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Sample records for anionic phospholipid vesicles

  1. The aminosterol antibiotic squalamine permeabilizes large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinsky, B S; Zhou, Z; Fojtik, K G; Jones, S R; Dollahon, N R; Shinnar, A E

    1998-03-13

    The ability of the shark antimicrobial aminosterol squalamine to induce the leakage of polar fluorescent dyes from large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (LUVs) has been measured. Micromolar squalamine causes leakage of carboxyfluorescein (CF) from vesicles prepared from the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol (PG), phosphatidylserine (PS), and cardiolipin. Binding analyses based on the leakage data show that squalamine has its highest affinity to phosphatidylglycerol membranes, followed by phosphatidylserine and cardiolipin membranes. Squalamine will also induce the leakage of CF from phosphatidylcholine (PC) LUVs at low phospholipid concentrations. At high phospholipid concentrations, the leakage of CF from PC LUVs deviates from a simple dose-response relationship, and it appears that some of the squalamine can no longer cause leakage. Fluorescent dye leakage generated by squalamine is graded, suggesting the formation of a discrete membrane pore rather than a generalized disruption of vesicular membranes. By using fluorescently labeled dextrans of different molecular weight, material with molecular weight squalamine, but material with molecular weight >/=10,000 is retained. Negative stain electron microscopy of squalamine-treated LUVs shows that squalamine decreases the average vesicular size in a concentration-dependent manner. Squalamine decreases the size of vesicles containing anionic phospholipid at a lower squalamine/lipid molar ratio than pure PC LUVs. In a centrifugation assay, squalamine solubilizes phospholipid, but only at significantly higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios than required for either dye leakage or vesicle size reduction. Squalamine solubilizes PC at lower squalamine/phospholipid ratios than PG. We suggest that squalamine complexes with phospholipid to form a discrete structure within the bilayers of LUVs, resulting in the transient leakage of small encapsulated molecules. At higher squalamine/phospholipid ratios, these

  2. Hybrid, Nanoscale Phospholipid/Block Copolymer Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liedberg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles, in which the polymeric membrane is blended with phospholipids, display interesting self-assembly behavior, incorporating the robustness and chemical versatility of polymersomes with the softness and biocompatibility of liposomes. Such structures can be conveniently characterized by preparing giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs via electroformation. Here, we are interested in exploring the self-assembly and properties of the analogous nanoscale hybrid vesicles (ca. 100 nm in diameter of the same composition prepared by film-hydration and extrusion. We show that the self-assembly and content-release behavior of nanoscale polybutadiene-b-poly(ethylene oxide (PB-PEO/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC hybrid phospholipid/block copolymer vesicles can be tuned by the mixing ratio of the amphiphiles. In brief, these hybrids may provide alternative tools for drug delivery purposes and molecular imaging/sensing applications and clearly open up new avenues for further investigation.

  3. Spontaneous transfer of gangliotetraosylceramide between phospholipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The transfer kinetics of the neutral glycosphingolipid gangliotetraosylceramide (asialo-GM1) were investigated by monitoring tritiated asialo-GM1 movement from donor to acceptor vesicles. Two different methods were employed to separate donor and acceptor vesicles at desired time intervals. In one method, a negative charge was imparted to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine donor vesicles by including 10 mol% dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid. Donors were separated from neutral dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine acceptor vesicles by ion-exchange chromatography. In the other method, small, unilamellar donor vesicles and large, unilamellar acceptor vesicles were coincubated at 45 degrees C and then separated at desired time intervals by molecular sieve chromatography. The majority of asialo-GM1 transfer to acceptor vesicles occurred as a slow first-order process with a half-time of about 24 days assuming that the relative concentration of asialo-GM1 in the phospholipid matrix was identical in each half of the donor bilayer and that no glycolipid flip-flop occurred. Asialo-GM1 net transfer was calculated relative to that of [14C]cholesteryl oleate, which served as a nontransferable marker in the donor vesicles. A nearly identical transfer half-time was obtained when the phospholipid matrix was changed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine to palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine. Varying the acceptor vesicle concentration did not significantly alter the asialo-GM1 transfer half-time. This result is consistent with a transfer mechanism involving diffusion of glycolipid through the aqueous phase rather than movement of glycolipid following formation of collisional complexes between donor and acceptor vesicles. (Abstract Truncated)

  4. Investigation of surface potential asymmetry in phospholipid vesicles by a spin label relaxation method.

    OpenAIRE

    Sundberg, S A; Hubbell, W L

    1986-01-01

    In earlier work, Castle and Hubbell (1976) demonstrated the use of a spin-labeled amphiphile as a probe for the electrostatic potential at the outer surface of charged phospholipid vesicles. In recent experiments, we have shown that the hydrophobic anion tetraphenylboron (TPB) promotes transbilayer migration of the probe molecule. Relaxation data recorded following the rapid mixing of the probe with TPB-containing vesicle samples provides information about the electrostatic potentials at both...

  5. Phospholipid flippases: building asymmetric membranes and transport vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Sebastian, Tessy T.; Baldridge, Ryan D.; Xu, Peng; Graham, Todd R.

    2011-01-01

    Phospholipid flippases in the type IV P-type ATPase family (P4-ATPases) are essential components of the Golgi, plasma membrane and endosomal system that play critical roles in membrane biogenesis. These pumps flip phospholipid across the bilayer to create an asymmetric membrane structure with substrate phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylethanolamine, enriched within the cytosolic leaflet. The P4-ATPases also help form transport vesicles that bud from Golgi and endosomal...

  6. The phospholipid vesicles coating on metal chelated inorganic surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work showed the formation of phospholipid vesicle coating on inorganic sericite surface with characterization by combining electron microscopy of FE-SEM, TEM, AFM, and qualitatively evaluated the coated phospholipid vesicle by XPS as a function of etching time. The possibility of phospholipid vesicle mobility on the surface was restrained by the chelation effect of magnesium cation. The stabilization properties of phospholipid vesicles on sericite surface were demonstrated by the various concentration of magnesium cation. The presence of magnesium was found to have a much more pronounced influence on the lipid deposition process. The Mg cation plays an important role for attaching the phospholipids with optimum concentration of 7 mM. Totally, the phospholipid vesicles coating on inorganic powder could be useful for bio-related fields such as cosmetics and drug delivery system as the key functional compounds. We hope this basic result lead to a general and simple approach to prepare a wide a range of controlled releasing materials including an encapsulation with cosmetics or drugs

  7. Ultradeformable phospholipid vesicles as a drug delivery system: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Eder Lilia

    2015-01-01

    Maria Jose Morilla, Eder Lilia RomeroNanomedicine Research Program, Department of Science and Technology, National University of Quilmes, Buenos Aires, Argentina Abstract: Ultradeformable vesicles are highly deformable (elastic/flexible) liposomes made of phospholipids plus highly mobile hydrophilic detergents capable of penetrating the intact skin across the stratum corneum and reaching the viable epidermis. Ultradeformable vesicles are more effective than conventional liposomes in deliveri...

  8. Synthesis of ultrafine, multicomponent particles using phospholipid vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that because of their unique properties of self-assembly and selective ion permeability across the lipid bilayers, phospholipid vesicles were used as reaction vessels for the synthesis of ultrafine, multicomponent ceramic particles containing Y, Ba, Cu, and Ag. Chemical inhomogeneities in the system were limited to the individual particle size (2O particles before and after the removal of the phospholipid molecules. Particle packing was greatly improved in the surfactant coated particles. This demonstrates the multifunctionality of this biomimetic system in which the vesicle membrane simultaneously acts as: a reaction cell for particle precipitation, an ion selective membrane that affects precipitation kinetics, a barrier to prevent spontaneous agglomeration of the ultrafine particles, and a lubricant dispersant that facilitates particle rearrangement during consolidation

  9. Permeability of phospholipid membrane for small polar molecules determined from osmotic swelling of giant phospholipid vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Peterlin, Primoz; Diamant, Haim; Haleva, Emir

    2012-01-01

    A method for determining permeability of phospholipid bilayer based on the osmotic swelling of micrometer-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) is presented as an alternative to the two established techniques, dynamic light scattering on liposome suspension, and electrical measurements on planar lipid bilayers. In the described technique, an individual GUV is transferred using a micropipette from a sucrose/glucose solution into an isomolar solution containing the solute under investigation. Throughout the experiment, vesicle cross-section is monitored and recorded using a digital camera mounted on a phase-contrast microscope. Using a least-squares procedure for circle fitting, vesicle radius R is computed from the recorded images of vesicle cross-section. Two methods for determining membrane permeability from the obtained R(t) dependence are described: the first one uses the slope of R(t) for a spherical GUV, and the second one the R(t) dependence around the transition point at which a flaccid vesicle trans...

  10. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The ...

  11. Negatively cooperative binding of melittin to neutral phospholipid vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, Francisco; Castellano, Gloria; Campos, Agustín; Abad, Concepción

    2007-05-01

    The association of basic amphipathic peptides to neutral phospholipid membranes is investigated in terms of binding and partition models. The binding of native and modified melittin to egg-yolk phosphatidylcholine vesicles is studied by steady-state fluorescence spectroscopy. The effect of the ionic strength shows an enhancement of the association as the ionic strength increases. After correction for electrostatic effects by the Gouy-Chapman theory, the melittin binding isotherms could be described by a partition model. In terms of conventional binding mechanisms, which do not take into account electrostatic effects, this would correspond to a negative cooperativity. A plausible way in which the interaction occurs is proposed, based on the calculated Hill coefficient.

  12. Organization and function of anionic phospholipids in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ti-Yu; Weibel, Douglas B

    2016-05-01

    In addition to playing a central role as a permeability barrier for controlling the diffusion of molecules and ions in and out of bacterial cells, phospholipid (PL) membranes regulate the spatial and temporal position and function of membrane proteins that play an essential role in a variety of cellular functions. Based on the very large number of membrane-associated proteins encoded in genomes, an understanding of the role of PLs may be central to understanding bacterial cell biology. This area of microbiology has received considerable attention over the past two decades, and the local enrichment of anionic PLs has emerged as a candidate mechanism for biomolecular organization in bacterial cells. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of anionic PLs in bacteria, including their biosynthesis, subcellular localization, and physiological relevance, discuss evidence and mechanisms for enriching anionic PLs in membranes, and conclude with an assessment of future directions for this area of bacterial biochemistry, biophysics, and cell biology. PMID:27026177

  13. Mechanisms of equinatoxin II-induced transport through the membrane of a giant phospholipid vesicle.

    OpenAIRE

    Mally, M; Majhenc, J; Svetina, S; Zeks, B.

    2002-01-01

    Protein equinatoxin II from sea anemone Actinia equina L. was used to form pores in phospholipid membranes. We studied the effect of these pores on the net transmembrane transport of sucrose and glucose by observing single giant (cell-size) vesicles under the phase contrast microscope. Sugar composition in the vesicle was determined by measuring the width of the halo, which appears around the vesicle in the phase contrast image. The transport of sugars was induced when a vesicle, filled with ...

  14. Transporting of a Cell-Sized Phospholipid Vesicle Across Water/Oil Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Hase, M; Hamada, T; Yoshikawa, K; Hase, Masahiko; Yamada, Ayako; Hamada, Tsutomu; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2006-01-01

    When a cell-sized water droplet, with a diameter of several tens of micro meter, is placed in oil containing phospholipids, a stable cell-sized vesicle is spontaneously formed as a water-in-oil phospholipid emulsion (W/O CE) with a phospholipid monolayer. We transferred the lipid vesicle thus formed in the oil phase to the water phase across the water/oil interface by micromanipulation, which suggests that the vesicle is transformed from a phospholipid monolayer as W/O CE into a bilayer. The lipid vesicle can then be transported back into the oil phase. This novel experimental procedure may be a useful tool for creating a model cellular system, which, together with a microreactor, is applicable as a micrometer-scale biochemical reaction field.

  15. Effect of Vesicle-to-Micelle Transition on the Interactions of Phospholipid/Sodium Cholate Mixed Systems with Curcumin in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sha; Wang, Xiaoyong

    2016-08-01

    The role of vesicle-to-micelle transition has been investigated in the interactions of phospholipid vesicles, phospholipid/sodium cholate (NaC) mixed vesicles, and phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles with curcumin in aqueous solution. The addition of NaC causes phospholipid vesicles to transit into phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles and phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles. Turbidity measurement reveals that the presence of curcumin increases the NaC concentration for the solubilization of phospholipid vesicles, which indicates that the bound curcumin tends to suppress the vesicle-to-micelle transition. The pyrene polarity index and curcumin fluorescence anisotropy measurements suggest that phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles have a more compact structure than that of phospholipid vesicles and phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles. Curcumin associated with phospholipid vesicles, phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles, and phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles often results in higher intensities of absorption and fluorescence than those of free curcumin. However, phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles lead to the highest values of absorption and fluorescence intensities, binding constant, and radical-scavenging capacity with curcumin. The different structures in the phospholipid bilayer of phospholipid/NaC mixed vesicles and the hydrophobic part of phospholipid/NaC mixed micelles where curcumin located are discussed to explain the interaction behaviors of phospholipid/NaC mixed systems with curcumin. PMID:27403579

  16. Preparation and characterization of unilamellar vesicles from cholate-phospholipid micelle treated with cholestyramine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventimiglia, J B; Levesque, M C; Chang, T Y

    1986-09-01

    Cholestyramine, a well-known bile-salt sequestrant, can be used effectively to remove cholate or deoxycholate from a solution of phosphatidylcholine-bile salt mixed micelle. Upon removal of the bile salt, unilamellar phospholipid vesicles form essentially instantaneously. Cholestyramine resin could be pelleted and removed from the vesicle solution after a low speed centrifugation. Based on phosphate analyses, the recovery of vesicles was approximately 60% of the starting material. The average diameter of these vesicles, as estimated by gel exclusion chromatography on sephacryl S-1000 beads and by trapped volume measurement using [3H]sucrose, ranged between 85 to 121 nm. Phosphatidylethanolamine, cholesterol, or n-alkane such as tetradecane can be incorporated into the vesicles without any selective loss; however, selective loss was experienced when negatively charged phospholipid species such as phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidylserine was included in vesicle formation. PMID:3777436

  17. Dynamic assembly of MinD on phospholipid vesicles regulated by ATP and MinE

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zonglin; Gogol, Edward P.; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Selection of the division site in Escherichia coli is regulated by the min system and requires the rapid oscillation of MinD between the two halves of the cell under the control of MinE. In this study we have further investigated the molecular basis for this oscillation by examining the interaction of MinD with phospholipid vesicles. We found that MinD bound to phospholipid vesicles in the presence of ATP and, upon binding, assembled into a well-ordered helical array that deformed the vesicle...

  18. Products and mechanism of the reaction of ozone with phospholipids in unilamellar phospholipid vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santrock, J.; Gorski, R.A.; O' Gara, J.F. (Biomedical Science Department, General Motors Research Laboratories, Warren, MI (United States))

    1992-01-01

    While considerable effort has been expended on determining the health effects of exposure to typical urban concentrations of O3, little is known about the chemical events responsible for toxicity. Phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids in the cell membranes of lung cells are likely reaction sites for inhaled ozone (O3). In this study, we examined the reaction of O3 with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) in unilamellar phospholipid vesicles. Reaction of ozone with the carbon-carbon double bond of POPC yielded an aldehyde and a hydroxy hydroperoxide. The hydroxy hydroperoxide eliminated H2O2 to yield a second aldehyde. Upon further ozonolysis, the aldehydes were oxidized to the corresponding carboxylic acids. A material balance showed that no other reaction consumed POPC and O3 or produced these products. As a mechanistic probe, we measured incorporation of oxygen-18 from 18O3 into aldehyde, carboxylic acid, and H2O2. Approximately 50% of the aldehyde oxygen atoms were derived from O3. Oxygen in H2O2 was derived solely from O3, where both oxygen atoms in a molecule of H2O2 were from the same molecule of O3. One of the carboxylic acid oxygen atoms was derived from the precursor aldehyde, while the other was derived from O3. These results support the following mechanism. Cleavage of the carbon-carbon double bond of POPC by O3 yields a carbonyl oxide and an aldehyde. Reaction of H2O with the carbonyl oxide yields a hydroxy hydroperoxide, preventing formation ozonide by reaction of the carbonyl oxide and aldehyde. Elimination of H2O2 from the hydroxy hydroperoxide yields a second aldehyde. Oxidation of the aldehydes by O3 yields carboxylic acids.

  19. Anionic micelles and vesicles induce tau fibrillization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirita, Carmen N; Necula, Mihaela; Kuret, Jeff

    2003-07-11

    Alzheimer's disease is defined in part by the intraneuronal accumulation of filaments comprised of the microtubule-associated protein tau. In vitro, fibrillization of recombinant tau can be induced by treatment with various agents, including phosphotransferases, polyanionic compounds, and fatty acids. Here we characterize the structural features required for the fatty acid class of tau fibrillization inducer using recombinant full-length tau protein, arachidonic acid, and a series of straight chain anionic, cationic, and nonionic detergents. Induction of measurable tau fibrillization required an alkyl chain length of at least 12 carbons and a negative charge consisting of carboxylate, sulfonate, or sulfate moieties. All detergents and fatty acids were micellar at active concentrations, due to a profound, taudependent depression of their critical micelle concentrations. Anionic surfaces larger than detergent micelles, such as those supplied by phosphatidylserine vesicles, also induced tau fibrillization with resultant filaments originating from their surface. These data suggest that anionic surfaces presented as micelles or vesicles can serve to nucleate tau fibrillization, that this mechanism underlies the activity of fatty acid inducers, and that anionic membranes may serve this function in vivo. PMID:12730214

  20. Linking Phospholipid flippases to vesicle-mediated protein transport

    OpenAIRE

    Muthusamy, Baby-Periyanayaki; Natarajan, Paramasivam; Zhou, Xiaoming; Graham, Todd R.

    2009-01-01

    Type IV P-type ATPases (P4-ATPases) are a large family of putative phospholipid translocases (flippases) implicated in the generation of phospholipid asymmetry in biological membranes. P4-ATPases are typically the largest P-type ATPase subgroup found in eukaryotic cells, with five members in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, six members in Caenorhabditis elegans, 12 members in Arabidopsis thaliani and 14 members in humans. In addition, many of the P4-ATPases require interaction with a noncatalytic su...

  1. Frequency-dependent electrodeformation of giant phospholipid vesicles in AC electric field

    CERN Document Server

    Peterlin, Primoz

    2010-01-01

    A model of vesicle electrodeformation is described which obtains a parametrized vesicle shape by minimizing the sum of the membrane bending energy and the energy due to the electric field. Both the vesicle membrane and the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle are treated as leaky dielectrics, and the vesicle itself is modelled as a nearly spherical shape enclosed within a thin membrane. It is demonstrated (a) that the model achieves a good quantitative agreement with the experimentally determined prolate-to-oblate transition frequencies in the kHz range, and (b) that the model can explain a phase diagram of shapes of giant phospholipid vesicles with respect to two parameters: the frequency of the applied AC electric field and the ratio of the electrical conductivities of the aqueous media inside and outside the vesicle, explored in a recent paper (S. Aranda et al., Biophys. J. 95:L19--L21, 2008). A possible use of the frequency-dependent shape transitions of phospholipid vesicles in conductometry of m...

  2. Role of lipid phase separations and membrane hydration in phospholipid vesicle fusion.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, D.

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between lipid phase separation and fusion of small unilamellar phosphatidylserine-containing vesicles was investigated. The kinetics of phase separation were monitored by following the increase of self-quenching of the fluorescent phospholipid analogue N-(7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazol

  3. Determining membrane permeability of giant phospholipid vesicles from a series of videomicroscopy images

    CERN Document Server

    Peterlin, Primoz; Pisanski, Tomaz

    2008-01-01

    A technique for determining the permeability of a phospholipid membrane from a sequence of videomicrographs is described. A single giant unilamellar vesicle (GUV) is transferred using a micropipette from a solution of an impermeable solute (e.g., glucose or sucrose) into an iso-osmolar solution of a solute with a higher membrane permeability (e.g., glycerol). Upon the transfer, the vesicle swells until it reaches the tensile strength of the membrane, when the membrane breaks and a fraction of the vesicle volume is ejected, sufficient for the membrane to return to its relaxed value. The swelling-burst cycle repeats itself until the composition of the solution in the vesicle interior equilibrates with the external solution. A sequence of ~10.000 image frames is obtained from a CCD camera mounted on the optical microscope, documenting the process. On each frame, the vesicle radius is determined, and from the rate of swelling the membrane permeability can be obtained.

  4. Stability a key parameter in the accumulation of phospholipid vesicles in tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipid vesicle (liposome) stability in human plasma was determined using perturbed angular correlation (PAC) with 111In as the aqueous phase marker. Using compositions given in earlier tumor imaging studies, liposomes were made with either egg lecithin (EL) or distearoyl phosphatidylcholine (DSPC) as the dominant phospholipid. With fresh human plasma at 37 degrees C. EL vesicles lysed much more rapidly with survival half times being 7 hr at 6.7 mg lipid/ml plasma. DSPC liposomes had a half-time of 130 hr independent of lipid concentration. No lysis occurred with plasma previously stored for 1 wk at 5 degrees C. The addition of 143 USP units of heparin per 4.5 ml sample decreased both half-times by two orders of magnitude. The authors conclude that EL vesicles exhibit plasma survival times much shorter than those found with DSPC liposomes; this may preclude the former agents from having significant tumor accumulation in vivo

  5. The amphiphilic alkyl ester derivatives of l-ascorbic acid induce reorganization of phospholipid vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giudice, Francesca; Ambroggio, Ernesto E; Mottola, Milagro; Fanani, Maria Laura

    2016-09-01

    l-ascorbic acid alkyl esters (ASCn) are lipophilic forms of vitamin C, which maintain some of its antioxidant power. Those properties make this drug family attractive to be used in pharmacological preparations protecting other redox-sensible drugs or designed to reduce possible toxic oxidative processes. In this work, we tested the ability of l-ascorbic acid alkyl esters (ASCn) to modulate the structure, permeability, and rheological properties of phospholipid bilayers. The ASCn studied here (ASC16, ASC14, and ASC12) alter the structural integrity as well as the rheological properties of phospholipid membranes without showing any evident detergent activity. ASC14 appeared as the most efficient drug in destabilize the membrane structure of nano- and micro-size phospholipid liposomes inducing vesicle content leakage and shape elongation on giant unilamellar vesicles. It also was the most potent enhancer of membrane microviscosity and surface water structuring. Only ASC16 induced the formation of drug-enriched condensed domains after its incorporation into the lipid bilayer, while ASC12 appeared as the less membrane-disturbing compound, likely because of its poor, and more superficial, partition into the membrane. We also found that incorporation of ASCn into the lipid bilayers enhanced the reduction of membrane components, compared with soluble vitamin C. Our study shows that ASCn compounds, which vary in the length of the acyl chain, show different effects on phospholipid vesicles used as biomembrane models. Those variances may account for subtly differences in the effectiveness on their pharmacological applications. PMID:27342371

  6. Needle-free jet injection of intact phospholipid vesicles across the skin: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlich, Michele; Lai, Francesco; Murgia, Sergio; Valenti, Donatella; Fadda, Anna Maria; Sinico, Chiara

    2016-08-01

    Needle-free liquid jet injectors are devices developed for the delivery of pharmaceutical solutions through the skin. In this paper, we investigated for the first time the ability of these devices to deliver intact lipid vesicles. Diclofenac sodium loaded phospholipid vesicles of two types, namely liposomes and transfersomes, were prepared and fully characterized. The lipid vesicles were delivered through a skin specimen using a jet injector and the collected samples were analyzed to assess vesicle structural integrity, drug retention and release kinetics after the injection. In this regard, data concerning size, size distribution, surface charge of vesicles and bilayer integrity and thickness, before and after the injections, were measured by dynamic light scattering experiments, cryo-electron microscopy, and X-ray scattering techniques. Finally, the effect of vesicle fast jet injection through the skin on drug release kinetics was checked by in vitro experiments. The retention of the morphological, physico-chemical, and technological features after injection, proved the integrity of vesicles after skin crossing as a high-speed liquid jet. The delivery of undamaged vesicular carriers beneath the skin is of utmost importance to create a controlled release drug depot in the hypoderm, which may be beneficial for several localized therapies. Overall results reported in this paper may broaden the range of application of liquid jet injectors to lipid vesicle based formulations thus combining beneficial performance of painless devices with those of liposomal drug delivery systems. PMID:27422107

  7. Effect of carbon black nanomaterial on biological membranes revealed by shape of human erythrocytes, platelets and phospholipid vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Drašler, Barbara; Pajnič, Manca; Šuštar, Vid; Štukelj, Roman; Kononenko, Veno; Šimundić, Metka; Hägerstrand, Henry; Kralj-Iglič, Veronika; Makovec, Darko; Drobne, Damjana; Krek, Judita Lea

    2016-01-01

    Background We studied the effect of carbon black (CB) agglomerated nanomaterial on biological membranes as revealed by shapes of human erythrocytes, platelets and giant phospholipid vesicles. Diluted human blood was incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by different microscopic techniques. Giant unilamellar phospholipid vesicles (GUVs) created by electroformation were incubated with CB nanomaterial and observed by optical microscopy. Populations of erythrocytes and GUVs were analyzed: t...

  8. Pressure-induced shape change of phospholipid vesicles: implication of compression and phase transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier-Cornet, J-M; Baddóuj, K; Gervais, P

    2005-04-01

    A microscopic study has allowed the analysis of modifications of various shapes acquired by phospholipid vesicles during a hydrostatic pressure treatment of up to 300 MPa. Giant vesicles of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine / phosphatidylserine (DMPC/PS) prepared at 40 degrees C mainly presented a shape change resembling budding during pressure release. This comportment was reinforced by the incorporation of 1,2-dioleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (DOPE) or by higher temperature (60 degrees C) processing. The thermotropic main phase transition (L alpha to P beta') of the different vesicles prepared was determined under pressure through a spectrofluorimetric study of 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylamino-naphtalene (Laurdan) incorporated into the vesicles' bilayer. This analysis was performed by microfluorescence observation of single vesicles. The phase transition was found to begin at about 80 MPa and 120 MPa for DMPC/PS vesicles at, respectively, 40 degrees C and 60 degrees C. At 60 degrees C the liquid-to-gel transition phase was not complete within 250 MPa. Addition of DMPE at 40 degrees C does not significantly shift the onset boundary of the phase transition but extends the transition region. At 40 degrees C, the gel phase was obtained at, respectively, 110 MPa and 160 MPa for DMPC/PS and DMPC/PS/DOPE vesicles. In comparing volume data obtained from image analysis and Laurdan signal, we assume the shape change is a consequence of the difference between lateral compressibility of the membrane and bulk water. The phase transition contributes to the membrane compression but seems not necessary to induce shape change of vesicles. The high compressibility of the L alpha phase at 60 degrees C allows induction on DMPC/PS vesicles of a morphological transition without phase change. PMID:16245032

  9. Selective uptake of surface-modified phospholipid vesicles by bone marrow macrophages in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sou, Keitaro; Goins, Beth; Takeoka, Shinji; Tsuchida, Eishun; Phillips, William T

    2007-06-01

    An advantage of using vesicles (liposomes) as drug delivery carriers is that their pharmacokinetics can be controlled by surface characteristics, which can permit specific delivery of the encapsulated agents to organs or cells in vivo. Here we report a vesicle formulation which targets the bone marrow after intravenous injection in rabbits. Surface modification of the vesicle with an anionic amphiphile; L-glutamic acid, N-(3-carboxy-1-oxopropyl)-, 1,5-dihexadecyl ester (SA) results in significant targeting of vesicles to bone marrow. Further incorporation of as little as 0.6 mol% of poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid (PEG-DSPE) passively enhanced the distribution of SA-vesicles into bone marrow and inhibited hepatic uptake. In this model, more than 60% of the intravenously injected vesicles were distributed to bone marrow within 6 h after administration of a small dose of lipid (15 mg/kg b.w.). Histological evidence indicates that the targeting was achieved due to uptake by bone marrow macrophages (BMMphi). The efficient delivery of encapsulated scintigraphic and fluorescent imaging agents to BMMphi suggests that vesicles are promising carriers for the specific targeting of BMMphi and may be useful for delivering a wide range of therapeutic agents to bone marrow. PMID:17316790

  10. Chemical characterization of Citrus limon var. pompia and incorporation in phospholipid vesicles for skin delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manconi, Maria; Manca, Maria Letizia; Marongiu, Francesca; Caddeo, Carla; Castangia, Ines; Petretto, Giacomo Luigi; Pintore, Giorgio; Sarais, Giorgia; D'hallewin, Guy; Zaru, Marco; Bacchetta, Gianluigi; Fadda, Anna Maria

    2016-06-15

    The components of pompia, a hybrid Citrus species cultivated only in Sardinia (Italy), were extracted using an environmentally-friendly method and food-grade solvents. Taking into account that only few data are available on pompia composition, the phytochemical fingerprint of its rind extract was obtained by accurate component separation and identification, combining HPLC and mass spectrometry. Different flavones such as naringin (23.77μg/mg), neoeriocitrin (46.53μg/mg) and neohesperidin (44.57μg/mg) were identified. Additionally, the antioxidant activity and phenolic content were confirmed by DPPH and Folin-Ciocalteu assays. The whole extract was incorporated in innovative phospholipid vesicles, namely glycerosomes, hyalurosomes and glycerol containing hyalurosomes, which were prepared using a high ratio of extract/phospholipid (1/3.5w/w). The in vitro biocompatibility of the nanoincorporated extract and its ability to potentiate the aptitude of the extract to counteract oxidative stress in skin cells were evaluated. The vesicles, especially glycerol containing hyalurosomes, were able to prevent oxidative damage and death of both keratinocytes and fibroblasts, promoting their viability. PMID:27084291

  11. Interaction of saposin D with membranes: effect of anionic phospholipids and sphingolipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Tatti, Massimo; Salvioli, Rosa; Vaccaro, Anna Maria

    2003-08-01

    Saposin (Sap) D is an endolysosomal protein that, together with three other similar proteins, Sap A, Sap B and Sap C, is involved in the degradation of sphingolipids and, possibly, in the solubilization and transport of gangliosides. We found that Sap D is able to destabilize and disrupt membranes containing each of the three anionic phospholipids most abundant in the acidic endolysosomal compartment, namely lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA), phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylserine (PS). The breakdown of the membranes, which occurs when the Sap D concentration on the lipid surface reaches a critical value, is a slow process that gives rise to small particles. The Sap D-particle complexes formed in an acidic milieu can be dissociated by an increase in pH, suggesting a dynamic association of Sap D with membranes. The presence of anionic phospholipids is required also for the Sap D-induced perturbation and solubilization of membranes containing a neutral sphingolipid such as ceramide or a ganglioside such as G(M1). At appropriate Sap D concentrations Cer and G(M1) are solubilized as constituents of small phospholipid particles. Our findings imply that most functions of Sap D are dependent on its interaction with anionic phospholipids, which mediate the Sap D effect on other components of the membrane such as sphingolipids. On consideration of the properties of Sap D we propose that Sap D might have a role in the definition of the structure and function of membranes, such as the intra-endolysosomal membranes, that are rich in anionic phospholipids. PMID:12733985

  12. Development of polyherbal antidiabetic formulation encapsulated in the phospholipids vesicle system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Kumar Gauttam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Multifactorial metabolic diseases, for instance diabetes develop several complications like hyperlipidemia, hepatic toxicity, immunodeficiency etc., Hence, instead of mono-drug therapy the management of the disease requires the combination of herbs. Marketed herbal drugs comprise of irrational combinations, which makes their quality control more difficult. Phytoconstituents, despite having excellent bioactivity in vitro demonstrate less or no in vivo actions due to their poor lipid solubility, resulting in high therapeutic dose regimen; phospholipids encapsulation can overcome this problem. Hence, present study was designed to develop a phospholipids encapsulated polyherbal anti-diabetic formulation. In the present study, polyherbal formulation comprises of lyophilized hydro-alcoholic (50% v/v extracts of Momordica charantia, Trigonella foenum-graecum and Withania somnifera 2:2:1, respectively, named HA, optimized based on oral glucose tolerance test model in normal Wistar rats. The optimized formulation (HA entrapped in the phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol (8:2 vesicle system is named HA lipids (HAL. The vesicles were characterized for shape, morphology, entrapment efficiency, polar-dispersity index and release profile in the gastric pH. The antidiabetic potential of HA, marketed polyherbal formulation (D-fit and HAL was compared in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat model of 21 days study. The parameters evaluated were behavioral changes, body weight, serum glucose level, lipid profile and oxidative stress. The antidiabetic potential of HA (1000 mg/kg was at par with the D-fit (1000 mg/kg. However, the potential was enhanced by phospholipids encapsulation; as HAL (500 mg/kg has shown more significant (P < 0.05 potential in comparison to HA (1000 mg/kg and at par with metformin (500 mg/kg.

  13. Characterization of the physicochemical properties of phospholipid vesicles prepared in CO2/water systems at high pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Hidemi; Taguchi, Shogo; Suga, Keishi; Hayashi, Keita; Jung, Ho-Sup; Umakoshi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid vesicles were prepared by the nonsolvent method using high-pressure CO2/water systems. The membrane properties of vesicles prepared at different pressures and temperatures were mainly characterized based on analysis of the membrane fluidity and membrane polarity, using the fluorescent probes 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and 6-dodecanoyl-N,N-dimethyl-2-naphthylamine, respectively. The CO2(liquid)/water(liquid) and the CO2(supercritical)/water(liquid) two-phase (heterogeneous) systems resulted in the formation of vesicles with high yield (ca. 85%-88%). The membrane fluidity and polarity of the vesicles were similar to those of liposomes prepared by the conventional method. It is suggested that high-pressure CO2 can be used to form an appropriate hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface where phospholipid molecules as a self-assembled membrane. PMID:26296356

  14. Supported Phospholipid Bilayer Defects Created by a Cation or Anion of a Room-Temperature Ionic Liquid

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this work, the independent effects on a supported phospholipid bilayer (SPB) caused by a cation and anion of a room-temperature ionic liquid (RT-IL) were studied via atomic force microscopy (AFM). The supported phospholipid bilayer was composed only of 1,2-dielaidoylphosphatidylcholine (DEPC) an...

  15. Immunogenicity of recombinant class 1 protein from Neisseria meningitidis refolded into phospholipid vesicles and detergent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebla, O; Alvarez, A; Martín, A; Rodríguez, A; Delgado, M; Falcón, V; Guillén, G

    2001-05-14

    The possibility of eliciting bactericidal antibodies against a recombinant class 1 protein (P1) from Neisseria meningitidis, joined to the first 45 amino acids of the neisserial LpdA protein (PM82), was examined. P1 was produced in Escherichia coli as intracellular inclusion bodies, from which it was purified and reconstituted by (a) inclusion into phospholipid vesicles and detergent and (b) refolding in 0.1% SDS. When Balb/c mice were immunised, high titres of subtype-specific bactericidal antibodies against P1 were obtained in both cases. These results suggest that in spite of being a denaturing agent, it is possible to use SDS to reconstitute the P1 protein in a conformation that exposes the immunodominat regions. PMID:11348724

  16. Intermolecular exciton-exciton annihilation in phospholipid vesicles doped with [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cadena, Alejandro; Pascher, Torbjörn; Davydova, Dar'ya; Akimov, Denis; Herrmann, Felix; Presselt, Martin; Wächtler, Maria; Dietzek, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The ultrafast photophysics of [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ (dppz = dipyrido[3,2-a:2‧,3‧-c]-phenazine) embedded into the walls of phospholipid vesicles has been studied by femtosecond time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy. While [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ has been studied intensively with respect to its intramolecular charge transfer processes, which are associated with the well known light-switch effect, this study focuses on intermolecular energy transfer processes taking place upon dense packing of the complexes into a phospholipid membrane composed of dipalmitoyl-L-α-phosphatidylglycerol, which can be thought of as a simplistic model of a cellular membrane. The data indicate additional quenching of excited [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ upon increasing the pump-pulse intensity. Hence, the observed photophysics, which is assigned to the presence of intermolecular exciton-exciton annihilation at high pump-intensities, might be related to the ultrafast photophysics of [Ru(bpy)2dppz]2+ when used as a chromophore to stain cells, an effect that may be taken into account during the employment of novel cellular markers based on Ru polypyridine complexes.

  17. Interaction of blood coagulation factor Va with phospholipid vesicles examined by using lipophilic photoreagents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different lipophilic photoreagents, [3H]adamantane diazirine and 3-(trifluoromethyl)-3-(m-[125I]iodophenyl)diazirine (TID), have been utilized to examine the interactions of blood coagulation factor Va with calcium, prothrombin, factor Xa, and, in particular, phospholipid vesicles. With each of these structurally dissimilar reagents, the extent of photolabeling of factor Va was greater when the protein was bound to a membrane surface than when it was free in solution. Specifically, the covalent photoreaction with Vl, the smaller subunit of factor Va, was 2-fold higher in the presence of phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylserine (PC/PS, 3:1) vesicles, to which factor Va binds, than in the presence of 100% PC vesicles, to which the protein does not bind. However, the magnitude of the PC/PS-dependent photolabeling was much less than has been observed previously with integral membrane proteins. It therefore appears that the binding of factor Va to the membrane surface exposes Vl to the lipid core of the bilayer, but that only a small portion of the Vl polypeptide is exposed to, or embedded in, the bilayer core. Addition of either prothrombin or active-site-blocked factor Xa to PC/PS-bound factor Va had little effect on the photolabeling of Vl with TID, but reduced substantially the covalent labeling of Vh, the larger subunit of factor Va. This indicates that prothrombin and factor Xa each cover nonpolar surfaces on Vh when the macromolecules associate on the PC/PS surface. It therefore seems likely that the formation of the prothrombinase complex involves a direct interaction between Vh and factor Xa and between Vh and prothrombin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Development of an in vitro model to study compromised skin: pigskin versus the Phospholipid Vesicle-based Permeation Assay

    OpenAIRE

    Fedreheim, Elena

    2013-01-01

    When the skin barrier is reduced, penetration of topical and transdermal drugs could potentially be enhanced and the risk of systemic effects is increased. The studies analysing penetration through intact or diseased skin are often limited by the variability in obtaining specimens of representative skin. The phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay is an artificial barrier mimicking human stratum corneum and can be used to determine the permeability of drugs through the skin. The model is ...

  19. In vitro permeation models for healthy and compromised skin: The Phospholipid Vesicle-based Permeation Assay (PVPA) for skin applications

    OpenAIRE

    Engesland, André

    2015-01-01

    In vitro models with the ability to estimate drug penetration through healthy and compromised skin may reduce animal testing of drugs and cosmetics to a minimum. The phospholipid vesicle based permeation assay (PVPA) is based on a tight barrier composed of liposomes mimicking cells. It was originally made to mimic the intestinal epithelial barrier and in this project further developed to mimic the stratum corneum barrier of the skin. The lipid composition was changed to better mimic the lipid...

  20. Hydrotropic salt promotes anionic surfactant self-assembly into vesicles and ultralong fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yiyang; Qiao, Yan; Cheng, Xinhao; Yan, Yun; Li, Zhibo; Huang, Jianbin

    2012-03-01

    Molecular self-assembly has become a versatile approach to create complex and functional nanoarchitectures. In this work, the self-assembly behavior of an anionic surfactant (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate, SDBS) and a hydrotropic salt (benzylamine hydrochloride, BzCl) in aqueous solution is investigated. Benzylamine hydrochloride is found to facilitate close packing of surfactants in the aggregates, inducing the structural transformation from SDBS micelles into unilamellar vesicles, and multilamellar vesicles. The multilamellar vesicles can transform into macroscale fibers, which are long enough to be visualized by the naked eye. Particularly, these fibers are robust enough to be conveniently separated from the surfactant solution. The combined effect of non-covalent interactions (e.g., hydrophobic effect, electrostatic attractions, and π-π interactions) is supposed to be responsible for the robustness of these self-assembled aggregates, in which π-π interactions provide the directional driving force for one-dimensional fiber formation. PMID:22209412

  1. Structural basis of control of inward rectifier Kir2 channel gating by bulk anionic phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sun-Joo; Ren, Feifei; Zangerl-Plessl, Eva-Maria; Heyman, Sarah; Stary-Weinzinger, Anna; Yuan, Peng; Nichols, Colin G

    2016-09-01

    Inward rectifier potassium (Kir) channel activity is controlled by plasma membrane lipids. Phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) binding to a primary site is required for opening of classic inward rectifier Kir2.1 and Kir2.2 channels, but interaction of bulk anionic phospholipid (PL(-)) with a distinct second site is required for high PIP2 sensitivity. Here we show that introduction of a lipid-partitioning tryptophan at the second site (K62W) generates high PIP2 sensitivity, even in the absence of PL(-) Furthermore, high-resolution x-ray crystal structures of Kir2.2[K62W], with or without added PIP2 (2.8- and 2.0-Å resolution, respectively), reveal tight tethering of the C-terminal domain (CTD) to the transmembrane domain (TMD) in each condition. Our results suggest a refined model for phospholipid gating in which PL(-) binding at the second site pulls the CTD toward the membrane, inducing the formation of the high-affinity primary PIP2 site and explaining the positive allostery between PL(-) binding and PIP2 sensitivity. PMID:27527100

  2. Studying the cytolytic activity of gas plasma with self-signalling phospholipid vesicles dispersed within a gelatin matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A synthetic biological sensor was developed to monitor the interaction of plasma with soft, hydrated biological material. It comprises phospholipid vesicles in a hydrated proteinaceous environment comprising 5% (w/v) gelatin. The vesicles contained a self-quenched dye, which was activated by vesicle destruction giving a clear fluorescent switch on. The interaction of bacterial toxins with the sensor was measured in a proof of principle experiment, then the effect of atmospheric plasma jets with the sensor, was studied in order to assess the cytolytic effect of plasma jets in biological systems. When the plasma contacted the gelatin surface perpendicular to the surface, the treatment resulted in the formation of a star-shaped pattern of microchannels that radiated out from the centre of the treatment area within the gelatin matrix, and locally damaged vesicles within the microchannels at a depth of 150 µm below the gelatin surface. Plasma jets applied in parallel to the surface of the matrix resulted in the formation of a single microchannel with damage to the vesicles only evident at the walls of the channel, and a much reduced penetration depth within the gelatin. Our data show that the effects of plasma can be deep in the gelatin material and that the angle of treatment significantly influenced the nature and level of damage to the gelatin and vesicles. Potentially this gelatin model can be used to unravel the roles of different plasma species and the direct effect of whole plasma contact, from those of primary and secondary species—i.e. primary, those emanating directly from the plasma and secondary, those species created in the ‘target’ tissue. This type of insight could be useful in the future development of safe and effective plasma medical technologies. (paper)

  3. Interaction of acylated and substituted antimicrobial peptide analogs with phospholipid-polydiacetylene vesicles. Correlation with their biological properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siano, Alvaro; Húmpola, María V; Rey, María C; Simonetta, Arturo; Tonarelli, Georgina G

    2011-07-01

    A series of peptide analogs based on region 6-22 of Plantaricin 149 sequence were synthesized. The interaction between these analogs and phospholipid-polydiacetylene vesicles was investigated to evaluate the ability of the bioassay to detect differences in the interaction of the peptides with dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine vesicles, associated with amino acid substitution and N-terminal conjugation of the sequences with short fatty acids (8 and 12 carbon atoms). Fatty acid conjugation of peptides with low antimicrobial activity resulted in lipopeptides with improved activity against strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes. The length of the fatty acid determined the bacterial specificity, and the conjugation with n-octanoic acid yielded the most active analog (C8-CT) against Staphylococcus aureus strain (MIC: 1.0 μm) while the conjugation with n-dodecanoic acid (C12-CT) was optimal for Listeria monocytogenes strain (MIC: 2.0 μm). In contrast, the substitution of Phe by Trp had an unfavorable effect on the antimicrobial activity. Hemolysis tests and membrane interaction studies with dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine-polydiacetylene vesicles showed that lipopeptides interact to a greater extent with both biological and biomimetic membranes. Also, a good correlation was found between antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus strain and % colorimetric response values with dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol-polydiacetylene vesicles. PMID:21496212

  4. Preparation and stability of lipid-coated nanocapsules of cisplatin: anionic phospholipid specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velinova, Maria J; Staffhorst, Rutger W H M; Mulder, Willem J M; Dries, Arno S; Jansen, Bart A J; de Kruijff, Ben; de Kroon, Anton I P M

    2004-05-27

    Cisplatin nanocapsules represent a novel lipid formulation of the anti-cancer drug cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cisplatin), in which nanoprecipitates of cisplatin are coated by a phospholipid bilayer consisting of a 1:1 mixture of zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) and negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS). Cisplatin nanocapsules are characterized by an unprecedented cisplatin-to-lipid ratio and exhibit increased in vitro cytotoxicity compared to the free drug [Nat. Med. 8, (2002) 81]. In the present study, the stability of the cisplatin nanocapsules was optimized by varying the lipid composition of the bilayer coat and monitoring in vitro cytotoxicity and the release of contents during incubations in water and in mouse serum. The release of cisplatin from the PC/PS (1:1) nanocapsules in water increased with increasing temperature with a t(1/2) of 6.5 h at 37 degrees C. At 4 degrees C, cisplatin was retained in the nanocapsules for well over 8 days. Replacement of PS by either phosphatidylglycerol or phosphatidic acid revealed that nanocapsules prepared of PS were more stable, which was found to be due to the ability of PS to form a stable cisplatin-PS coordination complex. Mouse serum had a strong destabilizing effect on the cisplatin nanocapsules. The PC/PS formulation lost over 80% of cisplatin within minutes after resuspension in serum. Incorporation of poly(ethylene glycol 2000) (PEG)-derivatized phosphatidylethanolamine and cholesterol in the bilayer coat extended the lifetime of the cisplatin nanocapsules in mouse serum to almost an hour. The results demonstrate that specificity in the interaction of cisplatin with anionic phospholipids is an important criterium for the formation and stability of cisplatin nanocapsules. PMID:15157616

  5. Vesicles of one monoglyceride and two phospholipids: phase behavior and susceptibility to hydrolysis by glyceride lipase and phospholipase A(2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vissing, Thomas; Ipsen, John Hjorth; Callisen, Thomas Hønger

    investigated by differential, scanning calorimetry (DSC). The zwitterionic DMPC and the anionic DMPG display almost ideal mixing as binary mixtures under our experimental conditions. DSC further showed that MMG induces a gel-fluid co-existence and an increase in the main phase transition temperature for binary...... means of a two-dimensional regular solution model. The theoretical results are in fine accordance with the experimentally observed non-ideal mixing behavior of the MMG-phospholipid systems. Repulsive interaction parameters between MMG and the two phospholipids are found, in both the gel and the fluid...... mixtures of 0-50 mol% MMG in DMPC and DMPG, respectively. Similar non-ideality was observed for ternary mixtures of 0-50 mol% MMG in lipid suspensions where the ratio of DMPC and DMPG was fixed at a molar ratio of 70:30. Thermodynamic calculations on the phase behavior of the lipid mixtures were made by...

  6. Interaction between zwitterionic and anionic surfactants: spontaneous formation of zwitanionic vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sampad; Khatua, Dibyendu; Dey, Joykrishna

    2011-05-01

    The physicochemical properties, such as critical micelle concentration (cmc), surface tension at cmc (γ(cmc)), and surface activity parameters of the mixtures of a new amino acid-based zwitterionic surfactant, N-(n-dodecyl-2-aminoethanoyl)-glycine (C(12)Gly) and an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) at different molar fractions, X(1) (= [C(12)Gly]/([C(12)Gly] + [SDS])) of C(12)Gly were studied. A synergistic interaction was observed between the surfactants in mixtures of different X(1). The self-organization of the mixtures at different molar fractions, concentrations, and pH was investigated. Fluorescence depolarization studies in combination with dynamic light scattering, and transmission electron microscopic and confocal fluorescence microscopic images suggested the formation of bilayer vesicles in dilute solutions of SDS rich mixtures with X(1) ≤ 0.17 in the pH range 7.0 to 9.0. However, the electronic micrographs showed structures with fingerprint-like texture in moderately dilute to concentrated C(12)Gly/SDS mixture at X(1) = 0.50. The vesicles were observed to transform into small micelles upon lowering the solution pH and upon increase of total surfactant concentration in mixtures with X(1) ≤ 0.17. However, decrease of SDS content transformed vesicles into wormlike micelles. The structural transitions were correlated with bulk viscosity of the binary mixtures. PMID:21462963

  7. Shape modification of phospholipid vesicles induced by high pressure: influence of bilayer compressibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beney, L; Perrier-Cornet, J M; Hayert, M; Gervais, P

    1997-03-01

    Giant vesicles composed of pure egg yolk phosphatidylcholine (EYPC) or containing cholesterol (28 mol%) have been studied during a high hydrostatic pressure treatment to 285 MPa by microscopic observation. During pressure loading the vesicles remain spherical. A shape transition consisting of budding only occurs on the cholesterol-free vesicles during pressure release. The decrease in the volume delimited by the pure EYPC bilayer between 0.1 and 285 MPa was found to be 16% of its initial volume, whereas the bulk compression of water in this pressure range is only 10%. So the compression at 285 MPa induced a water exit from the pure EYPC vesicle. The shape transition of the EYPC vesicle during pressure release is attributed to an increase in its area-to-volume ratio caused by the loss of its water content during compression. Because bulk compression of the cholesterol-containing vesicle is close to that of water, no water transfer would be induced across the bilayer and the vesicle remains spherical during the pressure release. PMID:9138571

  8. Growth and shape transformations of giant phospholipid vesicles upon interaction with an aqueous oleic acid suspension

    CERN Document Server

    Peterlin, Primoz; Kogej, Ksenija; Svetina, Sasa; Walde, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The interaction of two types of vesicle systems was investigated: micrometer-sized, giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) formed from 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and submicrometer-sized, large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) formed from oleic acid and oleate, both in a buffered aqueous solution (pH=8.8). Individual POPC GUVs were transferred with a micropipette into a suspension of oleic acid/oleate LUVs, and the shape changes of the GUVs were monitored using optical microscopy. The behavior of POPC GUVs upon transfer into a 0.8 mM suspension of oleic acid, in which oleic acid/oleate forms vesicular bilayer structures, was qualitatively different from the behavior upon transfer into a 0.3 mM suspension of oleic acid/oleate, in which oleic acid/oleate is predominantly present in the form of monomers and possibly non-vesicular aggregates. In both cases, changes in vesicle morphology were observed within tens of seconds after the transfer. Vesicle initially started to evaginate. In 60% of the...

  9. Spray layer-by-layer films based on phospholipid vesicles aiming sensing application via e-tongue system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoki, P.H.B., E-mail: pedroaoki@gmail.com [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, UNESP Univ Estadual Paulista, Presidente Prudente/SP, 19060-900 (Brazil); Volpati, D.; Cabrera, F.C.; Trombini, V.L. [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, UNESP Univ Estadual Paulista, Presidente Prudente/SP, 19060-900 (Brazil); Riul, A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, campus Sorocaba/SP, 18052-780 (Brazil); Constantino, C.J.L. [Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, UNESP Univ Estadual Paulista, Presidente Prudente/SP, 19060-900 (Brazil)

    2012-05-01

    The Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique via spraying (spray-LbL) has been applied as new and alternative methodology to fabricate ultrathin films due to its versatility in relation to the conventional dipping-LbL method, mainly in terms of faster layer deposition and larger coated area. In this work, the possibility of immobilizing vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) phospholipid onto alternating layers of the polyelectrolyte poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) using the spray-LbL method was investigated, being the results compared to the conventional dipping-LbL method. The growth of (PAH/DPPG){sub n} spray-LbL films was systematically monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, revealing a linear increase of the absorbance vs deposited layers. In relation to a possible electrostatic interaction between the groups PO{sub 4}{sup -} (DPPG) and NH{sub 3}{sup +} (PAH), it was observed through Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy that the spectrum recorded for the spray-LbL film is basically a simple superposition of the FTIR spectra from PAH and DPPG casting films. The latter indicates a weak interaction between both materials, differently of the trend observed for (PAH/DPPG){sub n} grown via dipping-LbL method. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of spray-LbL films showed evidences that the DPPG vesicles present in the aqueous dispersion are not destroyed when submitted to pressure conditions during the spray deposition. However, comparing to dipping-LbL, the DPPG vesicles do not cover completely the PAH layer for the spray-LbL film, which was further confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements. Moreover, the AFM analysis showed that the spray-LbL deposition led to thicker PAH/DPPG bilayers in average than via dipping-LbL for the same concentrations of PAH solution and DPPG dispersion, which is consistent with QCM and UV-vis absorption results. PAH

  10. Spray layer-by-layer films based on phospholipid vesicles aiming sensing application via e-tongue system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Layer-by-Layer (LbL) technique via spraying (spray-LbL) has been applied as new and alternative methodology to fabricate ultrathin films due to its versatility in relation to the conventional dipping-LbL method, mainly in terms of faster layer deposition and larger coated area. In this work, the possibility of immobilizing vesicles of dipalmitoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DPPG) phospholipid onto alternating layers of the polyelectrolyte poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) using the spray-LbL method was investigated, being the results compared to the conventional dipping-LbL method. The growth of (PAH/DPPG)n spray-LbL films was systematically monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) absorption spectroscopy, revealing a linear increase of the absorbance vs deposited layers. In relation to a possible electrostatic interaction between the groups PO4− (DPPG) and NH3+ (PAH), it was observed through Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) absorption spectroscopy that the spectrum recorded for the spray-LbL film is basically a simple superposition of the FTIR spectra from PAH and DPPG casting films. The latter indicates a weak interaction between both materials, differently of the trend observed for (PAH/DPPG)n grown via dipping-LbL method. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images of spray-LbL films showed evidences that the DPPG vesicles present in the aqueous dispersion are not destroyed when submitted to pressure conditions during the spray deposition. However, comparing to dipping-LbL, the DPPG vesicles do not cover completely the PAH layer for the spray-LbL film, which was further confirmed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements. Moreover, the AFM analysis showed that the spray-LbL deposition led to thicker PAH/DPPG bilayers in average than via dipping-LbL for the same concentrations of PAH solution and DPPG dispersion, which is consistent with QCM and UV–vis absorption results. PAH/DPPG films deposited by

  11. Dissipation of pH gradients in tonoplast vesicles and liposomes by mixtures of acridine orange and anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acridine orange altered the response to anions of both ATP and inorganic pyrophosphate-dependent pH gradient formation in tonoplast vesicles isolated from oat (Avena sativa L.) roots and red beet (Beta vulgaris L.) storage tissue. When used as a fluorescent pH probe in the presence of I-, ClO3-, NO3-, Br-, or SCN-, acridine orange reported lower pH gradients than either quinacrine or [14C]methylamine. Acridine orange, but not quinacrine, reduced [14C]methylamine accumulation when NO3- was present indicating that the effect was due to a real decrease in the size of the pH gradient, not a misreporting of the gradient by acridine orange. Other experiments indicated that acridine orange and NO3- increased the rate of pH gradient collapse both in tonoplast vesicles and in liposomes of phosphatidylcholine and that the effect in tonoplast vesicles was greater at 24 degree C than at 12 degree C. It is suggested that acridine orange and certain anions increase the permeability of membranes to H+, possibly because protonated acridine orange and the anions form a lipophilic ion pair within the vesicle which diffuses across the membrane thus discharging the pH gradient

  12. Nanoscopic Dynamics of Phospholipid Based Unilamellar Vesicles: Effect of Phase Transition and Addition of Melittin Peptide and Cholesterol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V. K.; Mamontov, E.; Anunciado, D. B.; O'Neill, H.; Urban, V.

    2015-03-01

    Dynamics of DMPC phospholipid in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) has been investigated using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) techniques and reported here. Effect of addition of melittin and cholesterol on the dynamics of the lipid molecules in the ULV is also investigated. For DMPC ULV, a sharp fall in the elastic scan intensity is observed at 296 K, which is an indication of a solid gel to fluid phase transition. The addition of cholesterol or melittin inhibits this steep fall indicating that these molecules do have an influence on the main phase transition of DMPC ULV. QENS experiments have been carried out on DMPC ULV solution in the presence and absence of these additives at 280 K, in the solid gel phase, and at 310K, where lipids are in the fluid phase. The data analysis clearly shows the presence of two distinct motions: lateral and internal motions of the DMPC monomer. Both lateral and internal motions are found to be affected by the main phase transition. The addition of cholesterol or melittin influences the dynamics significantly in a different way, depending on the phase of lipid bilayers and the nature of additives. Effect of phase transition and additives on the dynamics of lipid in ULV will be discussed in details.

  13. Phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay and EpiSkin® in assessment of drug therapies destined for skin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engesland, André; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša; Flaten, Gøril Eide

    2015-03-01

    Cost-effective and efficient methods for permeability screening are crucial during early development of drugs, drug formulations, and cosmeceuticals. Alternatives to animal experiments are impelled for both economical and ethical reasons. The aim of this study was to determine the ability of the phospholipid vesicle-based permeation assay (PVPA) to assess the effect of different formulations on drug permeability and thus establish its utility in formulation development. Three model drugs were tested in solutions and as liposomal formulations. The permeability results for the PVPA models were compared with the results for the reconstructed human skin model, EpiSkin(®). The drugs were ranked based on their estimated penetration potentials, and the results were in accordance with what was expected considering the physicochemical properties of the drugs. PVPAs (E-80, ceramide, cholesterol, cholesteryl sulfate, and palmitic acid) was able to distinguish between drug solutions and liposomal formulations; however, EpiSkin(®) detected only small differences between the drugs in solution and formulations. In contrast with EpiSkin(®), which is limited by a 3-day testing window, PVPA barriers can be stored frozen for up to 2 weeks or even up to 16 months, depending on their compositions. The PVPA models are thus more cost effective and efficient than the EpiSkin(®) model for permeability screening during early drug development. PMID:25558045

  14. The N370S (Asn370-->Ser) mutation affects the capacity of glucosylceramidase to interact with anionic phospholipid-containing membranes and saposin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvioli, Rosa; Tatti, Massimo; Scarpa, Susanna; Moavero, Sabrina Maria; Ciaffoni, Fiorella; Felicetti, Federica; Kaneski, Christine R; Brady, Roscoe O; Vaccaro, Anna Maria

    2005-08-15

    The properties of the endolysosomal enzyme GCase (glucosylceramidase), carrying the most prevalent mutation observed in Gaucher patients, namely substitution of an asparagine residue with a serine at amino acid position 370 [N370S (Asn370-->Ser) GCase], were investigated in the present study. We previously demonstrated that Sap (saposin) C, the physiological GCase activator, promotes the association of GCase with anionic phospholipid-containing membranes, reconstituting in this way the enzyme activity. In the present study, we show that, in the presence of Sap C and membranes containing high levels of anionic phospholipids, both normal and N370S GCases are able to associate with the lipid surface and to express their activity. Conversely, when the amount of anionic phospholipids in the membrane is reduced (approximately 20% of total lipids), Sap C is still able to promote binding and activation of the normal enzyme, but not of N370S GCase. The altered interaction of the mutated enzyme with anionic phospholipid-containing membranes and Sap C was further demonstrated in Gaucher fibroblasts by confocal microscopy, which revealed poor co-localization of N370S GCase with Sap C and lysobisphosphatidic acid, the most abundant anionic phospholipid in endolysosomes. Moreover, we found that N370S Gaucher fibroblasts accumulate endolysosomal free cholesterol, a lipid that might further interfere with the interaction of the enzyme with Sap C and lysobisphosphatidic acid-containing membranes. In summary, our results show that the N370S mutation primarily affects the interaction of GCase with its physiological activators, namely Sap C and anionic phospholipid-containing membranes. We thus propose that the poor contact between N370S GCase and its activators may be responsible for the low activity of the mutant enzyme in vivo. PMID:15826241

  15. Grazing incidence diffraction studies of the interactions between ursane-type antimicrobial triterpenes and bacterial anionic phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broniatowski, Marcin; Flasiński, Michał; Wydro, Paweł; Fontaine, Philippe

    2015-04-01

    α-Amyrin (AMalf) and ursolic acid (Urs) are ursane-type pentacyclic triterpenes which exhibit wide spectrum of antibacterial activity. These surface active compounds can be incorporated into bacterial membranes and alter their structure and function; however, the exact mechanism of their action still needs to be elucidated. Thus, we decided to study the interactions of these terpenes with specific anionic phospholipids:cardiolipins and phosphatidylglycerols extracted from Escherichia coli in the model environment of Langmuir monolayers. To characterize the ordering of the terpene molecules in one-component films as well as to study their interactions with the bacterial phospholipids in binary monolayers we applied grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD). It turned out that amyrins and ursolic acid molecules form crystalline hexagonal phases in Langmuir monolayers, in which the molecules are oriented uprightly. Regarding the mixtures, it was found that in the monolayers with Urs crystalline domains are present till moderate or even low Urs proportion. In contrast, in the mixtures with AMalf crystalline domains were observed only at the highest terpene concentration. In the interpretation of our results we underlined the significance of the interactions between the cyclopropane ring present in the hydrophobic part of the bacterial phospholipids and the terminal ring of the terpene structure. We proposed that the significant differences between the systems with AMalf and Urs are connected with the formation of hydrogen bonds between the Urs hydrophobic moieties. It can be inferred from the results that Urs is a more membrane-active agent than AMalf. PMID:25805152

  16. A rapid phospholipase D assay using zirconium precipitation of anionic substrate phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, G.; Hansen, Harald S.; Chapman, K.D.

    2000-01-01

    separate and quantify substrate and product(s). A more rapid assay can be used when utilizing phosphatidylcholine as a substrate because one of the products, choline, is water soluble and therefore easily separated from the substrate. However, this separation principle is not applicable in evaluating N......-acylphosphatidylethanolamine (NAPE)-hydrolyzing PLD activity, which produces two lipophilic products, N-acylethanolamine (NAE) and phosphatidic acid. Therefore, we developed a rapid assay for the routine detection of NAPE-hydrolyzing PLD activity. This assay is based on precipitation of radiolabeled substrate (NAPE) in the presence...... of ZrOCl, followed by quantification of radiolabeled NAE released into a methanolic supernatant. The precipitation involves a chemical reaction of the zirconyl cation with the phosphate anion. Conditions were optimized for the complete precipitation of NAPE, whereas N...

  17. The N-terminal segment of pulmonary surfactant lipopeptide SP-C has intrinsic propensity to interact with and perturb phospholipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plasencia, Inés; Rivas, Luis; Keough, Kevin M W; Marsh, Derek; Pérez-Gil, Jesús

    spontaneously with bilayers composed of either zwitterionic (phosphatidylcholine) or anionic (phosphatidylglycerol) phospholipids. The peptides show higher affinity for anionic than for zwitterionic membranes. Interaction of the peptides with both zwitterionic and anionic membranes promotes phospholipid vesicle......-terminal peptides on the membrane structure are mediated by significant perturbations of the packing order and mobility of phospholipid acyl chain segments deep in the bilayer, as detected by differential scanning calorimetry and spin-label ESR. These results suggest that the N-terminal region of SP-C, even in the...

  18. Properties of the mitochondrial carrier of adenine-nucleotide after purification. Study of the transport protein under isolated form and reincorporated form in phospho-lipidic vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first part of this research thesis addresses the reconstitution of the ADP/ATP transport by incorporation of the specific carrier, isolated in presence of detergent, in phospholipids vesicles. Fundamental properties of the reconstituted transport are identical to that of transport in mitochondria, notably as far as the exchange stoichiometry, the turn over and the transport Km are concerned, as well as the asymmetric orientation of the carrier in the membrane. The second part of this research addresses the study of interactions of specific ligands with the ADP/ATP transport protein in presence of detergent. The study of the variations of the intrinsic fluorescence of the isolated ADP/ATP carrier highlights conformational changes exclusively induced by the presence of transportable nucleotides which are modulated in a different manner by carboxy-atractyloside or bongkrekic acid. Moreover, by using the isolated protein, a detailed analysis of binding parameters of fluorescent analogues of ATP is reported

  19. Drug permeability across a phospholipid vesicle-based barrier: 4. The effect of tensides, co-solvent and pH changes on barrier integrity and on drug permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Flaten, Gøril Eide; Luthman, Kristina; Vasskog, Terje; Brandl, Martin

    2008-01-01

    In this study the integrity of the recently developed phospholipid vesicle-based permeability barrier in the presence of a variety of co-solvents and tensides has been investigated. Also included are studies of the influence of these additives on drug permeation and the effect of pH changes on the permeability of ionogenic drug compounds. Permeability experiments using the hydrophilic model compound calcein together with polysorbate 80 (Tween 80), polyoxyl 35 castor oil (Cremop...

  20. Mechanism of flocculate formation of highly concentrated phospholipid vesicles suspended in a series of water-soluble biopolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Hiromi; Sato, Atsushi; Takeoka, Shinji; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2009-08-10

    Polyethylene glycol-modified vesicles (liposomes) encapsulating hemoglobin (HbV) are artificial oxygen carriers that have been developed as a transfusion alternative. The HbV suspension in an albumin solution is nearly Newtonian; other biopolymers, hydroxyethyl starch (HES), dextran (DEX), and modified fluid gelatin, induce flocculation of HbVs through depletion interaction and render the suspensions as non-Newtonian. The flocculation level increased with hydrodynamic radius (R(h)) or radius of gyration (R(g)) of series of HES or DEX with different molecular weights at a constant polymer concentration (4 wt %). However, the flocculation level differed markedly among the polymers. A crowding index (C(i)) representing the crowding level of a polymer solution is defined as (excluded volume of one polymer) x (molar concentration) x Avogadro's number, using R(h) or R(g). All polymers' flocculation level increases when C(i) approaches 1: when the theoretical total excluded volumes approach the entire solution volume, the excluded HbV particles are forced to flocculate. PMID:19572642

  1. Formation of Polyion Complex (PIC) Micelles and Vesicles with Anionic pH-Responsive Unimer Micelles and Cationic Diblock Copolymers in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Sayaka; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Yusa, Shin-Ichi

    2016-04-26

    A random copolymer (p(A/MaU)) of sodium 2-(acrylamido)-2-methylpropanesulfonate (AMPS) and sodium 11-methacrylamidoundecanate (MaU) was prepared via conventional radical polymerization, which formed a unimer micelle under acidic conditions due to intramolecular hydrophobic interactions between the pendant undecanoic acid groups. Under basic conditions, unimer micelles were opened up to an expanded chain conformation by electrostatic repulsion between the pendant sulfonate and undecanoate anions. A cationic diblock copolymer (P163M99) consisting of poly(3-(methacrylamido)propyl)trimethylammonium chloride (PMAPTAC) and hydrophilic polybetaine, 2-(methacryloyloxy)ethylphosphorylcholine (MPC), blocks was prepared via controlled radical polymerization. Mixing of p(A/MaU) and P163M99 in 0.1 M aqueous NaCl under acidic conditions resulted in the formation of spherical polyion complex (PIC) micelles and vesicles, depending on polymer concentration before mixing. Shapes of the PIC micelles and vesicles changed under basic conditions due to collapse of the charge balance between p(A/MaU) and P163M99. The PIC vesicles can incorporate nonionic hydrophilic guest molecules, and the PIC micelles and vesicles can accept hydrophobic guest molecules in the hydrophobic core formed from p(A/MaU). PMID:27048989

  2. Transformation of Vesicles in Aqueous Two-Phase System of an Anionic Gemini Surfactant and a Cationic Conventional Surfactant Mixture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Rong; HUANG Yi-Xiong; ZHAO Jian-Xi; HUANG Chang-Cang

    2008-01-01

    Transformation of vesicles formed in DTAB/C11-p-PhCNa aqueous surfactant two-phase (ASTP) was observed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The trans-conformation of the gemini surfactant in the aggregates was considered to be the important factor for constructing the multi-lamellar structure of the vesicle wall. The cation-π interaction between the quaternary ammonium cation and the aromatic ring in the spacer was determined by the UV-Vis spectrum analysis, which, as well as the general electrostatic attraction and hydrophobic force, contributes to the stability of the multi-lamellar structure. The concentrations of the surface-active ions were measured for understanding the mechanism of vesicle transformation. The results show that isoelectric mixing of the two components benefits the growth of vesicles both in size and wall thickness.

  3. Attachment and phospholipase A2-induced lysis of phospholipid bilayer vesicles to plasma-polymerized maleic anhydride/SiO2 multilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chifen, Anye N; Förch, Renate; Knoll, Wolfgang; Cameron, Petra J; Khor, Hwei L; Williams, Thomas L; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2007-05-22

    This article describes a method by which intact vesicles can be chemically attached to hydrolyzed maleic anhydride films covalently bound to plasma-polymerized SiO2 on Au substrates. Surface plasmon field-enhanced fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) combined with surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPR) was used to monitor the activation of plasma-deposited maleic anhydride (pp-MA) film with EDC/NHS and the subsequent coupling of lipid vesicles. The vesicles were formed from a mixture of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine lipids, with a water-soluble fluorophore encapsulated within. Vesicle attachment was measured in real time on plasma films formed under different pulse conditions (plasma duty cycle). Optimum vesicle attachment was observed on the pp-MA films containing the highest density of maleic anhydride groups. Phospholipase A2 was used to lyse the surface-bound vesicles and to release the encapsulated fluorophore. PMID:17447800

  4. A phase III trial comparing an anionic phospholipid-based cream and aloe vera-based gel in the prevention of radiation dermatitis in pediatric patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dermatitis is a common side effect of radiation therapy (RT). In severe cases, RT must be interrupted until the skin heals, which can compromise treatment. The purpose of the study was to compare an anionic polar phospholipid (APP)-based cream and an aloe vera-based gel to determine their effectiveness in preventing and treating radiation dermatitis. Forty-five pediatric patients (median age, 11 years) with various diagnoses who received at least 23.4 Gy participated. APP cream and aloe vera gel were symmetrically applied within the irradiated field after each treatment. Three measures were collected before, during and after completion of treatment: subject's skin comfort, dermatologic assessment, and common toxicity criteria (CTC). Significant differences in specific variables favoring APP cream use were noted in some patients including skin comfort variables, dry (p = 0.002), soft (p = 0.057), feels good (p = 0.002), rough (p = 0.065), smooth (p = 0.012) and dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.013), erythema (p = 0.002) and peely (p = 0.008). Grouped CTC scores were supportive of APP cream (p = 0.004). In comparing the first and last assessments, two dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.035) and peely (p = 0.016), favored APP cream. APP cream is more effective than aloe vera-based gel for prevention and treatment of radiation dermatitis

  5. A phase III trial comparing an anionic phospholipid-based cream and aloe vera-based gel in the prevention of radiation dermatitis in pediatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Tina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Radiation dermatitis is a common side effect of radiation therapy (RT. In severe cases, RT must be interrupted until the skin heals, which can compromise treatment. The purpose of the study was to compare an anionic polar phospholipid (APP-based cream and an aloe vera-based gel to determine their effectiveness in preventing and treating radiation dermatitis. Patients and methods Forty-five pediatric patients (median age, 11 years with various diagnoses who received at least 23.4 Gy participated. APP cream and aloe vera gel were symmetrically applied within the irradiated field after each treatment. Three measures were collected before, during and after completion of treatment: subject's skin comfort, dermatologic assessment, and common toxicity criteria (CTC. Results Significant differences in specific variables favoring APP cream use were noted in some patients including skin comfort variables, dry (p = 0.002, soft (p = 0.057, feels good (p = 0.002, rough (p = 0.065, smooth (p = 0.012 and dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.013, erythema (p = 0.002 and peely (p = 0.008. Grouped CTC scores were supportive of APP cream (p = 0.004. In comparing the first and last assessments, two dermatologic variables, dryness (p = 0.035 and peely (p = 0.016, favored APP cream. Conclusion APP cream is more effective than aloe vera-based gel for prevention and treatment of radiation dermatitis.

  6. A kinetic and structural study of two-step aggregation and fusion of neutral phospholipid vesicles promoted by serum albumin at low pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkman, S; Soares de Araujo, P; Sesso, A; Quina, F H; Chaimovich, H

    1981-03-01

    The addition of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to 25 +/- 5 nm diameter single bilayer phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles (SBV) (pH 3.5) gives rise to readily visible transient turbidity. Studies of this system, employing a series of techniques, including time-dependent turbidity changes, membrane filtration, centrifugation, Sepharose chromatography and freeze fracture electron microscopy demonstrated that the process involves aggregation and fusion of the vesicles. At least three distinct time-dependent steps have been characterized: (1) the rapid initial formation (in approx. 5 min) of large aggregates (responsible for the visible turbidity) composed of SBV interconnected by BSA in its F form. The formation of these aggregates may be reversed by raising the pH or adding excess BSA to the system at this stage; (2) spontaneous collapse of these large aggregates, in an irreversible step, to form a heterogeneous population of vesicles; (3) fusion produces as the final product of the process, a relatively homogeneous population of larger (50 +/- 10 nm diamter) vesicles. This system serves as a convenient and simple model system for the detailed study of protein-mediated aggregation and fusion of membranes at the molecular level. PMID:7194154

  7. Interaction of a novel antimicrobial peptide isolated from the venom of solitary bee Colletes daviesanus with phospholipid vesicles and Escherichia coli cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čujová, Sabína; Bednárová, Lucie; Slaninová, Jiřina; Straka, J.; Čeřovský, Václav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 11 (2014), s. 885-895. ISSN 1075-2617 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : antimicrobial peptides * wild-bee venom * CD spectroscopy * large unilamellar vesicles * membrane permeabilization * electron microscopy Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 1.546, year: 2014

  8. The Arabidopsis P4-ATPase ALA3 requires a ß-subunit to function in phospholipid translocation and secretory vesicle formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura

    shoots. The root growth defect is accompanied by the failure of the root to release border cells of the root cap. Electron micrograph data suggest that functioning and shedding of border cells are dependent on ALA3, as ala3 mutants are devoid of the characteristic proliferation of slime vesicles at the...

  9. Implications of surface charge and curvature for the binding orientation of Thermomyces lanuginosus lipase on negatively charged or zwitterionic phospholipid vesicles as studied by ESR spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedin, E.M.K.; Høyrup, Lise Pernille Kristine; Patkar, S.A.;

    2005-01-01

    , Y., et al. (2000) Biochemistry 39, 413-423]. The productive-mode binding orientation of TLL at the lipid-water interface of small unilamellar vesicles (SUV) consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyi-sn-glycero-3-phosphati-dylglycerol (POPG) was previously determined using electron spin resonance (ESR......) spectroscopy in combination with site-directed spin-labeling [Hedin, E. M. K., et al. (2002) Biochemistry 41, 1418514196]. In our investigation, we have studied the interfacial orientation of TLL when bound to large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) consisting of POPG, and bound to SUV consisting of 1-palmitoyl-2...... fluorescence quenching efficiency between each spin-label positioned on TLL, and the lipid membrane. ESR exposure and fluorescence quenching data show that TILL associates closer to the negatively charged PG surface than the zwitterionic PC surface, and binds to both POPG LUV and POPC SUV predominantly through...

  10. Interaction of a synthetic peptide corresponding to the N-terminus of canine distemper virus fusion protein with phospholipid vesicles: a biophysical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda, Francisco J; Teruel, José A; Ortiz, Antonio

    2003-12-01

    The F protein of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a classic type I glycoprotein formed by two polypeptides, F1 and F2. The N-terminal regions of the F1 polypeptides of CDV, measles virus and other paramyxoviruses present moderate to high homology, supporting the existence of a high conservation within these structures, which emphasises its role in viral-host cell membrane fusion. This N-terminal polypeptide is usually termed the fusion peptide. The fusion peptides of most viral fusion-mediating glycoproteins contain a high proportion of hydrophobic amino acids, which facilitates its insertion into target membranes during fusion. In this work we report on the interaction of a 31-residue synthetic peptide (FP31) corresponding to the N terminus of CDV F1 protein with phospholipid membranes composed of various phospholipids, as studied by means of various biophysical techniques. FTIR investigation of FP31 secondary structure in aqueous medium and in membranes resulted in a major proportion of alpha-helical structure which increased upon membrane insertion. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) showed that the presence of concentrations of FP31 as low as 0.1 mol%, in mixtures with L-alpha-dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), L-alpha-dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and L-alpha-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DSPC), already affected the thermotropic properties of the gel to liquid-crystalline phase transition. In mixtures with the three lipids, increasing the concentration of peptide made the pretransition to disappear, and lowered and broadened the main transition. This effect was slightly stronger as the acyl chain length of the phospholipid grew larger. In the corresponding partial phase diagrams, no immiscibilities or critical points were observed. FTIR showed that incorporation of 1 mol% of peptide in DPPC shifted the antisymmetric and symmetric CH2 stretching bands to higher values, indicating the existence of an additional disordering of the acyl chain

  11. Phospholipid profiles of Clostridium difficile.

    OpenAIRE

    Drucker, D B; Wardle, H. M.; Boote, V.

    1996-01-01

    Phospholipid molecular species present in 32 isolates of Clostridium difficile were examined by fast atom bombardment-mass spectrometry in negative-ion mode. This revealed major anions consistent with the expected presence of the following phosphatidylglycerol (PG) analogs: PG(31:2), PG(32:1), PG(33:2), PG(33:1), PG(34:2), and PG(34:1). The major phospholipid molecular species are distinct from those of other bacterial groups examined.

  12. Anionic Pulmonary Surfactant Phospholipids Inhibit Inflammatory Responses from Alveolar Macrophages and U937 Cells by Binding the Lipopolysaccharide-interacting Proteins CD14 and MD-2*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Kuronuma, Koji; Mitsuzawa, Hiroaki; Takeda, Katsuyuki; Nishitani, Chiaki; Chan, Edward D.; Kuroki, Yoshio; Nakamura, Mari; Voelker, Dennis R.

    2009-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), derived from Gram-negative bacteria, is a major cause of acute lung injury and respiratory distress syndrome. Pulmonary surfactant is secreted as a complex mixture of lipids and proteins onto the alveolar surface of the lung. Surfactant phospholipids are essential in reducing surface tension at the air-liquid interface and preventing alveolar collapse at the end of the respiratory cycle. In the present study, we determined that palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylglycerol a...

  13. Phospholipid and Hydrocarbon Interactions with a Charged Electrode Interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Zachary A; DeNardis, Nadica Ivošević; Vernier, P Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Using a combination of molecular dynamics simulations and experiments we examined the interactions of alkanes and phospholipids at charged interfaces in order to understand how interfacial charge densities affect the association of these two representative molecules with electrodes. Consistent with theory and experiment, these model systems reveal interfacial associations mediated through a combination of Coulombic and van der Waals forces. van der Waals forces, in particular, mediate rapid binding of decane to neutral electrodes. No decane binding was observed at high surface charge densities because of interfacial water polarization, which screens hydrophobic attractions. The positively charged choline moiety of the phospholipid palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC) is primarily responsible for POPC attraction by a moderately negatively charged electrode. The hydrocarbon tails of POPC interact with the hydrophobic electrode interface similarly to decane. Previously reported electrochemical results confirm these findings by demonstrating bipolar displacement currents from PC vesicles adhering to moderately negatively charged interfaces, originating from the choline interactions observed in simulations. At more negatively charged interfaces, choline-to-surface binding was stronger. In both simulations and experiments the maximal interaction of anionic PS occurs with a positively charged interface, provided that the electrostatic forces outweigh local Lennard-Jones interactions. Direct comparisons between the binding affinities measured in experiments and those obtained in simulations reveal previously unobserved atomic interactions that facilitate lipid vesicle adhesion to charged interfaces. Moreover, the implementation of a charged interface in molecular dynamics simulations provides an alternative method for the generation of large electric fields across phospholipid bilayers, especially for systems with periodic boundary conditions, and may be useful for

  14. Vesicles and vesicle fusion: coarse-grained simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2010-01-01

    compounds inside vesicles delays their clearance from the blood stream. In this chapter, we survey the biological role and physico-chemical properties of phospholipids, and describe progress in coarse-grained simulations of vesicles and vesicle fusion. Because coarse-grained simulations retain only those...... molecular details that are thought to influence the large-scale processes of interest, they act as a model embodying our current understanding. Comparing the predictions of these models with experiments reveals the importance of the retained microscopic details and also the deficiencies that can suggest...

  15. Rapid anionic micelle-mediated alpha-synuclein fibrillization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necula, Mihaela; Chirita, Carmen N; Kuret, Jeff

    2003-11-21

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the aggregation of alpha-synuclein into filamentous forms within affected neurons of the basal ganglia. Fibrillization of purified recombinant alpha-synuclein is inefficient in vitro but can be enhanced by the addition of various agents including glycosaminoglycans and polycations. Here we report that fatty acids and structurally related anionic detergents greatly accelerate fibrillization of recombinant alpha-synuclein at low micromolar concentrations with lag times as short as 11 min and apparent first order growth rate constants as fast as 10.4 h-1. All detergents and fatty acids were micellar at active concentrations because of an alpha-synuclein-dependent depression of their critical micelle concentrations. Other anionic surfaces, such as those supplied by anionic phospholipid vesicles, also induced alpha-synuclein fibrillization, with resultant filaments originating from their surface. These data suggest that anionic surfaces presented as micelles or vesicles can serve to nucleate alpha-synuclein fibrillization, that this mechanism underlies the inducer activity of anionic surfactants, and that anionic membranes may serve this function in vivo. PMID:14506232

  16. Vesicle Photonics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdekis, Andreas E.; Scott, E. A.; Roke, Sylvie; Hubbell, J. A.; Psaltis, D.

    2013-04-03

    Thin membranes, under appropriate boundary conditions, can self-assemble into vesicles, nanoscale bubbles that encapsulate and hence protect or transport molecular payloads. In this paper, we review the types and applications of light fields interacting with vesicles. By encapsulating light-emitting molecules (e.g. dyes, fluorescent proteins, or quantum dots), vesicles can act as particles and imaging agents. Vesicle imaging can take place also under second harmonic generation from vesicle membrane, as well as employing mass spectrometry. Light fields can also be employed to transport vesicles using optical tweezers (photon momentum) or directly pertrurbe the stability of vesicles and hence trigger the delivery of the encapsulated payload (photon energy).

  17. Phospholipid Binding Protein C Inhibitor (PCI Is Present on Microparticles Generated In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Einfinger

    Full Text Available Protein C inhibitor is a secreted, non-specific serine protease inhibitor with broad protease reactivity. It binds glycosaminoglycans and anionic phospholipids, which can modulate its activity. Anionic phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine are normally localized to the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, but are exposed on activated and apoptotic cells and on plasma membrane-derived microparticles. In this report we show by flow cytometry that microparticles derived from cultured cells and activated platelets incorporated protein C inhibitor during membrane blebbing. Moreover, protein C inhibitor is present in/on microparticles circulating in normal human plasma as judged from Western blots, ELISAs, flow cytometry, and mass spectrometry. These plasma microparticles are mainly derived from megakaryocytes. They seem to be saturated with protein C inhibitor, since they do not bind added fluorescence-labeled protein C inhibitor. Heparin partially removed microparticle-bound protein C inhibitor, supporting our assumption that protein C inhibitor is bound via phospholipids. To assess the biological role of microparticle-bound protein C inhibitor we performed protease inhibition assays and co-precipitated putative binding partners on microparticles with anti-protein C inhibitor IgG. As judged from amidolytic assays microparticle-bound protein C inhibitor did not inhibit activated protein C or thrombin, nor did microparticles modulate the activity of exogenous protein C inhibitor. Among the proteins co-precipitating with protein C inhibitor, complement factors, especially complement factor 3, were most striking. Taken together, our data do not support a major role of microparticle-associated protein C inhibitor in coagulation, but rather suggest an interaction with proteins of the complement system present on these phospholipid vesicles.

  18. Cell mediated calcification and matrix vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication on calcification and the sequence of events directed by the cell to facilitate this process contains the following topics: New Ultrastructural Techniques for Study of Calcification; Mechanisms of Matrix Vesicle Calcification; Role of Mitochondria, Matrix Proteins and Cytokines in Calcification; Role of Phospholipids and Membranes in Calcification; Biogenesis of Matrix Vesicles in Vivo and in Vitro; Calcification and Ossification in Vitro; Calcific Diseases and Abnormal Bone Mineralization. (Auth.)

  19. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H.; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in...

  20. ETHOSOMES AS ELASTIC VESICLES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: AN OVERVIEW

    OpenAIRE

    N. B. Gupta et al.

    2012-01-01

    Ethosomes are as novel vesicles in transdermal drug delivery show significant effects of drug penetration through the biological membrane with slight modification of well established drug carrier liposomes. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles composed mainly of phospholipids, ethanol and water. The size of ethosome vesicles can be modulated from tens of nanometer to microns. The ethosomes can be prepared by Hot as well as Cold method. The evaluation parameters of ethosomes include visualiz...

  1. From Vesicles to Protocells: The Roles of Amphiphilic Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Yuka Sakuma; Masayuki Imai

    2015-01-01

    It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhes...

  2. Activation of calcineurin by phosphotidylserine containing vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Politino, M.; King, M.M.

    1986-05-01

    Calcineurin (CaN) is a Ca/sup 2 +/- and calmodulin-regulated phosphatase. Recent findings suggested an association of CaN with biological membranes and prompted the present investigation into the interactions of the phosphatase with phospholipids in vitro. In the absence of calmodulin, sonicated preparations of phosphatidylserine (PS) provided a five-fold activation of the Ni- and Mn-supported activities of CaN towards (/sup 32/P) histone Hl; activation in the presence of calmodulin was much less pronounced. Half-maximal activation in the absence of calmodulin required approximately 0.1 mg/ml of PS. Activation of CaN was also observed with mixed vesicles of phosphatidylcholine (PC) containing 20% PS but not with PC alone, or with phosphatidylethanolamine (PE). Molecular sieve chromatography on Ultrogel AcA 34 provided further evidence that CaN associates with phospholipid vesicles composed of PS, or PC containing 20% PS, but not with vesicles of PC or PE. Complete association with medium sized vesicles of PS and PC/PS required Ca/sup 2 +/ ions; in the absence of the metal ion at least 60% of the enzyme failed to interact with the lipids while the remainder preferentially migrated with larger vesicles. These results suggest a role for Ca/sup 2 +/ in regulating CaN's interaction with phospholipids.

  3. Connexin channels and phospholipids: association and modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris Andrew L

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For membrane proteins, lipids provide a structural framework and means to modulate function. Paired connexin hemichannels form the intercellular channels that compose gap junction plaques while unpaired hemichannels have regulated functions in non-junctional plasma membrane. The importance of interactions between connexin channels and phospholipids is poorly understood. Results Endogenous phospholipids most tightly associated with purified connexin26 or connexin32 hemichannels or with junctional plaques in cell membranes, those likely to have structural and/or modulatory effects, were identified by tandem electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry using class-specific interpretative methods. Phospholipids were characterized by headgroup class, charge, glycerol-alkyl chain linkage and by acyl chain length and saturation. The results indicate that specific endogenous phospholipids are uniquely associated with either connexin26 or connexin32 channels, and some phospholipids are associated with both. Functional effects of the major phospholipid classes on connexin channel activity were assessed by molecular permeability of hemichannels reconstituted into liposomes. Changes to phospholipid composition(s of the liposome membrane altered the activity of connexin channels in a manner reflecting changes to the surface charge/potential of the membrane and, secondarily, to cholesterol content. Together, the data show that connexin26 and connexin32 channels have a preference for tight association with unique anionic phospholipids, and that these, independent of headgroup, have a positive effect on the activity of both connexin26 and connexin32 channels. Additionally, the data suggest that the likely in vivo phospholipid modulators of connexin channel structure-function that are connexin isoform-specific are found in the cytoplasmic leaflet. A modulatory role for phospholipids that promote negative curvature is also inferred. Conclusion

  4. Phospholipides bio-sourcés riches en acides gras oméga 3 pour la formulation de liposomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bardeau, Tiphaine

    2015-01-01

    Liposomes, phospholipids vesicles, are colloidal systems used in search and different industrial fields (pharmaceutical, cosmetic, nutrition). Nevertheless their development face lack of phospholipid sources (soya and egg yolk). At the same time, industrial methods to extract phospholipids use organic solvents. In this context, the phospholipid extraction were studied using a green technology from new different sources in order to formulate liposomes. Oil mill and fishery by-products (seed ca...

  5. From vesicles to protocells: the roles of amphiphilic molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yuka; Imai, Masayuki

    2015-01-01

    It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures) and the phase separation. This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life. PMID:25738256

  6. From Vesicles to Protocells: The Roles of Amphiphilic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Sakuma

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available It is very challenging to construct protocells from molecular assemblies. An important step in this challenge is the achievement of vesicle dynamics that are relevant to cellular functions, such as membrane trafficking and self-reproduction, using amphiphilic molecules. Soft matter physics will play an important role in the development of vesicles that have these functions. Here, we show that simple binary phospholipid vesicles have the potential to reproduce the relevant functions of adhesion, pore formation and self-reproduction of vesicles, by coupling the lipid geometries (spontaneous curvatures and the phase separation. This achievement will elucidate the pathway from molecular assembly to cellular life.

  7. Phospholipid bilayer formation at a bare Si surface: a time-resolved neutron reflectivity study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gutberlet, T.; Steitz, R.; Fragneto, G.; Klösgen-Buchkremer, Beate Maria

    2004-01-01

    Neutron reflectivity was applied to monitor in situ the adsorption of small unilamellar phospholipid vesicles on a solid bare hydrophilic Si interface. The obtained reflectivity curves are consistent with the rupture and fusion model for the adsorption of phosphatidylcholine vesicles to solid...... as adsorption and penetration of peptides and proteins towards the supported bilayer at high resolution....

  8. Salt-free vesicle-phases and their template effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Researches on the construction, structure, and formation of vesicles formed from surfactants have attracted great attention from colloid and interface chemists. The vesicles formed from salt-free cationic-anionic surfactant systems are very different from those with excess salts, having many particular properties. In this paper, we introduce the properties of vesicles prepared from salt-free surfactant systems, according to our own results, especially the vesicles formed from surfactants with divalent metal ions as counterions in aqueous solutions and room temperature ionic liquids. Moreover, the primary results on template effect of the metal-ligand vesicles have also been summarized.

  9. Vesicle-Surfactant Interactions : Effects of Added Surfactants on the Gel to Liquid-crystal Transition for Two Vesicular Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blandamer, Michael J.; Briggs, Barbara; Cullis, Paul M.; Engberts, Jan B.F.N.; Kacperska, Anna

    1995-01-01

    Interactions of both cationic and anionic surfactants with vesicles formed by dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DOAB) and by sodium didodecylphosphate (DDP) have been probed using differential scanning microcalorimetry. The scans show that the surfactants are incorporated into the vesicle bilayer

  10. Toxicity of oxidized phospholipids in cultured macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stemmer Ute

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interactions of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL and macrophages are hallmarks in the development of atherosclerosis. The biological activities of the modified particle in these cells are due to the content of lipid oxidation products and apolipoprotein modification by oxidized phospholipids. Results It was the aim of this study to determine the role of short-chain oxidized phospholipids as components of modified LDL in cultured macrophages. For this purpose we investigated the effects of the following oxidized phospholipids on cell viability and apoptosis: 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PGPC, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC and oxidized alkylacyl phospholipids including 1-O-hexadecyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (E-PGPC and 1-O-hexadecyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (E-POVPC. We found that these compounds induced apoptosis in RAW264.7 and bone marrow-derived macrophages. The sn-2 carboxyacyl lipid PGPC was more toxic than POVPC which carries a reactive aldehyde function in position sn-2 of glycerol. The alkylacyl phospholipids (E-PGPC and E-POVPC and the respective diacyl analogs show similar activities. Apoptosis induced by POVPC and its alkylether derivative could be causally linked to the fast activation of an acid sphingomyelinase, generating the apoptotic second messenger ceramide. In contrast, PGPC and its ether analog only negligibly affected this enzyme pointing to an entirely different mechanism of lipid toxicity. The higher toxicity of PGPC is underscored by more efficient membrane blebbing from apoptotic cells. In addition, the protein pattern of PGPC-induced microparticles is different from the vesicles generated by POPVC. Conclusions In summary, our data reveal that oxidized phospholipids induce apoptosis in cultured macrophages. The mechanism of lipid toxicity, however, largely depends on the structural features of the

  11. ELECTRICALLY ADDRESSABLE VESICLES – TOOLS FOR DIELECTROPHORESIS METROLOGY

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Salil P.; Vahey, Michael D.; Voldman, Joel

    2009-01-01

    Dielectrophoresis (DEP) has emerged as an important tool for the manipulation of bioparticles ranging from the submicron to the tens of microns in size. Here we show the use of phospholipid vesicle electroformation techniques to develop a new class of test particles with specifically engineered electrical propserties to enable identifiable dielectrophoretic responses in microfabricated systems. These electrically addressable vesicles (EAVs) enable the creation of electrically distinct populat...

  12. Binding and inhibition studies on lipocortins using phosphatidylcholine vesicles and phospholipase A2 from snake venom, pancreas, and a macrophage-like cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, F F; Lister, M D; Dennis, E A

    1990-04-01

    Studies are reported on the inhibition of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) from porcine pancreas, cobra (Naja naja) venom, and the P388D1 macrophage-like cell line by human recombinant lipocortin I and bovine lung calpactin I. Membrane vesicles prepared from 1-stearoyl,2-arachidonoyl phosphatidylcholine (PC) and other PCs were utilized as substrate. Binding studies using sucrose flotation gradients showed that both lipocortin I and calpactin I bind to these vesicles although less tightly than to vesicles prepared from anionic phospholipids or fatty acids. Binding to PC was somewhat enhanced by Ca2+. Inhibition of cobra venom PLA2 was not observed when PC vesicles were used as substrate but was when dipalmitoyl phosphatidylethanolamine was used. Both the pancreatic and macrophage enzymes were inhibited when acting on PC. Interestingly, the inhibition of the macrophage enzyme toward PC depended on the fatty acid attached to the sn-2 position of PC with arachidonate greater than oleate greater than palmitate. Inhibition was also highest at low [PC]; these inhibition results can be explained by the "substrate depletion model" (Davidson, F. F., Dennis, E. A., Powell, M., and Glenney, J. (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 1698-1705). Experimental and theoretical considerations suggest that the in vitro inhibition by lipocortins of this macrophage PLA2 from a cell that makes lipocortin and is active in prostaglandin production is due to effects on substrate availability rather than direct inhibition. PMID:2138608

  13. Proton NMR study of the interactions of catecholamines with phospholipids from chicken erythrocyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varoucha, D.

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectroscopy has been applied to the study of the interaction of catecholamines, norepinephrine, epinephrine, isoproterenol and their antagonists propranolol and alprenolol with sonicated phospholipids extracted from chicken erythrocyte membranes (CEM). The catecholamine molecules are immobilized by the phospholipids of CEM and the magnitude of the effect seems to depend on the alkyl substitution of their amino group. Upon introduction of alprenolol and propranolol into phospholipid vesicles a broadening of the resonances of the n-methyl alkyl chain and the terminal methyl protons was observed. The results present evidence about the specificity of the interactions of catecholamines with phospholipids from CEM.

  14. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christine; Lippert, Anna H; Bonakdar, Navid; Sandoghdar, Vahid; Voll, Lars M

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, such as permeability, stability, or chemical reactivity. In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multicompartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nanoscale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nanoreactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore, we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins. PMID:26973834

  15. Compartmentalization and Transport in Synthetic Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine eSchmitt

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Nano-scale vesicles have become a popular tool in life sciences. Besides liposomes that are generated from phospholipids of natural origin, polymersomes fabricated of synthetic block copolymers enjoy increasing popularity, as they represent more versatile membrane building blocks that can be selected based on their specific physicochemical properties, like permeability, stability or chemical reactivity.In this review, we focus on the application of simple and nested artificial vesicles in synthetic biology. First, we provide an introduction into the utilization of multi-compartmented vesosomes as compartmentalized nano-scale bioreactors. In the bottom-up development of protocells from vesicular nano-reactors, the specific exchange of pathway intermediates across compartment boundaries represents a bottleneck for future studies. To date, most compartmented bioreactors rely on unspecific exchange of substrates and products. This is either based on changes in permeability of the coblock polymer shell by physicochemical triggers or by the incorporation of unspecific porin proteins into the vesicle membrane. Since the incorporation of membrane transport proteins into simple and nested artificial vesicles offers the potential for specific exchange of substances between subcompartments, it opens new vistas in the design of protocells. Therefore we devote the main part of the review to summarize the technical advances in the use of phospholipids and block copolymers for the reconstitution of membrane proteins.

  16. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Development of Extracellular Vesicle-Based Therapeutic Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-ichiro Ohno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Many types of cells release phospholipid membrane vesicles thought to play key roles in cell-cell communication, antigen presentation, and the spread of infectious agents. Extracellular vesicles (EVs carry various proteins, messenger RNAs (mRNAs, and microRNAs (miRNAs, like a “message in a bottle” to cells in remote locations. The encapsulated molecules are protected from multiple types of degradative enzymes in body fluids, making EVs ideal for delivering drugs. This review presents an overview of the potential roles of EVs as natural drugs and novel drug-delivery systems.

  17. [Milk phospholipids as nutraceutic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambroziak, Adam; Cichosz, Grazyna

    2013-01-01

    Almost the all milk fat is closed inside fat globules possessing envelope of phospholipids, glycosphingolipids, cholesterols and proteins. Phospholipids of milk are composed of phosphatidylcholine (lecithin), phosphatidylethanolamine (kefalin), sphingomyelin, also phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine and lizophosphatidylcholine (lizolecithin) and make 30% of the milk fat globule membrane. Phospholipids possess pro-health properties. They act neuroprotectively, regulate brain activity, improve memory and resistance to stress, reduce depression risk, Alzheimer and Parkinson diseases. Due to participation in molecular transport, they influence cell growth and development, speed up organism regeneration after great physical effort. The phospholipids limit cholesterol absorption from gastrointestinal tract, are effective in liver therapy (steatosis, alcohol intoxication). Moreover, they are inhibitors of proinflammation factors, pathogens of alimentary canal and cancers (e.g. of colon and adenoma). Alkiloglycerphospholipids - unique component of milk fat - stimulate immune system and protect tissues against toxic action of hydroxyl radicals that is generated during radiotherapy. PMID:23488289

  18. ETHOSOMES AS ELASTIC VESICLES IN TRANSDERMAL DRUG DELIVERY: AN OVERVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. B. Gupta et al.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Ethosomes are as novel vesicles in transdermal drug delivery show significant effects of drug penetration through the biological membrane with slight modification of well established drug carrier liposomes. Ethosomes are soft, malleable vesicles composed mainly of phospholipids, ethanol and water. The size of ethosome vesicles can be modulated from tens of nanometer to microns. The ethosomes can be prepared by Hot as well as Cold method. The evaluation parameters of ethosomes include visualization, vesicle size and zeta potential, transition temperature, surface tension activity measurement, vesicle stability, drug content, penetration and permeation studies. Ethosomes have been found to be much more efficient at delivering drug to the skin than either liposomes or hydroalcoholic solution. Thus, it can be a logical conclusion that ethosomal formulation possesses promising future in effective dermal/transdermal delivery of bioactive agents.

  19. Interaction of insulin with SDS/CTAB catanionic Vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, a novel method was used for entrapping the protein, insulin into the catanionic SDS/CTAB vesicle membrane. The anionic SDS and cationic CTAB formed catanionic vesicles at particular concentration (35:65 by volume). In this study, vesicle membrane can be considered as model membrane. The vesicle formation and entrapment efficiency depend on the pH of the aqueous solution. The insulin molecules have attached with the vesicular membrane at pH 7.0. However, at acidic pH, the vesicles were ruptured and the insulin did not entrap into the vesicle membrane, whereas at alkaline pH insulin became fibriller. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), Dynamic light scattering (DLS), and Zeta potential studies established the self-assembled structure formation of insulin and catanionic vesicles. To know the protein confirmations, Circular dichroism (CD) was also employed. The temperature dependent steady state and time resolved emission spectroscopy show that at room temperature (25 °C), apart from the 305 nm tyrosine fluorescence, a new emission peak at 450 nm was observed only in case of insulin-vesicle system, and was assigned as the tyrosine phosphorescence. This phosphorescence peak is the signature of the entrapment of insulin into the vesicle membrane. Highlights: • SDS-CTAB based catanionic vesicle has been fabricated. • Insulin has been successfully immobilized on these vesicles. • Immobilized insulin shows room temperature phosphorescence

  20. Aminosilane/oleic acid vesicles as model membranes of protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douliez, Jean-Paul; Zhendre, Vanessa; Grélard, Axelle; Dufourc, Erick J

    2014-12-16

    Oleic acid vesicles represent good models of membrane protocells that could have existed in prebiotic times. Here, we report the formation, growth polymorphism, and dynamics of oleic acid spherical vesicles (1-10 μm), stable elongated vesicles (>50 μm length; 1-3 μm diameter), and chains of vesicles (pearl necklaces, >50 μm length; 1-3 μm diameter) in the presence of aminopropyl triethoxysilane and guanidine hydrochloride. These vesicles exhibit a remarkable behavior with temperature: spherical vesicles only are observed when keeping the sample at 4 °C for 2 h, and self-aggregated spherical vesicles occur upon freezing/unfreezing (-20/20 °C) samples. Rather homogeneous elongated vesicles are reformed upon heating samples at 80 °C. The phenomenon is reversible through cycles of freezing/heating or cooling/heating of the same sample. Deuterium NMR evidences a chain packing rigidity similar to that of phospholipid bilayers in cellular biomembranes. We expect these bilayered vesicles to be surrounded by a layer of aminosilane oligomers, offering a variant model for membrane protocells. PMID:25420203

  1. A possible route to prebiotic vesicle reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisi, Pier Luigi; Rasi, Pasquale Stano Silvia; Mavelli, Fabio

    2004-01-01

    Spherical bounded structures such as those formed by surfactant aggregates (mostly micelles and vesicles), with an inside that is chemically and physically different from the outside medium, can be seen as primitive cell models. As such, they are fundamental structures for the theory of autopoiesis as originally formulated by Varela and Maturana. In particular, since self-reproduction is a very important feature of minimal cellular life, the study of self-reproduction of micelles and vesicles represents a quite challenging bio-mimetic approach. Our laboratory has put much effort in recent years into implementing self-reproduction of vesicles as models for self-reproduction of cellular bounded structures, and this article is a further contribution in this direction. In particular, we deal with the so-called matrix effect of vesicles, related to the fact that when fresh surfactant is added to an aqueous solution containing preformed vesicles of a very narrow size distribution, the newly formed vesicles (instead of being polydisperse, as is usually the case) have dimensions very close to those of the preformed ones. In practice, this corresponds to a mechanism of reproduction of vesicles of the same size. In this article, the matrix effect is re-elaborated in the perspective of the origin of life, and in particular in terms of the prebiotic mechanisms that might permit the growth and reproduction of vesicles. The data are analyzed by dynamic light scattering with a new program that permits the calculation of the number-weighted size distribution. It is shown that, on adding a stoichiometric amount of oleate micelles to preformed oleate vesicles extruded at 50 and 100 nm, the final distribution contains about twice the initial number of particles, centered around 50 and 100 nm. The same holds when oleate is added to preformed phospholipid liposomes. By contrast, when the same amount of oleate is added to an aqueous solution (as a control experiment), a very broad

  2. Incorporation of peptides in phospholipid aggregates using ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Raquel; Little, Collin; Ferreira, Helena; Paulo, Artur Cavaco

    2008-01-01

    This study presents the highlights of ultrasonic effects on peptides incorporated on phospholipid aggregates (liposomes). These liposomes or vesicles are known as transport agents in skin drug delivery and for hair treatment. They might be a good model to deliver larger peptides into hair to restore fibre strength after hair coloration, modelling, permanent wave and/or straightening. The preparation of liposomes 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) with peptides (LLLLK LLLLK LL...

  3. A unique antioxidant activity of phosphatidylserine on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacaranhe, C D; Terao, J

    2001-10-01

    The relationship between the antioxidant effect of acidic phospholipids, phosphatidic acid (PA), phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and phosphatidylserine (PS), on iron-induced lipid peroxidation of phospholipid bilayers and their abilities to bind iron ion was examined in egg yolk phosphatidylcholine large unilamellar vesicles (EYPC LUV). The effect of each acidic phospholipid added to the vesicles at 10 mol% was assessed by measuring phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PC-OOH) and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. The addition of dipalmitoyl PS (DPPS) showed a significant inhibitory effect, although the other two acidic phospholipids, dipalmitoyl PA (DPPA) and dipalmitoyl PG (DPPG), did not exert the inhibition. Neither dipalmitoyl PC (DPPC) nor dipalmitoyl phophatidylethanolamine (DPPE) showed any remarkable inhibition on this system. None of the tested phospholipids affected the lipid peroxidation rate remarkably when the vesicles were exposed to a water-soluble radical generator. The iron-binding ability of each phospholipid was estimated on the basis of the amounts of iron recovered in the chloroform/methanol phase after separation of the vesicle solution to water/methanol and chloroform/methanol phases. EYPC LUV containing DPPS, DPPA, and DPPG had higher amounts of bound iron than those containing DPPC and DPPE, indicating that these three acidic phospholipids possess an iron-binding ability at a similar level. Nevertheless, only DPPS suppressed iron-dependent decomposition of PC-OOH significantly. Therefore, it is likely that these three acidic phospholipids possess a significant iron-binding ability, although this ability per se does not warrant them antioxidative activities. The ability to suppress the iron-dependent decomposition of PC-OOH may explain the unique antioxidant activity of PS. PMID:11768154

  4. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K

    2013-03-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is composed of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant components, disaturated phosphatidylcholine that confers surface-tension lowering activities, and phosphatidylglycerol, recently implicated in innate immune defense. Future studies providing a better understanding of the molecular control and physiological relevance of minor surfactant lipid components are needed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Phospholipids and Phospholipid Metabolism. PMID:23026158

  5. Engineered Asymmetric Synthetic Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Chiarot, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Synthetic vesicles are small, fluid-filled spheres that are enclosed by a bilayer of lipid molecules. They can be used as models for investigating membrane biology and as delivery vehicles for pharmaceuticals. In practice, it is difficult to simultaneously control membrane asymmetry, unilamellarity, vesicle size, vesicle-to-vesicle uniformity, and luminal content. Membrane asymmetry, where each leaflet of the bilayer is composed of different lipids, is of particular importance as it is a feature of most natural membranes. In this study, we leverage microfluidic technology to build asymmetric vesicles at high-throughput. We use the precise flow control offered by microfluidic devices to make highly uniform emulsions, with controlled internal content, that serve as templates to build the synthetic vesicles. Flow focusing, dielectrophoretic steering, and interfacial lipid self-assembly are critical procedures performed on-chip to produce the vesicles. Fluorescent and confocal microscopy are used to evaluate the vesicle characteristics.

  6. POLYELEOSTEARIC ACID VESICLES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zichen; XIE Ximng; FAN Qinghua; FANG Yifei

    1992-01-01

    α-Eleostearic acid and β-eleostearic acid formed vesicles in aqueous medium when an ethanol solutionofeleostearic acid was injected rapidly into a vigorously vortexed aqueous phase. Formation of the vesicles was demonstrated by electron microscopic observation and bromothymol blue encapsulation experiments. Polymerizations of the eleostearic acids in the formed vesicles carried out by UV irradiation produced poly-α-eleostearic acid and poly-β-eleostearic acid vesicles.

  7. Polydiacetylene vesicles as a novel drug sustained-release system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Caixin; Liu, Shaoqin; Dai, Zhifei; Jiang, Chang; Li, Wenyuan

    2010-03-01

    Aiming at the enhancement of the physicochemical stability as well as the sustained-release property of conventional liposomes, a novel polymerized vesicular carrier, 10,12-pentacosadiynoic acid (PCDA) vesicles, loaded with paclitaxel as a model hydrophobic drug has been successfully constituted by incorporation of a polymerizable diacetylene into the lipid bilayer vesicles. The polymerized vesicles have been characterized in terms of particle size distribution and zeta-potential. Altering their lipid composition causes the zeta-potential to change from -3+/-1mV to more than -25mV, with a concomitant change in particle size distribution from 29+/-4nm to 149+/-18nm. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed that the stability of polymerized vesicles against Triton X-100 was improved greatly compared with the conventional liposomes. In vitro drug release studies show that PCDA-incorporating vesicles reduce the paclitaxel release over the conventional phospholipids vesicles. 69+/-6% paclitaxel is released within 24h from the conventional vesicles, but the insertion of 50% and 75% molar ratio of PCDA changes the amount to 57+/-1% and 32+/-4%, respectively. Our results demonstrate that such novel polymerized vesicles have very good prospect as an anticancer drug carrier. PMID:19896808

  8. Structure and organization of phospholipid/polysaccharide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years nanoparticles and microparticles composed of polymeric or lipid material have been proposed as drug carriers for improving the efficacy of encapsulated drugs. For the production of these systems different materials have been proposed, among them phospholipids and polysaccharides due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, low cost and safety. We report here a morphological and structural investigation, performed using cryo-TEM, static light scattering and small angle neutron and x-ray scattering, on phospholipid/saccharide nanoparticles loaded with a lipophilic positively charged drug (tamoxifen citrate) used in breast cancer therapy. The lipid component was soybean lecithin; the saccharide one was chitosan that usually acts as an outer coating increasing vesicle stability. The microscopy and scattering data indicate the presence of two distinct nanoparticle families: uni-lamellar vesicles with average radius 90 A and multi-lamellar vesicles with average radius 440 A. In both families the inner core is occupied by the solvent. The presence of tamoxifen gives rise to a multi-lamellar structure of the lipid outer shell. It also induces a positive surface charge into the vesicles, repelling the positively charged chitosan molecules which therefore do not take part in nanoparticle formation

  9. A microscopic model for mixed surfactant vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    D Duque; Tarazona, P.; Chacon, E.

    1998-01-01

    A microscopic model which has proven useful in describing amphiphilic aggregates as inhomogeneities of a fluid is extended here to study the case of a two component surfactant mixture. We have chosen an effective interaction between the amphiphiles that mimics the mixture of cationic--anionic surfactants. In agreement with experiments, and other theoretical approaches, we find regions where spherical vesicles are stable, with a well defined radius. The experimental dependence of the radius on...

  10. Characterization of phospholipid composition and its control in the plasma membrane of developing soybean root

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The phospholipid composition of plasma membrane enriched fractions from developing soybean root and several mechanisms which may regulate it have been examined. Plasma membrane vesicles were isolated from meristematic and mature sections of four-day-old dark grown soybean roots (Glycine max [L.] Merr. Cult. Wells II). Analysis of lipid extracts revealed two major phospholipid classes: phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Minor phospholipid classes were phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylgylcerol and diphosphatidylgylcerol. Phospholipid composition was similar at each developmental stage. Fatty acids of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were 16:0, 18:0, 18:2, and 18:3. Fatty acid composition varied with both phospholipid class and the developmental stage of the root. The degradation of phosphatidylcholine by endogenous phospholipase D during membrane isolation indicated that this enzyme might be involved in phospholipid turnover within the membrane. Phospholipase D activity was heat labile and increasing the pH of the enzyme assay from 5.3 to 7.8 resulted in 90% inhibition of activity. The turnover of fatty acids within the phospholipids of the plasma membrane was studied. Mature root sections were incubated with [1-14C] acetate, 1 mM Na acetate and 50 μg/ml chloramphenicol. Membrane lipid extracts analyzed for phospholipid class and acyl chain composition revealed that the long incubation times did not alter the phospholipid composition of the plasma membrane enriched fraction

  11. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaihara, Masanori; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Hirokazu [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Endo, Hitoshi [Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Ishihama, Yasushi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Handa, Tetsurou [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Suzuka University of Medical Science, 3500-3 Minami-Tamagaki-cho, Suzuka, Mie 513-8670 (Japan); Nakano, Minoru, E-mail: mnakano@pha.u-toyama.ac.jp [Graduate School of Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Toyama, 2630 Sugitani, Toyama 930-0194 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity.

  12. Control of phospholipid flip-flop by transmembrane peptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Phospholipid flip-flop in transmembrane peptide-containing vesicles was investigated. ► Peptides that contained polar residues in the center of the transmembrane region promoted phospholipid flip-flop. ► A bioinformatics approach revealed the presence of polar residues in the transmembrane region of ER membrane proteins. ► Polar residues in ER membrane proteins possibly provide flippase-like activity. - Abstract: We designed three types of transmembrane model peptides whose sequence originates from a frequently used model peptide KALP23, and we investigated their effects on phospholipid flip-flop. Time-resolved small-angle neutron scattering and a dithionite fluorescent quenching assay demonstrated that TMP-L, which has a fully hydrophobic transmembrane region, did not enhance phospholipid flip-flop, whereas TMP-K and TMP-E, which have Lys and Glu, respectively, in the center of their transmembrane regions, enhanced phospholipid flip-flop. Introduction of polar residues in the membrane-spanning helices is considered to produce a locally polar region and enable the lipid head group to interact with the polar side-chain inside the bilayers, thereby reducing the activation energy for the flip-flop. A bioinformatics approach revealed that acidic and basic residues account for 4.5% of the central region of the transmembrane domain in human ER membrane proteins. Therefore, polar residues in ER membrane proteins are considered to provide flippase-like activity

  13. DNA-mediated self-assembly of artificial vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although multicompartment systems made of single unilamellar vesicles offer the potential to outperform single compartment systems widely used in analytic, synthetic, and medical applications, their use has remained marginal to date. On the one hand, this can be attributed to the binary character of the majority of the current tethering protocols that impedes the implementation of real multicomponent or multifunctional systems. On the other hand, the few tethering protocols theoretically providing multicompartment systems composed of several distinct vesicle populations suffer from the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as from the loss of specificity of the linking mechanism over time. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In previous studies, we presented implementations of multicompartment systems and resolved the readjustment of the vesicle formation procedure as well as the loss of specificity by using linkers consisting of biotinylated DNA single strands that were anchored to phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers via streptavidin as a connector. The systematic analysis presented herein provides evidences for the incorporation of phospholipid-grafted biotinylated PEG tethers to the vesicle membrane during vesicle formation, providing specific anchoring sites for the streptavidin loading of the vesicle membrane. Furthermore, DNA-mediated vesicle-vesicle self-assembly was found to be sequence-dependent and to depend on the presence of monovalent salts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides a solid basis for the implementation of multi-vesicle assemblies that may affect at least three distinct domains. (i Analysis. Starting with a minimal system, the complexity of a bottom-up system is increased gradually facilitating the understanding of the components and their interaction. (ii Synthesis. Consecutive reactions may be implemented in networks of vesicles that outperform current single compartment

  14. Surfactant phospholipid metabolism

    OpenAIRE

    Agassandian, Marianna; Mallampalli, Rama K.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is essential for life and is comprised of a complex lipoprotein-like mixture that lines the inner surface of the lung to prevent alveolar collapse at the end of expiration. The molecular composition of surfactant depends on highly integrated and regulated processes involving its biosynthesis, remodeling, degradation, and intracellular trafficking. Despite its multicomponent composition, the study of surfactant phospholipid metabolism has focused on two predominant compone...

  15. LCA of Egg Phospholipids

    OpenAIRE

    Berggren, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Egg phospholipids are a group of fats or lipids in the egg yolk, commonly used as emulsifiers in the chemical industry to facilitate the dissolving of substances. The pharmaceutical company Fresenius-Kabi manufactures this product and seeks a better understanding of the product’s major environmental impacts in order to comply with the ISO 14001 requirements, communicate its environmental performance and choose raw materials that result in lower environmental impacts. The aim of this study is ...

  16. Anionic Lipids Enriched at the ExPortal of Streptococcus pyogenes▿

    OpenAIRE

    Rosch, Jason W.; Hsu, Fong Fu; Caparon, Michael G.

    2006-01-01

    The ExPortal of Streptococcus pyogenes is a membrane microdomain dedicated to the secretion and folding of proteins. We investigated the lipid composition of the ExPortal by examining the distribution of anionic membrane phospholipids. Staining with 10-N-nonyl-acridine orange revealed a single microdomain enriched with an anionic phospholipid whose staining characteristics and behavior in a cardiolipin-deficient mutant were characteristic of phosphatidylglycerol. Furthermore, the location of ...

  17. Influence of molecular packing and phospholipid type on rates of cholesterol exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rates of [14C]cholesterol transfer from small unilamellar vesicles containing cholesterol dissolved in bilayers of different phospholipids have been determined to examine the influence of phospholipid-cholesterol interactions on the rate of cholesterol desorption from the lipid-water interface. At 370C, for vesicles containing 10 mol % cholesterol, the half-times for exchange are about 1, 13, and 80 h, respectively, for unsaturated PC, saturated PC, and SM. In order to probe how differences in molecular packing in the bilayers cause the rate constants for cholesterol desorption to be in the order unsaturated PC > saturated PC > SM, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and monolayer methods were used to evaluate the cholesterol physical state and interactions with phospholipid. The NMR relaxation parameters for [4-13C] cholesterol reveal no differences in molecular dynamics in the above bilayers. The greater van der Waals interaction in the SM monolayer (or bilayer) compared to PC gives rise to a larger condensation by cholesterol. This is a direct demonstration of the greater interaction of cholesterol with SM compared to PC. An estimate of the van der Waals interactions between cholesterol and these phospholipids has been used to derive a relationship between the ratio of the rate constants for cholesterol desorption and the relative molecular areas (lateral packing density) in two bilayers. This analysis suggests that differences in cholesterol-phospholipid van der Waals interaction energy are an important cause of varying rates of cholesterol exchange from different host phospholipid bilayers

  18. NMR studies of 5-hydroxytryptamine transport through large unilamellar vesicle membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Viscio, D B; Prestegard, J H

    1981-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance techniques developed to study membrane permeability in closed membrane systems have been used to investigate transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine across the phospholipid membranes of large unilamellar vesicles. The vesicles, modeling the 5-hydroxytryptamine storage organelles of blood platelets, contained a high internal level of ATP buffered at a pH low relative to the external solution. The resultant pH gradient drove accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine to a level con...

  19. Intracellular vesicles as reproduction elements in cell wall-deficient L-form bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Briers, Yves; Staubli, Titu; Schmid, Markus C; Wagner, Michael; Schuppler, Markus; Loessner, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Cell wall-deficient bacteria, or L-forms, represent an extreme example of bacterial plasticity. Stable L-forms can multiply and propagate indefinitely in the absence of a cell wall. Data presented here are consistent with the model that intracellular vesicles in Listeria monocytogenes L-form cells represent the actual viable reproductive elements. First, small intracellular vesicles are formed along the mother cell cytoplasmic membrane, originating from local phospholipid accumulation. During...

  20. Extracellular Vesicle (EV) Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Malene; Bæk, Rikke; Pedersen, Shona;

    2013-01-01

    Exosomes are one of the several types of cell-derived vesicles with a diameter of 30-100 nm. These extracellular vesicles are recognized as potential markers of human diseases such as cancer. However, their use in diagnostic tests requires an objective and high-throughput method to define...

  1. Fusion of Nonionic Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bulut, Sanja; Oskolkova, M. Z.; Schweins, R.;

    2010-01-01

    We present an experimental study of vesicle fusion using light and neutron scattering to monitor fusion events. Vesicles are reproducibly formed with an extrusion procedure using an single amphiphile triethylene glycol mono-n-decyl ether in water. They show long-term stability for temperatures...... around 20 C, but at temperatures above 26 C we observe an increase in the scattered intensity due to fusion. The system is unusually well suited for the study of basic mechanisms of vesicle fusion. The vesicles are flexible with a bending rigidity of only a few k(H)T. The monolayer spontaneous curvature......, Ho, depends strongly on temperature in a known way and is thus tunable. For temperatures where H-0 > 0 vesicles tyre long-term stable, while in the range H-0 fusion rate increases the more negative the Spontaneous curvature Through a quantitative;analysis of the fusion rate we arrive tit...

  2. Tetracycline diffusion through phospholipid bilayers and binding to phospholipids.

    OpenAIRE

    Argast, M; Beck, C.F.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of tetracycline to pass through phospholipid bilayers by diffusion was investigated. Liposomes did not retain enclosed tetracycline. Accumulation of tetracycline was observed with liposomes containing entrapped Tet repressor protein. These results indicate that the drug can pass through lipid bilayers. The antibiotic was also shown to bind to liposomes and isolated phospholipids.

  3. Inhibition of skin inflammation by baicalin ultradeformable vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir-Palomo, Silvia; Nácher, Amparo; Díez-Sales, Octavio; Ofelia Vila Busó, M A; Caddeo, Carla; Manca, Maria Letizia; Manconi, Maria; Fadda, Anna Maria; Saurí, Amparo Ruiz

    2016-09-10

    The topical efficacy of baicalin, a natural flavonoid isolated from Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, which has several beneficial properties, such as antioxidative, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative, is hindered by its poor aqueous solubility and low skin permeability. Therefore, its incorporation into appropriate phospholipid vesicles could be a useful tool to improve its local activity. To this purpose, baicalin at increasing concentrations up to saturation, was incorporated in ultradeformable vesicles, which were small in size (∼67nm), monodispersed (PIhuman epidermis was concentration dependent. The in vivo results showed the significant anti-inflammatory activity of baicalin loaded nanovesicles irrespective of the concentration used, as they were able to reduce the skin damage induced by the phorbol ester (TPA) application, even in comparison with dexamethasone, a synthetic drug with anti-inflammatory properties. Overall results indicate that ultradeformable vesicles are promising nanosystems for the improvement of cutaneous delivery of baicalin in the treatment of skin inflammation. PMID:27374324

  4. Elastic vesicles as topical/transdermal drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, M J; Maibach, H I

    2005-08-01

    Skin acts a major target as well as a principle barrier for topical/transdermal drug delivery. Despite the many advantages of this system, the major obstacle is the low diffusion rate of drugs across the stratum corneum. Several methods have been assessed to increase the permeation rate of drugs temporarily. One simple and convenient approach is application of drugs in formulation with elastic vesicles or skin enhancers. Elastic vesicles are classified with phospholipid (Transfersomes((R)) and ethosomes) and detergent-based types. Elastic vesicles were more efficient at delivering a low and high molecular weight drug to the skin in terms of quantity and depth. Their effectiveness strongly depends on their physicochemical properties: composition, duration and application volume, and entrapment efficiency and application methods. This review focuses on the effect of elastic liposomes for enhancing the drug penetration and defines the action mechanism of penetration into deeper skin. PMID:18492190

  5. Preparation of large monodisperse vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting F Zhu

    Full Text Available Preparation of monodisperse vesicles is important both for research purposes and for practical applications. While the extrusion of vesicles through small pores (approximately 100 nm in diameter results in relatively uniform populations of vesicles, extrusion to larger sizes results in very heterogeneous populations of vesicles. Here we report a simple method for preparing large monodisperse multilamellar vesicles through a combination of extrusion and large-pore dialysis. For example, extrusion of polydisperse vesicles through 5-microm-diameter pores eliminates vesicles larger than 5 microm in diameter. Dialysis of extruded vesicles against 3-microm-pore-size polycarbonate membranes eliminates vesicles smaller than 3 microm in diameter, leaving behind a population of monodisperse vesicles with a mean diameter of approximately 4 microm. The simplicity of this method makes it an effective tool for laboratory vesicle preparation with potential applications in preparing large monodisperse liposomes for drug delivery.

  6. Outer membrane vesicles of Lysobacter sp. XL1: biogenesis, functions, and applied prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryakova, Irina V; Shishkova, Nina A; Vasilyeva, Natalia V

    2016-06-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by Gram-negative bacteria have been intensively investigated in recent times. Vesicle formation models have been proposed, some factors affecting the process were established, and important roles vesicles play in vital activities of their producing cells were determined. Studies of pathogenic bacterial vesicles contribute to understanding the causes of acute infection and developing drugs on their basis. Despite intensive research, issues associated with the understanding of vesicle biogenesis, the mechanisms of bacterium-bacterium and pathogen-host interactions with participation of vesicles, still remain unresolved. This review discusses some results obtained in the research into OMVs of Lysobacter sp. XL1 VKM B-1576. This bacterium secretes into the environment a spectrum of bacteriolytic enzymes that hydrolyze peptidoglycan of competing bacteria, thus leading to their lysis. One of these enzymes, lytic endopeptidase L5, has been shown not only to be secreted by means of vesicles but also to be involved in their formation. As part of vesicles, the antimicrobial potential of L5 enzyme has been found to be considerably expanded. Vesicles have been shown to have a therapeutic effect in respect of anthrax infection and staphylococcal sepsis modelled in mice. The scientific basis for constructing liposomal antimicrobial preparations from vesicle phospholipids and recombinant bacteriolytic enzyme L5 has been formed. PMID:27098257

  7. The effects of chondroitin sulfate and serum albumin on the fibrillation of human islet amyloid polypeptide at phospholipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Wang, Li; Lu, Tong; Wei, Ying; Li, Fei

    2016-04-28

    Glycosaminoglycans and serum albumin are important cellular components that regulate the fibril formation of proteins. Whereas the effects of cellular components on the fibrillation of amyloid proteins in bulk solution are widely studied, less attention has been paid to the effects of cellular components on amyloidogenesis occurring at cellular membranes. In this study, we focus on the impacts of chondroitin sulfate A (CSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) on the amyloidogenic behaviors of human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP) at phospholipid membranes consisting of neutral POPC and anionic POPG. Using the thioflavin T fluorescence assay, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism and nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, we demonstrate that CSA has an intensive promotion effect on the fibrillation of hIAPP at the POPC membrane, which is larger than the total effect of CSA alone and POPC alone. The further enhanced promotion of the fibrillation of hIAPP by CSA at the neutral membrane is associated with a specific interaction of CSA with POPC. In contrast, the activity of BSA as an inhibitor of hIAPP fibrillation observed in bulk solution decreases dramatically in the presence of POPG vesicles. The dramatic loss of the inhibition efficiency of BSA arises essentially from a specific interaction with the POPG component, but not simply from suppression by an opposite effect of the anionic membrane. The findings in this study suggest that the interactions between membranes and cellular components may have a significant effect on the activity of the cellular components in regulating the fibrillation of hIAPP. PMID:27067251

  8. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-01-01

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  9. Mechanism of cellular phospholipid efflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozar, R A; McKeone, B J; Pownall, H J

    1993-11-01

    Plasma phospholipid binding to cell-derived cholesterol is important in reverse cholesterol transport, a key step in the regression of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism by which phospholipids are transferred from cells to plasma remains unclear. [3H]Choline-labeled phospholipid efflux from fibroblasts has been studied using plasma and its components as acceptors. The kinetics were resolved into a fast component (k1 = 0.119 +/- 0.23 min-1) that corresponded to high-affinity binding of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) to the cell surface and a slow component (k2 = 0.0047 +/- 0.0009 min-1) due to protein-mediated desorption (n = 3). Altering the donor charge with heparinase or the acceptor charge by acetylation abolished the fast component, while the slow phase was unchanged. Only HDL displayed biexponential kinetics, comparable to whole plasma. Half-lives for low-density lipoprotein and very-low-density lipoprotein were t1/2 = 278 +/- 22 min and t1/2 = 1003 +/- 147 min, respectively. In the absence of transfer factor, HDL alone significantly reduced phospholipid efflux (t1/2 = 663 min). Phospholipid transfer protein restored biexponential kinetics. We conclude that cell membranes are a potentially important source of plasma phospholipids and that protein-mediated transfer to HDL is the major route for cell-to-plasma transfer. This step represents a locus for anti-atherosclerotic intervention. PMID:8231174

  10. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-01-01

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA[sup [minus

  11. Phospholipid transfer activities in toad oocytes and developing embryos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of lipid transfer proteins during plasma membrane biogenesis was explored. Developing amphibia embryos were used because during their growth an active plasma membrane biosynthesis occurs together with negligible mitochondrial and endoplasmic reticulum proliferation. Sonicated vesicles, containing 14C-labeled phospholipids and 3H-labeled triolein, as donor particles and cross-linked erythrocyte ghosts as acceptor particles were used to measure phospholipid transfer activities in unfertilized oocytes and in developing embryos of the toad Bufo arenarum. Phosphatidylcholine transfer activity in pH 5.1 supernatant of unfertilized oocytes was 8-fold higher than the activity found in female toad liver supernatant, but dropped steadily after fertilization. After 20 hr of development, at the stage of late blastula, the phosphatidylcholine transfer activity had dropped 4-fold. Unfertilized oocyte supernatant exhibited phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine transfer activity also, but at the late blastula stage the former had dropped 18-fold and the latter was no longer detectable under our assay conditions. Our results show that fertilization does not trigger a phospholipid transport process catalyzed by lipid transfer proteins. Moreover, they imply that 75% of the phosphatidylcholine transfer activity and more than 95% of the phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylethanolamine transfer activities present in pH 5.1 supernatants of unfertilized oocytes may not be essential for toad embryo development. Our findings do not rule out, however, that a phosphatidylcholine-specific lipid transfer protein could be required for embryo early growth

  12. Open Syntaxin Docks Synaptic Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Marc Hammarlund; Mark T Palfreyman; Shigeki Watanabe; Shawn Olsen; Erik M. Jorgensen

    2007-01-01

    Author Summary Like Olympic swimmers crouched on their starting blocks, synaptic vesicles prepare for fusion with the neuronal plasma membrane long before the starting gun fires. This preparation enables vesicles to fuse rapidly, synchronously, and in the correct place when the signal finally arrives. A well-known but poorly understood part of vesicle preparation is docking, in which vesicles prepare for release by attaching to the plasma membrane at the eventual site of release. Here, we out...

  13. Dicarboxylic phospholipids and irradiated biomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was decided to study the effects of ionizing radiations on biomembranes, with special reference to erythrocytes and liver microsomes representing two kinds of membrane very common in nature. Diacid phospholipids were observed at these membranes and the results are reported in part one of this work. It appeared essential to examine as far as possible the metabolism, in vitro and in animals, of these diacids and to find out whether certain harmful effects of radiations on the proteins (membrane permeability changes and enzyme inactivation) could be due to the action of these newly formed compounds. The study of acid compounds formed under irradiation was limited to nonanal-9-oic acid and azelaic acid. Part two deals with the incorporation of acid and diacid compounds into lipids and the effects of diacid phospholipids on the membrane permeability. A chapter is devoted to the changes in certain enzyme activities brought about by diacid phospholipids

  14. How pure are your vesicles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webber, Jason; Clayton, Aled

    2013-01-01

    We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles. PMID:24009896

  15. How pure are your vesicles?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Webber

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a straightforward method to estimate the purity of vesicle preparations by comparing the ratio of nano-vesicle counts to protein concentration, using tools such as the increasingly available NanoSight platform and a colorimetric protein assay such as the BCA-assay. Such an approach is simple enough to apply to every vesicle preparation within a given laboratory, assisting researchers as a routine quality control step. Also, the approach may aid in comparing/standardising vesicle purity across diverse studies, and may be of particular importance in evaluating vesicular biomarkers. We herein propose some criteria to aid in the definition of pure vesicles.

  16. SOFT MALLEABLE VESICLES TAILORED FOR ENHANCED DELIVERY OF ACTIVE AGENTS THROUGH THE SKIN: AN UPDATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar Parihar*, Mithun Bhowmick, Rajeev Kumar and Balkrishna Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethosomes are noninvasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. These are soft, malleable vesicles tailored for enhanced delivery of active agents. They are composed mainly of phospholipids, high concentration of ethanol and water. The high concentration of ethanol makes the ethosomes unique, as ethanol is known for its disturbance of skin lipid bilayer organization; therefore, when integrated into a vesicle membrane, it gives that vesicle the ability to penetrate the stratum corneum. Also, because of their high ethanol concentration, the lipid membrane is packed less tightly than conventional vesicles but has equivalent stability, allowing a more malleable structure and improves drug distribution ability in stratum corneum lipids. The Ethosomes were found to be suitable for various applications within the pharmaceutical, biotechnology, veterinary, cosmetic, and nutraceutical markets. These “soft vesicles” represents novel vesicular carrier for enhanced delivery to/through skin.

  17. A novel isolation strategy for obtaining crude membrane vesicles from bovine skim milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blans, Kristine; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Wiking, Lars;

    2014-01-01

    exosomes and microvesicles. These vesicles contain various types of RNAs and proteins, suggested to transfer health-promoting messages from mother to offspring. However, the variety of the vesicles in milk is less understood and, additionally, complicated by the complexity of more pronounced milk...... components. Here we present a novel strategy for a short, gentle and non-denaturing isolation of skim milk-derived membrane vesicles. Methods: Untreated fresh bovine milk was defatted to remove milk fat globules. The resulting skim milk was subjected to ultracentrifugation. The resulting ochre......-coloured soluble fraction above the casein pellet were further isolated from casein remnants by size-exclusion chromatography. Isolated membrane vesicles were investigated by electron microscopy, sucrose density centrifugation, western blotting and particle size analysis. Results: A crude phospholipid membrane...

  18. A novel isolation strategy for obtaining crude membrane vesicles from bovine skim milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blans, Kristine; Larsen, Lotte Bach; Wiking, Lars;

    exosomes and microvesicles. These vesicles contain various types of RNAs and proteins, suggested to transfer health-promoting messages from mother to offspring. However, the variety of the vesicles in milk is less understood and, additionally, complicated by the complexity of more pronounced milk...... components. Here we present a novel strategy for a short, gentle and non-denaturing isolation of skim milk-derived membrane vesicles. Methods: Untreated fresh bovine milk was defatted to remove milk fat globules. The resulting skim milk was subjected to ultracentrifugation. The resulting ochre......-coloured soluble fraction above the casein pellet were further isolated from casein remnants by size-exclusion chromatography. Isolated membrane vesicles were investigated by electron microscopy, sucrose density centrifugation, western blotting and particle size analysis. Results: A crude phospholipid membrane...

  19. Spontaneous formation of biocompatible vesicles in aqueous mixtures of amino acid-based cationic surfactants and SDS/SDBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shome, Anshupriya; Kar, Tanmoy; Das, Prasanta K

    2011-02-01

    The spontaneous formation of vesicles by six amino acid-based cationic surfactants and two anionic surfactants (sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)) is reported. The head-group structure of the cationic surfactants is minutely altered to understand their effect on vesicle formation. To establish the regulatory role of the aromatic group in self-aggregation, both aliphatic and aromatic side-chain-substituted amino acid-based cationic surfactants are used. The presence of aromaticity in any one of the constituents favors the formation of vesicles by cationic/anionic surfactant mixtures. The formation of vesicles is primarily dependent on the balance between the hydrophobicity and hydrophilicity of both cationic and anionic surfactants. Vesicle formation is characterized by surface tension, fluorescence anisotropy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, and phase diagrams. These vesicles are thermally stable up to 65 °C, determined by temperature-dependent fluorescence anisotropy. According to the MTT assay, these catanionic vesicles are nontoxic to NIH3T3 cells, thus indicating their wider applicability as delivery vehicles to cells. Among the six cationic surfactants examined, tryptophan- and tyrosine-based surfactants have the ability to reduce HAuCl(4) to gold nanoparticles (GNPs), which is utilized to obtain in-situ-synthesized GNPs entrapped in vesicles without the need for any external reducing agent. PMID:21275029

  20. Calcium transport in vesicles energized by cytochrome oxidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosier, Randy N.

    1979-01-01

    Experiments on the reconstitution of cytochrome oxidase into phospholipid vesicles were carried out using techniques of selectivity energizing the suspensions with ascorbate and cytochrome c or ascorbate, PMS, and internally trapped cytochrome c. It was found that the K/sup +/ selective ionophore valinomycin stimulated the rate of respiration of cytochrome oxidase vesicles regardless of the direction of the K/sup +/ flux across the vesicle membranes. The stimulation occurred in the presence of protonophoric uncouplers and in the complete absence of potassium or in detergent-lysed suspensions. Gramicidin had similar effects and it was determined that the ionophores acted by specific interaction with cytochrome oxidase rather than by the previously assumed collapse of membrane potentials. When hydrophobic proteins and appropriate coupling factors were incorporated into the cytochrome oxidase, vesicles phosphorylation of ADP could be coupled to the oxidation reaction of cytochrome oxidase. Relatively low P:O, representing poor coupling of the system, were problematical and precluded measurements of protonmotive force. However the system was used to study ion translocation.

  1. Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Südhof, Thomas C; Rizo, Josep

    2011-01-01

    Presynaptic nerve terminals release neurotransmitters by synaptic vesicle exocytosis. Membrane fusion mediating synaptic exocytosis and other intracellular membrane traffic is affected by a universal machinery that includes SNARE (for “soluble NSF-attachment protein receptor”) and SM (for “Sec1/Munc18-like”) proteins. During fusion, vesicular and target SNARE proteins assemble into an α-helical trans-SNARE complex that forces the two membranes tightly together, and SM proteins likely wrap aro...

  2. Phospholipid analogue distributions of Iranian isolates of candida

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to analyse polar lipids of candida species isolated from Ahwas (Iran) by fast Atom bombardment mass spectrometry . Nine isolates of Candida Sp. were identified by growth at 45digc, production of chlamydoconidia on cornmeal agar, colonial colour on CHROMagar Candida, germ tube production and ID 32 C kits. Then polar lipids were extracted from freeze-dried cultures and analysed using Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry. The most intense carboxylate and phospholipid molecular species anions were of m/z 281 (C18:1) and m/z 515 (PA 23:2). However, the most intense carboxylate and phospholipid analogues in Candida Parapsilosis were 292 (Un) and 555 (PA 26:3), which differed from other yeasts. Isolates were grouped by single linkage clustering based on correlation coefficient for strain pairs calculated with carboxylate and phospholipid molecular species distributions. Fast Atom Bombardment Mass Spectrometry can differentiate the C. albicans based on analysis of polar lipid distributions.These findings support that differentiation between C. albicans and other species is possible based on polar lipids

  3. Adsorption of Egg-PC to an Air/Water and Triolein/Water Bubble Interface: Use of the 2-Dimensional Phase Rule to Estimate the Surface Composition of a Phospholipid/Triolein/Water Surface as a Function of Surface Pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Mitsche, Matthew A.; Wang, Libo; Small, Donald M.

    2010-01-01

    Phospholipid monolayers play a critical role in the structure and stabilization of biological interfaces including all membranes, the alveoli of the lung, fat droplets in adipose tissue, and lipoproteins. The behavior of phospholipids in bilayers and at an air-water interface is well understood. However, the study of phospholipids at oil-water interfaces is limited due to technical challenges. In this study, egg-phosphatidylcholine (EPC) was deposited from small unilamellar vesicles onto a bu...

  4. Effect of gentamicin on phospholipid metabolism in cultured rabbit proximal tubular cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examined the hypothesis that the accumulation of phospholipid in cells exposed to gentamicin is due to impaired degradation. Experiments were performed in rabbit proximal tubular cells grown in primary culture. Cells exposed to 10(-3) M gentamicin manifested myeloid body formation and a progressive increase in total phospholipid that by day 6 was 44% higher than that of control cells and reflected increases of phosphatidylinositol of 235%, phosphatidylcholine of 60%, phosphatidylethanolamine of 90%, and phosphatidylserine of 55% above control values. Gentamicin impaired the degradation of these phospholipids. The t1/2 of the phospholipid pool labeled with [3H]myoinositol increased 146% from 1.17 (control) to 2.88 days (gentamicin); the t1/2 of the [3H]choline pool increased 34% from 1.77 to 2.38 days; the t1/2 of the [3H]ethanolamine pool increased 57% from 3.14 to 4.93 days; the t1/2 of the [3H] serine pool increased 37% from 6.30 to 8.63 days. Exposure of cells to gentamicin for 2 days also stimulated increased incorporation of [3H]myoinositol (68%) and [3H]ethanolamine (59%) into phospholipid. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that gentamicin inhibits the activity of lysosomal phospholipases that results in the accumulation of phospholipid within the lysosome in the form of myeloid bodies. Increased phospholipid synthesis may represent a compensatory response to the impaired lysosomal degradation of phospholipid. We postulate that the preferential increase of phosphatidylinositol reflects the capacity of the polycationic gentamicin to interact electrostatically with the anionic phosphoinositides and inhibit their turnover

  5. A vesicle bioreactor as a step toward an artificial cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noireaux, Vincent; Libchaber, Albert

    2004-12-01

    An Escherichia coli cell-free expression system is encapsulated in a phospholipid vesicle to build a cell-like bioreactor. Large unilamellar vesicles containing extracts are produced in an oil-extract emulsion. To form a bilayer the vesicles are transferred into a feeding solution that contains ribonucleotides and amino acids. Transcription-translation of plasmid genes is isolated in the vesicles. Whereas in bulk solution expression of enhanced GFP stops after 2 h, inside the vesicle permeability of the membrane to the feeding solution prolongs the expression for up to 5 h. To solve the energy and material limitations and increase the capacity of the reactor, the -hemolysin pore protein from Staphylococcus aureus is expressed inside the vesicle to create a selective permeability for nutrients. The reactor can then sustain expression for up to 4 days with a protein production of 30 µM after 4 days. Oxygen diffusion and osmotic pressure are critical parameters to maintain expression and avoid vesicle burst. -hemolysin | cell-free protein expression | membrane-anchoring polypeptide

  6. Spontaneous Vesicles Modulated by Polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Ortega; M. Mercedes Velázquez; Margarita Valero

    2011-01-01

    Vesicles are widely used in technological applications including cosmetic products, in microencapsulation for drug delivery, as anticancer agents and in the technology of adhesives, paints and inks. The vesicle size and the surface charge are very important properties from a technological point of view. Thus, the challenge in formulation is to find inexpensive stable vesicles with well-defined sizes and to modulate the surface charge of these aggregates. In this work we analyze the effect of ...

  7. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Loubet, Bastien; Olzynska, Agnieszka;

    2014-01-01

    We claim that (1) cholesterol protects bilayers from disruption caused by lipid oxidation by sequestering conical shaped oxidized lipid species such as 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PZPC) away from phospholipid, because cholesterol and the oxidized lipid have complementary...... shapes and (2) mixtures of cholesterol and oxidized lipids can self-assemble into bilayers much like lysolipid–cholesterol mixtures. The evidence for bilayer protection comes from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Unimodal size distributions of extruded...... vesicles (LUVETs) made up of a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and PZPC containing high amounts of PZPC are only obtained when cholesterol is present in high concentrations. In simulations, bilayers containing high amounts of PZPC become porous, unless cholesterol is also present...

  8. Vesicles in a Poiseuille flow

    CERN Document Server

    Danker, Gerrit; Misbah, Chaouqi

    2008-01-01

    Vesicle dynamics in unbounded Poiseuille flow is analyzed using a small-deformation theory. Our analytical results quantitatively describe vesicle migration and provide new physical insights. At low ratio between the inner and outer viscosity $\\lambda$ (i.e. in the tank-treading regime), the vesicle always migrates towards the flow centerline, unlike other soft particles such as drops. Above a critical $\\lambda$, vesicle tumbles and cross-stream migration vanishes. A novel feature is predicted, namely the coexistence of two types of nonequilibrium configurations at the centreline, a bullet-like and a parachute-like shapes.

  9. Oxidative stability of marine phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale;

    Many studies have shown that marine phospholipids (MPL) provide more advantages than fish oil. They have better bioavailability, better resistance towards oxidation and higher content of eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) than oily triglycerides (fish oil). The objective...... of this study is to investigate the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of MPL. In addition, this study also investigates the effect of chemical composition of MPL and Maillard reaction (interaction between lipids oxidation products with the residue of amino acids) on MPL emulsions’ stability. Firstly, MPL were...... prepared in the form of emulsions by high pressure homogenizer. Then, the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of phospholipids was investigated by measurement of simple chemical analyses such as Peroxide Value and Free Fatty Acids, and 31PNMR after 32 days storage at 2ºC. The oxidative stability of MPL...

  10. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendes, Ana C., E-mail: anac@food.dtu.dk, E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S., E-mail: anac@food.dtu.dk, E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk [Technical University of Denmark, DTU-Food, Søltofts Plads B227, DK-2800, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark)

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  11. SOFT MALLEABLE VESICLES TAILORED FOR ENHANCED DELIVERY OF ACTIVE AGENTS THROUGH THE SKIN: AN UPDATE

    OpenAIRE

    Sandeep Kumar Parihar*, Mithun Bhowmick, Rajeev Kumar and Balkrishna Dubey

    2013-01-01

    Ethosomes are noninvasive delivery carriers that enable drugs to reach the deep skin layers and/or the systemic circulation. These are soft, malleable vesicles tailored for enhanced delivery of active agents. They are composed mainly of phospholipids, high concentration of ethanol and water. The high concentration of ethanol makes the ethosomes unique, as ethanol is known for its disturbance of skin lipid bilayer organization; therefore, when integrated into ...

  12. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mendes, Ana Carina Loureiro; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan;

    2015-01-01

    . At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip....... The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h. (c) 2015 AIP Publishing LLC....

  13. Anion exchange membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

    2013-05-07

    An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

  14. Anions in Cometary Comae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions 0-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydro dynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of large carbon-chain anions in cometary coma chemistry. We calculate the effects of these anions on coma thermodynamics, charge balance and examine their impact on molecule formation.

  15. Vesicle Priming in a SNAP

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Martin; Davis, Graeme W.

    2010-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Burgalossi et al. (2010) investigate synaptic vesicle priming using presynaptic Ca2+ uncaging at a small, glutamatergic, central synapse. Combining this technique with mouse genetics, the authors demonstrate that vesicle priming during ongoing neural activity can be limited by the recycling of recently used SNARE complexes.

  16. 多组分磷脂巨囊泡的相结构和胆固醇对微畴成长的影响%Phase structure of multicomponent phospholipid giant unilamellar vesicles and the influence of cholesterol on domain growth

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨方源; 哈丽旦·居马汗; 蒋中英

    2014-01-01

    巨囊泡作为细胞的简化模型,其相分离与出芽动力学规律已引起许多领域科学家的关注。本实验采用DPPC/DOPC/Chol的三组分形成的巨囊泡作为模型,借助荧光显微镜观察该三组分体系侧向分离的相结构图,并对微畴的成长过程作了系统的观察研究和理论分析。实验发现:从高温的均相区域淬灭到低温的分相区域,膜表面发生侧向分离形成微畴。体系内胆固醇的掺入量的多少会影响磷脂膜的相结构和膜内微畴的成长,固定 DOPC/DPPC为1:1的前提下,微畴尺寸随着胆固醇掺入量的增加而变大。%Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs)as a simplified model of cell,its kinetics of phase separa-tion and budding have attracted many scientists attention.In this paper,the typical membrane system which consisted of DOPC/DPPC/Chol was used,the experiment studies and theoretically analyzes the growth process of domains by observing the structure diagram of its lateral separation with the help of fluorescence microscopy.It showed that:domains were forming through lateral separation on the sur-face of membrane from the homogeneous region at high temperature quenching to the heterogeneous re-gion at low temperature.Different component of Cholesterol would influence the phase structure of phospholipids‘membrane and the growth of domains within the membrane,with varying cholesterol composition against a fixed 1∶1 ratio of DOPC/DPPC,the domain radius increasing with the cholesterol composition.

  17. Interaction of enterocyte FABPs with phospholipid membranes: clues for specific physiological roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falomir-Lockhart, Lisandro J; Franchini, Gisela R; Guerbi, María Ximena; Storch, Judith; Córsico, Betina

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal and liver fatty acid binding proteins (IFABP and LFABP, respectively) are cytosolic soluble proteins with the capacity to bind and transport hydrophobic ligands between different sub-cellular compartments. Their functions are still not clear but they are supposed to be involved in lipid trafficking and metabolism, cell growth, and regulation of several other processes, like cell differentiation. Here we investigated the interaction of these proteins with different models of phospholipid membrane vesicles in order to achieve further insight into their specificity within the enterocyte. A combination of biophysical and biochemical techniques allowed us to determine affinities of these proteins to membranes, the way phospholipid composition and vesicle size and curvature modulate such interaction, as well as the effect of protein binding on the integrity of the membrane structure. We demonstrate here that, besides their apparently opposite ligand transfer mechanisms, both LFABP and IFABP are able to interact with phospholipid membranes, but the factors that modulate such interactions are different for each protein, further implying different roles for IFABP and LFABP in the intracellular context. These results contribute to the proposed central role of intestinal FABPs in the lipid traffic within enterocytes as well as in the regulation of more complex cellular processes. PMID:21539932

  18. Incorporation of peptides in phospholipid aggregates using ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Raquel; Little, Collin; Ferreira, Helena; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2008-09-01

    This study presents the highlights of ultrasonic effects on peptides incorporated on phospholipid aggregates (liposomes). These liposomes or vesicles are known as transport agents in skin drug delivery and for hair treatment. They might be a good model to deliver larger peptides into hair to restore fibre strength after hair coloration, modelling, permanent wave and/or straightening. The preparation of liposomes 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) with peptides (LLLLK LLLLK LLLLK LLLLK; LLLLL LCLCL LLKAK AK) was made by the thin film hydration method. The LUVs (uni-lamellar vesicles) were obtained by sonication, applying different experimental conditions, such as depth (mm) and power intensity (%). Photon-correlation spectroscopy (PCS) and electronic microscopy (EM) results confirmed that the incorporation of these peptides, with different sequence of amino acids, presented differences on the diameter, zeta-potential of membrane surface and shape of liposomes. The liposomes that included peptide LLLLK LLLLK LLLLK LLLLK present an increased in zeta-potential values after using ultrasound and an "amorphous" aspect. Conversely, the liposomes that incorporated the peptide LLLLL LCLCL LLKAK AK presented a define shape (rod shape) and the potential surface of liposome did not change significantly by the use of ultrasound. PMID:18467154

  19. Adsorption of ruthenium red to phospholipid membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Voelker, D; Smejtek, P

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the distribution of the hexavalent ruthenium red cation (RuR) between water and phospholipid membranes, have shown the critical importance of membrane negative surface charge for RuR binding, and determined the association constant of RuR for different phospholipid bilayers. The studies were performed with liposomes made of mixtures of zwitterionic L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (PC), and one of the negatively charged phospholipids: L-alpha-phosphatidylserine (PS), L-alpha-phosp...

  20. Regulation of phospholipid synthesis in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Carman, George M.; Han, Gil-Soo

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipid synthesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a complex process that involves regulation by both genetic and biochemical mechanisms. The activity levels of phospholipid synthesis enzymes are controlled by gene expression (e.g., transcription) and by factors (lipids, water-soluble phospholipid precursors and products, and covalent modification of phosphorylation) that modulate catalysis. Phosphatidic acid, whose levels are controlled by the biochemical regulation of key phosp...

  1. Effect of sodium deoxycholate and sodium cholate on DPPC vesicles: A fluorescence anisotropy study with diphenylhexatriene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usharani Subuddhi; Ashok K Mishra

    2007-03-01

    Effects of two bile salts, namely sodium deoxycholate (NaDC) and sodium cholate (NaC), on DPPC small unilamellar vesicles have been investigated using the steady-state fluorescence anisotropy () of diphenylhexatriene (DPH) as a tool. It was found that the variation of is sensitive enough to monitor different stages of interaction of bile salts with DPPC vesicles. NaDC induced significant changes in the membrane well below its CMC (6 mM). Even at 4 mM, which is still lower than the CMC, the phospholipids were completely solubilised by the NaDC micelles. The effect of NaC on DPPC vesicles, however, was much less significant, especially in the sub-micellar concentration regime. Being more hydrophilic NaC does not interact with the membrane efficiently. Complete solubilisation of phospholipids took place only when the concentration of NaC was above its CMC (16 mM). The experiments also showed that the bile salt-induced changes of vesicle structure were strongly dependent on the concentration of the bile salt and not on the molar ratio of lipid and bile salt.

  2. Dynamic assembly of MinD into filament bundles modulated by ATP, phospholipids, and MinE

    OpenAIRE

    Suefuji, Kyoko; Valluzzi, Regina; RayChaudhuri, Debabrata

    2002-01-01

    Accurate positioning of the division septum at the equator of Escherichia coli cells requires a rapid oscillation of MinD ATPase between the polar halves of the cell membrane, together with the division inhibitor MinC, under MinE control. The mechanism underlying MinD oscillation remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that purified MinD assembles into protein filaments in the presence of ATP. Incubation with phospholipid vesicles further stimulates MinD polymerization. Addition of pu...

  3. Radiolytic decomposition products of phospholipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipids are an important part of biological and food systems, even though they are not a major constituent of these systems. Little information has been reported concerning the effects of ionizing radiation on phospholipids. However, extensive work has been performed on triacylglycerols, fatty acids and various natural fats and oils. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of ionizing radiation on triacylglycerols and phospholipids. The effects of radiation on monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols were also studied. Monopalmitoylglycerol dipalmitoylglycerol, tripalmitoylglycerol, 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphoethanolamine and vegetable 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine were sealed in glass tubes and irradiated at 50 Mrad dose levels. Volatile components were collected by cold-finger distillation and the distillate further fractionated into oxygenated and non-oxygenated fractions. Identification of volatile radiolytic products was accomplished by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. Quantitative analysis was carried out by the use of gas chromatography with appropriate internal standards. Non-volatile products were separated and identified by thin layer chromatography. Qualitatively, the volatile compounds recovered from monopalmitoylglycerol, dipalmitoylglycerol, tripalmitoylglycerol and 3-sn-phosphatidylethanolamine were very similar. The compounds identified from tripalmitoylglycerol by other workers were confirmed. They include a series of alkanes and alkenes, as well as hexadecanal, 2-dodecylcyclobutanone, methyl palmitate and ethyl palmitate. In addition, a number of compounds were identified which had not been reported previously. These compounds include short chain aldehydes, methyl esters and ethyl esters as well as 2-ketones, 3-ketones and 4-ketones. The compounds recovered from vegetable 3-sn-phosphatidylcholine reflected the unsaturated nature of the fatty acid composition of the substrate

  4. Proton-stimulated Cl-HCO3 antiport by basolateral membrane vesicles of lobster hepatopancreas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purified epithelial basolateral membrane vesicles were prepared from lobster hepatopancreas by sorbitol gradient centrifugation. Na+-K+-adenosinetriphosphatase, alkaline phosphatase, and cytochrome-c oxidase enzyme activities in the final membrane preparation were enriched 9.6-, 1.4-, and 0.4-fold, respectively, compared with their activities in the original tissue homogenate. Vesicle osmotic reactivity was demonstrated using 60-min equilibrium 36Cl uptake experiments at a variety of transmembrane osmotic gradients. 36Cl uptake into vesicles preloaded with HCO3 was significantly greater than into vesicles lacking HCO3. This exchange process was stimulated by a transmembrane proton gradient (internal pH greater than external pH). Proton-gradient-dependent Cl-HCO3 exchange was potential sensitive and stimulated by an electrically negative vesicle interior. 36Cl influx (4-s exposures) into HCO3-loaded vesicles occurred by the combination of 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid sensitive, carrier-mediated transfer and apparent diffusion. 36Cl influx was a hyperbolic function of both internal [HCO3] and internal [Cl]. The two internal anions displayed a 100-fold difference in apparent affinity constants with HCO3 being strongly preferred. 36Cl influx was stimulated more by preloaded monovalent than by divalent anions. Na was an inhibitor of proton-dependent anion antiport, whereas K had no effect. A model for HCl-HCO3 antiport is suggested that employs combined transmembrane concentration gradients of Cl and HCO3 to power anion exchange and transfer protons against a concentration gradient

  5. Secretory Vesicle Priming by CAPS Is Independent of Its SNARE-Binding MUN Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuc Quynh Nguyen Truong

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Priming of secretory vesicles is a prerequisite for their Ca2+-dependent fusion with the plasma membrane. The key vesicle priming proteins, Munc13s and CAPSs, are thought to mediate vesicle priming by regulating the conformation of the t-SNARE syntaxin, thereby facilitating SNARE complex assembly. Munc13s execute their priming function through their MUN domain. Given that the MUN domain of Ca2+-dependent activator protein for secretion (CAPS also binds syntaxin, it was assumed that CAPSs prime vesicles through the same mechanism as Munc13s. We studied naturally occurring splice variants of CAPS2 in CAPS1/CAPS2-deficient cells and found that CAPS2 primes vesicles independently of its MUN domain. Instead, the pleckstrin homology domain of CAPS2 seemingly is essential for its priming function. Our findings indicate a priming mode for secretory vesicles. This process apparently requires membrane phospholipids, does not involve the binding or direct conformational regulation of syntaxin by MUN domains of CAPSs, and is therefore not redundant with Munc13 action.

  6. Nanotube-Enabled Vesicle-Vesicle Communication: A Computational Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liuyang; Wang, Xianqiao

    2015-07-01

    Cell-to-cell communications via the tunneling nanotubes or gap junction channels are vital for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. Instead of these intrinsic communication pathways, how to design artificial communication channels between cells remains a challenging but interesting problem. Here, we perform dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations to analyze the interaction between rotational nanotubes (RNTs) and vesicles so as to provide a novel design mechanism for cell-to-cell communication. Simulation results have demonstrated that the RNTs are capable of generating local disturbance and promote vesicle translocation toward the RNTs. Through ligand pattern designing on the RNTs, we can find a suitable nanotube candidate with a specific ligand coating pattern for forming the RNT-vesicle network. The results also show that a RNT can act as a bridged channel between vesicles, which facilitates substance transfer. Our findings provide useful guidelines for the molecular design of patterned RNTs for creating a synthetic channel between cells. PMID:26266730

  7. Enzymatic modification of phospholipids forfunctional applications and human nutrition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Zheng; Vikbjerg, Anders / Falk; Xu, Xuebing

    2005-01-01

    Rapid progress in biochemistry of phospholipids and evolution of modern bioengineering has brought forth a number of novel concepts and technical advancements in the modification of phospholipids for industrial applications and human nutrition. Highlights cover preparation of novel phospholipid...... phospholipids. This work reviews the natural occurrence and structural characteristics of phospholipids, their updated knowledge on manifold biological and nutritional functions, traditional and novel physical and chemical approaches to modify phospholipids as well as their applications to obtain novel...

  8. Packing of ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, J.; Kuhl, T.L.; Kjær, K.;

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD) and reflectivity, the in-plane and out-of-plane structure of mixed ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers was investigated at the air-water interface. Mixed monolayers of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 100 mol% ganglioside GM, and the phospholipid dipa...

  9. Patterning and characterization of model phospholipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassu, Aschalew; Calzzani, Fernando A., Jr.; Taguenang, Jean M.; Sileshi, Redahegn K.; Sharma, Anup

    2008-08-01

    Phospholipid, which is a building block of biological membranes, plays an important role in compartmentalization of cellular reaction environment and control of the physicochemical conditions inside the reaction environment. Phospholipid bilayer membrane has been proposed as a natural biocompatible platform for attaching biological molecules like proteins for biosensing related application. Due to the enormous potential applications of biomimetic model biomembranes, various techniques for depositions and patterning of these membranes onto solid supports and their possible biotechnological applications have been reported by different groups. In this work, patterning of phospholipid thin-films is accomplished by interferometric lithography as well as using lithographic masks in liquid phase. Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy and Atomic Force microscopy are used to characterize the model phospholipid membrane and the patterning technique. We describe an easy and reproducible technique for direct patterning of azo-dye (NBD)-labeled phospholipid (phosphatidylcholine) in aqueous medium using a low-intensity 488 nm Ar+ laser and various kinds of lithographic masks.

  10. Spontaneous Vesicles Modulated by Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Ortega

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Vesicles are widely used in technological applications including cosmetic products, in microencapsulation for drug delivery, as anticancer agents and in the technology of adhesives, paints and inks. The vesicle size and the surface charge are very important properties from a technological point of view. Thus, the challenge in formulation is to find inexpensive stable vesicles with well-defined sizes and to modulate the surface charge of these aggregates. In this work we analyze the effect of different polymers on the structural properties of vesicles of the biodegradable surfactant sodium bis(2-ethyl-hexyl sulfosuccinate, Aerosol OT. Using fluorescence, conductivity, electrophoretic mobility and dynamic light scattering measurements we study the effect of the polymer nature, molecular weight and polymer concentration on the stability and the vesicle size properties. Results demonstrate that it is possible to modulate both the size and the electric surface charge of spontaneous vesicles of Aerosol OT by the addition of very small percentages of poly(allylamine and poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecen.

  11. Composition, structure and properties of POPC–triolein mixtures. Evidence of triglyceride domains in phospholipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duelund, Lars; Jensen, Grethe Vestergaard; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian;

    2013-01-01

    We have in this study investigated the composition, structure and spectroscopical properties of multilamellar vesicles composed of a phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), and up to 10mol% of triolein (TO), a triglyceride. We found in agreement with previous results...... to exist as vesicular structures containing entrapped water. Bilayer structure of the membranes was supported by small angle X-ray scattering that showed the membranes to form a lamellar phase. Fluorescence spectroscopy with the polarity sensitive dye Nile red revealed, that the LF samples with more...

  12. Review: P4-ATPases as Phospholipid Flippases-Structure, Function, and Enigmas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens P; Vestergaard, Anna L; Mikkelsen, Stine A;

    2016-01-01

    P4-ATPases comprise a family of P-type ATPases that actively transport or flip phospholipids across cell membranes. This generates and maintains membrane lipid asymmetry, a property essential for a wide variety of cellular processes such as vesicle budding and trafficking, cell signaling, blood...... focuses on properties of mammalian and yeast P4-ATPases for which most mechanistic insight is available. However, the structure, function and enigmas associated with mammalian and yeast P4-ATPases most likely extend to P4-ATPases of plants and other organisms....

  13. From Self-Assembled Vesicles to Protocells

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Irene A.; Walde, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the ...

  14. Egg Phospholipids and Cardiovascular Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher N. Blesso

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Eggs are a major source of phospholipids (PL in the Western diet. Dietary PL have emerged as a potential source of bioactive lipids that may have widespread effects on pathways related to inflammation, cholesterol metabolism, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL function. Based on pre-clinical studies, egg phosphatidylcholine (PC and sphingomyelin appear to regulate cholesterol absorption and inflammation. In clinical studies, egg PL intake is associated with beneficial changes in biomarkers related to HDL reverse cholesterol transport. Recently, egg PC was shown to be a substrate for the generation of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO, a gut microbe-dependent metabolite associated with increased cardiovascular disease (CVD risk. More research is warranted to examine potential serum TMAO responses with chronic egg ingestion and in different populations, such as diabetics. In this review, the recent basic science, clinical, and epidemiological findings examining egg PL intake and risk of CVD are summarized.

  15. Raman spectroscopy of single extracellular vesicles reveals subpopulations with varying membrane content (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Zachary J.; Lee, Changwon; Rojalin, Tatu; Carney, Randy P.; Hazari, Sidhartha; Knudson, Alisha; Lam, Kit S.; Saari, Heikki; Lazaro Ibañez, Elisa; Viitala, Tapani; Laaksonen, Timo; Yliperttula, Marjo; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    Exosomes are small (~100nm) membrane bound vesicles excreted by cells as part of their normal biological processes. These extracellular vesicles are currently an area of intense research, since they were recently found to carry functional mRNA that allows transfer of proteins and other cellular instructions between cells. Exosomes have been implicated in a wide range of diseases, including cancer. Cancer cells are known to have increased exosome production, and may use those exosomes to prepare remote environments for metastasis. Therefore, there is a strong need to develop characterization methods to help understand the structure and function of these vesicles. However, current techniques, such as proteomics and genomics technologies, rely on aggregating a large amount of exosome material and reporting on chemical content that is averaged over many millions of exosomes. Here we report on the use of laser-tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) to probe individual vesicles, discovering distinct heterogeneity among exosomes both within a cell line, as well as between different cell lines. Through principal components analysis followed by hierarchical clustering, we have identified four "subpopulations" of exosomes shared across seven cell lines. The key chemical differences between these subpopulations, as determined by spectral analysis of the principal component loadings, are primarily related to membrane composition. Specifically, the differences can be ascribed to cholesterol content, cholesterol to phospholipid ratio, and surface protein expression. Thus, we have shown LTRS to be a powerful method to probe the chemical content of single extracellular vesicles.

  16. Intrinsic anion oxidation potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Patrik

    2006-11-01

    Anions of lithium battery salts have been investigated by electronic structure calculations with the objective to find a computational measure to correlate with the observed (in)stability of nonaqueous lithium battery electrolytes vs oxidation often encountered in practice. Accurate prediction of intrinsic anion oxidation potentials is here made possible by computing the vertical free energy difference between anion and neutral radical (Delta Gv) and further strengthened by an empirical correction using only the anion volume as a parameter. The 6-311+G(2df,p) basis set, the VSXC functional, and the C-PCM SCRF algorithm were used. The Delta Gv calculations can be performed using any standard computational chemistry software. PMID:17078600

  17. Degradation of phospholipids by oxidative stress--exceptional significance of cardiolipin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiswedel, Ingrid; Gardemann, Andreas; Storch, Andreas; Peter, Daniela; Schild, Lorenz

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of oxidative stress on mitochondrial phospholipids. In this context, this study investigated (i) the content of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylcholine (PC) and cardiolipin (CL), (ii) the correlation of CL degradation with mitochondrial function and (iii) the correlation of CL degradation and CL oxidation. Oxidative stress induced by iron/ascorbate caused a dramatic decrease of these phospholipids, in which CL was the most sensitive phospholipid. Even moderate oxidative stress by hypoxia/reoxygenation caused a decrease in CL that was parallelled by a decrease in active respiration of isolated rat heart mitochondria. The relation between oxidative stress, CL degradation and CL oxidation was studied by in vitro treatment of commercially available CL with superoxide anion radicals and H2O2. The degradation of CL was mediated by H2O2 and required the presence of cytochrome c. Other peroxidases such as horse radish peroxidase and glutathione peroxidase had no effect. Cytochrome c in the presence of H2O2 caused CL oxidation. The data demonstrate that oxidative stress may cause degradation of phospholipids by oxidation, in particular CL; resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:20092032

  18. The interfacial interactions of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles with surfactants and phospholipids revealed through the fluorescent response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkova, Olga D; Mustafina, Asiya R; Mukhametshina, Alsu R; Burilov, Vladimir A; Skripacheva, Viktoriya V; Zakharova, Lucia Ya; Fedorenko, Svetlana V; Konovalov, Alexander I; Soloveva, Svetlana E; Antipin, Igor S

    2012-04-01

    The quenching effect of dyes (phenol red and bromothymol blue) on Tb(III)-centered luminescence enables to sense the aggregation of cationic and anionic surfactants near the silica surface of Tb-doped silica nanoparticles (SN) in aqueous solutions. The Tb-centered luminescence of non-decorated SNs is diminished by the inner filter effect of both dyes. The decoration of the silica surface by cationic surfactants induces the quenching through the energy transfer between silica coated Tb(III) complexes and dye anions inserted into surfactant aggregates. Thus the distribution of surfactants aggregates at the silica/water interface and in the bulk of solution greatly affects dynamic quenching efficiency. The displacement of dye anions from the interfacial surfactant adlayer by anionic surfactants and phospholipids is accompanied by the "off-on" switching of Tb(III)-centered luminescence. PMID:22209651

  19. Coverage and disruption of phospholipid membranes by oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, Harke; Nolte, Tom M; Leermakers, Frans A M; Kleijn, J Mieke

    2014-12-01

    We studied the interactions of silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with phospholipid membranes and show how electrostatics plays an important role. For this, we systematically varied the charge density of both the membranes by changing their lipid composition and the oxide particles by changing the pH. For the silica nanoparticles, results from our recently presented fluorescence vesicle leakage assay are combined with data on particle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers obtained by optical reflectometry. Because of the strong tendency of the TiO2 nanoparticles to aggregate, the interaction of these particles with the bilayer was studied only in the leakage assay. Self-consistent field (SCF) modeling was applied to interpret the results on a molecular level. At low charge densities of either the silica nanoparticles or the lipid bilayers, no electrostatic barrier to adsorption exists. However, the adsorption rate and adsorbed amounts drop with increasing (negative) charge densities on particles and membranes because of electric double-layer repulsion, which is confirmed by the effect of the ionic strength. SCF calculations show that charged particles change the structure of lipid bilayers by a reorientation of a fraction of the zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) headgroups. This explains the affinity of the silica particles for pure PC lipid layers, even at relatively high particle charge densities. Particle adsorption does not always lead to the disruption of the membrane integrity, as is clear from a comparison of the leakage and adsorption data for the silica particles. The attraction should be strong enough, and in line with this, we found that for positively charged TiO2 particles vesicle disruption increases with increasing negative charge density on the membranes. Our results may be extrapolated to a broader range of oxide nanoparticles and ultimately may be used for establishing more accurate nanoparticle toxicity assessments and drug

  20. Cell signalling and phospholipid metabolism. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boss, W.F.

    1990-12-31

    These studies explored whether phosphoinositide (PI) has a role in plants analogous to its role in animal cells. Although no parallel activity of PI in signal transduction was found in plant cells, activity of inositol phospholipid kinase was found to be modulated by light and by cell wall degrading enzymes. These studies indicate a major role for inositol phospholipids in plant growth and development as membrane effectors but not as a source of second messengers.

  1. Thermodynamic Studies of Antimalarial Drugs and Their Interaction with Myoglobin, Hemoglobin and Phospholipid Model Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira A. Barghouthi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research we present binding studies of some selected antimalarial drugs such as primaquine and quinacrine with biomolecules. Ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectrophotometry along with equilibrium dialysis techniques were used to monitor the interaction of these drugs with myoglobin, hemoglobin albumin and with phospholipid unilamellar vesicles. Fluorescence spectrophotometry, UV-visible difference spectrophotometry and equilibrium dialysis showed no evidence of any binding of these drugs to myoglobin or hemoglobin. However, binding to albumin was evident from a blue shift in UV-Vis absorption spectra. Both primaquine and quinacrine were found to bind to phospholipid vesicles with binding constants of 2.7 ± 0.4x102 and 8.1 ± 0.8x104, respectively. As for the number of molecules per binding site, we found that eight molecules of primaquine occupies ten binding sites and in case of quinacrine two drug molecule for each ten binding sites. Physical parameters for primaquine are determined via UV-Vis absorption at a wavelength of 350 nm. In case of quinacrine fluorescence intensity was employed to measure concentrations with an excitation wavelength of 425 nm and an emission wavelength at 497 nm.

  2. Bile Salt Micelles and Phospholipid Vesicles Present in Simulated and Human Intestinal Fluids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elvang, Philipp A; Hinna, Askell H; Brouwers, Joachim; Hens, Bart; Augustijns, Patrick; Brandl, Martin

    2016-01-01

    apply asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation (AF4) in combination with multiangle laser light scattering in an attempt to reveal coexistence of colloidal particles in both artificial and aspirated HIFs and to determine their sizes. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation/multiangle laser light...

  3. Seminal vesicle schwannoma presenting with left hydroureteronephrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Gopalakrishnan Arun; Shrijeet Chakraborti; Santosh Rai; Gurupur Guni Laxman Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    We report a very rare case of seminal vesicle schwannoma in a 50-year-old male, with left hydroureteronephrosis. Only five cases of seminal vesicle schwannomas have been reported in medical literature until date.

  4. Anion-π catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yingjie; Beuchat, César; Domoto, Yuya; Gajewy, Jadwiga; Wilson, Adam; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2014-02-01

    The introduction of new noncovalent interactions to build functional systems is of fundamental importance. We here report experimental and theoretical evidence that anion-π interactions can contribute to catalysis. The Kemp elimination is used as a classical tool to discover conceptually innovative catalysts for reactions with anionic transition states. For anion-π catalysis, a carboxylate base and a solubilizer are covalently attached to the π-acidic surface of naphthalenediimides. On these π-acidic surfaces, transition-state stabilizations up to ΔΔGTS = 31.8 ± 0.4 kJ mol(-1) are found. This value corresponds to a transition-state recognition of KTS = 2.7 ± 0.5 μM and a catalytic proficiency of 3.8 × 10(5) M(-1). Significantly increasing transition-state stabilization with increasing π-acidity of the catalyst, observed for two separate series, demonstrates the existence of "anion-π catalysis." In sharp contrast, increasing π-acidity of the best naphthalenediimide catalysts does not influence the more than 12 000-times weaker substrate recognition (KM = 34.5 ± 1.6 μM). Together with the disappearance of Michaelis-Menten kinetics on the expanded π-surfaces of perylenediimides, this finding supports that contributions from π-π interactions are not very important for anion-π catalysis. The linker between the π-acidic surface and the carboxylate base strongly influences activity. Insufficient length and flexibility cause incompatibility with saturation kinetics. Moreover, preorganizing linkers do not improve catalysis much, suggesting that the ideal positioning of the carboxylate base on the π-acidic surface is achieved by intramolecular anion-π interactions rather than by an optimized structure of the linker. Computational simulations are in excellent agreement with experimental results. They confirm, inter alia, that the stabilization of the anionic transition states (but not the neutral ground states) increases with the π-acidity of the

  5. Recombination of vesicles during freeze-drying

    OpenAIRE

    Cabane, Bernard; Blanchon, Sylvène; Neves, Carole

    2006-01-01

    Concentrated dispersions of nanometric lipid vesicles (mean diameter 20 nm) in water/maltose solutions have been freeze-dried, and then redispersed in water, yielding again dispersions of lipid vesicles. At each stage of the freeze-drying process, the organization of the vesicles in the dispersion and their size distribution were examined through Small Angle Neutron Scattering and Gel Permeation Chromatography. It was found that the osmotic deswelling of the vesicles caused them to recombine ...

  6. Signaling for Vesicle Mobilization and Synaptic Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Levitan, Edwin S.

    2008-01-01

    The hypothesis that release of classical neurotransmitters and neuropeptides is facilitated by increasing the mobility of small synaptic vesicles (SSVs) and dense core vesicles (DCVs) could not be tested until the advent of methods for visualizing these secretory vesicles in living nerve terminals. In fact, fluorescence imaging studies have only since 2005 established that activity increases secretory vesicle mobility in motoneuron terminals and chromaffin cells. Mobilization of DCVs and SSVs...

  7. Impermeability effects in three-dimensional vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the effects of the impermeability constraint on the equilibrium shapes of a three-dimensional vesicle hosting a rigid inclusion. A given alteration of the inclusion and/or vesicle parameters leads to shape modifications of different orders of magnitude, when applied to permeable or impermeable vesicles. Moreover, the enclosed-volume constraint wrecks the uniqueness of stationary equilibrium shapes, and gives rise to pear-shaped or stomatocyte-like vesicles

  8. Quantitative single-vesicle analysis of antimicrobial peptide-induced leakage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Kasper; Ehrlich, Nicky; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    understanding of their interactions with phospholipid membranes. In this study, the membrane-permeabilizing effects of antimicrobial peptides were scrutinized by combining two biophysical techniques. Confocal fluorescence microscopy to visualize leakage from individual surface-immobilized lipid vesicles was......Although the research field of antimicrobial peptides has attracted considerable scientific attention in the past decades, the microbicidal mechanisms of antimicrobial peptides still remain elusive. One of the keys to a more profound comprehension of the function of these peptides is a deeper...... three canonical antimicrobial peptides: melittin, magainin 2, and mastoparan X. The results demonstrate an unprecedented level of insight into the molecular processes governing antimicrobial peptide-induced permeabilization of phospholipid membranes....

  9. Constitutive phospholipid scramblase activity of a G protein-coupled receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, Michael A.; Morizumi, Takefumi; Menon, Indu; Joseph, Jeremiah S.; Dittman, Jeremy S.; Cherezov, Vadim; Stevens, Raymond C.; Ernst, Oliver P.; Menon, Anant K.

    2014-10-01

    Opsin, the rhodopsin apoprotein, was recently shown to be an ATP-independent flippase (or scramblase) that equilibrates phospholipids across photoreceptor disc membranes in mammalian retina, a process required for disc homoeostasis. Here we show that scrambling is a constitutive activity of rhodopsin, distinct from its light-sensing function. Upon reconstitution into vesicles, discrete conformational states of the protein (rhodopsin, a metarhodopsin II-mimic, and two forms of opsin) facilitated rapid (>10,000 phospholipids per protein per second) scrambling of phospholipid probes. Our results indicate that the large conformational changes involved in converting rhodopsin to metarhodopsin II are not required for scrambling, and that the lipid translocation pathway either lies near the protein surface or involves membrane packing defects in the vicinity of the protein. In addition, we demonstrate that β2-adrenergic and adenosine A2A receptors scramble lipids, suggesting that rhodopsin-like G protein-coupled receptors may play an unexpected moonlighting role in re-modelling cell membranes.

  10. Bending elasticity of saturated and monounsaturated phospholipid membranes studied by the neutron spin echo technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have used neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy to study the effect of bilayer thickness and monounsaturation (existence of a single double bond on one of the aliphatic chains) on the physical properties of unilamellar vesicles. The bending elasticity of saturated and monounsaturated phospholipid bilayers made of phospholipids with alkyl chain length ranging from 14 to 20 carbons was investigated. The bending elasticity κc of phosphatidylcholines (PCs) in the liquid crystalline (Lα) phase ranges from 0.38 x 10-19 J for 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine to 0.64 x 10-19 J for 1,2-dieicosenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine. It was confirmed that, contrary to the strong effect on the main transition temperature, the monounsaturation has a limited influence on the bending elasticity of lipid bilayers. In addition, when the area modulus KA varies little with chain unsaturation or length, the elastic ratios (κc/KA)1/2 of saturated and monounsaturated phospholipid bilayers varies linearly with lipid hydrophobic thickness d which agrees well with the theory of ideal fluid membranes.

  11. Inborn errors of metabolism in the biosynthesis and remodelling of phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortmann, Saskia B; Espeel, Marc; Almeida, Ligia; Reimer, Annette; Bosboom, Dennis; Roels, Frank; de Brouwer, Arjan P M; Wevers, Ron A

    2015-01-01

    Since the proposal to define a separate subgroup of inborn errors of metabolism involved in the biosynthesis and remodelling of phospholipids, sphingolipids and long chain fatty acids in 2013, this group is rapidly expanding. This review focuses on the disorders involved in the biosynthesis of phospholipids. Phospholipids are involved in uncountable cellular processes, e.g. as structural components of membranes, by taking part in vesicle and mitochondrial fusion and fission or signal transduction. Here we provide an overview on both pathophysiology and the extremely heterogeneous clinical presentations of the disorders reported so far (Sengers syndrome (due to mutations in AGK), MEGDEL syndrome (or SERAC defect, SERAC1), Barth syndrome (or TAZ defect, TAZ), congenital muscular dystrophy due to CHKB deficiency (CHKB). Boucher-Neuhäuser/Gordon Holmes syndrome (PNPLA6), PHARC syndrome (ABHD12), hereditary spastic paraplegia type 28, 54 and 56 (HSP28, DDHD1; HSP54, DDHD2; HSP56, CYP2U1), Lenz Majewski syndrome (PTDSS1), spondylometaphyseal dysplasia with cone-rod dystrophy (PCYT1A), atypical haemolytic-uremic syndrome due to DGKE deficiency (DGKE). PMID:25178427

  12. Health effects of dietary phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Küllenberg Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Beneficial effects of dietary phospholipids (PLs have been mentioned since the early 1900's in relation to different illnesses and symptoms, e.g. coronary heart disease, inflammation or cancer. This article gives a summary of the most common therapeutic uses of dietary PLs to provide an overview of their approved and proposed benefits; and to identify further investigational needs. From the majority of the studies it became evident that dietary PLs have a positive impact in several diseases, apparently without severe side effects. Furthermore, they were shown to reduce side effects of some drugs. Both effects can partially be explained by the fact that PL are highly effective in delivering their fatty acid (FA residues for incorporation into the membranes of cells involved in different diseases, e.g. immune or cancer cells. The altered membrane composition is assumed to have effects on the activity of membrane proteins (e.g. receptors by affecting the microstructure of membranes and, therefore, the characteristics of the cellular membrane, e.g. of lipid rafts, or by influencing the biosynthesis of FA derived lipid second messengers. However, since the FAs originally bound to the applied PLs are increased in the cellular membrane after their consumption or supplementation, the FA composition of the PL and thus the type of PL is crucial for its effect. Here, we have reviewed the effects of PL from soy, egg yolk, milk and marine sources. Most studies have been performed in vitro or in animals and only limited evidence is available for the benefit of PL supplementation in humans. More research is needed to understand the impact of PL supplementation and confirm its health benefits.

  13. Vanadogermanate cluster anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, T; Wang, X; Jacobson, A J

    2003-06-16

    Three novel vanadogermanate cluster anions have been synthesized by hydrothermal reactions. The cluster anions are derived from the (V(18)O(42)) Keggin cluster shell by substitution of V=O(2+) "caps" by Ge(2)O(OH)(2)(4+) species. In Cs(8)[Ge(4)V(16)O(42)(OH)(4)].4.7H(2)O, 1, (monoclinic, space group C2/c (No. 15), Z = 8, a = 44.513(2) A, b = 12.7632(7) A, c = 22.923(1) A, beta = 101.376(1) degrees ) and (pipH(2))(4)(pipH)(4)[Ge(8)V(14)O(50).(H(2)O)] (pip = C(4)N(2)H(10)), 2 (tetragonal, space group P4(2)/nnm (No. 134), Z = 2, a = 14.9950(7) A, c = 18.408(1) A), two and four VO(2+) caps are replaced, respectively, and each cluster anion encapsulates a water molecule. In K(5)H(8)Ge(8)V(12)SO(52).10H(2)O, 3, (tetragonal, space group I4/m (No. 87), Z = 2, a = 15.573(1) A, c = 10.963(1) A), four VO(2+) caps are replaced by Ge(2)O(OH)(2)(4+) species, and an additional two are omitted. The cluster ion in 3 contains a sulfate anion disordered over two positions. The cluster anions are analogous to the vanadoarsenate anions [V(18)(-)(n)()As(2)(n)()O(42)(X)](m)(-) (X = SO(3), SO(4), Cl; n = 3, 4) previously reported. PMID:12793808

  14. Clathrin-coated vesicles in nervous tissue are involved primarily in synaptic vesicle recycling

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The recycling of synaptic vesicles in nerve terminals is thought to involve clathrin-coated vesicles. However, the properties of nerve terminal coated vesicles have not been characterized. Starting from a preparation of purified nerve terminals obtained from rat brain, we isolated clathrin-coated vesicles by a series of differential and density gradient centrifugation steps. The enrichment of coated vesicles during fractionation was monitored by EM. The final fraction consisted of greater tha...

  15. Human Monoclonal Antiphospholipid Antibodies Disrupt the Annexin A5 Anticoagulant Crystal Shield on Phospholipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Jacob H.; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Quinn, Anthony S.; Chen, Pojen P.; McCrae, Keith R.; Bovill, Edwin G.; Taatjes, Douglas J.

    2003-01-01

    The antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome is an autoimmune condition that is marked by recurrent pregnancy losses and/or systemic vascular thrombosis in patients who have antibodies against phospholipid/co-factor complexes. The mechanism(s) for pregnancy losses and thrombosis in this condition is (are) not known. Annexin A5 is a potent anticoagulantprotein, expressed by placental trophoblasts and endothelial cells, that crystallizes over anionic phospholipids, shielding them from availability for coagulation reactions. We previously presented data supporting the hypothesis that aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the anticoagulant annexin A5 shield could be a thrombogenic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. However, this has remained a subject of controversy. We therefore used atomic force microscopy, a method previously used to study the crystallization of annexin A5, to image the effects of monoclonal human aPL antibodies on the crystal structure of the protein over phospholipid bilayers. In the presence of the aPL monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and β2-GPI, the major aPL co-factor, structures presumed to be aPL mAb-antigen complexes were associated with varying degrees of disruption to the annexin A5 crystallization pattern over the bilayer. In addition, measurements of prothrombinase activity on the phospholipid bilayers showed that the aPL mAbs reduced the anti-coagulant effect of annexin A5 and promoted thrombin generation. These data provide morphological evidence that support the hypothesis that aPL antibodies can disrupt annexin A5 binding to phospholipid membranes and permit increased generation of thrombin. The aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 anticoagulant shield may be an important prothrombotic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. PMID:12937161

  16. Hemoglobin-Vesicles as Oxygen Carriers : Influence on Phagocytic Activity and Histopathological Changes in Reticuloendothelial System

    OpenAIRE

    Sakai, Hiromi; Horinouchi, Hirohisa; Tomiyama, Kenichi; IKEDA, EIJI; Takeoka, Shinji; Kobayashi, Koichi; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2001-01-01

    Hemoglobin-vesicles (HbV) have been developed for use as artificial oxygen carriers (particle diameter, 250 nm) in which a purified Hb solution is encapsulated with a phospholipid bilayer membrane. The influence of HbV on the reticuloendothelial system was studied by carbon clearance measurements and histopathological examination. The HbV suspension ([Hb] = 10 g/dl) was intravenously infused in male Wistar rats at dose rates of 10 and 20 ml/kg, and the phagocytic activity was measured by moni...

  17. Harnessing steric hindrance to control interfacial adsorption of patchy nanoparticles onto hairy vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, Fikret; Uppaladadium, Geetartha; Dutt, Meenakshi

    2016-05-01

    Via the Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulation technique we investigate the interfacial adsorption of nanoparticles with a binding site onto a hairy vesicle encompassing phospholipids and lipids functionalized with oligo ethylene glycol (OEG) chain. The functionalized nanoparticles are modeled as patchy spherical particles. We examine the relation between the relative concentration and size of the OEG chains, the adsorption kinetics, life-time and post-adsorption dynamics of the nanoparticles. We also draw correspondence with experimental studies on the adsorption of proteins onto the surface of colloidal particles. Results from our investigations can elucidate the fundamental factors and mechanisms controlling the adsorption of functionalized nanoparticles onto colloidal particles. PMID:26896651

  18. Nano-encapsulation of capsaicin on lipid vesicle and evaluation of their hepatocellular protective effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Tapan Kumar; Mukherjee, Payel; Barman, Tapan Kumar; Maity, Subhasis

    2016-07-01

    The intention of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of nanocapsulated food constituent capsaicin in protection of liver oxidative stress. We had prepared phospholipid vesicle (nanoliposome) by formation of thin lipid film followed by hydration when the mean vesicle diameter was found to be 277.7nm. Protection from sodium fluoride (NaF) induced oxidative stress by capsaicin loaded nanoliposomal formulation were tested in rats where a single dose of capsaicin in free and nanoliposome forms were administered after two hour of exposure to NaF. Membrane in hepatic cells were damaged by NaF and it was evaluated by estimating reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation, and catalase activity when it was observed that free capsaicin produced mild protection whereas liposomal capsaicin exerted a significant result. This can be suggested that liposome encapsulating capsaicin acts as a promising therapeutic agent in reducing liver oxidative stress produced by different stress factors. PMID:27032489

  19. Specific and Reversible DNA-Directed Self-Assembly of Modular Vesicle-Droplet Hybrid Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadorn, Maik; Boenzli, Eva; Hanczyc, Martin M

    2016-04-19

    Modular hybrid structures functionalized to assemble in a controlled manner possess diverse properties necessary for a new generation of complex materials and applications. Here, we functionalized giant unilamellar vesicles and emulsion droplets with biotinylated single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides using streptavidin as an intermediary linker to demonstrate specific and reversible DNA-directed self-assembly into vesicle-droplet hybrid structures. A low molar percentage of PEGylated phospholipids independent of the DNA-based recognition machinery at the supramolecular surface modulated the stability of the system. The reversibility of the aggregation was demonstrated by heating the hybrid structures above the melting temperature of the conjoining double-stranded DNA in the presence of excess biotin. The application of this general assembly control system to diverse multiphase soft materials provides the mechanism to assemble complex modular hybrid systems in a controllable and reversible way, which may provide an advantage where multifunctionality is a target property. PMID:27010467

  20. From self-assembled vesicles to protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Irene A; Walde, Peter

    2010-07-01

    Self-assembled vesicles are essential components of primitive cells. We review the importance of vesicles during the origins of life, fundamental thermodynamics and kinetics of self-assembly, and experimental models of simple vesicles, focusing on prebiotically plausible fatty acids and their derivatives. We review recent work on interactions of simple vesicles with RNA and other studies of the transition from vesicles to protocells. Finally we discuss current challenges in understanding the biophysics of protocells, as well as conceptual questions in information transmission and self-replication. PMID:20519344

  1. Pros and cons of phospholipid asymmetry in erythrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiswarya Sathi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Phospholipids of erythrocyte are found as bilayer with choline containing phospholipid like phosphatidyl choline and sphingomylein in the outer layer and amine containing phospholipid like phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidyl serine in the inner layer. This arrangement is known as phospholipid asymmetry. Lipid asymmetry is maintained throughout the entire life span of red blood cell and is disturbed when cells enter into the stage of apoptosis. We here discuss some of the conditions in which phospholipid asymmetry of erythrocyte is maintained and disturbed and the various detection methods to check the distortion phospholipid asymmetry of it.

  2. Vesicle Geometries Enabled by Dynamically Trapped States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaye; Yao, Zhenwei; Olvera de la Cruz, Monica

    2016-02-23

    Understanding and controlling vesicle shapes is a fundamental challenge in biophysics and materials design. In this paper, we design dynamic protocols for enlarging the shape space of both fluid and crystalline vesicles beyond the equilibrium zone. By removing water from within the vesicle at different rates, we numerically produced a series of dynamically trapped stable vesicle shapes for both fluid and crystalline vesicles in a highly controllable fashion. In crystalline vesicles that are continuously dehydrated, simulations show the initial appearance of small flat areas over the surface of the vesicles that ultimately merge to form fewer flat faces. In this way, the vesicles transform from a fullerene-like shape into various faceted polyhedrons. We perform analytical elasticity analysis to show that these salient features are attributable to the crystalline nature of the vesicle. The potential to use dynamic protocols, such as those used in this study, to engineer vesicle shape transformations is helpful for exploiting the richness of vesicle geometries for desired applications. PMID:26795199

  3. Formation of Oligovesicular Vesicles by Micromanipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihisa Okumura

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Cell-sized lipid bilayer membrane vesicles (giant vesicles, GVs or semi-vesicles were formed from egg yolk phosphatidylcholine on a platinum electrode under applied electric voltage by electroformation. Micromanipulation of the semi-vesicle by first pressing its membrane with a glass microneedle and then withdrawing the needle left a GV in the interior of the vesicle. During the process, an aqueous solution of Ficoll that filled the needle was introduced into the newly formed inner vesicle and remained encapsulated. Approximately 50% of attempted micromanipulation resulted in the formation of an inner daughter vesicle, “microvesiculation”. By repeating the microvesiculation process, multiple inner GVs could be formed in a single parent semi-vesicle. A semi-vesicle with inner GVs could be detached from the electrode by scraping with a microneedle, yielding an oligovesicular vesicle (OVV with desired inner aqueous contents. Microvesiculation of a GV held on the tip of a glass micropipette was also possible, and this also produced an OVV. Breaking the membrane of the parent semi-vesicle by micromanipulation with a glass needle after microvesiculation, released the inner GVs. This protocol may be used for controlled formation of GVs with desired contents.

  4. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    Model calculations based on the multiple equilibrium approach indicate that the spontaneous formation of geometrically closed bilayer vesicles is geared primarily by the bilayer tension which in turn is largely determined by the work of bending the bilayer into a spherical vesicle. and a statisti......Model calculations based on the multiple equilibrium approach indicate that the spontaneous formation of geometrically closed bilayer vesicles is geared primarily by the bilayer tension which in turn is largely determined by the work of bending the bilayer into a spherical vesicle. and a...... orders of magnitude larger than where the local free energy minima of the equilibrium vesicle actually occur. Moreover, according to our analysis, the relative width of a vesicle size distribution, sigma(R)/R-max, is generally at full equilibrium equal to 0.283, independently of the energetic vesicle...

  5. Phospholipid-polymer amphiphile hybrid assemblies and their interaction with macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerselvam, Karthiga; Lynge, Martin E; Riber, Camilla Frich; Mena-Hernando, Sofia; Smith, Anton A A; Goldie, Kenneth N; Zelikin, Alexander N; Städler, Brigitte

    2015-09-01

    Recently, the combination of lipids and block copolymers has become an alternative to liposomes and polymersomes as nano-sized drug carriers. We synthesize novel block copolymers consisting of poly(cholesteryl acrylate) as the hydrophobic core and poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) as the hydrophilic extensions. Their successful phospholipid-assisted assembly into vesicles is demonstrated using the evaporation-hydration method. The preserved thermo-responsive property of the lipid-polymer hybrids is shown by a temperature dependent adsorption behaviour of the vesicles to poly(l lysine) coated surfaces. As expected, the vesicle adsorption is found to be higher at elevated temperatures. The cellular uptake efficiency of hybrids is assessed using macrophages with applied shear stress. The amount of adhering macrophages is affected by the time and level of applied shear stress. Further, it is found that shorter PNIPAAm extensions lead to higher uptake of the assemblies by the macrophages with applied shear stress. No inherent cytotoxicity is observed at the tested conditions. Taken together, this first example of responsive lipid-polymer hybrids, and their positive biological evaluation makes them promising nano-sized drug carrier candidates. PMID:26339330

  6. Anion Ordering in Bichalcogenides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Valldor

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This review contains recent developments and new insights in the research on inorganic, crystalline compounds with two different chalcogenide ions (bichalcogenides. Anion ordering is used as a parameter to form structural dimensionalities as well as local- and global-electric polarities. The reason for the electric polarity is that, in the heterogeneous bichalcogenide lattice, the individual bond-lengths between cations and anions are different from those in a homogeneous anion lattice. It is also shown that heteroleptic tetrahedral and octahedral coordinations offer a multitude of new crystal fields and coordinations for involved cations. This coordination diversity in bichalcogenides seems to be one way to surpass electro-chemical redox potentials: three oxidation states of a single transition metal can be stabilized, e.g., Ba15V12S34O3. A new type of disproportionation, related to coordination, is presented and results from chemical pressure on the bichalcogenide lattices of (La,CeCrS2O, transforming doubly [CrS3/3S2/2O1/1]3− (5+1 into singly [CrS4/2S2/3]7/3− (6+0 and [CrS4/3O2/1]11/3− (4+2 coordinations. Also, magnetic anisotropy is imposed by the anion ordering in BaCoSO, where magnetic interactions via S or O occur along two different crystallographic directions. Further, the potential of the anion lattice is discussed as a parameter for future materials design.

  7. Storage stability of marine phospholipids emulsions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale;

    Marine phospholipids (MPL) are believed to provide more advantages than fish oil from the same source. They are considered to have a better bioavailability, a better resistance towards oxidation and a higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic...... acids (DHA) than oily triglycerides (fish oil). Therefore, the objective of this study is to explore the feasibility of using marine phospholipids emulsions as delivery system through investigation of the physical, oxidative and hydrolytic stability of MPL emulsions with or without addition of fish oil....... The effect of initial Peroxide Value, total lipids, phospholipids and antioxidants content on stability of MPL emulsions were studied. The physical stability was investigated through measurement of particle size distribution and creaming stability, which involve measurement of changes (%) in emulsion volume...

  8. Packing of ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, J.; Kuhl, T.L.; Kjær, K.; Smith, G.S.

    2001-01-01

    Using synchrotron grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXD) and reflectivity, the in-plane and out-of-plane structure of mixed ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers was investigated at the air-water interface. Mixed monolayers of 0, 5, 10, 20, and 100 mol% ganglioside GM, and the phospholipid...... DPPE monolayer and does not distort the hexagonal in-plane unit cell or out-of-plane two-dimensional (2-D) packing compared with a pure DPPE monolayer. The oligosaccharide headgroups were found to extend normally from the monolayer surface, and the incorporation of these glycolipids into DPPE...... monolayers did not affect hydrocarbon tail packing (fluidization or condensation of the hydrocarbon region). This is in contrast to previous investigations of lipopolymer-lipid mixtures, where the packing structure of phospholipid monolayers was greatly altered by the inclusion of lipids bearing hydrophilic...

  9. Immunotherapeutic potential of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eZhang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles or EVs is a term that encompasses all classes of secreted lipid membrane vesicles. Despite being scientific novelties, EVs are gaining importance as a mediator of important physiological and pathological intercellular activities possibly through the transfer of their cargo of protein and RNA between cells. In particular, exosomes the currently best characterized EVs have been notable for their in vitro and in vivo immunomodulatory activities. Exosomes are nanometer-sized endosome-derived vesicles secreted by many cell types and their immunomodulatory potential is independent of their cell source. Besides immune cells such as dendritic cells, macrophages and T cells, cancer and stem cells also secrete immunologically active exosomes that could influence both physiological and pathological processes. The immunological activities of exosomes affect both innate and adaptive immunity and include antigen presentation, T cell activation, T cell polarisation to Tregs, immune suppression and anti-inflammation. As such, exosomes carry much immunotherapeutic potential as a therapeutic agent and a therapeutic target.

  10. Phospholipids accumulation in mucolipidosis IV cultured fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargal, R; Bach, G

    1988-01-01

    Cultured fibroblasts from mucolipidosis IV patients accumulated phospholipids when compared to normal controls or cells from other genotypes. The major stored compounds were identified as phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and to a larger extent lysophosphatidylcholine and lysobisphosphatidic acid. Pulse chase experiments of 32P-labelled phospholipids showed increased retention of these compounds in the mucolipidosis IV lines throughout the pulse and chase periods. Phospholipase A1, A2, C, D and lysophospholipase showed normal activity in the mucolipidosis IV lines and thus the metabolic cause for this storage remains to be identified. PMID:3139925

  11. Resident CAPS on dense-core vesicles docks and primes vesicles for fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabachinski, Greg; Kielar-Grevstad, D Michelle; Zhang, Xingmin; James, Declan J; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-02-15

    The Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis of dense-core vesicles in neuroendocrine cells requires a priming step during which SNARE protein complexes assemble. CAPS (aka CADPS) is one of several factors required for vesicle priming; however, the localization and dynamics of CAPS at sites of exocytosis in live neuroendocrine cells has not been determined. We imaged CAPS before, during, and after single-vesicle fusion events in PC12 cells by TIRF micro-scopy. In addition to being a resident on cytoplasmic dense-core vesicles, CAPS was present in clusters of approximately nine molecules near the plasma membrane that corresponded to docked/tethered vesicles. CAPS accompanied vesicles to the plasma membrane and was present at all vesicle exocytic events. The knockdown of CAPS by shRNA eliminated the VAMP-2-dependent docking and evoked exocytosis of fusion-competent vesicles. A CAPS(ΔC135) protein that does not localize to vesicles failed to rescue vesicle docking and evoked exocytosis in CAPS-depleted cells, showing that CAPS residence on vesicles is essential. Our results indicate that dense-core vesicles carry CAPS to sites of exocytosis, where CAPS promotes vesicle docking and fusion competence, probably by initiating SNARE complex assembly. PMID:26700319

  12. Spectrin-phospholipid interaction. A monolayer study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mombers, C.; Gier, J. de; Demel, R.A.; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1980-01-01

    1.(1) The interaction of synthetic and natural phospholipids with spectrin, purified from human erythrocyte membranes, was studied using the monolayer technique at constant surface pressure. Spectrin penetration into the lipid monolayer was recorded as the rate of surface area increase on a two-comp

  13. Computer simulations of phospholipid - membrane thermodynamic fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, U.R.; Peters, Günther H.j.; Schröder, T.B.;

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports all-atom computer simulations of five phospholipid membranes, DMPC, DPPC, DMPG, DMPS, and DMPSH, with a focus on the thermal equilibrium fluctuations of volume, energy, area, thickness, and order parameter. For the slow fluctuations at constant temperature and pressure (defined...

  14. Synaptic Vesicle Proteins and Active Zone Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittel, Robert J.; Heckmann, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Neurotransmitter is released from synaptic vesicles at the highly specialized presynaptic active zone (AZ). The complex molecular architecture of AZs mediates the speed, precision and plasticity of synaptic transmission. Importantly, structural and functional properties of AZs vary significantly, even for a given connection. Thus, there appear to be distinct AZ states, which fundamentally influence neuronal communication by controlling the positioning and release of synaptic vesicles. Vice versa, recent evidence has revealed that synaptic vesicle components also modulate organizational states of the AZ. The protein-rich cytomatrix at the active zone (CAZ) provides a structural platform for molecular interactions guiding vesicle exocytosis. Studies in Drosophila have now demonstrated that the vesicle proteins Synaptotagmin-1 (Syt1) and Rab3 also regulate glutamate release by shaping differentiation of the CAZ ultrastructure. We review these unexpected findings and discuss mechanistic interpretations of the reciprocal relationship between synaptic vesicles and AZ states, which has heretofore received little attention.

  15. Phase Transition Induced Fission in Lipid Vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Leirer, C; Myles, V M; Schneider, M F

    2010-01-01

    In this work we demonstrate how the first order phase transition in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can function as a trigger for membrane fission. When driven through their gel-fluid phase transition GUVs exhibit budding or pearl formation. These buds remain connected to the mother vesicle presumably by a small neck. Cooling these vesicles from the fluid phase (T>Tm) through the phase transition into the gel state (Tvesicle remains intact. Pearling tubes which formed upon heating break-up and decay into multiple individual vesicles which then diffuse freely. Finally we demonstrate that mimicking the intracellular bulk viscosity by increasing the bulk viscosity to 40cP does not affect the overall fission process, but leads to a significant decrease in size of the released vesicles.

  16. Ultrasound-responsive ultrathin multiblock copolyamide vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Yu, Chunyang; Huang, Tong; Xu, Shuting; Bai, Yongping; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2016-02-01

    This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation.This study reports the self-assembly of novel polymer vesicles from an amphiphilic multiblock copolyamide, and the vesicles show a special structure with an ultrathin wall thickness of about 4.5 nm and a combined bilayer and monolayer packing model. Most interestingly, the vesicles are ultrasound-responsive and can release the encapsulated model drugs in response to ultrasonic irradiation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of experiments and characterization, and FT-IR, TEM, DPD, FL and micro-DSC results. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08596a

  17. Phase Transition Induced Fission in Lipid Vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Leirer, C.; Wunderlich, B.; Myles, V.M.; Schneider, M F

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this work we demonstrate how the first order phase transition in giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) can function as a trigger for membrane fission. When driven through their gel-fluid phase transition GUVs exhibit budding or pearl formation. These buds remain connected to the mother vesicle presumably by a small neck. Cooling these vesicles from the fluid phase (T>Tm) through the phase transition into the gel state (T

  18. Identification of coated vesicles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Clathrin-coated vesicles were found in yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and enriched from spheroplasts by a rapid procedure utilizing gel filtration on Sephacryl S-1000. The coated vesicles (62-nm diam) were visualized by negative stain electron microscopy and clathrin triskelions were observed by rotary shadowing. The contour length of a triskelion leg was 490 nm. Coated vesicle fractions contain a prominent band with molecular weight of approximately 185,000 when analyzed by SDS PAGE. The p...

  19. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  20. Isolation of functional, coated, endocytic vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Brief internalization of [125I]transferrin was used to label coated endocytic vesicles, which were then purified using a combination of 2H2O and 2H2O/Ficoll density gradients. Purification was monitored using an assay measuring fusion of endocytic organelles, so as to isolate functional vesicles. Isolated vesicles had all the properties of clathrin-coated vesicles, being enriched for the major components of clathrin coats and uncoated by either 1 M Tris-HCl or an uncoating ATPase. Nearly half...

  1. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G. [Department of Neuroscience, Room 215, Stemmler Hall, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zorec, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Zorec@mf.uni-lj.si [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  2. Membrane vesicles: A simplified system for studying auxin transport. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, M.H.M.

    1989-12-31

    Indoleacetic acid (IAA), the auxin responsible for regulation of growth, is transported polarly in plants. Several different models have been suggested to account for IAA transport by cells and its accumulation by membrane vesicles. One model sees diffusion of IAA driven by a pH gradient. The anion of a lipophilic weak acid like IAA or butyrate accumulates in an alkaline compartment in accord with the size of the pH gradient The accumulation of IAA may be diminished by the permeability of its lipophilic anion. This anion leak may be blocked by NPA. With anion efflux blocked, a gradient of two pH units would support an IAA accumulation of less than 50-fold at equilibrium (2) Another model sees diffusion of IAA in parallel with a saturable symport (IAA{sup {minus}} + nH{sup +}), driven by both the pH gradient and membrane voltage. Such a symport should be highly accumulative, however, with a lipophilic weak acid such as IAA, net diffusive efflux of IAAH whenever IAAHI{sub i} > IAAH{sub o} would constitute a leak. (3) A third model sees a pH change driven IAA uptake and saturable symport enhanced by internal binding sites. Following pH gradient-driven accumulation of IAA, the anion may bind to an intravesicular site, permitting further uptake of IAA. NPA, by blocking anion efflux, enhances this binding. We have reported that membrane vesicles isolated from actively growing plant tissues are a good system for studying the mechanisms involved in the transport and accumulation of auxin.

  3. OVARIAN CALCIFICATION MIMICKING VESICLE CALCULUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pallavi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Calcification in ovary is usually dystrophic in natu re, forming secondary to degeneration of the epithelium or in association wit h areas of necrosis. It may occur in cases of endometriosis [1] or in some ovarian tumor eg. Fibro thecoma [2] , Brenner’s tumor [3] , cavernous hemangioma [4] etc. Benign unilateral densely calcified ovary wit hout any association with tumor or endometriosis has not been reported previously. We report a case of heavily calcified left ovary which mimicked as vesicle calculus on X- ray leading to confusion in diagnosis.

  4. Biophysical studies of cholesterol in unsaturated phospholipid model membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Justin Adam

    PUFAs can incorporate into lipid rafts, which are domains enriched in SM and chol in the plasma membrane, and potentially disrupt the activity of signaling proteins that reside therein. DHA, furthermore, may be the more potent component of fish oil. PUFA-chol interactions were also examined through affinity measurements. A novel method utilizing electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) was developed, to monitor the partitioning of a spin-labeled analog of chol, 3beta-doxyl-5alpha-cholestane (chlstn), between large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) and methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (mbetaCD). The EPR spectra for chlstn in the two environments are distinguishable due to the substantial differences in tumbling rates, allowing the population distribution ratio to be determined by spectral simulation. Advantages of this approach include speed of implementation and avoidance of potential artifacts associated with physical separation of LUV and mbetaCD. Additionally, in a check of the method, the relative partition coefficients between lipids measured for the spin label analog agree with values obtained for chol by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Results from LUV with different composition confirmed a hierarchy of decreased sterol affinity for phospholipids with increasing acyl chain unsaturation, PDPC possessing half the affinity of the corresponding monounsaturated phospholipid. Taken together, the results of these studies on model membranes demonstrate the potential for PUFA-driven alteration of the architecture of biomembranes, a mechanism through which human health may be impacted.

  5. Synthesis of magnetic Fe3O4 particles covered with a modifiable phospholipid coat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports the synthesis of iron oxide cores by coprecipitation of Fe2+ and Fe3+ ions with NaHCO3 or NH3. Depending on the experimental conditions, particles of two different sizes (13 or 130 nm diameter) were produced. X-ray diffractometry revealed Fe3O4 (magnetite) to be the main constituent. The smaller particles, which, in contrast to the larger ones, are superparamagnetic, were stabilized with a phospholipid bilayer consisting of a 9:1 molar ratio of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol, thereby creating so-called magnetoliposomes. In a subsequent step, poly(ethylene glycol)-(PEG-) derivatized dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine was introduced into the lipid envelope by incubating the magnetoliposomes with pre-formed sonicated vesicles containing the PEGylated lipid. The mechanism by which lipid transfer occurred was determined from the kinetic profiles. The relevance of these observations to a wide range of biomedical applications is briefly discussed

  6. Synthesis of magnetic Fe sub 3 O sub 4 particles covered with a modifiable phospholipid coat

    CERN Document Server

    Cuyper, M D; Lueken, H; Hodenius, M

    2003-01-01

    This work reports the synthesis of iron oxide cores by coprecipitation of Fe sup 2 sup + and Fe sup 3 sup + ions with NaHCO sub 3 or NH sub 3. Depending on the experimental conditions, particles of two different sizes (13 or 130 nm diameter) were produced. X-ray diffractometry revealed Fe sub 3 O sub 4 (magnetite) to be the main constituent. The smaller particles, which, in contrast to the larger ones, are superparamagnetic, were stabilized with a phospholipid bilayer consisting of a 9:1 molar ratio of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol, thereby creating so-called magnetoliposomes. In a subsequent step, poly(ethylene glycol)-(PEG-) derivatized dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine was introduced into the lipid envelope by incubating the magnetoliposomes with pre-formed sonicated vesicles containing the PEGylated lipid. The mechanism by which lipid transfer occurred was determined from the kinetic profiles. The relevance of these observations to a wide range of biomedical applicat...

  7. Resonant spectra of quadrupolar anions

    CERN Document Server

    Fossez, K; Nazarewicz, W; Michel, N; Garrett, W R; Płoszajczak, M

    2016-01-01

    In quadrupole-bound anions, an extra electron is attached at a sufficiently large quadrupole moment of a neutral molecule, which is lacking a permanent dipole moment. The nature of the bound states and low-lying resonances of such anions is of interest for understanding the threshold behavior of open quantum systems in general. In this work, we investigate the properties of quadrupolar anions as extreme halo systems, the formation of rotational bands, and the transition from a subcritical to supercritical electric quadrupole moment. We solve the electron-plus-molecule problem using a non-adiabatic coupled-channel formalism by employing the Berggren ensemble, which explicitly contains bound states, narrow resonances, and the scattering continuum. We demonstrate that binding energies and radii of quadrupolar anions strictly follow the scaling laws for two-body halo systems. Contrary to the case of dipolar anions, ground-state band of quadrupolar anions smoothly extend into the continuum, and many rotational ban...

  8. Amyloglucosidase enzymatic reactivity inside lipid vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jin-Woo

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Efficient functioning of enzymes inside liposomes would open new avenues for applications in biocatalysis and bioanalytical tools. In this study, the entrapment of amyloglucosidase (AMG (EC 3.2.1.3 from Aspergillus niger into dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC multilamellar vesicles (MLVs and large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs was investigated. Negative-stain, freeze-fracture, and cryo-transmission electron microscopy images verified vesicle formation in the presence of AMG. Vesicles with entrapped AMG were isolated from the solution by centrifugation, and vesicle lamellarity was identified using fluorescence laser confocal microscopy. The kinetics of starch hydrolysis by AMG was modeled for two different systems, free enzyme in aqueous solution and entrapped enzyme within vesicles in aqueous suspension. For the free enzyme system, intrinsic kinetics were described by a Michaelis-Menten kinetic model with product inhibition. The kinetic constants, Vmax and Km, were determined by initial velocity measurements, and Ki was obtained by fitting the model to experimental data of glucose concentration-time curves. Predicted concentration-time curves using these kinetic constants were in good agreement with experimental measurements. In the case of the vesicles, the time-dependence of product (glucose formation was experimentally determined and simulated by considering the kinetic behavior of the enzyme and the permeation of substrate into the vesicle. Experimental results demonstrated that entrapped enzymes were much more stable than free enyzme. The entrapped enzyme could be recycled with retention of 60% activity after 3 cycles. These methodologies can be useful in evaluating other liposomal catalysis operations.

  9. Bound anionic states of adenine

    OpenAIRE

    Harańczyk, Maciej; Gutowski, Maciej; Li, Xiang; Bowen, Kit H.

    2007-01-01

    Anionic states of nucleic acid bases are involved in DNA damage by low-energy electrons and in charge transfer through DNA. Previous gas phase studies of free, unsolvated nucleic acid base parent anions probed only dipole-bound states, which are not present in condensed phase environments, but did not observe valence anionic states, which for purine bases are thought to be adiabatically unbound. Contrary to this expectation, we have demonstrated that some thus far ignored tautomers of adenine...

  10. Conducting gramicidin channel activity in phospholipid monolayers.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Nelson

    2001-01-01

    Potential step amperometry (chronoamperometry) of the Tl(I)/Tl(Hg) electrochemical reduction process has been used to investigate the underlying mechanisms of gramicidin activity in phospholipid monolayers. The experiments were carried out at gramicidin-modified dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC)-coated electrodes. Application of a potential step to the coated electrode system results in a current transient that can be divided into two regions. An initial exponential decay of current corresp...

  11. Dietary Phospholipids and Intestinal Cholesterol Absorption

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Tandy; Chung, Rosanna W. S.; Elaine Wat; Alvin Kamili; Cohn, Jeffrey S.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments carried out with cultured cells and in experimental animals have consistently shown that phospholipids (PLs) can inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption. Limited evidence from clinical studies suggests that dietary PL supplementation has a similar effect in man. A number of biological mechanisms have been proposed in order to explain how PL in the gut lumen is able to affect cholesterol uptake by the gut mucosa. Further research is however required to establish whether the abili...

  12. Group B streptococcal phospholipid causes pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Curtis, Jerri; Kim, Geumsoo; Wehr, Nancy B.; Levine, Rodney L

    2003-01-01

    Group B Streptococcus is the most common cause of bacterial infection in the newborn. Infection in many cases causes persistent pulmonary hypertension, which impairs gas exchange in the lung. We purified the bacterial components causing pulmonary hypertension and identified them as cardiolipin and phosphatidylglycerol. Synthetic cardiolipin or phosphatidylglycerol also induced pulmonary hypertension in lambs. The recognition that bacterial phospholipids may cause pulmonary hypertension in new...

  13. Reversibly formed bilayer vesicles: Energetics and polydispersity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergstöm, M.

    1997-01-01

    statistical-mechanical factor that accounts for the fluctuations in composition, chain packing density and shape. We demonstrate that the free energy required to form a spherical vesicle is made up of two main contributions: the (size-independent) work of bending the constituent monolayers and the work of......Model calculations based on the multiple equilibrium approach indicate that the spontaneous formation of geometrically closed bilayer vesicles is geared primarily by the bilayer tension which in turn is largely determined by the work of bending the bilayer into a spherical vesicle. and a...... stretching the bilayer that is determined by the planar bilayer tension. A previously undiscovered contribution to the work of bending a vesicle bilayer, originating from geometrical packing constraints, is presented. On this basis we obtain vesicle size distributions with maxima located at radii several...

  14. Alternative methods for characterization of extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh eMomen-Heravi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles are nano-sized vesicles released by all cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Their role has been implicated mainly in cell-cell communication, but also in disease biomarkers and more recently in gene delivery. They represent a snapshot of the cell status at the moment of release and carry bioreactive macromolecules such as nucleic acids, proteins and lipids. A major limitation in this emerging new field is the availability/awareness of techniques to isolate and properly characterize Extracellular vesicles. The lack of gold standards makes comparing different studies very difficult and may potentially hinder some Extracellular vesicles -specific evidence. Characterization of Extracellular vesicles has also recently seen many advances with the use of Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis (NTA, flow cytometry, cryo-EM instruments and proteomic technologies. In this review, we discuss the latest developments in translational technologies involving characterization methods including the facts in their support and the challenges they face.

  15. Annexin-Phospholipid Interactions. Functional Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Turnay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Annexins constitute an evolutionary conserved multigene protein superfamily characterized by their ability to interact with biological membranes in a calcium dependent manner. They are expressed by all living organisms with the exception of certain unicellular organisms. The vertebrate annexin core is composed of four (eight in annexin A6 homologous domains of around 70 amino acids, with the overall shape of a slightly bent ring surrounding a central hydrophilic pore. Calcium- and phospholipid-binding sites are located on the convex side while the N-terminus links domains I and IV on the concave side. The N-terminus region shows great variability in length and amino acid sequence and it greatly influences protein stability and specific functions of annexins. These proteins interact mainly with acidic phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, but differences are found regarding their affinity for lipids and calcium requirements for the interaction. Annexins are involved in a wide range of intra- and extracellular biological processes in vitro, most of them directly related with the conserved ability to bind to phospholipid bilayers: membrane trafficking, membrane-cytoskeleton anchorage, ion channel activity and regulation, as well as antiinflammatory and anticoagulant activities. However, the in vivo physiological functions of annexins are just beginning to be established.

  16. Hepatic Bel-7402 Cell Proliferation on Different Phospholipid Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Phospholipids are believed to be important biomaterials.However, limited information is available on their cytocompatibilities.The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of different phospholipids on the proliferation of hepatic Bel-7402 cells by comparing the adhesion, viability and proliferation of Bel-7402 cells cultured on different phospholipid surfaces.The cell adhesion, determined by counting the number of adhered cells to the surface, indicated that the cell adhesion was enhanced on charged phospolipid membranes.The cell viability evaluated by MTT[3 (4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium-bromide] showed that cells cultured on charged phospholipids have greater viability than those cultured on the control, while cells cultured on neutral phospholipids showed lower viability.The cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry demonstrated that S phase entry increased on charged phospholipids, while S phase entry decreased on neutral phospholipids.The results suggested that charged phospholipids, especially positively charged phospholipids, show better cytocompatibilities than neutral phospholipids to hepatic Bel-7402 cell.

  17. Mechanisms, pools, and sites of spontaneous vesicle release at synapses of rod and cone photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cork, Karlene M; Van Hook, Matthew J; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2016-08-01

    Photoreceptors have depolarized resting potentials that stimulate calcium-dependent release continuously from a large vesicle pool but neurons can also release vesicles without stimulation. We characterized the Ca(2+) dependence, vesicle pools, and release sites involved in spontaneous release at photoreceptor ribbon synapses. In whole-cell recordings from light-adapted horizontal cells (HCs) of tiger salamander retina, we detected miniature excitatory post-synaptic currents (mEPSCs) when no stimulation was applied to promote exocytosis. Blocking Ca(2+) influx by lowering extracellular Ca(2+) , by application of Cd(2+) and other agents reduced the frequency of mEPSCs but did not eliminate them, indicating that mEPSCs can occur independently of Ca(2+) . We also measured release presynaptically from rods and cones by examining quantal glutamate transporter anion currents. Presynaptic quantal event frequency was reduced by Cd(2+) or by increased intracellular Ca(2+) buffering in rods, but not in cones, that were voltage clamped at -70 mV. By inhibiting the vesicle cycle with bafilomycin, we found the frequency of mEPSCs declined more rapidly than the amplitude of evoked excitatory post-synaptic currents (EPSCs) suggesting a possible separation between vesicle pools in evoked and spontaneous exocytosis. We mapped sites of Ca(2+) -independent release using total internal reflectance fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy to visualize fusion of individual vesicles loaded with dextran-conjugated pHrodo. Spontaneous release in rods occurred more frequently at non-ribbon sites than evoked release events. The function of Ca(2+) -independent spontaneous release at continuously active photoreceptor synapses remains unclear, but the low frequency of spontaneous quanta limits their impact on noise. PMID:27255664

  18. Interaction of cord factor (alpha, alpha'-trehalose-6,6'-dimycolate) with phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, L M; Spargo, B J; Ioneda, T; Beaman, B L; Crowe, J H

    1994-08-24

    We previously reported that cord factor (alpha,alpha'-trehalose-6,6'-dimycolate) isolated from Nocardia asteroides strain GUH-2 strongly inhibits fusion between unilamellar vesicles containing acidic phospholipid. We chose to study the effects of this molecule on liposome fusion since the presence of N. asteroides GUH-2 in the phagosomes of mouse macrophages had been shown to prevent phagosomal acidification and inhibit phagosome-lysosome fusion. A virtually non-virulent strain, N. asteroides 10905, does not prevent acidification or phagosome-lysosome fusion and, further, contains only trace amounts of cord factor. In the present paper, we have investigated the effects of cord factor on phospholipid bilayers that could be responsible for the inhibition of fusion. We show that cord factor increases molecular area, measured by isothermal compression of a monolayer film, in a mixed monolayer more than would be expected based in its individual contribution to molecular area. Cord factor, as well as other glycolipids investigated, increased the overall hydration of bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine by 50%, as estimated from the unfrozen water fraction measured by differential scanning calorimetry. The effect of calcium on this increased molecular area and headgroup hydration was measured by fluorescence anisotropy and FTIR spectroscopy of phosphatidylserine liposomes. Both techniques showed that cord factor, incorporated at 10 mol%, increased acyl chain disorder over controls in the presence of Ca2+. However, FTIR showed that cord factor did not prevent headgroup dehydration by the Ca2+. The other glycolipids tested did not prevent either the Ca(2+)-induced chain crystallization or headgroup dehydration of phosphatidylserine bilayers. These data point to a possible role of the bulky mycolic acids of cord factor in preventing Ca(2+)-induced fusion of liposomes containing acidic phospholipids. PMID:8075141

  19. Some relationships between membrane phospholipid domains, conformational order, and cell shape in intact human erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D J; Gioioso, S; Sills, R H; Mendelsohn, R

    1999-01-01

    A novel method developed in this laboratory [D.J. Moore et al., Biochemistry 35 (1996) 229-235; D.J. Moore et al., Biochemistry 36 (1997) 660-664] to study the conformational order and the propensity for domain formation of specific phospholipids in intact human erythrocytes is extended to two additional species. Acyl chain perdeuterated 1,2-dilauroylphosphatidylethanolamine (diC12PE-d46) was incorporated preferentially (in separate experiments) into the inner leaflet of stomatocytic erythrocytes and into the outer leaflet of echinocytic erythrocytes, while acyl chain perdeuterated 1,2-dipentadecanoylphosphatidylcholine (diC15PC-d58) was incorporated into the outer leaflet of echinocytic erythrocytes. The conformational order and phase behavior of the incorporated molecules were monitored through FT-IR studies of the temperature dependence of the CD2 stretching vibrations. For both diC12PE-d46 and diC15PC-d58, the gel-->liquid crystal phase transition persisted when these lipids were located in the outer leaflet of echinocytic cells, a result indicative of the persistence of phospholipid domains. In each case, the transition widths were broadened compared to the pure lipids, suggestive of either small domains or the presence of additional molecular components within the domains. The conformational order of diC12PE-d46 differed markedly depending on its location and the morphology of the cells. When located predominantly in the inner membrane of stomatocytes, the phase transition of this species was abolished and the conformational order compared with pure lipid vesicles at the same temperature was much lower. The current results along with our previous studies provide a sufficient experimental basis to deduce some general principles of phospholipid conformational order and organization in both normal and shape-altered erythrocytes. PMID:9889394

  20. Mass-spectrometry-based molecular characterization of extracellular vesicles: lipidomics and proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreimer, Simion; Belov, Arseniy M; Ghiran, Ionita; Murthy, Shashi K; Frank, David A; Ivanov, Alexander R

    2015-06-01

    This review discusses extracellular vesicles (EVs), which are submicron-scale, anuclear, phospholipid bilayer membrane enclosed vesicles that contain lipids, metabolites, proteins, and RNA (micro and messenger). They are shed from many, if not all, cell types and are present in biological fluids and conditioned cell culture media. The term EV, as coined by the International Society of Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV), encompasses exosomes (30-100 nm in diameter), microparticles (100-1000 nm), apoptotic blebs, and other EV subsets. EVs have been implicated in cell-cell communication, coagulation, inflammation, immune response modulation, and disease progression. Multiple studies report that EV secretion from disease-affected cells contributes to disease progression, e.g., tumor niche formation and cancer metastasis. EVs are attractive sources of biomarkers due to their biological relevance and relatively noninvasive accessibility from a range of physiological fluids. This review is focused on the molecular profiling of the protein and lipid constituents of EVs, with emphasis on mass-spectrometry-based "omic" analytical techniques. The challenges in the purification and molecular characterization of EVs, including contamination of isolates and limitations in sample quantities, are discussed along with possible solutions. Finally, the review discusses the limited but growing investigation of post-translational modifications of EV proteins and potential strategies for future in-depth molecular characterization of EVs. PMID:25927954

  1. Transition from long- to short-lived transient pores in giant vesicles in an aqueous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Nicolas; Cribier, Sophie; Pincet, Frédéric

    2006-12-01

    We have observed large pores in the membrane of giant vesicles in an aqueous medium. The lifetime of the pores can reach 2min and their size (a few micrometers) enables their visualization by fluorescence microscopy. These pores are obtained thanks to a destabilization of the membrane due to the synergistic action of a cone-shaped and nitrobenzodiazole (NBD) labeled phospholipid illuminated in the presence of dithionite. The opening of the pore occurs immediately after illumination starts so that it can be accurately triggered. A concomitant decrease of the vesicle radius is observed; we interpret it as a solubilization of the membrane. Depending on the rate of this solubilization, long- or short-lived pores were observed. At the transition between both regimes for a 30μm vesicle, the solubilization rate was about 1/300s-1 . In order to interpret these observations, we have revisited the current model of pore opening to take into account this solubilization. This proposed model along with simulations enables us to prove that solubilization explains why the large long-lived pores are observed even in an aqueous medium. The model also predicts the solubilization rate at the transition between a single long-lived pore and a cascade of short-lived pores.

  2. Cl-, Na+, and H+ fluxes during the acidification of rabbit reticulocyte endocytic vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionic fluxes associated with the ATP-dependent acidification of endocytic vesicles were studied in a preparation isolated from rabbit reticulocytes enriched for transferrin-transferrin receptor complexes. No vesicle acidification was observed in the absence of intra- and extravesicular ions sucrose(in)/sucrose(out), while maximal acidification was observed with NaCl(in)/KCl(out).K+(in) was a poor substitute for Na+(in), and Cl-(out) could be replaced by other anions with the following efficacy of acidification: Cl- greater than Br- greater than I- greater than PO4(3-) greater than gluconate greater than SO4(2-). Flux studies using 36Cl- and 22Na+ showed that the vesicles had a permeability for Cl- and Na+, and that ATP-dependent H+ pumping was accompanied by a net influx of Cl- and a net efflux of Na+ provided that there was a Na+ concentration gradient. After 3 mins, the time necessary to maximal acidification, the electrical charge generated by the entrance of H+ was countered to about 45% by the Cl- influx and to about 42% by the Na+ efflux. These studies demonstrated that both Cl- and Na+ fluxes are necessary for optimal endocytic vesicle acidification

  3. On the Computing Potential of Intracellular Vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Mayne

    Full Text Available Collision-based computing (CBC is a form of unconventional computing in which travelling localisations represent data and conditional routing of signals determines the output state; collisions between localisations represent logical operations. We investigated patterns of Ca2+-containing vesicle distribution within a live organism, slime mould Physarum polycephalum, with confocal microscopy and observed them colliding regularly. Vesicles travel down cytoskeletal 'circuitry' and their collisions may result in reflection, fusion or annihilation. We demonstrate through experimental observations that naturally-occurring vesicle dynamics may be characterised as a computationally-universal set of Boolean logical operations and present a 'vesicle modification' of the archetypal CBC 'billiard ball model' of computation. We proceed to discuss the viability of intracellular vesicles as an unconventional computing substrate in which we delineate practical considerations for reliable vesicle 'programming' in both in vivo and in vitro vesicle computing architectures and present optimised designs for both single logical gates and combinatorial logic circuits based on cytoskeletal network conformations. The results presented here demonstrate the first characterisation of intracelluar phenomena as collision-based computing and hence the viability of biological substrates for computing.

  4. Stochastic simulations of mixed-lipid compartments: from self-assembling vesicles to self-producing protocells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Mirazo, Kepa; Piedrafita, Gabriel; Ciriaco, Fulvio; Mavelli, Fabio

    2011-01-01

    The computational platform ENVIRONMENT, developed to simulate stochastically reaction systems in varying compartmentalized conditions [Mavelli and Ruiz-Mirazo: Philos Trans R Soc Lond B Biol Sci 362:1789-1802, 2007; Physical Biology 7(3): 036002, 2010], is here applied to study the dynamic properties and stability of model protocells that start producing their own lipid molecules (e.g., phospholipids), which get inserted in previously self-assembled vesicles, made of precursor amphiphiles (e.g., fatty acids). Attention is mainly focused on the changes that this may provoke in the permeability of the compartment, as well as in its eventual osmotic robustness. PMID:21431610

  5. Membrane interactions of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers and encapsulation efficiencies of a RIP II protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manojlovic, V; Winkler, K; Bunjes, V; Neub, A; Schubert, R; Bugarski, B; Leneweit, G

    2008-07-15

    Membrane interactions of liposomes of ternary phospholipid/cholesterol bilayers are investigated. These interactions lead to discoidal deformations and regular aggregations and are strongly enhanced by the presence of mistletoe lectin (ML), a RIP II type protein. The encapsulation of ML into liposomal nanocapsules is studied with a systematic variation of the lipid composition to monitor its effect on the physical properties: entrapment, mean size, morphology, and stability. Extrusion of multilamellar vesicles through filters 80 nm pore size was used for the generation of liposomes. The mean sizes of liposomes ranged between 120 and 200 nm in diameter with narrow size distributions. The increase in flow rate with pressure for three dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC)/cholesterol (Chol)/dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid mixtures was linear and allowed to extrapolate to the minimum burst pressure of the liposomal bilayers. From the minimum pressures P(min), the bilayer lysis tensions gamma(l) were determined. The increase in P(min) and gamma(l) with an increasing content of a saturated phosopholipid (DPPC) indicates that DPPC increases the mechanical strength of lipid bilayers. Apparently, DPPC, like cholesterol, leads to a less compressible surface and a more cohesive membrane. After preparation, vesicle solutions were purified by gel permeation chromatography to separate encapsulated ML from free ML in the extravesicular solution. Purified liposomes were then characterized. The content of entrapped and adsorbed ML was measured using ELISA. Repetitive freezing/thawing cycles prior to extrusion significantly increased ML uptake. On the contrary, adsorption was not affected neither by lipid composition, nor concentration and preparation. Differences in experimental encapsulation efficiency only reflect the differences in the mean vesicle sizes of the different samples as is revealed by a comparison to a theoretical estimate. Cryo-transmission electron

  6. Periodic synthesis of phospholipids during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, E A; Bender, R A

    1987-01-01

    Net phospholipid synthesis is discontinuous during the Caulobacter crescentus cell cycle with synthesis restricted to two discrete periods. The first period of net phospholipid synthesis begins in the swarmer cell shortly after cell division and ends at about the time when DNA replication initiates. The second period of phospholipid synthesis begins at a time when DNA replication is about two-thirds complete and ends at about the same time that DNA replication terminates. Thus, considerable D...

  7. Critical assessment of phospholipid measurement in amniotic fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badham, L P; Worth, H G

    1975-09-01

    We assessed several methods of inorganic phosphate assay for their suitability in estimating phospholipids in digested extracts of amniotic fluids. The extraction and digestion procedures used for phospholipids from amniotic fluid were also examined critically. The effect of contamination by blood or obstetric cream has been examined. Accordingly, we suggest a method for measuring total phospholipids in amniotic fluids, and results of it are compared with the lecithin/sphingomyelin ratio measurement in some clinical situations. PMID:1157310

  8. Marine Phospholipids: Methods to Measure Oxidation Status and Stability

    OpenAIRE

    Evensen, Henning

    2014-01-01

    Marine phospholipids (MPL) have a higher content of the omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA than triacylglycerols from the same source. In addition they have been shown to have a better bioavailability, and a better resistance towards oxidation. However, marine phospholipids are highly susceptible to oxidation because of the high amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. This makes it challenging to incorporate phospholipids in food products. Knowledge of the oxidative status and stability of marine...

  9. Ascorbyl palmitate interaction with phospholipid monolayers: electrostatic and rheological preponderancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottola, Milagro; Wilke, Natalia; Benedini, Luciano; Oliveira, Rafael Gustavo; Fanani, Maria Laura

    2013-11-01

    Ascorbyl palmitate (ASC16) is an anionic amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest due to its antioxidant properties. We found that ASC16 strongly interacted with model membranes. ASC16 penetrated phospholipid monolayers, with a cutoff near the theoretical surface pressure limit. The presence of a lipid film at the interface favored ASC16 insertion compared with a bare air/water surface. The adsorption and penetration time curves showed a biphasic behavior: the first rapid peak evidenced a fast adsorption of charged ASC16 molecules to the interface that promoted a lowering of surface pH, thus partially neutralizing and compacting the film. The second rise represented an approach to the equilibrium between the ASC16 molecules in the subphase and the surface monolayer, whose kinetics depended on the ionization state of the film. Based on the Langmuir dimiristoylphosphatidylcholine+ASC16 monolayer data, we estimated an ASC16 partition coefficient to dimiristoylphosphatidylcholine monolayers of 1.5×10(5) and a ΔGp=-6.7kcal·mol(-1). The rheological properties of the host membrane were determinant for ASC16 penetration kinetics: a fluid membrane, as provided by cholesterol, disrupted the liquid-condensed ASC16-enriched domains and favored ASC16 penetration. Subphase pH conditions affected ASC16 aggregation in bulk: the smaller structures at acidic pHs showed a faster equilibrium with the surface film than large lamellar ones. Our results revealed that the ASC16 interaction with model membranes has a highly complex regulation. The polymorphism in the ASC16 bulk aggregation added complexity to the equilibrium between the surface and subphase form of ASC16, whose understanding may shed light on the pharmacological function of this drug. PMID:23806650

  10. Swelling of phospholipids by monovalent salt

    OpenAIRE

    Petrache, Horia I.; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Harries, Daniel; Kučerka, Norbert; Nagle, John F.; Parsegian, V. Adrian

    2005-01-01

    Critical to biological processes such as membrane fusion and secretion, ion-lipid interactions at the membrane-water interface still raise many unanswered questions. Using reconstituted phosphatidylcholine membranes, we confirm here that multilamellar vesicles swell in salt solutions, a direct indication that salt modifies the interactions between neighboring membranes. By varying sample histories, and by comparing with data from ion carrier-containing bilayers, we eliminate the possibility t...

  11. Enzyme catalysed production of phospholipids with modified fatty acid profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk

    2006-01-01

    projektet var at udvikle processer baseret på enzymatisk interesterificering til produktion af phospholipider med specifik fedtsyre profil (strukturerede phospholipider), og opsætning af membrane separationssystemer til oprensning af strukturerede phospholipider efter reaktion. Produktionen af strukturerede...... under dette arbejde udviklet en ”downstream” proces, som involver ultrafiltrering. I apolære solventer har phospholipider tendens til a danne ”reverse micelles”, som kan adskilles fra fedtsyrer og solvent ved anvendelse af passende membraner. Ydermere blev fysiske egenskaber af specifikke strukturerede...

  12. The oxidized phospholipid PazePC promotes permeabilization of mitochondrial membranes by Bax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lidman, Martin; Pokorná, Šárka; Dingeldein, Artur P G; Sparrman, Tobias; Wallgren, Marcus; Šachl, Radek; Hof, Martin; Gröbner, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    Mitochondria play a crucial role in programmed cell death via the intrinsic apoptotic pathway, which is tightly regulated by the B-cell CLL/lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2) protein family. Intracellular oxidative stress causes the translocation of Bax, a pro-apoptotic family member, to the mitochondrial outer membrane (MOM) where it induces membrane permeabilization. Oxidized phospholipids (OxPls) generated in the MOM during oxidative stress directly affect the onset and progression of mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. Here we use MOM-mimicking lipid vesicles doped with varying concentrations of 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PazePC), an OxPl species known to significantly enhance Bax-membrane association, to investigate three key aspects of Bax's action at the MOM: 1) induction of Bax pores in membranes without additional mediator proteins, 2) existence of a threshold OxPl concentration required for Bax-membrane action and 3) mechanism by which PazePC disturbs membrane organization to facilitate Bax penetration. Fluorescence leakage studies revealed that Bax-induced leakage, especially its rate, increased with the vesicles' PazePC content without any detectable threshold neither for OxPl nor Bax. Moreover, the leakage rate correlated with the Bax to lipid ratio and the PazePC content. Solid state NMR studies and calorimetric experiments on the lipid vesicles confirmed that OxPl incorporation disrupted the membrane's organization, enabling Bax to penetrate into the membrane. In addition, 15N cross polarization (CP) and insensitive nuclei enhanced by polarization transfer (INEPT) MAS NMR experiments using uniformly (15)N-labeled Bax revealed dynamically restricted helical segments of Bax embedded in the membrane, while highly flexible protein segments were located outside or at the membrane surface. PMID:26947183

  13. Motional Coherence in Fluid Phospholipid Membranes

    CERN Document Server

    Rheinstadter, Maikel C; Flenner, Elijah J; Bruening, Beate; Seydel, Tilo; Kosztin, Ioan

    2008-01-01

    We report a high energy-resolution neutron backscattering study, combined with in-situ diffraction, to investigate slow molecular motions on nanosecond time scales in the fluid phase of phospholipid bilayers of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phoshatidylcholine (DMPC) and DMPC/40% cholesterol (wt/wt). A cooperative structural relaxation process was observed. From the in-plane scattering vector dependence of the relaxation rates in hydrogenated and deuterated samples, combined with results from a 0.1 microsecond long all atom molecular dynamics simulation, it is concluded that correlated dynamics in lipid membranes occurs over several lipid distances, spanning a time interval from pico- to nanoseconds.

  14. Dolichol phosphate induces non-bilayer structures, vesicle fusion and transbilayer movements of lipids in model membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Kruijff, B.; Van Duijn, G.; Valtersson, C.; Chojnacki, T.; Verkleij, A.J.; Dallner, G.

    1987-05-01

    The effect of dolichols, polyprenols, dolichol esterified with fatty acids, and dolichol phosphate on the structure and fluidity of model membranes was studied using different biophysical techniques. These studies suggest that (1) dolichol and dolichol derivatives destabilize unsaturated PE-containing bilayers and promote hexagonal II phase formation; (2) high concentrations of dolichol induce lipid structures characterized by isotropic T P NMR and particulate fracture faces. The effect of dolichol and dolichyl phosphate on fusion between large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC and DOPE was studied using a fluroescence resonance energy transfer assay. The influence of dolichyl phosphate on the transbilary movement of DOPC in multilamellar vesicles (MLV) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) composed of DOPC and DOPE (1:2) was investigated by using the PC-specified transfer protein. The results indicate that: (1) both dolichol and dolichyl phosphate enhance vesicle fusion in a comparable and concentration-dependent way; (2) the amount of exchangeable PC from MLVs is increased by dolichyl phosphate probably as a result of fusion processes. It thus appears that these polyprenols are potent destabilizers of bilayer structure and that this process is accompanied by membrane fusion and transbilayer transport of phospholipids.

  15. Dolichol phosphate induces non-bilayer structures, vesicle fusion and transbilayer movements of lipids in model membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of dolichols, polyprenols, dolichol esterified with fatty acids, and dolichol phosphate on the structure and fluidity of model membranes was studied using different biophysical techniques. These studies suggest that (1) dolichol and dolichol derivatives destabilize unsaturated PE-containing bilayers and promote hexagonal II phase formation; (2) high concentrations of dolichol induce lipid structures characterized by isotropic 31P NMR and particulate fracture faces. The effect of dolichol and dolichyl phosphate on fusion between large unilamellar vesicles of DOPC and DOPE was studied using a fluroescence resonance energy transfer assay. The influence of dolichyl phosphate on the transbilary movement of DOPC in multilamellar vesicles (MLV) and large unilamellar vesicles (LUV) composed of DOPC and DOPE (1:2) was investigated by using the PC-specified transfer protein. The results indicate that: (1) both dolichol and dolichyl phosphate enhance vesicle fusion in a comparable and concentration-dependent way; (2) the amount of exchangeable PC from MLVs is increased by dolichyl phosphate probably as a result of fusion processes. It thus appears that these polyprenols are potent destabilizers of bilayer structure and that this process is accompanied by membrane fusion and transbilayer transport of phospholipids

  16. Chemical Modeling of Cometary Anions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordiner, Martin; Charnley, S. B.

    2009-09-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of 1P/Halley. The anions O-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not previously been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydrodynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of the hydrocarbon and nitrile anions Cn-, CnH- and CnN- in the coma. We calculate the effects of these anions on the charge balance and examine their impact on cometary coma chemistry. References: Chaizy, P. et al. 1991, Nature, 349, 393 Rodgers, S.D. & Charnley, S.B. 2002, MNRAS, 330, 660

  17. Dynamics of a compound vesicle: numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan; Young, Yuan-Nan; Vlahovska, Petia; Blawzdziewicz, Jerzy

    2010-11-01

    Vesicles (self-enclosing lipid membranes) in simple linear flows are known to exhibit rich dynamics such as tank-treading, tumbling, trembling (swinging), and vacillating breathing. Recently, vesicles have been used as a multi-functional platform for drug-delivery. In this work, the dynamics of simplified models for such compound vesicles is investigated numerically using a state-of-the-art boundary-integral code that has been validated with high accuracy and efficiency. Results show that for a vesicle enclosing a rigid particle in a simple shear flow, transition from tank-treading to tumbling is possible even in the absence of viscosity mismatch in the interior and exterior fluids. We will discuss the shape transformations, multiple particle interactions and the flow properties. Comparison with results from analytical modeling gives insights to the underlying physics for such novel dynamics.

  18. Kinetic regulation of coated vesicle secretion

    CERN Document Server

    Foret, Lionel

    2008-01-01

    The secretion of vesicles for intracellular transport often rely on the aggregation of specialized membrane-bound proteins into a coat able to curve cell membranes. The nucleation and growth of a protein coat is a kinetic process that competes with the energy-consuming turnover of coat components between the membrane and the cytosol. We propose a generic kinetic description of coat assembly and the formation of coated vesicles, and discuss its implication to the dynamics of COP vesicles that traffic within the Golgi and with the Endoplasmic Reticulum. We show that stationary coats of fixed area emerge from the competition between coat growth and the recycling of coat components, in a fashion resembling the treadmilling of cytoskeletal filaments. We further show that the turnover of coat components allows for a highly sensitive switching mechanism between a quiescent and a vesicle producing membrane, upon a slowing down of the exchange kinetics. We claim that the existence of this switching behaviour, also tri...

  19. New mechanisms of vesicles migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aursulesei, Viviana; Vasincu, Decebal; Timofte, Daniel; Vrajitoriu, Lucia; Gatu, Irina; Iacob, Dan D; Ghizdovat, Vlad; Buzea, Calin; Agop, Maricel

    2016-07-01

    In multicellular organisms, both health and disease are defined by means of communication patterns involving the component cells. Despite the intricate networks of soluble mediators, cells are also programed to exchange complex messages pre-assembled as multimolecular cargo of membranous structures known as extracellular vesicles (EVs). Several biogenetic pathways produce EVs with different properties able to orchestrate neighboring cell reactions or to establish an environment ripe for spreading tumor cells. Such an effect is in fact an extension of similar physiological roles played by exosomes in guiding cell migration under nontumoral tissue remodeling and organogenesis. We start with a biological thought experiment equivalent to Bénard's experiment, involving a fluid layer of EVs adherent to an extracellular matrix, in a haptotactic gradient, then, we build and present the first Lorenz model for EVs migration. Using Galerkin's method of reducing a system of partial differential equations to a system of ordinary differential equations, a biological Lorenz system is developed. Such a physical frame distributing individual molecular or exosomal type cell-guiding cues in the extracellular matrix space could serve as a guide for tissue neoformation of the budding pattern in nontumoral or tumoral instances. PMID:27045674

  20. Bacterial Outer Membrane Vesicles and Vaccine Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Valerie A. Ferro; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A...

  1. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Reinaldo eAcevedo; Sonsire eFernandez; Caridad eZayas; Armando eAcosta; Maria Elena Sarmiento; Valerie A. Ferro; Einar eRosenqvist; Concepcion eCampa; Daniel eCardoso; Luis eGarcia; Jose Luis Perez

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cu...

  2. Na+ uptake into colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na+ uptake was studied in colonic enterocyte membrane vesicles prepared from normal and dexamethasone-treated rats. Vesicles from rats treated with dexamethasone demonstrated a fivefold greater 22Na+ uptake compared with vesicles from normal rats. Most of the tracer uptake in membranes derived from treated rats occurred through a conductive, amiloride-blockable pathway located in vesicles with low native K+ permeability and high Cl- permeability. Kinetic analysis of the amiloride inhibition curve revealed the presence of two amiloride-blockable pathways, one with a high affinity accounting for 85% of the uptake, and one with a low affinity accounting for only 12% of the uptake. Only the low-affinity pathway was detected with vesicles from normal rats. The high sensitivity to amiloride, the dependence on dexamethasone pretreatment, and the relative permeabilities to K+ and Cl- indicate that most of the 22Na+ uptake in membranes derived from treated rats is through a Na+-specific channel located in apical membrane vesicles. Preincubation of the isolated cells from dexamethasone-treated rats at 37 degree C in Ca2+-free solutions before homogenization and membrane vesicle purification caused a 5- to 10-fold increase in amiloride-blockable 22Na+ uptake compared with vesicles derived from cells maintained at 0 degree C. The addition of Ca2+, but not of Mg2+, to the incubation solution markedly reduced this temperature-dependent enhancement in 22Na+ uptake. These results suggest that Na+ transport in colonic enterocytes from dexamethasone-treated rats is regulated by a Ca2+-dependent, temperature-sensitive process which causes a sustained change in the apical membrane

  3. Vesicle-associated melanization in Cryptococcus neoformans

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenman, Helene C; FRASES, SUSANA; Nicola, André M; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Recently, several pathogenic fungi were shown to produce extracellular vesicles that contain various components associated with virulence. In the human pathogenic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans, these components included laccase, an enzyme that catalyses melanin synthesis. Spherical melanin granules have been observed in the cell wall of C. neoformans. Given that melanin granules have dimensions that are comparable to those of extracellular vesicles, and that metazoan organisms produce melani...

  4. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in synaptic vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Pang, D T; Wang, J K; Valtorta, F; Benfenati, F; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation in purified synaptic vesicles from rat forebrain has been studied in the presence of Mn2+ and orthovanadate. High levels of endogenous protein tyrosine phosphorylation were observed. Four major phosphoproteins, with apparent molecular masses of 105, 94, 38, and 30 kDa, were shown to contain phosphotyrosine. The 38-kDa phosphoprotein was identified as synaptophysin (p38), a well-characterized integral membrane protein of synaptic vesicles. The three other phosp...

  5. Role of Matrix Vesicles in Biomineralization

    OpenAIRE

    Golub, Ellis E.

    2009-01-01

    Matrix vesicles have been implicated in the mineralization of calcified cartilage, bone and dentin for more than 40 years. During this period, their exact role, if any in the nucleation of hydroxyapatite mineral, and its subsequent association with the collagen fibrils in the organic matrix has been debated and remains controversial. Several hypotheses have been recently introduced to explain in greater detail how matrix vesicles function in biomineralization. This review will summarize recen...

  6. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    OpenAIRE

    Sayaka Oshikawa; Hiroko Sonoda; Masahiro Ikeda

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs fro...

  7. Phosphazene-promoted anionic polymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Junpeng

    2014-01-01

    In the recent surge of metal-free polymerization techniques, phosphazene bases have shown their remarkable potential as organic promoters/catalysts for the anionic polymerization of various types of monomers. By complexation with the counterion (e.g. proton or lithium cation), phosphazene base significantly improve the nucleophilicity of the initiator/chain-end resulting in rapid and usually controlled anionic/quasi-anionic polymerization. In this review, we will introduce the general mechanism, i.e. in situ activation (of initiating sites) and polymerization, and summarize the applications of such a mechanism on macromolecular engineering toward functionalized polymers, block copolymers and complex macromolecular architectures.

  8. Hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Hadorn

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic life contains hierarchical vesicular architectures (i.e. organelles that are crucial for material production and trafficking, information storage and access, as well as energy production. In order to perform specific tasks, these compartments differ among each other in their membrane composition and their internal cargo and also differ from the cell membrane and the cytosol. Man-made structures that reproduce this nested architecture not only offer a deeper understanding of the functionalities and evolution of organelle-bearing eukaryotic life but also allow the engineering of novel biomimetic technologies. Here, we show the newly developed vesicle-in-water-in-oil emulsion transfer preparation technique to result in giant unilamellar vesicles internally compartmentalized by unilamellar vesicles of different membrane composition and internal cargo, i.e. hierarchical unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity. The compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles were subsequently isolated by a separation step exploiting the heterogeneity of the membrane composition and the encapsulated cargo. Due to the controlled, efficient, and technically straightforward character of the new preparation technique, this study allows the hierarchical fabrication of compartmentalized giant unilamellar vesicles of controlled compositional heterogeneity and will ease the development of eukaryotic cell mimics that resemble their natural templates as well as the fabrication of novel multi-agent drug delivery systems for combination therapies and complex artificial microreactors.

  9. Phase-Field Modeling of Lipid Vesicles With Pores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Saman; Salac, David

    2013-11-01

    The formation and annihilation of pores in a lipid vesicle membrane is critical to a number of biotechnologies, such as drug delivery. Previous models of vesicle behavior have ignored the influence of topological changes in the vesicle membrane. Here the entire Helfrich model of a vesicle membrane is considered. Topological changes in the vesicle membrane, such as the formation of a pore, are captured through the use of an embedded phase-field model. The numerical method and sample results will be presented.

  10. Purification of coated vesicles by agarose gel electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    We have applied agarose gel electrophoresis as a novel step in the purification of clathrin-coated vesicles. Preparations of coated vesicles obtained by sedimentation velocity and isopycnic centrifugation are resolved into two distinct fractions upon electrophoresis. The slower migrating fraction contains smooth vesicles, whereas the faster contains only coated vesicles and empty clathrin coats. The faster mobility of the coated vesicles is primarily caused by the acidic nature of clathrin. C...

  11. Mobility and Turnover of Vesicles at the Synaptic Ribbon

    OpenAIRE

    LoGiudice, Lisamarie; Sterling, Peter; Matthews, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Ribbon synapses release neurotransmitter continuously at high rates, and the ribbons tether a large pool of synaptic vesicles. To determine if the tethered vesicles are actually released, we tracked vesicles labeled with FM4-64 dye in mouse retinal bipolar cell terminals whose ribbons had been labeled with a fluorescent peptide. We photobleached vesicles in regions with ribbons and without them and then followed recovery of fluorescence as bleached regions were repopulated by labeled vesicles...

  12. Interaction of anti-phospholipid antibodies with late endosomes of human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galve-de Rochemonteix, B; Kobayashi, T; Rosnoblet, C; Lindsay, M; Parton, R G; Reber, G; de Maistre, E; Wahl, D; Kruithof, E K; Gruenberg, J; de Moerloose, P

    2000-02-01

    Anti-phospholipid antibodies (APLAs) are associated with thrombosis and/or recurrent pregnancy loss. APLAs bind to anionic phospholipids directly or indirectly via a cofactor such as beta(2)-glycoprotein 1 (beta(2)GPI). The lipid target of APLA is not yet established. Recently, we observed that APLAs in vitro can bind lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). The internal membranes of late endosomes are enriched in this phospholipid. The current study was undertaken to determine to what extent binding of APLA to LBPA is correlated with binding to cardiolipin and to beta(2)GPI and to determine whether patient antibodies interact with late endosomes of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and thus modify the intracellular trafficking of proteins. Binding of patient immunoglobulin G (n=37) to LBPA was correlated significantly with binding to cardiolipin. Although LBPA binding was correlated to a lesser extent with beta(2)GPI binding, we observed that beta(2)GPI binds with high affinity to LBPA. Immunofluorescence studies showed that late endosomes of HUVECs contain LBPA. Patient but not control antibodies recognized late endosomes, but not cardiolipin-rich mitochondria, even when we used antibodies that were immunopurified on cardiolipin. Incubation of HUVECs with patient plasma samples immunoreactive toward LBPA resulted in an accumulation of the antibodies in late endosomes and led to a redistribution of the insulinlike growth factor 2/mannose-6-phosphate receptor from the Golgi apparatus to late endosomes. Our results suggest that LBPA is an important lipid target of APLA in HUVECs. These antibodies are internalized by the cells and accumulate in late endosomes. By modifying the intracellular trafficking of proteins, APLA could contribute to several of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms leading to the antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:10669657

  13. Investigation of nano lipid vesicles of methotrexate for anti-rheumatoid activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabhu P

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prabhakara Prabhu1, Rakshith Shetty1, Marina Koland1, K Vijayanarayana3, KK Vijayalakshmi2, M Harish Nairy1, GS Nisha11Department of Pharmaceutics, Nitte University, NGSM Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Paneer, Deralakatte, Mangalore, Karnataka, India; 2Department of Applied Zoology, Mangalore University, Konaje, Mangalore, Karnataka, India; 3Department of Pharmacy Practice, Manipal University, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal, Karnataka, IndiaBackground: The purpose of this study was to formulate and evaluate nano lipid vesicles of methotrexate (MTX for its anti-rheumatoid activity.Methods: In this study the principle of both active as well as passive targeting using MTX-loaded stealth liposomes as per the magic gun approach was followed. Stealth liposomes of MTX were prepared by thin-film hydration method using a PEGylated phospholipid-like DSPE-MPEG 2000. Similarly, conventional liposomes were prepared using phospholipids like DPPC and DSPC. Conventional liposomes were coated with a hydrophilic biocompatible polymer like chitosan. They were investigated for their physical properties and in vitro release profile. Further, in vivo screening of the formulations for their anti-rheumatoid efficacy was carried out in rats. Rheumatoid arthritis was induced in male Wistar-Lewis rats using complete Freund’s adjuvant (1 mg/mL Mycobacterium tuberculosis, heat killed in mineral oil.Results: It was found that chitosan coating of the conventional liposomes increased the physical stability of the liposomal suspension as well as its entrapment efficiency. The size of the unsonicated lipid vesicles was found to be in the range of 8–10 µm, and the sonicated lipid vesicles in the range of 210–260 nm, with good polydispersity index. Further, chitosan-coated conventional liposomes and the PEGylated liposomes released the drug for a prolonged period of time, compared to the uncoated conventional liposomes. It was found that there

  14. Anion Transport with Chalcogen Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Sebastian; Macchione, Mariano; Verolet, Quentin; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    In this report, we introduce synthetic anion transporters that operate with chalcogen bonds. Electron-deficient dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophenes (DTTs) are identified as ideal to bind anions in the focal point of the σ holes on the cofacial endocyclic sulfur atoms. Anion binding in solution and anion transport across lipid bilayers are found to increase with the depth of the σ holes of the DTT anionophores. These results introduce DTTs and related architectures as a privileged motif to engineer chalcogen bonds into functional systems, complementary in scope to classics such as 2,2'-bipyrroles or 2,2'-bipyridines that operate with hydrogen bonds and lone pairs, respectively. PMID:27433964

  15. Screening for the drug-phospholipid interaction: correlation to phospholipidosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alakoskela, Juha-Matti; Vitovic, Pavol; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2009-01-01

    Phospholipid bilayers represent a complex, anisotropic environment fundamentally different from bulk oil or octanol, for instance. Even "simple" drug association to phospholipid bilayers can only be fully understood if the slab-of-hydrocarbon approach is abandoned and the complex, anisotropic pro...

  16. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe; Dopson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow. PMID:27167213

  17. Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Felipe Pineda De Castro

    Full Text Available In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow.

  18. Generation, modulation and maintenance of the plasma membrane asymmetric phospholipid composition in yeast cells during growth: their relation to surface potential and membrane protein activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerbón, J; Calderón, V

    1995-04-12

    During growth a cyclic exposure of anionic phospholipids to the external surface of the plasma membrane was found. The surface charge density (sigma) increased gradually reaching a maximum in the first 5 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial value at the end of the logarithmic phase of growth (10-12 h). Phosphatidylinositol, that determines to a large extent the magnitude of the sigma, increased 83% in the yeast cells during the first 4 h of growth and returned gradually to their initial level at 10-12 h. During the stationary phase (12-24 h), both sigma and the anionic/zwitterionic phospholipid ratio, remained without any significant variation. The high-affinity H-linked glutamate transport system that behaves as a sensor of the changes in the membrane surface potential (phi) increased its activity in the first 5 h and then decreased it, following with great accuracy the sigma variations and remained without changes during the stationary phase of growth. The phosphatidylserine (PS) relative concentration in the cells (9.0%) did not significantly change during the whole growth curve, but their asymmetric distribution varied, contributing to the changes in sigma. PS facing the outer membrane surface increased 2.45-times during the first 5 h of growth and then returned to their original value at the end of the log phase (12 h). Phosphatidylcholine (PC) remained constant during the whole growth curve (50%), while phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) decreased 3-fold in the first 4 h and then increased to its original value at 10 h. Interestingly, PE at the outer membrane surface remained constant (3% of the total phospholipids) during the whole growth curve. During growth yeast cells change their phospholipid composition originating altered patterns of the plasma membrane phospholipid composition and IN-OUT distribution. This dynamic asymmetry is involved in the regulation of the surface potential and membrane protein activity. PMID:7718598

  19. Regulation of lung surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goss, Victoria; Hunt, Alan N; Postle, Anthony D

    2013-02-01

    The alveolar type II epithelial (ATII) cell is highly specialised for the synthesis and storage, in intracellular lamellar bodies, of phospholipid destined for secretion as pulmonary surfactant into the alveolus. Regulation of the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid synthesis and metabolism has been extensively characterised at both molecular and functional levels, but understanding of surfactant phospholipid metabolism in vivo in either healthy or, especially, diseased lungs is still relatively poorly understood. This review will integrate recent advances in the enzymology of surfactant phospholipid metabolism with metabolic studies in vivo in both experimental animals and human subjects. It will highlight developments in the application of stable isotope-labelled precursor substrates and mass spectrometry to probe lung phospholipid metabolism in terms of individual molecular lipid species and identify areas where a more comprehensive metabolic model would have considerable potential for direct application to disease states. PMID:23200861

  20. Integrated Microfluidic System for Size-Based Selection and Trapping of Giant Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazayama, Yuki; Teshima, Tetsuhiko; Osaki, Toshihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji; Toyota, Taro

    2016-01-19

    Vesicles composed of phospholipids (liposomes) have attracted interest as artificial cell models and have been widely studied to explore lipid-lipid and lipid-protein interactions. However, the size dispersity of liposomes prepared by conventional methods was a major problem that inhibited their use in high-throughput analyses based on monodisperse liposomes. In this study, we developed an integrative microfluidic device that enables both the size-based selection and trapping of liposomes. This device consists of hydrodynamic selection and trapping channels in series, which made it possible to successfully produce an array of more than 60 monodisperse liposomes from a polydisperse liposome suspension with a narrow size distribution (the coefficient of variation was less than 12%). We successfully observed a size-dependent response of the liposomes to sequential osmotic stimuli, which had not clarified so far, by using this device. Our device will be a powerful tool to facilitate the statistical analysis of liposome dynamics. PMID:26691855

  1. Kinase Associated-1 Domains Drive MARK/PAR1 Kinases to Membrane Targets by Binding Acidic Phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moravcevic, Katarina; Mendrola, Jeannine M.; Schmitz, Karl R.; Wang, Yu-Hsiu; Slochower, David; Janmey, Paul A.; Lemmon, Mark A. (UPENN-MED)

    2011-09-28

    Phospholipid-binding modules such as PH, C1, and C2 domains play crucial roles in location-dependent regulation of many protein kinases. Here, we identify the KA1 domain (kinase associated-1 domain), found at the C terminus of yeast septin-associated kinases (Kcc4p, Gin4p, and Hsl1p) and human MARK/PAR1 kinases, as a membrane association domain that binds acidic phospholipids. Membrane localization of isolated KA1 domains depends on phosphatidylserine. Using X-ray crystallography, we identified a structurally conserved binding site for anionic phospholipids in KA1 domains from Kcc4p and MARK1. Mutating this site impairs membrane association of both KA1 domains and intact proteins and reveals the importance of phosphatidylserine for bud neck localization of yeast Kcc4p. Our data suggest that KA1 domains contribute to coincidence detection, allowing kinases to bind other regulators (such as septins) only at the membrane surface. These findings have important implications for understanding MARK/PAR1 kinases, which are implicated in Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and autism.

  2. The impact of phospholipids and phospholipid removal on bioanalytical method performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmical, Jennifer; Brown, Stacy

    2016-05-01

    Phospholipids (PLs) are a component of cellmembranes, biological fluids and tissues. These compounds are problematic for the bioanalytical chemist, especially when PLs are not the analytes of interest. PL interference with bioanalysis highly impacts reverse-phase chromatographic methods coupled with mass spectrometric detection. Phospholipids are strongly retained on hydrophobic columns, and can cause significant ionization suppression in the mass spectrometer, as they outcompete analyte molecules for ionization. Strategies for improving analyte detection in the presence of PLs are reviewed, including in-analysis modifications and sample preparation strategies. Removal of interfering PLs prior to analysis seems to be most effective atmoderating thematrix effects fromthese endogenous cellular components, and has the potential to simplify chromatography and improve column lifetime. Products targeted at PL removal for sample pre-treatment, as well as products that combine multiplemodes of sample preparation (i.e. Hybrid SPE), show significant promise inmediating the effect on PL interference in bioanalysis. PMID:26773720

  3. Continuous microfluidic fabrication of synthetic asymmetric vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Li; Schertzer, Jeffrey W; Chiarot, Paul R

    2015-09-01

    We report on a novel microfluidic strategy for the continuous fabrication of monodisperse asymmetric vesicles with customized membrane composition, size, and luminal content. The microfluidic device encompasses a triangular post region and two flow-focusing regions. The major steps involved in the vesicle fabrication process include: (1) forming highly uniform water emulsions in an oil/inner-leaflet-lipid solution, (2) replacing the inner-leaflet-lipid solution with an outer-leaflet-lipid solution inside the microchannel network, (3) forming water-in-oil-in-water double emulsions, and (4) extracting excess oil/outer-leaflet-lipid solution from the double emulsions. Bilayer membrane asymmetry and unilamellarity are evaluated using a fluorescence quenching assay and a transmembrane protein insertion assay, respectively. Our approach addresses many of the deficiencies found in existing technologies for building vesicles, and yields strong membrane asymmetry. The ability to create and sustain membrane asymmetry is an important feature, as it is a characteristic of nearly all natural membranes. Over 80% of the vesicles remain stable for at least 6 weeks and the membrane asymmetry is maintained for over 30 hours. The asymmetric vesicles built using this strategy are collected off-chip and hold the potential to be used as model systems in membrane biology or as vehicles for drug delivery. PMID:26220822

  4. Astrocytic Vesicle Mobility in Health and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Zorec

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Astrocytes are no longer considered subservient to neurons, and are, instead, now understood to play an active role in brain signaling. The intercellular communication of astrocytes with neurons and other non-neuronal cells involves the exchange of molecules by exocytotic and endocytotic processes through the trafficking of intracellular vesicles. Recent studies of single vesicle mobility in astrocytes have prompted new views of how astrocytes contribute to information processing in nervous tissue. Here, we review the trafficking of several types of membrane-bound vesicles that are specifically involved in the processes of (i intercellular communication by gliotransmitters (glutamate, adenosine 5'-triphosphate, atrial natriuretic peptide, (ii plasma membrane exchange of transporters and receptors (EAAT2, MHC-II, and (iii the involvement of vesicle mobility carrying aquaporins (AQP4 in water homeostasis. The properties of vesicle traffic in astrocytes are discussed in respect to networking with neighboring cells in physiologic and pathologic conditions, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, multiple sclerosis, and states in which astrocytes contribute to neuroinflammatory conditions.

  5. EXTRACELLULAR VESICLES: CLASSIFICATION, FUNCTIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Oberemko

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This review presents a generalized definition of vesicles as bilayer extracellular organelles of all celular forms of life: not only eu-, but also prokaryotic. The structure and composition of extracellular vesicles, history of research, nomenclature, their impact on life processes in health and disease are discussed. Moreover, vesicles may be useful as clinical instruments for biomarkers, and they are promising as biotechnological drug. However, many questions in this area are still unresolved and need to be addressed in the future. The most interesting from the point of view of practical health care represents a direction to study the effect of exosomes and microvesicles in the development and progression of a particular disease, the possibility of adjusting the pathological process by means of extracellular vesicles of a particular type, acting as an active ingredient. Relevant is the further elucidation of the role and importance of exosomes to the surrounding cells, tissues and organs at the molecular level, the prospects for the use of non-cellular vesicles as biomarkers of disease.

  6. Conformation and Orientation of Phospholipid Molecule in Pure Phospholipid Monolayer During Compressing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Weilan; WANG Dan; ZENG Zuoxiang; GAO Xuechao

    2013-01-01

    On the basis of energy conservation law and surface pressure isotherm,the conformation energy changes of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine(DPPC)and dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol(DPPG)in pure phospholipid monolayer at the air/water interface during compression are derived.The optimized conformations of phospholipids at absolute freedom state are simulated by Gaussian 98 software.Based on following assumptions:(1)the conformation energy change is mainly caused by the rotation of one special bond;(2)the atoms of glycerol near the water surface are active;(3)the rotation is motivated by hydrogen-bond action;(4)the rotation of bond is inertial,one simplified track of conformational change is suggested and the conformations of DPPC and DPPG at different states are determined by the plots of conformation energy change vs.dihedral angle.The thickness of the simulated phospholipid monolayer is consistent with published experimental result.According to molecular areas at different states,the molecular orientations in the compressing process are also developed.

  7. Budding and Fission of a multiphase vesicle

    CERN Document Server

    Allain, J M; Allain, Jean-Marc; Amar, Martine Ben

    2005-01-01

    We present a model of bi-phasic vesicle in the limit of large surface tension. In this regime, the vesicle is completely stretched and well described by two spherical caps with a fold which concentrates the membrane stress. The conservation laws and geometric constraints restrict the space of possible shapes to a pair of solutions labeled by a parameter $\\tau$ given by {\\it line tension/pressure}. For a given $\\tau$ value, the two solutions differ by the length of the interface between domains. For a critical value $\\tau\\_c$, the two vesicle shapes become identical and no solution exists above this critical value. This model sheds new light on two proposed mechanisms (osmotic shocks and molecule absorption) to explain the budding and the fission in recent experiments.

  8. Computational algorithms for vesicle electrohydrodyna- mics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerapaneni, Shravan

    2015-11-01

    In this talk, we discuss a new integral equation method for simulating the electrohydrodynamics of a suspension of vesicles. The classical Taylor-Melcher leaky-dielectric model is employed for the electric response of each vesicle and the Helfrich energy model combined with local inextensibility is employed for its elastic response. The coupled governing equations for the vesicle position and its transmembrane electric potential are solved using a numerical method that is spectrally accurate in space and first-order in time. The method uses a semi-implicit time-stepping scheme to overcome the numerical stiffness associated with the governing equations. We will present new results on the suspension rheology, two-body interactions and pattern formation. This is joint work with Bowei Wu. This work was sponsored by NSF under grants DMS-1224656 and DMS-1418964.

  9. Functionalization of Block Copolymer Vesicle Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Meier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In dilute aqueous solutions certain amphiphilic block copolymers self-assemble into vesicles that enclose a small pool of water with a membrane. Such polymersomes have promising applications ranging from targeted drug-delivery devices, to biosensors, and nanoreactors. Interactions between block copolymer membranes and their surroundings are important factors that determine their potential biomedical applications. Such interactions are influenced predominantly by the membrane surface. We review methods to functionalize block copolymer vesicle surfaces by chemical means with ligands such as antibodies, adhesion moieties, enzymes, carbohydrates and fluorophores. Furthermore, surface-functionalization can be achieved by self-assembly of polymers that carry ligands at their chain ends or in their hydrophilic blocks. While this review focuses on the strategies to functionalize vesicle surfaces, the applications realized by, and envisioned for, such functional polymersomes are also highlighted.

  10. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper’s group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  11. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  12. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically. PMID:26465512

  13. Aquaporins in Urinary Extracellular Vesicles (Exosomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshikawa, Sayaka; Sonoda, Hiroko; Ikeda, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Since the successful characterization of urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs) by Knepper's group in 2004, these vesicles have been a focus of intense basic and translational research worldwide, with the aim of developing novel biomarkers and therapeutics for renal disease. Along with these studies, there is growing evidence that aquaporins (AQPs), water channel proteins, in uEVs have the potential to be diagnostically useful. In this review, we highlight current knowledge of AQPs in uEVs from their discovery to clinical application. PMID:27322253

  14. Pu Anion Exchange Process Intensification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor-Pashow, K. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-10-08

    This project seeks to improve the efficiency of the plutonium anion-exchange process for purifying Pu through the development of alternate ion-exchange media. The objective of the project in FY15 was to develop and test a porous foam monolith material that could serve as a replacement for the current anion-exchange resin, Reillex® HPQ, used at the Savannah River Site (SRS) for purifying Pu. The new material provides advantages in efficiency over the current resin by the elimination of diffusive mass transport through large granular resin beads. By replacing the large resin beads with a porous foam there is much more efficient contact between the Pu solution and the anion-exchange sites present on the material. Several samples of a polystyrene based foam grafted with poly(4-vinylpyridine) were prepared and the Pu sorption was tested in batch contact tests.

  15. Evidence-Based Clinical Use of Nanoscale Extracellular Vesicles in Nanomedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, Stefano; O'Driscoll, Lorraine; Borras, Francesc E; Buzas, Edit; Camussi, Giovanni; Cappello, Francesco; Carvalho, Joana; Cordeiro da Silva, Anabela; Del Portillo, Hernando; El Andaloussi, Samir; Ficko Trček, Tanja; Furlan, Roberto; Hendrix, An; Gursel, Ihsan; Kralj-Iglic, Veronika; Kaeffer, Bertrand; Kosanovic, Maja; Lekka, Marilena E; Lipps, Georg; Logozzi, Mariantonia; Marcilla, Antonio; Sammar, Marei; Llorente, Alicia; Nazarenko, Irina; Oliveira, Carla; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Rajendran, Lawrence; Raposo, Graça; Rohde, Eva; Siljander, Pia; van Niel, Guillaume; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Yáñez-Mó, María; Yliperttula, Marjo L; Zarovni, Natasa; Zavec, Apolonija Bedina; Giebel, Bernd

    2016-04-26

    Recent research has demonstrated that all body fluids assessed contain substantial amounts of vesicles that range in size from 30 to 1000 nm and that are surrounded by phospholipid membranes containing different membrane microdomains such as lipid rafts and caveolae. The most prominent representatives of these so-called extracellular vesicles (EVs) are nanosized exosomes (70-150 nm), which are derivatives of the endosomal system, and microvesicles (100-1000 nm), which are produced by outward budding of the plasma membrane. Nanosized EVs are released by almost all cell types and mediate targeted intercellular communication under physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Containing cell-type-specific signatures, EVs have been proposed as biomarkers in a variety of diseases. Furthermore, according to their physical functions, EVs of selected cell types have been used as therapeutic agents in immune therapy, vaccination trials, regenerative medicine, and drug delivery. Undoubtedly, the rapidly emerging field of basic and applied EV research will significantly influence the biomedicinal landscape in the future. In this Perspective, we, a network of European scientists from clinical, academic, and industry settings collaborating through the H2020 European Cooperation in Science and Technology (COST) program European Network on Microvesicles and Exosomes in Health and Disease (ME-HAD), demonstrate the high potential of nanosized EVs for both diagnostic and therapeutic (i.e., theranostic) areas of nanomedicine. PMID:26978483

  16. Vesicle-MaNiA: extracellular vesicles in liquid biopsy and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrano, Veronica; Royo, Felix; Peinado, Héctor; Loizaga-Iriarte, Ana; Unda, Miguel; Falcón-Perez, Juan M; Carracedo, Arkaitz

    2016-08-01

    Normal and tumor cells shed vesicles to the environment. Within the large family of extracellular vesicles, exosomes and microvesicles have attracted much attention in the recent years. Their interest ranges from mediators of cancer progression, inflammation, immune regulation and metastatic niche regulation, to non-invasive biomarkers of disease. In this respect, the procedures to purify and analyze extracellular vesicles have quickly evolved and represent a source of variability for data integration in the field. In this review, we provide an updated view of the potential of exosomes and microvesicles as biomarkers and the available technologies for their isolation. PMID:27366992

  17. Contribution of the Tyr-1 in Plantaricin149a to Disrupt Phospholipid Model Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Tonarelli

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Plantaricin149a (Pln149a is a cationic antimicrobial peptide, which was suggested to cause membrane destabilization via the carpet mechanism. The mode of action proposed to this antimicrobial peptide describes the induction of an amphipathic α-helix from Ala7 to Lys20, while the N-terminus residues remain in a coil conformation after binding. To better investigate this assumption, the purpose of this study was to determine the contributions of the Tyr1 in Pln149a in the binding to model membranes to promote its destabilization. The Tyr to Ser substitution increased the dissociation constant (KD of the antimicrobial peptide from the liposomes (approximately three-fold higher, and decreased the enthalpy of binding to anionic vesicles from −17.2 kcal/mol to −10.2 kcal/mol. The peptide adsorption/incorporation into the negatively charged lipid vesicles was less effective with the Tyr1 substitution and peptide Pln149a perturbed the liposome integrity more than the analog, Pln149S. Taken together, the peptide-lipid interactions that govern the Pln149a antimicrobial activity are found not only in the amphipathic helix, but also in the N-terminus residues, which take part in enthalpic contributions due to the allocation at a lipid-aqueous interface.

  18. The many ways of making anionic clays

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Michael Rajamathi; Grace S Thomas; P Vishnu Kamath

    2001-10-01

    Together with hydrotalcite-like layered double hydroxides, bivalent and trivalent metal hydroxides and their hydroxy salts are actually anionic clays consisting of positively charged hydroxide layers with anions intercalated in the interlayer region. The anionic clays exhibit anion sorption, anion diffusion and exchange properties together with surface basicity making them materials of importance for many modern applications. In this article, we discuss many different ways of making anionic clays and compare and contrast the rich diversity of this class of materials with the better-known cationic clays.

  19. Rigid-rod anion-pi slides for multiion hopping across lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorteau, Virginie; Bollot, Guillaume; Mareda, Jiri; Matile, Stefan

    2007-09-21

    Shape-persistent oligo-p-phenylene-N,N-naphthalenediimide (O-NDI) rods are introduced as anion-pi slides for chloride-selective multiion hopping across lipid bilayers. Results from end-group engineering and covalent capture as O-NDI hairpins suggested that self-assembly into transmembrane O-NDI bundles is essential for activity. A halide topology VI (Cl > F > Br approximately I, Cl/Br approximately Cl/I > 7) implied strong anion binding along the anion-pi slides with relatively weak contributions from size exclusion (F >or= OAc). Anomalous mole fraction effects (AMFE) supported the occurrence of multiion hopping along the pi-acidic O-NDI rods. The existence of anion-pi interactions was corroborated by high-level ab initio and DFT calculations. The latter revealed positive NDI quadrupole moments far beyond the hexafluorobenzene standard. Computational studies further suggested that anion binding occurs at the confined, pi-acidic edges of the sticky NDI surface and is influenced by the nature of the phenyl spacer between two NDIs. With regard to methods development, a detailed analysis of the detection of ion selectivity with the HPTS assay including AMFE in vesicles is provided. PMID:17728867

  20. Isolation of Phospholipid from Egg Yolk with Ultrasonic Separation Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-mei Jia

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presented a new solution of isolation for phospholipid from egg yolks by ultrasonic wave. Degradation of phospholipid was discussed with the aggregation of micro-particles. The frequency of ultrasonic wave was 20 kHz. Lubricant was treated for 9 min under 0, 200, 400, 600W, respectively. It was showed that concentration of phospholipid reduced as ultrasonic power and time increased. Ultrasonic wave was useful for degradation of high molecular protein. Phospholipid secondary structure transforming was also observed, which was affected by ultrasonic wave. Suspension particles aggregated under the different ultrasonic wave condition. Content of the aggregation increased and volume of the aggregate reduced as ultrasonic treatment time increased.

  1. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sutter, Esther [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Oliveira, Anna Paula de; Tobler, Kurt [Electron microscopy, Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Schraner, Elisabeth M. [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Sonda, Sabrina [Institute of Parasitology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Kaech, Andres [Center for Microscopy and Image Analysis, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Lucas, Miriam S. [Electron Microscopy ETH Zuerich (EMEZ), Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Ackermann, Mathias [Electron microscopy, Institute of Virology, University of Zuerich (Switzerland); Wild, Peter, E-mail: pewild@access.uzh.ch [Electron Microscopy, Institute of Veterinary Anatomy, University of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [{sup 3}H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [{sup 3}H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  2. Phospholipids of the lung in normal, toxic, and diseased states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, T.; Ohno, K.

    1981-01-01

    The highly pulmonary concentration of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycerol-3-phosphorylcholine (dipalmitoyllecithin) and its implication as an important component of lung surfactant have promoted investigation of phospholipid metabolism in the lung. This review will set the contents including recent informations for better understanding of phospholipid metabolism of the lung in normal state (physiological significances of lung phospholipids, characteristics of phospholipids in lung tissue and alveolar washing, biosynthetic pathways of dipalmitoyllecithin, etc.) as well as in toxic states (pulmonary oxygen toxicity, etc.) and in diseased states (idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, etc.) Since our main concern has been to clarify the most important route for supplying dipalmitoyllecithin, this review will be focused upon the various biosynthetic pathways leading to the formation of different molecular species of lecithin and their potential significance in the normal, toxic, and diseased lungs.

  3. Herpes simplex virus 1 induces de novo phospholipid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes acquiring an envelope composed of phospholipids. Hence, we measured incorporation of phospholipid precursors into these membranes, and quantified changes in size of cellular compartments by morphometric analysis. Incorporation of [3H]-choline into both nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes was significantly enhanced upon infection. [3H]-choline was also part of isolated virions even grown in the presence of brefeldin A. Nuclei expanded early in infection. The Golgi complex and vacuoles increased substantially whereas the endoplasmic reticulum enlarged only temporarily. The data suggest that HSV-1 stimulates phospholipid synthesis, and that de novo synthesized phospholipids are inserted into nuclear and cytoplasmic membranes to i) maintain membrane integrity in the course of nuclear and cellular expansion, ii) to supply membrane constituents for envelopment of capsids by budding at nuclear membranes and Golgi membranes, and iii) to provide membranes for formation of transport vacuoles.

  4. Characterisation of adipocyte-derived extracellular vesicles released pre- and post-adipogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine D. Connolly

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are submicron vesicles released from many cell types, including adipocytes. EVs are implicated in the pathogenesis of obesity-driven cardiovascular disease, although the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs are not well described. We sought to define the characteristics of adipocyte-derived EVs before and after adipogenesis, hypothesising that adipogenesis would affect EV structure, molecular composition and function. Using 3T3-L1 cells, EVs were harvested at day 0 and day 15 of differentiation. EV and cell preparations were visualised by electron microscopy and EVs quantified by nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA. EVs were then assessed for annexin V positivity using flow cytometry; lipid and phospholipid composition using 2D thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography; and vesicular protein content by an immuno-phenotyping assay. Pre-adipogenic cells are connected via a network of protrusions and EVs at both time points display classic EV morphology. EV concentration is elevated prior to adipogenesis, particularly in exosomes and small microvesicles. Parent cells contain higher proportions of phosphatidylserine (PS and show higher annexin V binding. Both cells and EVs contain an increased proportion of arachidonic acid at day 0. PREF-1 was increased at day 0 whilst adiponectin was higher at day 15 indicating EV protein content reflects the stage of adipogenesis of the cell. Our data suggest that EV production is higher in cells before adipogenesis, particularly in vesicles <300 nm. Cells at this time point possess a greater proportion of PS (required for EV generation whilst corresponding EVs are enriched in signalling fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid, and markers of adipogenesis, such as PREF-1 and PPARγ.

  5. Latent acetylcholinesterase in secretory vesicles isolated from adrenal medulla

    OpenAIRE

    Gratzl, Manfred; Krieger-Brauer, H.; Ekerdt, R

    1981-01-01

    A new procedure is described for the preparation of highly purified and stable secretory vesicles from adrenal medulla. Two forms of acetylcholinesterase, a membrane bound form as well as a soluble form, were found within these vesicles. The secretory vesicles, isolated by differential centrifugation, were further purified on a continuous isotonic Percoll™ gradient. In this way, secretory vesicles were separated from mitochondrial, microsomal and cell membrane contamination. The secretory ves...

  6. Bacteroides gingivalis vesicles bind to and aggregate Actinomyces viscosus.

    OpenAIRE

    Ellen, R P; Grove, D A

    1989-01-01

    Isolated Bacteroides gingivalis 2561 vesicles aggregated suspensions of Actinomyces viscosus and Actinomyces naeslundii of all taxonomy clusters. Vesicles bound near A. viscosus cell walls and among its surface fibrils. Tritiated vesicles bound slightly better to saliva-coated hydroxyapatite (SHA) than to SHA coated with A. viscosus; saturation was approached at the concentrations that were tested. Pretreatment of A. viscosus-coated SHA with vesicles impaired the subsequent adherence of B. gi...

  7. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Stevens

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP and a slowly releasable (SRP pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles.

  8. Preparation of vesicles entrapped lycopene extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luxsuwong, Dhitaree; Indranupakorn, Ratana; Wongtrakul, Paveena

    2014-01-01

    Lycopene, a lipophilic carotenoid, has been known as an effective antioxidant in supporting the cutaneous defensive system. However, it is unstable when exposed to light and water. In this study, lycopene was isolated from tomatoes and a vesicular delivery system was developed to entrap and stabilize the lycopene in the aqueous system. A simple process, maceration in ethyl acetate, was used to extract lycopene from the tomatoes. The extract was then chromatographed on the Sephadex LH20 column using acetone as a solvent system to yield 995 μg of lycopene per gram of dried tomato weight. The vesicular delivery system was prepared from a combination of ascorbic acid-6-palmitate (AP), cholesterol and dicetyl phosphate using a thin film hydration method. The formulation was composed of AP, cholesterol and dicetyl phosphate at a 44:44:12 molar ratio and with 2.12 μmol/ml of the isolated lycopene. Both blank vesicles and lycopene loaded vesicles were kept for a period of 3 months at 4±2°C and at the room temperature (28±2°C) to evaluate the effect of the encapsulation on the characteristic of the vesicles and on the antioxidant activity of the encapsulated lycopene. The result implied that lycopene could be stabilized in the vesicles and its scavenging activity against DPPH free radicals was superior to that of the free lycopene solution. PMID:24829133

  9. Hyperviscosity and hypofunction of the seminal vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, G F; Kortebani, G; Mazzolli, A B

    1993-01-01

    The study was designed to determine whether hyperviscosity of the semen sample is related to dysfunction of the male accessory glands. It was carried out on men who consecutively attended an infertility clinic between June 1989 and June 1991, and the men were grouped according to viscosity of semen samples (normal viscosity or higher viscosity). Semen samples from 229 infertility patients were studied. From these, 155 had normal viscosity and 74 showed hyperviscosity. The effect of hyperviscosity of semen samples on seminal quality and the function of the prostate was evaluated by acid phosphatase measurement, and the seminal vesicles by measurement of corrected fructose. Sperm motility (grades II-III), sperm vitality, and corrected fructose were significantly reduced in samples with high viscosity (p hyperviscosity in semen samples was associated with only hypofunction of the seminal vesicles. In fact, 36.5% of subjects with hyperviscosity showed reduced levels of corrected fructose. The same association with hyperviscosity was not observed when only hypofunction of the prostate was present, or when hypofunction of both prostate and seminal vesicles was present (P:NS). Further analysis showed that high viscosity is observed mainly when corrected seminal fructose levels were below 1.5 mg/mL x 10(6) spz/mL. It would appear that hyperviscosity affects sperm motility and is associated with hypofunction of the seminal vesicles. PMID:8420506

  10. Interaction of the Tim44 C-terminal domain with negatively charged phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marom, Milit; Safonov, Roman; Amram, Shay; Avneon, Yoav; Nachliel, Esther; Gutman, Menachem; Zohary, Keren; Azem, Abdussalam; Tsfadia, Yossi

    2009-12-01

    The translocation of proteins from the cytosol into the mitochondrial matrix is mediated by the coordinated action of the TOM complex in the outer membrane, as well as the TIM23 complex and its associated protein import motor in the inner membrane. The focus of this work is the peripheral inner membrane protein Tim44. Tim44 is a vital component of the mitochondrial protein translocation motor that anchors components of the motor to the TIM23 complex. For this purpose, Tim44 associates with the import channel by direct interaction with the Tim23 protein. Additionally, it was shown in vitro that Tim44 associates with acidic model membranes, in particular those containing cardiolipin. The latter interaction was shown to be mediated by the carboxy-terminal domain of Tim44 [Weiss, C., et al. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 96, 8890-8894]. The aim of this study was to determine the precise recognition site for negative lipids in the C-terminal domain of Tim44. In particular, we wanted to examine the recently suggested hypothesis that acidic phospholipids associate with Tim44 via a hydrophobic cavity that is observed in the high-resolution structure of the C-terminal domain of the protein [Josyula, R., et al. (2006) J. Mol. Biol. 359, 798-804]. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that (i) the hydrophobic tail of lipids may interact with Tim44 via the latter's hydrophobic cavity and (ii) a region, located in the N-terminal alpha-helix of the C-terminal domain (helices A1 and A2), may serve as a membrane attachment site. To validate this assumption, N-terminal truncations of yeast Tim44 were examined for their ability to bind cardiolipin-containing phospholipid vesicles. The results indicate that removal of the N-terminal alpha-helix (helix A1) abolishes the capacity of Tim44 to associate with cardiolipin-containing liposomes. We suggest that helices A1 and A2, in Tim44, jointly promote the association of the protein with acidic phospholipids. PMID:19863062

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation on solid and lyophilised phospholipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stensrud, G.; Redford, K.; Smistad, G.; Karlsen, J.

    1999-11-01

    The effects of gamma irradiation (25 kGy) as a sterilisation method for phospholipids (distearoylphosphatidylcholine and distearoylphosphatidylglycerol) were investigated. 31P-NMR revealed minor chemical degradation of the phospholipids but lower dynamic viscosity and pseudoplasticity, lower turbidity, higher diffusion constant, smaller size, more negative zeta potential and changes in the phase transition behaviour of the subsequently produced liposomes were observed. The observed changes could to some extent be explained by the irradiation-induced degradation products (distearoylphosphatidic acid, fatty acids, lysophospholipids).

  12. Uptake of /sup 75/Se-selenite by brush border membrane vesicles from chick duodenum stimulated by vitamin D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mykkanen, H.M.; Wasserman, R.H.

    1989-02-01

    Brush border membrane vesicles were isolated from mucosal homogenates of duodena from normal, rachitic and vitamin D-treated rachitic chicks using a discontinuous sucrose gradient, and further purified by glycerol gradient centrifugation. In vitro uptake of 75Se-selenite by purified brush border membrane vesicles was studied using a rapid filtration technique. The time course of 75Se uptake was non-linear; rapid initial binding was followed by a gradual decrease in the rate of uptake until an equilibrium value was reached at 60-120 min. The initial binding at 36 s was not affected by selenite concentration in the incubation buffer, while the fractional rate of uptake between the 36 s and 2 min time periods was clearly lower with 1 mM Se than with 4-100 microM Se. 75Se uptake did not show any dependency on the external Na-gradient, nor could it be inhibited by other anions (arsenate, phosphate). Treatment of rachitic chicks either with cholecalciferol (500 Iu, 72 h) or with 1,25(OH)2-cholecalciferol (0.5 microgram given 16 h prior to isolation of the vesicles) significantly enhanced 75Se uptake. A threefold excess of mannitol in the outside buffer reduced 75Se uptake by vesicles from vitamin D-deficient and D-treated chicks 60% and 35% respectively, but had no effect on vesicles from vitamin D-treated chicks preloaded with 75Se. Neither saponin treatment nor excess cold selenite could release the label from the vesicles preloaded with 75Se. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that selenite easily crosses the brush border membrane into the intravesicular space and, once inside, is tightly bound by the membrane.

  13. Uptake of 75Se-selenite by brush border membrane vesicles from chick duodenum stimulated by vitamin D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brush border membrane vesicles were isolated from mucosal homogenates of duodena from normal, rachitic and vitamin D-treated rachitic chicks using a discontinuous sucrose gradient, and further purified by glycerol gradient centrifugation. In vitro uptake of 75Se-selenite by purified brush border membrane vesicles was studied using a rapid filtration technique. The time course of 75Se uptake was non-linear; rapid initial binding was followed by a gradual decrease in the rate of uptake until an equilibrium value was reached at 60-120 min. The initial binding at 36 s was not affected by selenite concentration in the incubation buffer, while the fractional rate of uptake between the 36 s and 2 min time periods was clearly lower with 1 mM Se than with 4-100 microM Se. 75Se uptake did not show any dependency on the external Na-gradient, nor could it be inhibited by other anions (arsenate, phosphate). Treatment of rachitic chicks either with cholecalciferol (500 Iu, 72 h) or with 1,25(OH)2-cholecalciferol (0.5 microgram given 16 h prior to isolation of the vesicles) significantly enhanced 75Se uptake. A threefold excess of mannitol in the outside buffer reduced 75Se uptake by vesicles from vitamin D-deficient and D-treated chicks 60% and 35% respectively, but had no effect on vesicles from vitamin D-treated chicks preloaded with 75Se. Neither saponin treatment nor excess cold selenite could release the label from the vesicles preloaded with 75Se. These data are compatible with the hypothesis that selenite easily crosses the brush border membrane into the intravesicular space and, once inside, is tightly bound by the membrane

  14. Anion binding in biological systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feiters, Martin C [Department of Organic Chemistry, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Faculty of Science, Radboud University Nijmegen, Heyendaalseweg 135, 6525 AJ Nijmegen (Netherlands); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [EMBL Hamburg Outstation at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, D-22607 Hamburg (Germany); Kostenko, Alexander V; Soldatov, Alexander V [Faculty of Physics, Southern Federal University, Sorge 5, Rostov-na-Donu, 344090 (Russian Federation); Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and Universite Pierre et Marie Curie Paris-VI, Station Biologique de Roscoff, Place Georges Teissier, BP 74, F-29682 Roscoff cedex, Bretagne (France); Kuepper, Frithjof C [Scottish Association for Marine Science, Dunstaffnage Marine Laboratory, Oban, Argyll PA37 1QA, Scotland (United Kingdom); Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P [Institute of Molecular Biology and Biophysics, ETH Zuerich, Schafmattstrasse 20, Zuerich, 8093 (Switzerland); Bevers, Loes E; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R, E-mail: m.feiters@science.ru.n [Department of Biotechnology, Delft University of Technology, Julianalaan 67, 2628 BC Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-11-15

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L{sub 3} (2p{sub 3/2}) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  15. Anion binding in biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiters, Martin C.; Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram; Kostenko, Alexander V.; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Leblanc, Catherine; Michel, Gurvan; Potin, Philippe; Küpper, Frithjof C.; Hollenstein, Kaspar; Locher, Kaspar P.; Bevers, Loes E.; Hagedoorn, Peter-Leon; Hagen, Wilfred R.

    2009-11-01

    We compare aspects of biological X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) studies of cations and anions, and report on some examples of anion binding in biological systems. Brown algae such as Laminaria digitata (oarweed) are effective accumulators of I from seawater, with tissue concentrations exceeding 50 mM, and the vanadate-containing enzyme haloperoxidase is implicated in halide accumulation. We have studied the chemical state of iodine and its biological role in Laminaria at the I K edge, and bromoperoxidase from Ascophyllum nodosum (knotted wrack) at the Br K edge. Mo is essential for many forms of life; W only for certain archaea, such as Archaeoglobus fulgidus and the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, and some bacteria. The metals are bound and transported as their oxo-anions, molybdate and tungstate, which are similar in size. The transport protein WtpA from P. furiosus binds tungstate more strongly than molybdate, and is related in sequence to Archaeoglobus fulgidus ModA, of which a crystal structure is known. We have measured A. fulgidus ModA with tungstate at the W L3 (2p3/2) edge, and compared the results with the refined crystal structure. XAS studies of anion binding are feasible even if only weak interactions are present, are biologically relevant, and give new insights in the spectroscopy.

  16. IMPROVING OF ANION EXCHANGERES REGENERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzher M. Ibrahim

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Inthis study, Different basis [NaOH and KOH] of variable concentration are usedto reactivate Anion exchangers employing different schemes .The Laboratoryresults showed large improvement in efficiency of these exchangers ( i.eoperating time was increased from 12 to 42 hours .The results of this work showed that the environmentalload (waste water can be reduced greatly when using the proposed regenerationscheme .

  17. Formation of Giant Protein Vesicles by a Lipid Cosolvent Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper S.; Vararattanavech, Ardcharaporn; Vissing, Thomas;

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a method to create giant protein vesicles (GPVs) of ≥10 μm by solvent‐driven fusion of large vesicles (0.1–0.2 μm) with reconstituted membrane proteins. We found that formation of GPVs proceeded from rotational mixing of protein‐reconstituted large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs...

  18. Millimeter-area, free standing, phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltramo, Peter J; Van Hooghten, Rob; Vermant, Jan

    2016-05-11

    Minimal model biomembrane studies have the potential to unlock the fundamental mechanisms of cellular function that govern the processes upon which life relies. However, existing methods to fabricate free-standing model membranes currently have significant limitations. Bilayer sizes are often tens of micrometers, decoupling curvature or substrate effects, orthogonal control over tension, and solvent exchange combined with microscopy techniques is not possible, which restricts the studies that can be performed. Here, we describe a versatile platform to generate free standing, planar, phospholipid bilayers with millimeter scale areas. The technique relies on an adapted thin-film balance apparatus allowing for the dynamic control of the nucleation and growth of a planar black lipid membrane in the center of an orifice surrounded by microfluidic channels. Success is demonstrated using several different lipid types, including mixtures that show the same temperature dependent phase separation as existing protocols, moreover, membranes are highly stable. Two advantages unique to the proposed method are the dynamic control of the membrane tension and the possibility to make extremely large area membranes. We demonstrate this by showing how a block polymer, F68, used in drug delivery increases the membrane compliance. Together, the results demonstrate a new paradigm for studying the mechanics, structure, and function of model membranes. PMID:27050618

  19. Tissue phospholipids (TPL) in avian tuberculosis (AT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AT constitutes one of the major problems in animal husbandry. Chickens (white, leg horn, male, 400-600 g) were infected with Mycobacterium avium maintained on I.U.T. medium to induce clinical AT which was confirmed by histopathological examinations of the affected tissues. Fatty infiltration and tissue enlargement was visible in infected birds. After 4 wks, incorporation of i.v. 32P (50 uCi/100 g body wt.) in affected tissues was followed for 3,7,9,12 hr intervals. Lipids were extracted and fractionated by silicic acid (SA) column and SA impregnated paper chromatography. When compared with pair-fed controls, in AT slower turnover of TPL in liver, slightly higher in heart and significantly increased turnover of TPL in serum were observed. No appreciable change in total TPL content was noticed in brain, spleen and kidney. Further fractionation of TPL provided better understanding of the metabolism. Increase in lysophosphatidyl-choline (LPC) and -ethanolamine (LPE) content, powerful hemolytic agents, in liver may explain frequent occurrence of anemia in tuberculosis. Also, a concomitant marked increase in the ratio of total saturated/unsaturated fatty acids is observed in serum phosphatidyl choline fraction. This confirms the observation that the membrane phospholipid metabolism is significantly affected in tuberculosis infection

  20. Molecular Insights into Phospholipid -- NSAID Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu Boggara, Mohan; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2007-03-01

    Non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) e.g. Aspirin and Ibuprofen, with chronic usage cause gastro intestinal (GI) toxicity. It has been shown experimentally that NSAIDs pre-associated with phospholipids reduce the GI toxicity and also increase the therapeutic activity of these drugs compared to the unmodified ones. Using all atomistic simulations and two different methodologies, we studied the partitioning behavior of two model NSAIDs (Aspirin and Ibuprofen) as a function of pH and drug loading. The results from two methodologies are consistent in describing the equilibrium drug distribution in the bilayers. Additionally, the heterogeneity in density and polarity of the bilayer in the normal direction along with the fact that NSAIDs are amphiphilic (all of them have a carboxylic acid group and a non-polar part consisting of aromatic moieties), indicate that the diffusion mechanism in the bilayer is far different compared to the same in a bulk medium. This study summarizes the various effects of NSAIDs and their behavior inside the lipid bilayer both as a function of pH and drug concentration.

  1. Lipid metabolizing enzyme activities modulated by phospholipid substrate lateral distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, Dino G; Reyes, Juan G; De la Fuente, Milton

    2011-09-01

    Biological membranes contain many domains enriched in phospholipid lipids and there is not yet clear explanation about how these domains can control the activity of phospholipid metabolizing enzymes. Here we used the surface dilution kinetic theory to derive general equations describing how complex substrate distributions affect the activity of enzymes following either the phospholipid binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules directly bind the phospholipid substrate molecules), or the surface-binding kinetic model (which assumes that the enzyme molecules bind to the membrane before binding the phospholipid substrate). Our results strongly suggest that, if the enzyme follows the phospholipid binding kinetic model, any substrate redistribution would increase the enzyme activity over than observed for a homogeneous distribution of substrate. Besides, enzymes following the surface-binding model would be independent of the substrate distribution. Given that the distribution of substrate in a population of micelles (each of them a lipid domain) should follow a Poisson law, we demonstrate that the general equations give an excellent fit to experimental data of lipases acting on micelles, providing reasonable values for kinetic parameters--without invoking special effects such as cooperative phenomena. Our theory will allow a better understanding of the cellular-metabolism control in membranes, as well as a more simple analysis of the mechanisms of membrane acting enzymes. PMID:21108012

  2. Biomimetic surface modification of polyurethane with phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dongsheng; Liu, Liuxu; Li, Zhen; Fu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    To improve blood compatibility of polyurethane (PU), phospholipids grafted carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were prepared through zwitterion-mediated cycloaddition reaction and amide condensation, and then were added to the PU as fillers via solution mixing to form biomimetic surface. The properties of phospholipids grafted CNTs (CNT-PC) were investigated by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1) H NMR). The results indicated that the phospholipids were grafted onto CNTs in high efficiency, and the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the modified CNTs were improved effectively. The structures and properties of composites containing CNT-PC were investigated by optical microscope, XPS, and water contact angles. The results indicated that phospholipids were enriched on the surface with addition of 0.1 wt % of CNT-PC, which significantly reduced protein adsorption and platelet adhesion. The method of carrying phospholipids on the nanofiller to modify polymers has provided a promising way of constructing biomimetic phospholipid membrane on the surface to improve blood compatibility. PMID:25630300

  3. Surface behavior of α-Synuclein and its interaction with phospholipids using the Langmuir monolayer technique: a comparison between monomeric and fibrillar α-Synuclein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaari, Ali; Horchani, Habib; Frikha, Fakher; Verger, Robert; Gargouri, Youssef; Ladjimi, Moncef

    2013-07-01

    Due to the involvement of α-Synuclein (α-Syn) in lipid transport and its role in the normal function and in the pathology of Parkinson disease, it is important to study first the surface properties of the protein at the air/water interface and second its behavior related to biological membranes. For this purpose, the monomolecular film technique was used as membrane model to compare the interactions with various phospholipids of monomeric and fibrillar forms of α-Syn. We have determined the equilibrium surface pressure of the two forms of α-Syn (monomeric and fibrillar form) at the air/water interface. The surface pressures reached by monomeric α-Syn were shown to be higher than the ones of fibrillar α-Syn and similar to the value obtained by mellitin, a lytic peptide of bee venom, which has been described as "protein detergent". The monomeric α-Syn adsorbed more rapidly at the air/water interface with a maximal adsorption rate at least 60-times higher than the fibrillar form. In the presence of a phospholipid monolayer, the surface activities of two α-Syn forms are much greater than observed at the air/water interface. Also we can show that the fibrillar form of α-Syn have a higher value of critical pressure than the monomeric one for the cow brain extract and the Phospatidyl Glycerol (an anionic phospholipid) which confirm its higher affinity for the anionic phospholipid than the monomeric form. According these results, we can suggest that this aggregate form have important implications for the pathological activity and, therefore, for the associated neurotoxicity which can results in layer disruption and cell leakage. PMID:23562552

  4. Genetically Controlled Fusion, Exocytosis and Fission of Artificial Vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; De Lucrezia, Davide; Girke Jørgensen, Mikkel; Hotz, Peter Eggenberger; Hanczyc, Martin; Yomo, Tetsuya

    special class of viral proteins, termed fusogenic peptides, were added to the external medium. In the present work, we intend to develop genetically controlled fusion, fission and exocytosis of vesicles by the synthesis of peptides within vesicles. First, we enclosed synthesized peptides in vesicles to...... induce in a next step fusion of adjacent vesicles, fission and exocytosis of nested vesicles. Second, we will replace the peptides by an enclosed cell-free expression system to internally synthesize fusion peptides. To control the gene expression, different mechanisms are available, e.g. addition of...... fusion, fission and exocytosis....

  5. Efficient Amide Based Halogenide Anion Receptors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Xing WU; Feng Hua LI; Hai LIN; Shou Rong ZHU; Hua Kuan LIN

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the synthesis and anion recognition properties of the amide based phenanthroline derivatives 1, 2 and 3. In all cases 1:1 receptor: anion complexes were observed. The receptors were found to be selective for fluoride and chloride respectively over other putative anionic guest species.

  6. Physicochemical properties of phospholipid model membranes hydrolyzed by phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in the presence of cholesterol at different temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurak, Małgorzata; Szcześ, Aleksandra; Chibowski, Emil

    2013-02-01

    The physicochemical studies of the model biological membranes were undertaken to seek for correlations between the bilayer composition, the temperature 20 °C and 37 °C, the time of the enzymatic catalysis process, the surface free energy, as well the electron-donor interactions (the hydrogen bonding). The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) action on supported lipid bilayer and lipid vesicles was compared. The investigated liposomes and supported bilayers were composed of two phospholipids (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine - DPPC and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine - DOPC), which differ in hydrocarbon chains saturation, and mixed phospholipid/cholesterol systems. The results show that the changes of electron-donor parameter of the films during their hydrolysis process may be an indicator of the presence of polar products of catalysis in the membrane. Furthermore, the presence of cholesterol in phospholipid membranes and the temperature increase regulate the enzyme action what is reflected in the changes of thermodynamic parameters of the supported lipid bilayers, as well as in the size and polydispersity of the corresponding liposomes.

  7. Laser Cooling of Molecular Anions

    CERN Document Server

    Yzombard, Pauline; Gerber, Sebastian; Doser, Michael; Comparat, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We propose a scheme for laser cooling of negatively charged molecules. We briefly summarise the requirements for such laser cooling and we identify a number of potential candidates. A detailed computation study with C$\\_2^-$, the most studied molecular anion, is carried out. Simulations of 3D laser cooling in a gas phase show that this molecule could be cooled down to below 1 mK in only a few tens of milliseconds, using standard lasers. Sisyphus cooling, where no photo-detachment process is present, as well as Doppler laser cooling of trapped C$\\_2^-$, are also simulated. This cooling scheme has an impact on the study of cold molecules, molecular anions, charged particle sources and antimatter physics.

  8. Polymerization of anionic wormlike micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiyuan; González, Yamaira I; Xu, Hangxun; Kaler, Eric W; Liu, Shiyong

    2006-01-31

    Polymerizable anionic wormlike micelles are obtained upon mixing the hydrotropic salt p-toluidine hydrochloride (PTHC) with the reactive anionic surfactant sodium 4-(8-methacryloyloxyoctyl)oxybenzene sulfonate (MOBS). Polymerization captures the cross-sectional radius of the micelles (approximately 2 nm), induces micellar growth, and leads to the formation of a stable single-phase dispersion of wormlike micellar polymers. The unpolymerized and polymerized micelles were characterized using static and dynamic laser light scattering, small-angle neutron scattering, 1H NMR, and stopped-flow light scattering. Stopped-flow light scattering was also used to measure the average lifetime of the unpolymerized wormlike micelles. A comparison of the average lifetime of unpolymerized wormlike micelles with the surfactant monomer propagation rate was used to elucidate the mechanism of polymerization. There is a significant correlation between the ratio of the average lifetime to the monomer propagation rate and the average aggregation number of the polymerized wormlike micelles. PMID:16430253

  9. Anion Solvation in Carbonate Electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2015-11-16

    With the correlation between Li+ solvation and interphasial chemistry on anodes firmly established in Li-ion batteries, the effect of cation–solvent interaction has gone beyond bulk thermodynamic and transport properties and become an essential element that determines the reversibility of electrochemistry and kinetics of Li-ion intercalation chemistries. As of now, most studies are dedicated to the solvation of Li+, and the solvation of anions in carbonate-based electrolytes and its possible effect on the electrochemical stability of such electrolytes remains little understood. As a mirror effort to prior Li+ solvation studies, this work focuses on the interactions between carbonate-based solvents and two anions (hexafluorophosphate, PF6–, and tetrafluoroborate, BF4–) that are most frequently used in Li-ion batteries. The possible correlation between such interaction and the interphasial chemistry on cathode surface is also explored.

  10. Cholesterol versus cholesterol sulfate: effects on properties of phospholipid bilayers containing docosahexaenoic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, M; Jenski, L J; Dumaual, A C; Stillwell, W

    1998-09-01

    The important omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is present at high concentration in some membranes that also contain the unusual sterol cholesterol sulfate (CS). The association between these lipids and their effect on membrane structure is presented here. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), MC540 fluorescence, erythritol permeability, pressure/area isotherms on lipid monolayers and molecular modeling are used to compare the effect of CS and cholesterol on model phospholipid membranes. By DSC, CS decreases the main phase transition temperature and broadens the transitions of dipalmitolyphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,18:1 PC) and 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (18:0,22:6 PC) to a much larger extent than does cholesterol. In addition CS produces a three-component transition in 18:0,18:1 PC bilayers that is not seen with cholesterol. In a mixed phospholipid bilayer composed of 18:0,18:1 PC/18:0,22:6 PC (1:1, mol/mol), CS at 2.5 membrane mol% or more induces lateral phase separation while cholesterol does not. CS decreases lipid packing density and increases permeability of 18:0,18:1 PC and 18:0,22:6 PC bilayers to a much larger extent than cholesterol. CS disrupts oleic acid-containing bilayers more than those containing DHA. Molecular modeling confirms that the anionic sulfate moiety on CS renders this sterol more polar than cholesterol with the consequence that CS likely resides higher (extends further into the aqueous environment) in the bilayer. CS can therefore be preferentially accommodated into DHA-enriched bilayers where its tetracyclic ring system may fit into the delta 4 pocket of DHA, a location excluded to cholesterol. It is proposed that CS may in part replace the membrane function of cholesterol in DHA-rich membranes. PMID:9807808

  11. Pulsatile lipid vesicles under osmotic stress

    CERN Document Server

    Chabanon, Morgan; Liedberg, Bo; Parikh, Atul N; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-01-01

    The response of lipid bilayers to osmotic stress is an important part of cellular function. Previously, in [Oglecka et al. 2014], we reported that cell-sized giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) exposed to hypotonic media, respond to the osmotic assault by undergoing a cyclical sequence of swelling and bursting events, coupled to the membrane's compositional degrees of freedom. Here, we seek to deepen our quantitative understanding of the essential pulsatile behavior of GUVs under hypotonic conditions, by advancing a comprehensive theoretical model for vesicle dynamics. The model quantitatively captures our experimentally measured swell-burst parameters for single-component GUVs, and reveals that thermal fluctuations enable rate dependent pore nucleation, driving the dynamics of the swell-burst cycles. We further identify new scaling relationships between the pulsatile dynamics and GUV properties. Our findings provide a fundamental framework that has the potential to guide future investigations on the non-equili...

  12. Docking of secretory vesicles is syntaxin dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi de Wit

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles dock at the plasma membrane before they undergo fusion. Molecular docking mechanisms are poorly defined but believed to be independent of SNARE proteins. Here, we challenged this hypothesis by acute deletion of the target SNARE, syntaxin, in vertebrate neurons and neuroendocrine cells. Deletion resulted in fusion arrest in both systems. No docking defects were observed in synapses, in line with previous observations. However, a drastic reduction in morphologically docked secretory vesicles was observed in chromaffin cells. Syntaxin-deficient chromaffin cells showed a small reduction in total and plasma membrane staining for the docking factor Munc18-1, which appears insufficient to explain the drastic reduction in docking. The sub-membrane cortical actin network was unaffected by syntaxin deletion. These observations expose a docking role for syntaxin in the neuroendocrine system. Additional layers of regulation may have evolved to make syntaxin redundant for docking in highly specialized systems like synaptic active zones.

  13. Human monoclonal antiphospholipid antibodies disrupt the annexin A5 anticoagulant crystal shield on phospholipid bilayers: evidence from atomic force microscopy and functional assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Jacob H; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Quinn, Anthony S; Chen, Pojen P; McCrae, Keith R; Bovill, Edwin G; Taatjes, Douglas J

    2003-09-01

    The antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome is an autoimmune condition that is marked by recurrent pregnancy losses and/or systemic vascular thrombosis in patients who have antibodies against phospholipid/co-factor complexes. The mechanism(s) for pregnancy losses and thrombosis in this condition is (are) not known. Annexin A5 is a potent anticoagulant protein, expressed by placental trophoblasts and endothelial cells, that crystallizes over anionic phospholipids, shielding them from availability for coagulation reactions. We previously presented data supporting the hypothesis that aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the anticoagulant annexin A5 shield could be a thrombogenic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. However, this has remained a subject of controversy. We therefore used atomic force microscopy, a method previously used to study the crystallization of annexin A5, to image the effects of monoclonal human aPL antibodies on the crystal structure of the protein over phospholipid bilayers. In the presence of the aPL monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and beta(2)-GPI, the major aPL co-factor, structures presumed to be aPL mAb-antigen complexes were associated with varying degrees of disruption to the annexin A5 crystallization pattern over the bilayer. In addition, measurements of prothrombinase activity on the phospholipid bilayers showed that the aPL mAbs reduced the anti-coagulant effect of annexin A5 and promoted thrombin generation. These data provide morphological evidence that support the hypothesis that aPL antibodies can disrupt annexin A5 binding to phospholipid membranes and permit increased generation of thrombin. The aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 anticoagulant shield may be an important prothrombotic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. PMID:12937161

  14. Exosomes : Nano-vesicles in immune regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Sara M

    2008-01-01

    Nano-vesicles (30-100 nm) with an endosome-derived limiting membrane are called exosomes. These are released from the cell when the endosome fuses with the outer cell membrane. Exosomes from antigen presenting cells (APC) carry MHC class I and class II as well as integrins, tetraspanins and co-stimulatory molecules. They can either stimulate T cell responses or induce tolerance. Exosomes are presently being evaluated as therapeutic tools but still little is known about their...

  15. Ciliary extracellular vesicles: Txt msg orgnlls

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, Juan; Barr, Maureen M.

    2016-01-01

    Cilia are sensory organelles that protrude from cell surfaces to monitor the surrounding environment. In addition to its role as sensory receiver, the cilium also releases extracellular vesicles (EVs). The release of sub-micron sized EVs is a conserved form of intercellular communication used by all three kingdoms of life. These extracellular organelles play important roles in both short and long range signaling between donor and target cells and may coordinate systemic responses within an or...

  16. Lipid trafficking sans Vesicles: where, why, how?

    OpenAIRE

    Prinz, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells possess a remarkable diversity of lipids, which distribute among cellular membranes by well-characterized vesicle trafficking pathways. However, transport of lipids by alternate or “nonvesicular” routes is also critical for lipid synthesis, metabolism, and proper membrane partitioning. In the past few years, considerable progress has been made in characterizing the mechanisms of nonvesicular lipid transport and how it may go awry in particular diseases, but many fundamental q...

  17. Routes and mechanisms of extracellular vesicle uptake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ann Mulcahy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are small vesicles released by donor cells that can be taken up by recipient cells. Despite their discovery decades ago, it has only recently become apparent that EVs play an important role in cell-to-cell communication. EVs can carry a range of nucleic acids and proteins which can have a significant impact on the phenotype of the recipient. For this phenotypic effect to occur, EVs need to fuse with target cell membranes, either directly with the plasma membrane or with the endosomal membrane after endocytic uptake. EVs are of therapeutic interest because they are deregulated in diseases such as cancer and they could be harnessed to deliver drugs to target cells. It is therefore important to understand the molecular mechanisms by which EVs are taken up into cells. This comprehensive review summarizes current knowledge of EV uptake mechanisms. Cells appear to take up EVs by a variety of endocytic pathways, including clathrin-dependent endocytosis, and clathrin-independent pathways such as caveolin-mediated uptake, macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and lipid raft–mediated internalization. Indeed, it seems likely that a heterogeneous population of EVs may gain entry into a cell via more than one route. The uptake mechanism used by a given EV may depend on proteins and glycoproteins found on the surface of both the vesicle and the target cell. Further research is needed to understand the precise rules that underpin EV entry into cells.

  18. Astrocytic vesicles and gliotransmitters: Slowness of vesicular release and synaptobrevin2-laden vesicle nanoarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorec, R; Verkhratsky, A; Rodríguez, J J; Parpura, V

    2016-05-26

    Neurotransmitters released at synapses activate neighboring astrocytes, which in turn, modulate neuronal activity by the release of diverse neuroactive substances that include classical neurotransmitters such as glutamate, GABA or ATP. Neuroactive substances are released from astrocytes through several distinct molecular mechanisms, for example, by diffusion through membrane channels, by translocation via plasmalemmal transporters or by vesicular exocytosis. Vesicular release regulated by a stimulus-mediated increase in cytosolic calcium involves soluble N-ethyl maleimide-sensitive fusion protein attachment protein receptor (SNARE)-dependent merger of the vesicle membrane with the plasmalemma. Up to 25 molecules of synaptobrevin 2 (Sb2), a SNARE complex protein, reside at a single astroglial vesicle; an individual neuronal, i.e. synaptic, vesicle contains ∼70 Sb2 molecules. It is proposed that this paucity of Sb2 molecules in astrocytic vesicles may determine the slow secretion. In the present essay we shall overview multiple aspects of vesicular architecture and types of vesicles based on their cargo and dynamics in astroglial cells. PMID:25727638

  19. Post-translational regulation of P2X receptor channels: modulation by phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louis-Philippe eBernier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available P2X receptor channels mediate fast excitatory signaling by ATP and play major roles in sensory transduction, neuro-immune communication and inflammatory response. P2X receptors constitute a gene family of calcium-permeable ATP-gated cation channels therefore the regulation of P2X signaling is critical for both membrane potential and intracellular calcium homeostasis. Phosphoinositides (PIPn are anionic signaling phospholipids that act as functional regulators of many types of ion channels. Direct PIPn binding was demonstrated for several ligand- or voltage-gated ion channels, however no generic motif emerged to accurately predict lipid-protein binding sites. This review presents what is currently known about the modulation of the different P2X subtypes by phospholipids and about critical determinants underlying their sensitivity to PIPn levels in the plasma membrane.All functional mammalian P2X subtypes tested, with the notable exception of P2X5, have been shown to be positively modulated by PIPn, i.e. homomeric P2X1, P2X2, P2X3, P2X4, and P2X7, as well as heteromeric P2X1/5 and P2X2/3 receptors. Based on various results reported on the aforementioned subtypes including mutagenesis of the prototypical PIPn-sensitive P2X4 and PIPn-insensitive P2X5 receptor subtypes, an increasing amount of functional, biochemical and structural evidence converges on the modulatory role of a short polybasic domain located in the proximal C-terminus of P2X subunits. This linear motif, semi-conserved in the P2X family, seems necessary and sufficient for encoding direct modulation of ATP-gated channels by PIPn. Furthermore, the physiological impact of the regulation of ionotropic purinergic responses by phospholipids on pain pathways was recently revealed in the context of native crosstalks between phospholipase C-linked metabotropic receptors and P2X receptor channels in DRG sensory neurons and microglia.

  20. Amiodarone--induced changes in surfactant phospholipids of rat lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmavathy, B; Devaraj, H; Devaraj, N

    1993-04-01

    Amiodarone HCl (AD) is a very effective antiarrhythmic drug, but its use is often associated with serious pulmonary complications. It is shown to induce lung phospholipidosis. Nevertheless, the effects of this drug on pulmonary surfactant which is composed of about 75% phospholipids and which prevents alveolar collapse is not known. Therefore, we have examined the effect of AD on the intra- and extracellular surfactant pools and on the levels of phosphatidylcholine (PC), the primary constituent of pulmonary surfactant. Male Wistar rats were fed AD (175 mg/kg) by oral gavage for three weeks. At the end of the experimental period, the rats were killed, the lungs removed and perfused, and surfactant isolated. Some lungs were prepared for ultrastructural examination. Phospholipid was assayed in the intra- and extracellular surfactant. Amiodarone produced a significant increase in both the intra- and extracellular surfactant phospholipid along with an appreciable change in the phospholipid profile. Also, the drug seemed to increase the number of lamellar inclusions in the surfactant producing type II alveolar cells. These data suggest that administration of AD leads to an increase in the lung surfactant phospholipid levels and lamellar bodies in alveolar type II cells. PMID:8510769

  1. Effect of cellular phospholipid modification on phorbol diester binding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of cellular lipid composition on the specific binding of [20-3H]phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate to intact human promyelocytic leukemia cells was investigated. Cellular phospholipid composition could be manipulated by culturing cells in serum-free, chemically defined media containing base analogues of phospholipid polar head groups. Human promyelocytic leukemia cells grown in the presence of dimethylethanolamine, monomethylethanolamine, 3-aminopropanol, or isopropylethanolamine assimilated these natural and unnatural base moieties into endogenous phospholipids to the extent that 22 to 52% of the cell glycerophospholipids contained the base analogue. The formation of the phospholipid analogues was accompanied by a pronounced reduction in the levels of intracellular choline and ethanolamine glycerophospholipids. Analogue-supplemented cultures exhibited a reduced growth rate compared to control cells maintained in choline-containing medium. Specific [20-3H ]phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate binding was examined in lipid-altered cells and shown to be markedly higher (approximately 200% of control) in cells grown with dimethyl- or monomethylethanolamine. In contrast, exposure of cells to 3-aminopropanol or isopropylethanolamine resulted in a major reduction in [20-3H]phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate binding. Only minimal changes in nonspecific binding occurred between control and experimental cells. Because phorbol esters are highly membrane targeted, it is possible that phospholipid modification or the resulting changes in membrane organization influence receptor dynamics

  2. Ibuprofen-phospholipid solid dispersions: improved dissolution and gastric tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, M Delwar; Saxena, Vipin; Brausch, James F; Talukder, Rahmat M

    2012-01-17

    Solid dispersions of ibuprofen with various phospholipids were prepared, and the effect of phospholipids on the in vitro dissolution and in vivo gastrointestinal toxicity of ibuprofen was evaluated. Most phospholipids improved the dissolution of ibuprofen; dimyristoylphosphatidyl-glycerol (DMPG) had the greatest effect. At 45 min, the extent of dissolution of ibuprofen from the ibuprofen-DMPG system (weight ratio 9:1) increased about 69% compared to ibuprofen alone; the initial rate of dissolution increased sevenfold. Increasing the DMPG content from 9:1 to 4:1 in this system did not significantly increase the rate and the extent of dissolution. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron micrograph indicated a smaller crystallite size of ibuprofen with fairly uniform distribution in the ibuprofen-DMPG solid dispersion. A small amount of carrier phospholipid significantly increases the rate and the extent of dissolution, which may increase the bioavailability of ibuprofen. The number of ulcers >0.5mm in size formed in the gastric mucosa of rats following ibuprofen, DMPG, DMPC and DPPC solid dispersions (ibuprofen and phospholipid weight ratio 4:1) were 8.6 ± 6.2, 3.9 ± 5.3, 5.3 ± 4.9 and 9.1 ± 7.4, respectively. Solid dispersion of ibuprofen with DMPG was significantly less irritating to the gastric mucosa than ibuprofen itself (one-way ANOVA, p<0.05). Solid dispersion of ibuprofen and DMPG decreases the gastric side effects of ibuprofen. PMID:22101290

  3. Phospholipids of subcellular organelles isolated from cultured BHK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotherus, J; Renkonen, O

    1977-02-23

    Mitochondrial and nuclei were purified from cultured hamster fibroblasts (BHK21 cells) by centrifugation in sucrose gradients. The phospholipid compositions of the preparations were compared to those of the previously purified plasma membranes, endoplasmic reticulum and lysosomes. The mitochondria had a characteristically high content (approx. 16% of lipid phosphorus) of cardiolipin, which was practically absent from the other purified organelles. The nuclei were enriched in phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol (approx. 68% and 5% of lipid phosphorus, respectively). Lysobisphosphatidic acid was almost absent from the mitochondria and nuclei, as well as from the plasma membrane and endoplasmic reticulum, which suggests that this phospholipid is confined to the lysosomes of the BHK cell. The nuclei and the mitochondria contained relatively little sphingomyelin, a characteristic lipid of the plasma membrane. The distributions of the total cellular phospholipid and protein between the various organelles were calculated and compared to the corresponding data estimated for the rat liver. The BHK cell contained relatively more phospholipids in the nucleus and the lysosomes than the liver. All the organelles of the BHK cell contained less protein per phospholipid than the equivalent organelles of the liver. PMID:836856

  4. Release of canine parvovirus from endocytic vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) is a small nonenveloped virus with a single-stranded DNA genome. CPV enters cells by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and requires an acidic endosomal step for productive infection. Virion contains a potential nuclear localization signal as well as a phospholipase A2 like domain in N-terminus of VP1. In this study we characterized the role of PLA2 activity on CPV entry process. PLA2 activity of CPV capsids was triggered in vitro by heat or acidic pH. PLA2 inhibitors inhibited the viral proliferation suggesting that PLA2 activity is needed for productive infection. The N-terminus of VP1 was exposed during the entry, suggesting that PLA2 activity might have a role during endocytic entry. The presence of drugs modifying endocytosis (amiloride, bafilomycin A1, brefeldin A, and monensin) caused viral proteins to remain in endosomal/lysosomal vesicles, even though the drugs were not able to inhibit the exposure of VP1 N-terminal end. These results indicate that the exposure of N-terminus of VP1 alone is not sufficient to allow CPV to proliferate. Some other pH-dependent changes are needed for productive infection. In addition to blocking endocytic entry, amiloride was able to block some postendocytic steps. The ability of CPV to permeabilize endosomal membranes was demonstrated by feeding cells with differently sized rhodamine-conjugated dextrans together with the CPV in the presence or in the absence of amiloride, bafilomycin A1, brefeldin A, or monensin. Dextran with a molecular weight of 3000 was released from vesicles after 8 h of infection, while dextran with a molecular weight of 10,000 was mainly retained in vesicles. The results suggest that CPV infection does not cause disruption of endosomal vesicles. However, the permeability of endosomal membranes apparently changes during CPV infection, probably due to the PLA2 activity of the virus. These results suggest that parvoviral PLA2 activity is essential for productive infection and presumably

  5. Increased Placental Phospholipid Levels in Pre-Eclamptic Pregnancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Bütikofer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Physiological pregnancy is associated with an increase in lipids from the first to the third trimester. This is a highly regulated response to satisfy energy and membrane demands of the developing fetus. Pregnancy disorders, such as pre-eclampsia, are associated with a dysregulation of lipid metabolism manifesting in increased maternal plasma lipid levels. In fetal placental tissue, only scarce information on the lipid profile is available, and data for gestational diseases are lacking. In the present study, we investigated the placental lipid content in control versus pre-eclamptic samples, with the focus on tissue phospholipid levels and composition. We found an increase in total phospholipid content as well as changes in individual phospholipid classes in pre-eclamptic placental tissues compared to controls. These alterations could be a source of placental pathological changes in pre-eclampsia, such as lipid peroxide insult or dysregulation of lipid transport across the syncytiotrophoblast.

  6. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein

  7. Neutron diffraction studies of amphipathic helices in phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, J.P.; Gilchrist, P.J. [Univ. of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Duff, K.C. [Univ. of Edinburgh Medical School (United Kingdom); Saxena, A.M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The structural feature which is thought to facilitate the interaction of many peptides with phospholipid bilayers is the ability to fold into an amphipathic helix. In most cases the exact location and orientation of this helix with respect to the membrane is not known, and may vary with factors such as pH and phospholipid content of the bilayer. The growing interest in this area is stimulated by indications that similar interactions can contribute to the binding of certain hormones to their cell-surface receptors. We have been using the techniques of neutron diffraction from stacked phospholipid bilayers in an attempt to investigate this phenomenon with a number of membrane-active peptides. Here we report some of our findings with three of these: the bee venom melittin; the hormone calcitonin; and a synthetic peptide representing the ion channel fragment of influenza A M2 protein.

  8. Shear-induced morphology in mixed phospholipid films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsa, Amir; Young, James; Posada, David; Lopez, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Flow of mixed phospholipid films on liquid surfaces plays a significant role in biological processes ranging from lipid bilayer fluidity and the associated behavior of cellular membranes, to flow on the liquid lining in the lungs. Phospholipid films are also central to the process of two-dimensional protein crystallization below a ligand-bearing film. Here, we study a binary mixture of phospholipids that form an insoluble monolayer on the air-water interface. Brewster angle microscopy reveals that a shearing flow induces a phase separation in the binary film, resulting in the appearance of 10 micron-scale dark domains. Hydrodynamic response of the binary film is quantified at the macro-scale by measurements of the surface shear viscosity, via a deep-channel surface viscometer. Reynolds number was shown to be a state variable, along with surface pressure, controlling the surface shear viscosity of a biotinylated lipid film.

  9. Quantification of fatty acids as methyl esters and phospholipids in cheese samples after separation of triacylglycerides and phospholipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of the individual fatty acid composition of neutral- and phospholipids as well as the phospholipid content of dairy food and other foodstuffs are important tasks in life sciences. For these purposes, a method was developed for the separation of lipids (standards of triolein and diacylphosphatidylcholines as well as three cheese samples) by solid-phase extraction using a self-packed column filled with partly deactivated silica. Non-halogenated solvents were used for the elution of the lipid classes. Cyclohexane/ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) served for the elution of neutral lipids, while polar lipids were eluted with three solvents (ethyl acetate/methanol, methanol, and methanol/water) into one fraction. The separated lipid fractions were transesterified and the individual fatty acids were quantified by using gas chromatography coupled to electron ionization mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The recovery rate for standard phosphatidylcholines was ∼90% and cross-contamination from neutral lipids was negligible. The method was applied to cheese samples. Quantitative amounts of individual fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction were eq) were found to be representative for the average contribution of fatty acids to all classes of phospholipids in dairy products. Using this approach, the phospholipid content of lipids from mozzarella, camembert, and goat cream cheese was 0.60%, 1.42% and 0.79%, respectively

  10. Selective Interaction of a Cationic Polyfluorene with Model Lipid Membranes: Anionic versus Zwitterionic Lipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Kahveci

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the interaction mechanism between the conjugated polyelectrolyte {[9,9-bis(6'-N,N,N-trimethylammoniumhexyl]fluorene-phenylene}bromide (HTMA-PFP and model lipid membranes. The study was carried out using different biophysical techniques, mainly fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. Results show that despite the preferential interaction of HTMA-PFP with anionic lipids, HTMA-PFP shows affinity for zwitterionic lipids; although the interaction mechanism is different as well as HTMA-PFP’s final membrane location. Whilst the polyelectrolyte is embedded within the lipid bilayer in the anionic membrane, it remains close to the surface, forming aggregates that are sensitive to the physical state of the lipid bilayer in the zwitterionic system. The different interaction mechanism is reflected in the polyelectrolyte fluorescence spectrum, since the maximum shifts to longer wavelengths in the zwitterionic system. The intrinsic fluorescence of HTMA-PFP was used to visualize the interaction between polymer and vesicles via fluorescence microscopy, thanks to its high quantum yield and photostability. This technique allows the selectivity of the polyelectrolyte and higher affinity for anionic membranes to be observed. The results confirmed the appropriateness of using HTMA-PFP as a membrane fluorescent marker and suggest that, given its different behaviour towards anionic and zwitterionic membranes, HTMA-PFP could be used for selective recognition and imaging of bacteria over mammalian cells.

  11. NMR analyses of deuterated phospholipids isolated from Pichia angusta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massou, S.; Augé, S.; Tropis, M.; Lindley, N. D.; Milon, A.

    1998-02-01

    The phospholipid composition of methylotrophic yeasts grown on deuterated and hydrogenated media has been determined by proton and phosphorus NMR. By using a line narrowing solvent, we could obtain linewidth lower than 2 Hz, and all the resonances could be resolved. Phospholipids were identified on the basis of their chemical shift and by 31P - H correlations (HMQC - HOHAHA gradient enhanced experiments). We have thus analysed qualitatively and quantitatively lipids mixtures directly after chloroform-methanol extraction. The lipid composition is deeply modified after growth in deuterated medium were phosphatidyl Inositol (PI) becomes the major lipid, instead of a PC, PS, PI mixture in hydrogenated conditions. La composition en phospholipides de levures méthylotrophes ayant poussé sur des milieux de cultures hydrogénés et deutériés a été déterminée par RMN du proton et du phosphore31. L'utilisation d'un solvant d'affinement a permis d'obtenir des largeurs de raies inférieures à 2Hz et de résoudre toutes les classes de phospholipides. Ils sont ensuite identifiés par leur déplacement chimique et par des corrélations phosphore - proton spécifiques (expériences HMQC-HOHAHA gradients). Cette approche a permis une analyse qualitative et quantitative de mélanges de phospholipides directement après extraction au chloroforme-méthanol. La composition en phospholipides est profondément modifiée lors de la croissance en milieu perdeutérié où l'on observe un lipide majoritaire, le phosphatidyl Inositol (PI), au lieu d'un mélange PC, PS PI en milieu hydrogéné.

  12. Structure and mechanism of ATP-dependent phospholipid transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez Marques, Rosa Laura; Poulsen, Lisbeth Rosager; Bailly, Aurélien;

    2015-01-01

    Background ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters and P4-ATPases are two large and seemingly unrelated families of primary active pumps involved in moving phospholipids from one leaflet of a biological membrane to the other. Scope of review This review aims to identify common mechanistic features...... in the way phospholipid flipping is carried out by two evolutionarily unrelated families of transporters. Major conclusions Both protein families hydrolyze ATP, although they employ different mechanisms to use it, and have a comparable size with twelve transmembrane segments in the functional unit...

  13. Environmental behavior of inorganic anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent efforts have addressed two aspects of anion behavior in the soil/plant system. The first involves evaluation of the gaseous component of the terrestrial iodine cycle in soils and plants. Field analyses of 129I in soils and vegetation adjacent to a fuels reprocessing facility, which was idle for 10 years prior to the study, indicated that there may be a significant gaseous component to the terrestrial iodine cycle. Soil substrates, including a silt-sand, organic forest soil, quartz sand, and a sterilized soil, were amended with radioiodide, and the rates and quality of the volatile components evaluated

  14. PEGylated and targeted extracellular vesicles display enhanced cell specificity and circulation time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooijmans, S A A; Fliervoet, L A L; van der Meel, R; Fens, M H A M; Heijnen, H F G; van Bergen En Henegouwen, P M P; Vader, P; Schiffelers, R M

    2016-02-28

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are increasingly being recognized as candidate drug delivery systems due to their ability to functionally transfer biological cargo between cells. However, the therapeutic applicability of EVs may be limited due to a lack of cell-targeting specificity and rapid clearance of exogenous EVs from the circulation. In order to improve EV characteristics for drug delivery to tumor cells, we have developed a novel method for decorating EVs with targeting ligands conjugated to polyethylene glycol (PEG). Nanobodies specific for the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) were conjugated to phospholipid (DMPE)-PEG derivatives to prepare nanobody-PEG-micelles. When micelles were mixed with EVs derived from Neuro2A cells or platelets, a temperature-dependent transfer of nanobody-PEG-lipids to the EV membranes was observed, indicative of a 'post-insertion' mechanism. This process did not affect EV morphology, size distribution, or protein composition. After introduction of PEG-conjugated control nanobodies to EVs, cellular binding was compromised due to the shielding properties of PEG. However, specific binding to EGFR-overexpressing tumor cells was dramatically increased when EGFR-specific nanobodies were employed. Moreover, whereas unmodified EVs were rapidly cleared from the circulation within 10min after intravenous injection in mice, EVs modified with nanobody-PEG-lipids were still detectable in plasma for longer than 60min post-injection. In conclusion, we propose post-insertion as a novel technique to confer targeting capacity to isolated EVs, circumventing the requirement to modify EV-secreting cells. Importantly, insertion of ligand-conjugated PEG-derivatized phospholipids in EV membranes equips EVs with improved cell specificity and prolonged circulation times, potentially increasing EV accumulation in targeted tissues and improving cargo delivery. PMID:26773767

  15. Deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow

    OpenAIRE

    Haas,; Blom, C.; Ende, van den, D.; Duits, M. H. G.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    We describe experimental studies of the deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow. The experiments are carried out with a counterrotating Couette apparatus. The deformation depends on the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the vesicle radius, and the viscosity of the surrounding Newtonian liquid. We show that the relevant mechanical parameter is the bending rigidity. A simple model has been developed that describes the deformation of a vesicle. This model takes therma...

  16. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Qian Peter Su; Wanqing Du; Qinghua Ji; Boxin Xue; Dong Jiang; Yueyao Zhu; Jizhong Lou; Li Yu; Yujie Sun

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro st...

  17. A scenario for a genetically controlled fission of artificial vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bönzli, Eva; Hadorn, Maik; Jørgensen, Mikkel Girke;

    2011-01-01

    Artificial vesicles have been used for decades as model systems of biological cells to investigate scientific questions in simulacra. In recent years, the significance of artificial vesicles further increased because they represent ideal candidates to become the building block of a de novo constr...... transfer method to prepare vesicles, the base for the development of a protocol to induce fission in artificial cell may be available....

  18. Thermodynamics and dynamics of the formation of spherical lipidic vesicles

    CERN Document Server

    Zapata, E Hernandez; Santamaría-Holek, I

    2009-01-01

    We propose a free energy expression accounting for the formation of spherical vesicles from planar lipidic membranes and derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the probability distribution describing the dynamics of vesicle formation. We found that formation may occur as an activated process for small membranes and as a transport process for sufficiently large membranes. We give explicit expressions for the transition rates and the characteristic time of vesicle formation in terms of the relevant physical parameters.

  19. Solid-State NMR Characterization of Gas Vesicle Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Sivertsen, Astrid C.; Bayro, Marvin J.; Belenky, Marina; Griffin, Robert G.; Herzfeld, Judith

    2010-01-01

    Gas vesicles are gas-filled buoyancy organelles with walls that consist almost exclusively of gas vesicle protein A (GvpA). Intact, collapsed gas vesicles from the cyanobacterium Anabaena flos-aquae were studied by solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and most of the GvpA sequence was assigned. Chemical shift analysis indicates a coil-α-β-β-α-coil peptide backbone, consistent with secondary-structure-prediction algorithms, and complementary information about mobility and solvent exposure yields a pi...

  20. Effects of cholesterol or gramicidin on slow and fast motions of phospholipids in oriented bilayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Peng, Z. Y.; Simplaceanu, V; Dowd, S R; Ho, C.

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear spin-lattice relaxation both in the rotating frame and in the laboratory frame is used to investigate the slow and fast molecular motions of phospholipids in oriented bilayers in the liquid crystalline phase. The bilayers are prepared from a perdeuterated phospholipid labeled with a pair of 19F atoms at the 7 position of the 2-sn acyl chain. Phospholipid-cholesterol or phospholipid-gramicidin interactions are characterized by measuring the relaxation rates as a function of the bilayer...

  1. Ca2+ pump and Ca2+/H+ antiporter in plasma membrane vesicles isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from corn leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma membrane vesicles, which are mostly right side-out, were isolated from corn leaves by aqueous two-phase partitioning method. Characteristics of Ca2+ transport were investigated after preparing inside-out vesicles by Triton X-100 treatment. 45Ca2+ transport was assayed by membrane filtration technique. Results showed that Ca2+ transport into the plasma membrane vesicles was Mg-ATP dependent. The active Ca2+ transport system had a high affinity for Ca2+(Km(Ca2+) = 0.4 microM) and ATP(Km(ATP) = 3.9 microM), and showed pH optimum at 7.5. ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake in the plasma membrane vesicles was stimulated in the presence of Cl- or NO3-. Quenching of quinacrine fluorescence showed that these anions also induced H+ transport into the vesicles. The Ca2+ uptake stimulated by Cl- was dependent on the activity of H+ transport into the vesicles. However, carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) and VO4(3-) which is known to inhibit the H+ pump associated with the plasma membrane, canceled almost all of the Cl(-)-stimulated Ca2+ uptake. Furthermore, artificially imposed pH gradient (acid inside) caused Ca2+ uptake into the vesicles. These results suggest that the Cl(-)-stimulated Ca2+ uptake is caused by the efflux of H+ from the vesicles by the operation of Ca2+/H+ antiport system in the plasma membrane. In Cl(-)-free medium, H+ transport into the vesicles scarcely occurred and the addition of CCCP caused only a slight inhibition of the active Ca2+ uptake into the vesicles. These results suggest that two Ca2+ transport systems are operating in the plasma membrane from corn leaves, i.e., one is an ATP-dependent active Ca2+ transport system (Ca2+ pump) and the other is a Ca2+/H+ antiport system. Little difference in characteristics of Ca2+ transport was observed between the plasma membranes isolated from etiolated and green corn leaves

  2. Sugar-Decorated Sugar Vesicles : Lectin-Carbohydrate Recognition at the Surface of Cyclodextrin Vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuhl, Jens; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2010-01-01

    An artificial glycocalix self-assembles when unilamellar bilayer vesicles of amphiphilic beta-cyclodextrins are decorated with maltose and lactose by host-guest interactions. To this end, maltose and lactose were conjugated with adamantane through a tetra(ethyleneglycol) spacer. Both carbohydrate-ad

  3. Cimetidine transport in isolated brush border membrane vesicles from bovine choroid plexus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to elucidate the mechanisms involved in the transport of cimetidine across the brush border membrane of choroid plexus epithelium. Brush border membrane vesicles were prepared from bovine choroid plexus and the uptake of [3H]cimetidine was studied using the methods of rapid vacuum filtration and scintillation counting. Cimetidine accumulated in the vesicles with time reaching equilibrium within 2 hr. The amount of cimetidine taken up by the vesicles at equilibrium decreased with increasing extravesicular media osmolarity suggesting that cimetidine accumulates in an osmotically reactive intravesicular space. Binding of cimetidine to the membrane was estimated to be less than 18%. Michaelis-Menten studies demonstrated that cimetidine transport involved both a saturable and a nonsaturable component. The Vmax and Km (mean +/- S.E.) were 16.7 +/- 5.9 pmol/sec/mg protein and 58.1 +/- 3.1 microM, respectively, suggesting that cimetidine is transported across the choroid plexus brush border membrane with a lower affinity and a higher capacity than across the renal brush border membrane. The organic cation, quinidine (0.1 mM), and the amino acid, histidine (20 mM), both significantly reduced the initial, but not the equilibrium, uptake of cimetidine. However, high concentrations (5 mM) of more polar organic cations including tetraethylammonium, as well as of several organic anions including salicylate did not inhibit cimetidine transport. Studies with unlabeled cimetidine revealed a countertransport phenomenon. Attempts to drive the concentrative uptake of cimetidine with various ion gradients were unsuccessful. Of note was the fact that an outwardly directed proton gradient could significantly accelerate the uptake of cimetidine

  4. Electron transfer in dinucleoside phosphate anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron transfer reaction within various dinucleoside phosphate radical anions has been investigated by ESR spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis. In the ESR work electrons are produced by photolysis of K4Fe(CN)6 in a 12 M LiCl glass at 770K. Upon photobleaching the electrons react with the dinucleoside phosphate to form the anion radical. The anions of the four DNA nucleosides were also produced and their ESR spectra were appropriately weighted and summed by computer to simulate the spectra found for the dinucleoside phosphate anions. From the analysis the relative amounts of each of the nucleoside anions in the dinucleoside phosphate anion were determined. Evidence suggests the electron affinity of the pyrimidine bases are greater than the purine bases; however, the results are not sufficient to distinguish between the individual purine or pyrimidine. When dinucleoside phosphate anions containing thymidine are warmed, protonation occurs only on thymine to produce the well known ''thymyl'' spectrum. Pulse radiolysis experiments on individual nucleotides (TMP, dAMP), mixtures of these nucleotides and the dinucleoside phosphate, TdA, in aqueous solution at room temperature show that in the TdA anion electron transfer occurs from adenine to thymine, whereas no electron transfer is found for mixtures of individual nucleotides. Protonation is found to occur only on thymine in the TdA anion in agreement with the ESR results

  5. Profiling and tandem mass spectrometry analysis of aminoacylated phospholipids in Bacillus subtilis  [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Atila

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Cationic modulation of the dominantly negative electrostatic structure of phospholipids plays an important role in bacterial response to changes in the environment. In addition to zwitterionic phosphatidylethanolamine, Gram-positive bacteria are also abundant in positively charged lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol. Increased amounts of both types of lipids render Gram-positive bacterial cells more resistant to cationic antibiotic peptides such as defensins.  Lysyl and alanyl-phosphatidylglycerol as well as alanyl-cardiolipin have also been studied by mass spectroscopy. Phospholipids modified by other amino acids have been discovered by chemical analysis of the lipid lysate but have yet to be studied by mass spectroscopy. We exploited the high sensitivity of modern mass spectroscopy in searching for substructures in complex mixtures to establish a sensitive and thorough screen for aminoacylated phospholipids. The search for deprotonated aminoacyl anions in lipid extracted from Bacillus subtilis strain 168 yielded strong evidence as well as relative abundance of aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerols, which serves as a crude measure of the specificity of aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthase MprF. No aminoacyl-cardiolipin was found. More importantly, the second most abundant species in this category is D-alanyl-phosphatidylglycerol, suggesting a possible role in the D-alanylation pathway of wall- and lipo-teichoic acids.

  6. Profiling and tandem mass spectrometry analysis of aminoacylated phospholipids in Bacillus subtilis  [version 1; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Atila

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cationic modulation of the dominantly negative electrostatic structure of phospholipids plays an important role in bacterial response to changes in the environment. In addition to zwitterionic phosphatidylethanolamine, Gram-positive bacteria are also abundant in positively charged lysyl-phosphatidylglycerol. Increased amounts of both types of lipids render Gram-positive bacterial cells more resistant to cationic antibiotic peptides such as defensins.  Lysyl and alanyl-phosphatidylglycerol as well as alanyl-cardiolipin have also been studied by mass spectroscopy. Phospholipids modified by other amino acids have been discovered by chemical analysis of the lipid lysate but have yet to be studied by mass spectroscopy. We exploited the high sensitivity of modern mass spectroscopy in searching for substructures in complex mixtures to establish a sensitive and thorough screen for aminoacylated phospholipids. The search for deprotonated aminoacyl anions in lipid extracted from Bacillus subtilis strain 168 yielded strong evidence as well as relative abundance of aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerols, which serves as a crude measure of the specificity of aminoacyl-phosphatidylglycerol synthase MprF. No aminoacyl-cardiolipin was found. More importantly, the second most abundant species in this category is D-alanyl-phosphatidylglycerol, suggesting a possible role in the D-alanylation pathway of wall- and lipo-teichoic acids.

  7. Additive effects on the energy barrier for synaptic vesicle fusion cause supralinear effects on the vesicle fusion rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schotten, Sebastiaan; Meijer, Marieke; Walter, Alexander Matthias;

    2015-01-01

    supralinear effects on the fusion rate. To test this prediction experimentally, we developed a method to assess the number of releasable vesicles, rate constants for vesicle priming, unpriming, and fusion, and the activation energy for fusion by fitting a vesicle state model to synaptic responses induced by......-linear effects of genetic/pharmacological perturbations on synaptic transmission and a novel interpretation of the cooperative nature of Ca2+-dependent release....

  8. Coverage and disruption of phospholipid membranes by oxide nanoparticles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pera, H.; Nolte, T.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Kleijn, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    We studied the interactions of silica and titanium dioxide nanoparticles with phospholipid membranes and show how electrostatics plays an important role. For this, we systematically varied the charge density of both the membranes by changing their lipid composition and the oxide particles by changin

  9. PHOSPHOLIPIDS OF FIVE PSEUDOMONAD ARCHETYPES FOR DIFFERENT TOLUENE DEGRADATION PATHWAYS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS) was used to determine phospholipid profiles for five reference pseudomonad strains harboring distinct toluene catabolic pathways: Pseudomonas putida mt-2, Pseudomonas putida F1, Burkholderia cepacia G4, B...

  10. Membrane Phospholipid Redistribution in Cytokinesis: A Theoretical Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-Wen AN; Wen-Zhou WU; Wei-Yi CHEN

    2005-01-01

    In cell mitosis, cytokinesis is a major deformation process, during which the site of the contractile ring is determined by the biochemical stimulus from asters of the mitotic apparatus, actin and myosin assembly is related to the motion of membrane phospholipids, and local distribution and arrangement of the microfilament cytoskeleton are different at different cytokinesis stages. Based on the Zinemanas-Nir model, a new model is proposed in this study to simulate the entire process by coupling the biochemical stimulus with the mechanical actions. There were three assumptions in this model: the movements of phospholipid proteins are driven by gradients of biochemical stimulus on the membrane surface; the local assembly of actin and myosin filament depends on the amount of phospholipid proteins at the same location;and the surface tension includes membrane tensions due to both the passive deformation of the membrane and the active contraction of actin filament, which is determined by microfilament redistribution and rearrangement. This model could explain the dynamic movement of microfilaments during cytokinesis and predict cell deformation. The calculated results from this model demonstrated that the reorientation of phospholipid proteins and the redistribution and reorientation of microfilaments may play a crucial role in cell division. This model may better represent the cytokinesis process by the introduction of biochemical stimulus.

  11. Prostaglandin phospholipid conjugates with unusual biophysical and cytotoxic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Palle Jacob; Adolph, Sidsel K.; Andresen, Thomas Lars;

    2010-01-01

    The synthesis of two secretory phospholipase A(2) IIA sensitive 15-deoxy-Delta(12,14)-prostaglandin J(2) phospholipid conjugates is described and their biophysical and biological properties are reported. The conjugates spontaneously form particles in the liposome size region upon dispersion in an...

  12. Biomembrane modeling: molecular dynamics simulation of phospholipid monolayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, T.R.

    1979-01-01

    As a first step toward a computer model of a biomembrane-like bilayer, a dynamic, deterministric model of a phospholipid monolayer has been constructed. The model moves phospholipid-like centers of force according to an integrated law of motion in finite difference form. Forces on each phospholipid analogue are derived from the gradient of the local potential, itself the sum of Coulombic and short-range terms. The Coulombic term is approximated by use of a finite-difference form of Poisson's equation, while the short-range term results from finite-radius, pairwise summation of a Lennard-Jones potential. Boundary potentials are treated in such a way that the model is effectively infinite in extent in the plane of the monolayer. The two-dimensional virial theorem is used to find the surface pressure of the monolayer as a function of molecular area. Pressure-versus-area curves for simulated monolayers are compared to those of real monolayers. Dependence of the simulator's behavior on Lennard-Jones parameters and the specific geometry of the molecular analogue is discussed. Implications for the physical theory of phospholipid monolayers and bilayers are developed.

  13. Lysosomal phospholipids from rat liver after treatment with different drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjiong, H B; Lepthin, J; Debuch, H

    1978-01-01

    Rats were treated with 5 different drugs p-ethoxyacetanilide (I), indometacin (II) and nor-amidopyrine-methanesulfonate (III), O,O'-bis(diethylaminoethyl)hexestrol(IV) and choloroquine (V) for 3 - 4 weeks. Liver cell fractions were isolated by discontinuous gradient centrifugation and the specific activity of acid phosphatase was determined in each. Lysosomal fractions contained widely varying amounts of this marker enzyme, indicating that the concentration of lysosomes within these fractions differed. The amounts and patterns of phospholipids reflected this fact. Since we assumed bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate [(MAG)2-P; synonym:lysobisphosphatidic acid] is a marker lipid for secondary lysosomes, we expected and found significant quantities of this acidic phospholipid only in those lysosomal fractions which were also rich in acid phosphatase activity. 12% of the lysosomal phospholipids from animals receiving the hexestrol derivative (IV), and 19% of those from the chloroquine (V) experiment were present as (MAG)2P. The fatty acid compositions of this lysosomal phospholipid were not the same in all lysosome fractions. The more (MAG)2P present in the lysosomes, the more unsaturated are the fatty acids. Thus, after treatment with chloroquine, more than 90% of the fatty acids from (MAG)2P are unsaturated; C22:6 represents about 70% of the total. PMID:627402

  14. Calcium and protons affect the interaction of neurotransmitters and anesthetics with anionic lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Isidoro, Rosendo; Ruiz-Suárez, J C

    2016-09-01

    We study how zwitterionic and anionic biomembrane models interact with neurotransmitters (NTs) and anesthetics (ATs) in the presence of Ca(2+) and different pH conditions. As NTs we used acetylcholine (ACh), γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), and l-glutamic acid (LGlu). As ATs, tetracaine (TC), and pentobarbital (PB) were employed. By using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), we analyzed the changes such molecules produce in the thermal properties of the membranes. We found that calcium and pH play important roles in the interactions of NTs and ATs with the anionic lipid membranes. Changes in pH promote deprotonation of the phosphate groups in anionic phospholipids inducing electrostatic interactions between them and NTs; but if Ca(2+) ions are in the system, these act as bridges. Such interactions impact the physical properties of the membranes in a similar manner that anesthetics do. Beyond the usual biochemical approach, we claim that these effects should be taken into account to understand the excitatory-inhibitory orchestrated balance in the nervous system. PMID:27362370

  15. Role of Extracellular Vesicles in Hematological Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Raimondo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the role of tumor microenvironment in the progression of hematological malignancies has been widely recognized. Recent studies have focused on how cancer cells communicate within the microenvironment. Among several factors (cytokines, growth factors, and ECM molecules, a key role has been attributed to extracellular vesicles (EV, released from different cell types. EV (microvesicles and exosomes may affect stroma remodeling, host cell functions, and tumor angiogenesis by inducing gene expression modulation in target cells, thus promoting cancer progression and metastasis. Microvesicles and exosomes can be recovered from the blood and other body fluids of cancer patients and contain and deliver genetic and proteomic contents that reflect the cell of origin, thus constituting a source of new predictive biomarkers involved in cancer development and serving as possible targets for therapies. Moreover, due to their specific cell-tropism and bioavailability, EV can be considered natural vehicles suitable for drug delivery. Here we will discuss the recent advances in the field of EV as actors in hematological cancer progression, pointing out the role of these vesicles in the tumor-host interplay and in their use as biomarkers for hematological malignancies.

  16. Coated vesicles contain a phosphatidylinositol kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When coated vesicles (CVs) are incubated with [gamma-32P]ATP, radioactivity is rapidly incorporated into a compound identified by thin layer chromatography as phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. This activity has been identified in CVs isolated from bovine brain as well as from rat liver and chick embryo skeletal muscle. Phosphatidylinositol (PI) kinase is not separated from CVs during agarose electrophoresis, which produces CVs of greater than 95% purity, indicating that the activity present does not derive from contamination. The specific activity of these highly purified CVs was demonstrated to be approximately twice that of synaptic plasma membranes, further ruling out contamination from this source. The PI kinase remains associated with the vesicle upon removal of clathrin and its associated proteins and is solubilized by nonionic detergents, suggesting it is an integral membrane protein. The authors have been unable to demonstrate the formation of significant amounts of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate in any of the CV preparations. In the presence of exogenous PI, activity is stimulated, with maximal phosphorylation occurring at 0.1 mM. The enzyme appears to be maximally stimulated by 200 mM MgCl2 and 1 mM ATP and is most active at pH 7.25. Calculations indicate that, under optimal conditions, approximately 25 molecules of PIP are produced per CV within 60 s, suggesting that these structures may play an important role in cellular PI metabolism

  17. Bacterial outer membrane vesicles and vaccine applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, Reinaldo; Fernández, Sonsire; Zayas, Caridad; Acosta, Armando; Sarmiento, Maria Elena; Ferro, Valerie A; Rosenqvist, Einar; Campa, Concepcion; Cardoso, Daniel; Garcia, Luis; Perez, Jose Luis

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV) were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D) and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB) using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA), serogroup W (dOMVW), and serogroup X (dOMVX) were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC), Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP), Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM), and BCG (dOMVBCG). The immunogenicity of the OMV has been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice has shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin, and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates. PMID:24715891

  18. BACTERIAL OUTER MEMBRANE VESICLES AND VACCINE APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo eAcevedo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vaccines based on outer membrane vesicles (OMV were developed more than 20 years ago against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B. These nano-sized structures exhibit remarkable potential for immunomodulation of immune responses and delivery of self meningococcal antigens or unrelated antigens incorporated into the vesicle structure. This paper reviews different applications in OMV Research and Development (R&D and provides examples of OMV developed and evaluated at the Finlay Institute in Cuba. A Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP process was developed at the Finlay Institute to produce OMV from N. meningitidis serogroup B (dOMVB using detergent extraction. Subsequently, OMV from N. meningitidis, serogroup A (dOMVA, serogroup W (dOMVW and serogroup X (dOMVX were obtained using this process. More recently, the extraction process has also been applied effectively for obtaining OMV on a research scale from Vibrio cholerae (dOMVC, Bordetella pertussis (dOMVBP, Mycobacterium smegmatis (dOMVSM and BCG (dOMVBCG. The immunogenicity of the OMV have been evaluated for specific antibody induction, and together with functional bactericidal and challenge assays in mice have shown their protective potential. dOMVB has been evaluated with non-self neisserial antigens, including with a herpes virus type 2 glycoprotein, ovalbumin and allergens. In conclusion, OMV are proving to be more versatile than first conceived and remain an important technology for development of vaccine candidates.

  19. Nonenzymatic glycation of phosphatidylethanolamine in erythrocyte vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unsealed inside-out and right-side out vesicles were prepared from human red cells. The vesicles were incubated with D-glucose [14C(U)] and sodium cyanoborohydride in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4. After incubation, lipids were extracted with 1-butanol and non-lipid contaminants removed by Sephadex G-25 chromatography. Phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol was purified by chromatography on columns of silicic acid and phenylboronate agarose gel. Phospholipase C (B. cereus) liberated phosphoethanolamine-sorbitol (I) which comigrated on TLC with synthetic I prepared by reductive condensation of phosphoethanolamine and D-glucose and also with the product of phospholipase C (B. cereus) hydrolysis of reference phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol. Exposure of I to alkaline phosphatase (E. coli) gave P/sub i/ and ethanolamine-sorbitol (II) which comigrated on TLC with synthetic II prepared by reductive condensation of ethanolamine and D-glucose or by phospholipase D hydrolysis of reference phosphatidylethanolamine-sorbitol. These studies demonstrate that vesicular phosphatidylethanolamine can be reductively glycated and illustrate the applicability of both phospholipase C and phospholipase D in characterizing glycated phosphoglycerides

  20. Synergistic Interactions of Sugars/Polyols and Monovalent Salts with Phospholipids Depend upon Sugar/Polyol Complexity and Anion Identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Ginevra A; Henderson, J Michael; Heffern, Charles; Akgün, Bülent; Majewski, Jaroslaw; Lee, Ka Yee C

    2015-11-24

    We found that interactions of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid monolayers with sugars are influenced by addition of NaCl. This work is of general importance in understanding how sugar-lipid-salt interactions impact biological systems. Using Langmuir isothermal compressions, fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and neutron reflectometry, we examined DPPC monolayers upon addition of sugars/polyols and/or monovalent salts. Sugar-lipid interactions in the presence of NaCl increased with increasing complexity of the sugar/polyol in the order glycerol ≪ glucose lithium ions may also compete with glucose for binding sites. Thus, both cooperative and competitive factors contribute to the overall influence of salts on sugar-lipid interactions. PMID:26496486

  1. Calcium-phospholipid enhanced protein phosphorylation in human placenta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent protein phosphorylation has not been studied in placenta. Human placental cytosol was subjected to an endogenous protein phosphorylation assay using [γ-32P]ATP in the presence of calcium and phosphatidylserine. Protein phosphorylation was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. When compared to basal levels, calcium (10-6 M) in combination with phosphatidylserine (50 μg/ml) significantly enhanced (P 32P incorporation into phosphoproteins having mol wt 47,000, 43,000, and 37,000. Half-maximal 22P incorporation was observed with 3.5 x 10-7 M Ca2+ in the presence of phosphatidylserine (50 μg/ml). The effect of phosphatidylserine was biphasic. In the presence of Ca 10-6 M, 32P incorporation increased to a maximum at 70 +g/ml of phosphatidylserine. The increase was suppressed at 150 μg/ml. Tetracaine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent enhancement of the three phosphoproteins. Calcium in the absence of phospholipid enhanced the phosphorylation of a protein of 98,000 mol wt. Phosphatidylserine suppressed this enhancement. Calmodulin (10-6 M) had no detectable effect upon phosphorylation beyond that of calcium alone, but the calmodulin inhibitor R-24571 specifically inhibited the calcium-stimulated 98,000 mol wt phosphoprotein. Calcium-activated, phospholipid-dependent phospholipid-dependent phosphoproteins are present in human placental cytosol; whether calcium-activated, calmodulin-dependent phosphoproteins also are present remains a question

  2. Binding of Diphtheria Toxin to Phospholipids in Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alving, Carl R.; Iglewski, Barbara H.; Urban, Katharine A.; Moss, Joel; Richards, Roberta L.; Sadoff, Jerald C.

    1980-04-01

    Diphtheria toxin bound to the phosphate portion of some, but not all, phospholipids in liposomes. Liposomes consisting of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol did not bind toxin. Addition of 20 mol% (compared to dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine) of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid, dicetyl phosphate, phosphatidylinositol phosphate, cardiolipin, or phosphatidylserine in the liposomes resulted in substantial binding of toxin. Inclusion of phosphatidylinositol in dimyristol phosphatidylcholine / cholesterol liposomes did not result in toxin binding. The calcium salt of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid was more effective than the sodium salt, and the highest level of binding occurred with liposomes consisting only of dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (calcium salt) and cholesterol. Binding of toxin to liposomes was dependent on pH, and the pattern of pH dependence varied with liposomes having different compositions. Incubation of diphtheria toxin with liposomes containing dicetyl phosphate resulted in maximal binding at pH 3.6, whereas binding to liposomes containing phosphatidylinositol phosphate was maximal above pH 7. Toxin did not bind to liposomes containing 20 mol% of a free fatty acid (palmitic acid) or a sulfated lipid (3-sulfogalactosylceramide). Toxin binding to dicetyl phosphate or phosphatidylinositol phosphate was inhibited by UTP, ATP, phosphocholine, or p-nitrophenyl phosphate, but not by uracil. We conclude that (a) diphtheria toxin binds specifically to the phosphate portion of certain phospholipids, (b) binding to phospholipids in liposomes is dependent on pH, but is not due only to electrostatic interaction, and (c) binding may be strongly influenced by the composition of adjacent phospholipids that do not bind toxin. We propose that a minor membrane phospholipid (such as phosphatidylinositol phosphate or phosphatidic acid), or that some other phosphorylated membrane molecule (such as a phosphoprotein) may be important in the initial binding of

  3. Photoinduced electron transfer from (alkoxyphenyl)triphenylporphyrins to interface water of dihexadecyl phosphate, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Y.S.; Kevan, L. (Univ. of Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-04-21

    Photoionization of (alkoxyphenyl)triphenylporphyrins (C[sub n]OPTPP) in dihexadecyl phosphate (DHP), dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC), and dioctadecyldimethylammonium chloride (DODAC) frozen vesicle solutions at 77 K occurs via electron transfer from C[sub n]OPTPP to bulk water at the interface of the vesicles. This process results in C[sub n]OPTPP[sup +] formation which is characterized and quantitated by electron spin resonance. The cation yield decreases with increasing C[sub n] alkyl chain length of C[sub n]OPTPP due to an increasing interaction distance between the porphyrin headgroup and interface water. This change in interaction distance is directly measured with electron spin echo modulation by measuring the deuterium modulation depth associated with C[sub n]OPTPP[sup +] interactions with deuterated water at the interface. The cation yield also decreases from cationic DODAC to neutral DPPC to anionic DHP vesicles because of a charge effect on electron transfer through the interface. 37 refs., 5 figs.

  4. Ursodeoxycholic acid and superoxide anion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Predrag Ljubuncic; Omar Abu-Salach; Arieh Bomzon

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the ability of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) to scavenge superoxide anion (O2-).METHODS: We assessed the ability of UDCA to scavenge (O2-) generated by xanthine-xanthine oxidase (X-XO) in a cell-free system and its effect on the rate of O2--induced ascorbic acid (AA) oxidation in hepatic post-mitochondrial supernatants.RESULTS: UDCA at a concentration as high as 1 mmol/Ldid not impair the ability of the X-XO system to generate O2-, but could scavenge O2- at concentrations of 0.5 and 1 mmol/L, and decrease the rate of AA oxidation at a concentration of 100 μmol/L.CONCLUSION: UDCA can scavenge O2-, an action that may be beneficial to patients with primary biliary cirrhosis.

  5. Quantification of fatty acids as methyl esters and phospholipids in cheese samples after separation of triacylglycerides and phospholipids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauff, Simone [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Chemistry, Garbenstrasse 28, D-70599 Stuttgart (Germany); Vetter, Walter [University of Hohenheim, Institute of Food Chemistry, Garbenstrasse 28, D-70599 Stuttgart (Germany)], E-mail: w-vetter@uni-hohenheim.de

    2009-03-23

    Determination of the individual fatty acid composition of neutral- and phospholipids as well as the phospholipid content of dairy food and other foodstuffs are important tasks in life sciences. For these purposes, a method was developed for the separation of lipids (standards of triolein and diacylphosphatidylcholines as well as three cheese samples) by solid-phase extraction using a self-packed column filled with partly deactivated silica. Non-halogenated solvents were used for the elution of the lipid classes. Cyclohexane/ethyl acetate (1:1, v/v) served for the elution of neutral lipids, while polar lipids were eluted with three solvents (ethyl acetate/methanol, methanol, and methanol/water) into one fraction. The separated lipid fractions were transesterified and the individual fatty acids were quantified by using gas chromatography coupled to electron ionization mass spectrometry (GC/EI-MS) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The recovery rate for standard phosphatidylcholines was {approx}90% and cross-contamination from neutral lipids was negligible. The method was applied to cheese samples. Quantitative amounts of individual fatty acids in the phospholipid fraction were <0.002-0.29% of total lipids from camembert, <0.002-0.12% of total lipids from mozzarella, and <0.002-0.18% of total lipids in a goat cream cheese. Differences in the fatty acid pattern of neutral and polar lipids were detected. The quantity of the fatty acids determined in the phospholipid fraction was divided by the factor 0.7 in order to convert the fatty acid content into the phospholipid content of the cheese samples. This factor is based on the contribution of 16:0 to dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC). The resulting DPPC equivalents (DPPC{sub eq}) were found to be representative for the average contribution of fatty acids to all classes of phospholipids in dairy products. Using this approach, the phospholipid content of lipids from mozzarella, camembert, and goat cream cheese

  6. Deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haas, de K.H.; Blom, C.; Ende, van den D.; Duits, M.H.G.; Mellema, J.

    1997-01-01

    We describe experimental studies of the deformation of giant lipid bilayer vesicles in shear flow. The experiments are carried out with a counterrotating Couette apparatus. The deformation depends on the mechanical properties of the lipid bilayer, the vesicle radius, and the viscosity of the surroun

  7. Model of separated form factors for unilamellar vesicles

    OpenAIRE

    Kiselev, M A; Lesieur, P; Kisselev, A. M.; D. Lombardo; Aksenov, V. L.

    2001-01-01

    New model of separated form factors is proposed for the evaluation of small-angle neutron scattering curves from large unilamellar vesicles. The validity of the model was checked by comparison to the model of hollow sphere. The model of separated form factors and hollow sphere model give reasonable agreement in the evaluation of vesicle parameters.

  8. Schwannoma, a rare tumor of the seminal vesicle

    OpenAIRE

    Furtado, AM; Carrasquinho, E. (Eduardo); Ferreira, M; Afonso, A.; Ferrito, F

    2011-01-01

    We present a rare case of a schwannoma of the seminal vesicle that occurred in a 43-year-old male with symptoms of the lower urinary tract. Ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging documented a solid mass in the patient's left seminal vesicle. A transvesical approach with a transtrigonal midline incision was successfully performed. The microscopic aspect was compatible with schwannoma.

  9. Slow sedimentation and deformability of charged lipid vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Rey Suárez

    Full Text Available The study of vesicles in suspension is important to understand the complicated dynamics exhibited by cells in in vivo and in vitro. We developed a computer simulation based on the boundary-integral method to model the three dimensional gravity-driven sedimentation of charged vesicles towards a flat surface. The membrane mechanical behavior was modeled using the Helfrich Hamiltonian and near incompressibility of the membrane was enforced via a model which accounts for the thermal fluctuations of the membrane. The simulations were verified and compared to experimental data obtained using suspended vesicles labelled with a fluorescent probe, which allows visualization using fluorescence microscopy and confers the membrane with a negative surface charge. The electrostatic interaction between the vesicle and the surface was modeled using the linear Derjaguin approximation for a low ionic concentration solution. The sedimentation rate as a function of the distance of the vesicle to the surface was determined both experimentally and from the computer simulations. The gap between the vesicle and the surface, as well as the shape of the vesicle at equilibrium were also studied. It was determined that inclusion of the electrostatic interaction is fundamental to accurately predict the sedimentation rate as the vesicle approaches the surface and the size of the gap at equilibrium, we also observed that the presence of charge in the membrane increases its rigidity.

  10. Tension-induced vesicle fusion: pathways and pore dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shillcock, Julian C.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamics of tension-induced fusion of two vesicles is studied using dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) simulations. The vesicle membranes use an improved DPD parameter set that results in their sustaining only a 10–30% relative area stretch before rupturing on the microsecond timescale...

  11. Encapsulation of antitumor drug methotrexate in liposome vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liposome vesicles containing antitumor drug methotrexate (MTX) were prepared. MTX was labelled by the tritium ion beam method. After purification by TLC, the specific radioactivity of 3H-MTX was 1.19 GBq/mmol with radiochemical purity orver 95%. Under various forming conditions of liposome vesicles, the efficiency of encapsulation was 21-53%

  12. Tripodal Receptors for Cation and Anion Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David N. Reinhoudt

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses different types of artificial tripodal receptors for the selectiverecognition and sensing of cations and anions. Examples on the relationship between structure andselectivity towards cations and anions are described. Furthermore, their applications as potentiometricion sensing are emphasised, along with their potential applications in optical sensors or optodes.

  13. Test procedure for anion exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plutonium from stored nitrate solutions will be sorbed onto anion exchange resins and converted to storable plutonium dioxide. Useful information will be simultaneously gained on the thermal stability and ion exchange capacity of four commercially available anion exchange resins over several years and under severe degradative conditions. This information will prove useful in predicting the safe and efficient lifetimes of these resins

  14. Simultaneous anion and cation mobility in polypyrrole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaarup, Steen; Bay, Lasse; Vidanapathirana, K.;

    2003-01-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) polymer films permanently doped with large, immobile anion dodecyl benzene sulfonate (DBS) have been characterized by cyclic voltammetry in order to clarify the roles of cations and anions in the aqueous electrolyte as mobile ions in the film. Aqueous solutions of 0.05-0.1 M alk...

  15. Counterintuitive interaction of anions with benzene derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiñonero, David; Garau, Carolina; Frontera, Antonio; Ballester, Pau; Costa, Antonio; Deyà, Pere M.

    2002-06-01

    Ab initio calculations were carried out on complexes between 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB) and anions, where the anion is positioned over the ring along the C3 axis. This study combines crystallographic and computational evidences to demonstrate an attractive interaction between the anion and the π-cloud of TNB. This interaction is rationalized based on the important role of the quadrupole moment of TNB and the anion-induced polarization. In addition, this study has been extended to 1,3,5-trifluorobenzene (TFB), which possesses a very small quadrupole moment. As a result, minimum energy complexes have been found between TFB and both anions and cations due to the stabilization obtained from the ion-induced polarization.

  16. Membrane Protrusion Coarsening and Nanotubulation within Giant Unilamellar Vesicles

    KAUST Repository

    Węgrzyn, Ilona

    2011-11-16

    Hydrophobic side groups on a stimuli-responsive polymer, encapsulated within a single giant unilamellar vesicle, enable membrane attachment during compartment formation at elevated temperatures. We thermally modulated the vesicle through implementation of an IR laser via an optical fiber, enabling localized directed heating. Polymer-membrane interactions were monitored using confocal imaging techniques as subsequent membrane protrusions occurred and lipid nanotubes formed in response to the polymer hydrogel contraction. These nanotubes, bridging the vesicle membrane to the contracting hydrogel, were retained on the surface of the polymer compartment, where they were transformed into smaller vesicles in a process reminiscent of cellular endocytosis. This development of a synthetic vesicle system containing a stimuli-responsive polymer could lead to a new platform for studying inter/intramembrane transport through lipid nanotubes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  17. ISEV position paper: extracellular vesicle RNA analysis and bioinformatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew F. Hill

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are the collective term for the various vesicles that are released by cells into the extracellular space. Such vesicles include exosomes and microvesicles, which vary by their size and/or protein and genetic cargo. With the discovery that EVs contain genetic material in the form of RNA (evRNA has come the increased interest in these vesicles for their potential use as sources of disease biomarkers and potential therapeutic agents. Rapid developments in the availability of deep sequencing technologies have enabled the study of EV-related RNA in detail. In October 2012, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV held a workshop on “evRNA analysis and bioinformatics.” Here, we report the conclusions of one of the roundtable discussions where we discussed evRNA analysis technologies and provide some guidelines to researchers in the field to consider when performing such analysis.

  18. Interaction between silicon dioxide and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohd, Hur Munawar Kabir; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Radiman, Shahidan; Mohamed, Faizal; Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md; Ayob, Muhammad Taqiyuddin Mawardi; Rahman, Irman Abdul [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Many of the cellular process depend on the ability of the membrane to separate areas while allowing exchange and tightly regulated transport of material within and across the membrane to occur, which is the driving principle behind cell communication. The complexity of biological membranes has motivated the development of a wide variety of simpler model systems whose size, geometry and composition can be tailored with precision. This study was conducted to investigate the interactions between silica nanoparticles and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) vesicles. The size range of DPPC vesicles formed was from 50 to 150 nm. Concentration of silica added to the vesicles was varied from 0.25 to 1.5 mg/ml. The change in vesicle size distribution, localization and positioning of silica nanoparticles in vesicles was studied via transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC)

  19. A transient solution for vesicle electrodeformation and relaxation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Jia; Tan, Wenchang; Lin, Hao

    2012-01-01

    A transient analysis for vesicle deformation under DC electric fields is developed. The theory extends from a droplet model, with the additional consideration of a lipid membrane separating two fluids of arbitrary properties. For the latter, both a membrane-charging and a membrane-mechanical model are supplied. The vesicle is assumed to remain spheroidal in shape for all times. The main result is an ODE governing the evolution of the vesicle aspect ratio. The effects of initial membrane tension and pulse length are examined. The model prediction is extensively compared with experimental data, and is shown to accurately capture the system behavior in the regime of no or weak electroporation. More importantly, the comparison reveals that vesicle relaxation obeys a universal behavior regardless of the means of deformation. The process is governed by a single timescale that is a function of the vesicle initial radius, the fluid viscosity, and the initial membrane tension. This universal scaling law can be used to...

  20. Translocation of an Incompressible Vesicle through a Pore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shojaei, Hamid R; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2016-07-01

    We have derived the free energy landscape for the translocation of a single vesicle through a narrow pore by accounting for bending and stretching of the vesicle, and the deformation of the vesicle by the pore. Emergence of a free energy barrier for translocation is a general result, and the magnitude of the barrier is calculated in terms of the various material parameters. The extent of the reduction in the barrier by the presence of an external constant force is calculated. Using the Fokker-Planck formalism, we have calculated the average translocation time corresponding to the various free energy landscapes representing different parameter sets. The dependencies of the average translocation time on the strength of the external force, vesicle size, bending and stretching moduli of the vesicle, and radius and length of the pore are derived, and the computed results are discussed. PMID:27089012

  1. Phospholipid decoration of microcapsules containing perfluorooctyl bromide used as ultrasound contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-López, Raquel; Tsapis, Nicolas; Libong, Danielle; Chaminade, Pierre; Connan, Carole; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Berti, Romain; Taulier, Nicolas; Urbach, Wladimir; Nicolas, Valérie; Fattal, Elias

    2009-03-01

    We present here an easy method to modify the surface chemistry of polymeric microcapsules of perfluorooctyl bromide used as ultrasound contrast agents (UCAs). Capsules were obtained by a solvent emulsification-evaporation process with phospholipids incorporated in the organic phase before emulsification. Several phospholipids were reviewed: fluorescent, pegylated and biotinylated phospholipids. The influence of phospholipid concentration on microcapsule size and morphology was evaluated. Only a fraction of the phospholipids is associated to microcapsules, the rest being dissolved with the surfactant in the aqueous phase. Microscopy shows that phospholipids are present within the shell and that the core/shell structure is preserved up to 0.5 mg fluorescent phospholipids, up to about 0.25 mg pegylated phospholipids or biotinylated phospholipids (for 100 mg of polymer, poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA)). HPLC allows quantifying phospholipids associated to capsules: they correspond to 10% of pegylated phospholipids introduced in the organic phase. The presence of pegylated lipids at the surface of capsules was confirmed by X-ray photon electron spectroscopy (XPS). The pegylation did not modify the echographic signal arising from capsules. Finally biotinylated microcapsules incubated with neutravidin tend to aggregate, which confirms the presence of biotin at the surface. These results are encouraging and future work will consist of nanocapsule surface modification for molecular imaging. PMID:19097640

  2. Development of curcumin loaded sodium hyaluronate immobilized vesicles (hyalurosomes) and their potential on skin inflammation and wound restoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manca, M L; Castangia, I; Zaru, M; Nácher, A; Valenti, D; Fernàndez-Busquets, X; Fadda, A M; Manconi, M

    2015-12-01

    In the present work new highly biocompatible nanovesicles were developed using polyanion sodium hyaluronate to form polymer immobilized vesicles, so called hyalurosomes. Curcumin, at high concentration was loaded into hyalurosomes and physico-chemical properties and in vitro/in vivo performances of the formulations were compared to those of liposomes having the same lipid and drug content. Vesicles were prepared by direct addition of dispersion containing the polysaccharide sodium hyaluronate and the polyphenol curcumin to a commercial mixture of soy phospholipids, thus avoiding the use of organic solvents. An extensive study was carried out on the physico-chemical features and properties of curcumin-loaded hyalurosomes and liposomes. Cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering showed that vesicles were spherical, uni- or oligolamellar and small in size (112-220 nm). The in vitro percutaneous curcumin delivery studies on intact skin showed an improved ability of hyalurosomes to favour a fast drug deposition in the whole skin. Hyalurosomes as well as liposomes were biocompatible, protected in vitro human keratinocytes from oxidative stress damages and promoted tissue remodelling through cellular proliferation and migration. Moreover, in vivo tests underlined a good effectiveness of curcumin-loaded hyalurosomes to counteract 12-O-tetradecanoilphorbol (TPA)-produced inflammation and injuries, diminishing oedema formation, myeloperoxydase activity and providing an extensive skin reepithelization. Thanks to the one-step and environmentally-friendly preparation method, component biocompatibility and safety, good in vitro and in vivo performances, the hyalurosomes appear as promising nanocarriers for cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. PMID:26321058

  3. Adsorption of proteins onto poly(ether urethane) with a phosphorylcholine moiety and influence of preadsorbed phospholipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heiden, A P; Willems, G M; Lindhout, T; Pijpers, A P; Koole, L H

    1998-05-01

    In a previous report we demonstrated that the blood compatibility of poly(ether urethane) (PEU) was improved by grafting phosphorylcholine (PC) groups on the surface. The improved blood compatibility was indicated by decreased platelet adsorption/activation and reduced thrombin formation at the polymer surface in experiments in which the surfaces were contacted with platelet-rich plasma in vitro. In the present study, we investigated the effect of grafted PC groups at a PEU surface on protein and phospholipid adsorption. Adsorption of human fibrinogen (Fg), human serum albumin (Alb), human high-molecular-weight kininogen (HMWK), and dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) vesicles was measured by ellipsometry. For this purpose, thin PEU films were cast on silicon wafers. The polymer film was photochemically modified with a PC-containing aryl azide. The presence of PC groups on the polymer surface was demonstrated by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis). The hydrophilicity of the polymer surface increased by the surface modification, as indicated by a decrease of the contact angle from 59 degrees before to 43 degrees after modification. Our data show that the presence of PC groups has little effect on the adsorption of proteins to a PEU surface. The highest adsorption was observed for Fg (0.49 microgram/cm2 on PC-modified PEU and 0.50 microgram/cm2 on PEU), followed by HMWK (0.28 microgram/cm2 on both PC-modified PEU and PEU), and Alb (0.16 microgram/cm2 on PC-modified PEU and 0.18 microgram/cm2 on PEU). Protein adsorption was further studied on a "biomembrane-like" DOPC bilayer formed on hydrophilic silicon. We found no protein adsorption on this DOPC bilayer. The adsorption of small unilamellar DOPC vesicles on the polymer surfaces amounted to about 0.06 microgram/cm2 (corresponding to circa 30% of monolayer coverage) and was similar for PC-modified PEU and PEU. Despite this partial surface coverage, preadsorbed DOPC on the polymer surface diminished the

  4. Vesicular glutamate transporter 1 orchestrates recruitment of other synaptic vesicle cargo proteins during synaptic vesicle recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ping-Yue; Marrs, Julia; Ryan, Timothy A

    2015-09-11

    A long standing question in synaptic physiology is how neurotransmitter-filled vesicles are rebuilt after exocytosis. Among the first steps in this process is the endocytic retrieval of the transmembrane proteins that are enriched in synaptic vesicles (SVs). At least six types of transmembrane proteins must be recovered, but the rules for how this multiple cargo selection is accomplished are poorly understood. Among these SV cargos is the vesicular glutamate transporter (vGlut). We show here that vGlut1 has a strong influence on the kinetics of retrieval of half of the known SV cargos and that specifically impairing the endocytosis of vGlut1 in turn slows down other SV cargos, demonstrating that cargo retrieval is a collective cargo-driven process. Finally, we demonstrate that different cargos can be retrieved in the same synapse with different kinetics, suggesting that additional post-endocytic sorting steps likely occur in the nerve terminal. PMID:26224632

  5. Gas Vesicle Nanoparticles for Antigen Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiladitya DasSarma

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Microorganisms like the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp. NRC-1 produce gas-filled buoyant organelles, which are easily purified as protein nanoparticles (called gas vesicles or GVNPs. GVNPs are non-toxic, exceptionally stable, bioengineerable, and self-adjuvanting. A large gene cluster encoding more than a dozen proteins has been implicated in their biogenesis. One protein, GvpC, found on the exterior surface of the nanoparticles, can accommodate insertions near the C-terminal region and results in GVNPs displaying the inserted sequences on the surface of the nanoparticles. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on GVNP structure and biogenesis as well as available studies on immunogenicity of pathogenic viral, bacterial, and eukaryotic proteins and peptides displayed on the nanoparticles. Recent improvements in genetic tools for bioengineering of GVNPs are discussed, along with future opportunities and challenges for development of vaccines and other applications.

  6. Biomimetic proteolipid vesicles for targeting inflamed tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinaro, R; Corbo, C; Martinez, J O; Taraballi, F; Evangelopoulos, M; Minardi, S; Yazdi, I K; Zhao, P; De Rosa, E; Sherman, M B; De Vita, A; Toledano Furman, N E; Wang, X; Parodi, A; Tasciotti, E

    2016-09-01

    A multitude of micro- and nanoparticles have been developed to improve the delivery of systemically administered pharmaceuticals, which are subject to a number of biological barriers that limit their optimal biodistribution. Bioinspired drug-delivery carriers formulated by bottom-up or top-down strategies have emerged as an alternative approach to evade the mononuclear phagocytic system and facilitate transport across the endothelial vessel wall. Here, we describe a method that leverages the advantages of bottom-up and top-down strategies to incorporate proteins derived from the leukocyte plasma membrane into lipid nanoparticles. The resulting proteolipid vesicles-which we refer to as leukosomes-retained the versatility and physicochemical properties typical of liposomal formulations, preferentially targeted inflamed vasculature, enabled the selective and effective delivery of dexamethasone to inflamed tissues, and reduced phlogosis in a localized model of inflammation. PMID:27213956

  7. Extracellular vesicles in lung microenvironment and pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yu; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Araya, Jun; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-09-01

    Increasing attention is being paid to the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) in various lung diseases. EVs are released by a variety of cells, including respiratory cells and immune cells, and they encapsulate various molecules, such as proteins and microRNAs, as modulators of intercellular communication. Cancer cell-derived EVs play crucial roles in promoting tumor progression and modifying their microenvironment. By contrast, noncancerous cell-derived EVs demonstrate protective functions against injury, such as tissue recovery and repair, to maintain physiological homeostasis. Airway cells in contact with harmful substances may alter their EV composition and modify the balanced reciprocal interactions with surrounding mesenchymal cells. We summarize the novel findings of EV function in various lung diseases, primarily chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer. PMID:26231094

  8. Enhancement of Lateral Diffusion in Catanionic Vesicles during Multilamellar-to-Unilamellar Transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, S; Sharma, V K; Garcia-Sakai, V; Orecchini, A; Seydel, T; Johnson, M; Mukhopadhyay, R

    2016-04-21

    Catanionic vesicles are formed spontaneously by mixing cationic and anionic dispersions in aqueous solution in suitable conditions. Because of spontaneity in formation, long-term stability, and easy modulation of size and charge, they have numerous advantages over conventional lipid-based vesicles. The dynamics of such vesicles is of interest in the field of biomedicine, as they can be used to deliver drug molecules into the cell membrane. Dynamics of catanionic vesicles based on sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) have been studied using incoherent elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) techniques. Neutron scattering experiments have been carried out on two backscattering spectrometers, IRIS and IN16B, which have different energy resolutions and energy transfer windows. An elastic fixed-window scan carried out using IN16B shows a phase transition at ∼307 K during the heating cycle, whereas on cooling the transition occurred at ∼294 K. DSC results are found to be in close agreement with the elastic scan data. This transition is ascribed to a structural rearrangement from a multilamellar to a unilamellar phase [ Andreozzi J. Phys. Chem. B 2010 , 114 , 8056 - 8060 ]. It is found that a model in which the surfactant molecules undergo both lateral and internal motions can describe the QENS data quite well. While the data from IRIS have contributions from both dynamical processes, the data from IN16B probe only lateral motions, as the internal motions are too fast for the energy window of the spectrometer. It is found that, through the transition, the fraction of surfactant molecules undergoing lateral motion increases of a factor of 2 from the multilamellar to the unilamellar phase, indicating an enhanced fluidity of the latter. The lateral motion is found to be Fickian in nature, while the internal motion has been described by a localized translational diffusion model. The results reported here could have direct

  9. Proteomics of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans Outer Membrane Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieselbach, Thomas; Zijnge, Vincent; Granström, Elisabeth; Oscarsson, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is an oral and systemic pathogen associated with aggressive forms of periodontitis and with endocarditis. Outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) released by this species have been demonstrated to deliver effector proteins such as cytolethal distending toxin (CDT) and leukotoxin (LtxA) into human host cells and to act as triggers of innate immunity upon carriage of NOD1- and NOD2-active pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). To improve our understanding of the pathogenicity-associated functions that A. actinomycetemcomitans exports via OMVs, we studied the proteome of density gradient-purified OMVs from a rough-colony type clinical isolate, strain 173 (serotype e) using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). This analysis yielded the identification of 151 proteins, which were found in at least three out of four independent experiments. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002509. Through this study, we not only confirmed the vesicle-associated release of LtxA, and the presence of proteins, which are known to act as immunoreactive antigens in the human host, but we also identified numerous additional putative virulence-related proteins in the A. actinomycetemcomitans OMV proteome. The known and putative functions of these proteins include immune evasion, drug targeting, and iron/nutrient acquisition. In summary, our findings are consistent with an OMV-associated proteome that exhibits several offensive and defensive functions, and they provide a comprehensive basis to further disclose roles of A. actinomycetemcomitans OMVs in periodontal and systemic disease. PMID:26381655

  10. A single vesicle-vesicle fusion assay for in vitro studies of SNAREs and accessory proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Jiajie; Ishitsuka, Yuji; Lee, Hanki; Joo, Chirlmin; Su, Zengliu; Syed, Salman; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Yoon, Tae-Young; Ha, Taekjip

    2012-05-01

    SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins are a highly regulated class of membrane proteins that drive the efficient merger of two distinct lipid bilayers into one interconnected structure. This protocol describes our fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based single vesicle-vesicle fusion assays for SNAREs and accessory proteins. Both lipid-mixing (with FRET pairs acting as lipophilic dyes in the membranes) and content-mixing assays (with FRET pairs present on a DNA hairpin that becomes linear via hybridization to a complementary DNA) are described. These assays can be used to detect substages such as docking, hemifusion, and pore expansion and full fusion. The details of flow cell preparation, protein-reconstituted vesicle preparation, data acquisition and analysis are described. These assays can be used to study the roles of various SNARE proteins, accessory proteins and effects of different lipid compositions on specific fusion steps. The total time required to finish one round of this protocol is 3–6 d. PMID:22582418

  11. Infrared and fluorescence spectroscopic studies of a phospholipid bilayer supported by a soft cationic hydrogel scaffold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossutti, Michael; Seenath, Ryan; Noël, John A; Lipkowski, Jacek

    2016-07-01

    Polarized attenuated total reflection (ATR-IR) spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy techniques were used to characterize a 1,2-diphytanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPhPC) membrane supported on porous, cationic hydrogel beads. Fluorescence microscopy images showed that the DPhPC coated the external surface of the hydrogel scaffold. In addition, a fluorescence assay of the emission intensity of the Tb(3+)/dipicolinic acid complex demonstrated that the DPhPC coating acted as a barrier to Tb(3+) efflux from the scaffolded vesicle and successfully sealed the porous hydrogel bead. Fluorescence quenching and ATR-IR spectroscopic measurements revealed that the lipid coating has a bilayer structure. The phytanoyl chains were found to exhibit significant trans-gauche isomerization, characteristic of the fluid liquid phase. However, no lipid lateral mobility was observed by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) measurements. The phosphocholine headgroup was found to be well hydrated and oriented such that the cationic choline group tucked in behind the anionic phosphate group, consistent with an electrostatic attraction between the cationic scaffold and zwitterionic lipid. The absence of lipid lateral mobility may be due to the strength of this attraction. PMID:27064742

  12. Seminal vesicle intrafraction motion analysed with cinematic magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyses seminal vesicle displacement relative to the prostate and in relation to treatment time. A group of eleven patients undergoing prostate cancer radiotherapy were imaged with a continuous 3 T cine-MRI in the standard treatment setup position. Four images were recorded every 4 seconds for 15 minutes in the sagittal plane and every 6.5 seconds for 12 minutes in the coronal plane. The prostate gland and seminal vesicles were contoured on each MRI image. The coordinates of the centroid of the prostate and seminal vesicles on each image was analysed for displacement against time. Displacements between the 2.5 percentile and 97.5 percentile (i.e. the 2.5% trimmed range) for prostate and seminal vesicle centroid displacements were measured for 3, 5, 10 and 15 minutes time intervals in the anterior-posterior (AP), left-right (LR) and superior-inferior (SI) directions. Real time prostate and seminal vesicle displacement was compared for individual patients. The 2.5% trimmed range for 3, 5, 10 and 15 minutes for the seminal vesicle centroids in the SI direction measured 4.7 mm; 5.8 mm; 6.5 mm and 7.2 mm respectively. In the AP direction, it was 4.0 mm, 4.5 mm, 6.5 mm, and 7.0 mm. In the LR direction for 3, 5 and 10 minutes; for the left seminal vesicle, it was 2.7 mm, 2.8 mm, 3.4 mm and for the right seminal vesicle, it was 3.4 mm, 3.3 mm, and 3.4 mm. The correlation between the real-time prostate and seminal vesicle displacement varied substantially between patients indicating that the relationship between prostate displacement and seminal vesicles displacement is patient specific with the majority of the patients not having a strong relationship. Our study shows that seminal vesicle motion increases with treatment time, and that the prostate and seminal vesicle centroids do not move in unison in real time, and that an additional margin is required for independent seminal vesicle motion if treatment localisation is to the prostate

  13. The influence of plant hormones on phospholipid monolayer stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gzyl-Malchera, Barbara; Filek, Maria; Brezesinski, Gerald; Fischer, Antje

    2007-01-01

    The influence of hormones in water subphase on the stability of monolayers built of phospholipid mixtures extracted from embryogenic (PLE) and nonembryogenic (PLNE) wheat calli was examined. Additionally, experiments on individual lipids, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dipalmitoylphosphatidic acid (DPPA), were performed. DPPC was chosen because it was the main phospholipid present in both calli. Negatively charged DPPA could mimic a negatively charged natural mixture of lipids. As hormones, auxins (IAA and 2,4-D), cytokinins (zeatin and kinetin) and zearalenone were chosen. The time of monolayer stability for PLNE calli was much longer than for PLE calli. Kinetics of monolayer stability of PLNE was similar to DPPA, whereas that of PLE was similar to DPPC. Generally, hormones increased the time after which the monolayer stability was reached and decreased the surface pressure. The greatest effect was observed for auxins (especially IAA), whereas cytokinins affected the monolayer stability to a lesser degree. PMID:17425106

  14. Interactions Mode of Amphoteric Molecules with Ordered Phospholipid Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUNJin; CHENGGang; HEZhong-gui; WANGshu-jun; CHENJi-min

    2003-01-01

    Aim:To explore interaction mode between amphoteric molecules with the ordered phospholipid membrane.Methods:Membrane interactions were determined by immobilized artificial membrane(IAM) chromatography and solutes hydroph9obicity was measured by n-octanol/buffer system.Results:The ampholytes,similar to bases,generally exhibited higher membrane affinity than expected from their hydrophobicity,resulting from the attractive polar interaction with phospholipid membrane.Furthermore,the strength of additional polar interaction with membrane(Δlg kLAM) was then calculat ed.The Δlg KIAMvalues were far greater for bases and ampholytes ranging from 0.50-1.39,than those for acids and neutrals with the scope from-0.55-0.44.Conclusion :Considering the microspecies distribution of amphoteric molecules,it was assumed that not only neutral and positive but also zwitterionic microspecies are capable of partitioning into ordered amphoteric lipid membrane with complementarily conformational and energetically favorable interactions.

  15. Hormetic and anti-inflammatory properties of oxidized phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauerhofer, Christina; Philippova, Maria; Oskolkova, Olga V; Bochkov, Valery N

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized phospholipids are generally recognized as deleterious factors involved in disease pathogenesis. This review summarizes the data suggesting that under certain biological conditions the opposite is correct, namely that OxPLs can also induce protective effects. Examples that are discussed in the review include upregulation of antioxidant genes, inhibition of inflammatory signaling pathways through Nrf2-dependent and -independent mechanisms, antagonism of Toll-like receptors, immuno-modulating and immuno-suppressive action of OxPLs in adaptive immunity and autoimmune disease, activation of PPARs known for their anti-inflammatory action, as well as protective action against lung edema in acute lung inflammation. The data support the notion that oxidation of phospholipids provides a negative feedback preventing damage to host tissues due to uncontrolled inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:26948981

  16. Transport of cadmium ions across model supported phospholipid membranes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Šestáková, Ivana; Mareček, Vladimír; Štulík, Karel

    Ústí nad Labem: BEST servis, 2010 - (Navrátil, T.; Barek, J.), s. 119-123 ISBN 978-80-254-6710-7. [Modern Electroanalytical Methods /30./. Jetřichovice (CZ), 24.05.2010-28.05.2010] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : membranes * phospholipids * heavy metals * electrochemical impendance spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  17. Structural elucidation of phospholipids in omega-3 food supplements

    OpenAIRE

    Brogård, Charlotte Nikolaisen

    2014-01-01

    A novel method was developed for UPLC-MS analysis of phospholipids in complex lipid samples. The methods developed allowed for identification and structural elucidation of different PL species and by utilizing MSE technology, rapid qualitative analyses of complex lipid samples were made possible. By using UPLC-MS it was confirmed that a high proportion of the total content of commercial marine oils contained the essential fatty acids EPA and DHA. The study also showed that the two differen...

  18. Role of inositol phospholipid signaling in natural killer cell biology

    OpenAIRE

    Gumbleton, Matthew; Kerr, William G.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important for host defense against malignancy and infection. At a cellular level NK cells are activated when signals from activating receptors exceed signaling from inhibitory receptors. At a molecular level NK cells undergo an education process to both prevent autoimmunity and acquire lytic capacity. Mouse models have shown important roles for inositol phospholipid signaling in lymphocytes. NK cells from mice with deletion in different members of the inositol ph...

  19. Association of anti-phospholipid antibodies with connective tissue diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Reena Rai; Swetha, T.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA) are directed against phospholipids and their binding proteins and are frequently found in association with connective tissue disorders. Systemic lupus erythematoses (SLE) with APLA may cause a diagnostic dilemma as there are several manifestations like haemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, neurologic manifestations, leg ulcerations, serositis proteinuria which overlap in both these conditions. We conducted a study to find out the association o...

  20. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Tim A. D.; Phyu, Su M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined. Methods MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14...

  1. Effect of dipolar-angle on phospholipid assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Paul, Tanay

    2016-01-01

    We report the effect of lipid head-group dipole orientation on phase behaviour of phospholipid assembly. The work explains molecular-scale mechanism of ion-lipid, anesthetic-lipid interactions where reorientation of dipoles play important role in membrane potential modification. Molecular Dynamics simulations are performed to analyse structure-property relationship and dynamical behaviour of lipid biomembranes considering coarse-grained model interactions.

  2. Phospholipid interactions in model membrane systems. I. Experiments on monolayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Mingins, J; Stigter, D; Dill, K A

    1992-01-01

    We study the lateral headgroup interactions among phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules and among phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) molecules in monolayers and extend our previous models. In this paper, we present an extensive set of pressure-area isotherms and surface potential experiments on monolayers of phospholipids ranging from 14 to 22 carbons in length at the n-heptane/water interface, over a wide range of temperature, salt concentration, and pH on the acid side. The pressure data presented ...

  3. The Effects of Gramicidin on the Structure of Phospholipid Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Szule, J. A.; Rand, R. P.

    2003-01-01

    Gramicidin is an antibiotic peptide that can be incorporated into the monolayers of cell membranes. Dimerization through hydrogen bonding between gramicidin monomers in opposing leaflets of the membrane results in the formation of an iontophoretic channel. Surrounding phospholipids influence the gating properties of this channel. Conversely, gramicidin incorporation has been shown to affect the structure of spontaneously formed lipid assemblies. Using small-angle x-ray diffraction and model s...

  4. Phosphatidylinositol, a phospholipid of ice-nucleating bacteria.

    OpenAIRE

    Kozloff, L. M.; Turner, M.A.; Arellano, F; Lute, M

    1991-01-01

    The nature of the phospholipids of the various bacteria that have ice nucleation activity in supercooled water has been determined. The seven bacteria studied included Pseudomonas syringae, Erwinia herbicola, three Escherichia coli K-12 strains that are phenotypically Ice+ because they contain plasmids with different amounts of either P. syringae or E. herbicola cloned DNA, and two E. coli K-12 strains without cloned ice gene DNA. All five Ice+ bacterial strains contained small amounts (0.1 t...

  5. The interactions between surfactants and vesicles: Dissipative particle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kuei-Chun; Lin, Chun-Min; Tsao, Heng-Kwong; Sheng, Yu-Jane

    2009-06-01

    The interactions between surfactants and vesicles formed by double-tail amphiphiles are investigated by the dissipative particle dynamics. As the surfactant concentration is increased, vesicle solubilization can be generally described by the three-stage hypothesis including vesicular region, vesicle-micelle coexistence, and mixed micellar region. We study the partition of surfactants between the bilayer phase and the aqueous phase where a higher value of K indicates that more surfactant molecules are incorporated in the bilayer. It is found that ln(K-1) is proportional to the hydrophile-lipophile balance (HLB), which depicts the degree of hydrophilicity associated with a surfactant. As the overall hydrophilicity of surfactants increases, i.e., higher HLB, K declines and vice versa. When the amounts of surfactants reach a critical point, the solubilization begins and the coexistence of vesicles and mixed micelles is observed. Further increase in the surfactant concentration results in total collapse of the vesicle. Consistent with experimental observations, the three stages are identified through the vesicle size-surfactant concentration relation. Our simulations clearly demonstrate the process of the vesicle solubilization and confirm the validity of the three-stage hypothesis.

  6. The micromethod for determination of cholesterol, cholesteryl esters and phospholipids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okabe,Akinobu

    1974-12-01

    Full Text Available We examined the method for determining microquantities of lipids, including cholesterol, cholesteryl esters and phospholipids. A standard colorimetric procedure of cholesteryl esters was modified to accommodate a quantitative thin-layer chromatography. This method involved the following steps. (1 Separation of lipids by a thin-layer chromatography: Lipids were applied to Silica gel G plates. Plates were developed with petroleum ether-diethyl etheracetic acid (82: 18: 2, vIvIv. (2 Elution of cholesterol and its esters from scraped silica gel: After scraping the silica gel with adhered cholesterol and its esters, they were eluted with chloroform-methanol (4: 1, v,tv. In the case of phspholipids, the silica gel was calcified. (3 Colorimetric determination of the lipids: Cholesterol and its esters eluted from the silica gel were determined by the method of ZAK with ROSENTHAL'S color reagent directly and after saponification, respectively. Phospholipids were calculated from the phosphorous content determined by the method of KATES. On the basis of examination of recovery and analyses of lipids extracted from tissue, it was concluded that this method permitted a reliable estimation of microquantities of cholesterol, its esters and phospholipids from small amounts of biological materials.

  7. Hydrophobic Silica Nanoparticles Induce Gel Phases in Phospholipid Monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsi, Davide; Rimoldi, Tiziano; Guzmán, Eduardo; Liggieri, Libero; Ravera, Francesca; Ruta, Beatrice; Cristofolini, Luigi

    2016-05-17

    Silica nanoparticles (SiNP) can be incorporated in phospholipid layers to form hybrid organic-inorganic bidimensional mesostructures. Controlling the dynamics in these mesostructures paves the way to high-performance drug-delivery systems. Depending on the different hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of SiNP, recent X-ray reflectivity experiments have demonstrated opposite structural effects. While these are reasonably well understood, less is known about the effects on the dynamics, which in turn determine molecular diffusivity and the possibility of drug release. In this work we characterize the dynamics of a mixed Langmuir layer made of phospholipid and hydrophobic SiNP. We combine X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and epifluorescence discrete Fourier microscopy to cover more than 2 decades of Q-range (0.3-80 μm(-1)). We obtain evidence for the onset of an arrested state characterized by intermittent stress-relaxation rearrangement events, corresponding to a gel dominated by attractive interactions. We compare this with our previous results from phospholipid/hydrophilic SiNP films, which show an arrested glassy phase of repulsive disks. PMID:27133453

  8. Hybrid electrospun chitosan-phospholipids nanofibers for transdermal drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ana C; Gorzelanny, Christian; Halter, Natalia; Schneider, Stefan W; Chronakis, Ioannis S

    2016-08-20

    Chitosan (Ch) polysaccharide was mixed with phospholipids (P) to generate electrospun hybrid nanofibers intended to be used as platforms for transdermal drug delivery. Ch/P nanofibers exibithed average diameters ranging from 248±94nm to 600±201nm, depending on the amount of phospholipids used. Fourier Transformed Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS) data suggested the occurrence of electrostatic interactions between amine groups of chitosan with the phospholipid counterparts. The nanofibers were shown to be stable for at least 7days in Phosphate Buffer Saline (PBS) solution. Cytotoxicity studies (WST-1 and LDH assays) demonstrated that the hybrid nanofibers have suitable biocompatibility. Fluorescence microscopy, also suggested that L929 cells seeded on top of the CH/P hybrid have similar metabolic activity comparatively to the cells seeded on tissue culture plate (control). The release of curcumin, diclofenac and vitamin B12, as model drugs, from Ch/P hybrid nanofibers was investigated, demonstrating their potential utilization as a transdermal drug delivery system. PMID:27286632

  9. Changes in phospholipid metabolism during B lymphocyte activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phospholipid metabolism in murine B lymphocytes stimulated with anti-Ig bound to Sepharose has been examined. T cell-depleted splenic B lymphocytes cultured with Sepharose-coupled, affinity-purified goat anti-mouse Ig (GAMIg) increased the incorporation of 32PO4 into phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol within 3 hr and increased [3H]-thymidine uptake at 48 hr. No increase in labeling was observed in phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylcholine, or phosphatidylserine. Based on both negative and positive selection procedures, it was demonstrated that these responses occurred in B lymphocytes. In contrast to the thymidine uptake response did not require the presence of accessory cells or exogenous cytokines. The same selective changes in phospholipid metabolism were observed in neoplastic B lymphocytes (BCL1) after treatment with Sepharose anti-μ, but not with Sepharose anti-Ia or Sepharose normal Ig. The dose-response relationships of 32PO4 incorporation into phosphatidic acid and phosphatidylinositol and [3H] thymidine uptake were nearly identical in BCL1 cells. The results of these experiments indicate that interaction B lymphocytes with insolubilized anti-Ig results in prompt and selective changes in phospholipid metabolism that appear to be correlated with B lymphocyte proliferation

  10. Salicylic acid induces vanillin synthesis through the phospholipid signaling pathway in Capsicum chinense cell cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Rodas-Junco, Beatriz A; Cab-Guillen, Yahaira; Muñoz-Sanchez, J Armando; Vázquez-Flota, Felipe; Monforte-Gonzalez, Miriam; Hérnandez-Sotomayor, S M Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction via phospholipids is mediated by phospholipases such as phospholipase C (PLC) and D (PLD), which catalyze hydrolysis of plasma membrane structural phospholipids. Phospholipid signaling is also involved in plant responses to phytohormones such as salicylic acid (SA). The relationships between phospholipid signaling, SA, and secondary metabolism are not fully understood. Using a Capsicum chinense cell suspension as a model, we evaluated whether phospholipid signaling modulat...

  11. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eLi

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2, and a presynaptically-localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3 with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Re-acidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real-time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released.

  12. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-shifted reporter of vesicle recycling based on a vesicular glutamate transporter, VGLUT1-mOrange2 (VGLUT1-mOr2), and a presynaptically localized green calcium indicator, synaptophysin-GCaMP3 (SyGCaMP3) with a large dynamic range. The fluorescence of VGLUT1-mOr2 is quenched by the low pH of synaptic vesicles. Exocytosis upon electrical stimulation exposes the luminal mOr2 to the neutral extracellular pH and relieves fluorescence quenching. Reacidification of the vesicle upon endocytosis again reduces fluorescence intensity. Changes in fluorescence intensity thus monitor synaptic vesicle exo- and endocytosis, as demonstrated previously for the green VGLUT1-pHluorin. To monitor changes in calcium, we fused the synaptic vesicle protein synaptophysin to the recently improved calcium indicator GCaMP3. SyGCaMP3 is targeted to presynaptic varicosities, and exhibits changes in fluorescence in response to electrical stimulation consistent with changes in calcium concentration. Using real time imaging of both reporters expressed in the same synapses, we determine the time course of changes in VGLUT1 recycling in relation to changes in presynaptic calcium concentration. Inhibition of P/Q- and N-type calcium channels reduces calcium levels, as well as the rate of synaptic vesicle exocytosis and the fraction of vesicles released. PMID:22065946

  13. Extracellular Vesicles as Novel Delivery Tools for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, Erdogan Pekcan; Saydam, Okay

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are different types of membrane-derived vesicles that originate from the endosomal pathway or the plasma membrane. These vesicles are used as "carriers" in intercellular communication, and are responsible for the transfer of biological cargo (lipids, proteins, RNA species, and DNA) between different cells. Despite the shortcomings in our knowledge of EV biology, attempts to employ EVs as natural delivery tools for therapeutic purposes have been partly successful in different settings. In this review, we highlight this unique potential of EVs, and discuss previous examples and future scenarios. PMID:26412464

  14. Colocalization of synapsin and actin during synaptic vesicle recycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bloom, Ona; Evergren, Emma; Tomilin, Nikolay;

    2003-01-01

    activity, however, synapsin was detected in the pool of vesicles proximal to the active zone. In addition, actin and synapsin were found colocalized in a dynamic filamentous cytomatrix at the sites of synaptic vesicle recycling, endocytic zones. Synapsin immunolabeling was not associated with clathrin......-coated intermediates but was found on vesicles that appeared to be recycling back to the cluster. Disruption of synapsin function by microinjection of antisynapsin antibodies resulted in a prominent reduction of the cytomatrix at endocytic zones of active synapses. Our data suggest that in addition to its known...

  15. Extracellular vesicles round off communication in the nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnik, Vivian; Ruiz-Cañada, Catalina; Wendler, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Functional neural competence and integrity require interactive exchanges among sensory and motor neurons, interneurons and glial cells. Recent studies have attributed some of the tasks needed for these exchanges to extracellular vesicles (such as exosomes and microvesicles), which are most prominently involved in shuttling reciprocal signals between myelinating glia and neurons, thus promoting neuronal survival, the immune response mediated by microglia, and synapse assembly and plasticity. Such vesicles have also been identified as important factors in the spread of neurodegenerative disorders and brain cancer. These extracellular vesicle functions add a previously unrecognized level of complexity to transcellular interactions within the nervous system. PMID:26891626

  16. Extracellular vesicles are the Trojan horses of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles have recently emerged as a novel mode of viral propagation exploited by both enveloped and non-enveloped viruses. In particular non-enveloped viruses utilize the hosts' production of extracellular vesicles to exit from cells non-lytically and to hide and manipulate the immune system. Moreover, challenging the long held idea that viruses behave as independent genetic units, extracellular vesicles enable multiple viral particles and genomes to collectively traffic in and out of cells, which can promote genetic cooperativity among viral quasispecies and enhance the fitness of the overall viral population. PMID:27232382

  17. Molecular physiology of EAAT anion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahlke, Christoph; Kortzak, Daniel; Machtens, Jan-Philipp

    2016-03-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system. After release from presynaptic nerve terminals, glutamate is quickly removed from the synaptic cleft by a family of five glutamate transporters, the so-called excitatory amino acid transporters (EAAT1-5). EAATs are prototypic members of the growing number of dual-function transport proteins: they are not only glutamate transporters, but also anion channels. Whereas the mechanisms underlying secondary active glutamate transport are well understood at the functional and at the structural level, mechanisms and cellular roles of EAAT anion conduction have remained elusive for many years. Recently, molecular dynamics simulations combined with simulation-guided mutagenesis and experimental analysis identified a novel anion-conducting conformation, which accounts for all experimental data on EAAT anion currents reported so far. We here review recent findings on how EAATs accommodate a transporter and a channel in one single protein. PMID:26687113

  18. Renal elimination of organic anions in cholestasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Adriana Mónica Tortes

    2008-01-01

    The disposition of most drugs is highly dependent on specialized transporters.OAT1 and OAT3 are two organic anion transporters expressed in the basolateral membrane of renal proximal tubule cells,identified as contributors to xenobiotic and endogenous organic anion secretion.It is well known that cholestasis may cause renal damage.Impairment of kidney function produces modifications in the renal elimination of drugs.Recent studies have demonstrated that the renal abundance of OAT1 and OAT3 plays an important role in the renal elimination of organic anions in the presence of extrahepatic cholestasis.Time elapsed after obstructive cholestasis has an important impact on the regulation of both types of organic anion transporters.The renal expression of OAT1 and OAT3 should be taken into account in order to improve pharmacotherapeutic efficacy and to prevent drug toxicity during the onset of this hepatic disease.

  19. Glioblastoma extracellular vesicles: reservoirs of potential biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redzic JS

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Jasmina S Redzic,1 Timothy H Ung,2 Michael W Graner2 1Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, 2Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, CO, USA Abstract: Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most frequent and most devastating of the primary central nervous system tumors, with few patients living beyond 2 years postdiagnosis. The damage caused by the disease and our treatments for the patients often leave them physically and cognitively debilitated. Generally, GBMs appear after very short clinical histories and are discovered by imaging (using magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], and the diagnosis is validated by pathology, following surgical resection. The treatment response and diagnosis of tumor recurrence are also tracked by MRI, but there are numerous problems encountered with these monitoring modalities, such as ambiguous interpretation and forms of pseudoprogression. Diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive biomarkers would be an immense boon in following treatment schemes and in determining recurrence, which often requires an invasive intracranial biopsy to verify imaging data. Extracellular vesicles (EVs are stable, membrane-enclosed, virus-sized particles released from either the cell surface or from endosomal pathways that lead to the systemic release of EVs into accessible biofluids, such as serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, and saliva. EVs carry a wide variety of proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and other metabolites, with many common features but with enough individuality to be able to identify the cell of origin of the vesicles. These components, if properly interrogated, could allow for the identification of tumor-derived EVs in biofluids, indicating tumor progression, relapse, or treatment failure. That knowledge would allow clinicians to continue with treatment regimens that were actually effective or to change course if the therapies were failing. Here, we review

  20. Towards predictable transmembrane transport: QSAR analysis of anion binding and anion transport

    OpenAIRE

    Gale, Philip A.; Busschaert, Nathalie; Bradberry, Samuel J.; Wenzel, Marco; Haynes, Cally; Hiscock, Jennifer R.; Kirby, Isabelle; Karagiannidis, Louise E.; Moore, Stephen J.; Wells, Neil; Herniman, Julie; Langley, John; Horton, Peter; Mark E. Light; Marques, Igor

    2013-01-01

    The transport of anions across biological membranes by small molecules is a growing research field due to the potential therapeutic benefits of these compounds. However, little is known about the exact mechanism by which these drug-like molecules work and which molecular features make a good transporter. An extended series of 1-hexyl-3-phenylthioureas were synthesized, fully characterized (NMR, mass spectrometry, IR and single crystal diffraction) and their anion binding and anion transport p...

  1. Function of seminal vesicles and their role on male fertility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gustavo F. Gonzales

    2001-01-01

    The present review has been designed to update the recent developments on the function of seminal vesicles and their role on male fertility. It is indicated that the true corrected fructose level is a simple method for the assessment of the seminal vesicular function. Measurement of seminal fructose used universally as a marker of the seminal vesicle function is not an appropriate approach due to its inverse relationship with the sperm count. The true corrected fructose defined as [ log. motile sperm concentration ] multiplied by [ seminal fructose concentration ] has been shown to be a better marker of the seminal vesicle function.Seminal vesicular secretion is important for semen coagulation, sperm motility, and stability of sperm chromatin andsuppression of the immune activity in the female reproductive tract.In conclusion, the function of seminal vesicle is important for fertility. Parameters as sperm motility, sperm chromatin stability, and immuno-protection may be changed in case of its hypofunction.

  2. Electro-hydrodynamic effects on lipid membranes in giant vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staykova, Margarita; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Dimova, Rumiana

    2009-11-01

    Electric fields are widely applied for cell manipulation in numerous micron-scale systems. Here, we show for the first time that alternating electric fields may cause pronounced flows in the membrane of giant lipid vesicles as well as in the surrounding fluid media.^ The lipid vesicles are not only biomimetic model for the cell membrane but also have many potential biotechnological applications, e.g. as drug-delivery systems and micro-reactors. The reported effects should be considered in electric micro-manipulation procedures on cells and vesicles. They might be useful for applications in microfluidic technologies, for lipid mixing, trapping and displacement, as will be demonstrated. We also believe that our method for visualization of the lipid flows by fluorescently labeled intra-membrane domains will be helpful for studies on membrane behavior in vesicles subjected to shear or mechanical stresses.

  3. Generic sorting of raft lipids into secretory vesicles in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Klemm, Robin W; Ejsing, Christer S.; Simons, Kai

    2011-01-01

    Previous work has showed that ergosterol and sphingolipids become sorted to secretory vesicles immunoisolated using a chimeric, artificial raft membrane protein as bait. In this study, we have extended this analysis to three populations of secretory vesicles isolated using natural yeast plasma...... membrane (PM) proteins: Pma1p, Mid2p and Gap1*p as baits. We compared the lipidomes of the immunoisolated vesicles with each other and with the lipidomes of the donor compartment, the trans-Golgi network, and the acceptor compartment, the PM, using a quantitative mass spectrometry approach that provided a...... complete lipid overview of the yeast late secretory pathway. We could show that vesicles captured with different baits carry the same cargo and have almost identical lipid compositions; being highly enriched in ergosterol and sphingolipids. This finding indicates that lipid raft sorting is a generic...

  4. Lipid-Targeting Peptide Probes for Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Aaron D; Yin, Hang

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular vesicles released from cells are under intense investigation for their roles in cell-cell communication and cancer progression. However, individual vesicles have been difficult to probe as their small size renders them invisible by conventional light microscopy. However, as a consequence of their small size these vesicles possess highly curved lipid membranes that offer an unconventional target for curvature-sensing probes. In this article, we present a strategy for using peptide-based biosensors to detect highly curved membranes and the negatively charged membrane lipid phosphatidylserine, we delineate several assays used to validate curvature- and lipid-targeting mechanisms, and we explore potential applications in probing extracellular vesicles released from sources such as apoptotic cells, cancer cells, or activated platelets. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2327-2332, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26909741

  5. EVpedia : A community web portal for extracellular vesicles research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kim, Dae Kyum; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Sae Rom; Choi, Dong Sic; Yoon, Yae Jin; Kim, Ji Hyun; Go, Gyeongyun; Nhung, Dinh; Hong, Kahye; Jang, Su Chul; Kim, Si Hyun; Park, Kyong Su; Kim, Oh Youn; Park, Hyun Taek; Seo, Ji Hye; Aikawa, Elena; Baj-Krzyworzeka, Monika; Van Balkom, Bas W M; Belting, Mattias; Blanc, Lionel; Bond, Vincent; Bongiovanni, Antonella; Borràs, Francesc E.; Buée, Luc; Buzás, Edit I.; Cheng, Lesley; Clayton, Aled; Cocucci, Emanuele; Dela Cruz, Charles S.; Desiderio, Dominic M.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Ekström, Karin; Falcon-Perez, Juan M.; Gardiner, Chris; Giebel, Bernd; Greening, David W.; Christina Gross, Julia; Gupta, Dwijendra; Hendrix, An; Hill, Andrew F.; Hill, Michelle M.; Nolte-'T Hoen, Esther; Hwang, Do Won; Inal, Jameel; Jagannadham, Medicharla V.; Jayachandran, Muthuvel; Jee, Young Koo; Jørgensen, Malene; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, Yoon Keun; Kislinger, Thomas; Lässer, Cecilia; Lee, Dong Soo; Lee, Hakmo; Van Leeuwen, Johannes; Lener, Thomas; Liu, Ming Lin; Lötvall, Jan; Marcilla, Antonio; Mathivanan, Suresh; Möller, Andreas; Morhayim, Jess; Mullier, Francois; Nazarenko, Irina; Nieuwland, Rienk; Nunes, Diana N.; Pang, Ken; Park, Jaesung; Patel, Tushar; Pocsfalvi, Gabriella; Del Portillo, Hernando; Putz, Ulrich; Ramirez, Marcel I.; Rodrigues, Marcio L.; Roh, Tae Young; Royo, Felix; Sahoo, Susmita; Schiffelers, Raymond; Sharma, Shivani; Siljander, Pia; Simpson, Richard J.; Soekmadji, Carolina; Stahl, Philip; Stensballe, Allan; Stepień, Ewa; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Trummer, Arne; Valadi, Hadi; Vella, Laura J.; Wai, Sun Nyunt; Witwer, Kenneth; Yánez-Mó, Maria; Youn, Hyewon; Zeidler, Reinhard; Gho, Yong Song

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are spherical bilayered proteolipids, harboring various bioactive molecules. Due to the complexity of the vesicular nomenclatures and components, online searches for EV-related publications and vesicular components are currently challenging. Results: We prese

  6. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  7. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsushi Taguchi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  8. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi, E-mail: taguchi.tetsushi@nims.go.jp [Biofunctional Materials Unit, Nano-Bio Field, Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2011-12-15

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration. (topical review)

  9. Assembly of cells and vesicles for organ engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Tetsushi

    2011-12-01

    The development of materials and technologies for the assembly of cells and/or vesicles is a key for the next generation of tissue engineering. Since the introduction of the tissue engineering concept in 1993, various types of scaffolds have been developed for the regeneration of connective tissues in vitro and in vivo. Cartilage, bone and skin have been successfully regenerated in vitro, and these regenerated tissues have been applied clinically. However, organs such as the liver and pancreas constitute numerous cell types, contain small amounts of extracellular matrix, and are highly vascularized. Therefore, organ engineering will require the assembly of cells and/or vesicles. In particular, adhesion between cells/vesicles will be required for regeneration of organs in vitro. This review introduces and discusses the key technologies and materials for the assembly of cells/vesicles for organ regeneration.

  10. [Extracellular vesicles and their role in hematological malignancies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzepiel, Andrea; Kutszegi, Nóra; Cs Sági, Judit; Kelemen, Andrea; Pálóczi, Krisztina; F Semsei, Ágnes; Buzás, Edit; Erdélyi, Dániel János

    2016-08-01

    Extracellular vesicles are produced in all organisms. The most intensively investigated categories of extracellular vesicles include apoptotic bodies, microvesicles and exosomes. Among a very wide range of areas, their role has been confirmed in intercellular communication, immune response and angiogenesis (in both physiological and pathological conditions). Their alterations suggest the potential use of them as biomarkers. In this paper the authors give an insight into the research of extracellular vesicles in general, and then focus on published findings in hematological malignancies. Quantitative and qualitative changes of microvesicles and exosomes may have value in diagnostics, prognostics and minimal residual disease monitoring of hematological malignancies. The function of extracellular vesicles in downregulation of natural killer cells' activity has been demonstrated in acute myeloid leukemia. In chronic lymphocytic leukemia, microvesicles seem to play a role in drug resistance. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(35), 1379-1384. PMID:27569460

  11. Using crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids to construct two-dimensional packed beds in supported lipid bilayer separation platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kai Hu, Sheng-Wen Hsiao, Hsun-Yen Mao, Ya-Ming Chen, Yung Chang and Ling Chao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Separating and purifying cell membrane-associated biomolecules has been a challenge owing to their amphiphilic property. Taking these species out of their native lipid membrane environment usually results in biomolecule degradation. One of the new directions is to use supported lipid bilayer (SLB platforms to separate the membrane species while they are protected in their native environment. Here we used a type of crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids, diynePC (1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, as a packed material to create a 'two-dimensional (2D packed bed' in a SLB platform. After the diynePC SLB is exposed to UV light, some of the diynePC lipids in the SLB can crosslink and the non-crosslinked monomer lipids can be washed away, leaving a 2D porous solid matrix. We incorporated the lipid vesicle deposition method with a microfluidic device to pattern the location of the packed-bed region and the feed region with species to be separated in a SLB platform. Our atomic force microscopy result shows that the nano-scaled structure density of the '2D packed bed' can be tuned by the UV dose applied to the diynePC membrane. When the model membrane biomolecules were forced to transport through the packed-bed region, their concentration front velocities were found to decrease linearly with the UV dose, indicating the successful creation of packed obstacles in these 2D lipid membrane separation platforms.

  12. Dysregulations of Synaptic Vesicle Trafficking in Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbujo, Chijioke N; Sinclair, Duncan; Hahn, Chang-Gyu

    2016-08-01

    Schizophrenia is a serious psychiatric illness which is experienced by about 1 % of individuals worldwide and has a debilitating impact on perception, cognition, and social function. Over the years, several models/hypotheses have been developed which link schizophrenia to dysregulations of the dopamine, glutamate, and serotonin receptor pathways. An important segment of these pathways that have been extensively studied for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia is the presynaptic neurotransmitter release mechanism. This set of molecular events is an evolutionarily well-conserved process that involves vesicle recruitment, docking, membrane fusion, and recycling, leading to efficient neurotransmitter delivery at the synapse. Accumulated evidence indicate dysregulation of this mechanism impacting postsynaptic signal transduction via different neurotransmitters in key brain regions implicated in schizophrenia. In recent years, after ground-breaking work that elucidated the operations of this mechanism, research efforts have focused on the alterations in the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression of presynaptic neurotransmitter release molecules in schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric conditions. In this review article, we present recent evidence from schizophrenia human postmortem studies that key proteins involved in the presynaptic release mechanism are dysregulated in the disorder. We also discuss the potential impact of dysfunctional presynaptic neurotransmitter release on the various neurotransmitter systems implicated in schizophrenia. PMID:27371030

  13. Three-dimensional flow in Kupffer's Vesicle

    CERN Document Server

    Montenegro-Johnson, Thomas D; Smith, David J; Lopes, Susana S

    2016-01-01

    Whilst many vertebrates appear externally left-right symmetric, the arrangement of internal organs is asymmetric. In zebrafish, the breaking of left-right symmetry is organised by Kupffer's Vesicle (KV): an approximately spherical, fluid-filled structure that begins to form in the embryo 10 hours post fertilisation. A crucial component of zebrafish symmetry breaking is the establishment of a cilia-driven fluid flow within KV. However, it is still unclear (a) how dorsal, ventral and equatorial cilia contribute to the global vortical flow, and (b) if this flow breaks left-right symmetry through mechanical transduction or morphogen transport. Fully answering these questions requires knowledge of the three-dimensional flow patterns within KV, which have not been quantified in previous work. In this study, we calculate and analyse the three-dimensional flow in KV. We consider flow from both individual and groups of cilia, and (a) find anticlockwise flow can arise purely from excess of cilia on the dorsal roof over...

  14. Semi-permeable vesicles composed of natural clay

    OpenAIRE

    Subramaniam, Anand B.; Wan, Jiandi; Gopinath, Arvind; Stone, Howard A.

    2010-01-01

    We report a simple route to form robust, inorganic, semi-permeable compartments composed of montmorillonite, a natural plate-like clay mineral that occurs widely in the environment. Mechanical forces due to shear in a narrow gap assemble clay nanoplates from an aqueous suspension onto air bubbles. Translucent vesicles suspended in a single-phase liquid are produced when the clay-covered air bubbles are exposed to a variety of water-miscible organic liquids. These vesicles of clay are mechanic...

  15. Photoresponsive vesicle permeability based on intramolecular host-guest inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauscher, Ulrike; Samanta, Avik; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2014-01-28

    This article describes light-responsive vesicles that can release their contents in response to a light-sensitive molecular trigger. To this end, liposomes were equipped with amphiphilic β-cyclodextrin that was covalently labeled with azobenzene. Using dye encapsulation and confocal laser scanning microscopy, we show that the permeability of these vesicles strongly increases upon UV irradiation (λ = 350 nm) with concomitant isomerization of apolar trans-azobenzene to polar cis-azobenzene on the liposome surface. PMID:24287588

  16. Rheological properties of sheared vesicle and cell suspensions

    OpenAIRE

    Lamura, A.; Gompper, G.

    2014-01-01

    Numerical simulations of vesicle suspensions are performed in two dimensions to study their dynamical and rheological properties. An hybrid method is adopted, which combines a mesoscopic approach for the solvent with a curvature-elasticity model for the membrane. Shear flow is induced by two counter-sliding parallel walls, which generate a linear flow profile. The flow behavior is studied for various vesicle concentrations and viscosity ratios between the internal and the external fluid. Both...

  17. The puzzle of chloroplast vesicle transport – involvement of GTPases

    OpenAIRE

    Karim, Sazzad; Aronsson, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    In the cytosol of plant cells vesicle transport occurs via secretory pathways among the endoplasmic reticulum network, Golgi bodies, secretory granules, endosome, and plasma membrane. Three systems transfer lipids, proteins and other important molecules through aqueous spaces to membrane-enclosed compartments, via vesicles that bud from donor membranes, being coated and uncoated before tethered and fused with acceptor membranes. In addition, molecular, biochemical and ultrastructural evidence...

  18. Cell behaviour during optic vesicle morphogenesis in medaka

    OpenAIRE

    Rembold, Martina

    2005-01-01

    Vertebrate eye morphogenesis starts with the bilateral evagination of optic vesicles from the forebrain. A failure of evagination leads to the complete absence of eyes. Despite a good knowledge about patterning and retina differentiation, the mechanism underlying evagination remained largely unknown. Studies on optic vesicle morphogenesis and its underlying cellular basis were missing. I therefore used an in vivo imaging approach in medaka fish to investigate the cellular movements and dynami...

  19. Studies on the incorporation of lipase in synthetic polymerisable vesicles.

    OpenAIRE

    Mosmuller, E.W.J.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis describes studies on the suitability of synthetic polymerisable vesicles for the incorporation and stabilisation of lipase for the bioconversion of organic chemical compounds.In chapter 1 , some characteristics are reviewed of hydrolytic enzymes, and more specific those of lipases. In chapter 2 an overview is presented of the features and properties of surfactants and vesicles.In chapter 3 , the incorporation is described of lipase from Candida cylindracea (CCL) into polymerisable...

  20. Three-dimensional visualization of coated vesicle formation in fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Fibroblasts apparently ingest low density lipoproteins (LDL) by a selective mechanism of receptor-mediated endocytosis involving the formation of coated vesicles from the plasma membrane. However, it is not known exactly how coated vesicles collect LDL receptors and pinch off from the plasma membrane. In this report, the quick-freeze, deep- etch, rotary-replication method has been applied to fibroblasts; it displays with unusual clarity the coats that appear under the plasma membrane at the s...

  1. Concurrent Imaging of Synaptic Vesicle Recycling and Calcium Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Haiyan; Foss, Sarah M.; Dobryy, Yuriy L.; Park, C. Kevin; Hires, Samuel Andrew; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-sh...

  2. Concurrent imaging of synaptic vesicle recycling and calcium dynamics.

    OpenAIRE

    Haiyan eLi; Foss, Sarah M.; Yuriy eDobryy; C. Kevin ePark; Samuel Andrew Hires; Shaner, Nathan C.; Tsien, Roger Y.; Osborne, Leslie C.; Voglmaier, Susan M.

    2011-01-01

    Synaptic transmission involves the calcium-dependent release of neurotransmitter from synaptic vesicles. Genetically encoded optical probes emitting different wavelengths of fluorescent light in response to neuronal activity offer a powerful approach to understand the spatial and temporal relationship of calcium dynamics to the release of neurotransmitter in defined neuronal populations. To simultaneously image synaptic vesicle recycling and changes in cytosolic calcium, we developed a red-...

  3. Dielectric Spectroscopy Study on Vesicles of CTAB/SDBS System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Amphiphilic molecules can form into different structures, such as micelle, microemulsion, vesicle, liposome, liquid crystals, and so on by self-associating. The Dielectric Spectroscopy (DS) method has been applied to the systems of micelle and microemulsion successfully. For the first time the author put the method to the system of vesicle of CTAB/SDBS. The experiments show clear dielectric relaxation and the results were discussed primarily.

  4. Construction of phospholipid anti-biofouling multilayer on biomedical PET surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biomimetic phospholipid anti-biofouling multilayers were constructed on the biomedical poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) through the combination of layer-by-layer assembly and Michael addition reaction. Two biomacromolecules with opposite charges, alginate and chitosan, were sequentially adsorbed onto PET samples. The assembled multilayer was subsequently crosslinked with glutaraldehyde and biomimetic phospholipids was introduced into the assembled multilayer through the Michael addition of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC). The multilayer and phospholipid-modified PETs showed excellent hemocompatibility

  5. Continuous Production of Structured Phospholipids in a Packed Red Reactor with Lipase from Thermomyces lanuginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikbjerg, Anders Falk; Peng, Lifeng; Mu, Huiling;

    2005-01-01

    The possibilities of producing structured phospholipids by lipase-catalyzed acidolysis between soybean phospholipids and caprylic acid were examined in continuous packed bed enzyme reactors. Acidolysis reactions were performed in both a solvent system and a solvent-free system with the commercial...... was favored by high substrate ratio between acyl donor and phospholipids, longer residence time, and higher reaction temperature. Under certain conditions, an incorporation of around 30% caprylic acid can be obtained in continuous operation with hexane as the solvent....

  6. Phorbol esters promote alpha 1-adrenergic receptor phosphorylation and receptor uncoupling from inositol phospholipid metabolism.

    OpenAIRE

    Leeb-Lundberg, L M; Cotecchia, S; Lomasney, J W; DeBernardis, J F; Lefkowitz, R J; Caron, M G

    1985-01-01

    DDT1 MF-2 cells, which are derived from hamster vas deferens smooth muscle, contain alpha 1-adrenergic receptors (54,800 +/- 2700 sites per cell) that are coupled to stimulation of inositol phospholipid metabolism. Incubation of these cells with tumor-promoting phorbol esters, which stimulate calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, leads to a marked attenuation of the ability of alpha 1-receptor agonists such as norepinephrine to stimulate the turnover of inositol phospholipids. T...

  7. Structural evaluation of phospholipidic nanovesicles containing small amounts of chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertins, Omar; Cardoso, Mateus Borba; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; da Silveira, Nádya Pesce

    2006-08-01

    In this study we present a full characterization of nanovesicles containing soybean phosphatidylcholine and polysaccharide chitosan. The nanovesicles were prepared by the reverse phase evaporation method, including the preparation of reverse micelles followed by the formation of an organogel, which is dispersed in water to yield the final liposomal particles. Structural changes as a function of the chitosan amount and the filter porosity used in the nanovesicles preparation were studied employing Static and Dynamic Light Scattering as well as Small Angle X-ray Scattering. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanovesicles ranged between 106 and 287 nm, depending on the chitosan contents and the filter porosity. A comparison with nanovesicles free of chitosan indicates the existence of higher contents of multilamellar structures that depends on the chitosan concentration in the vesicles containing chitosan. Typical spherical vesicles having nanometric diameters with polydispersity mostly desired in the biomedical area could only be achieved by filtration through a 0.45 microm porous filter. PMID:17037851

  8. Efficiency of adsorption concentration of single-charged inorganic anions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of adsorption concentration of inorganic anions Br-, I-, SCN- from diluted aqueous solutions using of N-alkylpyridinium chlorides (alkyl C13-C16) are presented. It is ascertained that interaction between extracted anion and surfactant cation, determining the efficiency of foam flotation of the anions investigated, increases with the decrease in anion hydration in the series Br-, I-, SCN-

  9. Vesicles prepared with the complex salts dioctadecyldimethylammonium polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Fernanda Rosa; Loh, Watson

    2012-02-15

    The effect of a polymeric counterion on the thermotropic behavior of sonicated vesicles formed by complex salts in aqueous solution and with decanol (C(10)OH) and tetradecanol (C(14)OH) was investigated. The complex salts were prepared with dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB) and polyacrylic acids (PAA, containing 30 or 6000 repeating units), being referred to as DODAPA(30) and DODAPA(6000). Vesicles containing polymeric counterions presented higher contents of multilamellar vesicles that were dependent on the complex salt concentration and on the counterion chain length. For comparison, studies were performed with DODAAc, with the counterion acetate, resulting in the formation of mostly unilamellar vesicles, as expected due greater dissociation, leading to greater electrical repulsion between bilayers. Mixtures of these complex salts and DODAX (where X=acetate or bromide) were also investigated with respect to their vesicles thermotropic behavior and size. This study opens the possibility of applying the methodology of direct complex salt preparation (as opposed to mixing the surfactant and polymeric components) to produce vesicles with controlled composition and properties. PMID:22172692

  10. Vesicle Size Regulates Nanotube Formation in the Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Qian Peter; Du, Wanqing; Ji, Qinghua; Xue, Boxin; Jiang, Dong; Zhu, Yueyao; Lou, Jizhong; Yu, Li; Sun, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular membrane nanotube formation and its dynamics play important roles for cargo transportation and organelle biogenesis. Regarding the regulation mechanisms, while much attention has been paid on the lipid composition and its associated protein molecules, effects of the vesicle size has not been studied in the cell. Giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) are often used for in vitro membrane deformation studies, but they are much larger than most intracellular vesicles and the in vitro studies also lack physiological relevance. Here, we use lysosomes and autolysosomes, whose sizes range between 100 nm and 1 μm, as model systems to study the size effects on nanotube formation both in vivo and in vitro. Single molecule observations indicate that driven by kinesin motors, small vesicles (100–200 nm) are mainly transported along the tracks while a remarkable portion of large vesicles (500–1000 nm) form nanotubes. This size effect is further confirmed by in vitro reconstitution assays on liposomes and purified lysosomes and autolysosomes. We also apply Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) to measure the initiation force for nanotube formation. These results suggest that the size-dependence may be one of the mechanisms for cells to regulate cellular processes involving membrane-deformation, such as the timing of tubulation-mediated vesicle recycling. PMID:27052881

  11. Kinetics of a Multilamellar Lipid Vesicle Ripening: Simulation and Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Rui; He, Xuehao

    2016-03-10

    Lipid vesicle ripening via unimolecular diffusion and exchange greatly influences the evolution of complex vesicle structure. However, this behavior is difficult to capture using conventional experimental technology and molecular simulation. In the present work, the ripening of a multilamellar lipid vesicle (MLV) is effectively explored using a mesoscale coarse-grained molecular model. The simulation reveals that a small MLV evolves into a unilamellar vesicle over a very long time period. In this process, only the outermost bilayer inflates, and the inner bilayers shrink. With increasing MLV size, the ripening process becomes complex and depends on competition between a series of adjacent bilayers in the MLV. To understand the diffusion behavior of the unimolecule, the potentials of mean force (PMFs) of a single lipid molecule across unilamellar vesicles with different sizes are calculated. It is found that the PMF of lipid dissociation from the inner layer is different than that of the outer layer, and the dissociation energy barrier sensitively depends on the curvature of the bilayer. A kinetics theoretical model of MLV ripening that considers the lipid dissociation energy for curved bilayers is proposed. The model successfully interprets the MLV ripening process with various numbers of bilayers and shows potential to predict the ripening kinetics of complex lipid vesicles. PMID:26882997

  12. Studies of vesicle distribution patterns in Hawaiian lavas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basaltic lava flows are generally vesicular, and the broader facts relating to vesicle distribution have long been established; few studies have yet been made with a view to determining how and when vesicles form in the cooling history of the lava, explaining vesicle shape and size distribution, and gaining enough understanding to employ vesicles as a geological tool. Various avenues of approach exist by which one may seek to gain a better understanding of these ubiquitous structures and make a start towards developing a general theory, and three such avenues have recently been explored. One avenue involves the study of pipe vesicles; these are a well known feature of lava flows and are narrow pipes which occur near the base of many pahoehoe flow units. Another avenue of approach is that presented by the distinctive spongy pahoehoe facies of lava that is common in distal locations on Hawaiian volcanoes. A third avenue of approach is that of the study of gas blisters in lava. Gas blisters are voids, which can be as much as tens of meters wide, where the lava split along a vesicle-rich layer and the roof up-arched by gas pressure. These three avenues are briefly discussed

  13. Extracellular Membrane Vesicles and Phytopathogenicity of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav M. Chernov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available For the first time, the phytopathogenicity of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 (a ubiquitous mycoplasma that is one of the five common species of cell culture contaminants and is a causative agent for phytomycoplasmoses in Oryza sativa L. plants was studied. Data on the ability of extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 to penetrate from the nutrient medium into overground parts of Oryza sativa L. through the root system and to cause alterations in ultrastructural organization of the plants were presented. As a result of the analysis of ultrathin leaf sections of plants grown in medium with A. laidlawii PG8 vesicles, we detected significant changes in tissue ultrastructure characteristic to oxidative stress in plants as well as their cultivation along with bacterial cells. The presence of nucleotide sequences of some mycoplasma genes within extracellular vesicles of Acholeplasma laidlawii PG8 allowed a possibility to use PCR (with the following sequencing to perform differential detection of cells and bacterial vesicles in samples under study. The obtained data may suggest the ability of extracellular vesicles of the mycoplasma to display in plants the features of infection from the viewpoint of virulence criteria—invasivity, infectivity—and toxigenicity—and to favor to bacterial phytopathogenicity.

  14. Calmodulin stimulation of calcium transport in carrot microsomal vesicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ATP-dependent 45Ca2+ uptake into microsomal vesicles isolated from cultured carrot cells (Daucus carota Danvers) was stimulated 2-3 fold by 5 ug/ml calmodulin (CaM). Microsomal vesicles separated with a linear sucrose gradient showed two peaks with CaM-stimulated Ca2+ uptake activities. One peak (at 1.12 g/cc) comigrated with the activity of the antimycin A-insensitive NADH-dependent cytochrome c reductase. This transport activity was enhanced 10-20 fold by 10 mM oxalate and appeared to be associates with vesicles derived primarily from the ER. The other peak of CaM-stimulated Ca2+ uptake (at 1.17 g/cc) was not affected by oxalate. These vesicles are probably derived from the plasma membrane. Preliminary experiments with the low-density vesicles (ER) vesicles, indicate that inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate caused a transient reduction in intravesicular Ca2+. These results are consistent with the ER being an important site of intracellular Ca2+ regulation

  15. Bubble-induced microstreaming: guiding and destroying lipid vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmottant, Philippe; Hilgenfeldt, Sascha

    2002-11-01

    Micron-sized bubbles respond with strong oscillations when submitted to ultrasound. This has led to their use as echographic contrast enhancers. The large energy and force densities generated by the collapsing bubbles also make them non-invasive mechanical tools: Recently, it has been reported that the interaction of cavitating bubbles with nearby cells can render the latter permeable to large molecules (sonoporation), suggesting prospects for drug delivery and gene transfection. We have developed a laboratory setup that allows for a controlled study of the interaction of single microbubbles with single lipid bilayer vesicles. Substituting vesicles for cell membranes is advantageous because the mechanical properties of vesicles are well-known. Microscopic observations reveal that vesicles near a bubble follow the vivid streaming motion set up by the bubble. The vesicles "bounce" off the bubble, being periodically accelerated towards and away from it, and undergo well-defined shape deformations along their trajectory in accordance with fluid-dynamical theory. Break-up of vesicles could also be observed.

  16. Novel pseudo-delocalized anions for lithium battery electrolytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jónsson, Erlendur; Armand, Michel; Johansson, Patrik

    2012-05-01

    A novel anion concept of pseudo-delocalized anions, anions with distinct positive and negative charge regions, has been studied by a computer aided synthesis using DFT calculations. With the aim to find safer and better performing lithium salts for lithium battery electrolytes two factors have been evaluated: the cation-anion interaction strength via the dissociation reaction LiAn ⇌ Li(+) + An(-) and the anion oxidative stability via a vertical ionisation from anion to radical. Based on our computational results some of these anions have shown promise to perform well as lithium salts for modern lithium batteries and should be interesting synthetic targets for future research. PMID:22441354

  17. Polarized exocyst-mediated vesicle fusion directs intracellular lumenogenesis within the C. elegans excretory cell

    OpenAIRE

    Armenti, Stephen T.; Chan, Emily; Nance, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Lumenogenesis of small seamless tubes occurs through intracellular membrane growth and directed vesicle fusion events. Within the C. elegans excretory cell, which forms seamless intracellular tubes (canals) that mediate osmoregulation, lumens grow in length and diameter when vesicles fuse with the expanding lumenal surface. Here, we show that lumenal vesicle fusion depends on the small GTPase RAL-1, which localizes to vesicles and acts through the exocyst vesicle-tethering complex. Loss of ei...

  18. GTP hydrolysis is required for vesicle fusion during nuclear envelope assembly in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Nuclear envelope assembly was studied in vitro using extracts from Xenopus eggs. Nuclear-specific vesicles bound to demembranated sperm chromatin but did not fuse in the absence of cytosol. Addition of cytosol stimulated vesicle fusion, pore complex assembly, and eventual nuclear envelope growth. Vesicle binding and fusion were assayed by light and electron microscopy. Addition of ATP and GTP to bound vesicles caused limited vesicle fusion, but enclosure of the chromatin was not observed. Thi...

  19. Coated vesicles participate in the receptor-mediated endocytosis of insulin

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    We have purified coated vesicles from rat liver by differential ultracentrifugation. Electron micrographs of these preparations reveal only the polyhedral structures typical of coated vesicles. SDS PAGE of the coated vesicle preparation followed by Coomassie Blue staining of proteins reveals a protein composition also typical of coated vesicles. We determined that these rat liver coated vesicles possess a latent insulin binding capability. That is, little if any specific binding of 125I-insul...

  20. Studies of anions sorption on natural zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barczyk, K; Mozgawa, W; Król, M

    2014-12-10

    This work presents results of FT-IR spectroscopic studies of anions-chromate, phosphate and arsenate - sorbed from aqueous solutions (different concentrations of anions) on zeolites. The sorption has been conducted on natural zeolites from different structural groups, i.e. chabazite, mordenite, ferrierite and clinoptilolite. The Na-forms of sorbents were exchanged with hexadecyltrimethylammonium cations (HDTMA(+)) and organo-zeolites were obtained. External cation exchange capacities (ECEC) of organo-zeolites were measured. Their values are 17mmol/100g for chabazite, 4mmol/100g for mordenite and ferrierite and 10mmol/100g for clinoptilolite. The used initial inputs of HDTMA correspond to 100% and 200% ECEC of the minerals. Organo-modificated sorbents were subsequently used for immobilization of mentioned anions. It was proven that aforementioned anions' sorption causes changes in IR spectra of the HDTMA-zeolites. These alterations are dependent on the kind of anions that were sorbed. In all cases, variations are due to bands corresponding to the characteristic Si-O(Si,Al) vibrations (occurring in alumino- and silicooxygen tetrahedra building spatial framework of zeolites). Alkylammonium surfactant vibrations have also been observed. Systematic changes in the spectra connected with the anion concentration in the initial solution have been revealed. The amounts of sorbed CrO4(2-), AsO4(3-) and PO4(3-) ions were calculated from the difference between their concentrations in solutions before (initial concentration) and after (equilibrium concentration) sorption experiments. Concentrations of anions were determined by spectrophotometric method. PMID:25002191

  1. Islet amyloid polypeptide inserts into phospholipid monolayers as monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Maarten F M; Yigittop, HaciAli; Elgersma, Ronald C; Rijkers, Dirk T S; Liskamp, Rob M J; de Kruijff, Ben; Höppener, Jo W M; Antoinette Killian, J

    2006-02-24

    Amyloid deposits in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans are thought to be a main factor responsible for death of the insulin-producing islet beta-cells in type 2 diabetes. It is hypothesized that beta-cell death is related to interaction of the 37 amino acid residue human islet amyloid polypeptide (hIAPP), the major constituent of islet amyloid, with cellular membranes. However, the mechanism of hIAPP-membrane interactions is largely unknown. Here, we study the nature and the molecular details of the initial step of hIAPP-membrane interactions by using the monolayer technique. It is shown that both freshly dissolved hIAPP and the non-amyloidogenic mouse IAPP (mIAPP) have a pronounced ability to insert into phospholipid monolayers, even at lipid packing conditions that exceed the conditions that occur in biological membranes. In contrast, the fibrillar form of hIAPP has lost the ability to insert. These results, combined with the observations that both the insertion kinetics and the dependence of insertion on the initial surface pressure are similar for freshly dissolved hIAPP and mIAPP, indicate that hIAPP inserts into phospholipid monolayers most likely as a monomer. In addition, our results suggest that the N-terminal part of hIAPP, which is nearly identical with that of mIAPP, is largely responsible for insertion. This is supported by experiments with hIAPP fragments, which show that a peptide consisting of the 19 N-terminal residues of hIAPP efficiently inserts into phospholipid monolayers, whereas an amyloidogenic decapeptide, consisting of residues 20-29 of hIAPP, inserts much less efficiently. The results obtained here suggest that hIAPP monomers might insert with high efficiency in biological membranes in vivo. This process could play an important role as a first step in hIAPP-induced membrane damage in type 2 diabetes. PMID:16403520

  2. Focus on Extracellular Vesicles: Physiological Role and Signalling Properties of Extracellular Membrane Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunzio Iraci

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are a heterogeneous population of secreted membrane vesicles, with distinct biogenesis routes, biophysical properties and different functions both in physiological conditions and in disease. The release of EVs is a widespread biological process, which is conserved across species. In recent years, numerous studies have demonstrated that several bioactive molecules are trafficked with(in EVs, such as microRNAs, mRNAs, proteins and lipids. The understanding of their final impact on the biology of specific target cells remains matter of intense debate in the field. Also, EVs have attracted great interest as potential novel cell-free therapeutics. Here we describe the proposed physiological and pathological functions of EVs, with a particular focus on their molecular content. Also, we discuss the advances in the knowledge of the mechanisms regulating the secretion of EV-associated molecules and the specific pathways activated upon interaction with the target cell, highlighting the role of EVs in the context of the immune system and as mediators of the intercellular signalling in the brain.

  3. Separation of phosphatidylcholine from soybean phospholipids by simulated moving bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    L(U) Yu-bin; YANG Yi-wen; WU Ping-dong

    2006-01-01

    A simulated moving bed (SMB), equipped with eight silica-gel columns, was used to separate phosphatidylcholine (PC) from soybean phospholipids. The effects of flow rate in Sections 2 (Q2) and 3 (Q3), switching time, feed flow rate and feed concentration on the operating performance parameters: purity, recovery, productivity and desorbent consumption were studied.Operating conditions leading to more than 90% purity in both outlet streams have been identified, together with those achieving optimal performance. Regions leading to complete separation are observed and explained theoretically. As the mass-transfer effect was not considered, the triangle theory only gives initial guesses for the optimal operating conditions.

  4. Transport of Phytochelatin PC2 across Model Phospholipid Membrane

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šestáková, Ivana; Nováková, Kateřina; Josypčuk, Bohdan; Navrátil, Tomáš

    Ústí nad Labem : Best Servis, 2014 - (Navrátil, T.; Fojta, M.; Pecková, K.), s. 190-192 ISBN 978-80-905221-2-1. [Moderní Elektrochemické Metody /34./. Jetřichovice (CZ), 19.05.2014-23.05.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP206/11/1638; GA ČR(CZ) GAP208/12/1645 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Phospholipid membrane * Phytochelatin * Transport Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  5. Study of ion transports across model phospholipid bilayers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Navrátil, Tomáš; Šestáková, Ivana; Mareček, Vladimír

    Brno : PřF Masarykovy univerzity, 2009, s. 106-108. ISBN 978-80-7375-309-2. [Pracovní setkání fyzikálních chemiků a elektrochemiků /9./. Brno (CZ), 29.06.2009-30.06.2009] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400806 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : supported phospholipid bilayer * transport of charged particles * voltammetry * electrochemical impedance spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  6. Equation of State for Phospholipid Self-Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Phospholipid self-assembly is the basis of biomembrane stability. The entropy of transfer from water to self-assembled micelles of lysophosphatidylcholines and diacyl phosphatidylcholines with different chain lengths converges to a common value at a temperature of 44°C. The corresponding enthalpies...... of transfer converge at ∼-18°C. An equation of state for the free energy of self-assembly formulated from this thermodynamic data depends on the heat capacity of transfer as the sole parameter needed to specify a particular lipid. For lipids lacking calorimetric data, measurement of the critical...

  7. Oncogenic extracellular vesicles in brain tumour progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esterina eD'Asti

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The brain is a frequent site of neoplastic growth, including both primary and metastatic tumours. The clinical intractability of many brain tumours and their distinct biology are implicitly linked to the unique microenvironment of the central nervous system (CNS and cellular interactions within. Among the most intriguing forms of cellular interactions is that mediated by membrane-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs. Their biogenesis (vesiculation and uptake by recipient cells serves as a unique mechanism of intercellular trafficking of complex biological messages including the exchange of molecules that cannot be released through classical secretory pathways, or that are prone to extracellular degradation. Tumour cells produce EVs containing molecular effectors of several cancer-related processes such as growth, invasion, drug resistance, angiogenesis, and coagulopathy. Notably, tumour-derived EVs (oncosomes also contain oncogenic proteins, transcripts, DNA and microRNA (miR. Uptake of this material may change properties of the recipient cells and impact the tumour microenvironment. Examples of transformation-related molecules found in the cargo of tumour-derived EVs include the oncogenic epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII, tumour suppressors (PTEN and oncomirs (miR-520g. It is postulated that EVs circulating in blood or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of brain tumour patients may be used to decipher molecular features (mutations of the underlying malignancy, reflect responses to therapy or molecular subtypes of primary brain tumours (e.g. glioma or medulloblastoma. It is possible that metastases to the brain may also emit EVs with clinically relevant oncogenic signatures. Thus EVs emerge as a novel and functionally important vehicle of intercellular communication that can mediate multiple biological effects. In addition, they provide a unique platform to develop molecular biomarkers in brain malignancies.

  8. Surface glycosylation profiles of urine extracellular vesicles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jared Q Gerlach

    Full Text Available Urinary extracellular vesicles (uEVs are released by cells throughout the nephron and contain biomolecules from their cells of origin. Although uEV-associated proteins and RNA have been studied in detail, little information exists regarding uEV glycosylation characteristics. Surface glycosylation profiling by flow cytometry and lectin microarray was applied to uEVs enriched from urine of healthy adults by ultracentrifugation and centrifugal filtration. The carbohydrate specificity of lectin microarray profiles was confirmed by competitive sugar inhibition and carbohydrate-specific enzyme hydrolysis. Glycosylation profiles of uEVs and purified Tamm Horsfall protein were compared. In both flow cytometry and lectin microarray assays, uEVs demonstrated surface binding, at low to moderate intensities, of a broad range of lectins whether prepared by ultracentrifugation or centrifugal filtration. In general, ultracentrifugation-prepared uEVs demonstrated higher lectin binding intensities than centrifugal filtration-prepared uEVs consistent with lesser amounts of co-purified non-vesicular proteins. The surface glycosylation profiles of uEVs showed little inter-individual variation and were distinct from those of Tamm Horsfall protein, which bound a limited number of lectins. In a pilot study, lectin microarray was used to compare uEVs from individuals with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease to those of age-matched controls. The lectin microarray profiles of polycystic kidney disease and healthy uEVs showed differences in binding intensity of 6/43 lectins. Our results reveal a complex surface glycosylation profile of uEVs that is accessible to lectin-based analysis following multiple uEV enrichment techniques, is distinct from co-purified Tamm Horsfall protein and may demonstrate disease-specific modifications.

  9. Sugar-based gemini surfactant with a vesicle-to-micelle transition at acidic pH and a reversible vesicle flocculation near neutral pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Johnsson, M; Wagenaar, A; Engberts, JBFN

    2003-01-01

    A sugar-based (reduced glucose) gemini surfactant forms vesicles in dilute aqueous solution near neutral pH. At lower pH, there is a vesicle-to-micelle transition within a narrow pH region (pH 6.0-5.6). The vesicles are transformed into large cylindrical micelles that in turn are transformed into sm

  10. Phase behavior and microstructures in a mixture of anionic Gemini and cationic surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haiming; Li, Bingcheng; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin; Kang, Wanli

    2014-07-01

    We report in this work the phase behavior and microstructures in a mixture of an anionic Gemini surfactant, sodium dilauramino cystine (SDLC), and a conventional cationic surfactant, dodecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (DTAC). Observation of the appearance shows that the phase behavior of the SDLC-DTAC mixed cationic surfactant system transforms from an isotropic homogeneous phase to an aqueous surfactant two-phase system (ASTP) and then to an anisotropic homogeneous phase with the continuous addition of DTAC. The corresponding aggregate microstructures are investigated by rheology, dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and polarization microscopy. It has been found that a wormlike micelle, in the isotropic homogeneous phase, occurs linear to the branch growth. The aggregate microstructures in the ASTP lower and upper phases are branched wormlike micelles and vesicles, respectively. The micelle transformed into a vesicle upon varying the phase volume percentage until a lamellar liquid crystal formed in the anisotropic homogeneous phase. The macroscopic phase behavior and microscopic aggregate structure are related to the understanding of the possible mechanisms for the above phenomena. PMID:24817411

  11. Interleaflet mixing and coupling in liquid-disordered phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capponi, Sara; Freites, J Alfredo; Tobias, Douglas J; White, Stephen H

    2016-02-01

    Organized as bilayers, phospholipids are the fundamental building blocks of cellular membranes and determine many of their biological functions. Interactions between the two leaflets of the bilayer (interleaflet coupling) have been implicated in the passage of information through membranes. However, physically, the meaning of interleaflet coupling is ill defined and lacks a structural basis. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of fluid phospholipid bilayers of five different lipids with differing degrees of acyl-chain asymmetry, we have examined interleaflet mixing to gain insights into coupling. Reasoning that the transbilayer distribution of terminal methyl groups is an appropriate measure of interleaflet mixing, we calculated the transbilayer distributions of the acyl chain terminal methyl groups for five lipids: dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC), palmitoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (POPC), stearoyloleoylphosphatidylcholine (SOPC), oleoylmyristoylphosphatidylcholine (OMPC), and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We observed in all cases very strong mixing across the bilayer midplane that diminished somewhat with increasing acyl-chain ordering defined by methylene order parameters. A hallmark of the interleaflet coupling idea is complementarity, which postulates that lipids with short alkyl chains in one leaflet will preferentially associate with lipids with long alkyl chains in the other leaflet. Our results suggest a much more complicated picture for thermally disordered bilayers that we call distributed complementarity, as measured by the difference in the peak positions of the sn-1 and sn-2 methyl distributions in the same leaflet. PMID:26657692

  12. [Some peculiarities of brain phospholipids in deep sea fishes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomazanskaia, L F; Pravdina, N I; Chirkovskaia, E V

    1975-01-01

    Total phospholipids (PL) as well as the content of various phospholipid classes and their fatty acid composition have been investigated in the brain of mesopelagic and abyssal marine teleosts. These species were compared to shallow water ones. The brain of deep sea fishes was found to be very poor in PL as compared to the brain of mesopelagic ans surface water species. No differences concerning the brain PL content were revealed between the two last mentioned groups. The relative content of separate PL classes was very similar in all the species studied irrespectively of the depth of their habitat. Peculiarities were found in fatty acid composition of individual PL from deep sea species as compared to surface ones. The deeper the habitat, the lower the content of saturated fatty acids, especially of the stearic acid. The lowest content of saturated fatty acids, maximum level of polyenoic fatty acids as well as some peculiarities in the relative content of particular fatty acids were found in the brain of ultraabyssal (6, 000 m) Leucicorus sp. PMID:1217333

  13. Metformin Decouples Phospholipid Metabolism in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim A D Smith

    Full Text Available The antidiabetic drug metformin, currently undergoing trials for cancer treatment, modulates lipid and glucose metabolism both crucial in phospholipid synthesis. Here the effect of treatment of breast tumour cells with metformin on phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho metabolism which plays a key role in membrane synthesis and intracellular signalling has been examined.MDA-MB-468, BT474 and SKBr3 breast cancer cell lines were treated with metformin and [3H-methyl]choline and [14C(U]glucose incorporation and lipid accumulation determined in the presence and absence of lipase inhibitors. Activities of choline kinase (CK, CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyl transferase (CCT and PtdCho-phospholipase C (PLC were also measured. [3H] Radiolabelled metabolites were determined using thin layer chromatography.Metformin-treated cells exhibited decreased formation of [3H]phosphocholine but increased accumulation of [3H]choline by PtdCho. CK and PLC activities were decreased and CCT activity increased by metformin-treatment. [14C] incorporation into fatty acids was decreased and into glycerol was increased in breast cancer cells treated with metformin incubated with [14C(U]glucose.This is the first study to show that treatment of breast cancer cells with metformin induces profound changes in phospholipid metabolism.

  14. The herpes simplex virus 1 US3 regulates phospholipid synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 capsids bud at nuclear and Golgi membranes for envelopment by phospholipid bilayers. In the absence of US3, nuclear membranes form multiple folds harboring virions that suggests disturbance in membrane turnover. Therefore, we investigated phospholipid metabolism in cells infected with the US3 deletion mutant R7041(ΔUS3), and quantified membranes involved in viral envelopment. We report that (i) [3H]-choline incorporation into nuclear membranes and cytoplasmic membranes was enhanced peaking at 12 or 20 h post inoculation with wild type HSV-1 and R7041(ΔUS3), respectively, (ii) the surface area of nuclear membranes increased until 24 h of R7041(ΔUS3) infection forming folds that equaled ∼45% of the nuclear surface, (iii) the surface area of viral envelopes between nuclear membranes equaled ∼2400 R7041(ΔUS3) virions per cell, and (iv) during R7041(ΔUS3) infection, the Golgi complex expanded dramatically. The data indicate that US3 plays a significant role in regulation of membrane biosynthesis.

  15. Characterization of the phospholipid methyltransferase in RBC ghost preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activity of the phospholipid methyltransferase from human RBC ghosts was studied using radio-HPLC techniques to analyze the products. Both monomethyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (MMPE) and dimethyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DMPE) were used as substrated. The reaction rate was linear for 45 min. Apparent K/sub M/s of 24-28 uM and 19-21 uM were measured for these two substrates, respectively. The reaction rate was not linear with protein. It appeared to increase logarithmic. An apparent K/sub M/ for S-adenosylmethionine was 36-45 uM. These K/sub M/ values are similar to those reported by others for liver. As the concentration of MMPE was increased, the ratio of DMPE/PC also increased due largely to a greater increase in DMPE formation. Optimal reaction rates for the formation of DMPE were 0.9-1.3 pmol/mg/min, and an optimal rate of about 1.7-2.4 pmol/min/mg was measured for the conversion of DMPE to phosphatidyl choline (PC). Freezing the ghost preparation did not affect the activity of the enzyme. When no exogenous phospholipid was added to the incubation, the sum of the formation rates of all three methylated products was about 26 pmol/mg/hr. The relative amount of each product was 46% MMPE, 32% DMPE and 22% PC. When either MMPE or DMPE was added as substrate, the formation of MMPE was reduced to less than 1%

  16. Spontaneous structural transition in phospholipid-inspired aromatic phosphopeptide nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellach, Michal; Atsmon-Raz, Yoav; Simonovsky, Eyal; Gottlieb, Hugo; Jacoby, Guy; Beck, Roy; Adler-Abramovich, Lihi; Miller, Yifat; Gazit, Ehud

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipid membranes could be considered a prime example of the ability of nature to produce complex yet ordered structures, by spontaneous and efficient self-assembly. Inspired by the unique properties and architecture of phospholipids, we designed simple amphiphilic decapeptides, intended to fold in the center of the peptide sequence, with a phosphorylated serine "head" located within a central turn segment, and two hydrophobic "tails". The molecular design also included the integration of the diphenylalanine motif, previously shown to facilitate self-assembly and increase nanostructure stability. Secondary structure analysis of the peptides indeed indicated the presence of stabilized conformations in solution, with a central turn connecting two hydrophobic "tails", and interactions between the hydrophobic strands. The mechanisms of assembly into supramolecular structures involved structural transitions between different morphologies, which occurred over several hours, leading to the formation of distinctive nanostructures, including half-elliptical nanosheets and curved tapes. The phosphopeptide building blocks appear to self-assemble via a particular combination of aromatic, hydrophobic and ionic interactions, as well as hydrogen bonding, as demonstrated by proposed constructed simulated models of the peptides and self-assembled nanostructures. Molecular dynamics simulations also gave insight into mechanisms of structural transitions of the nanostructures at a molecular level. Because of the biocompatibility of peptides, the phosphopeptide assemblies allow for expansion of the library of biomolecular nanostructures available for future design and application of biomedical devices. PMID:25802000

  17. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust soot dispersed in phospholipid surfactants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.; Keane, M.; Xing, S.; Harrison, J.; Gautam, M.; Ong, T.

    1994-06-01

    Organics extractable from respirable diesel exhaust soot particles by organic solvents have been known for some time to be direct acting frameshift mutagens in the Ames Salmonella typhimurium histidine reversion assay. Upon deposition in a pulmonary alveolus or respiratory bronchiole, respirable diesel soot particles will contact first the hypophase which is coated by and laden with surfactants. To model interactions of soot and pulmonary surfactant, the authors dispersed soots in vitro in the primary phospholipid pulmonary surfactant dipalmitoyl glycerophosphorylcholine (lecithin) (DPL) in physiological saline. They have shown that diesel soots dispersed in lecithin surfactant can express mutagenic activity, in the Ames assay system using S. typhimurium TA98, comparable to that expressed by equal amounts of soot extracted by dichloromethane/dimethylsulfoxide (DCM/DMSO). Here the authors report additional data on the same system using additional exhaust soots and also using two other phospholipids, dipalmitoyl glycerophosphoryl ethanolamine (DPPE), and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA), with different ionic character hydrophilic moieties. A preliminary study of the surfactant dispersed soot in an eucaryotic cell test system also is reported.

  18. Cationic Polyene Phospholipids as DNA Carriers for Ocular Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Machado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent success in the treatment of congenital blindness demonstrates the potential of ocular gene therapy as a therapeutic approach. The eye is a good target due to its small size, minimal diffusion of therapeutic agent to the systemic circulation, and low immune and inflammatory responses. Currently, most approaches are based on viral vectors, but efforts continue towards the synthesis and evaluation of new nonviral carriers to improve nucleic acid delivery. Our objective is to evaluate the efficiency of novel cationic retinoic and carotenoic glycol phospholipids, designated C20-18, C20-20, and C30-20, to deliver DNA to human retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE cells. Liposomes were produced by solvent evaporation of ethanolic mixtures of the polyene compounds and coformulated with 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOPE or cholesterol (Chol. Addition of DNA to the liposomes formed lipoplexes, which were characterized for binding, size, biocompatibility, and transgene efficiency. Lipoplex formulations of suitable size and biocompatibility were assayed for DNA delivery, both qualitatively and quantitatively, using RPE cells and a GFP-encoding plasmid. The retinoic lipoplex formulation with DOPE revealed a transfection efficiency comparable to the known lipid references 3β-[N-(N′,N′-dimethylaminoethane-carbamoyl]-cholesterol (DC-Chol and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-ethylphosphocholine (EPC and GeneJuice. The results demonstrate that cationic polyene phospholipids have potential as DNA carriers for ocular gene therapy.

  19. Temperature-Induced Aggregate Transitions in Mixtures of Cationic Ammonium Gemini Surfactant with Anionic Glutamic Acid Surfactant in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xiuling; Tian, Maozhang; Wang, Yilin

    2016-02-01

    The aggregation behaviors of the mixtures of cationic gemini surfactant 1,4-bis(dodecyl-N,N-dimethylammonium bromide)-2,3-butanediol (C12C4(OH)2C12Br2) and anionic amino acid surfactant N-dodecanoylglutamic acid (C12Glu) in aqueous solution of pH = 10.0 have been studied. The mixture forms spherical micelles, vesicles, and wormlike micelles at 25 °C by changing mixing ratios and/or total surfactant concentration. Then these aggregates undergo a series of transitions upon increasing the temperature. Smaller spherical micelles transfer into larger vesicles, vesicles transfer into solid spherical aggregates and then into larger irregular aggregates, and entangled wormlike micelles transfer into branched wormlike micelles. Moreover, the larger irregular aggregates and branched micelles finally lead to precipitation and clouding phenomenon, respectively. All these transitions are thermally reversible, and the transition temperatures can be tuned by varying the mixing ratios and/or total concentration. These temperature-dependent aggregate transitions can be elucidated on the basis of the temperature-induced variations in the dehydration, electrostatic interaction, and hydrogen bonds of the headgroup area and in the hydrophobic interaction between the hydrocarbon chains. The results suggest that the surfactants carrying multiple binding sites will greatly improve the regulation ability and temperature sensitivity. PMID:26750978

  20. Recognition of anions by protonated methylazacalixpyridines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-yuan GONG; De-xian WANG; Zhi-tang HUANG; Mei-xiang WANG

    2009-01-01

    Methylazacalixpyridines are a unique kind of macro-cyclic molecules that are able to self-regulate their conformations to best fit the guests. They had shown good recognition to both neutral molecules such as diols and fullerenes and cations. After protonation, the conformation of methylazacalixpyridines became more flexible and could serve as receptors for anions.In the solution, the protonated methylazacalix[2]pyri-dine[2]arene formed complexes with halides yield-ing biding constants of 79(mol/L)-1 for chloride,10 (mol/L)-1 for bromide, and 79 (mol/L)-1 for iodide,respectively. The crystal structures of the complexes between protonated methylazaealix[4]pyridine (MACP-4), methylazacalix[2]pyridine[2] arene (MACP-2-A-2), and iodide anion showed a multiple interaction mode including electrostatic attraction,hydrogen bonding, and anion-π interactions.