of semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, John Erland; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Pedersen, Kjeld;

    2000-01-01

    Resonant second-harmonic generation is observed at room temperature in reflection from self-assembled InAlGaAs quantum dots grown on a GaAs (001) substrate. The detected second-harmonic signal peaks at a pump wavelength of similar to 885 nm corresponding to the quantum-dot photoluminescence maxim...... observe that second-harmonic images of the quantum-dot surface structure show wavelength-dependent spatial variations. Imaging at different wavelength is used to demonstrate second-harmonic generation from the semiconductor quantum dots. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  6. SMM DotA大赛结束中国DotA战队囊括三甲

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    11月27至29日,国外著名DotA大赛Sendi Mutiara Multimedia Grand National DotA Tournament:Grand Firlals 2009(以下简称SMM09)在马来西亚马六甲州进行了为期三天的精彩大战.最终来自中国的三支战队sGty、cD、EHOME囊括三甲。成为SMM09的最大赢家。

  7. Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH dependent hetero-interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, Xiao; Wang, Hao; Yi, Qinghua; Wang, Yun; Cong, Shan; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Yinghui; Zou, Guifu, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Qian, Zhicheng [School of Electronic and Information Engineering, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Huang, Jianwen; Xiong, Jie, E-mail: zouguifu@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: jiexiong@uestc.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Electronic Thin Films and Integrated Devices, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610054 (China); Luo, Hongmei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, New Mexico 88003 (United States)

    2015-11-16

    Due to the different emission mechanism between fluorescent carbon dots and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), it is of interest to explore the potential emission in hetero-structured carbon dots/semiconducting QDs. Herein, we design carbon dots coated CdTe QDs (CDQDs) and investigate their inherent emission. We demonstrate switchable emission for the hetero-interactions of the CDQDs. Optical analyses indicate electron transfer between the carbon dots and the CdTe QDs. A heterojunction electron process is proposed as the driving mechanism based on N atom protonation of the carbon dots. This work advances our understanding of the interaction mechanism of the heterostructured CDQDs and benefits the future development of optoelectronic nanodevices with new functionalities.

  8. Mid-infrared active PbTe/CdTe quantum dots: growth, optical properties and device applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mid-infrared spectral region is of high interest for the field of molecular gas spectroscopy as most strong molecular absorption lines lie within this region. Applications of gas analysis are very widespread. For mid-infrared optoelectronic devices, the IV-VI or lead salt compounds are very well suited as these materials have almost mirror-like conduction and valence bands as well as low non-radiative Auger recombination rates. The use of quantum dots as active regions in such devices enables enhanced device performance because the reduction of the dimensionalty to zero results in discrete energy levels and a peaked electronic density of states. In this work, IV-VI PbTe quantum dots embedded in II-VI CdTe are investigated with respect to growth, luminescence and device applications. The dot formation is based on phase separation due to the immiscibility of narrow-gap PbTe and wide-gap CdTe and the minimization of the interface energies. Hence, two-dimensional PbTe layers embedded in CdTe spontaneously split up into isolated nanoprecipitates or quantum dots. The resulting dots are spherically shaped and exhibit atomically sharp interfaces. The miscibility gap arises from the difference in the crystal structure between rocksalt PbTe and zincblende CdTe. The emission wavelenght can be tuned by their size over a broad spectral region from 1.4 - 3.3 mym. The quantum dot size can be adjusted by the inital layer thickness or the PbTe growth temperature. The relation between the dot size and the emission energy was determined and compared to theoretical calculation. From transmission electron microscopy images, the dot size distributions were evaluated and the transition energies were obtained from photoluminescence experiments. The calculation of the transition energy as a function of dot size allows an energy to size conversion of the photoluminescence spectra. Additional control of the emission energy to higher values is obtained by alloying the PbTe quantum dots

  9. Development of a Quantum Dot, 0.6 eV InGaAs Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David; Sinharoy, Samar; Raffalle, Ryne; Weizer, Victor; Homann, Natalie; Valko, Thomas; Bartos,Nichole; Scheiman, David; Bailey, Sheila

    2007-01-01

    Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power conversion has to date demonstrated conversion efficiencies exceeding 20% when coupled to a heat source. Current III-V semiconductor TPV technology makes use of planar devices with bandgaps tailored to the heat source. The efficiency can be improved further by increasing the collection efficiency through the incorporation of InAs quantum dots. The use of these dots can provide sub-gap absorption and thus improve the cell short circuit current without the normal increase in dark current associated with lowering the bandgap. We have developed self-assembled InAs quantum dots using the Stranski-Krastanov growth mode on 0.74 eV In0.53GaAs lattice-matched to InP and also on lattice-mismatched 0.6 eV In0.69GaAs grown on InP through the use of a compositionally graded InPAsx buffer structure, by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) measurements showed that the most reproducible dot pattern was obtained with 5 monolayers of InAs grown at 450 C. The lattice mismatch between InAs and In0.69GaAs is only 2.1%, compared to 3.2% between InAs and In0.53GaAs. The smaller mismatch results in lower strain, making dot formation somewhat more complicated, resulting in quantum dashes, rather than well defined quantum dots in the lattice-mismatched case. We have fabricated 0.6 eV InGaAs planer TPV cells with and without the quantum dashes

  10. High-efficiency aqueous-solution-processed hybrid solar cells based on P3HT dots and CdTe nanocrystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Shiyu; Chen, Zhaolai; Li, Fenghong; Xu, Bin; Song, Jiaxing; Yan, Lulin; Jin, Gan; Wen, Shanpeng; Wang, Chen; Yang, Bai; Tian, Wenjing

    2015-04-01

    Without using any environmentally hazardous organic solution, we fabricated hybrid solar cells (HSCs) based on the aqueous-solution-processed poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) dots and CdTe nanocrystals (NCs). As a novel aqueous donor material, the P3HT dots are prepared through a reprecipitation method and present an average diameter of 2.09 nm. When the P3HT dots are mixed with the aqueous CdTe NCs, the dependence of the device performance on the donor-acceptor ratio shows that the optimized ratio is 1:24. Specifically, the dependence of the device performance on the active-layer thermal annealing conditions is investigated. As a result, the optimized annealing temperature is 265 °C, and the incorporation of P3HT dots as donor materials successfully reduced the annealing time from 1 h to 10 min. In addition, the transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy measurements demonstrate that the size of the CdTe NCs increased as the annealing time increased, and the annealing process facilitates the formation of a smoother interpenetrating network in the active layer. Therefore, charge separation and transport in the P3HT dots:CdTe NCs layer are more efficient. Eventually, the P3HT dots:CdTe NCs solar cells achieved 4.32% power conversion efficiency. The polymer dots and CdTe NCs based aqueous-solution-processed HSCs provide an effective way to avoid a long-time thermal annealing process of the P3HT dots:CdTe NCs layer and largely broaden the donor materials for aqueous HSCs. PMID:25781480

  11. The Electron-Hole Pair in a Single Quantum Dot and That in a Vertically Coupled Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Fang; ZHU Wu

    2003-01-01

    The energy spectra of low-lying states of an exciton in a single and a vertically coupled quantum dots arestudied under the influence of a perpendicularly applied magnetic field. Calculations are made by using the method ofnumerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. We also calculated the bindingenergy of the ground and the excited states of an exciton in a single quantum dot and that in a vertically coupledquantum dot as a function of the dot radius for different values of the distance and the magnetic field strength.

  12. The Electron-Hole Pair in a Single Quantum Dot and That in a Vertically Coupled Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIEWen-Fang; ZHUWu

    2003-01-01

    The energy spectra of low-lying states of an exciton in a single and a vertically coupled quantum dots are studied under the influence of a perpendicularly applied magnetic field. Calculations are made by using the method of numerical diagonalization of the Hamiltonian within the effective-mass approximation. We also calculated the binding energy of the ground and the excited states of an exciton in a single quantum dot and that in a vertically coupled quantum dot as a function of the dot radius for different vaJues of the distance and the magnetic field strength.

  13. Electron charging in epitaxial germanium quantum dots on silicon (100)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketharanathan, Sutharsan

    The electron charging behavior of self assembled epitaxial Ge quantum dots on Si(100) grown using molecular beam epitaxy has been studied. Ge quantum dots encapsulated in n-type Si matrix were incorporated into Schottky diodes to investigate their charging behavior using capacitance-voltage measurements. These experimental results were interpreted in the context of theoretical models to assess the degree of charge localization to the dot. Experiments involving Ge quantum dot growth, growth of Sb-doped Si and morphological evolution during encapsulation of the Ge dots during Si overgrowth were performed in order to optimize the conditions for obtaining distinct Ge quantum dot morphologies. This investigation included finding a suitable method to minimize Sb segregation while maintaining good dot epitaxy and overall crystal quality. Holes are confined to the Ge dots for which the valence band offsets are large (˜650 meV). Electrons are confined to the strained Si regions adjacent to the Ge quantum dots which have relatively smaller confinement potentials (˜100--150 meV). Experimentally, it was found that but and pyramid clusters in the range from 20--40 nm in diameter confine ˜1electron per dot while dome clusters in the range from 60--80 nm diameter confine ˜6--8 electrons per dot. Theoretical simulations predict that similar pyramid structures confine ˜0.4 electrons per dot and dome structures confine ˜2.2--3 electrons per dot. Even though the theory and the experimental results disagree due to various uncertainties and approximations, the ratio between theory and experiment agree remarkably well for both island types. We also investigated constructive three-dimensional nanolithography. Nanoscale Au rich dots and pure Ge dots were deposited on SiO2 and Si3N4 substrates by decomposing adsorbed precursors using a focused electron beam in an environmental transmission electron microscope. Dimethyl acetylacetonate gold was used for Au and digermane was used to

  14. MOVPE growth of InAs quantum dots for mid-IR applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Xiao-hong; YIN Zong-you; DU An-yan; ZHAO Jing-hua; DENY S

    2006-01-01

    InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on InxGa1-xAs/InP matrix by low pressure metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (LP-MOVPE) in nitrogen ambient were studied. Formation of the InAs QDs with different growth conditions was investigated. To improve the dot size uniformity,a two-step growth method was used and investigated. It is found that morphology of the InAs QDs formed on such InxGa1-xAs/InP matrix is very sensitive to the growth conditions. InAs QDs with high density of 1.3×1010 cm-2 are grown by using S-K growth method with fast growth rate. Using the two-step growth method,the InAs QDs size uniformity improves by 63% and 110% compared that of the dots grown by ordinary S-K method and ALE method,respectively. Narrow photoluminescence (PL) emission spectrum of the QDs grown by using the two-step growth method is received. FWHM of the PL curve is measured at 26 meV and the peak emission wavelength is larger than 2.3 μm at 77 K.

  15. Electric-field controlled ferromagnetism in MnGe magnetic quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faxian Xiu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Electric-field control of ferromagnetism in magnetic semiconductors at room temperature has been actively pursued as one of the important approaches to realize practical spintronics and non-volatile logic devices. While Mn-doped III-V semiconductors were considered as potential candidates for achieving this controllability, the search for an ideal material with high Curie temperature (Tc>300 K and controllable ferromagnetism at room temperature has continued for nearly a decade. Among various dilute magnetic semiconductors (DMSs, materials derived from group IV elements such as Si and Ge are the ideal candidates for such materials due to their excellent compatibility with the conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS technology. Here, we review recent reports on the development of high-Curie temperature Mn0.05Ge0.95 quantum dots (QDs and successfully demonstrate electric-field control of ferromagnetism in the Mn0.05Ge0.95 quantum dots up to 300 K. Upon the application of gate-bias to a metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS capacitor, the ferromagnetism of the channel layer (i.e. the Mn0.05Ge0.95 quantum dots was modulated as a function of the hole concentration. Finally, a theoretical model based upon the formation of magnetic polarons has been proposed to explain the observed field controlled ferromagnetism.

  16. Spin-valley lifetimes in a silicon quantum dot with tunable valley splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, C H; Rossi, A; Ruskov, R; Lai, N S; Mohiyaddin, F A; Lee, S; Tahan, C; Klimeck, G; Morello, A; Dzurak, A S

    2013-01-01

    Although silicon is a promising material for quantum computation, the degeneracy of the conduction band minima (valleys) must be lifted with a splitting sufficient to ensure the formation of well-defined and long-lived spin qubits. Here we demonstrate that valley separation can be accurately tuned via electrostatic gate control in a metal-oxide-semiconductor quantum dot, providing splittings spanning 0.3-0.8 meV. The splitting varies linearly with applied electric field, with a ratio in agreement with atomistic tight-binding predictions. We demonstrate single-shot spin read-out and measure the spin relaxation for different valley configurations and dot occupancies, finding one-electron lifetimes exceeding 2 s. Spin relaxation occurs via phonon emission due to spin-orbit coupling between the valley states, a process not previously anticipated for silicon quantum dots. An analytical theory describes the magnetic field dependence of the relaxation rate, including the presence of a dramatic rate enhancement (or hot-spot) when Zeeman and valley splittings coincide.

  17. Spo5/Mug12, a putative meiosis-specific RNA-binding protein, is essential for meiotic progression and forms Mei2 dot-like nuclear foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasama, Takashi; Shigehisa, Akira; Hirata, Aiko; Saito, Takamune T; Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2006-08-01

    We report here a functional analysis of spo5(+)(mug12(+)) of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein. The disruption of spo5(+) caused abnormal sporulation, generating inviable spores due to failed forespore membrane formation and the absence of a spore wall, as determined by electron microscopy. Spo5 regulates the progression of meiosis I because spo5 mutant cells display normal premeiotic DNA synthesis and the timely initiation of meiosis I but they show a delay in the peaking of cells with two nuclei, abnormal tyrosine 15 dephosphorylation of Cdc2, incomplete degradation of Cdc13, retarded formation and repair of double strand breaks, and a reduced frequency of intragenic recombination. Immunostaining showed that Spo5-green fluorescent protein (GFP) appeared in the cytoplasm at the horsetail phase, peaked around the metaphase I to anaphase I transition, and suddenly disappeared after anaphase II. Images of Spo5-GFP in living cells revealed that Spo5 forms a dot in the nucleus at prophase I that colocalized with the Mei2 dot. Unlike the Mei2 dot, however, the Spo5 dot was observed even in sme2Delta cells. Taken together, we conclude that Spo5 is a novel regulator of meiosis I and that it may function in the vicinity of the Mei2 dot. PMID:16896214

  18. Spo5/Mug12, a Putative Meiosis-Specific RNA-Binding Protein, Is Essential for Meiotic Progression and Forms Mei2 Dot-Like Nuclear Foci†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasama, Takashi; Shigehisa, Akira; Hirata, Aiko; Saito, Takamune T.; Tougan, Takahiro; Okuzaki, Daisuke; Nojima, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    We report here a functional analysis of spo5+(mug12+) of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, which encodes a putative RNA-binding protein. The disruption of spo5+ caused abnormal sporulation, generating inviable spores due to failed forespore membrane formation and the absence of a spore wall, as determined by electron microscopy. Spo5 regulates the progression of meiosis I because spo5 mutant cells display normal premeiotic DNA synthesis and the timely initiation of meiosis I but they show a delay in the peaking of cells with two nuclei, abnormal tyrosine 15 dephosphorylation of Cdc2, incomplete degradation of Cdc13, retarded formation and repair of double strand breaks, and a reduced frequency of intragenic recombination. Immunostaining showed that Spo5-green fluorescent protein (GFP) appeared in the cytoplasm at the horsetail phase, peaked around the metaphase I to anaphase I transition, and suddenly disappeared after anaphase II. Images of Spo5-GFP in living cells revealed that Spo5 forms a dot in the nucleus at prophase I that colocalized with the Mei2 dot. Unlike the Mei2 dot, however, the Spo5 dot was observed even in sme2Δ cells. Taken together, we conclude that Spo5 is a novel regulator of meiosis I and that it may function in the vicinity of the Mei2 dot. PMID:16896214

  19. Optical and structural properties of ensembles of colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots in gelatin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ovchinnikov, O. V., E-mail: Ovchinnikov-O-V@rambler.ru; Smirnov, M. S. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation); Shapiro, B. I. [Moscow State University of Fine Chemical Technologies (Russian Federation); Shatskikh, T. S.; Perepelitsa, A. S.; Korolev, N. V. [Voronezh State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-03-15

    The size dependences of the absorption and luminescence spectra of ensembles of hydrophilic colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots produced by the sol-gel method and dispersed in gelatin are analyzed. By X-ray diffraction analysis and transmission electron microscopy, the formation of core/shell nanoparticles is detected. The characteristic feature of the nanoparticles is the formation of crystalline cores, 1.5–2.0 nm in dimensions, and shells of gelatin and its complexes with the components of synthesis. The observed slight size dependence of the position of infrared photoluminescence bands (in the range 1000–1400 nm) in the ensembles of hydrophilic colloidal Ag{sub 2}S quantum dots is explained within the context of the model of the radiative recombination of electrons localized at structural and impurity defects with free holes.

  20. [Spectral Characteristics of Si Quantum Dots Embedded in SiN(x) Thin Films Prepared by Magnetron Co-Sputtering].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-bo; Yang, Wen; Duan, Liang-fei; Zhang, Li-yuan; Yang, Pei-zhi; Song, Zhao-ning

    2015-07-01

    The silicon-rich SiN(x) films were fabricated on Si(100) substrate and quartz substrate at different substrate temperatures varying from room temperature to 400 degrees C by bipolar pulse ane RF magnetron co-sputtering deposition technique. After deposition, the films were annealed in a nitrogen atmosphere by rapid photothermal annealing at 1050 degrees C for 3 minutes. This thermal step allows the formation of the silicon quantum dots. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence spectroscopy were used to analyze the bonding configurations, microstructures and luminescence properties of the films. The experimental results showed that: silicon-rich Si-N bonds were found in Fourier transform infrared spectra, suggesting that the silicon-rich SiN, films were successfully prepared; when the substrate temperature was not lower than 200 degrees C, the Raman spectra of the films showed the transverse optical mode of Si-Si vibration, while the significant diffraction peaks of Si(111) and Si(311) were shown in grazing incidence X-ray diffraction spectra, confirming the formation of silicon quantum dots; our work indicated that there was an optimal substrate temperature (300 degrees C), which could significantly increase the amount and the crystalline volume fraction of silicon quantum dots; three visible photoluminescence bands can be obtained for both 30 degrees C sample and 400 degrees C sample, and in combination with Raman results, the emission peaks were reasonably explained by using the quantum confinement effect and radiative recombination defect state of Si nanocrystals; the average size of the silicon quantum dots is 3.5 and 3.4 nm for the 300 degrees C sample and 400 degrees C sample, respectively. These results are useful for optimizing the fabrication parameters of silicon quantum dots embedded in SiN. thin films and have valuable implications for silicon based photoelectric device

  1. Hybrid passivated colloidal quantum dot solids

    KAUST Repository

    Ip, Alex

    2012-07-29

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) films allow large-area solution processing and bandgap tuning through the quantum size effect. However, the high ratio of surface area to volume makes CQD films prone to high trap state densities if surfaces are imperfectly passivated, promoting recombination of charge carriers that is detrimental to device performance. Recent advances have replaced the long insulating ligands that enable colloidal stability following synthesis with shorter organic linkers or halide anions, leading to improved passivation and higher packing densities. Although this substitution has been performed using solid-state ligand exchange, a solution-based approach is preferable because it enables increased control over the balance of charges on the surface of the quantum dot, which is essential for eliminating midgap trap states. Furthermore, the solution-based approach leverages recent progress in metal:chalcogen chemistry in the liquid phase. Here, we quantify the density of midgap trap states in CQD solids and show that the performance of CQD-based photovoltaics is now limited by electrong-"hole recombination due to these states. Next, using density functional theory and optoelectronic device modelling, we show that to improve this performance it is essential to bind a suitable ligand to each potential trap site on the surface of the quantum dot. We then develop a robust hybrid passivation scheme that involves introducing halide anions during the end stages of the synthesis process, which can passivate trap sites that are inaccessible to much larger organic ligands. An organic crosslinking strategy is then used to form the film. Finally, we use our hybrid passivated CQD solid to fabricate a solar cell with a certified efficiency of 7.0%, which is a record for a CQD photovoltaic device. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved.

  2. Biphasic quantum dots of cubic and hexagonal Mn doped CdS; necessity of Rietveld analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heiba, Zein K., E-mail: zein_kh@yahoo.com [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Taif University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department (Saudi Arabia); Mohamed, Mohamed Bakr [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Cairo (Egypt); Imam, N.G. [Experimental Physics Department, Nuclear Research Center, Atomic Energy Authority, 13759 Cairo (Egypt)

    2015-01-05

    Highlights: • Mn{sup 2+} doped CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared via a simple chemical synthesis procedure. • Biphasic composite of CdS QDs was revealed with maximum magnetism at 10 at.% of Mn{sup 2+}. • Rietveld structural analysis is a necessity for dealing with nano or quantum dots chalcogenides. • Full investigation of effects of Mn doping on the structural, optical and magnetic parameters. - Abstract: Mn{sup 2+} doped CdS quantum dots (QDs) were prepared via a simple chemical synthesis method. Incorporation of Mn ions into CdS QDs was monitored by structural, magnetic and optical spectroscopy analysis. Although the diffraction patterns seemed to be single wurtzite hexagonal structure, analysis revealed biphasic composite of CdS QDs hexagonal wurtzite and cubic zinc blende. The band gap, crystal phase and the morphology of CdS QDs were found not to be greatly affected by Mn{sup 2+} doping, however there was an optimal Mn{sup 2+} doping content of 10% where the magnetism is maximum. The recorded photoluminescence (PL) emission spectra, excited at 370 nm, depict emission lines in the UV and blue-shift regions. The emission band reveals that the band gap of pure CdS QDs is around 3 eV which is greater than that of bulk CdS (2.42 eV). The band gap of Mn:CdS QDs is almost independent of Mn content (x) and the crystallite size remains almost the same for all values of x. The observed structural, magnetic and optical properties have been explained on the basis of formation of two phases of CdS doped with Mn. This work aims to highlight recent advances in the synthesis of Mn:CdS diluted magnetic semiconductor quantum dots and their wonderful performance.

  3. Illuminating microemulsions: ionic liquid-CdS quantum dots hybrid materials as potential white light harvesting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarla, Krishnaiah; Bharmoria, Pankaj; Rao, K Srinivasa; Gehlot, Praveen Singh; Kumar, Arvind

    2016-05-01

    Microemulsions (MEs) comprising of 2-hydroxyethylammonium formate, (HO-EAF), isooctane and dioctylsulfosuccinate proliniumisopropylester ([ProC3]AOT) have been constructed and used to prepare and stabilize CdS Quantum Dots (QDs) at room temperature. Such hybrid materials exhibited tunable light emission wherein the photoluminescence chromaticity could be precisely adjusted to pure white with a quantum efficiency (QE) of ∼43%, by adjusting the droplet size of MEs. PMID:27087045

  4. Trapping photon-dressed Dirac electrons in a quantum dot studied by coherent two dimensional photon echo spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslyak, O.; Gumbs, Godfrey; Mukamel, S.

    2012-05-01

    We study the localization of dressed Dirac electrons in a cylindrical quantum dot (QD) formed on monolayer and bilayer graphene by spatially different potential profiles. Short lived excitonic states which are too broad to be resolved in linear spectroscopy are revealed by cross peaks in the photon-echo nonlinear technique. Signatures of the dynamic gap in the two-dimensional spectra are discussed. The effect of the Coulomb induced exciton-exciton scattering and the formation of biexciton molecules are demonstrated.

  5. Nonvolatile Quantum Dot Gate Memory (NVQDM): Tunneling Rate from Quantum Well Channel to Quantum Dot Gate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, El-Sayed; Heller, Evan; Bansal, Rajeev; Jain, Faquir

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we compute the tunneling of electrons in a nonvolatile quantum dot memory (NVQDM) cell during the WRITE operation. The transition rate of electrons from a quantum well channel to the quantum dots forming the floating gate is calculated using a recently reported method by Chuang et al.[1]. Tunneling current is computed based on transport of electrons from the channel to the floating quantum dots. The maximum number of electrons on a dot is calculated using surface electric field and break down voltage of the tunneling dielectric material. Comparison of tunneling for silicon oxide and high-k dielectric gate insulators is also described. Capacitance-Voltage characteristics of a NVQDM device are calculated by solving the Schrodinger and Poisson equations self-consistently. In addition, the READ operation of the memory has been investigated analytically. Results for 70 nm channel length Si NVQDMs are presented. Threshold voltage is calculated including the effect of the charge on nanocrystal quantum dots. Current-voltage characteristics are obtained using BSIM3v3 model [2-3]. This work is supported by Office of Navel Research (N00014210883, Dr. D. Purdy, Program Monitor), Connecticut Innovations Inc./TranSwitch (CII # 00Y17), and National Science Foundation (CCR-0210428) grants. [1] S. L. Chuang and N. Holonyak, Appl. Phys. Lett., 80, pp. 1270, 2002. [2] Y. Chen et. al., BSIM3v3 Manual, Elect. Eng. and Comp. Dept., U. California, Berkeley, CA, 1996. [3] W. Liu, MOSFET Models for SPICE Simulation, John Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2001.

  6. Quantum dot density studies for quantum dot intermediate band solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomassen, Sedsel Fretheim; Zhou, Dayong; Vitelli, Stefano; Mayani, Maryam Gholami; Fimland, Bjoern-Ove; Reenaas, Turid Worren

    2010-07-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have been an active area of research for many years and have been implemented in several applications, such as lasers and detectors. During the last years, some attempts have been made to increase the absorption and efficiency of solar cells by inserting QDs into the intrinsic region of pin solar cells. So far, these attempts have been successful in increasing the absorption, but not the cell efficiency. There are probably several reasons for this lack of efficiency increase, but we believe that one important reason is the low density of the implemented QDs. In this work, samples of single layer InAs QDs on n-GaAs(001) substrates have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and we have performed a systematic study of how deposition parameters affect the QD density. The aim is to achieve densities > 1011 cm-2. The nominal substrate temperature (360 - 500 deg. C), the InAs growth rate (0.085 - 1 ML/s) and thickness (2.0 - 2.8 ML) have been varied in a systematic way for two different deposition methods of InAs, i.e. continuous deposition or deposition with interruptions. In addition, we have for the continuous growth samples also varied the As-flux (0.5 - 6 centre dot10-6 torr). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) has been the main characterization method to determine quantum dot sizes and densities, and atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used for evaluation of the quantum dot heights. We find that the QD density increases with reduced growth temperature and that it is higher for samples grown continuously than for samples grown with growth interruptions. The homogeneity is also strongly affected by temperature, InAs deposition method and the As-flux. We have observed QD densities as high as 2.5 centre dot1011 cm-2 for the samples grown at the lowest growth temperatures. (Author)

  7. Ultra-bright alkylated graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Lan; Tang, Xing-Yan; Zhong, Yun-Xin; Liu, Yue-Wen; Song, Xue-Huan; Deng, Shun-Liu; Xie, Su-Yuan; Yan, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Lan-Sun

    2014-10-01

    Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The photocatalytic rate is ca. 5.9 times higher than that of pure P25, indicating that AGQDs could harness the visible spectrum of sunlight for energy conversion or environmental therapy.Highly efficient and stable photoluminescence (PL) are urgently desired for graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to facilitate their prospective applications as optical materials. Here, we report the facile and straightforward synthesis of alkylated graphene quantum dots (AGQDs) via the solvothermal reaction of propagatively alkylated graphene sheets (PAGenes). In contrast to most GQDs reported so far, the synthesized AGQDs process pH-independent and ultra-bright PL with a relative quantum yield of up to 65%. Structural and chemical composition characterization demonstrated that the synthesized AGQDs are nearly oxygen-defect-free with alkyl groups decorated on edges and basal plane, which may contribute to their greatly improved pH tolerance and high quantum efficiency. The photocatalytic performance of AGQDs-P25 nanocomposites was evaluated by the degradation of Rhodamine B under visible light. The

  8. Quantum dot loaded immunomicelles for tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levchenko Tatyana

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical imaging is a promising method for the detection of tumors in animals, with speed and minimal invasiveness. We have previously developed a lipid coated quantum dot system that doubles the fluorescence of PEG-grafted quantum dots at half the dose. Here, we describe a tumor-targeted near infrared imaging agent composed of cancer-specific monoclonal anti-nucleosome antibody 2C5, coupled to quantum dot (QD-containing polymeric micelles, prepared from a polyethylene glycol/phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-PE conjugate. Its production is simple and involves no special equipment. Its imaging potential is great since the fluorescence intensity in the tumor is twofold that of non-targeted QD-loaded PEG-PE micelles at one hour after injection. Methods Para-nitrophenol-containing (5% PEG-PE quantum dot micelles were produced by the thin layer method. Following hydration, 2C5 antibody was attached to the PEG-PE micelles and the QD-micelles were purified using dialysis. 4T1 breast tumors were inoculated subcutaneously in the flank of the animals. A lung pseudometastatic B16F10 melanoma model was developed using tail vein injection. The contrast agents were injected via the tail vein and mice were depilated, anesthetized and imaged on a Kodak Image Station. Images were taken at one, two, and four hours and analyzed using a methodology that produces normalized signal-to-noise data. This allowed for the comparison between different subjects and time points. For the pseudometastatic model, lungs were removed and imaged ex vivo at one and twenty four hours. Results The contrast agent signal intensity at the tumor was double that of the passively targeted QD-micelles with equally fast and sharply contrasted images. With the side views of the animals only tumor is visible, while in the dorsal view internal organs including liver and kidney are visible. Ex vivo results demonstrated that the agent detects melanoma nodes in a lung

  9. Fano-Rashba effect in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the electronic transport through a Rashba quantum dot coupled to ferromagnetic leads. We show that the interference of localized electron states with resonant electron states leads to the appearance of the Fano-Rashba effect. This effect occurs due to the interference of bound levels of spin-polarized electrons with the continuum of electronic states with an opposite spin polarization. We investigate this Fano-Rashba effect as a function of the applied magnetic field and Rashba spin-orbit coupling

  10. Cotunneling effects in GaAs vertical double quantum dot

    OpenAIRE

    Badrutdinov, A. O.; Huang, S. M.; Kono, K; Ono, K.; Tayurskii, D. A.

    2010-01-01

    We observed lifting of Coulomb blockade in GaAs vertical double quantum dot with low potential barriers, induced by cotunneling mechanisms at dilution fridge temperature of 10 mK. Several distinct features were observed, compared to single dot case, and appropriate explanation for them was given

  11. A Multi-Chanel Speckle Imaging for the DOT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sütterlin, P.; Hammerschlag, R.H.; Bettonvil, F.C.M.; Rutten, R.J.; Skomorovsky, V.I.; Domyshev, G.N.

    2001-01-01

    The Dutch Open Telescope (DOT) had its initial observing campaighn in September 1999. Alhough only a simple video system was used, the results demonstrated the excellent high-resolution capabilities of the combination of the open-teloscope concept, the DOT optics, the remaining image degradation due

  12. High-resolution photoluminescence studies of single semiconductor quantum dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Østergaard, John Erland; Jensen, Jacob Riis;

    2000-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots, especially those formed by self-organized growth, are considered a promising material system for future optical devices [1] and the optical properties of quantum dot ensembles have been investigated in detail over the past years. Recently, considerable interest has...

  13. DOE evaluation document for DOT 7A Type A packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document, DOE Evaluation Document for DOT 7A Type A Packaging, March 1987, presents approximately 100 different packagings which have been determined to meet the requirements for a DOT Spec 7A Type A packaging (49 CFR 178.350) and satisfies the requirements of 49 CFR 174.315(a) concerning the requirements for a document

  14. 49 CFR 15.15 - SSI disclosed by DOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SSI disclosed by DOT. 15.15 Section 15.15 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROTECTION OF SENSITIVE SECURITY INFORMATION § 15.15 SSI... containing SSI are not available for public inspection or copying, nor does DOT release such records...

  15. Transport through Zero-Dimensional States in a Quantum Dot

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Wees, Bart J. van; Harmans, Kees J.P.M.; Williamson, John G.

    1990-01-01

    We have studied the electron transport through zero-dimensional (0D) states. 0D states are formed when one-dimensional edge channels are confined in a quantum dot. The quantum dot is defined in a two-dimensional electron gas with a split gate technique. To allow electronic transport, connection to t

  16. Negative Trions Trapped by a Spherical Parabolic Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, a negatively charged exciton trapped by a spherical parabolic quantum dot has been investigated. The energy spectra of low-lying states are calculated by means of matrix diagonalization. The important feature of the low-lying states of the negatively charged excitons in a spherical quantum dot is obtained via an analysis of the energy spectra.

  17. Ultrafast gain and index dynamics in quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang; Mørk, Jesper;

    1999-01-01

    The ultrafast dynamics of gain and refractive index in an InAs/GaAs quantum dot amplifier are investigated at room temperature. The gain is observed to recover with a 90 fs time constant, ruling out problems of slow carrier capture into the dots, and making this component promising for high...

  18. Electronic properties of assemblies of zno quantum dots

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roest, Aarnoud Laurens

    2003-01-01

    Electron transport in an assembly of ZnO quantum dots has been studied using an electrochemically gated transistor. The electron mobility shows a step-wise increase as a function of the electron occupation per quantum dot. When the occupation number is below two, transport occurs by tunnelling betwe

  19. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots and Heat Transport in Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kirsanskas, Gediminas

    and to perform electrical transport experiments at temperatures below one Kelvin (1 K), and thus to address such question. In this thesis we are concerned with the theoretical description of one kind of such devices called quantum dots. As the name suggest a quantum dot is a system where particles are confined...

  20. Growing InAs/GaAs quantum dots by droplet epitaxy under MOVPE conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surnina, M. A.; Akchurin, R. Kh.; Marmalyuk, A. A.; Bagaev, T. A.; Sizov, A. L.

    2016-07-01

    Results of studying the formation of InAs quantum dots (QDs) on GaAs(100) substrates by droplet epitaxy using trimethylindium and arsine (AsH3) as precursors are presented. The growth process was carried out at temperatures within 230-400°C in a horizontal reactor for metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) using high-purity hydrogen as the carrier gas. Data on the influence of process temperature on the QD size and the density of QD array and results of investigation of the low-temperature photoluminescence of obtained samples are presented.

  1. Static and dynamic properties of three-dimensional dot-type magnonic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksymov, Artur; Spinu, Leonard

    2016-04-01

    The static and dynamic magnetization of three-dimensional magnonic metamaterials has been investigated. By numerical means it was analyzed the impact of space dimensionality on the properties of magnonic crystal with unit cell consisting of four dots. It is find out the possibility of multi-vortex core formation which is related to the increasing of the crystal height by three-dimensional periodicity of single crystal layer. Additionally is provided the analysis of ferromagnetic resonance phenomenon for two-dimensional and three-dimensional structures. For the unsaturated magnetization of three-dimensional crystal the several pronounced resonance frequencies were detected.

  2. Resonance fluorescence from a telecom-wavelength quantum dot

    CERN Document Server

    Al-Khuzheyri, R; Huwer, J; Santana, T S; Szymanska, J Skiba-; Felle, M; Ward, M B; Stevenson, R M; Farrer, I; Tanner, M G; Hadfield, R H; Ritchie, D A; Shields, A J; Gerardot, B D

    2016-01-01

    We report on resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot emitting at telecom wavelengths. We perform high-resolution spectroscopy and observe the Mollow triplet in the Rabi regime--a hallmark of resonance fluorescence. The measured resonance-fluorescence spectra allow us to rule out pure dephasing as a significant decoherence mechanism in these quantum dots. Combined with numerical simulations, the experimental results provide robust characterisation of charge noise in the environment of the quantum dot. Resonant control of the quantum dot opens up new possibilities for on-demand generation of indistinguishable single photons at telecom wavelengths as well as quantum optics experiments and direct manipulation of solid-state qubits in telecom-wavelength quantum dots.

  3. Single-electron Spin Resonance in a Quadruple Quantum Dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Tomohiro; Nakajima, Takashi; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Amaha, Shinichi; Yoneda, Jun; Takeda, Kenta; Allison, Giles; Ito, Takumi; Sugawara, Retsu; Noiri, Akito; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D.; Tarucha, Seigo

    2016-08-01

    Electron spins in semiconductor quantum dots are good candidates of quantum bits for quantum information processing. Basic operations of the qubit have been realized in recent years: initialization, manipulation of single spins, two qubit entanglement operations, and readout. Now it becomes crucial to demonstrate scalability of this architecture by conducting spin operations on a scaled up system. Here, we demonstrate single-electron spin resonance in a quadruple quantum dot. A few-electron quadruple quantum dot is formed within a magnetic field gradient created by a micro-magnet. We oscillate the wave functions of the electrons in the quantum dots by applying microwave voltages and this induces electron spin resonance. The resonance energies of the four quantum dots are slightly different because of the stray field created by the micro-magnet and therefore frequency-resolved addressable control of each electron spin resonance is possible.

  4. Double Rashba Quantum Dots Ring as a Spin Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi Feng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe theoretically propose a double quantum dots (QDs ring to filter the electron spin that works due to the Rashba spin–orbit interaction (RSOI existing inside the QDs, the spin-dependent inter-dot tunneling coupling and the magnetic flux penetrating through the ring. By varying the RSOI-induced phase factor, the magnetic flux and the strength of the spin-dependent inter-dot tunneling coupling, which arises from a constant magnetic field applied on the tunneling junction between the QDs, a 100% spin-polarized conductance can be obtained. We show that both the spin orientations and the magnitude of it can be controlled by adjusting the above-mentioned parameters. The spin filtering effect is robust even in the presence of strong intra-dot Coulomb interactions and arbitrary dot-lead coupling configurations.

  5. Silicon quantum dots: fine-tuning to maturity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Quantum dots in semiconductor heterostructures provide one of the most flexible platforms for the study of quantum phenomena at the nanoscale. The surging interest in using quantum dots for quantum computation is forcing researchers to rethink fabrication and operation methods, to obtain highly tunable dots in spin-free host materials, such as silicon. Borselli and colleagues report in Nanotechnology the fabrication of a novel Si/SiGe double quantum dot device, which combines an ultra-low disorder Si/SiGe accumulation-mode heterostructure with a stack of overlapping control gates, ensuring tight confining potentials and exquisite tunability. This work signals the technological maturity of silicon quantum dots, and their readiness to be applied to challenging projects in quantum information science.

  6. Interaction of porphyrins with CdTe quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porphyrins may be used as photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy, photocatalysts for organic pollutant dissociation, agents for medical imaging and diagnostics, applications in luminescence and electronics. The detection of porphyrins is significantly important and here the interaction of protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX) with CdTe quantum dots was studied. It was observed that the luminescence of CdTe quantum dots was quenched dramatically in the presence of PPIX. When CdTe quantum dots were embedded into silica layers, almost no quenching by PPIX was observed. This indicates that PPIX may interact and alter CdTe quantum dots and thus quench their luminescence. The oxidation of the stabilizers such as thioglycolic acid (TGA) as well as the nanoparticles by the singlet oxygen generated from PPIX is most likely responsible for the luminescence quenching. The quenching of quantum dot luminescence by porphyrins may provide a new method for photosensitizer detection.

  7. Stellar formation

    CERN Document Server

    Reddish, V C

    1978-01-01

    Stellar Formation brings together knowledge about the formation of stars. In seeking to determine the conditions necessary for star formation, this book examines questions such as how, where, and why stars form, and at what rate and with what properties. This text also considers whether the formation of a star is an accident or an integral part of the physical properties of matter. This book consists of 13 chapters divided into two sections and begins with an overview of theories that explain star formation as well as the state of knowledge of star formation in comparison to stellar structure

  8. Extracellular biosynthesis of CdTe quantum dots by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum and their anti-bacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Asad; Ahmad, Absar

    2013-04-01

    The growing demand for semiconductor [quantum dots (Q-dots)] nanoparticles has fuelled significant research in developing strategies for their synthesis and characterization. They are extensively investigated by the chemical route; on the other hand, use of microbial sources for biosynthesis witnessed the highly stable, water dispersible nanoparticles formation. Here we report, for the first time, an efficient fungal-mediated synthesis of highly fluorescent CdTe quantum dots at ambient conditions by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum when reacted with a mixture of CdCl2 and TeCl4. Characterization of these biosynthesized nanoparticles was carried out by different techniques such as Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), X-ray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) analysis. CdTe nanoparticles shows antibacterial activity against Gram positive and Gram negative bacteria. The fungal based fabrication provides an economical, green chemistry approach for production of highly fluorescent CdTe quantum dots.

  9. DotFETs: MOSFETs strained by a Single SiGE dot in a Low-Temperature ELA Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biasotto, C.

    2011-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis was performed in the context of the European Sixth Framework Program FP6 project “Disposable Dot Field Effect Transistor for High Speed Si Integrated Circuits”, referred to as the D-DotFET project. The project had the goal of realizing strain-enhanced mobility in CM

  10. Dead zones in colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics: evidence and implications

    KAUST Repository

    Barkhouse, D. Aaron R.

    2010-09-01

    In order to fabricate photovoltaic (PV) cells incorporating light-trapping electrodes, flexible foil substrates, or more than one junction, illumination through the top-contact (i.e.: non-substrate) side of a photovoltaic device is desirable. We investigate the relative collection efficiency for illumination through the top vs. bottom of PbS colloidal quantum dot (CQD) PV devices. The external quantum efficiency spectra of FTO/TiO2/PbS CQD/ITO PV devices with various PbS layer thicknesses were measured for illumination through either the top (ITO) or bottom (FTO) contacts. By comparing the relative shapes and intensities of these spectra with those calculated from an estimation of the carrier generation profile and the internal quantum efficiency as a function of distance from the TiO2 interface in the devices, a substantial dead zone, where carrier extraction is dramatically reduced, is identified near the ITO top contact. The implications for device design, and possible means of avoiding the formation of such a dead zone, are discussed.

  11. Submonolayer Quantum Dots for High Speed Surface Emitting Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zakharov ND

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractWe report on progress in growth and applications of submonolayer (SML quantum dots (QDs in high-speed vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs. SML deposition enables controlled formation of high density QD arrays with good size and shape uniformity. Further increase in excitonic absorption and gain is possible with vertical stacking of SML QDs using ultrathin spacer layers. Vertically correlated, tilted or anticorrelated arrangements of the SML islands are realized and allow QD strain and wavefunction engineering. Respectively, both TE and TM polarizations of the luminescence can be achieved in the edge-emission using the same constituting materials. SML QDs provide ultrahigh modal gain, reduced temperature depletion and gain saturation effects when used in active media in laser diodes. Temperature robustness up to 100 °C for 0.98 μm range vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs is realized in the continuous wave regime. An open eye 20 Gb/s operation with bit error rates better than 10−12has been achieved in a temperature range 25–85 °Cwithout current adjustment. Relaxation oscillations up to ∼30 GHz have been realized indicating feasibility of 40 Gb/s signal transmission.

  12. Photoluminescence of germanium quantum dots formed by pulsed laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved studies of photoluminescence in the energy range 1.4-3.2 eV are carried out for GeOx films (x ≤ 2) containing Ge nanoclusters. The relaxation times vary in the range from 50 ns to 20 μs. The films are produced by single-stage pulsed laser ablation and deposited from the direct and reverse fluxes of particles of the erosion spray in oxygen and argon atmosphere. The dependences of the photoluminescence properties of the films on the conditions of deposition and on doping with gold are studied. The photoluminescence bands, with peaks at the energies 1.42-2.1 eV, are narrow, slow, and close to each other in energy, whereas the other bands, with peaks near 2.5 eV and in the range 2.7-2.9 eV, are broad, faster, and only slightly overlapping in energy. The results are interpreted in the context of the model of photoluminescence in Ge quantum dots, whose dimensions are controlled by the conditions of their formation

  13. Binding Quantum Dots to Silk Biomaterials for Optical Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Disi Lu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs, have great potential for fabricating optical sensing devices and imaging biomaterial degradation in vivo. In the present study, 2-mercaptoethylamine- (MEA- and mercaptopropionic acid- (MPA- capped CdTe-QDs were physically incorporated in silk films that contained a high content (>30% of crystalline beta-sheet structure. The beta-sheets were induced by the addition of glycerol, water annealing, glycerol/annealing, or treatment with methanol. Incorporation of QDs did not influence the formation of beta-sheets. When the films were extracted with water, most QDs remained associated with the silk, based on the retention of photoluminescence in the silk films and negligible photoluminescence in the extracts. Compared to the solution state, photoluminescence intensity significantly decreased for MEA-QDs but not for MPA-QDs in the silk films, while the emission maximum blue shifted (≈4 nm slightly for both. Further film digestion using protease XIV, alpha-chymotrypsin, and the combination of the two proteases suggested that QDs may be bound to the silk beta-sheet regions but not the amorphous regions. QDs photoluminescence in silk films was quenched when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 was above 0.2-0.3 mM, indicating the QDs-incorporated silk films can be used to report oxidation potential in solution.

  14. Photoluminescence Properties Research on Graphene Quantum Dots/Silver Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo-Ping; Xie, Dan-Dan; Ge, Juan; Liu, Hui

    2016-04-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) possess unique properties of graphene and exhibit a series of new phenomena of 0 dimension (D) carbon materials. Thus, GQDs have attracted much attention from researchers and have shown great promise for many applications. Recently, many works focus on GQDs-metal ions and metal nanoparticles (NPs). Although, many researches point out that metal ions and metal NPs have significant effect on photoluminescence (PL) feature of GQDs, mainly focus on PL intensity. Here, for the first time, we reported that metal NPs also affected PL peak position which was dependent on the mix mechanism of metal and GQDs. When GQDs-silver (Ag) composite mixed by physical method and excited at a wavelength of 320 nm, PL peak position of composites first showed blue-shifted then red-shifted with increasing of Ag content. However, if GQDs-Ag composite prepared by chemical method, PL peak position of the composites blue-shifted. Furthermore, the shift of PL peak position of GQDs-Ag prepared both for physical and chemical method displayed excitation-dependent feature. When the excitation wavelength approached to Ag SPR peaks, no obvious PL shift was observed. The mechanism for different PL shifts and the phenomenon of excitation-dependent PL shift as well as the formation mechanism of GQDs-Ag composite by chemical method are discussed in detail in this paper. PMID:27451653

  15. Multiple Energy Exciton Shelves in Quantum-Dot-DNA Nanobioelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Samuel M; Singh, Vivek; Ribot, Josep Casamada; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-11-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystallites with multiple size-dependent quantum-confined states that are being explored for utilizing broadband radiation. While DNA has been used for the self-assembly of nanocrystals, it has not been investigated for the formation of simultaneous conduction pathways for transporting multiple energy charges or excitons. These exciton shelves can be formed by coupling the conduction band, valence band, and hot-carrier states in QDs with different HOMO-LUMO levels of DNA nucleobases, resulting from varying degrees of conjugation in the nucleobases. Here we present studies on the electronic density of states in four naturally occurring nucleobases (guanine, thymine, cytosine, and adenine), which energetically couple to quantized states in semiconductor QDs. Using scanning tunneling spectroscopy of single nanoparticle-DNA constructs, we demonstrate composite DOS of chemically coupled DNA oligonucleotides and cadmium chalcogenide QDs (CdS, CdSe, CdTe). While perfectly aligned CdTe QD-DNA states lead to exciton shelves for multiple energy charge transport, mismatched energy levels in CdSe QD-DNA introduce intrabandgap states that can lead to charge trapping and recombination. Although further investigations are required to study the rates of charge transfer, recombination, and back-electron transfer, these results can have important implications for the development of a new class of nanobioelectronics and biological transducers. PMID:26278768

  16. Nano-laser on silicon quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Qi; Liu, Shi-Rong; Qin, Chao-Jian; Lü, Quan; Xu, Li

    2011-04-01

    A new conception of nano-laser is proposed in which depending on the size of nano-clusters (silicon quantum dots (QD)), the pumping level of laser can be tuned by the quantum confinement (QC) effect, and the population inversion can be formed between the valence band and the localized states in gap produced from the surface bonds of nano-clusters. Here we report the experimental demonstration of nano-laser on silicon quantum dots fabricated by nanosecond pulse laser. The peaks of stimulated emission are observed at 605 nm and 693 nm. Through the micro-cavity of nano-laser, a full width at half maximum of the peak at 693 nm can reach to 0.5 nm. The theoretical model and the experimental results indicate that it is a necessary condition for setting up nano-laser that the smaller size of QD (d nano-laser will be limited in the range of 1.7-2.3 eV generally due to the position of the localized states in gap, which is in good agreement between the experiments and the theory.

  17. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Vanessa; Bulović, Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs) have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI). We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs) in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs - optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection - that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt). We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs. PMID:22110863

  18. Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Wood

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dot light-emitting devices (QD-LEDs have generated considerable interest for applications such as thin film displays with improved color saturation and white lighting with a high color rendering index (CRI. We review the key advantages of using quantum dots (QDs in display and lighting applications, including their color purity, solution processability, and stability. After highlighting the main developments in QD-LED technology in the past 15 years, we describe the three mechanisms for exciting QDs – optical excitation, Förster energy transfer, and direct charge injection – that have been leveraged to create QD-LEDs. We outline the challenges facing QD-LED development, such as QD charging and QD luminescence quenching in QD thin films. We describe how optical downconversion schemes have enabled researchers to overcome these challenges and develop commercial lighting products that incorporate QDs to achieve desirable color temperature and a high CRI while maintaining efficiencies comparable to inorganic white LEDs (>65 lumens per Watt. We conclude by discussing some current directions in QD research that focus on achieving higher efficiency and air-stable QD-LEDs using electrical excitation of the luminescent QDs.

  19. Study of metallothionein-quantum dots interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tmejova, Katerina; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Krizkova, Sona; Blazkova, Iva; Trnkova, Libuse; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2014-05-01

    Nanoparticles have gained increasing interest in medical and in vivo applications. Metallothionein (MT) is well known as a maintainer of metal ions balance in intracellular space. This is due to high affinity of this protein to any reactive species including metals and reactive oxygen species. The purpose of this study was to determine the metallothionein-quantum dots interactions that were investigated by spectral and electrochemical techniques. CuS, CdS, PbS, and CdTe quantum dots (QDs) were analysed. The highest intensity was shown for CdTe, than for CdS measured by fluorescence. These results were supported by statistical analysis and considered as significant. Further, these interactions were analysed using gel electrophoresis, where MT aggregates forming after interactions with QDs were detected. Using differential pulse voltammetry Brdicka reaction, QDs and MT were studied. This method allowed us to confirm spectral results and, moreover, to observe the changes in MT structure causing new voltammetric peaks called X and Y, which enhanced with the prolonged time of interaction up to 6 h.

  20. Using quantum dot photoluminescence for load detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moebius, M.; Martin, J.; Hartwig, M.; Baumann, R. R.; Otto, T.; Gessner, T.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel concept for an integrable and flexible sensor capable to visualize mechanical impacts on lightweight structures by quenching the photoluminescence (PL) of CdSe quantum dots. Considering the requirements such as visibility, storage time and high optical contrast of PL quenching with low power consumption, we have investigated a symmetrical and an asymmetrical layer stack consisting of semiconductor organic N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis(3-methylphenyl)-3,3'-dimethylbenzidine (HMTPD) and CdSe quantum dots with elongated CdS shell. Time-resolved series of PL spectra from layer stacks with applied voltages of different polarity and simultaneous observation of power consumption have shown that a variety of mechanisms such as photo-induced charge separation and charge injection, cause PL quenching. However, mechanisms such as screening of external field as well as Auger-assisted charge ejection is working contrary to that. Investigations regarding the influence of illumination revealed that the positive biased asymmetrical layer stack is the preferred sensor configuration, due to a charge carrier injection at voltages of 10 V without the need of coincident illumination.

  1. Excitation transfer in stacked quantum dot chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacked InAs quantum dot chains (QDCs) on InGaAs/GaAs cross-hatch pattern (CHP) templates yield a rich emission spectrum with an unusual carrier transfer characteristic compared to conventional quantum dot (QD) stacks. The photoluminescent spectra of the controlled, single QDC layer comprise multiple peaks from the orthogonal QDCs, the free-standing QDs, the CHP, the wetting layers and the GaAs substrate. When the QDC layers are stacked, employing a 10 nm GaAs spacer between adjacent QDC layers, the PL spectra are dominated by the top-most stack, indicating that the QDC layers are nominally uncoupled. Under high excitation power densities when the high-energy peaks of the top stack are saturated, however, low-energy PL peaks from the bottom stacks emerge as a result of carrier transfers across the GaAs spacers. These unique PL signatures contrast with the state-filling effects in conventional, coupled QD stacks and serve as a means to quickly assess the presence of electronic coupling in stacks of dissimilar-sized nanostructures. (paper)

  2. Quantum Computer Using Coupled Quantum Dot Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, N J; Natori, A; Yasunaga, H; Wu*, Nan-Jian

    1999-01-01

    We propose a method for implementation of a quantum computer using artificial molecules. The artificial molecule consists of two coupled quantum dots stacked along z direction and one single electron. One-qubit and two-qubit gates are constructed by one molecule and two coupled molecules, respectively.The ground state and the first excited state of the molecule are used to encode the |0> and |1> states of a qubit. The qubit is manipulated by a resonant electromagnetic wave that is applied directly to the qubit through a microstrip line. The coupling between two qubits in a quantum controlled NOT gate is switched on (off) by floating (grounding) the metal film electrodes. We study the operations of the gates by using a box-shaped quantum dot model and numerically solving a time-dependent Schridinger equation, and demonstrate that the quantum gates can perform the quantum computation. The operating speed of the gates is about one operation per 4ps. The reading operation of the output of the quantum computer can...

  3. Kondo effects in triangular triple quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oguri, Akira; Numata, Takahide; Nisikawa, Yunori; Hewson, A. C.

    2009-03-01

    We study the conductance through a triangular triple quantum dot, which is connected to two noninteracting leads, using the numerical renormalization group (NRG). It is found that the system shows a variety of Kondo effects depending on the filling of the triangle. The SU(4) Kondo effect occurs at half-filling, and a sharp conductance dip due to a phase lapse appears in the gate-voltage dependence. Furthermore, when four electrons occupy the three sites on average, a local S=1 moment, which is caused by the Nagaoka mechanism, is induced along the triangle. The temperature dependence of the entropy and spin susceptibility of the triangle shows that this moment is screened by the conduction electrons via two separate stages at different temperatures. The two-terminal and four-terminal conductances show a clear difference at the gate voltages, where the SU(4) or the S=1 Kondo effects occur[1]. We will also discuss effects of deformations of the triangular configuration, caused by the inhomogeneity in the inter-dot couplings and in the gate voltages. [4pt] [1] T.Numata, Y.Nisikawa, A.Oguri, and A.C.Hewson: arXiv:0808.3496.

  4. Polymersomes containing quantum dots for cellular imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camblin M

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Marine Camblin,1 Pascal Detampel,1 Helene Kettiger,1 Dalin Wu,2 Vimalkumar Balasubramanian,1,* Jörg Huwyler1,*1Division of Pharmaceutical Technology, 2Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Quantum dots (QDs are highly fluorescent and stable probes for cellular and molecular imaging. However, poor intracellular delivery, stability, and toxicity of QDs in biological compartments hamper their use in cellular imaging. To overcome these limitations, we developed a simple and effective method to load QDs into polymersomes (Ps made of poly(dimethylsiloxane-poly(2-methyloxazoline (PDMS-PMOXA diblock copolymers without compromising the characteristics of the QDs. These Ps showed no cellular toxicity and QDs were successfully incorporated into the aqueous compartment of the Ps as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. Ps containing QDs showed colloidal stability over a period of 6 weeks if stored in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS at physiological pH (7.4. Efficient intracellular delivery of Ps containing QDs was achieved in human liver carcinoma cells (HepG2 and was visualized by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM. Ps containing QDs showed a time- and concentration-dependent uptake in HepG2 cells and exhibited better intracellular stability than liposomes. Our results suggest that Ps containing QDs can be used as nanoprobes for cellular imaging.Keywords: quantum dots, polymersomes, cellular imaging, cellular uptake

  5. Colloidal Quantum Dot Photovoltaics: A Path Forward

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-11-22

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) offer a path toward high-efficiency photovoltaics based on low-cost materials and processes. Spectral tunability via the quantum size effect facilitates absorption of specific wavelengths from across the sun\\'s broad spectrum. CQD materials\\' ease of processing derives from their synthesis, storage, and processing in solution. Rapid advances have brought colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic solar power conversion efficiencies of 6% in the latest reports. These achievements represent important first steps toward commercially compelling performance. Here we review advances in device architecture and materials science. We diagnose the principal phenomenon-electronic states within the CQD film band gap that limit both current and voltage in devices-that must be cured for CQD PV devices to fulfill their promise. We close with a prescription, expressed as bounds on the density and energy of electronic states within the CQD film band gap, that should allow device efficiencies to rise to those required for the future of the solar energy field. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  6. Galaxy formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  7. Galaxy formation

    CERN Document Server

    Silk, Joseph; Dvorkin, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Galaxy formation is at the forefront of observation and theory in cosmology. An improved understanding is essential for improving our knowledge both of the cosmological parameters, of the contents of the universe, and of our origins. In these lectures intended for graduate students, galaxy formation theory is reviewed and confronted with recent observational issues. In Lecture 1, the following topics are presented: star formation considerations, including IMF, star formation efficiency and star formation rate, the origin of the galaxy luminosity function, and feedback in dwarf galaxies. In Lecture 2, we describe formation of disks and massive spheroids, including the growth of supermassive black holes, negative feedback in spheroids, the AGN-star formation connection, star formation rates at high redshift and the baryon fraction in galaxies.

  8. Cost Effectiveness of DOTS and Non—DOTS Strategies for Smear—Positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU-QUN; JINSHUI-GAO; 等

    2000-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of DOTS(Directly Observed Treatment,short course)and nonDOTS strategies for smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Beijing was evaluated.Cost calculation was based on the experses of drugs ,chest X-ray films,sputm smears and cultures for the patients.Effectiveness of the intervention was assessed in two aspects:direct benefits to the patients treated and indirect benefits to the others through reduced transmission of tuberculsis;disability adjusted life of year(DALY) was used as an index.The results showed that one DALY could be saved with 45.7 Yuan by DOTS and 471.4 Yuan by non-DOTS.DOTS is a good control strategy for smear-positive tuberculosis.

  9. Cost Effectiveness of DOTS and Non-DOTS Strategies for Smear-positive Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The cost-effectiveness of DOTS (Directly Observed Treatment, short course) and non-DOTS strategies for smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in Beijing was evaluated. Cost calculation was based on the expenses of drugs, chest X-ray films, sputum smears and cultures for the patients. Effectiveness of the intervention was assessed in two aspects: direct benefits to the patients treated and indirect benefits to the others through reduced transmission of tuberculosis; disability adjusted life of year (DALY) was used as an index. The results showed that one DALY could be saved with 45.7 Yuan by DOTS and 471.4 Yuan by non-DOTS. DOTS is a good control strategy for smear-positive tuberculosis.

  10. Soil formation.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Buurman, P.

    1998-01-01

    Soil Formation deals with qualitative and quantitative aspects of soil formation (or pedogenesis) and the underlying chemical, biological, and physical processes. The starting point of the text is the process - and not soil classification. Effects of weathering and new formation of minerals, mobilis

  11. Prompt Planetesimal Formation beyond the Snow Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Philip J.; Eisner, Josh A.; Simon, Jacob B.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a simple model to predict the radial distribution of planetesimal formation. The model is based on the observed growth of dust to millimeter-sized particles, which drift radially, pile-up, and form planetesimals where the stopping time and dust-to-gas ratio intersect the allowed region for streaming instability-induced gravitational collapse. Using an approximate analytic treatment, we first show that drifting particles define a track in metallicity–stopping time space whose only substantial dependence is on the disk’s angular momentum transport efficiency. Prompt planetesimal formation is feasible for high particle accretion rates (relative to the gas, {\\dot{M}}p/\\dot{M}≳ 3× {10}-2 for α ={10}-2), which could only be sustained for a limited period of time. If it is possible, it would lead to the deposition of a broad and massive belt of planetesimals with a sharp outer edge. Numerically including turbulent diffusion and vapor condensation processes, we find that a modest enhancement of solids near the snow line occurs for centimeter-sized particles, but that this is largely immaterial for planetesimal formation. We note that radial drift couples planetesimal formation across radii in the disk, and suggest that considerations of planetesimal formation favor a model in which the initial deposition of material for giant planet cores occurs well beyond the snow line.

  12. Prompt Planetesimal Formation beyond the Snow Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Philip J.; Eisner, Josh A.; Simon, Jacob B.

    2016-09-01

    We develop a simple model to predict the radial distribution of planetesimal formation. The model is based on the observed growth of dust to millimeter-sized particles, which drift radially, pile-up, and form planetesimals where the stopping time and dust-to-gas ratio intersect the allowed region for streaming instability-induced gravitational collapse. Using an approximate analytic treatment, we first show that drifting particles define a track in metallicity-stopping time space whose only substantial dependence is on the disk’s angular momentum transport efficiency. Prompt planetesimal formation is feasible for high particle accretion rates (relative to the gas, {\\dot{M}}p/\\dot{M}≳ 3× {10}-2 for α ={10}-2), which could only be sustained for a limited period of time. If it is possible, it would lead to the deposition of a broad and massive belt of planetesimals with a sharp outer edge. Numerically including turbulent diffusion and vapor condensation processes, we find that a modest enhancement of solids near the snow line occurs for centimeter-sized particles, but that this is largely immaterial for planetesimal formation. We note that radial drift couples planetesimal formation across radii in the disk, and suggest that considerations of planetesimal formation favor a model in which the initial deposition of material for giant planet cores occurs well beyond the snow line.

  13. Tandem structured quantum dot/rod sensitized solar cell based on solvothermal synthesized CdSe quantum dots and rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golobostanfard, Mohammad Reza; Abdizadeh, Hossein

    2014-06-01

    The quantum dots (QD) and quantum rods (QR) of different sizes, shapes, and crystalline phases are synthesized by modified solvothermal method spontaneously employed stirring system and controlled internal applied pressure. The tandem structure of QDs and QRs as well as tetrapods is formed on hierarchical porous titania photoanode by means of electrophoretic deposition. A tremendous enhancement in efficiency of the cell is obtained in samples synthesized at 220 °C for 24 h due to the formation of tandem structure, utilization of Cu2S/CNT composite cathode, co-sensitization of CdS and CdSe, and beneficial role of QRs in electron lifetime. Smaller size QDs with higher band gaps penetrate deeper through the macro-channels of the hierarchical porous structure, while the QRs and tetrapods with lower band gaps are placed on upper layers. Although the charge injection is improved in smaller QDs, the electron lifetime in QRs is longer mainly due to the higher absorption cross section, proper charge separation, introduction of quasi-one dimensional route for charge transport through QRs, and higher surface area available for regeneration with electrolyte. The cell shows the efficiency of 1.05% with JSC of 4.48 mA cm-2, VOC of 0.45 V, and fill factor of 0.52.

  14. Pulse train amplification and regeneration based on semiconductor quantum dots waveguide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; Öhman, Filip; Mørk, Jesper

    2008-01-01

    We numerical analyze pulse train amplification up to 200 Gbit/s in quantum dot amplifiers and present regeneration properties with saturable absorber based on semiconductor quantum dot waveguides.......We numerical analyze pulse train amplification up to 200 Gbit/s in quantum dot amplifiers and present regeneration properties with saturable absorber based on semiconductor quantum dot waveguides....

  15. Ultrashort Dynamics in Quantum Dot Waveguides: Theoretical Analysis and Experimental Investigations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehrig, E.; Poel, Mike van der; Birkedal, Dan;

    2004-01-01

    Experimental pump-probe measurements and computational modeling on the basis of spatially resolved Quantum Dot Maxwell-Bloch equations allow identification of the processes underlying the ultrafast dot dynamics.......Experimental pump-probe measurements and computational modeling on the basis of spatially resolved Quantum Dot Maxwell-Bloch equations allow identification of the processes underlying the ultrafast dot dynamics....

  16. Electric properties of Ge quantum dot embedded in Si matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Xi-ying; SHI Wei-lin

    2005-01-01

    The electric characteristics of Ge quantum dot grown by molecular beam epitaxy in Si matrix were investigated by admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy. The admittance spectroscopy measurements show that the activation energy of 0.341 eV can be considered as the emitting energy of hole from the ground state of the quantum dot. And the capacitance variation with temperature of the sample shows a platform at various frequencies with reverse bias 0.5 V, which indicates that the boundary of space charge region is located at the quantum dot layer where the large confined hole concentration blocks the further extension of space charge region. When the temperature increases from 120 K to 200 K, the holes in the dot emit out completely. The position of the platform shifting with the increase of the applied frequency shows the frequency effects of the charges in the quantum dot. The deep level transient spectroscopy results show that the charge concentration in the Ge quantum dot is a function of the pulse duration and the reverse bias voltage, the activation energy and capture cross-section of hole decrease with the increase of pulse duration due to the Coulomb charging effect. The valence-band offsets of hole in Ge dot obtained by admittance spectroscopy and deep level transient spectroscopy are 0.341 and 0.338 eV, respectively.

  17. Atomically precise, coupled quantum dots fabricated by cleaved edge overgrowth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegscheider, W.; Schedelbeck, G.; Bichler, M.; Abstreiter, G.

    Recent progress in the fabrication of quantum dots by molecular beam epitaxy along three directions in space is reviewed. The optical properties of different sample structures consisting of individual quantum dots, pairs of coupled dots as well as of linear arrays of dots are studied by microscopic photoluminescence spectroscopy. The high degree of control over shape, composition and position of the 7×7×7 nm3 size GaAs quantum dots, which form at the intesection of three orthogonal quantum wells, allows a detailed investigation of the influence of coupling between almost identical zero-dimensional objects. In contrast to the inhomogeneously broadened quantum well and quantum wire signals originating from the complex twofold cleaved edge overgrowth structure, the photoluminescence spetrum of an individual quantum dot exhibits a single sharp line (full width at half maximum denomination "artificial atoms" for the quantum dots. It is further demonstrated that an "artifical molecule", characterized by the existence of bonding and antibonding states can be assembled from two of such "artificial atoms". The coupling strength between the "artificial atoms" is adjusted by the "interatomic" distance and is reflected in the energetic separation of the bonding and antibonding levels and the linewidths of the corresponding interband transitions.

  18. InP-quantum dots: Towards high temperature emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulz, Wolfgang-Michael; Rossbach, Robert; Jetter, Michael; Reischle, Matthias; Beirne, Gareth; Michler, Peter [Institut fuer Strahlenphysik, Allmandring 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    To increase the carrier confinement and luminescence at elevated temperatures for InP-quantum dots, we embedded them in Al{sub 0.50}Ga{sub 0.50}InP. Atomic force microscope measurements are showing a bimodal size distribution of uncapped samples, which can also be seen in the photoluminescence measurements. From time-resolved, power and temperature-dependent PL measurements, we could deduce a confinement energy of 274 meV for small A-type dots and 572 meV for bigger B-type dots. Therefore, the temperature where the thermal reemission of the carriers out of the dots dominates, could be estimated to 160 K for A-type, respectively 250 K for B-type dots. The sample also shows a thermally induced, wetting layer assisted carrier transfer between these bimodal dots, increasing the luminescence intensity of the A-type dots at elevated temperatures. A further increase of the luminescence at elevated temperatures was achieved by placing the QD layer on top of a DBR structure. On account, luminescence up to 460 K was observable. The zero-dimensional behavior was verified with high resolution {mu}-PL and autocorrelation measurements, showing single photon emission at 4 K.

  19. Standardization of the dot enzyme-lynked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA for experimental plague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia M. L. Montenegro

    1993-03-01

    Full Text Available A dot enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (dot-ELISA was previously developed to detect specific antibodies in rabbits sera immunized against FIA protein obtained from Yersina pestis. This antigen was covalently linked onto the surface of dacron (polyethyleneterephthalate. Here, standard conditions are described for the optimization of this procedure: an amount of 20 ng of FIA protein was fixed onto dacron; anti-rabbit IgG peroxidase conjugate diluted 1:8,000 and 30% non-fat instant milk as blocking substance were used throughout the method. This procedure was compared with that employing nitrocellulose as solid-phase which showed to be more sensitive. However, the method based on dacron did not show false positive reactions against non-immunized rabbits sera at low antigen amount and diluted anti-IgG peroxidase conjugate.

  20. Self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots and quantum dot laser

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王占国; 刘峰奇; 梁基本; 徐波

    2000-01-01

    Systematic study of molecular beam epitaxy-grown self-assembled ln(Ga)As/GaAs, In-AlAs/AlGaAs/GaAs, and InAs/InAIAs/lnP quantum dots (QDs) is demonstrated. By adjusting growth conditions, surprising alignment, preferential elongation, and pronounced sequential coalescence of dots under the specific condition are realized. Room-temperature (RT) continuous-wave (CW) lasing at the wavelength of 960 nm with output power of 1 W is achieved from vertical coupled InAs/GaAs QDs ensemble. The RT threshold current density is 218 A/cm2. An RT CW output power of 0.53 W ensures at least 3 000 h lasing (only drops 0.83 db). This is one of the best results ever reported.

  1. Highly tuneable hole quantum dots in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauns, Matthias; Ridderbos, Joost; Li, Ang; van der Wiel, Wilfred G.; Bakkers, Erik P. A. M.; Zwanenburg, Floris A.

    2016-10-01

    We define single quantum dots of lengths varying from 60 nm up to nearly half a micron in Ge-Si core-shell nanowires. The charging energies scale inversely with the quantum dot length between 18 and 4 meV. Subsequently, we split up a long dot into a double quantum dot with a separate control over the tunnel couplings and the electrochemical potential of each dot. Both single and double quantum dot configurations prove to be very stable and show excellent control over the electrostatic environment of the dots, making this system a highly versatile platform for spin-based quantum computing.

  2. Ultra-large scale synthesis of high electrochemical performance SnO2 quantum dots within 5 min at room temperature following a growth self-termination mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • SnO2 quantum dots were prepared at an ultra-large scale at room temperature within 5 min. • The grinding of SnCl2⋅2H2O and ammonium persulphate with morpholine produces quantum dots. • The reactions were self-terminated through the rapid consumption of water. • The obtained SnO2 quantum dots own high electrochemical performance. - Abstract: SnO2 quantum dots are prepared at an ultra-large scale by a productive synthetic procedure without using any organic ligand. The grinding of solid mixture of SnCl2⋅2H2O and ammonium persulphate with morpholine in a mortar at room temperature produces 1.2 nm SnO2 quantum dots within 5 min. The formation of SnO2 is initiated by the reaction between tin ions and hydroxyl groups generated from hydrolysis of morpholine in the released hydrate water from SnCl2⋅2H2O. It is considered that as water is rapidly consumed by the hydrolysis reaction of morpholine, the growth process of particles is self-terminated immediately after their transitory period of nucleation and growth. As a result of simple procedure and high toleration to scaling up of preparation, at least 50 g of SnO2 quantum dots can be produced in one batch in our laboratory. The as prepared quantum dots present high electrochemical performance due to the effective faradaic reaction and the alternative trapping of electrons and holes

  3. Lead Chalcogenide Quantum Dots and Quantum Dot Hybrids for Optoelectronic Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Schornbaum, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) exhibit remarkable properties, which include a size-tunable band gap and narrow emission bands. They are also suitable for large-area and low-cost fabrication, due to their solution-processability. Consequently, QDs are very promising for future applications in printable optoelectronic devices. Near-infrared (NIR) active lead chalcogenide QDs hold an enormous potential, as they exhibit optical properties in a wavelength regime, where efficient photoactive mate...

  4. Chemiluminescence behavior of the carbon dots and the reduced state carbon dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, Ping [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Xie, Jianxin [College of Resources and Environment, Yuxi Normal University, Yuxi, Yunnan 653100 (China); Long, Yijuan; Huang, Xiaoxiao; Zhu, Rui; Wang, Xiliang; Liang, Liping [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Huang, Yuming, E-mail: ymhuang@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China); Zheng, Huzhi, E-mail: zhenghz@swu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory on Luminescence and Real-Time Analysis, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southwest University, Chongqing 400715 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) can react with two different carbon nanoparticles, i.e., carbon dots (CDs) and reduced state carbon dots (r-CDs), in a strong acid medium to generate chemiluminescence (CL). Furthermore, the different CL intensities and CL behaviors due to the different surface groups on these two kinds of carbon nanoparticles were confirmed. CL spectra, fluorescence spectra, UV–vis absorption spectra, and electron paramagnanetic resonance spectra were applied to investigate the CL mechanism. The main reaction pathways were proposed as follows: for the CL reaction between CDs and KMnO{sub 4}, the excited states of CDs (CDs{sup ⁎}) and Mn(II) (Mn(II){sup ⁎}) emerged as KMnO{sub 4} could inject holes into CDs, then, the CDs{sup ⁎} and Mn(II){sup ⁎} acted as luminophors to yield CL; in the r-CDs-KMnO{sub 4} system, r-CDs were oxidized by KMnO{sub 4} directly, and CDs{sup ⁎} and Mn(II){sup ⁎} were produced, at the same time, CL occurred. What is more interesting is that the CL intensity of the r-CD system is stronger than that of the CD system, which confirms that functional groups have strong effect on the CL behavior. It inspired us that new carbon nanoparticles with excellent luminous performance can be designed by tuning their surface groups. -- Highlights: • Carbon dots (CDs) and reduced state carbon dots (r-CDs) can react with potassium permanganate (KMnO{sub 4}) in a strong acid to generate chemiluminescence (CL). • With different surface groups, the CL intensity of r-CDs-KMnO{sub 4} system is different from that of CDs-KMnO{sub 4} system. • The CL mechanisms of the two systems were investigated.

  5. Low-density InP-based quantum dots emitting around the 1.5 μm telecom wavelength range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on low-density InAs quantum dots (QDs) grown on AlGaInAs surfaces lattice matched to InP using post-growth annealing by solid-source molecular beam epitaxy. Clearly spatially separated QDs with a dot density of about 5 × 108 cm−2 are obtained by using a special capping technique after the dot formation process. High-resolution micro-photoluminescence performed on optimized QD structures grown on distributed Bragg reflector exhibits single QD emissions around 1.5 μm with narrow excitonic linewidth below 50 μeV, which can be used as single photon source in the telecom wavelength range

  6. Design optimization of large-size format edge-lit light guide units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastanin, J.; Lenaerts, C.; Fleury-Frenette, K.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present an original method of dot pattern generation dedicated to large-size format light guide plate (LGP) design optimization, such as photo-bioreactors, the number of dots greatly exceeds the maximum allowable number of optical objects supported by most common ray-tracing software. In the proposed method, in order to simplify the computational problem, the original optical system is replaced by an equivalent one. Accordingly, an original dot pattern is splitted into multiple small sections, inside which the dot size variation is less than the ink dots printing typical resolution. Then, these sections are replaced by equivalent cells with continuous diffusing film. After that, we adjust the TIS (Total Integrated Scatter) two-dimensional distribution over the grid of equivalent cells, using an iterative optimization procedure. Finally, the obtained optimal TIS distribution is converted into the dot size distribution by applying an appropriate conversion rule. An original semi-empirical equation dedicated to rectangular large-size LGPs is proposed for the initial guess of TIS distribution. It allows significantly reduce the total time needed to dot pattern optimization.

  7. Extracting inter-dot tunnel couplings between few donor quantum dots in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorman, S. K.; Broome, M. A.; Keizer, J. G.; Watson, T. F.; Hile, S. J.; Baker, W. J.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2016-05-01

    The long term scaling prospects for solid-state quantum computing architectures relies heavily on the ability to simply and reliably measure and control the coherent electron interaction strength, known as the tunnel coupling, t c. Here, we describe a method to extract the t c between two quantum dots (QDs) utilising their different tunnel rates to a reservoir. We demonstrate the technique on a few donor triple QD tunnel coupled to a nearby single-electron transistor (SET) in silicon. The device was patterned using scanning tunneling microscopy-hydrogen lithography allowing for a direct measurement of the tunnel coupling for a given inter-dot distance. We extract {t}{{c}}=5.5+/- 1.8 {{GHz}} and {t}{{c}}=2.2+/- 1.3 {{GHz}} between each of the nearest-neighbour QDs which are separated by 14.5 nm and 14.0 nm, respectively. The technique allows for an accurate measurement of t c for nanoscale devices even when it is smaller than the electron temperature and is an ideal characterisation tool for multi-dot systems with a charge sensor.

  8. Universal parametric correlations of conductance peaks in quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We compute the parametric correlation function of the conductance peaks in chaotic and weakly disordered quantum dots in the Coulomb blockade regime and demonstrate its universality upon an appropriate scaling of the parameter. For a symmetric dot we show that this correlation function is affected by breaking time-reversal symmetry but is independent of the details of the channels in the external leads. We derive a new scaling which depends on the eigenfunctions alone and can be extracted directly from the conductance peak heights. Our results are in excellent agreement with model simulations of a disordered quantum dot. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  9. Dielectrophoretic Manipulation and Separation of Microparticles Using Microarray Dot Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashar Yafouz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a dielectrophoretic system for the manipulation and separation of microparticles. The system is composed of five layers and utilizes microarray dot electrodes. We validated our system by conducting size-dependent manipulation and separation experiments on 1, 5 and 15 μm polystyrene particles. Our findings confirm the capability of the proposed device to rapidly and efficiently manipulate and separate microparticles of various dimensions, utilizing positive and negative dielectrophoresis (DEP effects. Larger size particles were repelled and concentrated in the center of the dot by negative DEP, while the smaller sizes were attracted and collected by the edge of the dot by positive DEP.

  10. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeHaven, Stan; Williams, Phillip; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide are presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dot application technique are discussed.

  11. Kondo effect in quantum dots and molecular devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Lang; LI Hongxiang; HU Wenping; ZHU Daoben

    2005-01-01

    Kondo effect is a very important many-body phenomenon in condensed matter physics,which explains why the resistance increases as the temperature is lowered (usually <10 K) in dilute magnetic alloy, and why the conductance increases as temperature is decreased in quantum dots. This paper simply introduces equilibrium and non- equilibrium Kondo effects in quantum dots together with the Kondo effect in quantum dots with even number of electrons (when the singlet and triplet states are degenerate). Furthermore, Kondo effect in single atom/molecular transistors is introduced, which indicates a new way to study Kondo effect.

  12. PL Emission and Shape of Silicon Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    The calculation results show that the bonding energy and electronic states of silicon quantum dots are different on various curved surfaces, for example, a Si-0-Si bridge bond on curved surface provides the localized levels in band gap and its bonding energy is shallower than that on facet. The red-shifting of PL spectra on smaller silicon quantum dots can be explained by curved surface effect. Experiments demonstrate that silicon quantum dots are activated for emission due to the localized levels provided in curved surface effect.About The Author: Zhong-Mei Huang,Master in Guizhou University.

  13. Thermal Rectification Effect of an Interacting Quantum Dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xue-Ou; DONG Bing; LEI Xiao-Lin

    2008-01-01

    @@ We investigate the nonlinear thermal transport properties of a single interacting quantum dot with two energy levels tunnel-coupled to two electrodes using nonequilibrium Green function method and Hartree-Fock decoupling approximation. In the case of asymmetric tunnel-couplings to two electrodes, for example, when the upper level of the quantum dot is open for transport, whereas the lower level is blocked, our calculations predict a strong asymmetry for the heat (energy) current, which shows that the quantum dot system may act as a thermal rectifier in this specific situation.

  14. Second Bound State of Biexcitons in Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Wen-Eang

    2003-01-01

    The second bound state of the biexcitons in a quantum dot, with orbital angular momentum L = 1, is reported. By using the method of few-body physics, the binding energy spectra of the second bound state of a biexciton in a GaAs quantum dot with a parabolic confinement have been calculated as a function of the electron-to-hole mass ratio and the quantum dot size. The fact that the biexcitons have a second bound state may aid in the better understanding of their binding mechanism.

  15. Imaging GABAc Receptors with Ligand-Conjugated Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian D. Tomlinson

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a methodology for labeling the GABAc receptor on the surface membrane of intact cells. This work builds upon our earlier work with serotonin-conjugated quantum dots and our studies with PEGylated quantum dots to reduce nonspecific binding. In the current approach, a PEGylated derivative of muscimol was synthesized and attached via an amide linkage to quantum dots coated in an amphiphilic polymer derivative of a modified polyacrylamide. These conjugates were used to image GABAC receptors heterologously expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes.

  16. Quantum repeaters using orbitals in quantum dot molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Toshio

    2016-09-01

    We propose quantum repeaters using quantum dot molecules, in which matter-photon entanglement is generated by Raman scatterings in lambda systems composed of various coherent exciton levels formed in the ensembles of asymmetric coupled quantum dots. In our scheme, the wavelength of Stokes and anti-Stokes photons can be chosen to fulfill the requirements of optical fiber communication. Further, the relative superposition phase in the entangled states can be stabilized by the active feedback to the gate voltage in quantum dot system. These characteristics are favorable for implementing our scheme in practice.

  17. Correlated Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum-dot structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasbjerg, Kristen; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically Coulomb drag in capacitively coupled quantum dots (CQDs) -- a biasdriven dot coupled to an unbiased dot where transport is due to Coulomb mediated energy transfer drag. To this end, we introduce a master-equation approach which accounts for higher-order tunneling (cotunneling....... Interestingly, the direction of the drag current is not determined by the drive current, but by an interplay between the energy-dependent lead couplings. Studying the drag mechanism in a graphene-based CQD heterostructure, we show that the predictions of our theory are consistent with recent experiments...

  18. Optically Modulated Bistability in Quantum Dot Resonant Tunneling Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Qian-Chun; An, Zheng-Hua; Hou, Ying; Zhu, Zi-Qiang

    2013-04-01

    InAs quantum dots are introduced into resonant tunneling diodes to study the electronic transport behavior, and a wide bistability (ΔV ~ 0.8 V) is observed in the negative differential resistance region. Based on an analytic model, we attribute the observed distinct bistability of a resonant tunneling diodes with quantum dots to the feedback dependence of energy of the electron-storing quantum dots on the tunneling current density. Meanwhile, we find that this wide bistable region can be modulated sensitively by light illumination and becomes narrower with increasing light intensity. Our results suggest that the present devices can be potentially used as sensitive photodetectors in optoelectronic fields.

  19. Electrostatically defined silicon quantum dots with counted antimony donor implants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, M., E-mail: msingh@sandia.gov; Luhman, D. R.; Lilly, M. P. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87175 (United States); Pacheco, J. L.; Perry, D.; Garratt, E.; Ten Eyck, G.; Bishop, N. C.; Wendt, J. R.; Manginell, R. P.; Dominguez, J.; Pluym, T.; Bielejec, E.; Carroll, M. S. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2016-02-08

    Deterministic control over the location and number of donors is crucial to donor spin quantum bits (qubits) in semiconductor based quantum computing. In this work, a focused ion beam is used to implant antimony donors in 100 nm × 150 nm windows straddling quantum dots. Ion detectors are integrated next to the quantum dots to sense the implants. The numbers of donors implanted can be counted to a precision of a single ion. In low-temperature transport measurements, regular Coulomb blockade is observed from the quantum dots. Charge offsets indicative of donor ionization are also observed in devices with counted donor implants.

  20. Realization of electrically tunable single quantum dot nanocavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofbauer, Felix Florian Georg

    2009-03-15

    We investigated the design, fabrication and optical investigation of electrically tunable single quantum dot-photonic crystal defect nanocavities operating in both the weak and strong coupling regimes of the light matter interaction. We demonstrate that the quantum confined Stark effect can be employed to quickly and reversibly switch the dot-cavity coupling, simply by varying a gate voltage. Our results show that exciton transitions from individual dots can be tuned by up to {proportional_to}4 meV relative to the nanocavity mode, before the emission quenches due to carrier tunneling escape from the dots. We directly probe spontaneous emission, irreversible polariton decay and the statistics of the emitted photons from a single-dot nanocavity in the weak and strong coupling regimes. New information is obtained on the nature of the dot-cavity coupling in the weak coupling regime and electrical control of zero dimensional polaritons is demonstrated for the first time. The structures investigated are p-i-n photodiodes consisting of an 180nm thick free-standing GaAs membrane into which a two dimensional photonic crystal is formed by etching a triangular lattice of air holes. Low mode volume nanocavities (V{sub mode}<1.6 ({lambda}/n){sup 3}) are realized by omitting 3 holes in a line to form L3 cavities and a single layer of InGaAs self-assembled quantum dots is embedded into the midpoint of the membrane. The nanocavities are electrically contacted via 35 nm thick p- and n-doped contact layers in the GaAs membrane. In the weak coupling regime, time resolved spectroscopy reveals a {proportional_to}7 x shortening of the spontaneous emission lifetime as the dot is tuned through the nanocavity mode, due to the Purcell effect. Upon strongly detuning the same quantum dot transition from the nanocavity mode we observe an additional {proportional_to}8 x lengthening of the spontaneous emission lifetime. These observations unequivocally highlight two regimes of dot

  1. Electrical control of a single Mn atom in a quantum dot

    OpenAIRE

    Léger, Yoan; Besombes, Lucien; Fernández Rossier, Joaquín; Maingault, Laurent; Mariette, Henri

    2006-01-01

    We report on the reversible electrical control of the magnetic properties of a single Mn atom in an individual quantum dot. Our device permits us to prepare the dot in states with three different electric charges, 0, +1e, and -1e which result in dramatically different spin properties, as revealed by photoluminescence. Whereas in the neutral configuration the quantum dot is paramagnetic, the electron-doped dot spin states are spin rotationally invariant and the hole-doped dot spins states are ...

  2. Charge sensing of a few-donor double quantum dot in silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, T. F., E-mail: tfwatson15@gmail.com; Weber, B.; Büch, H.; Fuechsle, M.; Simmons, M. Y., E-mail: michelle.simmons@unsw.edu.au [Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales 2052 (Australia)

    2015-12-07

    We demonstrate the charge sensing of a few-donor double quantum dot precision placed with atomic resolution scanning tunnelling microscope lithography. We show that a tunnel-coupled single electron transistor (SET) can be used to detect electron transitions on both dots as well as inter-dot transitions. We demonstrate that we can control the tunnel times of the second dot to the SET island by ∼4 orders of magnitude by detuning its energy with respect to the first dot.

  3. Tunneling rate in double quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filikhin, Igor; Matinyan, Sergei; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2014-03-01

    We study spectral properties of electron tunneling in double quantum dots (DQDs) (and double quantum wells (DQWs)) and their relation to the geometry. In particular we compare the tunneling in DQW with chaotic and regular geometry, taking into account recent evidence about regularization of the tunneling rate when the QW geometry is chaotic. Our calculations do not support this assumption. We confirm high influence of the QW geometry boundaries on the rate fluctuation along the spectrum. The factors of the effective mass anisotropy and violation of the symmetry of DQD and DQW are also considered. Generally, we found that the small violation of the symmetry drastically affects tunneling. This work is supported by the NSF (HRD-0833184) and NASA (NNX09AV07A).

  4. In Vivo Imaging of Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texier, Isabelle; Josser, Véronique

    Noninvasive whole-body near-infrared fluorescence imaging is now acknowledged as a powerful method for the molecular mapping of biological events in live small animals such as mouse models. With outstanding optical properties such as high fluorescence quantum yields and low photobleaching rates, quantum dots (QDs) are labels of choice in the near-infrared domain. The main applications described in the literature for in vivo imaging of mice after injection of QDs encompass imaging of lymph nodes and tumors and cell tracking. Standard methods for the preparation, the purification, and the in vivo fluorescence whole-body imaging of QDs in the live mouse are described. Nanoparticles coated by PEG chains of different sizes and terminal groups are prepared using 705-nm-emitting commercial QDs. Their biodistribution after intravenous or intradermal injections in tumor-bearing mice is reported here.

  5. Mitochondria as target of Quantum dots toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → The present work investigated the toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers. → These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level. → QDs toxicity on mitochondria indicates that the QDs require to be further improved before they can be safely used in clinic. - Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs) hold great promise in many biological applications, with the persistence of safety concerns about the environment and human health. The present work investigated the potential toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers by examining mitochondrial respiration, swelling, and lipid peroxidation. We observed that QDs can significantly affect the mitochondrial membrane properties, bioenergetics and induce mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level.

  6. Selective area epitaxy of quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: We investigate selective-area-epitaxy (SAE) as a tool for selectively controlling the physical and optical properties of quantum-dots (QDs), aiming at integration of QD devices. MOCVD growth of InGaAs/lnAs QDs on GaAs wafers patterned with pairs of SiO2 stripes is studied. Atomic force microscopy and cathodoluminescence are used for characterisation of these QDs. We show that InGaAs QD luminescence can be tuned over a range of 100nm by varying the dimensions of and/or spacings between the SiO2 stripes. Growth of InGaAs quantum-well and QDs on different parts of the same wafer, without using etch and regrowth techniques is also demonstrated. Results for the InAs/GaAs system are also presented. Copyright (2005) Australian Institute of Physics

  7. Building devices from colloidal quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Cherie R; Lifshitz, Efrat; Sargent, Edward H; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2016-08-26

    The continued growth of mobile and interactive computing requires devices manufactured with low-cost processes, compatible with large-area and flexible form factors, and with additional functionality. We review recent advances in the design of electronic and optoelectronic devices that use colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs). The properties of materials assembled of QDs may be tailored not only by the atomic composition but also by the size, shape, and surface functionalization of the individual QDs and by the communication among these QDs. The chemical and physical properties of QD surfaces and the interfaces in QD devices are of particular importance, and these enable the solution-based fabrication of low-cost, large-area, flexible, and functional devices. We discuss challenges that must be addressed in the move to solution-processed functional optoelectronic nanomaterials. PMID:27563099

  8. Wet electron microscopy with quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timp, Winston; Watson, Nicki; Sabban, Alon; Zik, Ory; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-09-01

    Wet electron microscopy (EM) is a new imaging method with the potential to allow higher spatial resolution of samples. In contrast to most EM methods, it requires little time to perform and does not require complicated equipment or difficult steps. We used this method on a common murine macrophage cell line, IC-21, in combination with various stains and preparations, to collect high resolution images of the actin cytoskeleton. Most importantly, we demonstrated the use of quantum dots in conjunction with this technique to perform light/electron correlation microscopy. We found that wet EM is a useful tool that fits into a niche between the simplicity of light microscopy and the high spatial resolution of EM.

  9. Biosensing with Luminescent Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hedi Mattoussi

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs are a recentlydeveloped class of nanomaterial whose unique photophysical properties are helping tocreate a new generation of robust fluorescent biosensors. QD properties of interest forbiosensing include high quantum yields, broad absorption spectra coupled to narrow sizetunablephotoluminescent emissions and exceptional resistance to both photobleaching andchemical degradation. In this review, we examine the progress in adapting QDs for severalpredominantly in vitro biosensing applications including use in immunoassays, asgeneralized probes, in nucleic acid detection and fluorescence resonance energy transfer(FRET - based sensing. We also describe several important considerations when workingwith QDs mainly centered on the choice of material(s and appropriate strategies forattaching biomolecules to the QDs.

  10. Universal Braess paradox in open quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A. L. R.; Bazeia, D.; Ramos, J. G. G. S.

    2014-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical results that demonstrate the presence of the Braess paradox in chaotic quantum dots. The paradox that we identify, originally perceived in classical networks, shows that the addition of more capacity to the network can suppress the current flow in the universal regime. We investigate the weak localization term, showing that it presents the paradox encoded in a saturation minimum of the conductance, under the presence of hyperflow in the external leads. In addition, we demonstrate that the weak localization suffers a transition signal depending on the overcapacity lead and presents an echo on the magnetic crossover before going to zero due to the full time-reversal symmetry breaking. We also show that the quantum interference contribution can dominate the Ohm term in the presence of constrictions and that the corresponding Fano factor engenders an anomalous behavior.

  11. Quantum dots for next-generation photovoltaics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavi E. Semonin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum-confined semiconductor nanostructures are an emerging class of functional material that are being developed for novel solar energy conversion strategies. One of the largest losses in a bulk or thin film solar cell occurs within a few picoseconds after the photon is absorbed, as photons with energy larger than the semiconductor bandgap produce charge-carriers with excess kinetic energy, which is then dissipated via phonon emission. Semiconductor nanostructures, where at least one dimension is small enough to produce quantum confinement effects, provide new pathways for controlling energy flow and therefore have the potential to increase the efficiency of the primary photoconversion step. In this review, we provide the current status of research efforts towards utilizing the unique properties of colloidal quantum dots (nanocrystals confined in three dimensions in prototype solar cells and demonstrate that these unique systems have the potential to bypass the Shockley-Queisser single-junction limit for solar photon conversion.

  12. Protease-activated quantum dot probes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a novel nanoparticulate luminescent probe with inherent signal amplification upon interaction with a targeted proteolytic enzyme. This construct may be useful for imaging in cancer detection and diagnosis. In this system, quantum dots (QDs) are bound to gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) via a proteolytically degradable peptide sequence to non-radiatively suppress luminescence. A 71% reduction in luminescence was achieved with conjugation of AuNPs to QDs. Release of AuNPs by peptide cleavage restores radiative QD photoluminescence. Initial studies observed a 52% rise in luminescence over 47 h of exposure to 0.2 mg/mL collagenase. These probes can be customized for targeted degradation simply by changing the sequence of the peptide linker

  13. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biomedicial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijia Shao

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs are nanometre-scale crystals, which have unique photophysical properties, such as size-dependent optical properties, high fluorescence quantum yields, and excellent stability against photobleaching. These properties enable QDs as the promising optical labels for the biological applications, such as multiplexed analysis of immunocomplexes or DNA hybridization processes, cell sorting and tracing, in vivo imaging and diagnostics in biomedicine. Meanwhile, QDs can be used as labels for the electrochemical detection of DNA or proteins. This article reviews the synthesis and toxicity of QDs and their optical and electrochemical bioanalytical applications. Especially the application of QDs in biomedicine such as delivering, cell targeting and imaging for cancer research, and in vivo photodynamic therapy (PDT of cancer are briefly discussed.

  14. Mitochondria as target of Quantum dots toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiahan; Zhang, Yue; Xiao, Qi; Tian, Fangfang; Liu, Xiaorong; Li, Ran; Zhao, Guangyuan; Jiang, Fenglei [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Liu, Yi, E-mail: yiliuchem@whu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Virology and Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} The present work investigated the toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers. {yields} These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level. {yields} QDs toxicity on mitochondria indicates that the QDs require to be further improved before they can be safely used in clinic. - Abstract: Quantum dots (QDs) hold great promise in many biological applications, with the persistence of safety concerns about the environment and human health. The present work investigated the potential toxicity of CdTe QDs on the function of mitochondria isolated from rat livers by examining mitochondrial respiration, swelling, and lipid peroxidation. We observed that QDs can significantly affect the mitochondrial membrane properties, bioenergetics and induce mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT). These results will help us learn more about QDs toxicity at subcellular (mitochondrial) level.

  15. Preparation and Application of Fluorescent Carbon Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zuo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent carbon dots (CDs are a novel type of fluorescent nanomaterials, which not only possess the specific quantum confinement effects of nanomaterials due to the small size of nanomaterials, but also have good biocompatibility and high fluorescence. Meanwhile, fluorescence CDs overcome the shortcomings of high toxicity of traditional nanomaterials. Moreover, the preparation procedure of fluorescent CDs is simple and easy. Therefore, fluorescent CDs have great potential applied in photocatalysis, biochemical sensing, bioimaging, drug delivery, and other related areas. In this paper, recent hot researches on fluorescent CDs are reviewed and some problems in the progress of fluorescent CDs are also summarized. At last, a future outlook in this direction is presented.

  16. Universal Braess paradox in open quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A L R; Bazeia, D; Ramos, J G G S

    2014-10-01

    We present analytical and numerical results that demonstrate the presence of the Braess paradox in chaotic quantum dots. The paradox that we identify, originally perceived in classical networks, shows that the addition of more capacity to the network can suppress the current flow in the universal regime. We investigate the weak localization term, showing that it presents the paradox encoded in a saturation minimum of the conductance, under the presence of hyperflow in the external leads. In addition, we demonstrate that the weak localization suffers a transition signal depending on the overcapacity lead and presents an echo on the magnetic crossover before going to zero due to the full time-reversal symmetry breaking. We also show that the quantum interference contribution can dominate the Ohm term in the presence of constrictions and that the corresponding Fano factor engenders an anomalous behavior. PMID:25375575

  17. Effect of Intra-Dot Coulomb Interaction on Andreev Reflection in Normal-Metal/Quantum-Dot/Superconductor System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Yu; SUN Qing-Feng; LIN Tsung-Han

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effect of intra-dot Coulomb interaction on the Andreev reflection in a normalmetal/quantum-dot/superconductor (N-QD-S) system with multiple levels in the quantum dot, in the regime where the intra-dot interacting constant is comparable to the energy gap of superconducting lead. By using nonequilibrium Green function method, the averaged occupation of electrons in the quantum dot and the Andreev reflection (AR) current are studied. Comparing to the case of non-interacting quantum dot, the system shows significant changes for the a two-step-like behavior; and the I-Vg shows two groups of peaks, separated by U and with equal heights, where Vg is the gate voltage and U denotes the intra-dot Coulomb interaction constant. (ii) For finite bias voltage, dips, superposed V ≥ U/2, extra AR current peaks occur between the two groups of the peaks. Besides, the properties of the heights of the AR current peaks are more complicated.``

  18. Bio-nanohybrids of quantum dots and photoproteins facilitating strong nonradiative energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seker, Urartu Ozgur Safak; Mutlugun, Evren; Hernandez-Martinez, Pedro Ludwig; Sharma, Vijay K; Lesnyak, Vladimir; Gaponik, Nikolai; Eychmüller, Alexander; Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    2013-08-01

    Utilization of light is crucial for the life cycle of many organisms. Also, many organisms can create light by utilizing chemical energy emerged from biochemical reactions. Being the most important structural units of the organisms, proteins play a vital role in the formation of light in the form of bioluminescence. Such photoproteins have been isolated and identified for a long time; the exact mechanism of their bioluminescence is well established. Here we show a biomimetic approach to build a photoprotein based excitonic nanoassembly model system using colloidal quantum dots (QDs) for a new bioluminescent couple to be utilized in biotechnological and photonic applications. We concentrated on the formation mechanism of nanohybrids using a kinetic and thermodynamic approach. Finally we propose a biosensing scheme with an ON/OFF switch using the QD-GFP hybrid. The QD-GFP hybrid system promises strong exciton-exciton coupling between the protein and the quantum dot at a high efficiency level, possessing enhanced capabilities of light harvesting, which may bring new technological opportunities to mimic biophotonic events.

  19. Enzyme-Polymers Conjugated to Quantum-Dots for Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Mansur

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, the concept of developing a novel system based on polymer-enzyme macromolecules was tested by coupling carboxylic acid functionalized poly(vinyl alcohol (PVA-COOH to glucose oxidase (GOx followed by the bioconjugation with CdS quantum-dots (QD. The resulting organic-inorganic nanohybrids were characterized by UV-visible spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy, Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The spectroscopy results have clearly shown that the polymer-enzyme macromolecules (PVA-COOH/GOx were synthesized by the proposed zero-length linker route. Moreover, they have performed as successful capping agents for the nucleation and constrained growth of CdS quantum-dots via aqueous colloidal chemistry. The TEM images associated with the optical absorption results have indicated the formation of CdS nanocrystals with estimated diameters of about 3.0 nm. The “blue-shift” in the visible absorption spectra and the PL values have provided strong evidence that the fluorescent CdS nanoparticles were produced in the quantum-size confinement regime. Finally, the hybrid system was biochemically assayed by injecting the glucose substrate and detecting the formation of peroxide with the enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP. Thus, the polymer-enzyme-QD hybrid has behaved as a nanostructured sensor for glucose detecting.

  20. Studies on formation and structures of ultrafine Cu precipitates in Fe-Cu model alloys for reactor pressure vessel steels using positron quantum dot confinement in the precipitates by their positron affinity. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H11-034 (Contract research)

    CERN Document Server

    Hasegawa, M; Suzuki, M; Tang, Z; Yubuta, K

    2003-01-01

    Positron annihilation experiments on Fe-Cu model dilute alloys of nuclear reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels have been performed after neutron irradiation in JMTR. Nanovoids whose inner surfaces were covered by Cu atoms were clearly observed. The nanovoids transformed to ultrafine Cu precipitates by dissociating their vacancies after annealing at around 400degC. The nanovoids and the ultrafine Cu precipitates are strongly suggested to be responsible for irradiation-induced embrittlement of RPV steels. Effects of Ni, Mn and P addition on the nanovoid and Cu precipitate formations were also studied. The nanovoid formation was enhanced by Ni and P, but suppressed by Mn. The Cu precipitates after annealing around 400degC were almost free from these doping elements and hence were pure Cu in the chemical composition. Furthermore the Fermi surface of the 'embedded' Cu precipitates with a body centered cubic crystal structure was obtained from two dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation (2D-ACAR) ...

  1. Photoluminescent silicon quantum dots in core/shell configuration: synthesis by low temperature and spontaneous plasma processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quantum confinement in zero-dimensional silicon nanocrystals (nC) in the quantum dot (QD) configuration has triggered a tremendous interest in nanostructured device technology. However, the formation of Si-QDs eventually proceeds through multi-step routes and involves high temperature processing that impedes preferred device configuration. The present work demonstrates the formation of nC-Si QDs of controlled size, density and distribution through one-step and spontaneous plasma processing, at a low substrate temperature (300 deg. C) compatible for device fabrication. Direct growth of nC-Si/SiOx core/shell quantum dots embedded in the a-Si matrix, 6.4-3.7 nm in diameter and with number density in the range ∼ 6 x 109-1 x 1011 cm-2 has been accomplished, following a novel route where He dilution to SiH4 in RF plasma CVD has been found instrumental. On gradual reduction in the size of QDs, splitting of the energy bands widens the optical band gap and induces visible photoluminescence that appears controllable by tuning the size and density of the dots. This low temperature and spontaneous plasma processing of nC-Si/SiOx core/shell QDs that exhibit the quantum size effect in photoluminescence is being reported for the first time.

  2. Advanced Epitaxial Lift-Off Quantum Dot Photovoltaic Devices Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a high-efficiency, triple-junction, epitaxial lift-off (ELO) solar cell by incorporating quantum dots (QDs) within the current-limiting...

  3. Type 2 quantum dots in Ge/Si system

    CERN Document Server

    Dvurechenskij, A V

    2001-01-01

    The results on the electronic structure of spatially indirect excitons, multiparticle excitonic complexes, and negative interband photoconductivity in arrays of Ge/Si type 2 quantum dots are presented. These data have been compared with the well known results for type 2 A sup I sup I sup I B sup V and A sup I sup I B sup V sup I -based heterostructures with quantum dots. Fundamental physical phenomena are found to be the result of an increase in the binding energy of excitons in quantum dots as compared with that of free excitons in bulk homogeneous materials; the shortwave shift of exciton transition energy at multiparticle complexes production (charges excitons, biexcitons), as well as the trapping of equilibrium carrier by localized states induced by the charged quantum dot electric field

  4. Kondo effect for electron transport through an artificial quantum dot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sun Ke-Wei; Xiong Shi-Jie

    2006-01-01

    We have calculated the transport properties of electron through an artificial quantum dot by using the numerical renormalization group technique in this paper.We obtain the conductance for the system of a quantum dot which is embedded in a one-dimensional chain in zero and finite temperature cases.The external magnetic field gives rise to a negative magnetoconductance in the zero temperature case.It increases as the external magnetic field increases.We obtain the relation between the coupling coefficient and conductance.If the interaction is big enough to prevent conduction electrons from tunnelling through the dot,the dispersion effect is dominant in this case.In the Kondo temperature regime,we obtain the conductivity of a quantum dot system with Kondo correlation.

  5. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  6. Fabrication of quantum-dot devices in graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Moriyama, Yoshifumi Morita, Eiichiro Watanabe, Daiju Tsuya, Shinya Uji, Maki Shimizu and Koji Ishibashi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe our recent experimental results on the fabrication of quantum-dot devices in a graphene-based two-dimensional system. Graphene samples were prepared by micromechanical cleavage of graphite crystals on a SiO2/Si substrate. We performed micro-Raman spectroscopy measurements to determine the number of layers of graphene flakes during the device fabrication process. By applying a nanofabrication process to the identified graphene flakes, we prepared a double-quantum-dot device structure comprising two lateral quantum dots coupled in series. Measurements of low-temperature electrical transport show the device to be a series-coupled double-dot system with varied interdot tunnel coupling, the strength of which changes continuously and non-monotonically as a function of gate voltage.

  7. Carbon Dot Based Sensing of Dopamine and Ascorbic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upama Baruah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate carbon dot based sensor of catecholamine, namely, dopamine and ascorbic acid. Carbon dots (CDs were prepared from a green source: commercially available Assam tea. The carbon dots prepared from tea had particle sizes of ∼0.8 nm and are fluorescent. Fluorescence of the carbon dots was found to be quenched in the presence of dopamine and ascorbic acid with greater sensitivity for dopamine. The minimum detectable limits were determined to be 33 μM and 98 μM for dopamine and ascorbic acid, respectively. The quenching constants determined from Stern-Volmer plot were determined to be 5 × 10−4 and 1 × 10−4 for dopamine and ascorbic acid, respectively. A probable mechanism of quenching has been discussed in the paper.

  8. A triple quantum dot based nano-electromechanical memory device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are free-standing nano-structures with chemically tunable electronic properties. This tunability offers intriguing possibilities for nano-electromechanical devices. In this work, we consider a nano-electromechanical nonvolatile memory (NVM) device incorporating a triple quantum dot (TQD) cluster. The device operation is based on a bias induced motion of a floating quantum dot (FQD) located between two bound quantum dots (BQDs). The mechanical motion is used for switching between two stable states, “ON” and “OFF” states, where ligand-mediated effective interdot forces between the BQDs and the FQD serve to hold the FQD in each stable position under zero bias. Considering realistic microscopic parameters, our quantum-classical theoretical treatment of the TQD reveals the characteristics of the NVM

  9. Charge-extraction strategies for colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics

    KAUST Repository

    Lan, Xinzheng

    2014-02-20

    The solar-power conversion efficiencies of colloidal quantum dot solar cells have advanced from sub-1% reported in 2005 to a record value of 8.5% in 2013. Much focus has deservedly been placed on densifying, passivating and crosslinking the colloidal quantum dot solid. Here we review progress in improving charge extraction, achieved by engineering the composition and structure of the electrode materials that contact the colloidal quantum dot film. New classes of structured electrodes have been developed and integrated to form bulk heterojunction devices that enhance photocharge extraction. Control over band offsets, doping and interfacial trap state densities have been essential for achieving improved electrical communication with colloidal quantum dot solids. Quantum junction devices that not only tune the optical absorption spectrum, but also provide inherently matched bands across the interface between p-and n-materials, have proven that charge separation can occur efficiently across an all-quantum-tuned rectifying junction. © 2014 Macmillan Publishers Limited.

  10. Quantum dot conjugates in a sub-micrometer fluidic channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavis, Samuel M.; Edel, Joshua B.; Samiee, Kevan T.; Craighead, Harold G.

    2010-04-13

    A nanofluidic channel fabricated in fused silica with an approximately 500 nm square cross section was used to isolate, detect and identify individual quantum dot conjugates. The channel enables the rapid detection of every fluorescent entity in solution. A laser of selected wavelength was used to excite multiple species of quantum dots and organic molecules, and the emission spectra were resolved without significant signal rejection. Quantum dots were then conjugated with organic molecules and detected to demonstrate efficient multicolor detection. PCH was used to analyze coincident detection and to characterize the degree of binding. The use of a small fluidic channel to detect quantum dots as fluorescent labels was shown to be an efficient technique for multiplexed single molecule studies. Detection of single molecule binding events has a variety of applications including high throughput immunoassays.

  11. Dot-Projection Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry of Gossamer Space Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Black, Jonathan T.; Blandino, Joseph R.; Jones, Thomas W.; Danehy, Paul M.; Dorrington, Adrian A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper documents the technique of using hundreds or thousands of projected dots of light as targets for photogrammetry and videogrammetry of gossamer space structures. Photogrammetry calculates the three-dimensional coordinates of each target on the structure, and videogrammetry tracks the coordinates versus time. Gossamer structures characteristically contain large areas of delicate, thin-film membranes. Examples include solar sails, large antennas, inflatable solar arrays, solar power concentrators and transmitters, sun shields, and planetary balloons and habitats. Using projected-dot targets avoids the unwanted mass, stiffness, and installation costs of traditional retroreflective adhesive targets. Four laboratory applications are covered that demonstrate the practical effectiveness of white-light dot projection for both static-shape and dynamic measurement of reflective and diffuse surfaces, respectively. Comparisons are made between dot-projection videogrammetry and traditional laser vibrometry for membrane vibration measurements. The paper closes by introducing a promising extension of existing techniques using a novel laser-induced fluorescence approach.

  12. Hydrogenic Donor in a Spherical Quantum Dot with Different Confinements

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A. John Peter; K. Navaneethakrishnan

    2009-01-01

    Binding energies of a hydrogenic donor in a spherical GaAs quantum dot surrounded by Ga1-xAlxAs matrix are calculated. The results are presented for realistic barrier heights corresponding to different values of x (x < 0.4). The calculations are performed under two different conditions: (i) a spherical dot with square well confinement and (ii) a dot with parabolic potential well confinement. The results show that (i) the donor ionization energies are always higher under parabolic confinement as compared to a dot of the same radius under square well confinement and (ii) the oscillator strengths coupling ground state with excited states are two orders larger under parabolic confinement. Our results are in agreement with the results of other researchers.

  13. Using a quantum dot system to realize perfect state transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ji; Wu Shi-Hai; Zhang Wen-Wen; Xi Xiao-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    There are some disadvantages to Nikolopoulos et al.'s protocol [Nikolopoulos G M,Petrosyan D and Lambropoulos P 2004 Europhys.Lett.65 297] where a quantum dot system is used to realize quantum communication.To overcome these disadvantages,we propose a protocol that uses a quantum dot array to construct a four-qubit spin chain to realize perfect quantum state transfer (PQST).First,we calculate the interaction relation for PQST in the spin chain.Second,we review the interaction between the quantum dots in the Heitler-London approach.Third,we present a detailed program for designing the proper parameters of a quantum dot array to realize PQST.

  14. Non-Markovian spontaneous emission from a single quantum dot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Kristian Høeg; Ates, Serkan; Lund-Hansen, Toke;

    2011-01-01

    We observe non-Markovian dynamics of a single quantum dot when tuned into resonance with a cavity mode. Excellent agreement between experiment and theory is observed providing the first quantitative description of such a system....

  15. [Louis Braille (1809-1852)--inventor of raised dots system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewicz, Piotr; Kopacz, Dorota

    2005-01-01

    Louis Braille was born on January 4th 1809 in Coupvray, France. An injury to his eye at the age of three, resulted in total loss of vision. In 1819 he entered the Institute for Blind Youth in Paris. There he would live, study, and later teach. When he was fifteen, he developed system of reading and writing by means of raised dots, which is known today as Braille. The basis of the Braille system is known as a Braille cell. The cell is comprised of six dots numbered in a specific order. Each dot or combination of dots represents a letter of the alphabet. This Braille system has established itself internationally and formed the basic Braille for all languages.

  16. A fast "hybrid" silicon double quantum dot qubit

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Zhan; Prance, J R; Gamble, John King; Koh, Teck Seng; Shim, Yun-Pil; Hu, Xuedong; Savage, D E; Lagally, M G; Eriksson, M A; Friesen, Mark; Coppersmith, S N

    2011-01-01

    We propose a quantum dot qubit architecture that has an attractive combination of speed and fabrication simplicity. It consists of a double quantum dot with one electron in one dot and two electrons in the other. The qubit itself is a set of two states with total spin quantum numbers $S^2=3/4$ ($S=\\half$) and $S_z = -\\half$, with the two different states being singlet and triplet in the doubly occupied dot. The architecture is relatively simple to fabricate, a universal set of fast operations can be implemented electrically, and the system has potentially long decoherence times. These are all extremely attractive properties for use in quantum information processing devices.

  17. A Novel Particle Detector: Quantum Dot Doped Liquid Scintillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winslow, Lindley; Conrad, Janet; Jerry, Ruel

    2010-02-01

    Quantum dots are semiconducting nanocrystals. When excited by light shorter then their characteristic wavelength, they re-emit in a narrow band around this wavelength. The size of the quantum is proportional to the characteristic wavelength so they can be tuned for many applications. CdS quantum dots are made in wavelengths from 360nm to 460nm, a perfect range for the sensitivity of photo-multiplier tubes. The synthesis of quantum dots automatically leaves them in toluene, a good organic scintillator and Cd is a particularly interesting material as it has one of the highest thermal neutron cross sections and has several neutrinoless double beta decay and double electron capture isotopes. The performance of quantum dot loaded scintillator compared to standard scintillators is measured and some unique properties presented. )

  18. The transfer matrix approach to circular graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau Nguyen, H.; Nguyen, Nhung T. T.; Nguyen, V. Lien

    2016-07-01

    We adapt the transfer matrix (T-matrix) method originally designed for one-dimensional quantum mechanical problems to solve the circularly symmetric two-dimensional problem of graphene quantum dots. Similar to one-dimensional problems, we show that the generalized T-matrix contains rich information about the physical properties of these quantum dots. In particular, it is shown that the spectral equations for bound states as well as quasi-bound states of a circular graphene quantum dot and related quantities such as the local density of states and the scattering coefficients are all expressed exactly in terms of the T-matrix for the radial confinement potential. As an example, we use the developed formalism to analyse physical aspects of a graphene quantum dot induced by a trapezoidal radial potential. Among the obtained results, it is in particular suggested that the thermal fluctuations and electrostatic disorders may appear as an obstacle to controlling the valley polarization of Dirac electrons.

  19. Energy levels of hybrid monolayer-bilayer graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Ketabi, S. A.; da Costa, D. R.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-04-01

    Often real samples of graphene consist of islands of both monolayer and bilayer graphene. Bound states in such hybrid quantum dots are investigated for (i) a circular single-layer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite bilayer graphene sheet and (ii) a circular bilayer graphene quantum dot surrounded by an infinite single-layer graphene. Using the continuum model and applying zigzag boundary conditions at the single-layer-bilayer graphene interface, we obtain analytical results for the energy levels and the corresponding wave spinors. Their dependence on perpendicular magnetic and electric fields are studied for both types of quantum dots. The energy levels exhibit characteristics of interface states, and we find anticrossings and closing of the energy gap in the presence of a bias potential.

  20. Electro-absorption of silicene and bilayer graphene quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Hazem; Talaat, Mohamed H.; Lukyanchuk, Igor; Portnoi, M. E.; Saroka, V. A.

    2016-07-01

    We study numerically the optical properties of low-buckled silicene and AB-stacked bilayer graphene quantum dots subjected to an external electric field, which is normal to their surface. Within the tight-binding model, the optical absorption is calculated for quantum dots, of triangular and hexagonal shapes, with zigzag and armchair edge terminations. We show that in triangular silicene clusters with zigzag edges a rich and widely tunable infrared absorption peak structure originates from transitions involving zero energy states. The edge of absorption in silicene quantum dots undergoes red shift in the external electric field for triangular clusters, whereas blue shift takes place for hexagonal ones. In small clusters of bilayer graphene with zigzag edges the edge of absorption undergoes blue/red shift for triangular/hexagonal geometry. In armchair clusters of silicene blue shift of the absorption edge takes place for both cluster shapes, while red shift is inherent for both shapes of the bilayer graphene quantum dots.

  1. 640 x 512 Pixels Long-Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) Quantum-Dot Infrared Photodetector (QDIP) Imaging Focal Plane Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunapala, Sarath D.; Bandara, Sumith V.; Hill, Cory J.; Ting, David Z.; Liu, John K.; Rafol, Sir B.; Blazejewski, Edward R.; Mumolo, Jason M.; Keo, Sam A.; Krishna, Sanjay; Chang, Y. -C.; Shott, Craig A.

    2007-01-01

    Epitaxially grown self-assembled. InAs-InGaAs-GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are exploited for the development of large-format long-wavelength infrared focal plane arrays (FPAs). The dot-in-a-well (DWELL) structures were experimentally shown to absorb both 45 degrees and normal incident light, therefore, a reflection grating structure was used to enhance the quantum efficiency. The devices exhibit peak responsivity out to 8.1 micrometers, with peak detectivity reaching approximately 1 X 10(exp 10) Jones at 77 K. The devices were fabricated into the first long-wavelength 640 x 512 pixel QD infrared photodetector imaging FPA, which has produced excellent infrared imagery with noise equivalent temperature difference of 40 mK at 60-K operating temperature.

  2. Intraband Relaxation and Its Influences on Quantum Dot Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Sheng-Ling; HUANG Yong-Zhen; YU Li-Juan

    2005-01-01

    @@ A comprehensive two-level numerical model is developed to describe carrier distribution in a quantum-dot laser. Light-emission spectra with different intraband relaxation rates (2ps, 7.5ps and 20ps) are calculated and analysed to investigate the influence of relaxation rates on performance of the quantum-dot laser. The results indicate that fast intraband relaxation favours not only the ground state single mode operation but also the higher injection efficiency.

  3. Dephasing of quantum dot exciton polaritons in electrically tunable nanocavities

    OpenAIRE

    Laucht, A.; Hauke, N.; Villas-Bôas, J. M.; Hofbauer, F.; Kaniber, M.; Böhm, G.; Finley, J.J.

    2009-01-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigate dephasing of zero dimensional microcavity polaritons in electrically tunable single dot photonic crystal nanocavities. Such devices allow us to alter the dot-cavity detuning in-situ and to directly probe the influence on the emission spectrum of varying the incoherent excitation level and the lattice temperature. By comparing our results with theory we obtain the polariton dephasing rate and clarify its dependence on optical excitation power and...

  4. THz Electro-absorption Effect in Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turchinovich, Dmitry; Monozon, Boris S.; Livshits, Daniil A.;

    2011-01-01

    Instantaneous electro-absorption effect in quantum dots, induced by electric field of THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth is demonstrated in THz pump - optical probe experiment. This effect may be promising for Tbit/s wireless transmission systems.......Instantaneous electro-absorption effect in quantum dots, induced by electric field of THz pulse with 3 THz bandwidth is demonstrated in THz pump - optical probe experiment. This effect may be promising for Tbit/s wireless transmission systems....

  5. Quantum Optics with Quantum Dots in Photonic Nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gérard, J.-M.; Claudon, J.; Bleuse, J.;

    2011-01-01

    We review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices.......We review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices....

  6. Highly Efficient Spontaneous Emission from Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Jeppe; Lund-Hansen, Toke; Hvam, Jørn Märcher;

    2006-01-01

    We present time resolved measurements of spontaneous emission (SE) from InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The measurements are interpreted using Fermi's Golden Rule and from this analysis we establish the parameters for high quantum efficiency.......We present time resolved measurements of spontaneous emission (SE) from InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). The measurements are interpreted using Fermi's Golden Rule and from this analysis we establish the parameters for high quantum efficiency....

  7. Solution-processed nanocrystal quantum dot tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Joshua J.; Lim, Yee-Fun [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Wenger, Whitney N.; Hoffman, Rachel S.; Hanrath, Tobias [School of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Luria, Justin; Marohn, John A. [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Jasieniak, Jacek [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, Bayview Ave, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia)

    2011-07-26

    Solution-processed tandem solar cells created from nanocrystal quantum dots with size-tuned energy levels are demonstrated. Prototype devices featuring interconnected quantum dot layers of cascaded energy gaps exhibit IR sensitivity and an open circuit voltage, V{sub oc}, approaching 1 V. The tandem solar cell performance depends critically on the optical and electrical properties of the interlayer. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Spin and edge channel dependent transport through quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the influence of spin polarized currents and non-equilibrated edge channels on the transport properties of a single quantum dot. Polarized currents are realized by the manual depletion of edge channels in high magnetic fields via a metallic top gate covering the source contact in the system. We observe a suppression and enhancement in the conductance of the quantum dot dependent on the edge channel configuration in the leads.

  9. Spin and edge channel dependent transport through quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ridder, T; Rogge, M C; Haug, R J [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Appelstrasse 2, D-30167 Hannover (Germany)], E-mail: ridder@nano.uni-hannover.de

    2008-11-12

    We investigate the influence of spin polarized currents and non-equilibrated edge channels on the transport properties of a single quantum dot. Polarized currents are realized by the manual depletion of edge channels in high magnetic fields via a metallic top gate covering the source contact in the system. We observe a suppression and enhancement in the conductance of the quantum dot dependent on the edge channel configuration in the leads.

  10. Ultrafast optical signal processing using semiconductor quantum dot amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing.......The linear and nonlinear properties of quantum dot amplifiers are discussed on the basis of an extensive theoretical model. These devices show great potential for linear amplification as well as ultrafast signal processing....

  11. Isoniazid-induced psychosis in a patient on DOTS therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imran Masood

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute psychosis induced by INH, especially when given as part of the DOTS regimen, has a variable presentation, and should always be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. The diagnosis becomes especially challenging when the patient has tubercular meningitis or some other neurological disease. Here we present a case report of a patient who after 2 days of INH therapy under the DOTS regimen developed acute psychosis that resolved only after discontinuation of the drug.

  12. Dynamical symmetries in Kondo tunneling through complex quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, T; Kikoin, K; Avishai, Y

    2002-10-01

    Kondo tunneling reveals hidden SO(n) dynamical symmetries of evenly occupied quantum dots. As is exemplified for an experimentally realizable triple quantum dot in parallel geometry, the possible values n=3,4,5,7 can be easily tuned by gate voltages. Following construction of the corresponding o(n) algebras, scaling equations are derived and Kondo temperatures are calculated. The symmetry group for a magnetic field induced anisotropic Kondo tunneling is SU(2) or SO(4).

  13. Resonance fluorescence from quantum dots: beyond the Mollow triplet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lorke, Michael;

    2011-01-01

    We show that the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a quantum dot excited by a strong pulse contains multiple peaks. An analytical model shows how the peak positions depend on pulse width and amplitude.......We show that the resonance fluorescence spectrum of a quantum dot excited by a strong pulse contains multiple peaks. An analytical model shows how the peak positions depend on pulse width and amplitude....

  14. Isoniazid-induced psychosis in a patient on DOTS therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Imran Masood; Sanjay Bhat; Aadil Beigh; Veena Gupta

    2011-01-01

    Acute psychosis induced by INH, especially when given as part of the DOTS regimen, has a variable presentation, and should always be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis. The diagnosis becomes especially challenging when the patient has tubercular meningitis or some other neurological disease. Here we present a case report of a patient who after 2 days of INH therapy under the DOTS regimen developed acute psychosis that resolved only after discontinuation of the drug.

  15. Quantum optics with quantum dots in photonic nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    We will review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices.......We will review recent studies performed on InAs quantum dots embedded in GaAs photonic wires, which highlight the strong interest of the photonic wire geometry for quantum optics experiments and quantum optoelectronic devices....

  16. Direct Interband Light Absorption in Conical Quantum Dot

    OpenAIRE

    Hayrapetyan, D. B.; Chalyan, A. V.; Kazaryan, E. M.; H. A. Sarkisyan

    2015-01-01

    In the framework of the adiabatic approximation, the energy states of electron as well as the direct light absorption are investigated in conical quantum dot. Analytical expressions for particle energy spectrum are obtained. The dependence of the absorption edge on geometrical parameters of conical quantum dot is obtained. Selection rules are revealed for transitions between levels with different quantum numbers. In particular, it is shown that for the radial quantum number transitions are al...

  17. Universal Parametric Correlations of Conductance Peaks in Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassid, Y.; Attias, H.

    1996-01-01

    We compute the parametric correlation function of the conductance peaks in chaotic and weakly disordered quantum dots in the Coulomb blockade regime and demonstrate its universality upon an appropriate scaling of the parameter. For a symmetric dot we show that this correlation function is affected by breaking time-reversal symmetry but is independent of the details of the channels in the external leads. We derive a new scaling which depends on the eigenfunctions alone and can be extracted dir...

  18. Coulomb effects in tunneling through a quantum dot stack

    OpenAIRE

    Sprekeler, H.; Kiesslich, G.; Wacker, A; Schoell, E.

    2003-01-01

    Tunneling through two vertically coupled quantum dots is studied by means of a Pauli master equation model. The observation of double peaks in the current-voltage characteristic in a recent experiment is analyzed in terms of the tunnel coupling between the quantum dots and the coupling to the contacts. Different regimes for the emitter chemical potential indicating different peak scenarios in the tunneling current are discussed in detail. We show by comparison with a density matrix approach t...

  19. Shot Noise in Tunneling through a Quantum Dot Array

    OpenAIRE

    Kiesslich, G.; Wacker, A; Schoell, E.; Nauen, A.; Hohls, F.; Haug, R. J.

    2002-01-01

    The shot noise suppression in a sample containing a layer of self-assembled InAs quantum dots has been investigated experimentally and theoretically. The observation of a non-monotonic dependence of the Fano factor on the bias voltage in a regime where only few quantum dot ground states contribute to the tunneling current is analyzed by a master equation model. Under the assumption of tunneling through states without Coulomb interaction this behaviour can be qualitatively reproduced by an ana...

  20. Tip-enhanced fluorescence imaging of quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, F.M.; Festy, F; Richards, D. R.

    2005-01-01

    We have imaged the fluorescence from a single quantum dot cluster using an apertureless scanning near-field optical microscope. When a sharp gold tip is brought within a few nanometers from the sample surface, the resulting enhancement in quantum dot fluorescence in the vicinity of the tip leads to a resolution of about 60 nm. We determine this enhancement of the fluorescence to be about fourfold in magnitude, which is consistent with the value expected as a result of competition between fluo...

  1. Time dependent quantum transport through Kondo correlated quantum dots

    OpenAIRE

    Goker, Ali; Gedik, Elif

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we review recent work about time dependent quantum transport through a quantum dot in Kondo regime. This represents a major step towards designing next generation transistors that are expected to replace current MOSFET's in a few years. We first discuss the effects of the density of states of gold contacts on the instantaneous conductance of an asymmetrically coupled quantum dot that is abruptly moved into Kondo regime via a gate voltage. Next, we investigate the effect of st...

  2. Noise and saturation properties of semiconductor quantum dot optical amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Tommy Winther; Mørk, Jesper

    2002-01-01

    We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved.......We present a detailed theoretical analysis of quantum dot optical amplifiers. Due to the presence of a reservoir of wetting layer states, the saturation and noise properties differ markedly from bulk or QW amplifiers and may be significantly improved....

  3. Solution-Processed Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Tandem Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Choi, Joshua J.

    2011-06-03

    Solution-processed tandem solar cells created from nanocrystal quantum dots with size-tuned energy levels are demonstrated. Prototype devices featuring interconnected quantum dot layers of cascaded energy gaps exhibit IR sensitivity and an open circuit voltage, V oc, approaching 1 V. The tandem solar cell performance depends critically on the optical and electrical properties of the interlayer. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Phonon-assisted decoherence and tunneling in quantum dot molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grodecka-Grad, Anna; Foerstner, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We study the influence of the phonon environment on the electron dynamics in a doped quantum dot molecule. A non-perturbative quantum kinetic theory based on correlation expansion is used in order to describe both diagonal and off-diagonal electron-phonon couplings representing real and virtual...... the quantum dots is studied in detail. (© 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)...

  5. Progress in the toxicological researches for quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI HongCheng; ZHOU QunFang; LIU Wei; YAN Bing; ZHAO Yibing; JIANG GuiBin

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have Received more and more attention as a novel example of nanomaterials. Due to their unique fluorescent characteristics, quantum dots have been successfully applied in biotech-nology and medicine applications. Recently, the toxicity and the potential environmental effects of QDs have become a research hotspot. In this paper, toxicological effects of QDs are reviewed, and the prospects and research directions are given based on the analysis of this research field.

  6. Progress in the toxicological researches for quantum dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have received more and more attention as a novel example of nanomaterials. Due to their unique fluorescent characteristics,quantum dots have been successfully applied in biotech-nology and medicine applications. Recently,the toxicity and the potential environmental effects of QDs have become a research hotspot. In this paper,toxicological effects of QDs are reviewed,and the prospects and research directions are given based on the analysis of this research field.

  7. Magnetization reversal in long chains of submicrometric Co dots

    OpenAIRE

    Martín, J.I.; Nogués i Sanmiquel, Josep; Schuller, Ivan K.; van Bael, M.J.; Temst, K; Van Haesendonck, C.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Bruynseraede, Y.

    1998-01-01

    This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the American Institute of Physics. Long chains of 400 nm diam Co dots prepared by combined electron-beam lithography exhibit interesting magnetotransport properties. The magnetoresistance of the chains of dots is markedly different from single Co films, indicating a strongly modified magnetization reversal process. Magnetic force microscopy(MFM) shows that, after magnetic saturat...

  8. Fluorescence from a quantum dot and metallic nanosphere hybrid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schindel, Daniel G. [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Winnipeg, 515 Portage Avenue, Winnipeg, MB, R3B 2E9 (Canada); Singh, Mahi R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-03-31

    We present energy absorption and interference in a quantum dot-metallic nanosphere system embedded on a dielectric substrate. A control field is applied to induce dipole moments in the nanosphere and the quantum dot, and a probe field is applied to monitor absorption. Dipole moments in the quantum dot or the metal nanosphere are induced, both by the external fields and by each other's dipole fields. Thus, in addition to direct polarization, the metal nanosphere and the quantum dot will sense one another via the dipole-dipole interaction. The density matrix method was used to show that the absorption spectrum can be split from one peak to two peaks by the control field, and this can also be done by placing the metal sphere close to the quantum dot. When the two are extremely close together, a self-interaction in the quantum dot produces an asymmetry in the absorption peaks. In addition, the fluorescence efficiency can be quenched by the addition of a metal nanosphere. This hybrid system could be used to create ultra-fast switching and sensing nanodevices.

  9. Emission redistribution from a quantum dot-bowtie nanoantenna

    CERN Document Server

    Regler, A; Lyamkina, A; Spiegl, M; Müller, K; Vuckovic, J; Finley, J J; Kaniber, M

    2016-01-01

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of a single self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot coupled to a nearby ($\\sim 25nm$) plasmonic antenna. Micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy shows a $\\sim 2.4\\times$ increase of intensity, which is attributed to spatial far-field redistribution of the emission from the quantum dot-antenna system. Power-dependent studies show similar saturation powers of $2.5\\mu W$ for both coupled and uncoupled quantum dot emission in polarization-resolved measurements. Moreover, time-resolved spectroscopy reveals the absence of Purcell-enhancement of the quantum dot coupled to the antenna as compared to an uncoupled dot, yielding comparable exciton lifetimes of $\\tau\\sim0.5ns$. This observation is supported by numerical simulations, suggesting only minor Purcell-effects of $25nm$. The observed increased emission from a coupled quantum dot-plasmonic antenna system is found to be in good qualitative agreement with numerical simulations and will lead to a better understanding o...

  10. Random Telegraph Signal in a Metallic Double-Dot System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Yuval; Guttman, Avraham; Bar-Joseph, Israel

    2015-03-01

    Double quantum dot systems offer a unique opportunity for studying the world of quantum transport. This stems from the ability to localize an electron in a limited region in space on the dot, and monitor its presence and properties. Another system, in which electrons can be stored and measured, is an electronic trap in solid. The electrons in such a trap are better isolated from the environment. However, their measurement and control are more difficult. Here we demonstrate how these two systems, metallic double-dots and electronic traps, are combined to yield a hybrid structure in which an electron can be stored for long durations and can be easily detected and measured. We investigate the dynamics of a single electron surface trap, embedded in a self-assembly metallic double-dot system. The charging and discharging of the trap by a single electron is manifested as a random telegraph signal of the current through the double-dot device. We find that we can control the duration that an electron resides in the trap through the current, varying it between fractions of a second to more than an hour, at the Coulomb blockade region. We suggest that the observed switching is the electrical manifestation of the optical blinking phenomenon, commonly observed in semiconductor quantum dots. Y. Vardi, A. Guttman, and I. Bar-Joseph, Nano Lett. 14, 2794 (2014). [DOI: 10.1021/nl500803p

  11. Colloidal quantum dot photovoltaics: The effect of polydispersity

    KAUST Repository

    Zhitomirsky, David

    2012-02-08

    The size-effect tunability of colloidal quantum dots enables facile engineering of the bandgap at the time of nanoparticle synthesis. The dependence of effective bandgap on nanoparticle size also presents a challenge if the size dispersion, hence bandgap variability, is not well-controlled within a given quantum dot solid. The impact of this polydispersity is well-studied in luminescent devices as well as in unipolar electronic transport; however, the requirements on monodispersity have yet to be quantified in photovoltaics. Here we carry out a series of combined experimental and model-based studies aimed at clarifying, and quantifying, the importance of quantum dot monodispersity in photovoltaics. We successfully predict, using a simple model, the dependence of both open-circuit voltage and photoluminescence behavior on the density of small-bandgap (large-diameter) quantum dot inclusions. The model requires inclusion of trap states to explain the experimental data quantitatively. We then explore using this same experimentally tested model the implications of a broadened quantum dot population on device performance. We report that present-day colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic devices with typical inhomogeneous linewidths of 100-150 meV are dominated by surface traps, and it is for this reason that they see marginal benefit from reduction in polydispersity. Upon eliminating surface traps, achieving inhomogeneous broadening of 50 meV or less will lead to device performance that sees very little deleterious impact from polydispersity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  12. Influence of phase separation for surfactant driven pattern formation during ion beam erosion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofsaess, Hans; Zhang, Kun; Vetter, Ulrich; Bobes, Omar; Pape, Andre; Gehrke, Hans-Gregor; Broetzmann, Marc [II. Physikalisches Institut, Goettingen Univ. (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    We will present results on metal surfactant driven self-organized pattern formation on surfaces by ion beam erosion, with a focus on the role of phase separation for the initial steps of pattern formation. Si substrates were irradiated with 5 keV Xe ions at normal incidence and ion fluences up to 5.10{sup 17} Xe/cm{sup 2} under continuous deposition of surfactant atoms. In the absence of such surfactants uniform flat surfaces are obtained, while in the presence of Fe and Mo surfactants pronounced patterns like dots, combinations of dots and ripples with wavelengths around 100 nm are generated. The surfactant coverage and deposition direction determine the pattern type and the pattern orientation, respectively. A critical steady-state coverage for onset of dot formation and onset of ripple formation is in the range of 10{sup 15} and 5.10{sup 15} Xe/cm{sup 2}. The steady-state surface region consists of a thin amorphous metal silicide layer with high metal concentration in the ripple and dot regions. Pattern formation is explained by ion induced diffusion and phase separation of the initially flat amorphous silicide layer and subsequent ion beam erosion with composition dependent sputter yield. To investigate the role of initial phase separation we additionally compare the pattern formation for different other metal surfactants.

  13. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra

  14. Growth and characterization of InP/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P quantum dots optimized for single-photon emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ugur, Asli

    2012-08-28

    In this work the growth of self-assembled InP/InGaP quantum dots, as well as their optical and structural properties are presented and discussed. The QDs were grown on In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P, lattice matched to GaAs. Self-assembled InP quantum dots are grown using gas-source molecular beam epitaxy over a wide range of InP deposition rates, using an ultra-low growth rate of about 0.01 atomic monolayers/s, a quantum-dot density of 1 dot/μm{sup 2} is realized. The resulting isolated InP quantum dots are individually characterized without the need for lithographical patterning and masks on the substrate. Both excitonic and biexcitonic emissions are observed from single dots, appearing as doublets with a fine-structure splitting of 320 μeV. Hanbury Brown-Twiss correlation measurements for the excitonic emission under cw excitation show anti-bunching behavior with an autocorrelation value of g{sup (2)}(0)=0.2. This system is applicable as a single-photon source for applications such as quantum cryptography. The formation of well-ordered chains of InP quantum dots on GaAs (001) substrates by using self-organized In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P surface undulations as a template is also demonstrated. The ordering requires neither stacked layers of quantum dots nor substrate misorientation. The structures are investigated by polarization-dependent photoluminescence together with transmission electron microscopy. Luminescence from the In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P matrix is polarized in one crystallographic direction due to anisotropic strain arising from a lateral compositional modulation. The photoluminescence measurements show enhanced linear polarization in the alignment direction of quantum dots. A polarization degree of 66% is observed. The optical anisotropy is achieved with a straightforward heterostructure, requiring only a single layer of QDs.

  15. Compact Interconnection Networks Based on Quantum Dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Nikzad; Modarress, Katayoon; Spotnitz, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    Architectures that would exploit the distinct characteristics of quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) have been proposed for digital communication networks that connect advanced digital computing circuits. In comparison with networks of wires in conventional very-large-scale integrated (VLSI) circuitry, the networks according to the proposed architectures would be more compact. The proposed architectures would make it possible to implement complex interconnection schemes that are required for some advanced parallel-computing algorithms and that are difficult (and in many cases impractical) to implement in VLSI circuitry. The difficulty of implementation in VLSI and the major potential advantage afforded by QCA were described previously in Implementing Permutation Matrices by Use of Quantum Dots (NPO-20801), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 25, No. 10 (October 2001), page 42. To recapitulate: Wherever two wires in a conventional VLSI circuit cross each other and are required not to be in electrical contact with each other, there must be a layer of electrical insulation between them. This, in turn, makes it necessary to resort to a noncoplanar and possibly a multilayer design, which can be complex, expensive, and even impractical. As a result, much of the cost of designing VLSI circuits is associated with minimization of data routing and assignment of layers to minimize crossing of wires. Heretofore, these considerations have impeded the development of VLSI circuitry to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. On the other hand, with suitable design and under suitable operating conditions, QCA-based signal paths can be allowed to cross each other in the same plane without adverse effect. In principle, this characteristic could be exploited to design compact, coplanar, simple (relative to VLSI) QCA-based networks to implement complex, advanced interconnection schemes. The proposed architectures require two advances in QCA-based circuitry beyond basic QCA-based binary

  16. Galaxy Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sparre, Martin

    Galaxy formation is an enormously complex discipline due to the many physical processes that play a role in shaping galaxies. The objective of this thesis is to study galaxy formation with two different approaches: First, numerical simulations are used to study the structure of dark matter and how...... galaxies form stars throughout the history of the Universe, and secondly it is shown that observations of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) can be used to probe galaxies with active star formation in the early Universe. A conclusion from the hydrodynamical simulations is that the galaxies from the stateof-the-art...

  17. The DotA protein from Legionella pneumophila is secreted by a novel process that requires the Dot/Icm transporter

    OpenAIRE

    Nagai, Hiroki; Roy, Craig R.

    2001-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila requires the dot/icm genes to create an organelle inside eukaryotic host cells that will support bacterial replication. The dot/icm genes are predicted to encode a type IV-related secretion apparatus. However, no proteins have been identified that require the dot/icm genes for secretion. In this study we show that the DotA protein, which was previously found to be a polytopic membrane protein, is secreted by the Dot/Icm transporter into culture supernatants. Secreted Do...

  18. Ground State Transitions in Vertically Coupled Four-Layer Single Electron Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG An-Mei; XIE Wen-Fang

    2005-01-01

    We study a four-electron system in a vertically coupled four-layer quantum dot under a magnetic field by the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix. We find that discontinuous ground-state energy transitions are induced by an external magnetic field. We find that dot-dot distance and electron-electron interaction strongly affect the low-lying states of the coupled quantum dots. The inter-dot correlation leads to some sequences of possible disappearances of ground state transitions, which are present for uncoupled dots.

  19. Ground State Transitions in Vertically Coupled Four-Layer Single Electron Quantum Dots

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANGAn-Mei; XIEWen-Fang

    2005-01-01

    We study a four-electron system in a vertically coupled four-layer quantum dot under a magnetic field by the exact diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matr/x. We find that discontinuous ground-state energy transitions are induced by an external magnetic field. We find that dot-dot distance and electron-electron interaction strongly affect the low-lying states of the coupled quantum dots. The inter-dot correlation leads to some sequences of possible disappearances of ground state transitions, which are present for uncoupled dots.

  20. Bulge Formation

    CERN Document Server

    Combes, F

    1999-01-01

    The currently discussed theories of bulge formation are reviewed, including the primordial scenario, where bulges form rapidly and then accrete disks, the secular scenario, where bulges are formed by dynamical evolution of disks through bars and galaxy interactions, and some combinations of both, where formation of bulges and disks are more continuous and interleaved. The various scenarios make specific predictions about the relative masses, angular momenta, colours, metallicities of bulges relative to disks, and the bulge-to-disk ratio as a function of time. Dynamical processes relevant to the formation of bulges (bar instabilities, mergers) are described and tested against observed statistics. Current data suggest a dynamical feedback from gravitational instabilities in bulge and disk formation. It is very difficult to discriminate between the various scenarios from surveys at z=0 only, and observations at high redshift are presently the best hope for large progress.

  1. Advancing colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs are attractive materials for solar cells due to their low cost, ease of fabrication and spectral tunability. Progress in CQD photovoltaic technology over the past decade has resulted in power conversion efficiencies approaching 10%. In this review, we give an overview of this progress, and discuss limiting mechanisms and paths for future improvement in CQD solar cell technology.We briefly summarize nanoparticle synthesis and film processing methods and evaluate the optoelectronic properties of CQD films, including the crucial role that surface ligands play in materials performance. We give an overview of device architecture engineering in CQD solar cells. The compromise between carrier extraction and photon absorption in CQD photovoltaics is analyzed along with different strategies for overcoming this trade-off. We then focus on recent advances in absorption enhancement through innovative device design and the use of nanophotonics. Several light-trapping schemes, which have resulted in large increases in cell photocurrent, are described in detail. In particular, integrating plasmonic elements into CQD devices has emerged as a promising approach to enhance photon absorption through both near-field coupling and far-field scattering effects. We also discuss strategies for overcoming the single junction efficiency limits in CQD solar cells, including tandem architectures, multiple exciton generation and hybrid materials schemes. Finally, we offer a perspective on future directions for the field and the most promising paths for achieving higher device efficiencies.

  2. Colloidal quantum dot photodetectors (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adinolfi, Valerio; Sargent, Edward H.

    2015-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are emerging solution processed materials combining low cost, easy deposition on large and flexible substrates, and bandgap tunability. The latter feature, which allows spectral tuning of the absorption profile of the semiconductor, makes these materials particularly attractive for light detection applications. Lead sulfide (PbS) CQDs, in particular, have shown astonishing performance as a light sensitive material operating at visible and infrared (IR) wavelengths. Early studies of PbS CQDs used as a photosensitive resistor (photoconductor) showed an impressive responsivity - exceeding 1000 A/W - and a detectivity (D*) higher then 10^13 Jones. This impressive D* was preserved in the successive development of the first PbS CQD photodiode, showing the possibility to realize fast - f_3db > 1Mhz - and sensitive IR detectors. Currently, the field is moving toward the development of hybrid devices and phototransitors. PbS CQDs have been combined in field effect transistors (FETs) with graphene and MoS2 channels, showing ultra-high gain (exceeding 10^8 electrons/photons) and high D*. Recently a photo-junction FET (photo-JFET) has been reported that breaks the inherent dark current/gain/bandwidth compromise affecting photoconductive light detectors. With this presentation we offer a broad overview on CQD photodetection highlighting the past achievements, the benefits, the challenges and the prospects for the future research on this field.

  3. Doping silicon nanocrystals and quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Chatelain, Brittany L.; Ticich, Thomas M.; Barron, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to incorporate a dopant element into silicon nanocrystals (NC) and quantum dots (QD) is one of the key technical challenges for the use of these materials in a number of optoelectronic applications. Unlike doping of traditional bulk semiconductor materials, the location of the doping element can be either within the crystal lattice (c-doping), on the surface (s-doping) or within the surrounding matrix (m-doping). A review of the various synthetic strategies for doping silicon NCs and QDs is presented, concentrating on the efficacy of the synthetic routes, both in situ and post synthesis, with regard to the structural location of the dopant and the doping level. Methods that have been applied to the characterization of doped NCs and QDs are summarized with regard to the information that is obtained, in particular to provide researchers with a guide to the suitable techniques for determining dopant concentration and location, as well as electronic and photonic effectiveness of the dopant.

  4. Photodynamic antibacterial effect of graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Biljana Z; Milenkovic, Marina M; Dakic, Ivana R; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana M; Milosavljevic, Momir S; Budimir, Milica D; Paunovic, Verica G; Dramicanin, Miroslav D; Markovic, Zoran M; Trajkovic, Vladimir S

    2014-05-01

    Synthesis of new antibacterial agents is becoming increasingly important in light of the emerging antibiotic resistance. In the present study we report that electrochemically produced graphene quantum dots (GQD), a new class of carbon nanoparticles, generate reactive oxygen species when photoexcited (470 nm, 1 W), and kill two strains of pathogenic bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Bacterial killing was demonstrated by the reduction in number of bacterial colonies in a standard plate count method, the increase in propidium iodide uptake confirming the cell membrane damage, as well as by morphological defects visualized by atomic force microscopy. The induction of oxidative stress in bacteria exposed to photoexcited GQD was confirmed by staining with a redox-sensitive fluorochrome dihydrorhodamine 123. Neither GQD nor light exposure alone were able to cause oxidative stress and reduce the viability of bacteria. Importantly, mouse spleen cells were markedly less sensitive in the same experimental conditions, thus indicating a fairly selective antibacterial photodynamic action of GQD. PMID:24612819

  5. Photodynamic antibacterial effect of graphene quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Biljana Z; Milenkovic, Marina M; Dakic, Ivana R; Todorovic-Markovic, Biljana M; Milosavljevic, Momir S; Budimir, Milica D; Paunovic, Verica G; Dramicanin, Miroslav D; Markovic, Zoran M; Trajkovic, Vladimir S

    2014-05-01

    Synthesis of new antibacterial agents is becoming increasingly important in light of the emerging antibiotic resistance. In the present study we report that electrochemically produced graphene quantum dots (GQD), a new class of carbon nanoparticles, generate reactive oxygen species when photoexcited (470 nm, 1 W), and kill two strains of pathogenic bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Bacterial killing was demonstrated by the reduction in number of bacterial colonies in a standard plate count method, the increase in propidium iodide uptake confirming the cell membrane damage, as well as by morphological defects visualized by atomic force microscopy. The induction of oxidative stress in bacteria exposed to photoexcited GQD was confirmed by staining with a redox-sensitive fluorochrome dihydrorhodamine 123. Neither GQD nor light exposure alone were able to cause oxidative stress and reduce the viability of bacteria. Importantly, mouse spleen cells were markedly less sensitive in the same experimental conditions, thus indicating a fairly selective antibacterial photodynamic action of GQD.

  6. Advancing colloidal quantum dot photovoltaic technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yan; Arinze, Ebuka S.; Palmquist, Nathan; Thon, Susanna M.

    2016-06-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are attractive materials for solar cells due to their low cost, ease of fabrication and spectral tunability. Progress in CQD photovoltaic technology over the past decade has resulted in power conversion efficiencies approaching 10%. In this review, we give an overview of this progress, and discuss limiting mechanisms and paths for future improvement in CQD solar cell technology.We briefly summarize nanoparticle synthesis and film processing methods and evaluate the optoelectronic properties of CQD films, including the crucial role that surface ligands play in materials performance. We give an overview of device architecture engineering in CQD solar cells. The compromise between carrier extraction and photon absorption in CQD photovoltaics is analyzed along with different strategies for overcoming this trade-off. We then focus on recent advances in absorption enhancement through innovative device design and the use of nanophotonics. Several light-trapping schemes, which have resulted in large increases in cell photocurrent, are described in detail. In particular, integrating plasmonic elements into CQD devices has emerged as a promising approach to enhance photon absorption through both near-field coupling and far-field scattering effects. We also discuss strategies for overcoming the single junction efficiency limits in CQD solar cells, including tandem architectures, multiple exciton generation and hybrid materials schemes. Finally, we offer a perspective on future directions for the field and the most promising paths for achieving higher device efficiencies.

  7. Optical nuclear spin polarization in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ai-Xian; Duan, Su-Qing; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Hyperfine interaction between electron spin and randomly oriented nuclear spins is a key issue of electron coherence for quantum information/computation. We propose an efficient way to establish high polarization of nuclear spins and reduce the intrinsic nuclear spin fluctuations. Here, we polarize the nuclear spins in semiconductor quantum dot (QD) by the coherent population trapping (CPT) and the electric dipole spin resonance (EDSR) induced by optical fields and ac electric fields. By tuning the optical fields, we can obtain a powerful cooling background based on CPT for nuclear spin polarization. The EDSR can enhance the spin flip-flop rate which may increase the cooling efficiency. With the help of CPT and EDSR, an enhancement of 1300 times of the electron coherence time can be obtained after a 10-ns preparation time. Project partially supported by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant Nos. 11374039 and 11174042) and the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2011CB922204 and 2013CB632805).

  8. Cement Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Telschow, Samira; Jappe Frandsen, Flemming; Theisen, Kirsten;

    2012-01-01

    Cement production has been subject to several technological changes, each of which requires detailed knowledge about the high multiplicity of processes, especially the high temperature process involved in the rotary kiln. This article gives an introduction to the topic of cement, including......−liquid reactions are discussed, as are the influences of particles sizes on clinker phase formation. Furthermore, a mechanism for clinker phase formation in an industrial rotary kiln reactor is outlined....

  9. The ten deadly mistakes of wanna-dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanter, R M

    2001-01-01

    Increasingly, it seems, there are just two types of companies left in the world: dot-coms, born on the Internet, and "wanna-dots," established organizations that are seeking to incorporate the Internet into their businesses. Some wanna-dots manage the deep mind-shift required to cross the digital divide. These are the pacesetters--the first movers and fast followers that exhibit organizational curiosity and the desire to innovate. But most wanna-dots are laggards; they don't rise to the challenge with the same resolve. In a global research effort involving more than 800 companies, the author uncovered so many wanna-dots making the same kinds of mistakes that it almost seemed they were following a How Not to Change guide. In this article, Kanter creates just such a guide, offering ten pieces of antiadvice that expose the tendency of wanna-dots to make only cosmetic changes when deep transformation is required. Beyond delineating what not to do, Kanter serves up two examples of wanna-dots that got it right. First, Williams-Sonoma, which successfully made up for a slow start to create a strong Web presence. Second, Honeywell, a pacesetter led by e-believers from the start, which still found the road to the Web a challenging one. For companies not born digital, the fundamental problem is change. And the real place to look for change is not on the Internet but inside your company--at your own organizational culture and your attitude toward change.

  10. Detection of CdSe quantum dot photoluminescence for security label on paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isnaeni,, E-mail: isnaeni@lipi.go.id; Sugiarto, Iyon Titok [Research Center for Physics, Indonesian Institute of Science, Building 442 Puspiptek Serpong, South Tangerang, Banten, Indonesia 15314 (Indonesia); Bilqis, Ratu; Suseno, Jatmiko Endro [Department of Physics, Diponegoro University, Jl. Prof. Soedarto, Tembalang, Semarang, Indonesia 50275 (Indonesia)

    2016-02-08

    CdSe quantum dot has great potential in various applications especially for emitting devices. One example potential application of CdSe quantum dot is security label for anti-counterfeiting. In this work, we present a practical approach of security label on paper using one and two colors of colloidal CdSe quantum dot, which is used as stamping ink on various types of paper. Under ambient condition, quantum dot is almost invisible. The quantum dot security label can be revealed by detecting emission of quantum dot using photoluminescence and cnc machine. The recorded quantum dot emission intensity is then analyzed using home-made program to reveal quantum dot pattern stamp having the word ’RAHASIA’. We found that security label using quantum dot works well on several types of paper. The quantum dot patterns can survive several days and further treatment is required to protect the quantum dot. Oxidation of quantum dot that occurred during this experiment reduced the emission intensity of quantum dot patterns.

  11. Detection of CdSe quantum dot photoluminescence for security label on paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CdSe quantum dot has great potential in various applications especially for emitting devices. One example potential application of CdSe quantum dot is security label for anti-counterfeiting. In this work, we present a practical approach of security label on paper using one and two colors of colloidal CdSe quantum dot, which is used as stamping ink on various types of paper. Under ambient condition, quantum dot is almost invisible. The quantum dot security label can be revealed by detecting emission of quantum dot using photoluminescence and cnc machine. The recorded quantum dot emission intensity is then analyzed using home-made program to reveal quantum dot pattern stamp having the word ’RAHASIA’. We found that security label using quantum dot works well on several types of paper. The quantum dot patterns can survive several days and further treatment is required to protect the quantum dot. Oxidation of quantum dot that occurred during this experiment reduced the emission intensity of quantum dot patterns

  12. Phase diagram and low temperature scenario for a triangular triple dot system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yong-Chen; Wang, Wei-Zhong; Yang, Jun-Tao; Luo, Shi-Jun

    2016-01-01

    We present a triangular triple quantum dot (TTQD) system with two dots connected parallelly to one conduction lead, and investigate the phase diagram, the electric transport, and the temperature-dependent magnetic moment at half filling. When the hopping between two connected dots t12 = 0, and those between the connected dots and the side dot are symmetric t13 = t23, two connected dots form a spin triplet due to the Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction mediated by the dot-lead coupling and/or the hopping t13 (t23). For t13 = 0, the triplet is partially screened by the conduction leads at low temperature. Both the connected dots and the side dot contribute to the magnetic moment of the system. For any definite t13, the triplet is totally screened by the conduction leads and the side dot, and the two-stage Kondo effect occurs. When t12 increases beyond a critical t12c, two connected dots form a spin singlet and decouple from the side dot. In this case, the Kondo peak is strongly suppressed, indicating zero conductance, and only the localized side dot contribute to the magnetic moment at low temperature. When t13 ≠ t23, we find a crossover as t12 increases, contrast to the first order transition of the symmetric case. Numerical renormalization group technique and physical arguments are used to obtain a detailed understanding of these problems.

  13. Blocking transport resonances via Kondo many-body entanglement in quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Michael; Smirnov, Sergey; Mantelli, Davide; Margańska, Magdalena; Nguyen, Ngoc-Viet; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cleuziou, Jean-Pierre; Grifoni, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Many-body entanglement is at the heart of the Kondo effect, which has its hallmark in quantum dots as a zero-bias conductance peak at low temperatures. It signals the emergence of a conducting singlet state formed by a localized dot degree of freedom and conduction electrons. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to study the emergence of the Kondo entanglement by tuning many-body correlations with a gate voltage. Here we show another side of Kondo correlations, which counterintuitively tend to block conduction channels: inelastic co-tunnelling lines in the magnetospectrum of a carbon nanotube strikingly disappear when tuning the gate voltage. Considering the global SU(2) ⊗ SU(2) symmetry of a nanotube coupled to leads, we find that only resonances involving flips of the Kramers pseudospins, associated to this symmetry, are observed at temperatures and voltages below the corresponding Kondo scale. Our results demonstrate the robust formation of entangled many-body states with no net pseudospin. PMID:27526870

  14. Blocking transport resonances via Kondo many-body entanglement in quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, Michael; Smirnov, Sergey; Mantelli, Davide; Margańska, Magdalena; Nguyen, Ngoc-Viet; Wernsdorfer, Wolfgang; Cleuziou, Jean-Pierre; Grifoni, Milena

    2016-01-01

    Many-body entanglement is at the heart of the Kondo effect, which has its hallmark in quantum dots as a zero-bias conductance peak at low temperatures. It signals the emergence of a conducting singlet state formed by a localized dot degree of freedom and conduction electrons. Carbon nanotubes offer the possibility to study the emergence of the Kondo entanglement by tuning many-body correlations with a gate voltage. Here we show another side of Kondo correlations, which counterintuitively tend to block conduction channels: inelastic co-tunnelling lines in the magnetospectrum of a carbon nanotube strikingly disappear when tuning the gate voltage. Considering the global SU(2) ⊗ SU(2) symmetry of a nanotube coupled to leads, we find that only resonances involving flips of the Kramers pseudospins, associated to this symmetry, are observed at temperatures and voltages below the corresponding Kondo scale. Our results demonstrate the robust formation of entangled many-body states with no net pseudospin. PMID:27526870

  15. A simple route for making surfactant free lead sulfide (PbS) quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Firoz; Kumar, Neetesh; Dutta, Viresh, E-mail: vdutta@ces.iitd.ac.in

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Surfactant free PbS NCs were successfully synthesised using CoSP technique. • The technique eliminates the requirements of washing to remove the ligands. • Grinding using mortar and pestle creates well separated PbS QDs. • Surfactant free PbS NCs are stable and do not show any degradation with time. - Abstract: An efficient, cost effective and less time consuming method suitable for mass production of surfactant free quantum dots (QDs) of lead sulfide (PbS) is reported. PbS nanocrystals (NCs) are first synthesised by continuous spray pyrolysis (CoSP) technique and de-agglomeration into PbS quantum dots (QDs) is achieved by vigorous mechanical grinding using mortar and pestle. Lead acetate and thiourea were used as the precursor materials for preparation of surfactant free PbS NCs. The broadening in XRD peaks of ground NCs as compared to as synthesized PbS NCs clearly indicated the reduction in particle size to be QDs of PbS. The TEM images also showed that ground PbS NCs were nearly spherical in shape having an average diameter in the range of 4–6 nm. The shift in optical gap from 0.41 eV to 1.47 eV supported the QD formation.

  16. MBE growth of InAs quantum dots and dashes grown on (100) silicon substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self assembled InAs quantum dots (QDs) are grown by solid source molecular beam epitaxy after deposition of a 50 nm silicon buffer layer on (100)Si substrates using Stranski-Krastanov (SK) growth mode. Reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED) streak patterns confirm that the combination of the atomic hydrogen at 500 C followed by thermal desorption at 900 C is an efficient surface cleaning method. The evolution of size, density and shape of the QDs are ex-situ characterized by atomic-force microscopy (AFM). Different growth parameters such as InAs coverage, growth temperature, In-growth rate and V/III ratio are examined on differently prepared silicon surfaces including ex- and in-situ cleaning procedures. Additional improvement for the cleaning and growth is achieved by exposing the Si surface with Ga at low fluxes. The Ga treatment at a temperature of 560 C for two minutes results in a strong reduction of the lateral size of InAs QDs and a significant enhancement of the homogeneity of the dot size and distribution. The InAs QDs density is strongly increased from 108 to 1011 cm-2 for V/III ratios in the range of 15-35, respectively. InAs QD formations are not observed at temperatures as high as 500 C. Moreover, InAs quantum dashes are observed at higher In-growth rate of 0.3 ML/s.

  17. Perovskite Quantum Dots Modeled Using ab Initio and Replica Exchange Molecular Dynamics

    KAUST Repository

    Buin, Andrei

    2015-06-18

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Organometal halide perovskites have recently attracted tremendous attention at both the experimental and theoretical levels. Much of this work has been dedicated to bulk material studies, yet recent experimental work has shown the formation of highly efficient quantum-confined nanocrystals with tunable band edges. Here we investigate perovskite quantum dots from theory, predicting an upper bound of the Bohr radius of 45 Å that agrees well with literature values. When the quantum dots are stoichiometric, they are trap-free and have nearly symmetric contributions to confinement from the valence and conduction bands. We further show that surface-associated conduction bandedge states in perovskite nanocrystals lie below the bulk states, which could explain the difference in Urbach tails between mesoporous and planar perovskite films. In addition to conventional molecular dynamics (MD), we implement an enhanced phase-space sampling algorithm, replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD). We find that in simulation of methylammonium orientation and global minima, REMD outperforms conventional MD. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first REMD implementation for realistic-sized systems in the realm of DFT calculations.

  18. Spin qubits in quantum dots - beyond nearest-neighbour exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandersypen, Lieven

    The spin of a single electron is the canonical two-level quantum system. When isolated in a semiconductor quantum dot, a single electron spin provides a well-controlled and long-lived quantum bit. So far, two-qubit gates in this system have relied on the spin exchange interaction that arises when the wave functions of neighbouring electrons overlap. Furthermore, experimental demonstrations of controlled spin-exchange have been limited to 1D quantum dot arrays only. Here we explore several avenues for scaling beyond 1D arrays with nearest-neighbour coupling. First, we show that second-order tunnel processes allow for coherent spin-exchange between non-nearest neighbour quantum dots. The detuning of the intermediate quantum dot controls the frequency of the exchange-driven oscillations of the spins. Second, we demonstrate shuttling of electrons in quantum dot arrays preserving the spin projection for more than 500 hops. We use this technique to read out multiple spins in a way analogous to the operation of a CCD. Finally, we develop superconducting resonators that are resilient to magnetic field and with a predicted tenfold increase in vacuum electric field amplitudes. This makes coupling spin qubits via superconducting resonators in a circuit-QED approach a realistic possibility. Supported by ERC, FOM, NWO, IARPA, ARO, EU.

  19. Quantum Dot- and Aptamer-Based Nanostructures for Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshik, Xenia

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanoparticles that have gained popularity in optical and electronic applications in recent years. Aptamers are short man-made oligonucleotides with high binding affinity for a specific target. One part of this work presents an optical FRET-based sensor for K+ and Pb2+ consisting of a fluorescent quantum dot, an aptamer, and a gold nanoparticle quencher. Additionally, an electrochemical sensor for K+ and Pb2+ is also presented, which consists of an aptamer with an electron donor bound to graphene. Both sensors are shown to detect K+ and Pb2+ at concentrations critical for human health. The emission spectrum of the optical sensor is also shown to shift in response to strong electric fields. UV-excited TiO 2 quantum dots are also investigated for their ability to influence the dynamics of voltage gated ion channels in cells. It was found that the activation voltage is shifted in the presence of UV-excited TiO2 quantum dots. Electrostatic force measurements and theoretical calculations confirm that electric fields in TiO2 can in fact be optically induced. ZnO quantum dots are also synthesized and their optical and electrical properties are similarly investigated. Additionally, Raman and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy is used in this work to find previously-unknown spectra of the aptamer Apt-alphavbeta3 and the peptide thymosin-beta4.

  20. Sunlight assisted photodegradation by tin oxide quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shajira, P. S.; Prabhu, V. Ganeshchandra; Bushiri, M. Junaid

    2015-12-01

    Rutile phase of SnO2 quantum dots of average size of 2.5 nm were synthesized at a growth temperature of 70 °C and characterized with XRD, TEM, FTIR and Raman analysis. The effective strain within the lattice of SnO2 quantum dots was calculated by Williamson-Hall method. The broad peaks in XRD as well as Raman spectra and the presence of Raman bands at 569 and 432 cm-1 are due to lower crystallinity of nanoparticles. The optical band gap of SnO2 quantum dots was increased to 3.75 eV attributed to the quantum size effect. SnO2 quantum dots were annealed in air atmosphere and the crystallite size of the particles increased with annealing temperature. Sunlight assisted photodegration property of SnO2 quantum dots was investigated with vanillin as a model system and it shows the photodegradation efficiency of 87%. The photoluminescence and photodegradation efficiency of nanocrystallite SnO2 decreases with increase of crystallite size contributed to the reduction in population of defects and surface area.