WorldWideScience

Sample records for animals evolution effectiveness

  1. Oxygen and Early Animal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, S.

    2012-12-01

    It is often hypothesized that the rise of animals was triggered by an increase in O2 levels in the atmosphere and oceans. However, this hypothesis is remarkably difficult to test, because the timing of animal divergences is poorly resolved, the physiology of early animals is often unknown, estimates of past pO2 levels come with large error bars, and causal relationships between oxygenation and animal evolution are difficult to establish. Nonetheless, existing phylogenetic, paleontological, and geochemical data indicate that the evolution of macroscopic animals and motile macrometazoans with energetically expensive lifestyles may be temporally coupled with ocean oxygenation events in the Ediacaran Period. Thus, it is plausible that ocean oxygenation may have been a limiting factor in the early evolution of macroscopic, complex, and metabolically aggressive animals (particularly bilaterian animals). However, ocean oxygenation and animal evolution were likely engaged in two-way interactions: Ediacaran oxygenation may have initially lifted a physiological barrier for the evolution of animal size, motility, and active lifestyles, but subsequent animal diversification in the Paleozoic may have also changed oceanic redox structures. Viewed in a broader context, the early evolutionary history of animals was contingent upon a series of events, including genetic preparation (developmental genetics), environmental facilitation (oceanic oxygenation), and ecological escalation (Cambrian explosion), but the rise of animals to ecological importance also had important geobiological impacts on oceanic redox structures, sedimentary fabrics, and global geochemical cycles.

  2. THE EVOLUTION OF THE ANIMAL EFFECTIVES IN EU – 25 AND IN ROMANIA IN THE PERIOD 2002 – 2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IOANA ANDA MILIN

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The study will analyze the evolution of the animal production and the animal effectives in the period 2002 – 2004 in EU and in Romania. The purpose of the study is to emphasize the differences between the Romanian and EU zootechnics according to the in formation supplied by the EU and national statistics. We analyzed the zoo-technical production, its percentage from the total agricultural production, the evolution of the animal effectives comparing the present situation in EU – 15, EU – 25 and Romania.

  3. Measurement in Learning Games Evolution: Review of Methodologies Used in Determining Effectiveness of "Math Snacks" Games and Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Karen; Chamberlin, Barbara; Wiburg, Karin; Armstrong, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    This article captures the evolution of research goals and methodologies used to assess the effectiveness and impact of a set of mathematical educational games and animations for middle-school aged students. The researchers initially proposed using a mixed model research design of formative and summative measures, such as user-testing,…

  4. Animal evolution: trilobites on speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Graham E

    2013-10-01

    A new study quantifies rates of morphological and molecular evolution for arthropods during the critical Cambrian explosion. Both morphological and molecular evolution are accelerated--but not so much to break any speed limits. PMID:24112983

  5. Polyploidy in animals : Effects of gene expression on sex determination, evolution and ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wertheim, B.; Beukeboom, L. W.; van de Zande, L.

    2013-01-01

    Polyploidy is rarer in animals than in plants. Why? Since Muller's observation in 1925, many hypotheses have been proposed and tested, but none were able to completely explain this intriguing fact. New genomic technologies enable the study of whole genomes to explain the constraints on or consequenc

  6. The Evolution of Multicellular Plants and Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, James W.

    1978-01-01

    Traces the evolution of unicellular organisms to the multi-cellular plants and animals in existence today. Major events are depicted in a geologic timetable. Organisms, extinct and recent, are classified by taxonomic group. (MA)

  7. The Effect of Abiotic Factors on Marine Animal Body Size Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X. F.; Wong, W.; Heim, N.; Payne, J.

    2015-12-01

    While there is evidence of a general increase in body size over time, there has been no comprehensive attempt to determine the influence of abiotic factors on body size. Although an increase in maximum body size has been observed during and after the Precambrian oxidation events in the Late Archean and at the onset of the Cambrian, these observations took into account the appearance of eukaryotic life and multicellular life respectively. Using a database of marine animal body sizes spanning the Phanerozoic, we conducted a series of Pearson product-moment correlation tests with igneous rock weathering (Strontium-87: Strontium-86), rate of carbon cycle (δ13C), temperature (δ18O), CO2 concentration, sulfate mineral weathering (δ34S), atmospheric oxygen concentration, and sea level as independent variables, and mean body size as the dependent variable. Our test yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.81 between δ18O and body size, and -0.78 between rCO2 and body size; since δ18O is inversely correlated with temperature, these results indicate that both temperature and CO2 have strong inverse relationships with body size. Atmospheric oxygen yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.09, demonstrating that it ceased to play an influential role in shaping body sizes following the start of the Phanerozoic.

  8. Ecology, Evolution, and Animal Behavior (EBB)

    OpenAIRE

    Bradley, Gordon

    2008-01-01

    As discussed in Chapter 2 of Kendall’s thesis, there is a subfield of biology called Ecology, Evolution, and Animal Behavior that is sometimes called Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior with both abbreviated as EEB. Some universities have Departments with this name and it is a well establish field of research. “Ecology is ‘the study of the interrelationships between organisms and their natural environment, both living and nonliving.’ .... Evolution is ‘the gradual process by which th...

  9. National biosecurity approaches, plans and programmes in response to diseases in farmed aquatic animals: evolution, effectiveness and the way forward

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Håstein, T.; Binde, M.; Hine, M.;

    2008-01-01

    and Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals serve as an excellent framework. Using examples from a few countries and selected diseases, this paper provides a general overview of the development of approaches to implementing biosecurity strategies, including those emerging in the national legislation......The rapid increase in aquaculture production and trade, and increased attention to the negative effects of disease, are becoming stimuli for developing national biosecurity strategies for farmed fisheries, for which the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) Aquatic Animal Health Code...

  10. Animal plant warfare and secondary metabolite evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Wöll, Steffen; Kim, Sun Hee; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The long-lasting discussion, why plants produce secondary metabolites, which are pharmacologically and toxicologically active towards mammals traces back to the eminent role of medicinal plants in the millennia-old history of manhood. In recent years, the concept of an animal plant warfare emerged, which focused on the co-evolution between plants and herbivores. As a reaction to herbivory, plants developed mechanical defenses such as thorns and hard shells, which paved the way for ad...

  11. Earth's oxygen cycle and the evolution of animal life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhard, Christopher T.; Planavsky, Noah J.; Olson, Stephanie L.; Lyons, Timothy W.; Erwin, Douglas H.

    2016-08-01

    The emergence and expansion of complex eukaryotic life on Earth is linked at a basic level to the secular evolution of surface oxygen levels. However, the role that planetary redox evolution has played in controlling the timing of metazoan (animal) emergence and diversification, if any, has been intensely debated. Discussion has gravitated toward threshold levels of environmental free oxygen (O2) necessary for early evolving animals to survive under controlled conditions. However, defining such thresholds in practice is not straightforward, and environmental O2 levels can potentially constrain animal life in ways distinct from threshold O2 tolerance. Herein, we quantitatively explore one aspect of the evolutionary coupling between animal life and Earth’s oxygen cycle—the influence of spatial and temporal variability in surface ocean O2 levels on the ecology of early metazoan organisms. Through the application of a series of quantitative biogeochemical models, we find that large spatiotemporal variations in surface ocean O2 levels and pervasive benthic anoxia are expected in a world with much lower atmospheric pO2 than at present, resulting in severe ecological constraints and a challenging evolutionary landscape for early metazoan life. We argue that these effects, when considered in the light of synergistic interactions with other environmental parameters and variable O2 demand throughout an organism’s life history, would have resulted in long-term evolutionary and ecological inhibition of animal life on Earth for much of Middle Proterozoic time (˜1.8-0.8 billion years ago).

  12. Molecular evolution of cyclin proteins in animals and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonnikov Dmitry A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The passage through the cell cycle is controlled by complexes of cyclins, the regulatory units, with cyclin-dependent kinases, the catalytic units. It is also known that cyclins form several families, which differ considerably in primary structure from one eukaryotic organism to another. Despite these lines of evidence, the relationship between the evolution of cyclins and their function is an open issue. Here we present the results of our study on the molecular evolution of A-, B-, D-, E-type cyclin proteins in animals and fungi. Results We constructed phylogenetic trees for these proteins, their ancestral sequences and analyzed patterns of amino acid replacements. The analysis of infrequently fixed atypical amino acid replacements in cyclins evidenced that accelerated evolution proceeded predominantly during paralog duplication or after it in animals and fungi and that it was related to aromorphic changes in animals. It was shown also that evolutionary flexibility of cyclin function may be provided by consequential reorganization of regions on protein surface remote from CDK binding sites in animal and fungal cyclins and by functional differentiation of paralogous cyclins formed in animal evolution. Conclusions The results suggested that changes in the number and/or nature of cyclin-binding proteins may underlie the evolutionary role of the alterations in the molecular structure of cyclins and their involvement in diverse molecular-genetic events.

  13. Animal evolution during domestication: the domesticated fox as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trut, Lyudmila; Oskina, Irina; Kharlamova, Anastasiya

    2009-03-01

    We review the evolution of domestic animals, emphasizing the effect of the earliest steps of domestication on its course. Using the first domesticated species, the dog (Canis familiaris), for illustration, we describe the evolutionary peculiarities during the historical domestication, such as the high level and wide range of diversity. We suggest that the process of earliest domestication via unconscious and later conscious selection of human-defined behavioral traits may accelerate phenotypic variations. The review is based on the results of a long-term experiment designed to reproduce early mammalian domestication in the silver fox (Vulpes vulpes) selected for tameability or amenability to domestication. We describe changes in behavior, morphology and physiology that appeared in the fox during its selection for tameability, which were similar to those observed in the domestic dog. Based on the data of the fox experiment and survey of relevant data, we discuss the developmental, genetic and possible molecular genetic mechanisms underlying these changes. We ascribe the causative role in evolutionary transformation of domestic animals to the selection for behavior and to the neurospecific regulatory genes it affects.

  14. The cell's view of animal body-plan evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Deirdre C; Martindale, Mark Q; Srivastava, Mansi

    2014-10-01

    An adult animal's form is shaped by the collective behavior of cells during embryonic development. To understand the forces that drove the divergence of animal body-plans, evolutionary developmental biology has focused largely on studying genetic networks operating during development. However, it is less well understood how these networks modulate characteristics at the cellular level, such as the shape, polarity, or migration of cells. We organized the "Cell's view of animal body plan evolution" symposium for the 2014 The Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology meeting with the explicit goal of bringing together researchers studying the cell biology of embryonic development in diverse animal taxa. Using a broad range of established and emerging technologies, including live imaging, single-cell analysis, and mathematical modeling, symposium participants revealed mechanisms underlying cells' behavior, a few of which we highlight here. Shape, adhesion, and movements of cells can be modulated over the course of evolution to alter adult body-plans and a major theme explored during the symposium was the role of actomyosin in coordinating diverse behaviors of cells underlying morphogenesis in a myriad of contexts. Uncovering whether conserved or divergent genetic mechanisms guide the contractility of actomyosin in these systems will be crucial to understanding the evolution of the body-plans of animals from a cellular perspective. Many speakers presented research describing developmental phenomena in which cell division and tissue growth can control the form of the adult, and other presenters shared work on studying cell-fate specification, an important source of novelty in animal body-plans. Participants also presented studies of regeneration in annelids, flatworms, acoels, and cnidarians, and provided a unifying view of the regulation of cellular behavior during different life-history stages. Additionally, several presentations highlighted technological

  15. The Amphimedon queenslandica genome and the evolution of animal complexity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, Mansi; Simakov, Oleg; Chapman, Jarrod; Fahey, Bryony; Gauthier, Marie E.A.; Mitros, Therese; Richards, Gemma S.; Conaco, Cecilia; Dacre, Michael; Hellsten, Uffe; Larroux, Claire; Putnam, Nicholas H.; Stanke, Mario; Adamska, Maja; Darling, Aaron; Degnan, Sandie M.; Oakley, Todd H.; Plachetzki, David C.; Zhai, Yufeng; Adamski, Marcin; Calcino, Andrew; Cummins, Scott F.; Goodstein, David M.; Harris, Christina; Jackson, Daniel J.; Leys, Sally P.; Shu, Shengqiang; Woodcroft, Ben J.; Vervoort, Michel; Kosik, Kenneth S.; Manning, Gerard; Degnan, Bernard M.; Rokhsar, Daniel S.

    2010-07-01

    Sponges are an ancient group of animals that diverged from other metazoans over 600 million years ago. Here we present the draft genome sequence of Amphimedon queenslandica, a demosponge from the Great Barrier Reef, and show that it is remarkably similar to other animal genomes in content, structure and organization. Comparative analysis enabled by the sponge sequence reveals genomic events linked to the origin and early evolution of animals, including the appearance, expansion, and diversification of pan-metazoan transcription factor, signaling pathway, and structural genes. This diverse 'toolkit' of genes correlates with critical aspects of all metazoan body plans, and comprises cell cycle control and growth, development, somatic and germ cell specification, cell adhesion, innate immunity, and allorecognition. Notably, many of the genes associated with the emergence of animals are also implicated in cancer, which arises from defects in basic processes associated with metazoan multicellularity.

  16. Adaptive evolution of centromere proteins in plants and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henikoff Steven

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Centromeres represent the last frontiers of plant and animal genomics. Although they perform a conserved function in chromosome segregation, centromeres are typically composed of repetitive satellite sequences that are rapidly evolving. The nucleosomes of centromeres are characterized by a special H3-like histone (CenH3, which evolves rapidly and adaptively in Drosophila and Arabidopsis. Most plant, animal and fungal centromeres also bind a large protein, centromere protein C (CENP-C, that is characterized by a single 24 amino-acid motif (CENPC motif. Results Whereas we find no evidence that mammalian CenH3 (CENP-A has been evolving adaptively, mammalian CENP-C proteins contain adaptively evolving regions that overlap with regions of DNA-binding activity. In plants we find that CENP-C proteins have complex duplicated regions, with conserved amino and carboxyl termini that are dissimilar in sequence to their counterparts in animals and fungi. Comparisons of Cenpc genes from Arabidopsis species and from grasses revealed multiple regions that are under positive selection, including duplicated exons in some grasses. In contrast to plants and animals, yeast CENP-C (Mif2p is under negative selection. Conclusions CENP-Cs in all plant and animal lineages examined have regions that are rapidly and adaptively evolving. To explain these remarkable evolutionary features for a single-copy gene that is needed at every mitosis, we propose that CENP-Cs, like some CenH3s, suppress meiotic drive of centromeres during female meiosis. This process can account for the rapid evolution and the complexity of centromeric DNA in plants and animals as compared to fungi.

  17. Neoproterozoic Glaciations and the Early Evolution of Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narbonne, G. M.

    2004-05-01

    The intense climatic changes that characterized the Neoproterozoic world were marked by equally profound evolutionary changes that ultimately led to the Cambrian Explosion. Early and Middle Neoproterozoic oceans contained prokaryotes and diverse eukaryotic lineages, including crown-group red, green, and heterokont algae. The survival of diverse eukaryotic lineages through the Sturtian, Marinoan, and Gaskiers glaciations implies that, although these were among the most extreme glaciations Earth has ever experienced, sea ice was not as thick or pervasive as required by earlier "hard Snowball" models. Most molecular clocks predict the existence of animals well before 600 Ma and a few tantalizing hints have been found, but the oldest definite evidence of animal life are phosphatized eggs and embryos overlying Marinoan glacial deposits in China. The subsequent Late Neoproterozoic is characterized by the global occurrence of the Ediacara biota, an assemblage of cm- to m-scale fossils of soft-bodied organisms that probably represent a mixture of stem groups of modern phyla and "failed experiments" in evolution. The oldest Ediacaran fossils occur in eastern Newfoundland, and postdate the glacial diamictites and cap carbonate of the Gaskiers Formation (580 Ma) by only 5 million years, implying a causal relationship between the end of the Neoproterozoic glaciations and the proliferation of animal life. These fossils include architecturally complex fronds up to two metres long, implying either extremely rapid rates of evolution or a pre-glacial origin of the Ediacara biota. Fossils of the Mistaken Point biota (575-560 Ma) were completely sessile and show a similar fractal architecture that is difficult to relate to any existing life forms. Some of these taxa persisted into the White Sea biota (560-550 Ma), which also contains trace fossils and metameric fossils that confirm the evolution of mobile bilaterians. The youngest Ediacaran fossils (550-543 Ma) exhibit the first

  18. Evolution of maternal effect senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moorad, Jacob A; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-12

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton's evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton's age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species.

  19. The TALE face of Hox proteins in animal evolution

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    Samir eMerabet

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes are major regulators of embryonic development. One of their most conserved functions is to coordinate the formation of specific body structures along the anterior-posterior (AP axis in Bilateria. This architectural role was at the basis of several morphological innovations across bilaterian evolution. In this review, we traced the origin of the Hox patterning system by considering the partnership with PBC and Meis proteins. PBC and Meis belong to the TALE-class of homeodomain-containing transcription factors and act as generic cofactors of Hox proteins for AP axis patterning in Bilateria. Recent data indicate that Hox proteins acquired the ability to interact with their TALE partners in the last common ancestor of Bilateria and Cnidaria. These interactions relied initially on a short peptide motif called hexapeptide (HX, which is present in Hox and non-Hox protein families. Remarkably, Hox proteins can also recruit the TALE cofactors by using specific PBC Interaction Motifs (SPIMs. We describe how a functional Hox/TALE patterning system emerged in eumetazoans through the acquisition of SPIMs. We anticipate that interaction flexibility could be found in other patterning systems, being at the heart of the astonishing morphological diversity observed in the animal kingdom.

  20. 'Biogeneric' developmental processes: drivers of major transitions in animal evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Stuart A

    2016-08-19

    Using three examples drawn from animal systems, I advance the hypothesis that major transitions in multicellular evolution often involved the constitution of new cell-based materials with unprecedented morphogenetic capabilities. I term the materials and formative processes that arise when highly evolved cells are incorporated into mesoscale matter 'biogeneric', to reflect their commonality with, and distinctiveness from, the organizational properties of non-living materials. The first transition arose by the innovation of classical cell-adhesive cadherins with transmembrane linkage to the cytoskeleton and the appearance of the morphogen Wnt, transforming some ancestral unicellular holozoans into 'liquid tissues', and thereby originating the metazoans. The second transition involved the new capabilities, within a basal metazoan population, of producing a mechanically stable basal lamina, and of planar cell polarization. This gave rise to the eumetazoans, initially diploblastic (two-layered) forms, and then with the addition of extracellular matrices promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transformation, three-layered triploblasts. The last example is the fin-to-limb transition. Here, the components of a molecular network that promoted the development of species-idiosyncratic endoskeletal elements in gnathostome ancestors are proposed to have evolved to a dynamical regime in which they constituted a Turing-type reaction-diffusion system capable of organizing the stereotypical arrays of elements of lobe-finned fish and tetrapods. The contrasting implications of the biogeneric materials-based and neo-Darwinian perspectives for understanding major evolutionary transitions are discussed.This article is part of the themed issue 'The major synthetic evolutionary transitions'. PMID:27431521

  1. The cytochrome P450 genesis locus: the origin and evolution of animal cytochrome P450s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, David R; Goldstone, Jared V; Stegeman, John J

    2013-02-19

    The neighbourhoods of cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes in deuterostome genomes, as well as those of the cnidarians Nematostella vectensis and Acropora digitifera and the placozoan Trichoplax adhaerens were examined to find clues concerning the evolution of CYP genes in animals. CYP genes created by the 2R whole genome duplications in chordates have been identified. Both microsynteny and macrosynteny were used to identify genes that coexisted near CYP genes in the animal ancestor. We show that all 11 CYP clans began in a common gene environment. The evidence implies the existence of a single locus, which we term the 'cytochrome P450 genesis locus', where one progenitor CYP gene duplicated to create a tandem set of genes that were precursors of the 11 animal CYP clans: CYP Clans 2, 3, 4, 7, 19, 20, 26, 46, 51, 74 and mitochondrial. These early CYP genes existed side by side before the origin of cnidarians, possibly with a few additional genes interspersed. The Hox gene cluster, WNT genes, an NK gene cluster and at least one ARF gene were close neighbours to this original CYP locus. According to this evolutionary scenario, the CYP74 clan originated from animals and not from land plants nor from a common ancestor of plants and animals. The CYP7 and CYP19 families that are chordate-specific belong to CYP clans that seem to have originated in the CYP genesis locus as well, even though this requires many gene losses to explain their current distribution. The approach to uncovering the CYP genesis locus overcomes confounding effects because of gene conversion, sequence divergence, gene birth and death, and opens the way to understanding the biodiversity of CYP genes, families and subfamilies, which in animals has been obscured by more than 600 Myr of evolution.

  2. Animated Autoethnographies: Stop Motion Animation as a Tool for Self-Inquiry and Personal Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Jeremy Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article will present the autoethnographic animations and processes from three select preservice art educators that enrolled in the Applications of Technology in Art Education course. These students created stop motion animations using small objects, toys, and their bodies; accessing culturally constructed fears, investigating impactful…

  3. Metabolic effects of hypergravity on experimental animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyama, J.

    1982-01-01

    Several experiments concerned with the exposure of animals to acute or chronic centrifugation are described. The effects of hypergravity particularly discussed include the decreased growth rate and body weight, increased metabolic rate, skeletal deformation, and loss of body fat.

  4. Evolution of the hormonal control of animal performance: insights from the seaward migration of salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    The endocrine system is the key mediator of environmental and developmental (internal) information, and is likely to be involved in altering the performance of animals when selection has favored phenotypic plasticity. The endocrine control of performance should be especially pronounced in animals that undergo a developmental shift in niche, such as occurs in migratory species. By way of example, I review the developmental and environmental control of the preparatory changes for seawater entry of juvenile salmon (known as smolting) and its hormonal regulation. There is a size threshold for smolt development in juvenile Atlantic salmon that results in greater sensitivity of the growth hormone and cortisol axes to changes in daylength. These hormones, in turn, have broad effects on survival, ion homeostasis, growth and swimming performance during entry into seawater. Migratory niche shifts and metamorphic events are extreme examples of the role of hormones in animal performance and represent one end of a continuum. A framework for predicting when hormones will be involved in performance of animals is presented. Endocrine involvement in performance will be more substantial when (1) selection differentials on traits underlying performance are high and temporally discontinuous over an animal's lifetime, (2) the energetic and fitness costs of maintaining performance plasticity are less than those of constant performance, (3) cues for altering performance are reliable indicators of critical environmental conditions, require neurosensory input, and minimize effects of lag, and (4) the need for coordination of organs, tissues and cells to achieve increased performance is greater. By examining these impacts of selection, endocrinologists have an opportunity to contribute to the understanding of performance, phenotypic plasticity, and the evolution of life-history traits.

  5. Oxygen and animal evolution: Did a rise of atmospheric oxygen trigger the origin of animals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mills, Daniel Brady; Canfield, Donald Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies challenge the classical view that the origin of animal life was primarily controlled by atmospheric oxygen levels. For example, some modern sponges, representing early-branching animals, can live under 200 times less oxygen than currently present in the atmosphere - levels commonly...... thought to have been maintained prior to their origination. Furthermore, it is increasingly argued that the earliest animals, which likely lived in low oxygen environments, played an active role in constructing the well-oxygenated conditions typical of the modern oceans. Therefore, while oxygen is still...

  6. Irradiation effect on animal feeds and feedstuffs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming to secure the safety of animal feeds and develop the new resources, the effect of γ-irradiation on disinfection and the changes in components were investigated. Salmonellae and coliforms contaminating in animal feeds and feedstuffs were eliminated by 0.5 -- 0.6 Mrad and 0.5 -- 0.8 Mrad, and osmophilic moulds were sterilized by 0.7 -- 0.75 Mrad. From these results, it is concluded that the dose for disinfection of animal feeds is 0.8 Mrad. The main components were hardly changed by irradiation up to 5 Mrad, and the component changes in irradiated samples could be suppressed during storage while the components in unirradiated samples were markedly changed with the growth of osmophilic moulds. Histamine and lysinoalanine, which may cause the feed poisoning, were never accumulated in feedstuffs by irradiation. The nutritional value of chick feeds was not changed by 1.0 Mrad irradiation. From these results, it is considered that no problem for wholesomeness of animal feeds occurs by irradiation. Therefore, the irradiation is effective for disinfection and keeping the nutritional value of animal feeds during storage. Irradiation promotes the recovery of proteins in the wastewater by coagulation of proteins and improves the property of coagulants due to the degradation of polysaccharides. These results indicate that irradiation is effective to develop the new resources for animal feeds. (author)

  7. Effectiveness of animation in trend visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, George; Fernandez, Roland; Fisher, Danyel; Lee, Bongshin; Stasko, John

    2008-01-01

    Animation has been used to show trends in multi-dimensional data. This technique has recently gained new prominence for presentations, most notably with Gapminder Trendalyzer. In Trendalyzer, animation together with interesting data and an engaging presenter helps the audience understand the results of an analysis of the data. It is less clear whether trend animation is effective for analysis. This paper proposes two alternative trend visualizations that use static depictions of trends: one which shows traces of all trends overlaid simultaneously in one display and a second that uses a small multiples display to show the trend traces side-by-side. The paper evaluates the three visualizations for both analysis and presentation. Results indicate that trend animation can be challenging to use even for presentations; while it is the fastest technique for presentation and participants find it enjoyable and exciting, it does lead to many participant errors. Animation is the least effective form for analysis; both static depictions of trends are significantly faster than animation, and the small multiples display is more accurate.

  8. Molecular evolution of dentin phosphoprotein among toothed and toothless animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Larry W

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP is the largest member of the SIBLING family and is the most abundant noncollagenous protein in dentin. DSPP is also expressed in non-mineralized tissues including metabolically active ductal epithelia and some cancers. Its function, however, is poorly defined. The carboxy-terminal fragment, dentin phosphoprotein (DPP is encoded predominantly by a large repetitive domain that requires separate cloning/sequencing reactions and is, therefore, often incomplete in genomic databases. Comparison of DPP sequences from at least one member of each major branch in the mammalian evolutionary tree (including some "toothless" mammals as well as one reptile and bird may help delineate its possible functions in both dentin and ductal epithelia. Results The BMP1-cleavage and translation-termination domains were sufficiently conserved to permit amplification/cloning/sequencing of most species' DPP. While the integrin-binding domain, RGD, was present in about half of species, only vestigial remnants of this tripeptide were identified in the others. The number of tandem repeats of the nominal SerSerAsp phosphorylation motif in toothed mammals (including baleen whale and platypus which lack teeth as adults, ranged from ~75 (elephant to >230 (human. These repeats were not perfect, however, and patterns of intervening sequences highlight the rapidity of changes among even closely related species. Two toothless anteater species have evolved different sets of nonsense mutations shortly after their BMP1 motifs suggesting that while cleavage may be important for DSPP processing in other tissues, the DPP domain itself may be required only in dentin. The lizard DSPP had an intact BMP1 site, a remnant RGD motif, as well as a distinctly different Ser/Asp-rich domain compared to mammals. Conclusions The DPP domain of DSPP was found to change dramatically within mammals and was lost in two truly toothless animals. The

  9. Influence of radioprotectors on total body weight evolution and on oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals. (Preliminary study)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparison of total body weight evolution and oxygen consumption in lethal dose irradiated animals, protected by various well known radioprotective substances, isolated or in mixture, with evolution and consumption of non protected animals irradiated at the same dose and with these of check animals

  10. The evolution of novel animal signals: silk decorations as a model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, André; Elgar, Mark A

    2012-08-01

    Contemporary animal signals may derive from an elaboration of existing forms or novel non-signalling traits. Unravelling the evolution of the latter is challenging because experiments investigating the maintenance of the signal may provide little insight into its early evolution. The web decorations, or stabilimenta of some orb web spiders represent an intriguing model system to investigate novel animal signals. For over 100 years, biologists have struggled to explain why spiders decorate their webs with additional threads of silk, producing a conspicuous signal on a construction whose function is to entangle unsuspecting prey. The numerous explanations for the maintenance of this behaviour starkly contrast with the absence of a plausible explanation for its evolutionary origin. Our review highlights the difficulties in resolving both the evolution and maintenance of animal signalling, and inferring the causative arrow-even from experimental studies. Drawing on recent research that focuses on physiological processes, we provide a model of the evolutionary progression of web-decorating behaviour.

  11. Vive la différence: biogenesis and evolution of microRNAs in plants and animals

    OpenAIRE

    Axtell, Michael J.; Westholm, Jakub O.; Eric C Lai

    2011-01-01

    MicroRNAs are pervasive in both plants and animals, but many aspects of their biogenesis, function and evolution differ. We reveal how these differences contribute to characteristic features of microRNA evolution in the two kingdoms.

  12. The Evolution of Personality Variation in Humans and Other Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nettle, Daniel

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive evolutionary framework for understanding the maintenance of heritable behavioral variation in humans is yet to be developed. Some evolutionary psychologists have argued that heritable variation will not be found in important, fitness-relevant characteristics because of the winnowing effect of natural selection. This article…

  13. Harmful Effects of Nanoparticles on Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Marie Exbrayat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since several years nanoparticles (NPs are produced by industries and used in several fields of activities. They are finally found in aquatic and terrestrial environments, where they are ingested by living organisms in which they accumulate, before being eliminated. In organisms, NPs represent foreign elements with their own physicochemical properties due to their small size. So NPs may interfere with the normal physiological mechanisms of the embryos, growing animals, and adults, and it is indispensable to understand their potentially direct or indirect harmful effects on living organisms. It has been already shown that NPs could be toxic to bacteria, algae, invertebrates, and vertebrates. In this review, several examples of recent studies are given. We will examine successively the effects of NPs on terrestrial and semiaquatic and aquatic vertebrate and invertebrate animals.

  14. The Effect of Probiotics on Animal Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolae Corcionivoschi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms of action of probiotic bacteria and their effect in combating digestive disorders in humans and animals has been demonstrated and supported in numerous scientific studies. Probiotic bacteria are used in a wide range of nutritional techniques in order to support the host organism during physiological strain, to reduce stress due to technology and to combat diarrheal syndromes (occurring naturally or pharmacologically induced. Based on a rich bibliographic material, this paper presents the role of probiotic bacteria to equilibrate the beneficial microbial population and in bacterial turnover by stimulating the host immune response via specific secretions (eg. bacteriocins and competitive exclusion of potentially pathogenic germs in the digestive tract (Salmonella, E. coli. In the same context, this review presents the basic studies on the effect of probiotic bacteria in health maintenance for the main species of farm animals: pigs, poultry, cattle and sheep.

  15. Insights into the early evolution of animal calcium signaling machinery: a unicellular point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Xinjiang; Wang, Xiangbing; Patel, Sandip; Clapham, David E

    2015-03-01

    The basic principles of Ca(2+) regulation emerged early in prokaryotes. Ca(2+) signaling acquired more extensive and varied functions when life evolved into multicellular eukaryotes with intracellular organelles. Animals, fungi and plants display differences in the mechanisms that control cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations. The aim of this review is to examine recent findings from comparative genomics of Ca(2+) signaling molecules in close unicellular relatives of animals and in common unicellular ancestors of animals and fungi. Also discussed are the evolution and origins of the sperm-specific CatSper channel complex, cation/Ca(2+) exchangers and four-domain voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels. Newly identified evolutionary evidence suggests that the distinct Ca(2+) signaling machineries in animals, plants and fungi likely originated from an ancient Ca(2+) signaling machinery prior to early eukaryotic radiation.

  16. On the eve of animal radiation: phylogeny, ecology and evolution of the Ediacara biota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuhai; Laflamme, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Ediacara fossils document an important evolutionary episode just before the Cambrian explosion and hold critical information about the early evolution of macroscopic and complex multicellular life. They also represent an enduring controversy in paleontology. How are the Ediacara fossils related to living animals? How did they live? Do they share any evolutionary patterns with other life forms? Recent developments indicate that Ediacara fossils epitomize a phylogenetically diverse biosphere, probably including animals, protists, algae, fungi and others. Their simple ecology is dominated by epibenthic osmotrophs, deposit feeders and grazers, but few if any predators. Their evolution started with an early morphospace expansion followed by taxonomic diversification within confined morphospace, and concluded by extinction of many taxa at the Ediacaran-Cambrian boundary. PMID:18952316

  17. INFORMATION SOCIETY EVOLUTION AND EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Tony

    2016-01-01

    The evolution and effects of the information society can be exemplified via many threads, both in hard and soft science, according to ones’ discipline and field. In this contribution, the speaker’s three decades of applied research acts as a vehicle to demonstrate development and impact via...... directly and creatively applying technical advances to affect life quality at a societal level. Illustrated is how empirical research successfully reaches beyond the walls of academia to directly affect individuals, groups and communities across abilities and ages. Developments that have led to patented...... commercial product, national and international projects, and industry startups (including impactful third party research investigations) form the basis for discussion. Beyond this, a wider more generic perspective reflects on product adoption that illustrate todays’ contemporary e-society tendencies where...

  18. The Evolution of Animal Communication Systems: Questions of Function Examined through Simulation

    OpenAIRE

    Noble, J.

    1998-01-01

    Simulated evolution is used as a tool for investigating the selective pressures that have influenced the design of animal signalling systems. The biological literature on communication is first reviewed: central concepts such as the handicap principle and the view of signalling as manipulation are discussed. The equation of “biological function” with “adaptive value” is then defended, along with a workable definition of communication. Evolutionary simulation models are advocated as a way of t...

  19. Effects of lectin ingestion on animal growth and internal organs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, A

    1998-01-01

    Lectins are essential and omnipresent plant constituents. As many foods are of plant origin, the daily ingestion of lectins by both humans and animals is appreciable. For example, in an ad hoc survey, 53 edible plants were shown to contain lectins and approx 30% of fresh and processed food regularly consumed by humans had significant hemagglutinating activity (1). The situation is potentially even more acute in animal nutrition because animal diet is less diverse than that of humans, and in most instances foodstuffs are not thoroughly heat-treated. This is particularly significant in the light of our finding a correlation between lectin activity and antinutritional effects (2). As in evolution, the mammalian gut has been regularly exposed to lectins, they must have played an important part in the development of the digestive system. Although based on experience, most overtly toxic plants have been eliminated from the diet, many plants with appreciable lectin content are still consumed because it has not been easy to relate growth retardation and antinutritional, mild allergic or other subclinical symptoms to the food consumed or a particular component of it. As some lectins are at least partially heat stable and most survive the passage through the gut in functionally and immunologically intact form, their interaction with the gut surface epithelium (3) can damage the gut at high dietary intakes and this may lead to digestive disorders/diseases in some instances. However, it is not generally appreciated that not all lectins are antinutrients and indeed some may have beneficial effects and be of potential value in nutritional practice. Accordingly, it is of considerable importance to establish whether a lectin has deleterious or potentially beneficial effects for mammals. Unfortunately at present there are no adequate in vitro methods to do this reliably and it is usually necessary to carry out in vivo animal feeding studies, despite their relatively cumbersome

  20. Mycotoxin: Its Effect on Animal Health and its Residues in Animal Products and its Control

    OpenAIRE

    Raphaella Widiastuti

    2006-01-01

    Mycotoxins are the toxic metabolites of certain fungi which is able to influence animal health . Five types of the most important mycotoxins are aflatox ns, ochratoksin A . zearalenone, trichotecenes and fumonisin . The effect of mycotoxin on animal health depends on the type and amount of the mycotoxins consumed . The occurrence of mycotoxin causes animal health problem and also leads to the arise of mycotoxin residues in food derived from animal products such as meat, eggs and milk which ca...

  1. Zebrafish RNase T2 genes and the evolution of secretory ribonucleases in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Essner Jeffrey J

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Members of the Ribonuclease (RNase T2 family are common models for enzymological studies, and their evolution has been well characterized in plants. This family of acidic RNases is widespread, with members in almost all organisms including plants, animals, fungi, bacteria and even some viruses. While several biological functions have been proposed for these enzymes in plants, their role in animals is unknown. Interestingly, in vertebrates most of the biological roles of plant RNase T2 proteins are carried out by members of a different family, RNase A. Still, RNase T2 proteins are conserved in these animals Results As a first step to shed light on the role of animal RNase T2 enzymes, and to understand the evolution of these proteins while co-existing with the RNase A family, we characterized RNase Dre1 and RNase Dre2, the two RNase T2 genes present in the zebrafish (Danio rerio genome. These genes are expressed in most tissues examined, including high expression in all stages of embryonic development, and their expression corresponds well with the presence of acidic RNase activities in every tissue analyzed. Embryo expression seems to be a conserved characteristic of members of this family, as other plant and animal RNase T2 genes show similar high expression during embryo development. While plant RNase T2 proteins and the vertebrate RNase A family show evidences of radiation and gene sorting, vertebrate RNase T2 proteins form a monophyletic group, but there is also another monophyletic group defining a fish-specific RNase T2 clade. Conclusion Based on gene expression and phylogenetic analyses we propose that RNase T2 enzymes carry out a housekeeping function. This conserved biological role probably kept RNase T2 enzymes in animal genomes in spite of the presence of RNases A. A hypothetical role during embryo development is also discussed.

  2. The evolution of animal welfare and the 3Rs in Brazil, China, and India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayne, Kathryn; Ramachandra, Gudde S; Rivera, Ekaterina A; Wang, Jianfei

    2015-03-01

    Increasingly, scientific collaborations and contracts cross country borders. The need for assurance that the quality of animal welfare and the caliber of animal research conducted are equivalent among research partners around the globe is of concern to the scientific and laboratory animal medicine communities, the general public, and other key stakeholders. Therefore, global harmonization of animal care and use standards and practices, with the welfare of the animals as a cornerstone, is essential. In the evolving global landscape of enhanced attention to animal welfare, a widely accepted path to achieving this goal is the successful integration of the 3Rs in animal care and use programs. Currently, awareness of the 3Rs, their implementation, and the resulting animal care and use standards and practices vary across countries. This variability has direct effects on the animals used in research and potentially the data generated and may also have secondary effects on the country's ability to be viewed as a global research partner. Here we review the status of implementation of the 3Rs worldwide and focus on 3 countries-Brazil, China and India-with increasing economic influence and an increasing footprint in the biomedical research enterprise.

  3. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  4. Convergent evolution of chromosomal sex-determining regions in the animal and fungal kingdoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Fraser

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Sexual identity is governed by sex chromosomes in plants and animals, and by mating type (MAT loci in fungi. Comparative analysis of the MAT locus from a species cluster of the human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus revealed sequential evolutionary events that fashioned this large, highly unusual region. We hypothesize that MAT evolved via four main steps, beginning with acquisition of genes into two unlinked sex-determining regions, forming independent gene clusters that then fused via chromosomal translocation. A transitional tripolar intermediate state then converted to a bipolar system via gene conversion or recombination between the linked and unlinked sex-determining regions. MAT was subsequently subjected to intra- and interallelic gene conversion and inversions that suppress recombination. These events resemble those that shaped mammalian sex chromosomes, illustrating convergent evolution in sex-determining structures in the animal and fungal kingdoms.

  5. The Effect of Toxic Cyanobacteria on Human and Animal Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of environmental health typically focuses on human populations. However, companion animals, livestock and wildlife also experience adverse health effects from environmental pollutants. Animals may experience direct exposure to pollutants unlike people in most ambient ex...

  6. Elemental magic, v.2 the technique of special effects animation

    CERN Document Server

    Gilland, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Design beautiful, professional-level animated effects with these detailed step-by-step tutorials from former Disney animator and animated effects expert Joseph Gilland. Filled with beautiful, full-color artwork, Elemental Magic, Volume II, breaks down the animated effect process from beginning to end-including booming explosions, gusting winds, magical incantations, and raging fires. He also breaks down the process of effects ""clean-up,"" as well as timing and frame rates. The companion website includes real-time footage of the author lecturing as he animates the drawings from the

  7. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  8. Delayed radiation effect on animals: adaptive reply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adaptive response by micronuclei test was studied in mole-voles (Ellobius talpinus) from two populations differing in degree of radioactive contamination. It was found the significant adaptive response in animals living the left coast of the Techa River, as compared to the reference one. Some convincing evidences of the adaptive rearrangements and higher radioresistance of animals inhabiting the radiocontaminated zone during a long period and in the course of changing generations was obtained at the example of radiosensitive specie. (authors)

  9. The evolution of the animals: introduction to a Linnean tercentenary celebration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telford, Maximilian J; Littlewood, D Timothy J

    2008-04-27

    Celebrating 300 years since the birth of Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778), a meeting was held in June 2007 to review recent progress made in understanding the origins and evolutionary radiation of the animals. The year 2008 celebrates the 250th anniversary of the publication of the 10th edition of Linnaeus' Systema Naturae, generally considered to be the starting point of zoological nomenclature. With subsequent advances in comparative taxonomic and systematic studies, Darwin's discovery of evolution by natural selection, the birth of phylogenetic systematics, and the wider interest in biodiversity, it is salutary to consider that many of the major advances in our understanding of animal evolution have been made in recent years. Phylogenetic systematics, drawing from evidence provided by genotype, phenotype and an understanding of the link between them through comparative embryological and evolutionary developmental studies, has provided a wide consensus of the major branching patterns of the tree of life. More importantly, the integrated approaches discussed in the 16 contributions to this volume highlight the identity and nature of problematic taxa, the missing data, errors in existing analytical procedures and the promise of a wealth of additional characters from genomes that need to be accumulated and assessed in providing a definitive Systema Naturae. PMID:18192193

  10. Comprehensive analysis of animal TALE homeobox genes: new conserved motifs and cases of accelerated evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Krishanu; Bürglin, Thomas R

    2007-08-01

    TALE homeodomain proteins are an ancient subgroup within the group of homeodomain transcription factors that play important roles in animal, plant, and fungal development. We have extracted the full complement of TALE superclass homeobox genes from the genome projects of seven protostomes, seven deuterostomes, and Nematostella. This was supplemented with TALE homeobox genes from additional species and phylogenetic analyses were carried out with 276 sequences. We found 20 homeobox genes and 4 pseudogenes in humans, 21 genes in mouse, 8 genes in Drosophila, and 5 genes plus one truncated gene in Caenorhabditis elegans. Apart from the previously identified TALE classes MEIS, PBC, IRO, and TGIF, a novel class is identified, termed MOHAWK (MKX). Further, we show that the MEIS class can be divided into two families, PREP and MEIS. Prep genes have previously only been described in vertebrates but are lacking in Drosophila. Here we identify orthologues in other insect taxa as well as in the cnidarian Nematostella. In C. elegans, a divergent Prep protein has lost the homeodomain. Full-length multiple sequence alignment of the protostome and deuterostome sequences allowed us to identify several novel conserved motifs within the MKX, TGIF, and MEIS classes. Phylogenetic analyses revealed fast-evolving PBC class genes; in particular, some X-linked PBC genes in nematodes are subject to rapid evolution. In addition, several instances of gene loss were identified. In conclusion, our comprehensive analysis provides a defining framework for the classification of animal TALE homeobox genes and the understanding of their evolution.

  11. Road transport of farm animals: effects of journey duration on animal welfare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birte Lindstrøm; Dybkjær, Lise; Herskin, Mette S

    2011-01-01

    Transport of farm animals gives rise to concern about their welfare. Specific attention has been given to the duration of animal transport, and maximum journey durations are used in legislation that seek to minimise any negative impact of transport on animal welfare. This paper reviews...... the relatively few scientific investigations into effects of transport duration on animal welfare in cattle, sheep, horses, pigs and poultry. From the available literature, we attempt to distinguish between aspects, which will impair welfare on journeys of any duration, such as those associated with loading......, and those aspects that may be exacerbated by journey time. We identify four aspects of animal transport, which have increasing impact on welfare as transport duration increases. These relate to (i) the physiological and clinical state of the animal before transport; and - during transport - to (ii) feeding...

  12. The role of natural enemies in the expression and evolution of mixed mating in hermaphroditic plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steets, Janette A; Wolf, Diana E; Auld, Josh R; Ashman, Tia-Lynn

    2007-09-01

    Although a large portion of plant and animal species exhibit intermediate levels of outcrossing, the factors that maintain this wealth of variation are not well understood. Natural enemies are one relatively understudied ecological factor that may influence the evolutionary stability of mixed mating. In this paper, we aim for a conceptual unification of the role of enemies in mating system expression and evolution in both hermaphroditic animals and plants. We review current theory and detail the potential effects of enemies on fundamental mating system parameters. In doing so, we identify situations in which consideration of enemies alters expectations about the stability of mixed mating. Generally, we find that inclusion of the enemy dimension may broaden conditions in which mixed mating systems are evolutionarily stable. Finally, we highlight avenues ripe for future theoretical and empirical work that will advance our understanding of enemies in the expression and evolution of mixed mating in their hosts/victims, including examination of feedback cycles between victims and enemies and quantification of mating system-related parameters in victim populations in the presence and absence of enemies.

  13. The influence of body size and net diversification rate on molecular evolution during the radiation of animal phyla

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welch John J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular clock dates, which place the origin of animal phyla deep in the Precambrian, have been used to reject the hypothesis of a rapid evolutionary radiation of animal phyla supported by the fossil record. One possible explanation of the discrepancy is the potential for fast substitution rates early in the metazoan radiation. However, concerted rate variation, occurring simultaneously in multiple lineages, cannot be detected by "clock tests", and so another way to explore such variation is to look for correlated changes between rates and other biological factors. Here we investigate two possible causes of fast early rates: change in average body size or diversification rate of deep metazoan lineages. Results For nine genes for phylogenetically independent comparisons between 50 metazoan phyla, orders, and classes, we find a significant correlation between average body size and rate of molecular evolution of mitochondrial genes. The data also indicate that diversification rate may have a positive effect on rates of mitochondrial molecular evolution. Conclusion If average body sizes were significantly smaller in the early history of the Metazoa, and if rates of diversification were much higher, then it is possible that mitochondrial genes have undergone a slow-down in evolutionary rate, which could affect date estimates made from these genes.

  14. Effects of Animations in Learning--A Cognitive Fit Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengtao; Santhanam, Radhika; Carswell, Catherine M.

    2009-01-01

    Information technology (IT) artifacts such as animations are increasingly used in educational institutions. Researchers caution that, if we are to derive benefits from animations and other such IT artifacts, we must understand how to use it optimally. In this study, we look at the effects of animations in supporting learning processes. IT-enabled…

  15. ANIMAL WELFARE AND ECONOMIC EFFECTIVENESS IN BULGARIA AND EU FARMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TSVETANA HARIZANOVA

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study the relationship between economic effectiveness and animal welfare standards is investigated in the case of the pig and cattle breeding. The issue is of importance in order to assess economic viability of livestock breeding while applying animal friendly practices. This paper considers animal welfare standards in national regulations in pig breeding and cattle breeding, production under animal welfare and economic effectiveness in the specified sectors. It is pointed out the conditions which the legislation lays down to ensure better animal welfare. The discussion continues with detailed examination of the applying these standards in the production process. At the end of the paper are presented main conclusions concerning economic efficiency under animal welfare standards. The aim of the paper is to analyse the interactions between the economic effectiveness of livestock production and animal welfare in the pig breeding and cattle breeding.

  16. Maternal effects in molecular evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Wilke, C O

    2002-01-01

    We introduce a model of molecular evolution in which the fitness of an individual depends both on its own and on the parent's genotype. The model can be solved by means of a nonlinear mapping onto the standard quasispecies model. The dependency on the parental genotypes cancels from the mean fitness, but not from the individual sequence concentrations. For finite populations, the position of the error threshold is very sensitive to the influence from parent genotypes. In addition to biological applications, our model is important for understanding the dynamics of self-replicating computer programs.

  17. EFFECTIVE COMPOUNDS OF POMEGRANATE AND THEIR EFFECT ON ANIMAL CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Dagmara Packová; Nora Maruniaková; Marek Halenár; Ángel A. Carbonell-Barrachina; Adriana Kolesárová

    2014-01-01

    This review describes possible effects of antioxidant compounds of pomegranate on animal cells. Pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruits are widely consumed. Pomegranate is one of the oldest known edible fruit. Spain is main producer in the Europe. Pomegranate contains bioactive polyphenols - punicalagin with molecular weight 1084. Part of punicalagin's molecule is ellagic acid. The both substances generate total antioxidant capacity of pomegranate. Punicalagin compounds present high antioxida...

  18. The effects of music on animal physiology, behavior and welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alworth, Leanne C; Buerkle, Shawna C

    2013-02-01

    Physiological and psychological effects of listening to music have been documented in humans. The changes in physiology, cognition and brain chemistry and morphology induced by music have been studied in animal models, providing evidence that music may affect animals similarly to humans. Information about the potential benefits of music to animals suggests that providing music may be used as a means of improving the welfare of laboratory animals, such as through environmental enrichment, stress relief and behavioral modification. The authors review the current research on music's effect on animals' physiology and behavior and discuss its potential for improving animal welfare. They conclude that the benefits of providing music to laboratory animals depend on the species and the type of music.

  19. EFFECTS OF SEGMENTATION OF INSTRUCTIONAL ANIMATION IN FACILITATING LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zamzuri Mohamad Ali

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of segmented-animation, playpause- animation and continuous-animation in facilitating learning of low prior knowledge learners. A courseware prototype entitled Transmission Media was developed for the research purpose. The courseware contains nine animations on various topics in Transmission Media. Pre-test and post-test experimental design was employed on three different groups respectively. The data collected were analyzed statistically by using one-way between-groups ANOVA with post-hoc comparisons. Apparently, the result suggests that segmented-animation was significantly more effective than play-pause-animation and continuous-animation in enhancing students’ learning performance. The result indicates that segmented-animation was beneficial for students in conducting adequate cognitive processes of the information depicted in the animation. Furthermore, the result shows that allowing students to decide the segmentation in play-pause-animation condition does not necessarily promotes better learning. This was due to low prior knowledge students’ inability in deciding the appropriate stop points in animation and/or play-pause-replay button design that might causes split attention effect resulting extraneous cognitive load throughout the learning process.

  20. Generating Cellular Diversity and Spatial Form: Wnt Signaling and the Evolution of Multicellular Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Kyle M; van Amerongen, Renée; Nusse, Roel

    2016-09-26

    There were multiple prerequisites to the evolution of multicellular animal life, including the generation of multiple cell fates ("cellular diversity") and their patterned spatial arrangement ("spatial form"). Wnt proteins operate as primordial symmetry-breaking signals. By virtue of their short-range nature and their capacity to activate both lineage-specifying and cell-polarizing intracellular signaling cascades, Wnts can polarize cells at their site of contact, orienting the axis of cell division while simultaneously programming daughter cells to adopt diverging fates in a spatially stereotyped way. By coupling cell fate to position, symmetry-breaking Wnt signals were pivotal in constructing the metazoan body by generating cellular diversity and spatial form. PMID:27676437

  1. Large-scale trends in the evolution of gene structures within 11 animal genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Yandell

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We have used the annotations of six animal genomes (Homo sapiens, Mus musculus, Ciona intestinalis, Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae, and Caenorhabditis elegans together with the sequences of five unannotated Drosophila genomes to survey changes in protein sequence and gene structure over a variety of timescales--from the less than 5 million years since the divergence of D. simulans and D. melanogaster to the more than 500 million years that have elapsed since the Cambrian explosion. To do so, we have developed a new open-source software library called CGL (for "Comparative Genomics Library". Our results demonstrate that change in intron-exon structure is gradual, clock-like, and largely independent of coding-sequence evolution. This means that genome annotations can be used in new ways to inform, corroborate, and test conclusions drawn from comparative genomics analyses that are based upon protein and nucleotide sequence similarities.

  2. Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨光

    2000-01-01

    The largest animal ever to live on the earth is the blue whale(蓝鲸)It weighs about 80 tons--more than 24 elephants. It is more than 30 metres long. A newborn baby whale weighs as much as a big elephant.

  3. ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Mammals(哺乳动物)Mammals are the world's most dominant(最占优势的)animal.They are extremely(非常)diverse(多种多样的)creatures(生物,动物)that include(包括)the biggest ever animal (the blue whale鲸,which eats up to 6 tons every day),the smallest(leaf-nosed bat小蹄蝠) and the laziest(sloth树獭,who spends 80% of their time sleeping).There are over 4,600 kinds of mammals and they live in very different environments(环境)—oceans(海洋),rivers,the jungle(丛林),deserts,and plains(平原).

  4. Placental Evolution within the Supraordinal Clades of Eutheria with the Perspective of Alternative Animal Models for Human Placentation

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Mess

    2014-01-01

    Here a survey of placental evolution is conducted. Placentation is a key factor for the evolution of placental mammals that had evolved an astonishing diversity. As a temporary organ that does not allow easy access, it is still not well understood. The lack of data also is a restriction for better understanding of placental development, structure, and function in the human. Animal models are essential, because experimental access to the human placenta is naturally restricted. However, there i...

  5. Possible Electromagnetic Effects on Abnormal Animal Behavior Before an Earthquake

    OpenAIRE

    Masashi Hayakawa

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary Possible electromagnetic effects on abnormal animal behavior before earthquakes. Abstract The former statistical properties summarized by Rikitake (1998) on unusual animal behavior before an earthquake (EQ) have first been presented by using two parameters (epicentral distance (D) of an anomaly and its precursor (or lead) time (T)). Three plots are utilized to characterize the unusual animal behavior; (i) EQ magnitude (M) versus D, (ii) log T versus M, and (iii) occurrence hist...

  6. Consumer perception of animal welfare and the effect of information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørkbak, Morten Raun; Nordström, Jonas

    , the results suggest that once the respondents/consumers are given information about the production method, the higher income people have the more do they care about animal welfare in terms of WTP. Thus, economic progress is likely to have a positive effect on animal welfare, if the consumers are given......The motivation for the present study is to understand food choice in relation to animal welfare, and how choices and preferences are influenced by expert information. The focus is on the attribute "animal welfare", which is represented by the method of producing chicken (indoor and outdoor...

  7. The Effect of Animal Dissections on Student Acquisition of Knowledge of and Attitudes toward the Animals Dissected.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Terry L.

    A conflict exists over the use of animals in the classroom. One aspect of this use involved the dissection of animals. Animal protection advocates report that dissections constitute abuse of the animals dissected. The advocates state that what is learned by dissection could be more effectively learned by other means. Some science educators state…

  8. Animation, Small Multiples, and the Effect of Mental Map Preservation in Dynamic Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Archambault, Daniel; Purchase, Helen; Pinaud, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    International audience In this paper, we present the results of a human computer interaction experiment that compared the performance of the animation of dynamic graphs to the presentation of small multiples and the effect that mental map preservation had on the two conditions. Questions used in the experiment were selected to test both local and global properties of graph evolution over time. The data sets used in this experiment were derived from standard benchmark data sets of the infor...

  9. Cyanotoxins: Bioaccumulation and Effects on Aquatic Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Kozlowsky-Suzuki

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic prokaryotes with wide geographic distribution that can produce secondary metabolites named cyanotoxins. These toxins can be classified into three main types according to their mechanism of action in vertebrates: hepatotoxins, dermatotoxins and neurotoxins. Many studies on the effects of cyanobacteria and their toxins over a wide range of aquatic organisms, including invertebrates and vertebrates, have reported acute effects (e.g., reduction in survivorship, feeding inhibition, paralysis, chronic effects (e.g., reduction in growth and fecundity, biochemical alterations (e.g., activity of phosphatases, GST, AChE, proteases, and behavioral alterations. Research has also focused on the potential for bioaccumulation and transferring of these toxins through the food chain. Although the herbivorous zooplankton is hypothesized as the main target of cyanotoxins, there is not unquestionable evidence of the deleterious effects of cyanobacteria and their toxins on these organisms. Also, the low toxin burden in secondary consumers points towards biodilution of microcystins in the food web as the predominant process. In this broad review we discuss important issues on bioaccumulation and the effects of cyanotoxins, with emphasis on microcystins, as well as drawbacks and future needs in this field of research.

  10. Effect of Xanthone Derivatives on Animal Models of Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Zhao, MD

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions: Within certain dose ranges, xanthone derivatives 1101 and 1105 have similar effects to venlafaxine hydrochloride in the treatment of depression as suggested by behavioral despair animal models using rats and mice.

  11. Animal evolution and atmospheric pO2: is there a link between gradual animal adaptation to terrain elevation due to Ural orogeny and survival of subsequent hypoxic periods?

    OpenAIRE

    Kurbel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Considering evolution of terrestrial animals as something happening only on flat continental plains seems wrong. Many mountains have arisen and disappeared over the geologic time scale, so in all periods some areas of high altitude existed, with reduced oxygen pressure (pO2) and increased aridity. During orogeny, animal species of the raising terrain can slowly adapt to reduced oxygen levels. This review proposes that animal evolution was often driven by atmospheric oxygen availability. Trans...

  12. The Evolution of Animal Welfare and the 3Rs in Brazil, China, and India

    OpenAIRE

    Bayne, Kathryn; Ramachandra, Gudde S; Rivera, Ekaterina A; Wang, Jianfei

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, scientific collaborations and contracts cross country borders. The need for assurance that the quality of animal welfare and the caliber of animal research conducted are equivalent among research partners around the globe is of concern to the scientific and laboratory animal medicine communities, the general public, and other key stakeholders. Therefore, global harmonization of animal care and use standards and practices, with the welfare of the animals as a cornerstone, is esse...

  13. The evolution of multivariate maternal effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuijper, Bram; Johnstone, Rufus A; Townley, Stuart

    2014-04-01

    There is a growing interest in predicting the social and ecological contexts that favor the evolution of maternal effects. Most predictions focus, however, on maternal effects that affect only a single character, whereas the evolution of maternal effects is poorly understood in the presence of suites of interacting traits. To overcome this, we simulate the evolution of multivariate maternal effects (captured by the matrix M) in a fluctuating environment. We find that the rate of environmental fluctuations has a substantial effect on the properties of M: in slowly changing environments, offspring are selected to have a multivariate phenotype roughly similar to the maternal phenotype, so that M is characterized by positive dominant eigenvalues; by contrast, rapidly changing environments favor Ms with dominant eigenvalues that are negative, as offspring favor a phenotype which substantially differs from the maternal phenotype. Moreover, when fluctuating selection on one maternal character is temporally delayed relative to selection on other traits, we find a striking pattern of cross-trait maternal effects in which maternal characters influence not only the same character in offspring, but also other offspring characters. Additionally, when selection on one character contains more stochastic noise relative to selection on other traits, large cross-trait maternal effects evolve from those maternal traits that experience the smallest amounts of noise. The presence of these cross-trait maternal effects shows that individual maternal effects cannot be studied in isolation, and that their study in a multivariate context may provide important insights about the nature of past selection. Our results call for more studies that measure multivariate maternal effects in wild populations.

  14. The evolution of multivariate maternal effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bram Kuijper

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing interest in predicting the social and ecological contexts that favor the evolution of maternal effects. Most predictions focus, however, on maternal effects that affect only a single character, whereas the evolution of maternal effects is poorly understood in the presence of suites of interacting traits. To overcome this, we simulate the evolution of multivariate maternal effects (captured by the matrix M in a fluctuating environment. We find that the rate of environmental fluctuations has a substantial effect on the properties of M: in slowly changing environments, offspring are selected to have a multivariate phenotype roughly similar to the maternal phenotype, so that M is characterized by positive dominant eigenvalues; by contrast, rapidly changing environments favor Ms with dominant eigenvalues that are negative, as offspring favor a phenotype which substantially differs from the maternal phenotype. Moreover, when fluctuating selection on one maternal character is temporally delayed relative to selection on other traits, we find a striking pattern of cross-trait maternal effects in which maternal characters influence not only the same character in offspring, but also other offspring characters. Additionally, when selection on one character contains more stochastic noise relative to selection on other traits, large cross-trait maternal effects evolve from those maternal traits that experience the smallest amounts of noise. The presence of these cross-trait maternal effects shows that individual maternal effects cannot be studied in isolation, and that their study in a multivariate context may provide important insights about the nature of past selection. Our results call for more studies that measure multivariate maternal effects in wild populations.

  15. Indirect Genetic Effects for group-housed animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alemu, Setegn Worku

    This thesis investigated social interactions in group-housed animals. The main findings of this thesis: 1) Statistical methods to estimate indirect genetic effects when interactions differ between kin vs. non-kin were developed. 2) Indirect genetic effects contribute a substantial amount of herit......This thesis investigated social interactions in group-housed animals. The main findings of this thesis: 1) Statistical methods to estimate indirect genetic effects when interactions differ between kin vs. non-kin were developed. 2) Indirect genetic effects contribute a substantial amount...

  16. Effective evolution equations from quantum dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Benedikter, Niels; Schlein, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    These notes investigate the time evolution of quantum systems, and in particular the rigorous derivation of effective equations approximating the many-body Schrödinger dynamics in certain physically interesting regimes. The focus is primarily on the derivation of time-dependent effective theories (non-equilibrium question) approximating many-body quantum dynamics. The book is divided into seven sections, the first of which briefly reviews the main properties of many-body quantum systems and their time evolution. Section 2 introduces the mean-field regime for bosonic systems and explains how the many-body dynamics can be approximated in this limit using the Hartree equation. Section 3 presents a method, based on the use of coherent states, for rigorously proving the convergence towards the Hartree dynamics, while the fluctuations around the Hartree equation are considered in Section 4. Section 5 focuses on a discussion of a more subtle regime, in which the many-body evolution can be approximated by means of t...

  17. Review of "Animal Models in the Light of Evolution" by Niall Shanks, Ph.D., and C. Ray Greek, M.D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolpert Lewis

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Animal Models in the Light of Evolution provides persuasive evidence that animal models should be used with great caution when applying the results to human diseases. Mice and other model animals are both similar and different, in their biology, to humans.

  18. Review of "Animal Models in the Light of Evolution" by Niall Shanks, Ph.D., and C. Ray Greek, M.D

    OpenAIRE

    Wolpert Lewis

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Animal Models in the Light of Evolution provides persuasive evidence that animal models should be used with great caution when applying the results to human diseases. Mice and other model animals are both similar and different, in their biology, to humans.

  19. Evolution of bright colours in animals: worlds of prohibition and oblivion [version 2; referees: 1 approved, 2 approved with reservations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wladimir J. Alonso

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Because the ability to hide in plain sight provides a major selective advantage to both prey and predator species, the emergence of the striking colouration of some animal species (such as many coral reef fish represents an evolutionary conundrum that remains unsolved to date. Here I propose a framework by which conspicuous colours can emerge when the selective pressures for camouflage are relaxed (1 because camouflage is not essential under specific prey/predator conditions or (2 due to the impossibility of reducing the signal-to-background noise in the environment. The first case is found among non-predator-species that possess effective defences against predators (hence a “Carefree World”, such as the strong macaws’ beaks and the flight abilities of hummingbirds. The second case is found in diurnal mobile fish of coral reef communities, which swim in clear waters against highly contrasting and unpredictable background (hence an "Hyper-Visible World”. In those contexts the selective pressures that usually come secondary to camouflage (such as sexual, warning, species recognition or territorial display are free to drive the evolution of brilliant and diverse colouration. This theoretical framework can also be useful for studying the conditions that allow for conspicuousness in other sensory contexts (acoustic, chemical, electrical, etc..

  20. Mechanisms of Gene Duplication and Translocation and Progress towards Understanding Their Relative Contributions to Animal Genome Evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Mendivil Ramos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Duplication of genetic material is clearly a major route to genetic change, with consequences for both evolution and disease. A variety of forms and mechanisms of duplication are recognised, operating across the scales of a few base pairs upto entire genomes. With the ever-increasing amounts of gene and genome sequence data that are becoming available, our understanding of the extent of duplication is greatly improving, both in terms of the scales of duplication events as well as their rates of occurrence. An accurate understanding of these processes is vital if we are to properly understand important events in evolution as well as mechanisms operating at the level of genome organisation. Here we will focus on duplication in animal genomes and how the duplicated sequences are distributed, with the aim of maintaining a focus on principles of evolution and organisation that are most directly applicable to the shaping of our own genome.

  1. Toxic Effects of Cannabis and Cannabinoids: Animal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Beaulieu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article reviews the main toxic effects of cannabis and cannabinoids in animals. Toxic effects can be separated into acute and chronic classifications. Acute toxicity studies show that it is virtually impossible to die from acute administration of marijuana or tetrahydrocannabinol, the main psychoactive component of cannabis. Chronic toxicity involves lesions of airway and lung tissues, as well as problems of neurotoxicity, tolerance and dependence, and dysregulations in the immune and hormonal systems. Animal toxicity data, however, are difficult to extrapolate to humans.

  2. Effects of different ways of fasting in experimental animals

    OpenAIRE

    Zari Naderi Ghalenoie; Shahrzad Hessami Arani; Mohammad Amin Kerachian

    2015-01-01

    While fasting has been practiced for centuries, its beneficial effects was unknown until recently. This review tries to analyze the current literature of how fasting and intermittent fasting (IF) could affect clinical pathological parameters, learning, mood and brain plasticity. The effects of different ways of fasting on metabolism and stress were also explored. Animal experiments have elucidated fasting and IF could exert positive effects on learning, mood and brain, plus metabolic function...

  3. New Trends and Perspectives in the Evolution of Neurotransmitters in Microbial, Plant, and Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshchina, Victoria V

    2016-01-01

    The evolutionary perspective on the universal roles of compounds known as neurotransmitters may help in the analysis of relations between all organisms in biocenosis-from microorganisms to plant and animals. This phenomenon, significant for chemosignaling and cellular endocrinology, has been important in human health and the ability to cause disease or immunity, because the "living environment" influences every organism in a biocenosis relationship (microorganism-microorganism, microorganism-plant, microorganism-animal, plant-animal, plant-plant and animal-animal). Non-nervous functions of neurotransmitters (rather "biomediators" on a cellular level) are considered in this review and ample consideration is given to similarities and differences that unite, as well as distinguish, taxonomical kingdoms. PMID:26589213

  4. Microevolutionary Effects of Habitat Fragmentation on Plant-Animal Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Fontúrbel, Francisco E.; Maureen M. Murúa

    2014-01-01

    Plant-animal interactions are a key component for biodiversity maintenance, but they are currently threatened by human activities. Habitat fragmentation might alter ecological interactions due to demographic changes, spatial discontinuities, and edge effects. Also, there are less evident effects of habitat fragmentation that potentially alter selective forces and compromise the fitness of the interacting species. Changes in the mutualistic and antagonistic interactions in fragmented habitats ...

  5. The Rise and Fall of an Evolutionary Innovation: Contrasting Strategies of Venom Evolution in Ancient and Young Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagar, Kartik; Moran, Yehu

    2015-01-01

    Animal venoms are theorized to evolve under the significant influence of positive Darwinian selection in a chemical arms race scenario, where the evolution of venom resistance in prey and the invention of potent venom in the secreting animal exert reciprocal selection pressures. Venom research to date has mainly focused on evolutionarily younger lineages, such as snakes and cone snails, while mostly neglecting ancient clades (e.g., cnidarians, coleoids, spiders and centipedes). By examining genome, venom-gland transcriptome and sequences from the public repositories, we report the molecular evolutionary regimes of several centipede and spider toxin families, which surprisingly accumulated low-levels of sequence variations, despite their long evolutionary histories. Molecular evolutionary assessment of over 3500 nucleotide sequences from 85 toxin families spanning the breadth of the animal kingdom has unraveled a contrasting evolutionary strategy employed by ancient and evolutionarily young clades. We show that the venoms of ancient lineages remarkably evolve under the heavy constraints of negative selection, while toxin families in lineages that originated relatively recently rapidly diversify under the influence of positive selection. We propose that animal venoms mostly employ a ‘two-speed’ mode of evolution, where the major influence of diversifying selection accompanies the earlier stages of ecological specialization (e.g., diet and range expansion) in the evolutionary history of the species–the period of expansion, resulting in the rapid diversification of the venom arsenal, followed by longer periods of purifying selection that preserve the potent toxin pharmacopeia–the period of purification and fixation. However, species in the period of purification may re-enter the period of expansion upon experiencing a major shift in ecology or environment. Thus, we highlight for the first time the significant roles of purifying and episodic selections in

  6. The Rise and Fall of an Evolutionary Innovation: Contrasting Strategies of Venom Evolution in Ancient and Young Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagar, Kartik; Moran, Yehu

    2015-10-01

    Animal venoms are theorized to evolve under the significant influence of positive Darwinian selection in a chemical arms race scenario, where the evolution of venom resistance in prey and the invention of potent venom in the secreting animal exert reciprocal selection pressures. Venom research to date has mainly focused on evolutionarily younger lineages, such as snakes and cone snails, while mostly neglecting ancient clades (e.g., cnidarians, coleoids, spiders and centipedes). By examining genome, venom-gland transcriptome and sequences from the public repositories, we report the molecular evolutionary regimes of several centipede and spider toxin families, which surprisingly accumulated low-levels of sequence variations, despite their long evolutionary histories. Molecular evolutionary assessment of over 3500 nucleotide sequences from 85 toxin families spanning the breadth of the animal kingdom has unraveled a contrasting evolutionary strategy employed by ancient and evolutionarily young clades. We show that the venoms of ancient lineages remarkably evolve under the heavy constraints of negative selection, while toxin families in lineages that originated relatively recently rapidly diversify under the influence of positive selection. We propose that animal venoms mostly employ a 'two-speed' mode of evolution, where the major influence of diversifying selection accompanies the earlier stages of ecological specialization (e.g., diet and range expansion) in the evolutionary history of the species-the period of expansion, resulting in the rapid diversification of the venom arsenal, followed by longer periods of purifying selection that preserve the potent toxin pharmacopeia-the period of purification and fixation. However, species in the period of purification may re-enter the period of expansion upon experiencing a major shift in ecology or environment. Thus, we highlight for the first time the significant roles of purifying and episodic selections in shaping animal

  7. The Rise and Fall of an Evolutionary Innovation: Contrasting Strategies of Venom Evolution in Ancient and Young Animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartik Sunagar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal venoms are theorized to evolve under the significant influence of positive Darwinian selection in a chemical arms race scenario, where the evolution of venom resistance in prey and the invention of potent venom in the secreting animal exert reciprocal selection pressures. Venom research to date has mainly focused on evolutionarily younger lineages, such as snakes and cone snails, while mostly neglecting ancient clades (e.g., cnidarians, coleoids, spiders and centipedes. By examining genome, venom-gland transcriptome and sequences from the public repositories, we report the molecular evolutionary regimes of several centipede and spider toxin families, which surprisingly accumulated low-levels of sequence variations, despite their long evolutionary histories. Molecular evolutionary assessment of over 3500 nucleotide sequences from 85 toxin families spanning the breadth of the animal kingdom has unraveled a contrasting evolutionary strategy employed by ancient and evolutionarily young clades. We show that the venoms of ancient lineages remarkably evolve under the heavy constraints of negative selection, while toxin families in lineages that originated relatively recently rapidly diversify under the influence of positive selection. We propose that animal venoms mostly employ a 'two-speed' mode of evolution, where the major influence of diversifying selection accompanies the earlier stages of ecological specialization (e.g., diet and range expansion in the evolutionary history of the species-the period of expansion, resulting in the rapid diversification of the venom arsenal, followed by longer periods of purifying selection that preserve the potent toxin pharmacopeia-the period of purification and fixation. However, species in the period of purification may re-enter the period of expansion upon experiencing a major shift in ecology or environment. Thus, we highlight for the first time the significant roles of purifying and episodic selections

  8. Animation, Small Multiples, and the Effect of Mental Map Preservation in Dynamic Graphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archambault, D; Purchase, H; Pinaud, B

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we present the results of a human-computer interaction experiment that compared the performance of the animation of dynamic graphs to the presentation of small multiples and the effect that mental map preservation had on the two conditions. Questions used in the experiment were selected to test both local and global properties of graph evolution over time. The data sets used in this experiment were derived from standard benchmark data sets of the information visualization community. We found that small multiples gave significantly faster performance than animation overall and for each of our five graph comprehension tasks. In addition, small multiples had significantly more errors than animation for the tasks of determining sets of nodes or edges added to the graph during the same timeslice, although a positive time-error correlation coefficient suggests that, in this case, faster responses did not lead to more errors. This result suggests that, for these two tasks, animation is preferable if accuracy is more important than speed. Preserving the mental map under either the animation or the small multiples condition had little influence in terms of error rate and response time.

  9. Epidemiology, Phylogeny, and Evolution of Emerging Enteric Picobirnaviruses of Animal Origin and Their Relationship to Human Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashpal S. Malik

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Picobirnavirus (PBV which has been included in the list of viruses causing enteric infection in animals is highly versatile because of its broad host range and genetic diversity. PBVs are among the most recent and emerging small, nonenveloped viruses with a bisegmented double-stranded RNA genome, classified under a new family “Picobirnaviridae.” PBVs have also been detected from respiratory tract of pigs, but needs further close investigation for their inhabitant behavior. Though, accretion of genomic data of PBVs from different mammalian species resolved some of the ambiguity, quite a few questions and hypotheses regarding pathogenesis, persistence location, and evolution of PBVs remain unreciprocated. Evolutionary analysis reveals association of PBVs with partitiviruses especially fungi partitiviruses. Although, PBVs may have an ambiguous clinical implication, they do pose a potential public health concern in humans and control of PBVs mainly relies on nonvaccinal approach. Based upon the published data, from 1988 to date, generated from animal PBVs across the globe, this review provides information and discussion with respect to genetic analysis as well as evolution of PBVs of animal origin in relation to human strains.

  10. ”ORIGINALITY” DIMENSION IN THERAPEUTIC TECHNIQUES’ EVOLUTION. ANIMAL ASSISTED THERAPY

    OpenAIRE

    Ardelea, Maria Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    This essay presents new perspectives and approach of the therapeutic interventions. Animal assisted therapy developed an original dimension of the techniques used in other types of therapy. The animal therapist involved facilitates the relationship that evolves between the client and the therapist. Based on instincts and smooth communication the relationship is formed in a natural way, in a very short period of time. The human therapist has an improved image which helps the therapy to evolve....

  11. Plasticity of animal genome architecture unmasked by rapid evolution of a pelagic tunicate

    OpenAIRE

    Denoeud, F.; Henriet, S.; Mungpakdee, S.; Aury, J.; da Silva, C.; Brinkmann, H; Mikhaleva, J.; Olsen, L.; Jubin, C.; Canestro, C.; Bouquet, J; Danks, G.; Poulain, J.; Campsteijn, C.; Adamski, M

    2010-01-01

    International audience Genomes of animals as different as sponges and humans show conservation of global architecture. Here we show that multiple genomic features including transposon diversity, developmental gene repertoire, physical gene order, and intron-exon organization are shattered in the tunicate Oikopleura, belonging to the sister group of vertebrates and retaining chordate morphology. Ancestral architecture of animal genomes can be deeply modified and may therefore be largely non...

  12. Animated Cell Biology: A Quick and Easy Method for Making Effective, High-Quality Teaching Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H.

    2006-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that animations aid learning of dynamic concepts in cell biology. However, existing animation packages are expensive and difficult to learn, and the subsequent production of even short animations can take weeks to months. Here I outline the principles and sequence of steps for producing high-quality PowerPoint…

  13. Emerging directions in the study of the ecology and evolution of plant-animal mutualistic networks: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hao; Goodale, Eben; Chen, Jin

    2015-03-18

    The study of mutualistic plant and animal networks is an emerging field of ecological research. We reviewed progress in this field over the past 30 years. While earlier studies mostly focused on network structure, stability, and biodiversity maintenance, recent studies have investigated the conservation implications of mutualistic networks, specifically the influence of invasive species and how networks respond to habitat loss. Current research has also focused on evolutionary questions including phylogenetic signal in networks, impact of networks on the coevolution of interacting partners, and network influences on the evolution of interacting species. We outline some directions for future research, particularly the evolution of specialization in mutualistic networks, and provide concrete recommendations for environmental managers. PMID:25855224

  14. Effects of Animal Venoms and Toxins on Hallmarks of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Hodgson, Wayne C; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Prasongsook, Naiyarat

    2016-01-01

    Animal venoms are a cocktail of proteins and peptides, targeting vital physiological processes. Venoms have evolved to assist in the capture and digestion of prey. Key venom components often include neurotoxins, myotoxins, cardiotoxins, hematoxins and catalytic enzymes. The pharmacological activities of venom components have been investigated as a source of potential therapeutic agents. Interestingly, a number of animal toxins display profound anticancer effects. These include toxins purified from snake, bee and scorpion venoms effecting cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptotic activity and neovascularization. Indeed, the mechanism behind the anticancer effect of certain toxins is similar to that of agents currently used in chemotherapy. For example, Lebein is a snake venom disintegrin which generates anti-angiogenic effects by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF). In this review article, we highlight the biological activities of animal toxins on the multiple steps of tumour formation or hallmarks of cancer. We also discuss recent progress in the discovery of lead compounds for anticancer drug development from venom components. PMID:27471574

  15. Effects of Animal Venoms and Toxins on Hallmarks of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisakul, Janeyuth; Hodgson, Wayne C.; Kuruppu, Sanjaya; Prasongsook, Naiyarat

    2016-01-01

    Animal venoms are a cocktail of proteins and peptides, targeting vital physiological processes. Venoms have evolved to assist in the capture and digestion of prey. Key venom components often include neurotoxins, myotoxins, cardiotoxins, hematoxins and catalytic enzymes. The pharmacological activities of venom components have been investigated as a source of potential therapeutic agents. Interestingly, a number of animal toxins display profound anticancer effects. These include toxins purified from snake, bee and scorpion venoms effecting cancer cell proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptotic activity and neovascularization. Indeed, the mechanism behind the anticancer effect of certain toxins is similar to that of agents currently used in chemotherapy. For example, Lebein is a snake venom disintegrin which generates anti-angiogenic effects by inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factors (VEGF). In this review article, we highlight the biological activities of animal toxins on the multiple steps of tumour formation or hallmarks of cancer. We also discuss recent progress in the discovery of lead compounds for anticancer drug development from venom components. PMID:27471574

  16. An empiricist guide to animal personality variation in ecology and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    SashaR.X.Dall; SimonC.Griffith

    2014-01-01

    The study of animal personality variation promises to provide significant new insight into the way that behaviour evolves in animals, along with its ecological and evolutionary influences. We strongly advocate more empirical work in this exciting and rapidly expanding research area, but hope that new studies adopt a more hypothesis-driven and/or experimental approach than seems to be usual at the moment. Here we outline what we feel is “good practice” to the many empiricists that are keen on ...

  17. Life-history trade-offs favour the evolution of animal personalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolf, M.; Van Doorn, G.S.; Leimar, O.; Weissing, F.J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years evidence has been accumulating that personalities are not only found in humans(1) but also in a wide range of other animal species(2-8). Individuals differ consistently in their behavioural tendencies and the behaviour in one context is correlated with the behaviour in multiple other

  18. An empiricist guide to animal personality variation in ecology and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasha R.X. Dall

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The study of animal personality variation promises to provide significant new insight into the way that behaviour evolves in animals, along with its ecological and evolutionary influences. We strongly advocate more empirical work in this exciting and rapidly expanding research area, but hope that new studies adopt a more hypothesis-driven and/or experimental approach than seems to be usual at the moment. Here we outline what we feel is good practice to the many empiricists that are keen on pursuing work in this field. We highlight the substantial body of theoretical work that exists for providing well-reasoned hypotheses, which new empirical studies should be designed to test. Furthermore, using a brief review of existing work on the behavioural ecology of animal personality variation in the zebra finch - one of the more widely used model systems in this field - we stress the importance of understanding the ecology of the chosen study animal, and the problems that are likely to arise by neglecting to identify or account for the structure of behavioural variation that is often likely to occur.

  19. Something gone awry: unsolved mysteries in the evolution of asymmetric animal genitalia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schilthuizen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The great diversity in genital shape and function across and within the animal phyla hamper the identification of specific evolutionary trends that stretch beyond the limits of the group under study. Asymmetry might be a trait in genital morphology that could play a unifying role in the evolutionary

  20. Effects of metabolic rate on protein evolution

    OpenAIRE

    James F Gillooly; Michael W. McCoy; Allen, Andrew P.

    2007-01-01

    Since the modern evolutionary synthesis was first proposed early in the twentieth century, attention has focused on assessing the relative contribution of mutation versus natural selection on protein evolution. Here we test a model that yields general quantitative predictions on rates of protein evolution by combining principles of individual energetics with Kimura's neutral theory. The model successfully predicts much of the heterogeneity in rates of protein evolution for diverse eukaryotes ...

  1. Crafting Effective User Interface Animations : Understanding the Complexity of Crafting User Interface Animations on Web Platforms

    OpenAIRE

    Wolowelsky, Yonathan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to cover widely the area of user interface animations in different lights and perspectives, in order to fully understand the complexity interactive producers, such as designer and developers, have to deal with in order to create good, well thought and well designed animated experience. The thesis is consisted of an introduction, 4 research chapters and final conclusion chapter. The first research part is an overview of user interface animation usage. The sec...

  2. Investigating animal health effects of sour gas acid forming emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of sour gas well blowout emissions on livestock are reviewed. Guidelines for safe drilling operations in hydrogen sulfide environments, general hazards and characteristics of hydrogen sulfide, and guidelines for field investigation into the effects of sour gas and acid emissions on livestock are discussed. A case history involving the Ross No. 2 gas well blowout of July 1985 in Rankin County, Mississippi is presented. The blowout lasted for 72 days, and at peak discharge the 500 ppM radius was ca 3.5 miles. A cattle embryo transplant operation located one half mile from the well was affected by the blowout. Examination by a local veterinarian of the cattle demonstrated eye irritation, epiphora, nasal discharge and coughing. After one and a half months of exposure, most animals showed clinical signs of a severe dry hacking cough, epiphora, dry rales over the thoracic inlet, and a bronchial popping sound over the lateral thorax. All animals had eye irritation. Of 55 animals showing signs of respiratory distress and eye irritations, 15 were still clinically ill in May of 1986. 7 refs., 1 tab

  3. The detrimental effects of lead on human and animal health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Mohammed Abdulrazzaq; Hezmee, Mohd Noor Mohd; Haron, Abd Wahid; Sabri, Mohd Yusof Mohd; Rajion, Mohd Ali

    2016-01-01

    Lead, a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb (from Latin: Plumbum, meaning “the liquid silver”) and has an atomic number 82 in the periodic table. It was the first element that was characterized by its kind of toxicity. In animal systems, lead (Pb) has been incriminated in a wide spectrum of toxic effects and it is considered one of the persistent ubiquitous heavy metals. Being exposed to this metal could lead to the change of testicular functions in human beings as well as in the wildlife. The lead poising is a real threat to the public health, especially in the developing countries. Accordingly, great efforts on the part of the occupational and public health have been taken to curb the dangers of this metal. Hematopoietic, renal, reproductive, and central nervous system are among the parts of the human body and systems that are vulnerable toward the dangers following exposure to high level of Pb. In this review, we discussed the massive harmful impact that leads acetate toxicity has on the animals and the worrying fact that this harmful toxicant can be found quite easily in the environment and abundance. Highlighting its (Pb) effects on various organs in the biological systems, its economic, as well as scientific importance, with the view to educate the public/professionals who work in this area. In this study, we focus on the current studies and research related to lead toxicity in animals and also to a certain extent toward human as well. PMID:27397992

  4. The detrimental effects of lead on human and animal health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdulrazzaq Assi

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lead, a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb (from Latin: Plumbum, meaning “the liquid silver” and has an atomic number 82 in the periodic table. It was the first element that was characterized by its kind of toxicity. In animal systems, lead (Pb has been incriminated in a wide spectrum of toxic effects and it is considered one of the persistent ubiquitous heavy metals. Being exposed to this metal could lead to the change of testicular functions in human beings as well as in the wildlife. The lead poising is a real threat to the public health, especially in the developing countries. Accordingly, great efforts on the part of the occupational and public health have been taken to curb the dangers of this metal. Hematopoietic, renal, reproductive, and central nervous system are among the parts of the human body and systems that are vulnerable toward the dangers following exposure to high level of Pb. In this review, we discussed the massive harmful impact that leads acetate toxicity has on the animals and the worrying fact that this harmful toxicant can be found quite easily in the environment and abundance. Highlighting its (Pb effects on various organs in the biological systems, its economic, as well as scientific importance, with the view to educate the public/professionals who work in this area. In this study, we focus on the current studies and research related to lead toxicity in animals and also to a certain extent toward human as well.

  5. The detrimental effects of lead on human and animal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assi, Mohammed Abdulrazzaq; Hezmee, Mohd Noor Mohd; Haron, Abd Wahid; Sabri, Mohd Yusof Mohd; Rajion, Mohd Ali

    2016-06-01

    Lead, a chemical element in the carbon group with symbol Pb (from Latin: Plumbum, meaning "the liquid silver") and has an atomic number 82 in the periodic table. It was the first element that was characterized by its kind of toxicity. In animal systems, lead (Pb) has been incriminated in a wide spectrum of toxic effects and it is considered one of the persistent ubiquitous heavy metals. Being exposed to this metal could lead to the change of testicular functions in human beings as well as in the wildlife. The lead poising is a real threat to the public health, especially in the developing countries. Accordingly, great efforts on the part of the occupational and public health have been taken to curb the dangers of this metal. Hematopoietic, renal, reproductive, and central nervous system are among the parts of the human body and systems that are vulnerable toward the dangers following exposure to high level of Pb. In this review, we discussed the massive harmful impact that leads acetate toxicity has on the animals and the worrying fact that this harmful toxicant can be found quite easily in the environment and abundance. Highlighting its (Pb) effects on various organs in the biological systems, its economic, as well as scientific importance, with the view to educate the public/professionals who work in this area. In this study, we focus on the current studies and research related to lead toxicity in animals and also to a certain extent toward human as well. PMID:27397992

  6. Effect of Computer Animation Technique on Students' Comprehension of the

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gokhan AKSOY

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of computer animation technique on academic achievement of students in the 'Solar System and Beyond' unit lectured as part of the Science and Technology course of the seventh grade in primary education. The sample of the study consists of 60 students attending to the 7th grade of primary school under two different classes during the 2011-2012 academic year. While the lectures in the class designated as the experiment group were given with computer animation technique, in the class designated as the control group Powerpoint presentations and videos were utilized along with the traditional teaching methods. According to the findings, it was determined that computer animation technique is more effective than traditional teaching methods in terms of enhancing students' achievement. It was also determined in the study that, the Powerpoint presentations and related videos used together with the traditional teaching methods provided to the control group significantly help the students to increase their academic achievement.

  7. Health effects of airborne exposures from concentrated animal feeding operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heederik, Dick; Sigsgaard, Torben; Thorne, Peter S;

    2006-01-01

    of Concentrated Animal Feeding Operations: Anticipating Hazards-Searching for Solutions, concluded that there is a great need to evaluate health effects from exposures to the toxic gases, vapors, and particles emitted into the general environment by CAFOs. Research should focus not only on nuisance and odors......Toxic gases, vapors, and particles are emitted from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) into the general environment. These include ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide, malodorous vapors, and particles contaminated with a wide range of microorganisms. Little is known about...... the health risks of exposure to these agents for people living in the surrounding areas. Malodor is one of the predominant concerns, and there is evidence that psychophysiologic changes may occur as a result of exposure to malodorous compounds. There is a paucity of data regarding community adverse health...

  8. ECONOMIC EFFICIENCY ANALYSIS OF ORGANIC CROP AND ANIMAL FARMS IN ROMANIA. COMPARATIVE EVOLUTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra MUSCĂNESCU

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The organic sector in our country, although as shown in continuous development, faces a multitude of problems: the climatic conditions of our country, characterized by periods of drought in many parts of the country, high input prices, the majority of which are imported; difficulties in identifying markets for products, reduced subsidies, standardized conditions difficult to meet, etc. The problems the sector is facing reflect in the organization of the production activity and hence the economic performance of farm production. Accordingly, the aim of this paper was to analyze on the basis of annual financial and accounting information collected in the two vegetable farms and the two animal breeding farms, their efficiency / inefficiency, and the results were compared to identify the causes of the differences obtained in the efficiency at a farm level. The results obtained reveal a higher level of return on integrated vegetable farm in a joint recovery and a high efficiency for chain integrated animal farms.

  9. The evolution of juvenile animal testing for small and large molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Recent formalised regulatory requirements for ensuring safe use of new drugs in children has increased the requirement, when considered relevant, to perform juvenile animal testing before commencing paediatric clinical trials. A key goal of this work is to identify or examine for a developmental or toxicity finding not seen in other toxicology testing. With our current knowledge, this paper examines what types of testing are occurring, what novel findings are being seen and their relevance in the safety evaluation process. Furthermore, trends for now and the future in the type of juvenile animal testing will be described including a need for more focused study designs and more published data on modern cross-species postnatal development. PMID:23896345

  10. The evolution of juvenile animal testing for small and large molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldrick, Paul

    2013-11-01

    Recent formalised regulatory requirements for ensuring safe use of new drugs in children has increased the requirement, when considered relevant, to perform juvenile animal testing before commencing paediatric clinical trials. A key goal of this work is to identify or examine for a developmental or toxicity finding not seen in other toxicology testing. With our current knowledge, this paper examines what types of testing are occurring, what novel findings are being seen and their relevance in the safety evaluation process. Furthermore, trends for now and the future in the type of juvenile animal testing will be described including a need for more focused study designs and more published data on modern cross-species postnatal development.

  11. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Merchant, Sabeeha S; Prochnik, Simon E; Vallon, Olivier; Harris, Elizabeth H.; Karpowicz, Steven J.; Witman, George B.; Terry, Astrid; Salamov, Asaf; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian K.; Maréchal-Drouard, Laurence; Marshall, Wallace F.; Qu, Liang-Hu; Nelson, David R.; Sanderfoot, Anton A.; Spalding, Martin H

    2007-01-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the ∼120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes enco...

  12. The ecology and evolution of animal medication : genetically fixed response versus phenotypic plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Choisy, Marc; de Roode, J. C.

    2014-01-01

    Animal medication against parasites can occur either as a genetically fixed (constitutive) or phenotypically plastic (induced) behavior. Taking the tritrophic interaction between the monarch butterfly Danaus plexippus, its protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha, and its food plant Asclepias spp. as a test case, we develop a game-theory model to identify the epidemiological (parasite prevalence and virulence) and environmental (plant toxicity and abundance) conditions that predict the ...

  13. Food for thought on the evolution of toxicology and the phasing out of animal testing

    OpenAIRE

    Hartung, Thomas; Leist, Marcel

    2008-01-01

    There is something brewing in the field of toxicology: Last year's vision and strategy document published by the US National Academy of Sciences (NRC, 2007) has excited many toxicologists on both sides of the Atlantic. In February 2008 several American agencies announced a coalition to set this into practice (www.sciencemag.org/content/vol319/issue 5865/index.dtl): We propose a shift from primarily in vivo animal studies to in vitro assays, in vivo assays with lower organisms, and computatio...

  14. Something gone awry: unsolved mysteries in the evolution of asymmetric animal genitalia

    OpenAIRE

    Schilthuizen, M

    2013-01-01

    The great diversity in genital shape and function across and within the animal phyla hamper the identification of specific evolutionary trends that stretch beyond the limits of the group under study. Asymmetry might be a trait in genital morphology that could play a unifying role in the evolutionary biology of genitalia. Here, I review the current knowledge on the taxonomic distribution, phylogenetic patterns, genetics, development, and ecology of asymmetric (chiral) genitalia. Asymmetric gen...

  15. Prebiotic effect of Agave fourcroydes fructans: an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Curbelo, Yanelys; Bocourt, Ramón; Savón, Lourdes L; García-Vieyra, Maria Isabel; López, Mercedes G

    2015-09-01

    The use of prebiotics such as fructans has increased in human and animal nutrition because of their productive performance and health benefits. Agave fourcroydes has shown high concentrations of fructans in their stems; however, there is no information on new products derived from this plant that might enhance its added value. Therefore, we evaluated the prebiotic effect of Agave fourcroydes fructans in an animal model. Male mice (C57BL/6J) were fed on parallel form with a standard diet or diets supplemented with 10% of fructans from Cichorium intybus (Raftilose P95) and Agave fourcroydes from Cuba for 35 days. The body weight, food intake, blood glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol, gastrointestinal organ weights, fermentation indicators in cecal and colon contents and mineral content in femurs were determined. The body weight and food intake of mice were not significantly modified by any treatment. However, serum glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides decreased (P Agave fourcroydes in the mice diet induced a prebiotic response, similar to or greater than the commercial product (Raftilose P95) and this constitutes a promising alternative with potential use not only in animal but also in human diets. PMID:26237650

  16. Effects of different ways of fasting in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zari Naderi Ghalenoie

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While fasting has been practiced for centuries, its beneficial effects was unknown until recently. This review tries to analyze the current literature of how fasting and intermittent fasting (IF could affect clinical pathological parameters, learning, mood and brain plasticity. The effects of different ways of fasting on metabolism and stress were also explored. Animal experiments have elucidated fasting and IF could exert positive effects on learning, mood and brain, plus metabolic functions such lowering plasma glucose and insulin level and improvement in lipid metabolism (reduced visceral fat tissue and increased plasma adiponectin level, and an increased resistance to stress. Thus, more clinical studies are necessary to test the effectiveness of fasting and IF in preventing different diseases.

  17. A review of experimental animal radon health effects data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abundant epidemiological data from underground miners confirm that radon decay products (progeny) are carcinogenic, although the evidence is less conclusive on the quantitative risks of these exposures, especially for indoor air. The imprecision results principally from differences between exposures in mining and domestic environments and from uncertainties about the interaction between smoking and exposure to radon progeny. Experimental animal studies of radon-induced lung cancer are particularly valuable for understanding the carcinogenicity of human radon exposures in the home and in the workplace. Animals can be exposed to a variety of agents under carefully controlled conditions and then sacrificed for the study of developing lesions or held for their life span for tumor development. The doses to critical cells in the respiratory tract can be determined, and these in turn can be related to doses to critical cells in the respiratory tract of humans exposed to similar aerosols. The study of radon-induced mutations and changes in expression of oncogenes and tumor-suppressor genes as well as growth factors and growth factor receptors during tumor progression in animals also provides valuable evidence on the underlying mechanisms of radon carcinogenesis. This evidence, particularly that of the efficiency for oncogenic transformation at low dose rates, is crucial to the determination of the risk of lung cancer from exposure to indoor levels of radon. This review of animal health effects data emphasizes the carcinogenicity of radon exposures in rats; mechanistic data on radon-induced lung tumors in rats are currently sparse and are not reviewed here. (author). 15 refs, 1 fig., 1 tab

  18. Effect of Computer Animation Technique on Students' Comprehension of the

    OpenAIRE

    Aksoy, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of computer animation technique on academic achievement of students in the 'Solar System and Beyond' unit lectured as part of the Science and Technology course of the seventh grade in primary education. The sample of the study consists of 60 students attending to the 7th grade of primary school under two different classes during the 2011-2012 academic year. While the lectures in the class designated as the experiment group were given with c...

  19. Experimental animal data and modeling of late somatic effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section is restricted to radiation-induced life shortening and cancer and mainly to studies with external radiation. The emphasis will be on the experimental data that are available and the experimental systems that could provide the type of data with which to either formulate or test models. Genetic effects which are of concern are not discussed in this section. Experimental animal radiation studies fall into those that establish general principles and those that demonstrate mechanisms. General principles include the influence of dose, radiation quality, dose rate, fractionation, protraction and such biological factors as age and gender. The influence of these factors are considered as general principles because they are independent, at least qualitatively, of the species studied. For example, if an increase in the LET of the radiation causes an increased effectiveness in cancer induction in a mouse a comparable increase in effectiveness can be expected in humans. Thus, models, whether empirical or mechanistic, formulated from experimental animal data should be generally applicable

  20. Payoff non-linearity sways the effect of mistakes on the evolution of reciprocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Shun

    2016-09-01

    The existence of cooperation is considered to require explanation, and reciprocity is a potential explanatory mechanism. Animals sometimes fail to cooperate even when they attempt to do so, and a reciprocator has an Achilles' heel: it is vulnerable to error (the interaction between two reciprocators can lead to an endless vendetta.). However, the strategy favored by natural selection is determined also by its interaction with other strategies. The relationship between two reciprocators leading to a collapse of cooperation through error does not straightforwardly imply that mistakes make the conditions under which reciprocity evolves stringent. Hence, mistakes may facilitate the evolution of reciprocity. However, it has been shown through the analysis of the interaction between reciprocators and unconditional defectors that the existence of mistakes makes the conditions for reciprocators stable against invasion by an unconditional defector more stringent, which indicates that mistakes discourage the evolution of reciprocity. However, this result is based on the assumption that the effects of cooperation are additive (payoff is linear), while the game played by real animals does not always display this feature. In such cases, the result may be swayed. In this paper, we remove this assumption, reexamining whether mistakes disturb the evolution of reciprocity. Using the analysis of an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS), we show that when extra fitness costs are present in cases where mutual cooperation is established, mistakes can facilitate the evolution of reciprocity; whereas, when the effect of cooperation is additive, mistakes always disturb the evolution of reciprocity, as has been shown previously. PMID:27424953

  1. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatic and genetic effects of the continuous ingestion of tritiated water (HTO) at concentrations of 0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 μCi/ml were investigated in mice of the Hale-Stoner-Brookhaven strain. At these levels, there was no measurable somatic effect. Although genetic effects as measured by dominant lethal mutation (DLM) assay indicated a significant effect (P>0.01) on the number of viable embryos and early deaths in the 3.0 μCi/ml HTO group and on the number of viable embryos in the 1.0 μCi/ml HTO group, no genetic effects were significantly noted in the 0.3 μCi/ml HTO group. Liver cytogenetic studies showed a significant increase in the number of abnormal cells in the 3.0 μCi/ml HTO group. A reduction in bone marrow stem cells, without an attendant reduction in total marrow cellularity, was noted in the 3.0 and 1.0 μCi/ml HTO groups. There was no significant difference in any of the DLM parameters between animals maintained on 3.0 μCi/ml of HTO and animals exposed to the equivalent 137Cs gamma dose (22 hours/day exposure). Consideration of the relative amounts and biological half lives of tritium present in the nucleus as water, DNA and histone suggests that after transient exposure to tritiated water, nearly all significant radiation damage can be attributed to tritium present in the nucleus as water. These data suggest that hazards from tritium attendant with normal reactor operation should not at this time be considered as a deterrent to the further development of fission and/or fusion reactor technology. (Namekawa, K.)

  2. Antidepressant Effects of Resveratrol in an Animal Model of Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinfiresoye, Laura L. Hurley, Luli; Kalejaiye, Olubukola; Tizabi, Yousef

    2014-01-01

    Resveratrol (3,4’,5-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene) is a natural non-flavonoid polyphenol antioxidant extracted from red grapes in the processing of wine. Initially it was studied for its potential as anticancer drug, and later was found to reduce cardiovascular disease. More recently resveratrol was shown to alleviate depressive-like symptoms induced by stress or other means in mice and rats. The major purpose of this study was to investigate whether resveratrol would manifest an antidepressant effect in Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, a putative and non-induced animal model of depression, and whether this effect might be associated with an increase in hippocampal and frontal cortical brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a protein implicated in chronic effects of many antidepressants. Adult male WKY rats were injected with two doses of resveratrol (10 and 40 mg/kg, i.p.) and their behavior in the open field locomotor activity (LMA), forced swim test (FST: a measure of helplessness), and sucrose preference test (SPT: a measure of anhedonia) was evaluated after a single acute injection or following 7 days of daily treatment. Both acute and chronic administration of resveratrol resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in FST. However, only chronic resveratrol resulted in dose-dependent increase in sucrose consumption. LMA was not affected by any treatment. Parallel to the observed behavioral effects the level of hippocampal, but not frontal cortical, BDNF was also dose-dependently elevated after chronic resveratrol administration. These findings indicate an antidepressant-like effect of resveratrol in an animal model of depression possibly via activation of hippocampal BDNF, and suggest therapeutic potential of resveratrol in at least a subpopulation of depressed patients. PMID:24717328

  3. The Chlamydomonas Genome Reveals the Evolution of Key Animal and Plant Functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2007-04-09

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii is a unicellular green alga whose lineage diverged from land plants over 1 billion years ago. It is a model system for studying chloroplast-based photosynthesis, as well as the structure, assembly, and function of eukaryotic flagella (cilia), which were inherited from the common ancestor of plants and animals, but lost in land plants. We sequenced the 120-megabase nuclear genome of Chlamydomonas and performed comparative phylogenomic analyses, identifying genes encoding uncharacterized proteins that are likely associated with the function and biogenesis of chloroplasts or eukaryotic flagella. Analyses of the Chlamydomonas genome advance our understanding of the ancestral eukaryotic cell, reveal previously unknown genes associated with photosynthetic and flagellar functions, and establish links between ciliopathy and the composition and function of flagella.

  4. The evolution and functional diversification of animal microRNA genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Liu; Katsutomo Okamura; David M Tyler; Michael D Phillips; Wei-Jen Chung; Eric C Lai

    2008-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are an abundant class of ~22 nucleotide (nt) regulatory RNAs that are pervasive in higher eukaryotic genomes.In order to fully understand their prominence in genomes,it is necessary to elucidate the molecu lar mechanisms that can diversify miRNA activities.In this review,we describe some of the many strategies that allow novel miRNA functions to emerge,with particular emphasis on how miRNA genes evolve in animals.These mechanisms include changes in their sequence,processing,or expression pattern;acquisition of miRNA* functionality or antisense processing;and de novo gene birth.The facility and versatility of miRNAs to evolve and change likely underlies how they have become dominant constituents of higher genomes.

  5. Effects of drought on the animal population in Eritrea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woldehiwet, Z.; Haywood, S.; Trafford, J.

    1985-08-17

    Most nomads in Eritrea have lost their animals due to outright starvation or diseases aggravated by malnutrition, resulting in part from drought. Animals surviving the drought itself are succumbing to infectious diseases and ecto- and endoparasites. Affected animals include camels as well as bovine and caprine populations.

  6. Effects of (-)stepholidine in animal models for schizophrenia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bart A ELLENBROEK; Xue-xiang ZHANG; Guo-zhang JIN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: (-)Stepholidine (SPD) is an active ingredient of the Chinese herb Stephania intermedia, which binds to the dopamine D1 and D2 like receptors. Biochemical, electrophysiological and behavioural experiments have provided strong evidence that SPD is both a D1 and a D2 antagonist, which could make SPD a unique antipsychotic drug. The present study aimed to investigate the antipsychotic properties of SPD in two animal models for schizophrenia. Methods: The effects of SPD, clozapine and haloperidol in increasing forelimb and hindlimb retraction time in the paw test and in reversing the apomorphine and MK801-induced disruption of prepulse inhibition was investigated. Results: In the paw test, clozapine and SPD increased the hindlimb retraction time, with only a marginal effect on the forelimb retraction time, whereas haloperidol potently increased both. In the prepulse inhibition paradigm, all three drugs reverse the apomorphine-induced disruption in prepulse inhibition, while none of the drugs could reverse the MK801-induced disruption. SPD even slightly, but significantly, potentiated the effects of MK801. Conclusion: The data show that SPD showed antipsychotic-like effects in both the prepulse inhibition paradigm and in the paw test. Moreover, the results of the paw test suggest that SPD has an atypical character with a relatively small potency to induce extrapyramidal side effects.

  7. The effects of schooling on empathy toward animals

    OpenAIRE

    Kwok, Hiu-lam; 郭曉琳

    2013-01-01

    In Hong Kong’s schools, it is common to see meat-based lunches and snacks, photos of captive sea creatures in textbooks, dissection of animals in Science class, meat, dairy, eggs, wool in Home Economics class, animal-tested products in washrooms and so on. Schools seem to have (un)intentionally encouraged young learners’ ignorance of animal natures and ‘presumption of superiority’ over non-human animals. However, schooling may have increased the ‘moral debt’ to only some, instead of all, anim...

  8. Review: Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    RAJPUT Zahid Iqbal; HU Song-hua; XIAO Chen-wen; ARIJO Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines,ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund's complete adjuvant, Freund's incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc.,are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed.

  9. Effect of Saraswatarishta in animal models of behavior despair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshma R Parekar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Saraswatarishta (SA is a herbo-mineral formulation consisting of 18 plants some of which are Medhyarasayanas. It has been claimed to be useful in treating central nervous system disorders. Objective: To evaluate antidepressant effect of ′Saraswatarishta′(SA alone and in combination with imipramine and fluoxetine in animal models of depression. Materials and Methods: After obtaining IAEC permission, 144 rats (n = 36/part were randomized into 6 groups- Group 1: Distilled water (1 mL, Group 2: Imipramine (30 mg/kg, Group 3: Fluoxetine (10 mg/kg, Group 4: SA (1.8 mL/kg, Group 5: Imipramine + SA, Group 6: Fluoxetine + SA. Effects of study drugs were evaluated in forced swim test (FST with single exposure to FST (Part 1 and repeated exposure for 14 days (Part 2. In Part 3, reserpine was used with FST and effects of study drugs were evaluated against single exposure to FST. Same model was used with repeated exposures to FST (Part 4. In each part, rats were subjected to open field test (OFT for 5 min prior to final FST. The variables measured: Immobility time in FST; line crossing, rearing and defecation in the OFT. Results: In all four parts, individual drugs and combinations thereof produced significant decrease in immobility time as compared to control, and extent of decrease was comparable amongst these groups. However, values for combination of fluoxetine with SA group were found to be lesser than that for individual agents in Parts 2 and 3. Combination of SA with imipramine did not enhance its anti-depressant effect in any of the parts. OFT findings did not vary significantly amongst the study groups. Conclusion: Decreased immobility in FST and absence of generalized stimulation or depression of motor activity in OFT point towards potential antidepressant effect of Saraswatarishta. Its co-administration with fluoxetine showed more promising effects.

  10. Effective average action for gauge theories and exact evolution equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a new nonperturbative evolution equation for Yang-Mills theories. It describes the scale dependence of an effective action. The running of the nonabelian gauge coupling in arbitrary dimension is computed. (orig.)

  11. Achieving Effective Innovation Based On TRIZ Technological Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, J. G.; Tan, R. H.; Cao, G. Z.

    2009-01-01

    This paper outlines the conception of effective innovation and discusses the method to achieve it. Effective Innovation is constrained on the path of technological evolution so that the corresponding path must be detected before conceptual design of the product. The process of products technological evolution is a technical developing process that the products approach to Ideal Final Result (IFR). During the process, the sustaining innovation and disruptive innovation carry on alt...

  12. The use of planarians as in vivo animal model to study laser biomodulation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munin, Egberto; Garcia, Neila Maria Rocha; Braz, Allison Gustavo; de Souza, Sandra Cristina; Alves, Leandro Procópio; Salgado, Miguel Angel Castillo; Pilla, Viviane

    2007-02-01

    A variety of effects is attributed to the photo stimulation of tissues, such as improved healing of ulcers, analgesic and anti-inflammatory effects, stimulation of the proliferation of cells of different origins and stimulation of bone repair. Some investigations that make qualitative evaluations, like wound healing and evaluation of pain and edema, can be conducted in human subjects. However, deeper investigations on the mechanisms of action of the light stimulus and other quantitative works that requires biopsies or destructive analysis has to be carried out in animal models or in cell cultures. In this work, we propose the use of planarians as a model to study laser-tissue interaction. Contrasting with cell cultures and unicellular organisms, planarians are among the simplest organism having tissue layers, central nerve system, digestive and excretory system that might have been platforms for the evolution of the complex and highly organized tissues and organs found in higher organisms. For the present study, 685 nm laser radiation was employed. Planarians were cut transversally, in a plane posterior to the auricles. The body fragments were left to regenerate and the proliferation dynamics of stem cells was studied by using histological analysis. Maximum cell count was obtained for the laser treated group at the 4 th experimental day. At that experimental time, we also had the largest difference between the irradiated and the non-irradiated control group. We concluded that the studied flatworm could be an interesting animal model for in vivo studies of laser-tissue interactions.

  13. The chaotic effects in a nonlinear QCD evolution equation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Shen, Zhenqi; Ruan, Jianhong

    2016-10-01

    The corrections of gluon fusion to the DGLAP and BFKL equations are discussed in a united partonic framework. The resulting nonlinear evolution equations are the well-known GLR-MQ-ZRS equation and a new evolution equation. Using the available saturation models as input, we find that the new evolution equation has the chaos solution with positive Lyapunov exponents in the perturbative range. We predict a new kind of shadowing caused by chaos, which blocks the QCD evolution in a critical small x range. The blocking effect in the evolution equation may explain the Abelian gluon assumption and even influence our expectations to the projected Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC), Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) and the upgrade (CppC) in a circular e+e- collider (SppC).

  14. The chaotic effects in a nonlinear QCD evolution equation

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The corrections of gluon fusion to the DGLAP and BFKL equations are discussed in a united partonic framework. The resulting nonlinear evolution equations are the well-known GLR-MQ-ZRS equation and a new evolution equation. Using the available saturation models as input, we find that the new evolution equation has the chaos solution with positive Lyaponov exponents in the perturbative range. We predict a new kind of shadowing caused by chaos, which blocks the QCD evolution in a critical small $x$ range. The blocking effect in the evolution equation may explain the Abelian gluon assumption and even influence our expectations to the projected Large Hadron Electron Collider (LHeC) and Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC).

  15. Nature vs Nurture: Effects of Learning on Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagrani, Nagina

    In the field of Evolutionary Robotics, the design, development and application of artificial neural networks as controllers have derived their inspiration from biology. Biologists and artificial intelligence researchers are trying to understand the effects of neural network learning during the lifetime of the individuals on evolution of these individuals by qualitative and quantitative analyses. The conclusion of these analyses can help develop optimized artificial neural networks to perform any given task. The purpose of this thesis is to study the effects of learning on evolution. This has been done by applying Temporal Difference Reinforcement Learning methods to the evolution of Artificial Neural Tissue controller. The controller has been assigned the task to collect resources in a designated area in a simulated environment. The performance of the individuals is measured by the amount of resources collected. A comparison has been made between the results obtained by incorporating learning in evolution and evolution alone. The effects of learning parameters: learning rate, training period, discount rate, and policy on evolution have also been studied. It was observed that learning delays the performance of the evolving individuals over the generations. However, the non zero learning rate throughout the evolution process signifies natural selection preferring individuals possessing plasticity.

  16. Effect of cadmium on bone tissue in growing animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Juliana; Mandalunis, Patricia Mónica

    2016-08-01

    Accumulation of cadmium (Cd), an extremely toxic metal, can cause renal failure, decreased vitamin D synthesis, and consequently osteoporosis. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of Cd on two types of bone in growing Wistar rats. Sixteen 21-day-old male Wistar rats were assigned to one of two groups. The Cd group subcutaneously received 0.5mg/kg of CdCl2 5 times weekly for 3 months. The control group similarly received bidistilled water. Following euthanasia, the mandibles and tibiae were resected, fixed, decalcified and processed histologically to obtain sections for H&E and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining. Photomicrographs were used to determine bone volume (BV/TV%), total growth cartilage width (GPC.Wi) hypertrophic cartilage width (HpZ.Wi), percentage of yellow bone marrow (%YBM), megakaryocyte number (N.Mks/mm(2)), and TRAP+osteoclast number (N.TRAP+Ocl/mm(2)). Results were statistically analyzed using Student's t test. Cd exposed animals showed a significant decrease in subchondral bone volume and a significant increase in TRAP+ osteoclast number and percentage of yellow bone marrow in the tibia, and an increase in megakaryocyte number in mandibular interradicular bone. No significant differences were observed in the remaining parameters. The results obtained with this experimental design show that Cd would seemingly have a different effect on subchondral and interradicular bone. The decrease in bone volume and increase in tibial yellow bone marrow suggest that cadmium inhibits differentiation of mesenchymal cells to osteoblasts, favoring differentiation into adipocytes. The different effects of Cd on interradicular bone might be due to the protective effect of the mastication forces. PMID:27312893

  17. Animal lectins as self/non-self recognition molecules. Biochemical and genetic approaches to understanding their biological roles and evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasta, G R; Ahmed, H; Fink, N E; Elola, M T; Marsh, A G; Snowden, A; Odom, E W

    1994-04-15

    In recent years, the significant contributions from molecular research studies on animal lectins have elucidated structural aspects and provided clues not only to their evolution but also to their multiple biological functions. The experimental evidence has suggested that distinct, and probably unrelated, groups of molecules are included under the term "lectin." Within the invertebrate taxa, major groups of lectins can be identified: One group would include lectins that show significant homology to membrane-integrated or soluble vertebrate C-type lectins. The second would include those beta-galactosyl-specific lectins homologous to the S-type vertebrate lectins. The third group would be constituted by lectins that show homology to vertebrate pentraxins that exhibit lectin-like properties, such as C-reactive protein and serum amyloid P. Finally, there are examples that do not exhibit similarities to any of the aforementioned categories. Moreover, the vast majority of invertebrate lectins described so far cannot yet be placed in one or another group because of the lack of information regarding their primary structure. (See Table 1.) Animal lectins do not express a recombinatorial diversity like that of antibodies, but a limited diversity in recognition capabilities would be accomplished by the occurrence of multiple lectins with distinct specificities, the presence of more than one binding site, specific for different carbohydrates in a single molecule, and by certain "flexibility" of the binding sites that would allow the recognition of a range of structurally related carbohydrates. In order to identify the lectins' "natural" ligands, we have investigated the interactions between those proteins and the putative endogenous or exogenous glycosylated substances or cells that may be relevant to their biological function. Results from these studies, together with information on the biochemical properties of invertebrate and vertebrate lectins, including their structural

  18. Effect of Composting on Dissolved Organic Matter in Animal Manure and Its Binding with Cu

    OpenAIRE

    Fengsong Zhang; Yanxia Li; Xiong Xiong; Ming Yang; Wei Li

    2012-01-01

    The agricultural application of raw animal manure introduces large amounts of dissolved organic matter (DOM) into soil and would increase transport of heavy metals such as Cu which are widely present in animal manure. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the evolution of DOM from pig and cattle manures during composting through excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy and the binding ability of DOM toward copper (Cu) ions with the aid of fluorescence quenching titrat...

  19. Modeling the evolution of winner and loser effects: A survey and prospectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesterton-Gibbons, Mike; Dai, Yao; Goubault, Marlène

    2016-04-01

    The evolution of winner or loser effects-higher probabilities of winning after winning or of losing after losing-has received remarkably little attention from theoreticians, even though such effects are widespread across the animal kingdom. We review game-theoretic models that regard such winner and loser effects as outcomes of a strategic response. We show that these models have been well supported by the empirical literature in the past, but are not designed to address some recent observations. In the light of this recent progress on the empirical front, we identify factors that newer theory must be developed to explore. PMID:26874216

  20. EFFECTS OF MULBERRY FRUIT POWDER IN ANIMAL MODEL OF STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratchaya Kaewkaen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stroke is the leading cause of death and the important cause of disability worldwide. Presently, the effectiveness of therapeutic strategy is still very limited. Based on the role neuroprotective effect of substance possessing antioxidant effect previously reported, we hypothesized mulberry fruit a substance possessing anti-oxidant activity, might be able to protect against cognitive impairment induced by stroke or cerebral ischemia. Male Wistar rats were orally given mulberry fruit powder at doses of 2,10 and 50 mg kg-1 BW at a periods of 7 days before and 21 days after induced Middle Cerebral Artery Occlusion (MCAO. The animals were determined spatial memory using Morris water maze test, motor performance was determined using neurological score and the sensory performance was also determined using hot plate test every 7 days before and after the operation until the end of experiment. In addition, the density of survival neurons was determined using cresyl violet stain. The results showed that the significant improvement of mulberry fruits in healthy condition after single dose and 7 days of MCAO at dose 2 and10 mg kg-1 BW. In cognitive deficit condition, mulberry fruits can exert neuroprotective at dose 10 and 50 mg kg-1 BW after 21 days MCAO. Moreover, the significant change of sensory recovery was observed at 50 mg kg-1 BW after MCAO 7 days. The mulberry fruits significantly improved the density of survival neurons in CA2 and CA3 of hippocampus after 21 days of MCAO. All results in this study suggested that mulberry fruit had high potential to be developed as novel preventive and therapeutic strategy against stroke condition. However, precise underlying mechanism is still required further investigation.

  1. THE EFFECTS OF ANIMATED AGENTS ON STUDENTS’ ACHIEVEMENT AND ATTITUDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Figen UNAL-COLAK

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Animated agents are electronic agents that interact with learners through voice, visuals or text and that carry human-like characteristics such as gestures and facial expressions with the purpose of creating a social learning environment, and provide information and guidance and when required feedback and motivation to students during their learning experience. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of the use of pedagogical agents in learning materials designed in multimedia on the achievement and attitudes of students. A general evaluation of the research findings indicate that the use of multimedia software developed by using pedagogical agents positively affects student achievement and attitude. The achievement of the students who worked with the software significantly increased, but no significant difference in terms of different pedagogical agents was observed. The comparison of the student’s attitudes revealed no significant difference in terms of different pedagogical agents, yet the attitudes regarding “bearing human features” showed positively significant difference for the software with body shot of a real person. As it is seen in the unstructured interviews with the participants conducted during and after the experimental process, it should be stated that the students had positive attitudes towards the software and the use of pedagogical agent and expressed their liking.

  2. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, 252Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by 60Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use

  3. Biological effectiveness of neutron irradiation on animals and man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straume, T.

    1982-11-01

    Neutron experiments on a highly radiosensitive in vivo system - oocytes in mice - provide new insight into the nature of the radiosensitive targets of these important cells. With the radiobiological literature as background, neutron data from animals and humans are integrated, and the controversial question of radiation protection standards for neutrons is addressed. Oocyte killing in juvenile mice by 0.43-MeV, /sup 252/Cf-fission, and 15 MeV neutrons, compared with that by /sup 60/Co gamma rays, yields unusually low neutron RBEs (relative biological effectiveness). At 0.1 rad of 0.43-MeV neutrons the RBE is only 1.8, contrasting greatly with values of 100 or more reported at low-doses for other endpoints. In mice just prior to birth, however, when oocytes are less radiosensitive, the neutron RBE is much higher, similar to values for most other mammalian endpoints. This dramatic change in neutron RBE with mouse age (occurring within 2 to 3 days) can be explained as the result of a shift from a less radiosensitive target (presumably nuclear DNA) to a much more radiosensitive one (probably the oocyte plasma membrane). Using various approaches, a value for the neutron Quality Factor (Q, a radiation protection standard) is estimated as 17 (+-100%), much lower than 100 which has been suggested. With the large uncertainty, 17 is not markedly different from the value of 10 presently in general use.

  4. Free surface effect on dune morphology and evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Naqshband, S.; Ribberink, J.S.; Hulscher, S.J.M.H.; Schielen, R.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Our aim in this paper is to illustrate the importance of free water surface effects and sediment transport mode in the morphological evolution of sand dunes to upper stage plane beds. We have analyzed a large number of bed form data, 414 experiments from flumes and field, showing significantly different evolution of dune height and length in shallow (high Froude numbers) and in deep flows (low Froude numbers). In shallow flows, dune heights are observed to grow only in bed load dominant trans...

  5. Cognitive effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals in animals.

    OpenAIRE

    Schantz, S L; Widholm, J.J

    2001-01-01

    A large number of chemical pollutants including phthalates, alkylphenolic compounds, polychlorinated biphenyls and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, organochlorine pesticides, bisphenol A, and metals including lead, mercury, and cadmium have the ability to disrupt endocrine function in animals. Some of these same chemicals have been shown to alter cognitive function in animals and humans. Because hormonally mediated events play a central role in central nervous system development and function, ...

  6. Effects of Teacher Controlled Segmented-Animation Presentation in Facilitating Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad Ali, Ahmad Zamzuri

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to study the effectiveness of teacher controlled segmented-animation presentation on learning achievement of students with lower level of prior knowledge. Segmented-animation and continuous-animation courseware showing cellular signal transmission process were developed for the research purpose. Pre-test and post-test…

  7. [Effect of increasing the omega-3 fatty acid in the diets of animals on the animal products consumed by humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourre, Jean-Marie

    2005-01-01

    As shown by huge amount of assays in human as well as in animal models, w-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids play important role in the development and maintenance of different organs, primarily the brain, and could be useful in the prevention of different pathologies, mainly the cardiovascular diseases, and, as proposed recently, some psychiatric, dermatological or rheumatological disorders. For ALA, the major and cheapest source for human is rapeseed oil (canola oil), and walnut "noix de Grenoble" oil). The actual goal is first to identify which foods are naturally rich in w-3 fatty acids, and, second, to determine the true impact of the formulations (enriched in w-3 fatty acids) in chows used on farms and breeding centres on the nutritional value of the products and thus their effect on the health of consumers, thanks to quantities of either ALA, or EPA or DHA or both. This concern fish (in proportion of their lipid content, mainly mackerel, salmon, sardine and herring), eggs (wildly naturally rich in w-3 fatty acids, both ALA and DHA, or from laying hen fed ALA from linseed or rapeseed), meat from birds, mammals (from the highest concentration : rabbit, then pig and monogastrics, then polygastrics such as beef, mutton and goat) \\; in butter, milk, dairy products, cheese (all naturally poor in w-3 fatty acids)... Indeed, the nature of fatty acids of reserve triglycerides (found in more or less large amounts depending on the anatomical localisation, that is to say the butcher's cuts) can vary mainly as a function of the food received by the animal. EPA and DHA are mainly present in animal's products. The impact (qualitative and quantitative) of alterations in the lipid composition of animal foods on the nutritional value of derived products (in terms of EPA and DHA content) eaten by humans are more important in single-stomach animals than multi-stomach animals (due to their hydrogenating intestinal bacteria). The intestinal physiology of birds results in the

  8. Animal evolution and atmospheric pO2: is there a link between gradual animal adaptation to terrain elevation due to Ural orogeny and survival of subsequent hypoxic periods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Considering evolution of terrestrial animals as something happening only on flat continental plains seems wrong. Many mountains have arisen and disappeared over the geologic time scale, so in all periods some areas of high altitude existed, with reduced oxygen pressure (pO2) and increased aridity. During orogeny, animal species of the raising terrain can slowly adapt to reduced oxygen levels.This review proposes that animal evolution was often driven by atmospheric oxygen availability. Transitions of insect ancestors and amphibians out of water are here interpreted as events forced by the lack of oxygen in shallow and warm water during Devonian. Hyperoxia during early Carboniferous allowed giant insects to be predators of lowlands, forcing small amphibians to move to higher terrains, unsuitable to large insects due to reduced pO2. In arid mountainous habitats, ascended animals evolved in early reptiles with more efficient lungs and improved circulation. Animals with alveolar lungs became the mammalian ancestors, while those with respiratory duct lungs developed in archosaurs. In this interpretation, limb precursors of wings and pneumatised bones might have been adaptations for moving on steep slopes.Ural mountains have risen to an estimated height of 3000 m between 318 and 251 Mya. The earliest archosaurs have been found on the European Ural side, estimated 275 Myr old. It is proposed that Ural orogeny slowly elevated several highland habitats within the modern Ural region to heights above 2500 m. Since this process took near 60 Myr, animals in these habitats fully to adapted to hypoxia.The protracted P-Tr hypoxic extinction event killed many aquatic and terrestrial animals. Devastated lowland areas were repopulated by mammaliaformes that came down from mountainous areas. Archosaurs were better adapted to very low pO2, so they were forced to descend to the sea level later when the lack of oxygen became severe. During the Triassic period, when the relative content

  9. Pseudomonas Exotoxin A: optimized by evolution for effective killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta eMichalska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas Exotoxin A (PE is the most toxic virulence factor of the pathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This review describes current knowledge about the intoxication pathways of PE. Moreover, PE represents a remarkable example for pathoadaptive evolution, how bacterial molecules have been structurally and functionally optimized under evolutionary pressure to effectively impair and kill their host cells.

  10. Effects of conformism on the cultural evolution of social behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Molleman

    Full Text Available Models of cultural evolution study how the distribution of cultural traits changes over time. The dynamics of cultural evolution strongly depends on the way these traits are transmitted between individuals by social learning. Two prominent forms of social learning are payoff-based learning (imitating others that have higher payoffs and conformist learning (imitating locally common behaviours. How payoff-based and conformist learning affect the cultural evolution of cooperation is currently a matter of lively debate, but few studies systematically analyse the interplay of these forms of social learning. Here we perform such a study by investigating how the interaction of payoff-based and conformist learning affects the outcome of cultural evolution in three social contexts. First, we develop a simple argument that provides insights into how the outcome of cultural evolution will change when more and more conformist learning is added to payoff-based learning. In a social dilemma (e.g. a Prisoner's Dilemma, conformism can turn cooperation into a stable equilibrium; in an evasion game (e.g. a Hawk-Dove game or a Snowdrift game conformism tends to destabilize the polymorphic equilibrium; and in a coordination game (e.g. a Stag Hunt game, conformism changes the basin of attraction of the two equilibria. Second, we analyse a stochastic event-based model, revealing that conformism increases the speed of cultural evolution towards pure equilibria. Individual-based simulations as well as the analysis of the diffusion approximation of the stochastic model by and large confirm our findings. Third, we investigate the effect of an increasing degree of conformism on cultural group selection in a group-structured population. We conclude that, in contrast to statements in the literature, conformism hinders rather than promotes the evolution of cooperation.

  11. Effect of precipitation on the evolution of cube recrystallization texture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benum, S. [Hydro Aluminium, Haavik (Norway). R and D Materials Technology; Nes, E. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Dept. of Metallurgy

    1997-11-01

    A study of the evolution of recrystallized structure and texture in the surface of a cold rolled twin roll cast AlFeSi alloy is presented. Annealing of such alloys often results in an abnormally coarse grained recrystallized surface structure with a strong cube texture. The evolution of this structure depends on the annealing procedures, that is, the precipitation state. Increased amounts of precipitating particles increase the grain size and the fraction of cube texture. The oriented growth theory does not offer any plausible interpretation of this precipitation effect. A recrystallization model that incorporates the differences in Zener drag between different annealing procedures has shown that the evolution of a strong cube texture and coarse grains is the result of a preferential nucleation of cube oriented grains. Precipitation increases the critical nucleation diameter and the resulting grain size. Cube oriented subgrains have a size advantage compared to other potential nucleation sites and are therefore not so affected by precipitation.

  12. Effect of the number of blades on propeller wake evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felli, Mario; Guj, Giulio; Camussi, Roberto [University, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Rome (Italy)

    2008-03-15

    The effect of the number of blades on wake evolution was investigated on three propellers having the same blade geometry but different numbers of blades. The experiments concerned velocity measurements along nine transversal planes of the wake by LDV phase-sampling techniques. The study was performed with all the propellers having the same tip vortex intensity. In addition, high-speed visualizations were carried out to analyze the main features of propeller wake evolution in the transition and in the far wake. Aspects concerning wake evolution were pointed out, with particular emphasis on the instability mechanism of the propeller slipstream and on its correlation with the blade-to-blade interaction phenomenon. (orig.)

  13. Radiological effects on plants and animals from Clink during operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the basis for the environmental impact study which is submitted in connection with applications for construction and operation of the encapsulation plant and final disposal facility. The report presents the results of calculations of Clabs'/Clinks' contribution to dose rates for biota in the environment around the Simpevarp peninsula. The biota referred to in this report means plants and animals excluding humans. Calculations are for the reported releases from CLAB to air and water, and estimated future emissions from the CLAB and Clink, both for normal operation and any mishaps. For future emissions both so-called realistic and conservative estimates were used

  14. ‘Captivity bias’ in animal tool use and its implications for the evolution of hominin technology

    OpenAIRE

    Haslam, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Animals in captive or laboratory settings may outperform wild animals of the same species in both frequency and diversity of tool use, a phenomenon here termed ‘captivity bias’. Although speculative at this stage, a logical conclusion from this concept is that animals whose tool-use behaviour is observed solely under natural conditions may be judged cognitively or physically inferior than if they had also been tested or observed under controlled captive conditions. In turn, this situation cre...

  15. Groundwater animals

    OpenAIRE

    Maurice, Louise; Bloomfield, John; Robertson, Anne; Allen, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    Groundwater animals are adapted to live in environments with no light and limited nutrients, They can provide insights into fundamental questions of evolution, ecology and biodiversity. They also have an important role to play in informing the reconstruction of past changes in geomorphology and climate, and can be used for characterising aquifers. The BGS is undertaking a systematic survey of selected areas and lithologies in the UK where groundwater animals have not been inves...

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis: adding value to assessment of animal health welfare and production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babo Martins, S; Rushton, J

    2014-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) has been extensively used in economic assessments in fields related to animal health, namely in human health where it provides a decision-making framework for choices about the allocation of healthcare resources. Conversely, in animal health, cost-benefit analysis has been the preferred tool for economic analysis. In this paper, the use of CEA in related areas and the role of this technique in assessments of animal health, welfare and production are reviewed. Cost-effectiveness analysis can add further value to these assessments, particularly in programmes targeting animal welfare or animal diseases with an impact on human health, where outcomes are best valued in natural effects rather than in monetary units. Importantly, CEA can be performed during programme implementation stages to assess alternative courses of action in real time.

  17. Applications of Animal Research in the Behavioral Sciences: Effects of Chronic Exercise on Emotionality in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharp, Gerald D.

    The psychological effects of exercise training are difficult to study in humans, but analogous emotionality changes in animals can be studied using simple measurements employed in emergence and open-field tests. The basis of these tests is that animals that are more emotional are more fearful when placed in a novel situation and will exhibit less…

  18. Effect of four processed animal proteins in the diet on digestibility and performance in laying hens.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krimpen, van M.M.; Veldkamp, T.; Binnendijk, G.P.; Veer, de R.

    2010-01-01

    An experiment was performed to investigate the effect of animal vs. vegetable protein sources in the diet of laying hens on the development of hen performance. A diet containing protein sources of only vegetable origin was compared with 4 diets, each containing 1 of 4 processed animal proteins (PAP)

  19. Effects of Animation's Speed of Presentation on Perceptual Processing and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katja; Rasch, Thorsten; Schnotz, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Animations presented at different speed are assumed to differentially interact with learners' perception and cognition due to the constraints imposed by learners' limited sensitivity to incoming dynamic information. To investigate the effects of high and low presentation speed of animation, two studies were conducted. In Study 1, participants were…

  20. Animal Research on Effects of Experience on Brain and Behavior: Implications for Rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, Mark R.

    2002-01-01

    This article first considers how plasticity of the brain in response to differential experience was discovered in research with laboratory rats around 1960. Animal research soon followed on effects of enriched experience as therapy for brain dysfunction. Relations between animal research and some human therapies are considered. (Contains…

  1. Enhancement of the radioprotective effect of hypoxia on animals adapted to hyperoxic conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments on mice a hypothesis on radioprotective effect of exogenic hypoxia on animal cells adapted to hyperoxic conditions is tested. The survival curves plotted on the basis of 4 experiments on animal irradiation at a dose of 6-16.5 Gy confirmed the validity of adaptation hypothesis

  2. Animal models for the study of the effects of spaceflight on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    2003-10-01

    Animal models have been used to determine the effects of spaceflight on the immune system. Rats and rhesus monkeys have been the primary animals used for actual space flight studies, but mice have also been utilized for studies in ground-based models. The primary ground based model used has been hindlimb unloading of rodents, which is similar to the chronic bed-rest model for humans. A variety of immune responses have been shown to be modified when animals are hindlimb unloaded. These results parallel those observed when animals are flown in space. In general, immune responses are depressed in animals maintained in the hindlimb unloading model or flown in space. These results raise the possibility that spaceflight could result in decreased resistance to infection in animals.

  3. The effect of lethal doses of X-rays on chilled and thyroidectomized animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hempelmann, L.H.; Trujillo, T.T.; Knowlton, N.P. Jr.

    1949-04-19

    The chilling of animals has been shown to offer some protection from the lethal effects of radiation. An effort has been made to extend the study of the effects of chilling on the lethal effects of x radiation and to determine whether or not the lowering of the basal metabolic rate by thyroidectomy will give similar protection. Five experiments were carried out using mice and rats as the experimental animals.

  4. Possible Effects of a Cosmological Constant on Black Hole Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Fred C.; Mbonye, Manasse; Laughlin, Gregory

    1999-01-01

    We explore possible effects of vacuum energy on the evolution of black holes. If the universe contains a cosmological constant, and if black holes can absorb energy from the vacuum, then black hole evaporation could be greatly suppressed. For the magnitude of the cosmological constant suggested by current observations, black holes larger than $\\sim 4 \\times 10^{24}$ g would accrete energy rather than evaporate. In this scenario, all stellar and supermassive black holes would grow with time un...

  5. The Effect of Social Learning on Individual Learning and Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Marriott, Chris; Chebib, Jobran

    2014-01-01

    We consider the effects of social learning on the individual learning and genetic evolution of a colony of artificial agents capable of genetic, individual and social modes of adaptation. We confirm that there is strong selection pressure to acquire traits of individual learning and social learning when these are adaptive traits. We show that selection pressure for learning of either kind can supress selection pressure for reproduction or greater fitness. We show that social learning differs ...

  6. The Multipartite Mitochondrial Genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila: Insights into the Evolution of Mitochondrial Genomes in Bilateral Animals

    OpenAIRE

    Dan-Dan Wei; Renfu Shao; Ming-Long Yuan; Wei Dou; Barker, Stephen C.; Jin-Jun Wang

    2012-01-01

    Booklice (order Psocoptera) in the genus Liposcelis are major pests to stored grains worldwide and are closely related to parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera). We sequenced the mitochondrial (mt) genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila and found that the typical single mt chromosome of bilateral animals has fragmented into and been replaced by two medium-sized chromosomes in this booklouse; each of these chromosomes has about half of the genes of the typical mt chromosome of bilateral animals. The...

  7. EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL DEGRADATION ON ANIMAL DIVERSITY IN BALI, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Waya Kasa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bali is a small beautiful tropical island of Indonesia archipelago lies betweens the continent of Asia and Australia as well as the Indian and Pacific Ocean. As a tropical archipelago, of course, many kinds of biodiversity can be found over there. In the island of Bali in particular, there are typical animal diversity that could not be investigated beyond such island, such as, Bali cattle, Bali dog, Bali white starling and others. As time goes on, the existance of such biodiversity decreases in both quality and quantity. Both global warming/climate change and land use change are the main factors affecting such phenomenon. This study has been conducted by employing field observation as well as literature study. It was found that, the quality of purebred Bali cattle species decreases genetically that could be notified of smaller bodysize for both male and female. Land use change of agriculture activity to the hotels, house of living, roads and other infrastructures are the main factors for Bali cattle existancy. For typical famous bird of white starling, the problem is because of deforestation which cause natural habitat loss, due to land use change for agricultural activity and house building by local people. In case of Bali dog, the mad dog of rabies is just introduce and spreading over Bali island, whichis formerly the island of Bali has been recognised as free zone area of the rabies. As consequency, suffering dogs must be eliminated by a mass killing cause decrease total number of such poor dog. Overall, it could be concluded that environmental degradations of land use change, deforestation and desease are the main causes of biodiversity decreasing number of the Bali cattle, Bali white starling and Bali dog respectively, beside global warming/climate change natural disaster.

  8. World Organisation for Animal Health: strengthening Veterinary Services for effective One Health collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corning, S

    2014-08-01

    To effectively reduce health risks at the animal-human-ecosystems interface, a One Health strategy is crucially important to create strong national and regional animal health systems that are well coordinated with strong public health systems. Animal diseases, particularly those caused by new and emerging zoonotic pathogens, must be effectively controlled at their source to reduce their potentially devastating impact upon both animal and human health. As the international organisation responsible for developing standards, guidelines and recommendations for animal health, the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) plays an important role in minimising animal and public health risks attributable to zoonoses and other animal diseases, which can have severe consequences for global food safety and security. National Veterinary Services, which implement OIE animal health and welfare standards and other measures, are the first line of defence against these diseases, and must have the capacity to meet the core requirements necessary for their diagnosis and control. The OIE works collaboratively with the World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations to improve the ability of national animal and public health systems to respond to current and emerging animal health risks with public health consequences. In addition to improving and aligning national laboratory capacities in high-risk areas, the OIE collaborates on One Health-oriented projects for key diseases, establishing model frameworks which can be applied to manage other existing and emerging priority diseases. This article reviews the role and activities of the OIE in strengthening the national Veterinary Services of its Member Countries for a more effective and sustainable One Health collaboration. PMID:25707190

  9. The Effect of Steps to Promote Higher Levels of Farm Animal Welfare across the EU. Societal versus Animal Scientists’ Perceptions of Animal Welfare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlatko Ilieski

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Information about animal welfare standards and initiatives from eight European countries was collected, grouped, and compared to EU welfare standards to detect those aspects beyond minimum welfare levels demanded by EU welfare legislation. Literature was reviewed to determine the scientific relevance of standards and initiatives, and those aspects going beyond minimum EU standards. Standards and initiatives were assessed to determine their strengths and weaknesses regarding animal welfare. Attitudes of stakeholders in the improvement of animal welfare were determined through a Policy Delphi exercise. Social perception of animal welfare, economic implications of upraising welfare levels, and differences between countries were considered. Literature review revealed that on-farm space allowance, climate control, and environmental enrichment are relevant for all animal categories. Experts’ assessment revealed that on-farm prevention of thermal stress, air quality, and races and passageways’ design were not sufficiently included. Stakeholders considered that housing conditions are particularly relevant regarding animal welfare, and that animal-based and farm-level indicators are fundamental to monitor the progress of animal welfare. The most notable differences between what society offers and what farm animals are likely to need are related to transportation and space availability, with economic constraints being the most plausible explanation.

  10. The Effect of Steps to Promote Higher Levels of Farm Animal Welfare across the EU. Societal versus Animal Scientists' Perceptions of Animal Welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averós, Xavier; Aparicio, Miguel A; Ferrari, Paolo; Guy, Jonathan H; Hubbard, Carmen; Schmid, Otto; Ilieski, Vlatko; Spoolder, Hans A M

    2013-01-01

    Information about animal welfare standards and initiatives from eight European countries was collected, grouped, and compared to EU welfare standards to detect those aspects beyond minimum welfare levels demanded by EU welfare legislation. Literature was reviewed to determine the scientific relevance of standards and initiatives, and those aspects going beyond minimum EU standards. Standards and initiatives were assessed to determine their strengths and weaknesses regarding animal welfare. Attitudes of stakeholders in the improvement of animal welfare were determined through a Policy Delphi exercise. Social perception of animal welfare, economic implications of upraising welfare levels, and differences between countries were considered. Literature review revealed that on-farm space allowance, climate control, and environmental enrichment are relevant for all animal categories. Experts' assessment revealed that on-farm prevention of thermal stress, air quality, and races and passageways' design were not sufficiently included. Stakeholders considered that housing conditions are particularly relevant regarding animal welfare, and that animal-based and farm-level indicators are fundamental to monitor the progress of animal welfare. The most notable differences between what society offers and what farm animals are likely to need are related to transportation and space availability, with economic constraints being the most plausible explanation.

  11. Fusarium mycotoxins: effects on reproductive function in domestic animals--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinovis, Cristina; Pizzo, Fabiola; Spicer, Leon J; Caloni, Francesca

    2013-10-01

    On a global scale, cereal grains and animal feed may be contaminated with trichothecenes, such as deoxynivalenol and T-2 toxin, zearalenone (ZEA), and fumonisins, the major mycotoxins of Fusarium fungi. Of these mycotoxins, ZEA is unequivocally implicated in reproductive disorders of swine and other domestic animals. Experiments in vivo and in vitro indicate that ZEA and its metabolites exert estrogenic effects resulting in functional and morphological alterations in reproductive organs. Recently, the potential of trichothecenes and fumonisins to cause reproductive disorders in domestic animals has been investigated. The present review summarizes the toxicological data on the effects of Fusarium mycotoxins on ovarian function, testicular function, placenta and fetus, and puberty/sexual maturity of domestic animals. The results of in vivo animal studies and in vitro tests are reported and discussed.

  12. Chemosensetizing and cardioprotective effects of resveratrol in doxorubicin- treated animals

    OpenAIRE

    Osman, Abdel-Moneim M; Al-Harthi, Sameer E.; AlArabi, Ohoud M; Elshal, Mohamed F.; Ramadan, Wafaa S.; Alaama, Mohamed N; Al-Kreathy, Huda M; Zoheir A Damanhouri; Osman, Osman H

    2013-01-01

    Background Doxorubicin (DOX), an anthracycline antibiotic is one of the most effective anticancer drug used in the treatment of variety of cancers .Its use is limited by its cardiotoxicity. The present study was designed to assess the role of a natural product resveratrol (RSVL) on sensitization of mammary carcinoma (Ehrlich ascites carcinoma) to the action of DOX and at the same time its protective effect against DOX-induced cardiotoxicity in rats. Methods Ehrlich ascites carcinoma bearing m...

  13. EFECTOS DE LOS FITOESTRÓGENOS EN LA REPRODUCCIÓN ANIMAL PHYTOSTROGEN EFFECTS ON ANIMAL REPRODUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser Yohan Lenis Sanin

    2010-12-01

    shown both carcinogenic and anticarcinogenic effects. The mechanism of action of phytoestrogens is mediated by stimulation or inhibition of the receptors ERalpha and ERbeta that are specific to estrogen, and therefore are considered of importance in animal production systems and human health because they may cause alterations on the reproductive physiology. The aim of this review is to show the state of the art about the knowledge of the effect of phytoestrogens on reproduction and highlight gaps in knowledge.

  14. Observational learning from animated models: Effects of modality and reflection on transfer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Pieter; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Wouters, P.J.M., Paas, F. & van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2008). Observational learning from animated models: Effects of modality and reflection on transfer. Contemporary Educational Psychology, 34, 1-8.

  15. Effects of urapidil on blood pressure and adrenoceptors in various animal models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zwieten, P A; Mathy, M J; Thoolent, M J; Wilffert, B; de Jonge, A; Timmermans, P B

    1984-01-01

    The interaction with alpha- and beta-adrenoceptors, and the antihypertensive and hypotensive effects of urapidil were studied in various animal models. Urapidil reduced the mean arterial pressure (MAP) of conscious normotensive and spontaneously hypertensive rates after oral administration. Urapidil

  16. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Narges; Germaschewski, Kai; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-06-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron-free energy so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  17. Effects of electron temperature anisotropy on proton mirror instability evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadi, Narges; Raeder, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Proton mirror modes are large amplitude nonpropagating structures frequently observed in the magnetosheath. It has been suggested that electron temperature anisotropy can enhance the proton mirror instability growth rate while leaving the proton cyclotron instability largely unaffected, therefore causing the proton mirror instability to dominate the proton cyclotron instability in Earth's magnetosheath. Here, we use particle-in-cell simulations to investigate the electron temperature anisotropy effects on proton mirror instability evolution. Contrary to the hypothesis, electron temperature anisotropy leads to excitement of the electron whistler instability. Our results show that the electron whistler instability grows much faster than the proton mirror instability and quickly consumes the electron free energy, so that there is no electron temperature anisotropy left to significantly impact the evolution of the proton mirror instability.

  18. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carsten, A.L.; Brooks, A.; Commerford, S.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The possible genetic (dominant lethal mutations (DLM) and cytogenetic changes in the regenerating liver) and somatic (hematopoietic stem cell changes, growth and nonspecific life time shortening) effects in mice maintained on tritiated water (HTO) over two generations was investigated. Results to date are summarized. (ACR)

  19. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possible genetic (dominant lethal mutations (DLM) and cytogenetic changes in the regenerating liver) and somatic (hematopoietic stem cell changes, growth and nonspecific life time shortening) effects in mice maintained on tritiated water (HTO) over two generations was investigated. Results to date are summarized

  20. ANAEROBIC DIGESTION OF ANIMAL WASTE: EFFECT OF MODE OF MIXING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laboratory-scale digesters were operated to study the effect of mixing (via biogas recirculation, impeller mixing, and slurry recirculation) on biogas production. Three sets of experiments were performed using cow manure slurry feed with either 50, 100, or 150 g/L total solids (TS) concentrations (r...

  1. Using the Ferret as an Animal Model for Investigating Influenza Antiviral Effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, Ding Y.; Hurt, Aeron C.

    2016-01-01

    The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort toward the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-l...

  2. Psychosocial and Psychophysiological Effects of Human-Animal Interactions: The Possible Role of Oxytocin

    OpenAIRE

    Beetz, Andrea; Uvnäs-Moberg, Kerstin; Julius, Henri; Kotrschal, Kurt

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade it has become more widely accepted that pet ownership and animal assistance in therapy and education may have a multitude of positive effects on humans. Here, we review the evidence from 69 original studies on human-animal interactions (HAI) which met our inclusion criteria with regard to sample size, peer-review, and standard scientific research design. Among the well-documented effects of HAI in humans of different ages, with and without special medical, or mental hea...

  3. The functions of grainy head-like proteins in animals and fungi and the evolution of apical extracellular barriers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Paré

    Full Text Available The Grainy head (GRH family of transcription factors are crucial for the development and repair of epidermal barriers in all animals in which they have been studied. This is a high-level functional conservation, as the known structural and enzymatic genes regulated by GRH proteins differ between species depending on the type of epidermal barrier being formed. Interestingly, members of the CP2 superfamily of transcription factors, which encompasses the GRH and LSF families in animals, are also found in fungi--organisms that lack epidermal tissues. To shed light on CP2 protein function in fungi, we characterized a Neurospora crassa mutant lacking the CP2 member we refer to as grainy head-like (grhl. We show that Neurospora GRHL has a DNA-binding specificity similar to that of animal GRH proteins and dissimilar to that of animal LSF proteins. Neurospora grhl mutants are defective in conidial-spore dispersal due to an inability to remodel the cell wall, and we show that grhl mutants and the long-known conidial separation-2 (csp-2 mutants are allelic. We then characterized the transcriptomes of both Neurospora grhl mutants and Drosophila grh mutant embryos to look for similarities in the affected genes. Neurospora grhl appears to play a role in the development and remodeling of the cell wall, as well as in the activation of genes involved in defense and virulence. Drosophila GRH is required to activate the expression of many genes involved in cuticular/epidermal-barrier formation. We also present evidence that GRH plays a role in adult antimicrobial defense. These results, along with previous studies of animal GRH proteins, suggest the fascinating possibility that the apical extracellular barriers of some animals and fungi might share an evolutionary connection, and that the formation of physical barriers in the last common ancestor was under the control of a transcriptional code that included GRH-like proteins.

  4. Asenapine effects in animal models of psychosis and cognitive function

    OpenAIRE

    Hugh M Marston; Young, Jared W.; Martin, Frederic D.; Serpa, Kevin A.; Moore, Christopher L; Wong, Erik H.; Gold, Lisa; Meltzer, Leonard T.; Azar, Marc R.; Geyer, Mark A.; Shahid, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Rationale Asenapine, a novel psychopharmacologic agent in the development for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, has high affinity for serotonergic, α-adrenergic, and dopaminergic receptors, suggesting potential for antipsychotic and cognitive-enhancing properties. Objectives The effects of asenapine in rat models of antipsychotic efficacy and cognition were examined and compared with those of olanzapine and risperidone. Materials and methods Amphetamine-stimulated locomotor activity (Amp-LM...

  5. The effect of animation on learning action symbols by individuals with intellectual disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujisawa, Kazuko; Inoue, Tomoyoshi; Yamana, Yuko; Hayashi, Humirhiro

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether participants with intellectual impairments could benefit from the movement associated with animated pictures while they were learning symbol names. Sixteen school students, whose linguistic-developmental age ranged from 38?91 months, participated in the experiment. They were taught 16 static visual symbols and the corresponding action words (naming task) in two sessions conducted one week apart. In the experimental condition, animation was employed to facilitate comprehension, whereas no animation was used in the control condition. Enhancement of learning was shown in the experimental condition, suggesting that the participants benefited from animated symbols. Furthermore, it was found that the lower the linguistic developmental age, the more effective the animated cue was in learning static visual symbols.

  6. The multipartite mitochondrial genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila: insights into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in bilateral animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dan-Dan; Shao, Renfu; Yuan, Ming-Long; Dou, Wei; Barker, Stephen C; Wang, Jin-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Booklice (order Psocoptera) in the genus Liposcelis are major pests to stored grains worldwide and are closely related to parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera). We sequenced the mitochondrial (mt) genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila and found that the typical single mt chromosome of bilateral animals has fragmented into and been replaced by two medium-sized chromosomes in this booklouse; each of these chromosomes has about half of the genes of the typical mt chromosome of bilateral animals. These mt chromosomes are 8,530 bp (mt chromosome I) and 7,933 bp (mt chromosome II) in size. Intriguingly, mt chromosome I is twice as abundant as chromosome II. It appears that the selection pressure for compact mt genomes in bilateral animals favors small mt chromosomes when small mt chromosomes co-exist with the typical large mt chromosomes. Thus, small mt chromosomes may have selective advantages over large mt chromosomes in bilateral animals. Phylogenetic analyses of mt genome sequences of Psocodea (i.e. Psocoptera plus Phthiraptera) indicate that: 1) the order Psocoptera (booklice and barklice) is paraphyletic; and 2) the order Phthiraptera (the parasitic lice) is monophyletic. Within parasitic lice, however, the suborder Ischnocera is paraphyletic; this differs from the traditional view that each suborder of parasitic lice is monophyletic. PMID:22479490

  7. The multipartite mitochondrial genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila: insights into the evolution of mitochondrial genomes in bilateral animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan-Dan Wei

    Full Text Available Booklice (order Psocoptera in the genus Liposcelis are major pests to stored grains worldwide and are closely related to parasitic lice (order Phthiraptera. We sequenced the mitochondrial (mt genome of Liposcelis bostrychophila and found that the typical single mt chromosome of bilateral animals has fragmented into and been replaced by two medium-sized chromosomes in this booklouse; each of these chromosomes has about half of the genes of the typical mt chromosome of bilateral animals. These mt chromosomes are 8,530 bp (mt chromosome I and 7,933 bp (mt chromosome II in size. Intriguingly, mt chromosome I is twice as abundant as chromosome II. It appears that the selection pressure for compact mt genomes in bilateral animals favors small mt chromosomes when small mt chromosomes co-exist with the typical large mt chromosomes. Thus, small mt chromosomes may have selective advantages over large mt chromosomes in bilateral animals. Phylogenetic analyses of mt genome sequences of Psocodea (i.e. Psocoptera plus Phthiraptera indicate that: 1 the order Psocoptera (booklice and barklice is paraphyletic; and 2 the order Phthiraptera (the parasitic lice is monophyletic. Within parasitic lice, however, the suborder Ischnocera is paraphyletic; this differs from the traditional view that each suborder of parasitic lice is monophyletic.

  8. Effects of nectar-robbing on plant reproduction and evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yanwen; WANG Yong; GUO Youbao

    2007-01-01

    The relationship between plant and pollinator is considered as the mutualism because plant benefits from the pollinator's transport of male gametes and pollinator benefits from plant's reward.Nectar robbers are frequently described as cheaters in the plant-pollinator mutualism,because it is assumed that they obtain a reward (nectar) without providing a service (pollination).Nectar robbers are birds,insects,or other flower visitors that remove nectar from flowers through a hole pierced or bitten in the corolla.Nectar robbing represents a complex relationship between animals and plants.Whether plants benefit from the relationship is always a controversial issue in earlier studies.This paper is a review of the recent literatures on nectar robbing and attempts to acquire an expanded understanding of the ecological and evolutionary roles that robbers play.Understanding the effects of nectar robbers on the plants that they visited and other flower visitors is especially important when one considers the high rates of robbing that a plant population may experience and the high percentage of all flower visitors that nectar robbers make to some species.There are two standpoints in explaining why animals forage on flowers and steal nectar in an illegitimate behavior.One is that animals can only get food in illegitimate way because of the mismatch of the morphologies of animals'mouthparts and floral structure.The other point of view argues that nectar robbing is a relatively more efficient,thus more energy-saving way for animals to get nectar from flowers.This is probably associated with the difficulty of changing attitudes that have been held for a long time.In the case of positive effect,the bodies of nectar robbers frequently touch the sex organs of plants during their visiting to the flowers and causing pollination.The neutral effect,nectar robbers' behavior may destruct the corollas of flowers,but they neither touch the sex organs nor destroy the ovules.Their behavior

  9. The heart and heart conducting system in the kingdom of animals: A comparative approach to its evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Šolc, David

    2007-01-01

    The phylogeny of the heart and its conducting system is surveyed in the present study, as well as its parallels with ontogeny. A concise review of its evolution in the main taxonomic groups is presented. The aim is to inform physicians on evolutionary connections to the physiology of the human heart conducting system. Furthermore, some unanswered questions in terms of the developmental biology of the heart are offered. It is assumed that some supraventricular arrhythmias are based on remnants...

  10. Edaphics, active tectonics and animal movements in the Kenyan Rift - implications for early human evolution and dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kübler, Simon; Owenga, Peter; Rucina, Stephen; King, Geoffrey C. P.

    2014-05-01

    The quality of soils (edaphics) and the associated vegetation strongly controls the health of grazing animals. Until now, this has hardly been appreciated by paleo-anthropologists who only take into account the availability of water and vegetation in landscape reconstruction attempts. A lack of understanding the importance of the edaphics of a region greatly limits interpretations of the relation between our ancestors and animals over the last few million years. If a region lacks vital trace elements then wild grazing and browsing animals will avoid it and go to considerable length and take major risks to seek out better pasture. As a consequence animals must move around the landscape at different times of the year. In complex landscapes, such as tectonically active rifts, hominins can use advanced group behaviour to gain strategic advantage for hunting. Our study in the southern Kenya rift in the Lake Magadi region shows that the edaphics and active rift structures play a key role in present day animal movements as well as the for the location of an early hominin site at Mt. Olorgesailie. We carried out field analysis based on studying the relationship between the geology and soil development as well as the tectonic geomorphology to identify 'good' and 'bad' regions both in terms of edaphics and accessibility for grazing animals. We further sampled different soils that developed on the volcanic bedrock and sediment sources of the region and interviewed the local Maasai shepherds to learn about present-day good and bad grazing sites. At the Olorgesailie site the rift valley floor is covered with flood trachytes; basalts only occur at Mt. Olorgesailie and farther east up the rift flank. The hominin site is located in lacustrine sediments at the southern edge of a playa that extends north and northwest of Mt. Olorgesailie. The lakebeds are now tilted and eroded by motion on two north-south striking faults. The lake was trapped by basalt flows from Mt. Olorgesailie

  11. Phenotypic plasticity and longevity in plants and animals: cause and effect?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Renee M Borges

    2009-10-01

    Immobile plants and immobile modular animals outlive unitary animals. This paper discusses competing but not necessarily mutually exclusive theories to explain this extreme longevity, especially from the perspective of phenotypic plasticity. Stem cell immortality, vascular autonomy, and epicormic branching are some important features of the phenotypic plasticity of plants that contribute to their longevity. Monocarpy versus polycarpy can also influence the kind of senescent processes experienced by plants. How density-dependent phenomena affecting the establishment of juveniles in these immobile organisms can influence the evolution of senescence, and consequently longevity, is reviewed and discussed. Whether climate change scenarios will favour long-lived or short-lived organisms, with their attendant levels of plasticity, is also presented.

  12. Development of experimental animals for studies of radiation effects. Contribution to the studies of the team for laboratory animal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Author's team for the title purpose in National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) mainly handles the reproductive physiology and embryonic technology to meet the researchers' needs. For developing gene-modified animals, the system is established for freeze-storing the ovum of those animals based on techniques of the micro-manipulation for external handling of ovum, in vitro fertilization (IVF) and early embryo culture. For preparing transgenic and/or knockout mice, embryos of 2-8 cell stages are usually freeze-stored. IVF/implanting fertilized ovum systems are also run for requests for storing the gene-modified ova and for supplying quickly many (up to about 100) animals. Techniques for freeze-storing unfertilized ova are to be established within this year. As well, the team is conducting the practical studies for the animals like genetic diagnoses of diseases and for the rapid supply of animals in accordance to research needs. (S.I.)

  13. THE EFFECTS OF ANIMAL AGE AND ACETIC ACID CONCENTRATION ON PIGSKIN GELATIN CHARACTERISTICS

    OpenAIRE

    Y. Pranoto; A. Pertiwiningrum; Triatmojo, S.; M. Sompie

    2012-01-01

    This research was aimed to study the influence of animal age and concentration of the acetic acid solution on physical and chemical properties of pigskin gelatin. The experiment used Completely Randomized Design (CRD) with two factors. The first factor was animal age consisted of 3 levels (5, 7 and 9 months). The second factor was concentration of acetic acid solution consisted of 3 levels (2, 4 and 6 percents). The result showed that animal age had significant effect (P0.05) on the yields,...

  14. Effect of sepsis on behavioral changes on the ketamine-induced animal model of schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comim, Clarissa M; Silva, Napoleão C; Patrício, Janini J; Palmas, Daphne; Mendonça, Bruna P; Bittencourt, Mariana O; Cassol-Jr, Omar J; Barichello, Tatiana; Zugno, Alexandra I; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2015-04-15

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of sepsis on behavioral changes on the ketamine-induced animal model of schizophrenia. Male Wistar rats underwent Cecal Ligation and Perporation (CLP) with "basic support" or were sham-operated. After 30 days, the animals were submitted to a model of schizophrenia by injection of Ketamine. The behavior tests were performed after 30 min of the injection of Ketamine or saline. Ketamine in doses of 15 and 25mg/kg increased locomotor activity, latency to first contact in the social interaction and stereotyped behavior. Some changes caused by sepsis may be associated with a predisposition to develop schizophrenia in the animal model.

  15. Emerging directions in the study of the ecology and evolution of plant-animal mutualistic networks: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Hao; Goodale, Eben; Chen, Jin

    2015-01-01

    The study of mutualistic plant and animal networks is an emerging field of ecological research. We reviewed progress in this field over the past 30 years. While earlier studies mostly focused on network structure, stability, and biodiversity maintenance, recent studies have investigated the conservation implications of mutualistic networks, specifically the influence of invasive species and how networks respond to habitat loss. Current research has also focused on evolutionary questions inclu...

  16. Scientists and the 3Rs: attitudes to animal use in biomedical research and the effect of mandatory training in laboratory animal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, N H; Olsson, I A S

    2014-01-01

    The 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction, and refinement has increasingly been endorsed by legislators and regulatory bodies as the best approach to tackle the ethical dilemma presented by animal experimentation in which the potential benefits for humans stand against the costs borne by the animals. Even when animal use is tightly regulated and supervised, the individual researcher's responsibility is still decisive in the implementation of the 3Rs. Training in laboratory animal science (LAS) aims to raise researchers' awareness and increase their knowledge, but its effect on scientists' attitudes and practice has not so far been systematically assessed. Participants (n = 206) in eight LAS courses (following the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations category C recommendations) in Portugal were surveyed in a self-administered questionnaire during the course. Questions were related mainly to the 3Rs and their application, attitudes to animal use and the ethical review of animal experiments. One year later, all the respondents were asked to answer a similar questionnaire (57% response rate) with added self-evaluation questions on the impact of training. Our results suggest that the course is effective in promoting awareness and increasing knowledge of the 3Rs, particularly with regard to refinement. However, participation in the course did not change perceptions on the current and future needs for animal use in research. PMID:23940123

  17. Scientists and the 3Rs: attitudes to animal use in biomedical research and the effect of mandatory training in laboratory animal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, N H; Olsson, I A S

    2014-01-01

    The 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction, and refinement has increasingly been endorsed by legislators and regulatory bodies as the best approach to tackle the ethical dilemma presented by animal experimentation in which the potential benefits for humans stand against the costs borne by the animals. Even when animal use is tightly regulated and supervised, the individual researcher's responsibility is still decisive in the implementation of the 3Rs. Training in laboratory animal science (LAS) aims to raise researchers' awareness and increase their knowledge, but its effect on scientists' attitudes and practice has not so far been systematically assessed. Participants (n = 206) in eight LAS courses (following the Federation of European Laboratory Animal Science Associations category C recommendations) in Portugal were surveyed in a self-administered questionnaire during the course. Questions were related mainly to the 3Rs and their application, attitudes to animal use and the ethical review of animal experiments. One year later, all the respondents were asked to answer a similar questionnaire (57% response rate) with added self-evaluation questions on the impact of training. Our results suggest that the course is effective in promoting awareness and increasing knowledge of the 3Rs, particularly with regard to refinement. However, participation in the course did not change perceptions on the current and future needs for animal use in research.

  18. Neurological effects of white spirit: Contribution of animal studies during a 30-year period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Gunnar Damgård; Lund, Søren Peter; Ladefoged, Ole

    2006-01-01

    , but the neurophysiological tests showed adverse effects at this level. Fourth, neurophysiological methods may be more sensitive than histopathological, neurobehavioural and neurochemical methods. Overall, white spirit with a high and a low content of aromatics showed no overt difference in long-term effects in animals......Numerous studies have suggested that long-term occupational exposure to white spirit may cause chronic toxic encephalopathy (WHO 1996). This review summarizes the chronic nervous system effects of white spirit in animal studies during a 30-year period. First, routine histopathology was consistently...... unable to reveal adverse peripheral or central nervous system effects after inhalation of white spirit. Second, neurobehavioural studies in animals showed no adverse effect after inhalation of white spirit with a high content of aromatics in contrast to what was found with products with a low content...

  19. Effects of nitric oxide-related compounds in the acute ketamine animal model of schizophrenia

    OpenAIRE

    Kandratavicius, Ludmyla; Balista, Priscila Alves; Wolf, Daniele Cristina; Abrao, Joao; Evora, Paulo Roberto; Rodrigues, Alfredo Jose; Chaves, Cristiano; Maia-de-Oliveira, Joao Paulo; Leite, Joao Pereira; Dursun, Serdar Murat; Baker, Glen Bryan; Guimaraes, Francisco Silveira; Hallak, Jaime Eduardo Cecilio

    2015-01-01

    Background Better treatments for schizophrenia are urgently needed. The therapeutic use of the nitric oxide (NO)-donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in patients with schizophrenia has shown promising results. The role of NO in schizophrenia is still unclear, and NO modulation is unexplored in ketamine (KET) animal models to date. In the present study, we compared the behavioral effects of pre- and post-treatment with SNP, glyceryl trinitrate (GTN), and methylene blue (MB) in the acute KET animal...

  20. Animal models for predicting the efficacy and side effects of antipsychotic drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Pedro H. Gobira; Jivago Ropke; Aguiar, Daniele C; Jose A.S. Crippa; Moreira, Fabricio A.

    2013-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic drugs represents an important approach for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, their efficacy is limited to certain symptoms of this disorder, and they induce serious side effects. As a result, there is a strong demand for the development of new drugs, which depends on reliable animal models for pharmacological characterization. The present review discusses the face, construct, and predictive validity of classical animal models for studying the efficacy and side ...

  1. Analysis of neoplasia in life-span radiation effects studies in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the occurrence of neoplastic disease in animals on life-span radiation effects experiments presents some unique problems. A simple analysis of tumor incidence or prevalence may overlook differences in the nature of specific types of neoplasms which can be extremely important in interpreting the results. Analyses should address not only whether or not an animal has a particular tumor type, but should also address the ultimate effect of that tumor on the fate of the animal. For life-span studies in dogs, where multiple neoplasms in individual animals are the rule rather than the exception this is particularly important. An easily computerized approach to performing such analyses has been adapted from a previous work. Neoplasms are classified as incidental (those found at necropsy in dogs which died of an unrelated cause), mortality-independent (those seen in live dogs and diagnosed after surgical removal), or fatal (those directly or indirectly responsible for death). In the authors' studies such categorization has allowed the evaluation of the overall impact of a tumor on an animal and enhanced the understanding of the meaning of experimental results. Adoption of a similar approach by various groups performing radiation effects studies in animals would facilitate the comparative evaluation of data from these studies

  2. Evolution of the violin: The law of effect in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Edward A; Cullen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As is true for most other human inventions, the origin of the violin is unknown. What is known is that this popular and versatile instrument has notably changed over the course of several hundred years. At issue is whether those evolutionary changes in the construction of the violin are the result of premeditated, intelligent design or whether they arose through a trial-and-error process. Recent scientific evidence favors the latter account. Our perspective piece puts these recent empirical findings into a comprehensive selectionist framework. According to this view, the many things we do and make--like violins--arise from a process of variation and selection which accords with the law of effect. Contrary to popular opinion, there is neither mystique nor romance in this process; it is as fundamental and ubiquitous as the law of natural selection. As with the law of natural selection in the evolution of organisms, there is staunch resistance to the role of the law of effect in the evolution of human inventions. We conclude our piece by considering several objections to our perspective. PMID:26569015

  3. Evolution of the violin: The law of effect in action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Edward A; Cullen, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    As is true for most other human inventions, the origin of the violin is unknown. What is known is that this popular and versatile instrument has notably changed over the course of several hundred years. At issue is whether those evolutionary changes in the construction of the violin are the result of premeditated, intelligent design or whether they arose through a trial-and-error process. Recent scientific evidence favors the latter account. Our perspective piece puts these recent empirical findings into a comprehensive selectionist framework. According to this view, the many things we do and make--like violins--arise from a process of variation and selection which accords with the law of effect. Contrary to popular opinion, there is neither mystique nor romance in this process; it is as fundamental and ubiquitous as the law of natural selection. As with the law of natural selection in the evolution of organisms, there is staunch resistance to the role of the law of effect in the evolution of human inventions. We conclude our piece by considering several objections to our perspective.

  4. Neuroprotective effect of transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursors in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Aharonowiz

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Multiple sclerosis (MS is an immune mediated demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS. A potential new therapeutic approach for MS is cell transplantation which may promote remyelination and suppress the inflammatory process. METHODS: We transplanted human embryonic stem cells (hESC-derived early multipotent neural precursors (NPs into the brain ventricles of mice induced with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE, the animal model of MS. We studied the effect of the transplanted NPs on the functional and pathological manifestations of the disease. RESULTS: Transplanted hESC-derived NPs significantly reduced the clinical signs of EAE. Histological examination showed migration of the transplanted NPs to the host white matter, however, differentiation to mature oligodendrocytes and remyelination were negligible. Time course analysis of the evolution and progression of CNS inflammation and tissue injury showed an attenuation of the inflammatory process in transplanted animals, which was correlated with the reduction of both axonal damage and demyelination. Co-culture experiments showed that hESC-derived NPs inhibited the activation and proliferation of lymph node-derived T cells in response to nonspecific polyclonal stimuli. CONCLUSIONS: The therapeutic effect of transplantation was not related to graft or host remyelination but was mediated by an immunosuppressive neuroprotective mechanism. The attenuation of EAE by hESC-derived NPs, demonstrated here, may serve as the first step towards further developments of hESC for cell therapy in MS.

  5. Animal rights, animal minds, and human mindreading

    OpenAIRE

    Mameli, M.; Bortolotti, L

    2006-01-01

    Do non‐human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non‐human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. However, the s...

  6. Explaining the Segmentation Effect in Learning from Animations: The Role of Pausing and Temporal Cueing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanjers, Ingrid A. E.; van Gog, Tamara; Wouters, Pieter; van Merrienboer, Jeroen J. G.

    2012-01-01

    Segmentation of animations, that is presenting them in pieces rather than as a continuous stream of information, has been shown to have a beneficial effect on cognitive load and learning for novices. Two different explanations of this segmentation effect have been proposed. Firstly, pauses are usually inserted between the segments, which may give…

  7. Animal learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Leyre; Wasserman, Edward A

    2010-01-01

    Pavlov and Thorndike pioneered the experimental study of animal learning and provided psychologists with powerful tools to unveil its underlying mechanisms. Today's research developments and theoretical analyses owe much to the pioneering work of these early investigators. Nevertheless, in the evolution of our knowledge about animal learning, some initial conceptions have been challenged and revised. We first review the original experimental procedures and findings of Pavlov and Thorndike. Next, we discuss critical research and consequent controversies which have greatly shaped animal learning theory. For example, although contiguity seemed to be the only condition that is necessary for learning, we now know that it is not sufficient; the conditioned stimulus (CS) also has to provide information about the occurrence of the unconditioned stimulus (US). Also, animals appear to learn different things about the same stimuli when circumstances vary. For instance, when faced with situations in which the meaning of a CS changes, as in the case of acquisition and later extinction, animals seem to preserve the original knowledge (CS-US) in addition to learning about the new conditions (CS-noUS). Finally, we discuss how parallels among Pavlovian conditioning, operant conditioning, and human causal judgment suggest that causal knowledge may lie at the root of both human and animal learning. All of these empirical findings and theoretical developments prove that animal learning is more complex and intricate than was once imagined. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26272842

  8. Modular evolution of glutathione peroxidase genes in association with different biochemical properties of their encoded proteins in invertebrate animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zo Young-Gun

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidases (PHGPx, the most abundant isoforms of GPx families, interfere directly with hydroperoxidation of lipids. Biochemical properties of these proteins vary along with their donor organisms, which has complicated the phylogenetic classification of diverse PHGPx-like proteins. Despite efforts for comprehensive analyses, the evolutionary aspects of GPx genes in invertebrates remain largely unknown. Results We isolated GPx homologs via in silico screening of genomic and/or expressed sequence tag databases of eukaryotic organisms including protostomian species. Genes showing strong similarity to the mammalian PHGPx genes were commonly found in all genomes examined. GPx3- and GPx7-like genes were additionally detected from nematodes and platyhelminths, respectively. The overall distribution of the PHGPx-like proteins with different biochemical properties was biased across taxa; selenium- and glutathione (GSH-dependent proteins were exclusively detected in platyhelminth and deuterostomian species, whereas selenium-independent and thioredoxin (Trx-dependent enzymes were isolated in the other taxa. In comparison of genomic organization, the GSH-dependent PHGPx genes showed a conserved architectural pattern, while their Trx-dependent counterparts displayed complex exon-intron structures. A codon for the resolving Cys engaged in reductant binding was found to be substituted in a series of genes. Selection pressure to maintain the selenocysteine codon in GSH-dependent genes also appeared to be relaxed during their evolution. With the dichotomized fashion in genomic organizations, a highly polytomic topology of their phylogenetic trees implied that the GPx genes have multiple evolutionary intermediate forms. Conclusion Comparative analysis of invertebrate GPx genes provides informative evidence to support the modular pathways of GPx evolution, which have been accompanied with sporadic

  9. The effect of steps to promote higher levels of farm animal welfare across the EU. Societal versus animal scientists’ perceptions of animal welfare

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Averós, X.; Aparicio, M.A.; Ferrari, P.; Guy, J.H.; Hubbard, C.; Schmid, O.; Ilieski, V.; Spoolder, H.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Information about animal welfare standards and initiatives from eight European countries was collected, grouped, and compared to EU welfare standards to detect those aspects beyond minimum welfare levels demanded by EU welfare legislation. Literature was reviewed to determine the scientific relevanc

  10. [Effects of transgenic Bt crops on non-target soil animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi-gang; Ge, Feng

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic Bt crops are widely planted around the world. With the quick development and extension of genetically modified crops, it is needed to make a deep study on the effects of Bt crops on soil ecosystem. This paper reviewed the research progress on the effects of transgenic Bt crops on the population dynamics and community structure of soil animals, e.g., earthworm, nematode, springtail, mite, and beetle, etc. The development history of Bt crops was introduced, the passway the Bt protein comes into soil as well as the residual and degradation of Bt protein in soil were analyzed, and the critical research fields about the ecological risk analysis of transgenic Bt crops on non-target soil animals in the future were approached, which would provide a reference for the research of the effects of transgenic Bt crops on non-target soil animals.

  11. [Effects of transgenic Bt crops on non-target soil animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yi-gang; Ge, Feng

    2010-05-01

    Transgenic Bt crops are widely planted around the world. With the quick development and extension of genetically modified crops, it is needed to make a deep study on the effects of Bt crops on soil ecosystem. This paper reviewed the research progress on the effects of transgenic Bt crops on the population dynamics and community structure of soil animals, e.g., earthworm, nematode, springtail, mite, and beetle, etc. The development history of Bt crops was introduced, the passway the Bt protein comes into soil as well as the residual and degradation of Bt protein in soil were analyzed, and the critical research fields about the ecological risk analysis of transgenic Bt crops on non-target soil animals in the future were approached, which would provide a reference for the research of the effects of transgenic Bt crops on non-target soil animals. PMID:20707123

  12. Distinct expression patterns of glycoprotein hormone subunits in the lophotrochozoan Aplysia: implications for the evolution of neuroendocrine systems in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyland, Andreas; Plachetzki, David; Donelly, Evonne; Gunaratne, Dinuka; Bobkova, Yelena; Jacobson, John; Kohn, Andrea B; Moroz, Leonid L

    2012-11-01

    Glycoprotein hormones (GPHs) comprise a group of signaling molecules critical for major metabolic and reproductive functions. In vertebrates they include chorionic gonadotropin, LH, FSH, and TSH. The active hormones are characterized by heterodimerization between a common α and hormone-specific β subunit, which activate leucine-rich repeat-containing G protein coupled receptors. To date, genes referred to as GPHα2 and GPHβ5 have been the only glycoprotein hormone subunits identified in invertebrates, suggesting that other GPHα and GPHβ subunits diversified during vertebrate evolution. Still the functions of GPHα2 and GPHβ5 remain largely unknown for both vertebrates and invertebrates. To further understand the evolution and putative function of these subunits, we cloned and analyzed phylogenetically two glycoprotein subunits, AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ, from the sea hare Aplysia californica. Model based three-dimensional predictions of AcaGPHβ confirm the presence of a complete cysteine knot, two hairpin loops, and a long loop. As in the human GPHβ5 subunit the seatbelt structure is absent in AcaGPHβ. We also found that AcaGPHα and AcaGPHβ subunits are expressed in larval stages of Aplysia, and we present a detailed expression map of the subunits in the adult central nervous system using in situ hybridizations. Both subunits are expressed in subpopulations of pleural and buccal mechanosensory neurons, suggesting a neuronal modulatory function of these subunits in Aplysia. Furthermore it supports the model of a relatively diffuse neuroendocrine-like system in molluscs, where specific primary sensory neurons release peptides extrasynaptically (paracrine secretion). This is in contrast to vertebrates and insects, in which releasing and stimulating factor from centralized sensory regions of the central nervous system ultimately regulate hormone release in peripheral glands.

  13. On the Role of Neurogenesis and Neural Plasticity in the Evolution of Animal Personalities and Stress Coping Styles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overli, Oyvind; Sorensen, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Individual variation in how animals react to stress and environmental change has become a central topic in a wide range of biological disciplines, from evolutionary ecology to biomedicine. Such variation manifests phenotypically as correlated trait-clusters (referred to as coping styles, behavioral...... are conserved throughout the vertebrate subphylum, including factors affecting perception, learning, and memory of stimuli and events. Here we review conserved aspects of the contribution of neurogenesis and other aspects of neural plasticity to stress coping. In teleost fish, brain cell proliferation...... and neurogenesis have received recent attention. This work reveals that brain cell proliferation and neurogenesis are associated with heritable variation in stress coping style, and they are also differentially affected by short- and long-term stress in a biphasic manner. Routine-dependent and inflexible behavior...

  14. Mother Knows Best: Epigenetic Inheritance, Maternal Effects, and the Evolution of Human Intelligence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, David F.

    2006-01-01

    Contemporary evolution biology has recognized the role of development in evolution. Evolutionarily oriented psychologists have similarly recognized the role that behavioral plasticity, particularly early in development, may have had on the evolution of species, harking back to the ideas of Baldwin (the Baldwin effect). Epigenetic theories of…

  15. Sensory preconditioning, the Espinet effect, and Heider's balance theory: note on animal reasoning of event relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Sadahiko

    2005-06-01

    Sensory preconditioning and the Espinet effect illustrate that animals can reason about event relations. In sensory preconditioning, a combination of positive A-B and B-C relations yields a positive A-C relation. In the Espinet effect, a combination of a negative A-B relation and a positive B-C relation yields a negative A-C relation. Using analogies of Heider's balance theory of human attitudes, we predict that nonhuman animals would also infer a positive A-C relation from negative A-B and B-C relations.

  16. A method for comparison of animal and human alveolar dose and toxic effect of inhaled ozone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present models for predicting the pulmonary toxicity of O3 in humans from the toxic effects observed in animals rely on dosimetric measurements of O3 mass balance and species comparisons of mechanisms that protect tissue against O3. The goal of the study described was to identify a method to directly compare O3 dose and effect in animals and humans using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid markers. The feasibility of estimating O3 dose to alveoli of animals and humans was demonstrated through assay of reaction products of 18O-labeled O3 in lung surfactant and macrophage pellets of rabbits. The feasibility of using lung lavage fluid protein measurements to quantify the O3 toxic response in humans was demonstrated by the finding of significantly increased lung lavage protein in 10 subjects exposed to 0.4 ppm O3 for 2 h with intermittent periods of heavy exercise. The validity of using the lavage protein marker to quantify the response in animals has already been established. The positive results obtained in both the 18O3 and the lavage protein studies reported here suggest that it should be possible to obtain a direct comparison of both alveolar dose and toxic effect of O3 to alveoli of animals or humans

  17. Quality of mixing in a stired bioreactor used for animal cells culture: heterogeneities in a lab scale bioreactor and evolution of mixing time with scale up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collignon, ML.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal cells are industrially cultivated inside stirred bioreactors to produce proteinic compounds. Due to the use of mild agitation conditions in order to limit mechanical constraints, the homogeneity of the culture medium can be far from perfect. This study has therefore two objectives: the global characterization of the mixing via the mixing time and the local description of concentration fields. The mixing time is measured by conductimetry inside 20 l, 80 l, 600 l tanks. The Grenville correlation is adjusted on these experimental measurements to improve the prediction of the mixing time during the scale-up of the process. The concentration fields are visualized by the Planar Laser Induced Fluorescence (P.L.I.F. technique in the 20 l tank. This part of the study is focused on the time evolution of the maximum value of the tracer concentration inside measurement planes and of the numerical distribution of theses concentration fields.

  18. [Effect of the low-frequency impulse magnetic field on the autonomic nervous system in animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraiukhina, K Iu; Lobkaeva, E P; Deviatkova, N S

    2010-01-01

    The effect of weak (up to 3.5 mT) low-frequency (up to 100 Hz) impulse magnetic field on the state of the vegetative nervous system of animals has been studied by analyzing the variability of the heart rate. The effect of the magnetic field was estimated by a specially designed complex for recording cardiac signals of animals. Several specially selected regimes of impulse magnetic fields were studied. It was shown that the impulse magnetic field possesses a high biological activity at all regimes used, and the indices of the vegetative nervous system after the exposure to the impulse magnetic field approach the values typical for normotonic animals. This makes it possible to use magnetic fields at these regimes in magnetotherapy. PMID:20968088

  19. Antimyoclonic effect of gabapentin in a posthypoxic animal model of myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanthasamy, A G; Vu, T Q; Yun, R J; Truong, D D

    1996-02-22

    The antimyoclonic property of the novel antiepileptic drug, gabapentin (1-(aminomethyl) cyclohexane acetic acid), was tested in cardiac arrest-and p,p'-DDT(1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl)ethane)-induced animal models of myoclonus. Gabapentin dose-dependently attenuated myoclonus in posthypoxic rats for more than 3 h. The drug was also found to be effective in controlling the early stages of seizures following the anoxic insult. In contrast, the drug was ineffective in controlling either myoclonus or seizures in p,p'-DDT-treated animals. These results suggest that gabapentin can be used used as an effective therapeutic agent in an acute hypoxia/ischemia-induced neurological disorder. The data further indicate that distinct neurological mechanisms may be operating in the expression of myoclonus among posthypoxic and p,p'-DDT-induced animal models. PMID:8666053

  20. Effect of dietary protein content on animal production and blood metabolites of dairy cows during lactation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, R A; Young, F J; Patterson, D C; Kilpatrick, D J; Wylie, A R G; Mayne, C S

    2009-03-01

    Ninety autumn-calving Holstein dairy cows [45 primiparous and 45 multiparous (mean parity, 3.1)] were allocated to 1 of 3 dietary crude protein (CP) concentrations: 173, 144, or 114 g of CP/kg of DM, from calving until d 150 of lactation. On d 151, half of the animals in each treatment were allocated an alternative dietary protein concentration. Half of the animals receiving 114 g of CP/kg of DM went onto 144 g of CP/kg of DM; half of the animals receiving 144 g of CP/kg of DM went onto 173 g of CP/kg of DM; and half of the animals receiving 173 g of CP/kg of DM went onto 144 g of CP/kg of DM, with the remaining animals staying on their original treatment. This resulted in 6 treatments in the mid to late lactation period: 114/114, 144/144, 173/173, 114/144, 144/173, and 173/144 g of CP/kg of DM. An increase in dietary CP concentration significantly increased milk, fat, and protein yield in early lactation (d 1 to 150). Dry matter intake was also increased with increased dietary protein concentration; however, this was not significant between 144 and 173 g of CP/kg of DM. Increased dietary CP significantly increased plasma urea, albumin, and total protein concentrations but had no significant effect on NEFA, leptin, or IGF-1 concentrations. Decreasing the dietary CP concentration in mid-late lactation (d 151 to 305) from 173 to 144 g/kg of DM had no significant effect on milk yield, dry matter intake, or milk fat and protein yield, compared with animals that remained on 173 g of CP/kg of DM throughout lactation. Increasing dietary CP concentration from 144 to 173 g/kg of DM significantly increased dry matter intake compared with animals that remained on the 144 g of CP/kg of DM throughout lactation. There were no significant dietary treatment effects on live weight or body condition score change throughout the experiment. Results of this study indicate that high protein diets (up to 173 g of CP/kg of DM) improved feed intake and animal performance in early lactation

  1. The Mozart effect: tracking the evolution of a scientific legend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Adrian; Heath, Chip

    2004-12-01

    Theories of the diffusion of ideas in social psychology converge on the assumption that shared beliefs (e.g., social representations, rumours and legends) propagate because they address the needs or concerns of social groups. But little empirical research exists demonstrating this link. We report three media studies of the diffusion of a scientific legend as a particular kind of shared belief. We studied the Mozart effect (ME), the idea that listening to classical music enhances intelligence. Study 1 showed that the ME elicited more persistent media attention than other science reports and this attention increased when the ME was manifested in events outside of science. Study 2 suggested that diffusion of the ME may have responded to varying levels of collective anxiety. Study 3 demonstrated how the content of the ME evolved during diffusion. The results provide evidence for the functionality of diffusion of ideas and initial elements for a model of the emergence and evolution of scientific legends.

  2. The Mozart effect: tracking the evolution of a scientific legend.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bangerter, Adrian; Heath, Chip

    2004-12-01

    Theories of the diffusion of ideas in social psychology converge on the assumption that shared beliefs (e.g., social representations, rumours and legends) propagate because they address the needs or concerns of social groups. But little empirical research exists demonstrating this link. We report three media studies of the diffusion of a scientific legend as a particular kind of shared belief. We studied the Mozart effect (ME), the idea that listening to classical music enhances intelligence. Study 1 showed that the ME elicited more persistent media attention than other science reports and this attention increased when the ME was manifested in events outside of science. Study 2 suggested that diffusion of the ME may have responded to varying levels of collective anxiety. Study 3 demonstrated how the content of the ME evolved during diffusion. The results provide evidence for the functionality of diffusion of ideas and initial elements for a model of the emergence and evolution of scientific legends. PMID:15601511

  3. The Evolution and Space Weather Effects of Solar Coronal Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Krista, Larisza Diana

    2012-01-01

    In recent years the role of space weather forecasting has grown tremendously as our society increasingly relies on satellite dependent technologies. The forecasting of flare and CME related transient geomagnetic storms has become a primary initiative, however, minor magnetic storms caused by coronal holes (CHs) have also proven to be of high importance due to their long lasting and recurrent geomagnetic effects. In order to study CH properties, the author developed an automated CH detection method (CHARM), which uses local intensity histograms to identify CH boundaries. An additional algorithm package (CHEVOL) was developed to study individual CHs by tracking their boundary evolution. It is widely accepted that the short-term changes in CH boundaries are due to the interchange reconnection between the CH open field lines and small loops. In order to test the interchange reconnection model, the magnetic reconnection rate and the diffusion coefficient at CH boundaries were determined using observed CH boundary ...

  4. Anthropometric evolution and classification of pre-scholar and scholar students from public education: Relation to food of animal origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Aparecida Pissaia Savitsky

    2012-12-01

    decrease on the stature deficit on children from 0 to 6 years old (p<0.01 and a decrease on low weight (p<0.01, of weight and height of children from 6 to 12 years old (p=0.97. Results show an increase on children´s weight, especially on children under 6 years old, where there is a need for preventive attitudes, in order to reduce the DCNT. In this context the increase on quality and/or quantity of animal origin products in the children´s diet at school must be evaluated and reformulated substituting carbohydrates for animal food from several sources (poultry, fish, bovine meat, eggs, milk, etc. Sustainability of public education has to deal with nutritional factors and the end of the animal food chain to aim better education and better citizens.

  5. Genetic characterization of flea-derived Bartonella species from native animals in Australia suggests host-parasite co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaewmongkol, Gunn; Kaewmongkol, Sarawan; McInnes, Linda M; Burmej, Halina; Bennett, Mark D; Adams, Peter J; Ryan, Una; Irwin, Peter J; Fenwick, Stanley G

    2011-12-01

    Fleas are important arthropod vectors for a variety of diseases in veterinary and human medicine, and bacteria belonging to the genus Bartonella are among the organisms most commonly transmitted by these ectoparasites. Recently, a number of novel Bartonella species and novel species candidates have been reported in marsupial fleas in Australia. In the present study the genetic diversity of marsupial fleas was investigated; 10 species of fleas were collected from seven different marsupial and placental mammal hosts in Western Australia including woylies (Bettongia penicillata), western barred bandicoots (Perameles bougainville), mardos (Antechinus flavipes), bush rats (Rattus fuscipes), red foxes (Vulpes vulpes), feral cats (Felis catus) and rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus). PCR and sequence analysis of the cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and the 18S rRNA genes from these fleas was performed. Concatenated phylogenetic analysis of the COI and 18S rRNA genes revealed a close genetic relationship between marsupial fleas, with Pygiopsylla hilli from woylies, Pygiopsylla tunneyi from western barred bandicoots and Acanthopsylla jordani from mardos, forming a separate cluster from fleas collected from the placental mammals in the same geographical area. The clustering of Bartonella species with their marsupial flea hosts suggests co-evolution of marsupial hosts, marsupial fleas and Bartonella species in Australia. PMID:21856444

  6. Effect of Probiotics on Central Nervous System Functions in Animals and Humans: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huiying; Lee, In-Seon; Braun, Christoph; Enck, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To systematically review the effects of probiotics on central nervous system function in animals and humans, to summarize effective interventions (species of probiotic, dose, duration), and to analyze the possibility of translating preclinical studies. Literature searches were conducted in Pubmed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library. Only randomized controlled trials were included. In total, 38 studies were included: 25 in animals and 15 in humans (2 studies were conducted in both). Most studies used Bifidobacterium (eg, B. longum, B. breve, and B. infantis) and Lactobacillus (eg, L. helveticus, and L. rhamnosus), with doses between 109 and 1010 colony-forming units for 2 weeks in animals and 4 weeks in humans. These probiotics showed efficacy in improving psychiatric disorder-related behaviors including anxiety, depression, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), obsessive-compulsive disorder, and memory abilities, including spatial and non-spatial memory. Because many of the basic science studies showed some efficacy of probiotics on central nervous system function, this background may guide and promote further preclinical and clinical studies. Translating animal studies to human studies has obvious limitations but also suggests possibilities. Here, we provide several suggestions for the translation of animal studies. More experimental designs with both behavioral and neuroimaging measures in healthy volunteers and patients are needed in the future. PMID:27413138

  7. Using Bayesian analysis in repeated preclinical in vivo studies for a more effective use of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Rosalind; Sherington, John; Rastrick, Joe; Detrait, Eric; Hanon, Etienne; Watt, Gillian

    2016-05-01

    Whilst innovative Bayesian approaches are increasingly used in clinical studies, in the preclinical area Bayesian methods appear to be rarely used in the reporting of pharmacology data. This is particularly surprising in the context of regularly repeated in vivo studies where there is a considerable amount of data from historical control groups, which has potential value. This paper describes our experience with introducing Bayesian analysis for such studies using a Bayesian meta-analytic predictive approach. This leads naturally either to an informative prior for a control group as part of a full Bayesian analysis of the next study or using a predictive distribution to replace a control group entirely. We use quality control charts to illustrate study-to-study variation to the scientists and describe informative priors in terms of their approximate effective numbers of animals. We describe two case studies of animal models: the lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine release model used in inflammation and the novel object recognition model used to screen cognitive enhancers, both of which show the advantage of a Bayesian approach over the standard frequentist analysis. We conclude that using Bayesian methods in stable repeated in vivo studies can result in a more effective use of animals, either by reducing the total number of animals used or by increasing the precision of key treatment differences. This will lead to clearer results and supports the "3Rs initiative" to Refine, Reduce and Replace animals in research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effects of Roads on Animal Abundance: an Empirical Review and Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trina Rytwinski

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available We attempted a complete review of the empirical literature on effects of roads and traffic on animal abundance and distribution. We found 79 studies, with results for 131 species and 30 species groups. Overall, the number of documented negative effects of roads on animal abundance outnumbered the number of positive effects by a factor of 5; 114 responses were negative, 22 were positive, and 56 showed no effect. Amphibians and reptiles tended to show negative effects. Birds showed mainly negative or no effects, with a few positive effects for some small birds and for vultures. Small mammals generally showed either positive effects or no effect, mid-sized mammals showed either negative effects or no effect, and large mammals showed predominantly negative effects. We synthesized this information, along with information on species attributes, to develop a set of predictions of the conditions that lead to negative or positive effects or no effect of roads on animal abundance. Four species types are predicted to respond negatively to roads: (i species that are attracted to roads and are unable to avoid individual cars; (ii species with large movement ranges, low reproductive rates, and low natural densities; and (iii and iv small animals whose populations are not limited by road-affected predators and either (a avoid habitat near roads due to traffic disturbance or (b show no avoidance of roads or traffic disturbance and are unable to avoid oncoming cars. Two species types are predicted to respond positively to roads: (i species that are attracted to roads for an important resource (e.g., food and are able to avoid oncoming cars, and (ii species that do not avoid traffic disturbance but do avoid roads, and whose main predators show negative population-level responses to roads. Other conditions lead to weak or non-existent effects of roads and traffic on animal abundance. We identify areas where further research is needed, but we also argue that the

  9. An expertise reversal effect of segmentation in learning from animated worked-out examples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanjers, Ingrid; Wouters, Pieter; Van Gog, Tamara; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2010-01-01

    Spanjers, I. A. E., Wouters, P., Van Gog, T., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2011). An expertise reversal effect of segmentation in learning from animated worked-out examples. Computers in Human Behavior, 27(1), 46-52. doi:10.1016/j.chb.2010.05.011

  10. Effects of animal productivity on the costs of complying with environmental legislation in Dutch dairy farming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berentsen, P.B.M.

    2003-01-01

    Effects of animal productivity on the costs of complying with environmental legislation in Dutch dairy farming P. B. M. Berentsen, Farm Management Group, Wageningen University, Hollandseweg 1, 6706 KN Wageningen, The Netherlands Available online 20 November 2003. Abstract Dutch dairy farmers have to

  11. An Experiment on the Short-Term Effects of Engagement and Representation in Program Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevalainen, Seppo; Sajaniemi, Jorma

    2008-01-01

    When visualization tools utilized in computer programming education have been evaluated empirically, the results have remained controversial. To address this problem, we have developed a model of short-term effects of program animation, and used it in a series of experiments. In the current experiment, we varied visual representation of an…

  12. Supporting Multimedia Learning with Visual Signalling and Animated Pedagogical Agent: Moderating Effects of Prior Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A. M.; Ozogul, G.; Reisslein, M.

    2015-01-01

    An experiment examined the effects of visual signalling to relevant information in multiple external representations and the visual presence of an animated pedagogical agent (APA). Students learned electric circuit analysis using a computer-based learning environment that included Cartesian graphs, equations and electric circuit diagrams. The…

  13. Ecological effects and animal risk assessment of radiation pollution in Russia and former USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ecological after-effects of long-term radiation pollution, animal biodiversity changes and life-cycle assessment of model species of soil invertebrates mammals, birds, reptiles have been studied in 1968-1994 in the former USSR (Russia, Ukraine, Kazachstan). There has been observed an initial reduction of animal biodiversity community structure in Kyshtym (south Ural) and Chernobyl polluted areas and a low return to the former ecosystems. The secondary changes and side-effects for the active migrants (insects, birds, mammals) have been registered. The most valid bioindicators and biomarkers of radioactive pollution may be stable populations of reptiles, birds, earthworms, centipede, microarthropods. The radioactive soil pollution exerts the greatest impact on the permanent soil dwelling animals. As direct effects it has been seen the appreciable reduction of population density disturbance of the breeding process, degradation of species diversity community structure. In fact a soil with high level 90Sr and a radiation 1--3 R/day containing 10-fold reduction of population soil inhabit millipedes earthworms, insect larvae, Enchytraeidae aranea. The accumulation of radionuclides by terrestrial and soil animals effects of trophic levels, zoogenical radionuclides migration have been studied in polluted ecosystems of South Ural and Chernobyl

  14. [Effect of phenibut on the behavior of experimental animals under conditions of voluntary chronic alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiurenkov, I N; Voronkov, A V; Borodkina, L E

    2005-01-01

    The effect of phenibut on the locomotor and orientation-research activity, as well as on the alcohol and food motivation, was studied on experimental animals under conditions of voluntary chronic alcoholism. Phenibut decreased the manifestations of alcohol-induced behavioral disorders and reduced alcohol motivation. PMID:16047680

  15. 21 CFR 601.91 - Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Efficacy Studies Are Not Ethical or Feasible § 601.91 Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals. (a) FDA may grant marketing approval for a biological product for which safety has... and ethical. Such postmarketing studies would not be feasible until an exigency arises. When...

  16. 21 CFR 314.610 - Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUG Approval of New Drugs When Human Efficacy Studies Are Not Ethical or Feasible § 314.610 Approval based on evidence of effectiveness from studies in animals. (a) FDA may grant marketing approval for a... feasible and ethical. Such postmarketing studies would not be feasible until an exigency arises. When...

  17. Effects of Animation on Naming and Identification across Two Graphic Symbol Sets Representing Verbs and Prepositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Ralf W.; Koul, Rajinder; Shane, Howard; Sorce, James; Brock, Kristofer; Harmon, Ashley; Moerlein, Dorothy; Hearn, Emilia

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of animation on naming and identification of graphic symbols for verbs and prepositions were studied in 2 graphic symbol sets in preschoolers. Method: Using a 2 × 2 × 2 × 3 completely randomized block design, preschoolers across three age groups were randomly assigned to combinations of symbol set (Autism Language Program…

  18. Effectiveness of Three-Dimensional Digital Animation in Teaching Human Anatomy in an Authentic Classroom Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyek, Nady; Collet, Christian; Di Rienzo, Franck; De Almeida, Mickael; Guillot, Aymeric

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) digital animations were used to teach the human musculoskeletal system to first year kinesiology students. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of this method by comparing two groups from two different academic years during two of their official required anatomy examinations (trunk and upper limb…

  19. The Effects of Animation Technique on the 7th Grade Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of animation technique on academic achievement of students in the "Human and Environment" unit lectured as part of the Science and Technology course of the seventh grade in primary education. The sample of the study consists of 58 students attending to the 7th grade of Erzurum MEB…

  20. Antibiotic Resistance in Animal-waste-impacted Farm Soil: From Molecular Mechanisms to Microbial Evolution and Ecology

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Y.; Ward, M. J.; Hilpert, M.

    2012-12-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing public health problem worldwide and the routine use of antibiotics in industrial animal production has sparked debate on whether this practice might constitute an environmental and public health concern. At a broiler farm, electromagnetic induction (EMI) surveying assisted soil sampling from a chicken-waste-impacted site and a marginally affected site. Consistent with the EMI survey, disparity existed between the two sites with regard to soil pH, tetracycline resistance (TcR) levels among heterotrophic culturable soil bacteria, and the incidence/prevalence of a number of tet and erm genes in the soils. No significant difference was observed in these aspects between the marginally affected site and several sites in a regional state forest that has not been in agricultural use for decades. Shortly after our sampling, the farm closed down and all the waste was removed. This unique change in situation offered us an unusual opportunity to examine the reversibility of any impact of the chicken waste on the soil microbial community. Two years after the event, several antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) were still detected in the waste-impacted soil, and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) data showed that their relative abundance remained at substantial levels. A mobilizable tet(L)-carrying plasmid, pSU1, was identified in several chicken-waste-exposed soil bacteria of three different genera. Quantification of the plasmid's mobilization gene suggested that pSU1 had contributed to the prevalence and persistence of tet(L) in the waste-impacted soil. A second mobilizable tet(L)-carrying plasmid, pBSDMV9, isolated from the same soil, contained a region with 98.8% nucleotide identity to pSU1. The mosaic structure of the plasmids and the highly conserved nature of the tet(L) genes suggested that plasmid rearrangement favoring the acquisition of tet(L) may have occurred in the soil relatively recently. Additionally, in one chicken

  1. Effect of a wildlife conservation camp experience in China on student knowledge of animals, care, propensity for environmental stewardship, and compassionate behavior toward animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bexell, Sarah M.

    The goal of conservation education is positive behavior change toward animals and the environment. This study was conducted to determine whether participation in a wildlife conservation education camp was effective in positively changing 8-12 year old students': (a) knowledge of animals, (b) care about animals, (c) propensity for environmental and wildlife stewardship, and (d) compassionate behavior toward animals. During the summer of 2005, 2 five-day camps were conducted at 2 zoological institutions in Chengdu, China. The camp curriculum was influenced by theory and research on the following: conservation psychology, social learning theory, empathy and moral development theory, socio-biological theory, constructivist theory, and conservation science. Camp activities were sensitive to Chinese culture and included Chinese conservation issues. Activities were designed to help children form bonds with animals and care enough about them to positively change their behavior toward animals and the environment. This mixed methods study triangulated quantitative and qualitative data from six sources to answer the following: (1) Did camp increase student knowledge of animals? (2) Did camp increase student caring about animals? (3) Did camp increase student propensity for environmental and wildlife stewardship? (4) Did camp affect student compassionate behavior toward animals? A conservation stewards survey revealed significant increases on pre-post, self-report of knowledge, care, and propensity. Pre-post, rubric-scored responses to human-animal interaction vignettes indicated a significant increase in knowledge, and stable scores on care and propensity. Qualitative data from student journals, vignettes, and end-of-camp questionnaires demonstrated knowledge, caring, and propensity, and revealed the emergent theme empathy. To address question 4, instructors tallied campers' behavior toward animals using a student behavior ethogram. Occurrence of positive behaviors was

  2. Effects of different simplified milk recording methods on genetic evaluation with test-day animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Cacioppo, D; Tolone, M.; Riggio, V; Maizon, D.O.; Portolano, B

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare estimated breeding values (EBV) for milk yield using different testing schemes with a test-day animal model and to evaluate the effect of different testing schemes on the ranking of top sheep. Alternative recording schemes that use less information than that currently obtained with a monthly test-day schedule were employed to estimate breeding values. A random regression animal mixed model that used a spline function of days in milk was fitted. EB...

  3. Effects of number of animals monitored on representations of cattle group movement characteristics and spatial occupancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Liu

    Full Text Available The number of animals required to represent the collective characteristics of a group remains a concern in animal movement monitoring with GPS. Monitoring a subset of animals from a group instead of all animals can reduce costs and labor; however, incomplete data may cause information losses and inaccuracy in subsequent data analyses. In cattle studies, little work has been conducted to determine the number of cattle within a group needed to be instrumented considering subsequent analyses. Two different groups of cattle (a mixed group of 24 beef cows and heifers, and another group of 8 beef cows were monitored with GPS collars at 4 min intervals on intensively managed pastures and corn residue fields in 2011. The effects of subset group size on cattle movement characterization and spatial occupancy analysis were evaluated by comparing the results between subset groups and the entire group for a variety of summarization parameters. As expected, more animals yield better results for all parameters. Results show the average group travel speed and daily travel distances are overestimated as subset group size decreases, while the average group radius is underestimated. Accuracy of group centroid locations and group radii are improved linearly as subset group size increases. A kernel density estimation was performed to quantify the spatial occupancy by cattle via GPS location data. Results show animals among the group had high similarity of spatial occupancy. Decisions regarding choosing an appropriate subset group size for monitoring depend on the specific use of data for subsequent analysis: a small subset group may be adequate for identifying areas visited by cattle; larger subset group size (e.g. subset group containing more than 75% of animals is recommended to achieve better accuracy of group movement characteristics and spatial occupancy for the use of correlating cattle locations with other environmental factors.

  4. Effects of number of animals monitored on representations of cattle group movement characteristics and spatial occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Green, Angela R; Rodríguez, Luis F; Ramirez, Brett C; Shike, Daniel W

    2015-01-01

    The number of animals required to represent the collective characteristics of a group remains a concern in animal movement monitoring with GPS. Monitoring a subset of animals from a group instead of all animals can reduce costs and labor; however, incomplete data may cause information losses and inaccuracy in subsequent data analyses. In cattle studies, little work has been conducted to determine the number of cattle within a group needed to be instrumented considering subsequent analyses. Two different groups of cattle (a mixed group of 24 beef cows and heifers, and another group of 8 beef cows) were monitored with GPS collars at 4 min intervals on intensively managed pastures and corn residue fields in 2011. The effects of subset group size on cattle movement characterization and spatial occupancy analysis were evaluated by comparing the results between subset groups and the entire group for a variety of summarization parameters. As expected, more animals yield better results for all parameters. Results show the average group travel speed and daily travel distances are overestimated as subset group size decreases, while the average group radius is underestimated. Accuracy of group centroid locations and group radii are improved linearly as subset group size increases. A kernel density estimation was performed to quantify the spatial occupancy by cattle via GPS location data. Results show animals among the group had high similarity of spatial occupancy. Decisions regarding choosing an appropriate subset group size for monitoring depend on the specific use of data for subsequent analysis: a small subset group may be adequate for identifying areas visited by cattle; larger subset group size (e.g. subset group containing more than 75% of animals) is recommended to achieve better accuracy of group movement characteristics and spatial occupancy for the use of correlating cattle locations with other environmental factors. PMID:25647571

  5. The effect of dog-human interaction on cortisol and behavior in registered animal-assisted activity dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Zenithson Ying

    2013-01-01

    Background: The effect of animal-assisted activities (AAA) on the animal participants has been minimally investigated and the welfare of these animals has been questioned. Cortisol, in conjunction with stress-associated behavior, has been utilized as an objective assessment of animal welfare.Objective: Salivary cortisol and behavior in AAA dogs were measured to test the null hypothesis that salivary cortisol concentration and behavior are not different in an AAA environment compared to home o...

  6. Effects of Pronunciation Practice System Based on Personalized CG Animations of Mouth Movement Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Arai

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Pronunciation practice system based on personalized Computer Graphics: CG animation of mouth movement model is proposed. The system enables a learner to practice pronunciation by looking at personalized CG animations of mouth movement model , and allows him/her to compare them with his/her own mouth movements. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the system by using personalized CG animation of mouth movement model, Japanese vowel and consonant sounds were read by 8 infants before and after practicing with the proposed system, and their pronunciations were examined. Remarkable improvement on their pronunciations is confirmed through a comparison to their pronunciation without the proposed system based on identification test by subjective basis.

  7. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (pProteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption.

  8. Investigations into the effect of immunostimulating drugs on the immune system of irradiated experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments with mice and pigs a sublethal irradiation before vaccination proved to be by far more efficient than an irradiation with the same dose following vaccination. In the irradiated animals a retarded beginning of the immune response compared with the controls was observed. In the experiments with mice positive effects of the adjuvant azimexon and levamisol on the radiation induced immunosuppression was seen. In the experiments with pigs the radiation iduced immunosuppression was completely abolished by addition of incomplete Freund adjuvant to the antigen. Azimexon as adjuvant was efficient both when given before or after exposition. Post-endotoxic serum from BCG-infected animals (BCG/ET) had only a weak effect in animals immunized before exposition. Serum immunoglobulin levels of pigs were stable against irradiation and application of immunomodulating agents. Stimulation effects of the irradiation on the antibody response were observed in mice and pigs if the animals were first immunized and irradiated afterwards. In the irradiated pigs the mitogenic stimulation of T and B cells was depressed. After application of azimexon the stimulation of T cells was significantly increased in irradiated pigs; the impaired B cell stimulation, however, remained unaltered. By using the monoclonal antibody technique functionally distinct subpopulations of peripherals lymphocytes in swine were detected, each showing a different sensibility towards in vivo irradiation. (orig.) With 10 refs., 21 figs

  9. Evidence for effects of chronic lead exposure on blood pressure in experimental animals: an overview.

    OpenAIRE

    Victery, W

    1988-01-01

    Information obtained in a number of experimental studies conducted over the last 40 years on the effects of lead on blood pressure is reviewed. Differences in animal species, age at beginning of exposure, level of lead exposure, indices of lead burden, and blood pressure effects of each study are reported. In several of the high-dose experiments, hypertension was observed, but nephrotoxicity of lead may have contributed to its development. Moreover, in other high-dose experiments, no hyperten...

  10. Deep Time Ecosystem Engineers: The Correlation between Palaeozoic Vegetation, Evolution of Physical Riverine Habitats, and Plant and Animal Terrestrialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, N. S.; Gibling, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    corridors narrowed throughout the Ordovician and Silurian, the potential importance of riparian zones as a global biome would have increased as they became more extensive in continental environments. Furthermore, the move towards climatic controls on the ephemeral or perennial nature of streams would have boosted the diversity of temporally diverse hydrodynamic regimes. As single-thread meandering channels and extensive muddy floodplains, stabilised by vegetation, became significant components of the global suite of alluvial geomorphic components throughout the Siluro-Devonian, further diversification of the extent and diversity of physical habitats within the global riparian biome occurred. Into the Carboniferous, the evolution of the anabranching habit within alluvial systems created further new physical landforms for colonization and would have promoted increasingly complex hyporheic flow regimes. Furthermore the associated advent of arborescent vegetation and, specifically, the large woody debris supplied by this, would have created a wealth of new microhabitats for continental organisms. The expanding extent and diversity of physical alluvial niches during the Palaeozoic can be argued to be an underappreciated driver of the terrestrialization of early continental life. The study of the deep time fossil and stratigraphic record also illustrates that vegetation is a fundamental prerequisite for the creation of biogeomorphic alluvial landforms and physical habitats and microhabitats.

  11. Psychosocial and psychophysiological effects of human-animal interactions: the possible role of oxytocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBeetz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade it has become more widely accepted that pet-ownership and animal-assistance in therapy and education may have a multitude of positive effects on humans. Here, we review the evidence from 67 original studies on human-animal interactions (HAI which met our inclusion criteria with regard to sample size, peer-review and standard scientific research design. Among the well-documented effects of HAI in humans of different ages, with and without special medical or mental health conditions are benefits for: social attention, social behavior, interpersonal interactions and mood; stress-related parameters such as cortisol, heart rate, and blood pressure; self-reported fear and anxiety; and mental and physical health, especially cardiovascular diseases. Limited evidence exists for positive effects of HAI on: reduction of stress-related parameters such as epinephrine and norepinephrine; improvement of immune system functioning and pain management; increased trustworthiness of and trust towards other persons; reduced aggression; enhanced empathy and improved learning. We propose that the activation of the oxytocin system plays a key role in the majority of these reported psychological and psychophysiological effects of HAI. Oxytocin and HAI effects largely overlap, as documented by research in both, humans and animals, and first studies found that HAI affects the oxytocin system. As a common underlying mechanism, the activation of the oxytocin system does not only provide an explanation, but also allows an integrative view of the different effects of HAI.

  12. Scientific Opinion on the effect on public or animal health or on the environment on the presence of seeds of Ambrosia spp. in animal feed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, R.; Candresse, T.; Dormannsné Simon, E.;

    2010-01-01

    pollen in animals. With regard to the effects on the environment of the further distribution of Ambrosia spp. in the European Union, the PLH Panel concluded that there is no direct evidence that Ambrosia spp. cause extinction of plant species. However, there are some indications that A. artemisiifolia......The European Commission requested EFSA to provide a scientific opinion on the effect on public or animal health or on the environment on the further distribution of Ambrosia spp. in the European Union and on the importance of feed materials, in particular bird feed, in the dispersion of Ambrosia...... could become highly invasive in certain environmentally-valuable habitats and might be linked to an impoverishment of species richness, therefore further ecological studies are needed. The CONTAM Panel focused on the relative importance of animal feed, bird feed in particular, on the dispersion...

  13. Effects of sea level rise on coastal evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stive, M.J.F.

    1990-01-01

    Using the Dutch coastal evolution in the Holocene upto the present as an example and a test case, a coastal evolution concept is proposed and materialized with which shoreline position changes for different sea level rise scenarios are predicted. The (more generally applicable) model applies to (qua

  14. 动物中microRNA的保守性和进化历程%Conservation and Evolution of microRNAs in Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗艳; 张群; 梁宇君; 张士璀

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs,~22 nucleotides in length, which have been found in diverse animals and function as post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression. MiRNAs play versatile and important roles in the ontogeny of developmental timing, cell differentiation and nervous system development. Recent evidence has suggested that miRNAs have huge impacts on animal phylogeny. Many of miRNAs are phylogenetically conserved among different animals. In addition, the miRNAs innovation appears to be associated with the advent of major lineages of metazoans. This review summarizes conservations of miRNAs in their biogenesis, regulatory mechanisms, the phylogenetic distribution and functions in the ontogeny. We also discuss evolutionary histories of miRNAs and how they impact on the animal evolution.%microRNA是一类长度约为22个核苷酸的内源性非编码单链RNA,在后生动物中普遍存在,在转录后过程调控基因表达.miRNA在个体发育过程中发挥着各种功能,如发育时序调控和细胞分化、神经发育等.miRNA在各种后生动物中具有保守性,而且多个关键类群的出现皆伴随着大量新miRNA的产生,这些现象都表明miRNA与动物的系统发生密切相关.本文从miRNA的产生和作用机制、在后生动物中的分布格局及其在个体发育中的调控功能3个方面论述了miRNA的保守性,并结合miRNA的发生和发展历程,探讨了miRNA在动物进化中起到的重要作用.

  15. Comparative aspects of animal and human data on somatic effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains presentations at the 17th Symposium organized by the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, which took place in Chiba, Japan, from 11 to 12 December 1985. Unlike in the previous symposiums dealing with cellular and molecular levels, the present symposium discussed somatic effects of ionizing radiation at the organic level in conjunction with epidemiological data. This report is divided into five sections: the first is explanation for UNSCEAR's and ICRP's views of human and animal data in the current assessment of radiation health risks; the second covers comparison of epidemiological and animal experimental data on the dose-effect relationship for carcinogenesis, together with problems in epidemiological and experimental studies; the third discusses significance and problems in animal experiments on modifying factors of radiation carcinogenesis; the fourth deals with studies on carcinogenesis mechanism, aiming at elucidating their significance and potential role in the risk evaluation for humans; and the last section is a compilation of panel discussion of differences in humans and animals, giving a proposal for future research. (Namekawa, K.)

  16. Regulation of glucose utilization and lipogenesis in adipose tissue of diabetic and fat fed animals: Effects of insulin and manganese

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Najma Z Baquer; M Sinclair; S Kunjara; Umesh C S Yadav; P McLean

    2003-03-01

    In order to evaluate the modulatory effects of manganese, high fat diet fed and alloxan diabetic rats were taken and the changes in the glucose oxidation, glycerol release and effects of manganese on these parameters were measured from adipose tissue. An insulin-mimetic effect of manganese was observed in the adipose tissue in the controls and an additive effect of insulin and manganese on glucose oxidation was seen when Mn2+ was added in vitro. The flux of glucose through the pentose phosphate pathway and glycolysis was significantly decreased in high fat fed animals. Although the in vitro addition of Mn2+ was additive with insulin when 14CO2 was measured from control animals, it was found neither in young diabetic animals (6–8 weeks old) nor in the old (16 weeks old). Both insulin and manganese caused an increased oxidation of carbon-1 of glucose and an increase of its incorporation into 14C-lipids in the young control animals; the additive effect of insulin and manganese suggests separate site of action. This effect was decreased in fat fed animals, diabetic animals and old animals. Manganese alone was found to decrease glycerol in both the control and diabetic adipose tissue in in vitro incubations. The results of the effects of glucose oxidation, lipogenesis, and glycerol release in adipose tissue of control and diabetic animals of different ages are presented together with the effect of manganese on adipose tissue from high fat milk diet fed animals.

  17. Gene Expression Data from the Moon Jelly, Aurelia, Provide Insights into the Evolution of the Combinatorial Code Controlling Animal Sense Organ Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagayasu Nakanishi

    Full Text Available In Bilateria, Pax6, Six, Eya and Dach families of transcription factors underlie the development and evolution of morphologically and phyletically distinct eyes, including the compound eyes in Drosophila and the camera-type eyes in vertebrates, indicating that bilaterian eyes evolved under the strong influence of ancestral developmental gene regulation. However the conservation in eye developmental genetics deeper in the Eumetazoa, and the origin of the conserved gene regulatory apparatus controlling eye development remain unclear due to limited comparative developmental data from Cnidaria. Here we show in the eye-bearing scyphozoan cnidarian Aurelia that the ectodermal photosensory domain of the developing medusa sensory structure known as the rhopalium expresses sine oculis (so/six1/2 and eyes absent/eya, but not optix/six3/6 or pax (A&B. In addition, the so and eya co-expression domain encompasses the region of active cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and mechanoreceptor development in rhopalia. Consistent with the role of so and eya in rhopalial development, developmental transcriptome data across Aurelia life cycle stages show upregulation of so and eya, but not optix or pax (A&B, during medusa formation. Moreover, pax6 and dach are absent in the Aurelia genome, and thus are not required for eye development in Aurelia. Our data are consistent with so and eya, but not optix, pax or dach, having conserved functions in sensory structure specification across Eumetazoa. The lability of developmental components including Pax genes relative to so-eya is consistent with a model of sense organ development and evolution that involved the lineage specific modification of a combinatorial code that specifies animal sense organs.

  18. Metabolomic assessment with CE-MS of the nutraceutical effect of Cystoseira spp extracts in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraes, Edgar P; Rupérez, Francisco Javier; Plaza, Merichel; Herrero, Miguel; Barbas, Coral

    2011-08-01

    There is a need of scientific evidence of claimed nutraceutical effects, but also there is a social movement towards the use of natural products and among them algae are seen as rich resources. Within this scenario, the development of methodology for rapid and reliable assessment of markers of efficiency and security of these extracts is necessary. The rat treated with streptozotocin has been proposed as the most appropriate model of systemic oxidative stress for studying antioxidant therapies. Cystoseira is a brown alga containing fucoxanthin and other carothenes whose pressure-assisted extracts were assayed to discover a possible beneficial effect on complications related to diabetes evolution in an acute but short-term model. Urine was selected as the sample and CE-TOF-MS as the analytical technique to obtain the fingerprints in a non-target metabolomic approach. Multivariate data analysis revealed a good clustering of the groups and permitted the putative assignment of compounds statistically significant in the classification. Interestingly a group of compounds associated to lysine glycation and cleavage from proteins was found to be increased in diabetic animals receiving vehicle as compared to control animals receiving vehicle (N6,N6,N6-trimethyl-L-lysine, N-methylnicotinamide, galactosylhydroxylysine, L-carnitine, N6-acetyl-N6-hydroxylysine, fructose-lysine, pipecolic acid, urocanic acid, amino-isobutanoate, formylisoglutamine. Fructoselysine significantly decreased after the treatment changing from a 24% increase to a 19% decrease. CE-MS fingerprinting of urine has provided a group of compounds different to those detected with other techniques and therefore proves the necessity of a cross-platform analysis to obtain a broad view of biological samples. PMID:21792987

  19. The Effect of Stellar Evolution on Migrating Warm Jupiters

    CERN Document Server

    Frewen, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Warm jupiters are an unexpected population of extrasolar planets that are too near to their host to have formed in situ, but distant enough to retain a significant eccentricity in the face of tidal damping. These planets are curiously absent around stars larger than two solar radii. We hypothesize that the warm jupiters are migrating due to Kozai-Lidov oscillations, which leads to transient episodes of high eccentricity and a consequent tidal decay. As their host evolves, such planets would be rapidly dragged in or engulfed at minimum periapse, leading to a rapid depletion of the population with increasing stellar radius, as is observed. Using numerical simulations, we determine the relationship between periapse distance and orbital migration rate for planets 0.1 to 10 Jupiter masses and with orbital periods between 10 and 100 days. We find that Kozai-Lidov oscillations effectively result in planetary removal early in the evolution of the host star, possibly accounting for the observed deficit. While the obse...

  20. Effects of Diet on Brain Plasticity in Animal and Human Studies: Mind the Gap

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tytus Murphy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary interventions have emerged as effective environmental inducers of brain plasticity. Among these dietary interventions, we here highlight the impact of caloric restriction (CR: a consistent reduction of total daily food intake, intermittent fasting (IF, every-other-day feeding, and diet supplementation with polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs on markers of brain plasticity in animal studies. Moreover, we also discuss epidemiological and intervention studies reporting the effects of CR, IF and dietary polyphenols and PUFAs on learning, memory, and mood. In particular, we evaluate the gap in mechanistic understanding between recent findings from animal studies and those human studies reporting that these dietary factors can benefit cognition, mood, and anxiety, aging, and Alzheimer’s disease—with focus on the enhancement of structural and functional plasticity markers in the hippocampus, such as increased expression of neurotrophic factors, synaptic function and adult neurogenesis. Lastly, we discuss some of the obstacles to harnessing the promising effects of diet on brain plasticity in animal studies into effective recommendations and interventions to promote healthy brain function in humans. Together, these data reinforce the important translational concept that diet, a modifiable lifestyle factor, holds the ability to modulate brain health and function.

  1. Effects of Diet on Brain Plasticity in Animal and Human Studies: Mind the Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Gisele Pereira

    2014-01-01

    Dietary interventions have emerged as effective environmental inducers of brain plasticity. Among these dietary interventions, we here highlight the impact of caloric restriction (CR: a consistent reduction of total daily food intake), intermittent fasting (IF, every-other-day feeding), and diet supplementation with polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on markers of brain plasticity in animal studies. Moreover, we also discuss epidemiological and intervention studies reporting the effects of CR, IF and dietary polyphenols and PUFAs on learning, memory, and mood. In particular, we evaluate the gap in mechanistic understanding between recent findings from animal studies and those human studies reporting that these dietary factors can benefit cognition, mood, and anxiety, aging, and Alzheimer's disease—with focus on the enhancement of structural and functional plasticity markers in the hippocampus, such as increased expression of neurotrophic factors, synaptic function and adult neurogenesis. Lastly, we discuss some of the obstacles to harnessing the promising effects of diet on brain plasticity in animal studies into effective recommendations and interventions to promote healthy brain function in humans. Together, these data reinforce the important translational concept that diet, a modifiable lifestyle factor, holds the ability to modulate brain health and function. PMID:24900924

  2. Effects of urbanization on groundwater evolution in an urbanizing watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, D.; Banner, J. L.; Bendik, N.

    2011-12-01

    The Jollyville Plateau Salamander (Eurycea tonkawae), a candidate species for listing under the Endangered Species Act, is endemic to springs and caves within the Bull Creek Watershed of Austin, Texas. Rapid urbanization endangers known populations of this salamander. Conservation strategies lack information on the extent of groundwater contamination from anthropogenic sources in this karst watershed. Spring water was analyzed for strontium (Sr) isotopes and major ions from sites classified as "urban" or "rural" based on impervious cover estimates. Previous studies have shown that the 87Sr/86Sr value of municipal water is significantly higher than values for natural streamwater, which are similar to those for the Cretaceous limestone bedrock of the region's watersheds. We investigate the application of this relationship to understanding the effects of urbanization on groundwater quality. The use of Sr isotopes as hydrochemical tracers is complemented by major ion concentrations, specifically the dominant ions in natural groundwater (Ca and HCO3) and the ions associated with the addition of wastewater (Na and Cl). To identify high priority salamander-inhabited springs for water quality remediation, we explore the processes controlling the chemical evolution of groundwater such as municipal water inputs, groundwater-soil interactions, and solution/dissolution reactions. 87Sr/86Sr values for water samples from within the watershed range from 0.70760 to 0.70875, the highest values corresponding to sites located in the urbanized areas of the watershed. Analyses of the covariation of Sr isotopes with major ion concentrations help elucidate controls on spring water evolution. Springs located in rural portions of the watershed have low 87Sr/86Sr, high concentrations of Ca and HCO3, and low concentrations of Na and Cl. This is consistent with small inputs of municipal water. Three springs located in urban portions of the watershed have high 87Sr/86Sr, low Ca and HCO3, and

  3. New animal model to study epigenetic mechanisms mediating altered gravity effects upon cell growth and morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigoryan, Eleonora N.; Dvorochkin, Natasha; Radugina, Elena A.; Poplinskaya, Valentina; Novikova, Julia; Almeida, Eduardo

    The gravitational field and its variations act as a major environmental factor that can impact morphogenesis developing through epigenetic molecular mechanisms. The mechanisms can be thoroughly investigated by using adequate animal models that reveal changes in the morpho-genesis of a growing organ as a function of gravitational effects. Two cooperative US/Russian experiments on Foton-M2 (2005) and Foton-M3 (2007) were the first to demonstrate differences in the shape of regenerating tails of space-flown and ground control newts. The space-flown and aquarium (simulated microgravity) animals developed lancet-shaped tails whereas 1 g con-trols (kept in space-type habitats) showed hook-like regenerates. These visual observations were supported by computer-aided processing of the images and statistical analysis of the results. Morphological examinations and cell proliferation measurements using BrdU demon-strated dorsal-ventral asymmetry as well as enhanced epithelial growth on the dorsal area of regenerating tails in 1 g newts. These findings were reproduced in laboratory tests on newts kept at 1 g and in large water tanks at cut g. The 1 g animals showed statistically significant deviations of the lancet-like tail shape typically seen in aquarium animals. Such modifications were found as early as regeneration stages III-IV and proved irreversible. The authors believe that the above phenomenon detected in newts used in many space experiments can serve as an adequate model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying gravitational effects upon animal morphogenesis.

  4. Risk assessment and cost-effectiveness of animal health certification methods for livestock export in Somalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Jones, T J D; Njeumi, F; Elsawalhy, A; Wabacha, J; Rushton, J

    2014-03-01

    Livestock export is vital to the Somali economy. To protect Somali livestock exports from costly import bans used to control the international spread of disease, better certification of livestock health status is required. We performed quantitative risk assessment and cost-effectiveness analysis on different health certification protocols for Somali livestock exports for six transboundary diseases. Examining stock at regional markets alone without port inspection and quarantine was inexpensive but was ineffective for all but contagious bovine pleuropneumonia, contagious caprine pleuropneumonia and peste des petits ruminants. While extended pre-export quarantine improves detection of infections that cause clinical disease, if biosecurity is suboptimal quarantine provides an opportunity for transmission and increased risk. Clinical examination, laboratory screening and vaccination of animals for key diseases before entry to the quarantine station reduced the risk of an exported animal being infected. If vaccination could be reliably performed weeks before arrival at quarantine its effect would be greatly enhanced. The optimal certification method depends on the disease. Laboratory diagnostic testing was particularly important for detecting infections with limited clinical signs in male animals (only males are exported); for Rift Valley fever (RVF) the probability of detection was 99% or 0% with and without testing. Based on our findings animal inspection and certification at regional markets combined with quarantine inspection and certification would reduce the risk of exporting infected animals and enhance disease control at the regional level. This is especially so for key priority diseases, that is RVF, foot-and-mouth disease and Brucellosis. Increased data collection and testing should be applied at point of production and export.

  5. Behavioral effects of acclimatization to restraint protocol used for awake animal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Michael D; Pira, Ashley S; Febo, Marcelo

    2013-07-15

    Functional MRI in awake rats involves acclimatization to restraint to minimize motion. We designed a study to examine the effects of an acclimatization protocol (5 days of restraint, 60 min per day) on the emission of 22-kHz ultrasonic vocalizations and performance in a forced swim test (FST). Our results showed that USV calls are reduced significantly by days 3, 4 and 5 of acclimatization. Although the rats showed less climbing activity (and more immobility) in FST on day 5 compared to the 1st day of restraint acclimatization, the difference was not detected once the animals were given a 2-week hiatus. Overall, we showed that animals adapt to the restraint over a five-day period; however, restraint may introduce confounding behavioral outcomes that may hinder the interpretation of results derived from awake rat imaging. The present data warrants further testing of the effects of MRI restraint on behavior. PMID:23562621

  6. Energy dependence of the Cronin effect from nonlinear QCD evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonlinear evolution of dense partonic systems has been suggested as a novel physics mechanism relevant for the dynamics of p-A and A-A collisions at collider energies. Here we study to what extent the description of Cronin enhancement in the framework of this nonlinear evolution is consistent with the recent observation in √(s)=200 GeV d-Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We solve the Balitsky-Kovchegov evolution equation numerically for several initial conditions encoding Cronin enhancement. We find that the properly normalized nuclear gluon distribution is suppressed at all momenta relative to that of a single nucleon. For the resulting spectrum of produced gluons in p-A and A-A collisions, the nonlinear QCD evolution is unable to generate a Cronin-type enhancement, and it quickly erases any such enhancement which may be present at lower energies

  7. Effects of two- and three-dimensional animations on coordination chemistry conceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedy, Debra Erika

    This study investigated the effects of animation dimensions, spatial ability level, and gender on student understanding of coordination chemistry concepts. A computer module was developed for a general chemistry chapter of coordination chemistry, incorporating images, animations (two-dimensional, three-dimensional depth perception, or three-dimensional anaglyph), explanations, questions, and feedback. Intact laboratory sections were randomly assigned to one of three animation conditions or the control group. Students within each section were designated as high or low spatial ability based on total scores on two spatial tests. The study examined the effects of animation condition (three treatments and control), spatial ability level (high or low), and gender on post-test scores of coordination chemistry. Analyses were also conducted for these factors subdivided by question types (problem-solving, algorithmic, isomers, color and magnetism, and Crystal Field Theory (CFT)). Results of analyses were nonsignificant for animation conditions and gender on post-test measures, but spatial ability was significantly correlated with scores on problem-solving, isomers, and Crystal Field Theory questions. Although nonsignificant differences were obtained between treatment and control group scores, students classified as high spatial ability generally scored higher than low spatial ability students. Exceptions to these generalizations occurred significant gender by spatial ability level interactions in the control group and two-dimensional condition group for AB isomers and CFT questions, respectively. No significant differences were obtained between animation condition groups on post-test measures. Based on observations of students' interactions with the modules and responses to the module evaluation survey, students perceived the module to be helpful although several students commented that the topics were too complex to learn in a one-hour intervention. Interviews with two

  8. Effect of management practices and animal age on incidence of mastitis in Nili Ravi buffaloes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Tariq; Rahman, Abdur; Qureshi, Muhammand Subhan; Hussain, Muhammad Tariq; Khan, Muhammad Shauib; Uddin, Siraj; Iqbal, Muhammad; Han, Bo

    2014-10-01

    Buffalo is an economically important dairy animal in South Asia but mostly ignored in research priorities. In this retrospective study, the effect of management practices and age of animal on the incidence of mastitis in Nili Ravi buffaloes was investigated. A total of 1,560 quarters of buffaloes (n = 390) were screened by visual examination of the udder and milk (clinical mastitis) and California mastitis test (subclinical mastitis). Household data was collected on a predesigned questionnaire and analyzed. The prevalence of subclinical mastitis, clinical mastitis, and blind quarters was 41.8, 13.6, and 9.7 %, respectively. The highest prevalence was noted in the hind quarters and left side as compared to that in the forequarters and right side. This data significantly (p buffaloes that ranged 6-10 l/day showed a higher rate of mastitis occurrence (p < 0.05). The cleanliness condition of a farm also contributed significantly. Animal age significantly affected the incidence of mastitis. Results revealed that age of the animal has a positive correlation (R (2) = 0.772) with mastitis. This study concluded that some factors alone or in combination with other factors influence significantly the occurrence of mastitis, and to minimize the infection, these factors should be considered. The outcome of the study will be valuable for policy-making for positive management practices and implementation of preventive measures. PMID:25027737

  9. Evaluation of protective effect of Aegle marmelos Corr. in an animal model of chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanphawng Lalremruta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate ethanolic extract of leaves of Aegle marmelos in an experimental animal model of chronic fatigue syndrome for potential therapeutic benefit. Materials and Methods: Age/weight-matched female Wistar albino rats were grouped into five groups. (Group I- V (n = 8. Group I served as naïve control and II served as stress control. Except for group I animals, other group animals were subjected to forced swimming every day for 15 minutes to induce a state of chronic fatigue and simultaneously treated with ethanolic extract of Aegle marmelos (EEAM 150 and 250 mg/kg b.w. and Imipramine (20 mg.kg b.w., respectively. Duration of immobility, anxiety level and locomotor activity were assessed on day 1, 7, 14 and 21 followed by biochemical estimation of oxidative biomarkers at the end of the study. Results: Treatment with EEAM (150 and 250 mg/kg b.w. resulted in a statistically significant and dose dependent reduction (P <0.001 in the duration of immobility, reduction in anxiety and increase in locomotor activity. Dose dependent and significant reduction in LPO level and increase in CAT and SOD was observed in extract treated animals. Conclusion: The results are suggestive of potential protective effect of A. marmelos against experimentally induced CFS.

  10. Grain size effects on He bubbles distribution and evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Gao, X.; Gao, N. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, Z.G., E-mail: zhgwang@impcas.ac.cn [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Cui, M.H.; Wei, K.F.; Yao, C.F.; Sun, J.R.; Li, B.S.; Zhu, Y.B.; Pang, L.L. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Li, Y.F. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Wang, D. [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xie, E.Q. [School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • SMAT treated T91 and conventional T91 were implanted by 200 keV He{sup 2+} to 1 × 10{sup 21} He m{sup −2} at room temperature and annealed at 450 °C for 3.5 h. • He bubbles in nanometer-size-grained T91 are smaller in as-implanted case. • The bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were hard to detect and those along the nanograin boundaries coalesced and filled with the grain boundaries after annealing. • Brownian motion and coalescence and Ostwald ripening process might lead to bubbles morphology presented in the nanometer-size-grained T91 after annealing. - Abstract: Grain boundary and grain size effects on He bubble distribution and evolution were investigated by He implantation into nanometer-size-grained T91 obtained by Surface Mechanical Attrition Treatment (SMAT) and the conventional coarse-grained T91. It was found that bubbles in the nanometer-size-grained T91 were smaller than those in the conventional coarse-grained T91 in as-implanted case, and bubbles in the matrix of nanograins were undetectable while those at nanograin boundaries (GBs) coalesced and filled in GBs after heat treatment. These results suggested that the grain size of structural material should be larger than the mean free path of bubble’s Brownian motion and/or denuded zone around GBs in order to prevent bubbles accumulation at GBs, and multiple instead of one type of defects should be introduced into structural materials to effectively reduce the susceptibility of materials to He embrittlement and improve the irradiation tolerance of structural materials.

  11. Antioxidant effect of garlic and aged black garlic in animal model of type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Young-Min; Gweon, Oh-Cheon; Seo, Yeong-Ju; Im, Jieun; Kang, Min-Jung; Kim, Myo-Jeong; Kim, Jung-In

    2009-01-01

    Hyperglycemia in the diabetic state increases oxidative stress and antioxidant therapy can be strongly correlated with decreased risks for diabetic complications. The purpose of this study is to determine antioxidant effect of garlic and aged black garlic in animal model of type 2 diabetes. The antioxidant activity of garlic and aged black garlic was measured as the activity in scavenging free radicals by the trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) assay. Three week-old db/db mice were ...

  12. Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ayahuasca: a systematic literature review of animal and human studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael G. dos Santos; Osório, Flávia L.; José Alexandre S. Crippa; Hallak, Jaime E. C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To conduct a systematic literature review of animal and human studies reporting anxiolytic or antidepressive effects of ayahuasca or some of its isolated alkaloids (dimethyltryptamine, harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline). Methods: Papers published until 3 April 2015 were retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases following a comprehensive search strategy and using a predetermined set of criteria for article selection. Results: Five hundred and fourteen studies ...

  13. Effects of Diet on Brain Plasticity in Animal and Human Studies: Mind the Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Tytus Murphy; Gisele Pereira Dias; Sandrine Thuret

    2014-01-01

    Dietary interventions have emerged as effective environmental inducers of brain plasticity. Among these dietary interventions, we here highlight the impact of caloric restriction (CR: a consistent reduction of total daily food intake), intermittent fasting (IF, every-other-day feeding), and diet supplementation with polyphenols and polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) on markers of brain plasticity in animal studies. Moreover, we also discuss epidemiological and intervention studies reporting ...

  14. Effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (an animal model of multiple sclerosis)

    OpenAIRE

    Klaren, Rachel E; Motl, Robert W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Exercise training has improved many outcomes in “clinical” research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is limited understanding of the underlying “basic” pathophysiological mechanisms. The animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), seems ideal for examining the effects of exercise training on MS-disease pathophysiology. EAE is an autoimmune T-helper cell-mediated disease characterized by T-cell and monocyte infiltration and inflammation in the ...

  15. Effects of Onion Juice on the Normal Flora of Eyelids and Conjunctiva in an Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Nejabat, Mahmoud; Salehi, Alireza; Noorani Azad, Parisa; Ashraf, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Traditional medicine/complementary alternative medicine may suggest new ideas to modern medicine in order to face new challenges however these concepts should be acknowledged based on experimental studies. Objectives: We aimed to study the effects of onion (Allium cepa) juice on the normal flora of conjunctiva and eye lids, and to follow the histopathology changes of conjunctiva in an animal study. Materials and Methods: Twenty-four rabbits were randomly classified into three equa...

  16. Effects of Animal Science Agricultural Education Course Completion on Urban High School Students' Career Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Gowans, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    This study focused on testing the effects of agricultural education on urban high school students’ career choices. It looked into how students view agriculture, how they perceive their peers view agriculture, how their demographics are related to career choice, and if their career choice was changed to a different career upon completion of the study. The study showed a positive relationship between completing an agricultural education class in animal science and interest in going into an agri...

  17. The Effects of Panax ginseng and Panax quinquefolius on Thermoregulation in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Na Hong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We devised a study using animal models of hyperthermia and hypothermia and also attempted to accurately assess the effects of Panax ginseng (PG and Panax quinquefolius (PQ on body temperature using these models. In addition, we investigated the effects of PG and PQ in our animal models in high and low temperature environments. The results of our experiments show that mice with normothermia, hyperthermia, and hypothermia maintained their body temperatures after a certain period in accordance with the condition of each animal model. In our experiments of body temperature change in models of normal, low, or high room temperature, the hyperthermic model did not show any body temperature change in either the PG- or PQ-administered group. In the normal and low room temperature models, the group administered PG maintained body temperature, while the body temperature of the PQ-administered group was lower than or similar to that of the control group. In conclusion, the fact that PG increases body temperature could not be verified until now. We also showed that the effect of maintaining body temperature in the PG-administered group was superior in a hypothermia-prone low temperature environment.

  18. Effects of HIV and Methamphetamine on Brain and Behavior: Evidence from Human Studies and Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soontornniyomkij, Virawudh; Kesby, James P; Morgan, Erin E; Bischoff-Grethe, Amanda; Minassian, Arpi; Brown, Gregory G; Grant, Igor

    2016-09-01

    Methamphetamine (Meth) use is frequent among HIV-infected persons. Combined HIV and Meth insults may exacerbate neural injury in vulnerable neuroanatomic structures or circuitries in the brain, leading to increased behavioral disturbance and cognitive impairment. While acute and chronic effects of Meth in humans and animal models have been studied for decades, the neurobehavioral effects of Meth in the context of HIV infection are much less explored. In-depth understanding of the scope of neurobehavioral phenotypes and mechanisms in HIV/Meth intersection is needed. The present report summarizes published research findings, as well as unpublished data, in humans and animal models with regard to neurobehavioral disturbance, neuroimaging, and neuropathology, and in vitro experimental systems, with an emphasis on findings emerging from the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) funded Translational Methamphetamine AIDS Research Center (TMARC). Results from human studies and animal (primarily HIV-1 gp120 transgenic mouse) models thus far suggest that combined HIV and Meth insults increase the likelihood of neural injury in the brain. The neurobehavioral effects include cognitive impairment and increased tendencies toward impaired behavioral inhibition and social cognition. These impairments are relevant to behaviors that affect personal and social risks, e.g. worse medication adherence, riskier behaviors, and greater likelihood of HIV transmission. The underlying mechanisms may include electrochemical changes in neuronal circuitries, injury to white matter microstructures, synaptodendritic damage, and selective neuronal loss. Utilization of research methodologies that are valid across species is instrumental in generating new knowledge with clinical translational value. PMID:27484318

  19. Relative biological effectiveness and radiation weighting factors in the context of animals and plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation weighting factors have long been employed to modify absorbed dose as part of the process of evaluating radiological impact to humans. Their use represents an acknowledgement of the fundamental difference in energy deposition patterns of charged and uncharged particles, and how this can translate into varying degrees of biological impact. Weighting factors used in human radiation protection are derived from a variety of endpoints taken from in-vitro experiments that include human and animal cell lines, as well as in-vivo experiments with animals. Nonetheless, the application of radiation weighting factors in the context of dose assessment of animals and plants is not without some controversy. Specifically, radiation protection of biota has largely focused on limiting deterministic effects, such as reduced reproductive fitness. Consequently, the application of conventional stochastic-based radiation weighting factors (when used for human protection) appears inappropriate. While based on research, radiation weighting factors represent the parsing of extensive laboratory studies on relative biological effectiveness. These studies demonstrate that the magnitude of a biological effect depends not just on dose, but also on other factors including the rate at which the dose is delivered, the type and energy of the radiation delivering the dose, and, most importantly, the endpoint under consideration. This article discusses the efforts taken to develop a logical, transparent, and defensible approach to establishing radiation weighting factors for use in assessing impact to non-human biota, and the challenges found in differentiating stochastic from deterministic impacts.

  20. The UDP-glycosyltransferase (UGT) superfamily expressed in humans, insects and plants: Animal-plant arms-race and co-evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Karl Walter

    2016-01-01

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are major phase II enzymes of a detoxification system evolved in all kingdoms of life. Lipophilic endobiotics such as hormones and xenobiotics including phytoalexins and drugs are conjugated by vertebrates mainly with glucuronic acid, by invertebrates and plants mainly with glucose. Plant-herbivore arms-race has been the major driving force for evolution of large UGT and other enzyme superfamilies. The UGT superfamily is defined by a common protein structure and signature sequence of 44 amino acids responsible for binding the UDP moiety of the sugar donor. Plants developed toxic phytoalexins stored as glucosides. Upon herbivore attack these conjugates are converted to highly reactive compounds. In turn, animals developed large families of UGTs in their intestine and liver to detoxify these phytoalexins. Interestingly, phytoalexins, exemplified by quercetin glucuronides and glucosinolate-derived isocyanates, are known insect attractant pigments in plants, and antioxidants, anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive compounds of humans. It is to be anticipated that phytochemicals may provide a rich source in beneficial drugs.

  1. Computer animation in teaching science: Effectiveness in teaching retrograde motion to 9th graders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenk, Kristin Elmstrom

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether an instructional approach which includes computer animations is more effective than a traditional textbook-only approach in helping ninth grade students learn an abstract concept, in this case planetary retrograde motion. This investigation uses a quasi-experimental design with convenient sampling. The independent variable is the type of instruction provided to students; traditional text-based instruction (control group) compared to traditional instruction which also includes the viewing of 4 computer animations (treatment). Two conditions of the treatment examine the relative advantage of the order of the presentation of the animations and text-based instruction, as well as the quality of understanding and the retention of the learning over time. The dependent variable is student achievement which is measured using an instrument designed specifically for this study. Comparison of the independent variable to the dependent variable based upon the results from a Repeated Measure Factorial Design in ANOVA indicates that the treatment is an effective instructional technique. The posttest1 mean score of the treatment groups was significantly greater than the posttest1 mean score of the control group. Further posthoc tests indicate that there was no significant difference between the two treatments (1 and 2); read/animation versus animation/read. However, there was a significant difference in the mean score depending on the pathway, students enrolled in the A pathway achieved a significantly higher mean score after the treatment than students in the B pathway. The A pathway (n = 185) represent the larger heterogeneous population of students as compared to the B pathway (n=16) which includes students with lower cognitive abilities and special needs. When all of the students are included in the analysis the results indicate that students do not retain their understanding of the concept. However, when the students in the B

  2. Antidepressive and anxiolytic effects of ayahuasca: a systematic literature review of animal and human studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael G. dos Santos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To conduct a systematic literature review of animal and human studies reporting anxiolytic or antidepressive effects of ayahuasca or some of its isolated alkaloids (dimethyltryptamine, harmine, tetrahydroharmine, and harmaline. Methods: Papers published until 3 April 2015 were retrieved from the PubMed, LILACS and SciELO databases following a comprehensive search strategy and using a predetermined set of criteria for article selection. Results: Five hundred and fourteen studies were identified, of which 21 met the established criteria. Studies in animals have shown anxiolytic and antidepressive effects of ayahuasca, harmine, and harmaline, and experimental studies in humans and mental health assessments of experienced ayahuasca consumers also suggest that ayahuasca is associated with reductions in anxiety and depressive symptoms. A pilot study reported rapid antidepressive effects of a single ayahuasca dose in six patients with recurrent depression. Conclusion: Considering the need for new drugs that produce fewer adverse effects and are more effective in reducing anxiety and depression symptomatology, the described effects of ayahuasca and its alkaloids should be further investigated.

  3. Effects of different simplified milk recording methods on genetic evaluation with Test-Day animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cacioppo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to compare estimated breeding values (EBV for milk yield using different testing schemes with a test-day animal model and to evaluate the effect of different testing schemes on the ranking of top sheep. Alternative recording schemes that use less information than that currently obtained with a monthly test-day schedule were employed to estimate breeding values. A random regression animal mixed model that used a spline function of days in milk was fitted. EBVs obtained with alternative recording schemes showed different degrees of Spearman correlation with EBVs obtained using the monthly recording scheme. These correlations ranged from 0.77 to 0.92. A reduction in accuracy and intensity of selection could be anticipated if these alternative schemes are used; more research in this area is needed to reduce the costs of test-day recording.

  4. Animal mdels for the study of the effects of spaceflight on the immune system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    Animal models have been used extensively to study the effects of spaceflight on the immune system. The rat has been the animal used most extensively, but some studies have also been carried out utilizing mice and rhesus monkeys. Hindlimb unloading of rats and mice is a ground-based model that has been utilized to determine the effects of spaceflight-type conditions on the immune systems. The results using this model have shown that hindlimb unloading results in alterations of functional rodent immune responses, including cytokine production, blastogenesis of leukocytes, response of bone marrow cells to colony stimulating factors, neutrophil activity, and resistance to infection. Distribution of leukocyte subtypes was not affected by hindlimb unloading. Studies on rats flown in space have demonstrated that exposure to spaceflight results in alterations in cytokine production, alterations in the ability of bone marrow cells to respond to colony stimulating factors, alterations in leukocyte subset distribution, and alterations in natural killer cell function. When pregnant rats were flown in space, although the immune responses of the pregnant mothers were altered by exposure to spaceflight, no effects of spaceflight on the immune responses of the offspring were observed. In one study, rhesus monkeys were flown in space and their immune status was evaluated upon their return to earth. Results of that study showed alterations in the ability of monkey immune cells to produce cytokines, express cytokine receptors, and respond to colony stimulating factor. Therefore, it is clear that exposure to spaceflight results in alterations in immune responses of the test animals. These changes are similar to those observed for humans that have flown in space, and demonstrate that the animal models are appropriate for studying the effects of spaceflight on the immune system. Although use of the hindlimb unloading model on the ground has indicated that exposure to the model also

  5. The effect of young children on their parents’ anime viewing habits: Evidence from Japanese micro data

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAMURA, Eiji

    2013-01-01

    Anime is now considered an accepted form of animation and is considered to represent Japanese contemporary culture worldwide. There are many fans of anime and manga, creating a community known as otaku world. However, Japanese anime and manga have gained popularity in Western countries as well as in Japan. This paper attempts to ascertain the determinants of watching anime in Japan based on individual-level data from Japan. Despite the growth in the number of adult anime fans, children are st...

  6. [Effects of laser radiation on the periodontium. An animal model approach. Effects of usual radiation dosage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguerol Rodriguez, B; Alandez Chamorro, J; Cañizares Garcia, J; Campos Muñoz, A; Sicilia Felechosa, A

    1989-05-01

    Twenty four albino mice of forty days old were selected. Twelve forty days old albino mice were irradiated with a Helium-Neon laser source, dose of 10.50566 Jul/cm2. They were divided in two groups according to time of animal sacrifice (immediately after irradiation and ten days after). As control were used twelve mice using the same time as the experimental groups, but without radiation. T.E.M. ultrathin sections showed alteration only in the conjunctiva and in the bone tissues, but not in the epithelial tissue. The bone showed two osteocyte population according to their response to irradiation. The first population showed characteristic comparable with the controls, and the second showed alterations suggestive of a degenerative process. The connective tissue also showed two fibroblasts populations, the first showed signs of a big synthesizing activity, and the second, degenerative signs. The first fibroblast population appeared in the animals sacrificed immediately after irradiation. PMID:2637054

  7. [Effects of laser radiation on the periodontium. An animal model approach. Effects of usual radiation dosage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguerol Rodriguez, B; Alandez Chamorro, J; Cañizares Garcia, J; Campos Muñoz, A; Sicilia Felechosa, A

    1989-05-01

    Twenty four albino mice of forty days old were selected. Twelve forty days old albino mice were irradiated with a Helium-Neon laser source, dose of 10.50566 Jul/cm2. They were divided in two groups according to time of animal sacrifice (immediately after irradiation and ten days after). As control were used twelve mice using the same time as the experimental groups, but without radiation. T.E.M. ultrathin sections showed alteration only in the conjunctiva and in the bone tissues, but not in the epithelial tissue. The bone showed two osteocyte population according to their response to irradiation. The first population showed characteristic comparable with the controls, and the second showed alterations suggestive of a degenerative process. The connective tissue also showed two fibroblasts populations, the first showed signs of a big synthesizing activity, and the second, degenerative signs. The first fibroblast population appeared in the animals sacrificed immediately after irradiation.

  8. Tuition vs. Intuition: Effects of Instruction on Naive Theories of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shtulman, Andrew; Calabi, Prassede

    2013-01-01

    Recent research suggests that a major obstacle to evolution understanding is an essentialist view of the biological world. The present study investigated the effects of formal biology instruction on such misconceptions. Participants (N = 291) completed an assessment of their understanding of six aspects of evolution (variation, inheritance,…

  9. Computer animation as a tool to visualize effects of seismic wave propagation inside heterogeneous media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lanucara

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available A technique to make computer animations representing the propagation of antiplane shear waves in heterogeneous dissipative media is presented. The aim is to develop a useful tool to better investigate the physics of site effectsin the 2D approximation. We apply this technique to real case studies that were the subject of previous papers. For each case study a movie has been made to illustrate the wavefield time evolution and its interaction with the geological structure. All the movies can be seen and downloaded at the web site http://sigfrido.ingrm.it/movies.html. The paper shows the most representative frames of movies, providing an overview of the role played by the topographic irregularities and the geometry of internal discontinuities in trapping and focusing energy. The details of the dynamics are well visualized through movies. Particular attention is devoted to the representation of simulated ground motion in sediment-filled basins under resonance conditions. Problems related to color scales and frame normalization are analysed and discussed.

  10. The study of biological effects of electromagnetic mobile phone radiation on experimental animals by combining numerical modeling and experimental research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Krstić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to study biological effects of electromagneticradiation, it is essential to know the real values of field componentsthat penetrated the tissue. The study of biological effects is usuallyperformed on experimental animals. The biological effects observedon experimental animals should be linked with penetrating field inthe tissue. The penetrating electromagnetic field is almost impossibleto measure; therefore, modeling process must be carried out and thefield components in models of experimental animals could becalculated. This paper presents an approach to modeling of fieldpenetration and gives contribution to understanding the real effects of the fields and the sensitivity of tissues to electromagnetic radiation generated by mobile phone.

  11. Animation & Neurocinematics*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carpe Pérez, Inmaculada Concepción

    2016-01-01

    machines that think”-(Damasio, A. Descartes error). Such feelings come from the interpretation of the emotions in our bodies. Emotions are our universal language, the motivation of living, the key to what makes a movie successful and truly an art piece that you will remember because moves you. Animation......, indeed, can be considered a social/ emotional learning media, which goes beyond the limitations of live action movies. This is due to the diversity of techniques, and its visual plasticity that constructs the impossible. Animators are not real actors but more like the midwife who brings the anima...... into aliveness, which requires knowing how emotions work. Ed Hooks as an expert in training animators and actors, always remarks: “emotions tend to lead to action”. In this paper we want to argue that by producing animated films, as we watch them, cause a stronger effect, not only in our brains, but also in our...

  12. Cooperative effects in microstructural evolutions under irradiation: fundamental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a novel technique for studying the coupling of the evolution of the various components of the microstructure. The state of the microstructure is represented by a point in an appropriate state space; a microstructural evolution corresponds to a trajectory in this space. Standard technique are used for studying the topology of all a priori possible trajectories. The practical use of this technique is exemplified by the study of the evolution of dislocation lines or dislocation interstitial loops in the presence of cavities. The state of the microstructure is represented by the curvature radii of these two classes of sinks. The model reveals the following possible behaviours, some of which have been experimentally observed but not properly accounted for by existing theories: - existence of an incubation dose for swelling. The amplitude of the incubation dose depends on the dislocation density and on the irradiation flux and temperature; - possibility of transient swelling (cavity growth followed by decay); - large dose divergence of evolution which are very similar at lower doses (swelling heterogeneities); - irradiation induced enhancement of the rate of sintering: a new mechanism has been revealed by the model. Preliminary results obtained for precipitates-containing microstructures are briefly discussed

  13. Chemical cocktails in aquatic systems: Pesticide effects on the response and recovery of >20 animal taxa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural systems are often exposed to individual insecticides or combinations of multiple insecticides. Using an additive and substitutive design, we examined how populations and communities containing >20 animal taxa are affected by four insecticides applied individually and as a mixture for 18 wks in aquatic mesocosms. The four insecticides had distinct lethal effects on the response and recovery of cladocerans, copepods, amphipods, isopods, and amphibians but not snails. The lethal effect on cladocerans and copepods induced trophic cascades that facilitated algal blooms and abiotic changes (higher pH and dissolved oxygen, but lower light transmission). Exposure to endosulfan resulted in a lag effect reducing cladocerans and spring-breeding amphibian abundance. The reduction in spring-breeding amphibian abundance led to cascading indirect effects on summer-breeding amphibians. Finally, the mixture treatment had lethal effects throughout the community that led to long-term effects on amphibian mass and unique indirect consequences on phytoplankton and abiotic variables. - Highlights: • Insecticides had unique direct and indirect effects on response and recovery. • Due to lag effects, endosulfan was more toxic than expected based on 4d tests. • Variation in oviposition phenology led to positive effects on amphibians. • Lethal direct effects of mixtures were pervasive and led to unique indirect effects. - Insecticides applied individually and in a mixture have complex direct and indirect consequences on aquatic system response and recovery

  14. In Vivo Evaluation of Cervical Stiffness Evolution during Induced Ripening Using Shear Wave Elastography, Histology and 2 Photon Excitation Microscopy: Insight from an Animal Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Peralta

    Full Text Available Prematurity affects 11% of the births and is the main cause of infant mortality. On the opposite case, the failure of induction of parturition in the case of delayed spontaneous birth is associated with fetal suffering. Both conditions are associated with precocious and/or delayed cervical ripening. Quantitative and objective information about the temporal evolution of the cervical ripening may provide a complementary method to identify cases at risk of preterm delivery and to assess the likelihood of successful induction of labour. In this study, the cervical stiffness was measured in vivo in pregnant sheep by using Shear Wave Elastography (SWE. This technique assesses the stiffness of tissue through the measurement of shear waves speed (SWS. In the present study, 9 pregnant ewes were used. Cervical ripening was induced at 127 days of pregnancy (term: 145 days by dexamethasone injection in 5 animals, while 4 animals were used as control. Elastographic images of the cervix were obtained by two independent operators every 4 hours during 24 hours after injection to monitor the cervical maturation induced by the dexamethasone. Based on the measurements of SWS during vaginal ultrasound examination, the stiffness in the second ring of the cervix was quantified over a circular region of interest of 5 mm diameter. SWS was found to decrease significantly in the first 4-8 hours after dexamethasone compared to controls, which was associated with cervical ripening induced by dexamethasone (from 1.779 m/s ± 0.548 m/s, p < 0.0005, to 1.291 m/s ± 0.516 m/s, p < 0.000. Consequently a drop in the cervical elasticity was quantified too (from 9.5 kPa ± 0.9 kPa, p < 0.0005, to 5.0 kPa ± 0.8 kPa, p < 0.000. Moreover, SWE measurements were highly reproducible between both operators at all times. Cervical ripening induced by dexamethasone was confirmed by the significant increase in maternal plasma Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, as evidenced by the assay of its

  15. Neuroprotective effects of protocatechuic aldehyde against neurotoxin-induced cellular and animal models of Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhao

    Full Text Available Protocatechuic aldehyde (PAL has been reported to bind to DJ-1, a key protein involved in Parkinson's disease (PD, and exerts potential neuroprotective effects via DJ-1 in SH-SY5Y cells. In this study, we investigated the neuroprotective pharmacological effects of PAL against neurotoxin-induced cell and animal models of PD. In cellular models of PD, PAL markedly increased cell viability rates, mitochondrial oxidation-reduction activity and mitochondrial membrane potential, and reduced intracellular ROS levels to prevent neurotoxicity in PC12 cells. In animal models of PD, PAL reduced the apomorphine injection, caused turning in 6-OHDA treated rats, and increased the motor coordination and stride decreases in MPTP treated mice. Meanwhile, in an MPTP mouse model, PAL prevented a decrease of the contents of dopamine (DA and its metabolites in the striatum and TH-positive dopaminergic neuron loss in the substantia nigra (SN. In addition, PAL increased the protein expression of DJ-1 and reduced the level of α-synuclein in the SN of MPTP lesioned mice. PAL also increased the spine density in hippocampal CA1 neurons. The current study demonstrates that PAL can efficiently protect dopaminergic neurons against neurotoxin injury in vitro and in vivo, and that the potential mechanisms may be related to its effects in increasing DJ-1, decreasing α-synuclein and its growth-promoting effect on spine density.

  16. Using the Ferret as an Animal Model for Investigating Influenza Antiviral Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ding Y; Hurt, Aeron C

    2016-01-01

    The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort toward the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titer of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness. PMID:26870031

  17. Using the ferret as an animal model for investigating influenza antiviral effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Yuan Oh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concern of the emergence of a pandemic influenza virus has sparked an increased effort towards the development and testing of novel influenza antivirals. Central to this is the animal model of influenza infection, which has played an important role in understanding treatment effectiveness and the effect of antivirals on host immune responses. Among the different animal models of influenza, ferrets can be considered the most suitable for antiviral studies as they display most of the human-like symptoms following influenza infections, they can be infected with human influenza virus without prior viral adaptation and have the ability to transmit influenza virus efficiently between one another. However, an accurate assessment of the effectiveness of an antiviral treatment in ferrets is dependent on three major experimental considerations encompassing firstly, the volume and titre of virus, and the route of viral inoculation. Secondly, the route and dose of drug administration, and lastly, the different methods used to assess clinical symptoms, viral shedding kinetics and host immune responses in the ferrets. A good understanding of these areas is necessary to achieve data that can accurately inform the human use of influenza antivirals. In this review, we discuss the current progress and the challenges faced in these three major areas when using the ferret model to measure influenza antiviral effectiveness.

  18. Effects on Animal Models of Depression of Bioactive Compounds from Entomogenous Fungi, A Novel Antioxidant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周兰兰; 明亮; 马传庚; 樊美珍; 程燕; 江勤

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the antidepressant effects and its mechanism of bioactive compounds (metabolite extract) from entomogenous fungi (BCEF) on experimental animal models of depression. Methods: The antidepressant effect of BCEF was examined on the acquired models of depression (rats and mice in forced swimming test) and unpredictable chronic stress mouse models. The behavior alterations were assayed by detecting the duration of immobility in forced swimming test. UV spectrophotometer analysis technique was used to detect the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) and catalase (CAT) in mice brain mitochondria; and colorimetric method was used to detect the content of malondealdehyde (MDA), nitrogen oxide (NO) in rat brain cytoplasm and mitochondria. Results: BCEF (25, 50,100 mg/kg) could obviously shorten the immobility time in forced swimming mice and BCEF (50,100 mg/kg)could obviously shorten the immobility time in forced swimming rats. Both of them showed some extent of dose-effect relationship. BCEF (50, 100 mg/kg) could significantly inhibit the increase of MDA and NO content in brain mitochondria and cytoplasm in chronic unpredictable stress models. BCEF (25,50,100 mg/kg)could obviously enhance the activities of SOD and GSH-PX. BCEF (50 mg/kg) also enhances the activities of CAT. Conclusion: BCEF has antidepressant effects in depressed animal models. The anti-oxidation may be one of the important mechanisms.

  19. Animal models for predicting the efficacy and side effects of antipsychotic drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro H. Gobira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of antipsychotic drugs represents an important approach for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, their efficacy is limited to certain symptoms of this disorder, and they induce serious side effects. As a result, there is a strong demand for the development of new drugs, which depends on reliable animal models for pharmacological characterization. The present review discusses the face, construct, and predictive validity of classical animal models for studying the efficacy and side effects of compounds for the treatment of schizophrenia. These models are based on the properties of antipsychotics to impair the conditioned avoidance response and reverse certain behavioral changes induced by psychotomimetic drugs, such as stereotypies, hyperlocomotion, and deficit in prepulse inhibition of the startle response. Other tests, which are not specific to schizophrenia, may predict drug effects on negative and cognitive symptoms, such as deficits in social interaction and memory impairment. Regarding motor side effects, the catalepsy test predicts the liability of a drug to induce Parkinson-like syndrome, whereas vacuous chewing movements predict the liability to induce dyskinesia after chronic treatment. Despite certain limitations, these models may contribute to the development of more safe and efficacious antipsychotic drugs.

  20. Stem cell transplantation in neurological diseases: improving effectiveness in animal models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella eAdami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neurological diseases afflict a growing proportion of the human population. There are two reasons for this: first, the average age of the population (especially in the industrialised world is increasing, and second, the diagnostic tools to detect these pathologies are now more sophisticated and can be used on a higher percentage of the population. In many cases, neurological disease has a pharmacological treatment which, as in the case of Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Epilepsy, and Multiple Sclerosis can reduce the symptoms and slow down the course of the disease but cannot reverse its effects or heal the patient.In the last two decades the transplantation approach, by means of stem cells of different origin, has been suggested for the treatment of neurological diseases. The choice of slightly different animal models and the differences in methods of stem cell preparation make it difficult to compare the results of transplantation experiments. Moreover, the translation of these results into clinical trials with human subjects is difficult and has so far met with little success.This review seeks to discuss the reasons for these difficulties by considering the differences between human and animal cells (including isolation, handling and transplantation and between the human disease model and the animal disease model.

  1. The effect of proteins from animal source foods on heme iron bioavailability in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Fernando; Olivares, Manuel; Valenzuela, Carolina; Brito, Alex; Weinborn, Valerie; Flores, Sebastián; Arredondo, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Forty-five women (35-45 year) were randomly assigned to three iron (Fe) absorption sub-studies, which measured the effects of dietary animal proteins on the absorption of heme Fe. Study 1 was focused on heme, red blood cell concentrate (RBCC), hemoglobin (Hb), RBCC+beef meat; study 2 on heme, heme+fish, chicken, and beef; and study 3 on heme and heme+purified animal protein (casein, collagen, albumin). Study 1: the bioavailability of heme Fe from Hb was similar to heme only (∼13.0%). RBCC (25.0%) and RBCC+beef (21.3%) were found to be increased 2- and 1.6-fold, respectively, when compared with heme alone (p<0.05). Study 2: the bioavailability from heme alone (10.3%) was reduced (p<0.05) when it was blended with fish (7.1%) and chicken (4.9%), however it was unaffected by beef. Study 3: casein, collagen, and albumin did not affect the bioavailability of Fe. Proteins from animal source foods and their digestion products did not enhance heme Fe absorption. PMID:26593548

  2. THE EFFECTS OF METAL NANOPARTICLES ON EMBRYOS OF DIFFERENT ANIMAL SPECIES. A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. TEUŞAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Today nanotechnology represents a domain that is rapidly developing because nanoparticles are being used in a very large range of products with biomedical applications. Every year, new products, containing nanoparticles (NP appear on the market. Most of the products containing such nanomaterials come to be used by consumers without a previous and careful testing. Therefore, the effects they may have upon human health should be thoroughly investigated, the toxicological potential of NP upon the reproduction function (nanoreprotoxicity in particular, as any possible noxious effect will be reflected in the new generation. Most of the research papers that exist refer on the effects of silver, gold and titanium dioxide NP on embryo development. In this review paper we present the effects of less studied metal NP (platinum, aluminium, cerium oxide, tin oxide, nickel and indium on different species of animal embryos (Gallus domesticus – different hybrids, Danio rerio and Xenopus laevis

  3. The Possible Effects of Depleted Uranium (DU) Ammunition on the Environment and in Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As stated by the official reports, during NATO bombing of Serbia and Montenegro in 1999 approximately 500.000 missiles were used i.e. 3600 kg of uranium oxide, yielding activity of 18,3x1010 Bq entered the environment. Yugoslav Federal Ministry of Defense announced that 8 locations in the region of Vranje, Bujanovac and Lustica Peninsula, outside Kosovo/Metohia, were hit by DU ammunition and were isolated afterwards. The soil was contaminated with 200.000-250.000 Bq uranium/kg soil but this was mainly agricultural land, far from urban areas. The report stated that no DU ammunition was used above 44th parallel. The paper presents the preliminary results of the study on environmental and animal health effects due to the use of DU ammunition during NATO bombing of Serbia and Montenegro in 1999. The samples of animal blood (sheep, caws), soils and vegetation (corps, grass, leaves) were collected randomly in the region of Bujanovac (Novo Selo, Borovac) in the spring/fall of 2003. The hematological and some biochemical parameters of the peripheral blood were analyzed: concentration of hemoglobin, number of erythrocytes, leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, eozinophiles, neutrophiles, serumamiloidA (SAA), haptoglobin (Hp) and malondialdehide in erythrocytes and blood serum. The samples were analyzed by classical manual counting methods, spectrophotometry (by Drapkin) and ELISA immunological technique. Blood samples from the control group of animals on a farm in the vicinity of Belgrade were taken and analyzed for the same parameters, too. The samples of soils and vegetation were dried up and analyzed for the contents of uranium and other natural and man made radionuclides by standard gamma spectrometry (HPGe detector, relative efficiency 23%). The results are to be correlated with the data on the concentration of DU that entered the environment during the bombing, as well as with the data of the long-term measurements of uranium concentrations in the environment and human

  4. EFFECTIVENESS OF USING GRAPHIC ANIMATION COURSEWARE FOR STUDENTS WITH DIFFERENT COGNITIVE STYLES AND SPATIAL VISUAL ABILITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rizal Madar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to examine the effectiveness of using graphic animation courseware on pre and post test performance achievement in Electronic System 1 subject among students undergoing Certificate of Electrical and Electronic Engineering at the Malaysian Ministry of Higher Education Polytechnics. These students have different Cognitive Styles (Field Independent & Field Dependent and Spatial Visual Abilities (High Visual and Low Visual. The achievement performance of this pre and post test was obtained from students who apply graphic animation courseware (experimental group and conventional (control group as their learning styles. The research samples comprised of 138 semester 1 students undergoing Certificate of Electrical and Electronic Engineering in the Department of Electrical Engineering, MOHE polytechnics. Two MOHE polytechnics were involved in this research, which are Central and Southern Zone. The experimental group consisted of students from Southern Zone, while the control group recruited students from Central Zone. Quasi-experimental with 2 x 2 factorial (Cognitive style x spatial visual ability design was applied using quantitative data. Data collected were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics which are mean, standard deviation, and independent samples T-test. A significant value of 0.05 was set for data reporting. Overall research finding shows that ; there was a significant difference in students achievement with Cognitive Styles of FI, FD, VT and VR where the experimental group were found better than the control group ; there was significant differences in the achievement of students with the characteristics of FIVT, FIVR, FDVT and FDVR where the experimental group showed a better result compared to the control group and ; the elements (Interface Design, Interaction Design, Motivation and User Friendliness in the Electronic System 1 graphic animation courseware assist in students learning achievement

  5. Differential Effects of Sertraline in a Predator Exposure Animal Model of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Brad eWilson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT, norepinephrine (NE, and other neurotransmitters are modulated in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. In addition, pro-inflammatory cytokines (PIC are elevated during the progression of the disorder. Currently, the only approved pharmacologic treatments for PTSD are the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI sertraline and paroxetine, but their efficacy in treating PTSD is marginal at best. In combat-related PTSD, SSRIs are of limited effectiveness. Thus, this study sought to analyze the effects of the SSRI sertraline on inflammation and neurotransmitter modulation via a predator exposure/psychosocial stress animal model of PTSD. We hypothesized that sertraline would diminish inflammatory components and increase 5-HT but might also affect levels of other neurotransmitters, particularly NE. PTSD-like effects were induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 6/group x 4 groups. The rats were secured in Plexiglas cylinders and placed in a cage with a cat for 1 hour on days 1 and 11 of a 31-day stress regimen. PTSD rats were also subjected to psychosocial stress via daily cage cohort changes. At the conclusion of the stress regimen, treatment group animals were injected intraperitoneally (i.p. with sertraline HClNorepinephrine at 10mg/kg for 7 consecutive days, while controls received i.p. vehicle. The animals were subsequently sacrificed on day 8. Sertraline attenuated inflammatory markers and normalized 5-HT levels in the central nervous system (CNS. In contrast, sertraline produced elevations in NE in the CNS and systemic circulation of SSRI treated PTSD and control groups. This increase in norepinephrine suggests SSRIs produce a heightened noradrenergic response, which might elevate anxiety in a clinical setting.

  6. Biological effects of high-strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim report, March 1, 1978-September 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Anderson, L.E.; Kaune, W.T.

    1979-12-01

    Progress is described on a project assessing the biological effects of 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals (rats and mice). The report includes sections on hematology and seram chemistry, immunology, pathology, metabolism, bone growth, endocrinology, cardiovascular function, neurophysiology, growth and development, and animal behavior. (ACR)

  7. An Investigation of the Effects of Different Types of Activities during Pauses in a Segmented Instructional Animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Jongpil; Chung, Sungwon; Crooks, Steven M.; Song, Jaeki; Kim, Jeakyeong

    2014-01-01

    Since the complex and transient information in instructional animations requires more cognitive resources, the segmenting principle has been proposed to reduce cognitive overload by providing smaller chunks with pauses between segments. This study examined the effects of different types of activities during pauses in a segmented animation. Four…

  8. A study of the effects of computer animation on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Nilforooshan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ongoing research aimed at investigating the efficacy of computer animations in improving college students’ learning of building sustainability concepts and practices. The use of animations in educational contexts is not new, however scientific evidence that supports their effectiveness as educational materials is still limited. This paper reports an experiment that explored the impact of an educational digital animation, called “LEED-ERS”, on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED rating system. Specifically, the animation focused on the LEED category of Sustainable Site. Results of a study with 68 students show that viewing the animation led to an increase in subjects’ declarative knowledge by 15%. Compared to traditional learning methods (e.g. reading assignments with static images, viewing the animation led to significantly higher declarative knowledge gains.

  9. Effect of Cerium on Gas Evolution Behavior of Pb-Ca-Sn Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Guanfa; Zhou Genshu; Li Dangguo; Zheng Maosheng

    2006-01-01

    The effect of Ce on the behavior of gas evolution on Pb-Ca-Sn alloy in 4.5 mol·L-1 H2SO4 was investigated using cyclic voltammetry (CV), cathodic polarization curves and AC impedance (EIS).Cyclic voltammetry experiments show that the current of oxygen evolution on Pb-Ca-Sn-Ce electrode is lower than that of Pb-Ca-Sn electrode in the same anodic voltage.Moreover, the oxygen evolution potential on the former electrode is greater than that on the latter, and this means that Ce can increase the potential of oxygen evolution on Pb-Ca-Sn alloy.The AC impedance experiments show that Ce can also enhance the resistance of hydrogen evolution on Pb-Ca-Sn electrode, i.e., Ce can inhibit the hydrogen evolution on Pb-Ca-Sn electrode.The reason why Ce decreases the volume of hydrogen evolution on Pb-Ca-Sn alloy is that Ce increases the resistance of absorbing step of hydrogen evolution reaction.All the experimental results indicate that Pb-Ca-Sn-Ce alloy can rapidly decrease the oxygen and hydrogen evolution on Pb-Ca-Sn-Ce alloy.It is concluded that Pb-Ca-Sn-Ce alloy can promote the maintenance-free property of lead acid battery, and can serve as the candidate of the grid material for maintenance-free lead acid battery.

  10. Silymarin protects liver against toxic effects of anti-tuberculosis drugs in experimental animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izzettin Fikret V

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first line anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid (INH, rifampicin (RIF and pyrazinamide (PZA continues to be the effective drugs in the treatment of tuberculosis, however, the use of these drugs is associated with toxic reactions in tissues, particularly in the liver, leading to hepatitis. Silymarin, a standard plant extract with strong antioxidant activity obtained from S. marianum, is known to be an effective agent for liver protection and liver regeneration. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective actions of silymarin against hepatotoxicity caused by different combinations of anti-tuberculosis drugs. Methods Male Wistar albino rats weighing 250–300 g were used to form 6 study groups, each group consisting of 10 rats. Animals were treated with intra-peritoneal injection of isoniazid (50 mg/kg and rifampicin (100 mg/kg; and intra-gastric administration of pyrazinamid (350 mg/kg and silymarin (200 mg/kg. Hepatotoxicity was induced by a combination of drugs with INH+RIF and INH+RIF+PZA. Hepatoprotective effect of silymarin was investigated by co-administration of silymarin together with the drugs. Serum biochemical tests for liver functions and histopathological examination of livers were carried out to demonstrate the protection of liver against anti-tuberculosis drugs by silymarin. Results Treatment of rats with INH+RIF or INH+RIF+PZA induced hepatotoxicity as evidenced by biochemical measurements: serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT, aspartate aminotransferase (AST and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activities and the levels of total bilirubin were elevated, and the levels of albumin and total protein were decreased in drugs-treated animals. Histopathological changes were also observed in livers of animals that received drugs. Simultaneous administration of silymarin significantly decreased the biochemical and histological changes induced by the drugs. Conclusion The active components of silymarin had

  11. Effects of Gamma Irradiation and Pasteurization on the Nutritive Composition of Commercially Available Animal Diets

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield, Catherine D; Cassidy, Joseph P.; Kelly, John P.

    2008-01-01

    Gamma radiation is used to sterilize diets for specific pathogen-free (SPF) animals. Because a gamma-irradiated diet was linked to leukoencephalomyelopathy in SPF cats, we investigated the effects of ‘typical’ (28.9–34.3 kGy) and ‘high-end’ (38.4–48.7 kGy) doses of gamma irradiation and of pasteurization (at 107 °C for 15 min) on the amounts of fat; protein; carbohydrate (and taurine in cat diet); vitamins A, E, B1, B2, B6, and B12; and peroxide in commercially available dry cat, dog, and rod...

  12. EFFECT OF ELECTRON BEAM RADIATIONS ON ANXIETY IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMAL MODELS

    OpenAIRE

    Deepa B; Shyamjith Manikkoth

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the study was to test the effect of whole body electron beam radiation on anxiety statein Swiss albino mice. Methods: Mice were irradiated with three different doses (2Gy,4Gy,6Gy)of electron beam radiations.After 24hours of radiation exposure animals were taken for testing level of anxiety using elevated plus maze and light dark arena apparatus. Results: Whole body electron beam irradiation at doses of 2, 4 and 6Gy lead to significant (p

  13. Effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (an animal model of multiple sclerosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaren, Rachel E; Motl, Robert W; Woods, Jeffrey A; Miller, Stephen D

    2014-09-15

    Exercise training has improved many outcomes in "clinical" research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is limited understanding of the underlying "basic" pathophysiological mechanisms. The animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), seems ideal for examining the effects of exercise training on MS-disease pathophysiology. EAE is an autoimmune T-helper cell-mediated disease characterized by T-cell and monocyte infiltration and inflammation in the CNS. To that end, this paper briefly describes common models of EAE, reviews existing research on exercise and EAE, and then identifies future research directions for understanding the consequences of exercise training using EAE. PMID:24999244

  14. Effects of exercise in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (an animal model of multiple sclerosis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaren, Rachel E.; Motl, Robert W.; Woods, Jeffrey A.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2015-01-01

    Exercise training has improved many outcomes in “clinical” research involving persons with multiple sclerosis (MS), but there is limited understanding of the underlying “basic” pathophysiological mechanisms. The animal model of MS, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), seems ideal for examining the effects of exercise training on MS-disease pathophysiology. EAE is an autoimmune T-helper cell-mediated disease characterized by T-cell and monocyte infiltration and inflammation in the CNS. To that end, this paper briefly describes common models of EAE, reviews existing research on exercise and EAE, and then identifies future research directions for understanding the consequences of exercise training using EAE. PMID:24999244

  15. The Effect of Camellia sinensis on Wound Healing Potential in an Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Fatemeh Hajiaghaalipour; Kanthimathi, M. S.; Mahmood Ameen Abdulla; Junedah Sanusi

    2013-01-01

    Camellia sinensis (tea) is reported to have health benefits, including the building of healthy skin. This study evaluated the effects of topical application of Camellia sinensis extract on the rate of wound closure and the histology of wound area. A uniform area of 2.00 cm in diameter was excised from the neck of adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The animals were topically treated with 0.2 mL of vehicle (CMC), Intrasite gel (positive control), or 200 and 400 mg/mL of extract. Wounds dressed wit...

  16. Evaluation of the respiratory motion effect in small animal PET images with GATE Monte Carlo simulations

    OpenAIRE

    Branco, Susana; Almeida, Pedro; Jan, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    The rapid growth in genetics and molecular biology combined with the development of techniques for genetically engineering small animals has led to increased interest in in vivo small animal imaging. Small animal imaging has been applied frequently to the imaging of small animals (mice and rats), which are ubiquitous in modeling human diseases and testing treatments. The use of PET in small animals allows the use of subjects as their own control, reducing the interanimal variability....

  17. Effect of eye NGF administration on two animal models of retinal ganglion cells degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Colafrancesco

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of nerve growth factor (NGF administration on retinal ganglion cells (RGCs in experimentally induced glaucoma (GL and diabetic retinopathy (DR. GL was induced in adult rats by injection of hypertonic saline into the episcleral vein of the eye and diabetes (DT was induced by administration of streptozoticin. Control and experimental rats were treated daily with either ocular application of NGF or vehicle solution. We found that both animal models present a progressive degeneration of RGCs and changing NGF and VEGF levels in the retina and optic nerve. We then proved that NGF eye drop administration exerts a protective effect on these models of retinal degeneration. In brief, our findings indicate that NGF can play a protective role against RGC degeneration occurring in GL and DR and suggest that ocular NGF administration might be an effective pharmacological approach.

  18. [Animal experiment studies on the topical and systemic effectiveness of prednisolone-17-ethylcarbonate-21-propionate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpermann, H G; Sandow, J; Vogel, H G

    1986-01-01

    Prednisolone-17-ethyl carbonate-21-propionate (PrEP, Hoe 777) was tested for antiinflammatory activity in various animal models by topical and systemic administration. In those models being indicative of topical efficacy, the potency of PrEP was the same as that of desoximetasone. However, systemic effects after topical administration of PrEP in shaved skin of the dorsum of rats were relatively weak compared with the reference compound. Moreover, there were less systemic corticoid effects after s.c. administration of PrEP than after desoximetasone. Thus, PrEP is obviously a compound with a considerable split of topical and systemic activity, suggesting its testing in man for systemic effects after topical administration. PMID:3705675

  19. Evaluation of antinociceptive effect of Petiveria alliacea (guiné in animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thereza C. M. de Lima

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Petiveria alliacea (Phytolaccaceae is a bush widely distributed in South America including Brazil, where it is popularly known as "guiné", pipi", "tipi" or "erva-de-tipi". Brazilian folk medicine attributes to the hot water infusion of its roots or leaves the following pharmacologicalproperties: antipyretic, antispasmodic, abortifacient, antirrheumatic, diuretic, analgesic and sedative. The present study has evaluated the alleged effects of P. alliacea on central nervous system (CNS, particularly, the sedative and analgesic properties of root crude aqueous extract of this plant in mice and rats. This extract showed an antinociceptive effect in acetic acid - acetylcholine - and hypertonic saline - induced abdominal constrictions, but not in hot-plate and tail flick tests P. alliacea did not produce any CNS depressor effect. Thus its antinociceptive action in animals can be responsible by its poplar use as an analgesic.

  20. Animal rights, animal minds, and human mindreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameli, M; Bortolotti, L

    2006-02-01

    Do non-human animals have rights? The answer to this question depends on whether animals have morally relevant mental properties. Mindreading is the human activity of ascribing mental states to other organisms. Current knowledge about the evolution and cognitive structure of mindreading indicates that human ascriptions of mental states to non-human animals are very inaccurate. The accuracy of human mindreading can be improved with the help of scientific studies of animal minds. However, the scientific studies do not by themselves solve the problem of how to map psychological similarities (and differences) between humans and animals onto a distinction between morally relevant and morally irrelevant mental properties. The current limitations of human mindreading-whether scientifically aided or not-have practical consequences for the rational justification of claims about which rights (if any) non-human animals should be accorded.

  1. The Effects of Network Neighbours on Protein Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Guang-Zhong Wang; Martin J Lercher

    2011-01-01

    Interacting proteins may often experience similar selection pressures. Thus, we may expect that neighbouring proteins in biological interaction networks evolve at similar rates. This has been previously shown for protein-protein interaction networks. Similarly, we find correlated rates of evolution of neighbours in networks based on co-expression, metabolism, and synthetic lethal genetic interactions. While the correlations are statistically significant, their magnitude is small, with network...

  2. Deposition, translocation and effects of transuranic particles inhaled by experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhalation exposure constitutes the most likely route of entrance for transuranics into the body. Cancer is the most likely consequence of exposure, but several thousand workers have been exposed during the last 30 yrs without, so far, evidence of exposure-related effects. Several soluble and insoluble transuranic compounds have been studied in rodents and dogs, either alone or combined with exposure to other materials (e.g., PuO/sub 2/--UO/sub 2/ fuel and Na). These studies have provided a wide variety of spatial and temporal dose distribution patterns in the lung. The distribution and total initial deposition in the respiratory tract is a function of the physical characteristics of the inhaled aerosols (size distribution, shape, hygroscopicity) and of the morphology and physiology of the animal. Translocation rates, organ and tissue distribution and excretion in urine and feces, are a function of the physicochemical characteristics of the deposited material (solubility, specific activity, chemical compound, etc.). Differences in rate of translocation of the solubilized material, primarily to the liver and bone, determines the radiation dose to the various tissues involved. Insoluble particles of plutonium dioxide are transferred to the thoracic lymph nodes, which may be functionally destroyed as a consequence. Radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis are the main causes of death in animals with cumulative radiation doses to the lung of a few thousand rads. The most significant long-term effect of inhaled transuranic compounds in animals is the development of lung and bone tumors. The main type of lung tumor in both dog and rat is the bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (adenocarcinoma). However, tumor type is a function of radiation dose and dose-distribution at high doses. Bone ranks next to lung as the tissue developing the most tumors following inhalation of transuranics

  3. Motion control in animation,simulation and visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Hegron, G?rard; Palamidese, Patrizia; Thalmann, D

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the role and the evolution of animation, simulation and scientific visualizzation and their relationships. Two trends are described: (1) the physical laws are well-know and their use improves the animation (2) the physical laws are not really well-know and the animation techniques contribute to understand them. We distinguish descriptive models used to reproduce an effect without knowledge about its cause and generative models describing the cause which produces the effec...

  4. The effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems

    OpenAIRE

    Belkus, H.; Van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper we report on first results of a project in Brussels where we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using the 3 decades expertise in massive star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass loss formalism on the formation of intermedi...

  5. Effect of pregnancy and tobacco smoke on the antioxidant activity of rutin in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Ewa; Ignatowicz, Ewa; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Tobacco smoke is a source of free radicals and causes oxidative stress in smokers' tissues. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the effect of rutin on the total antioxidant status (TAS) in pregnant and non-pregnant rats that were exposed to cigarette smoke. TAS in brain, lungs, liver, kidneys and plasma were measured by the 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate) (ABTS) radical-cation decolorization assay. In pregnant rats, a diversified distribution of endogenous antioxidants was found in comparison to the matched non-pregnant animals. In pregnant rats, TAS was higher in plasma (by 33%) and kidney (by 76%), and lower in brain (by 48%) and liver (by 50%) compared with non-pregnant rats. Generally (except liver), exposure to tobacco smoke caused an increase in the antioxidative status of pregnant compared to non-pregnant animals (by 29, 16, 18 and 87% in plasma, brain, lung and kidney, respectively). Overall, rutin had little (plasma, non-pregnant rats) or a no protective effect in the examined tissues.

  6. The effect of blue light exposure in an ocular melanoma animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odashiro Alexandre N

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uveal melanoma (UM cell lines, when exposed to blue light in vitro, show a significant increase in proliferation. In order to determine if similar effects could be seen in vivo, we investigated the effect of blue light exposure in a xenograft animal model of UM. Methods Twenty New Zealand albino rabbits were injected with 1.0 × 106 human UM cells (92.1 in the suprachoroidal space of the right eye. Animals were equally divided into two groups; the experimental group was exposed to blue light, while the control group was protected from blue light exposure. The eyes were enucleated after sacrifice and the proliferation rates of the re-cultured tumor cells were assessed using a Sulforhodamine-B assay. Cells were re-cultured for 1 passage only in order to maintain any in vivo cellular changes. Furthermore, Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA protein expression was used to ascertain differences in cellular proliferation between both groups in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded eyes (FFPE. Results Blue light exposure led to a statistically significant increase in proliferation for cell lines derived from intraocular tumors (p Conclusion There is an increasing amount of data suggesting that blue light exposure may influence the progression of UM. Our results support this notion and warrant further studies to evaluate the ability of blue light filtering lenses to slow disease progression in UM patients.

  7. Post-release dispersal in animal translocations: social attraction and the "vacuum effect".

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Baptiste Mihoub

    Full Text Available Animal translocations are human-induced colonizations that can represent opportunities to contribute to the knowledge on the behavioral and demographic processes involved in the establishment of animal populations. Habitat selection behaviors, such as social cueing, have strong implications on dispersal and affect the establishment success of translocations. Using modeling simulations with a two-population network model (a translocated population and a remnant population, we investigated the consequences of four habitat selection strategies on post-translocation establishment probabilities in short- and long-lived species. Two dispersal strategies using social cues (conspecific attraction and habitat copying were compared to random and quality-based strategies. We measured the sensitivity of local extinctions to dispersal strategies, life cycles, release frequencies, remnant population and release group sizes, the proportion of breeders and the connectivity between populations. Our results indicate that social behaviors can compromise establishment as a result of post-release dispersal, particularly in long-lived species. This behavioral mechanism, the "vacuum effect", arises from increased emigration in populations that are small relative to neighboring populations, reducing their rate of population growth. The vacuum effect can drive small remnant populations to extinction when a translocated group is large. In addition, the magnitude of the vacuum effect varies non-linearly with connectivity. The vacuum effect represents a novel form of the behaviorally mediated Allee effect that can cause unexpected establishment failures or population extinctions in response to social cueing. Accounting for establishment probabilities as a conditional step to the persistence of populations would improve the accuracy of predicting the fates of translocated or natural (metapopulations.

  8. Post-release dispersal in animal translocations: social attraction and the "vacuum effect".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihoub, Jean-Baptiste; Robert, Alexandre; Le Gouar, Pascaline; Sarrazin, François

    2011-01-01

    Animal translocations are human-induced colonizations that can represent opportunities to contribute to the knowledge on the behavioral and demographic processes involved in the establishment of animal populations. Habitat selection behaviors, such as social cueing, have strong implications on dispersal and affect the establishment success of translocations. Using modeling simulations with a two-population network model (a translocated population and a remnant population), we investigated the consequences of four habitat selection strategies on post-translocation establishment probabilities in short- and long-lived species. Two dispersal strategies using social cues (conspecific attraction and habitat copying) were compared to random and quality-based strategies. We measured the sensitivity of local extinctions to dispersal strategies, life cycles, release frequencies, remnant population and release group sizes, the proportion of breeders and the connectivity between populations. Our results indicate that social behaviors can compromise establishment as a result of post-release dispersal, particularly in long-lived species. This behavioral mechanism, the "vacuum effect", arises from increased emigration in populations that are small relative to neighboring populations, reducing their rate of population growth. The vacuum effect can drive small remnant populations to extinction when a translocated group is large. In addition, the magnitude of the vacuum effect varies non-linearly with connectivity. The vacuum effect represents a novel form of the behaviorally mediated Allee effect that can cause unexpected establishment failures or population extinctions in response to social cueing. Accounting for establishment probabilities as a conditional step to the persistence of populations would improve the accuracy of predicting the fates of translocated or natural (meta)populations. PMID:22194784

  9. Sexual and Natural Selection Both Influence Male Genital Evolution

    OpenAIRE

    House, Clarissa M.; Zenobia Lewis; Hodgson, Dave J.; Nina Wedell; Sharma, Manmohan D.; John Hunt; Hosken, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and divergent evolution of male genital morphology is a conspicuous and general pattern across internally fertilizing animals. Rapid genital evolution is thought to be the result of sexual selection, and the role of natural selection in genital evolution remains controversial. However, natural and sexual selection are believed to act antagonistically on male genital form. We conducted an experimental evolution study to investigate the combined effects of natural and sexual selection on ...

  10. A Systematic Review of the Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Essential Oils in Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damião Pergentino de Sousa

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The clinical efficacy of standardized essential oils (such as Lavender officinalis, in treating anxiety disorders strongly suggests that these natural products are an important candidate source for new anxiolytic drugs. A systematic review of essential oils, their bioactive constituents, and anxiolytic-like activity is conducted. The essential oil with the best profile is Lavendula angustifolia, which has already been tested in controlled clinical trials with positive results. Citrus aurantium using different routes of administration also showed significant effects in several animal models, and was corroborated by different research groups. Other promising essential oils are Citrus sinensis and bergamot oil, which showed certain clinical anxiolytic actions; along with Achillea wilhemsii, Alpinia zerumbet, Citrus aurantium, and Spiranthera odoratissima, which, like Lavendula angustifolia, appear to exert anxiolytic-like effects without GABA/benzodiazepine activity, thus differing in their mechanisms of action from the benzodiazepines. The anxiolytic activity of 25 compounds commonly found in essential oils is also discussed.

  11. [Effects of low calorie sweeteners based on data from clinical trials, in vitro and animal studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szűcs, Zsuzsanna; Ábel, Tatjána; Lengyel, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Low calorie sweeteners are used by many consumers as they can provide the sweet taste without calories and, therefore, they may have a beneficial effect on weight management. These positive outcomes are often questioned and accused of keeping up or increasing a liking for sweetness and leading to overconsumption of sugar containing food and beverages. The most recent studies failed to find any positive correlation between usage of low calorie sweeteners and craving for sweet taste. In randomized controlled trials consumption of low calorie sweeteners have accompanied with lower intake of sugar containing food, higher healthy eating index and better weight management. Several laboratory trials on cell cultures and animal studies found a link between the usage of low calorie sweeteners and positive metabolic effects, e.g. smaller ectopic fat deposits in the fat and liver tissue versus controll group. In addition, increased adipogenesis and reduction of lipolysis were also observed. Orv. Hetil., 2016, 157(Suppl. 1), 3-7. PMID:27088713

  12. Influence of Biopolym Granulat effects on reductionof ammonia concentration in stables of intensive farm animals breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohuslav Čermák

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The living environment distress is connected currently not only with industrial production but also agriculture is biggest producer of toxic gas – ammonia (NH3 .Emissions of that gas originate mainly in the farm animals breeding and generate within storage and handling with farmyard manure, slurry, poultry excrements and litter. Agriculture influences considerably landscape. has impact on basic effect on soil, water and air. In assessing experiment the preparation Biopolym Granulat rumen metabolism and N-balance was found positive effects in terms of increased ammonia nitrogen, the number of ciliates and the reduction of N-compounds in feces. Confirmed the impact on the ammonia content in well-ventilated dairy stable. The economic evaluation depends on the exercise price of milk.

  13. Effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals at levels implied by current radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1977 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection stated that the commission believes that if man is adequately protected from radiation, other organisms are also likely to be sufficiently protected. The present report examines this statement by considering the effects of ionizing radiation on animals and plants in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The conclusions are that chronic dose rates of IMGy.d-1 or less are unlikely to cause measurable deleterious effects in terrestrial populations, and that in the aquatic environment limiting chronic dose rates to 10MGy.d-1 to the maximally exposed individuals would provide adequate protection for the population. Thus specific radiation protection standards for non-human organisms are not needed. 193 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  14. Weber's law, the magnitude effect and discrimination of sugar concentrations in nectar-feeding animals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladislav Nachev

    Full Text Available Weber's law quantifies the perception of difference between stimuli. For instance, it can explain why we are less likely to detect the removal of three nuts from a bowl if the bowl is full than if it is nearly empty. This is an example of the magnitude effect - the phenomenon that the subjective perception of a linear difference between a pair of stimuli progressively diminishes when the average magnitude of the stimuli increases. Although discrimination performances of both human and animal subjects in various sensory modalities exhibit the magnitude effect, results sometimes systematically deviate from the quantitative predictions based on Weber's law. An attempt to reformulate the law to better fit data from acoustic discrimination tasks has been dubbed the "near-miss to Weber's law". Here, we tested the gustatory discrimination performance of nectar-feeding bats (Glossophaga soricina, in order to investigate whether the original version of Weber's law accurately predicts choice behavior in a two-alternative forced choice task. As expected, bats either preferred the sweeter of the two options or showed no preference. In 4 out of 6 bats the near-miss to Weber's law provided a better fit and Weber's law underestimated the magnitude effect. In order to test the generality of this observation in nectar-feeders, we reviewed previously published data on bats, hummingbirds, honeybees, and bumblebees. In all groups of animals the near-miss to Weber's law provided better fits than Weber's law. Furthermore, whereas the magnitude effect was stronger than predicted by Weber's law in vertebrates, it was weaker than predicted in insects. Thus nectar-feeding vertebrates and insects seem to differ in how their choice behavior changes as sugar concentration is increased. We discuss the ecological and evolutionary implications of the observed patterns of sugar concentration discrimination.

  15. Effect of space flights on plasma hormone levels in man and in experimental animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, L.; Kvetňanský, R.; Vigaš, M.; Németh, S.; Popova, I.; Tigranian, R. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Serova, L.; Grigoriev, I. A.

    An important increase of plasma hormone levels like insulin, TSH and aldosterone was observed in human subjects after space flights, however in the changes of plasma content of ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline the individual variations were observed in relation to number and duration of space flight. For evaluation of the effects of these changes in plasma hormone levels on metabolic processes also the experiments with small animals subjected to space flights on a board of biosatellite of Cosmos series were running. An elevation of plasma levels of corticosterone, adrenaline, noradrenaline and insulin was found in rats after the space flights of duration from 7 to 20 days. It was demonstrated, that the increase of corticosterone in plasma is followed by the activation of enzymes involved in the aminoacid metabolism in rat liver (tyrosine aminotransferase, tryptophanpyrolase, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase). After a short recovery period (2 to 6 days) the plasma corticosterone concentration and also the activity of liver enzymes returned to control levels. The exposition of animals to stress stimuli during this recovery period showed higher response of corticosterone levels in flight rats as compared to intact controls. The increase of plasma catecholamine levels was not followed by elevation of lipolysis in adipose tissue. This is due to lower response of adipose tissue to catecholamine because a decrease of the stimulation of lipolysis by noradrenaline was observed in animals after space flight. The increase of insulin was not followed by adequate decrease of glucose concentration suggesting a disturbances in glucose utilization similarly as in cosmonauts after a long-term space flight. These results showed that changes in plasma hormone levels, observed after space flight, affected the regulation of metabolic processes in tissues.

  16. Effects of rotation on the evolution of primordial stars

    OpenAIRE

    S. Ekström; G. Meynet; Chiappini, C.; Hirschi, R.; Maeder, A

    2008-01-01

    (Abridged) Rotation has been shown to play a determinant role at very low metallicity, bringing heavy mass loss where almost none was expected. Is this still true when the metallicity strictly equals zero? The aim of our study is to get an answer to this question, and to determine how rotation changes the evolution and the chemical signature of the primordial stars. We have calculated 14 differentially-rotating and non-rotating stellar models at zero metallicity, with masses between 9 and 200...

  17. TERMS OF TRADE EVOLUTION, CAUSES AND EFFECTS: CASE STUDY ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negrea Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Terms of trade are meant to show the ratio by which a country is different in the level and dynamics of revenues from the exchange made by different categories of products on the external markets. The level of recorded revenues from the commercialization of products and services varies from country to country, and there is rarely a mutually beneficial exchange situation from these operations. Trade efficiency analysis lies in the determination of the terms of trade. In the current paper, international developments are analyzed based on net terms of trade index used by UNCTAD. Statistical data are provided by the World Bank, where export and import price index and the volume of imports and exports by countries were considered. The classification of the countries has been done according to the geographical orientation and based on the purchasing power parity, thus creating two tables, the first table highlighting seven regions, and the second table with seven categories of states including OPEC and non-OPEC members. The terms of trade evolution are influenced by certain important factors in the production process of goods and services. Some of these factors are mentioned: labour productivity; changes in commodity prices; yet, only the last factor is examined in this paper. Based on World Bank commodity price data, the evolution of major energy inputs such as crude oil, gas, coal, and major industrial raw materials such as aluminium, copper, lead, nickel, tin, zinc, silver, gold, platinum and iron was analysed and interpreted. For Romania, the data on terms of trade evolution shows a dramatic situation. If terms of trade development presented a cyclical evolution, the economy as a whole would send an optimistic message. In contrast, the data presented in the following paper will show that our country has registered continuous depreciation of the terms of trade ratio, with a direct impact on external trade balance deficits, a rising external debt

  18. Psychological and physiological effects of an animal-assisted intervention with unsecurely and desorganizedly attached children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Kotrschal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate whether children with insecure/disorganized attachment become less stressed and more prosocial in the presence of a guinea pig during an empathy training. This hypothesis is based on studies that show that insecure attachment representations, which are associated with low abilities to regulate stress and social relations, are transferred to human figures but not to pets. 12 boys and 4 girls (age 7-9, selected via the Separation Anxiety Test (SAT for insecure/disorganized attachment representation, were randomly assigned to the intervention and control group. The children of the intervention group attended an empathy training, in which every child received a guinea pig during every session while the controls got the same training without a guinea pig. In comparsion to controls the children of the animal assisted intervention group showed less aggression towards their peers as well as more prosocial behavior towards their teachers and peers. In addition the strongest decrease of cortisol levels were obtained in the animal-assisted intervention group. The more these children stroked the guinea pig, the more their cortisol levels decreased. These data suggest that children with insecure/disorganized attachment can better regulate stress and become less aggressive as well as more prosocial in the presence of a guinea pig. The authors discuss if these results can be interpreted as oxytocin mediated effects.

  19. Sex-specific lung diseases: effect of oestrogen on cultured cells and in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosung Shim

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sex prevalence in lung disease suggests that sex-specific hormones may contribute to the pathogenesis and/or progression of at least some lung diseases, such as lung adenocarcinoma, lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM and benign metastasising leiomyoma (BML. Oestrogen is an important hormone in normal lung development and in the pathogenesis of female predominant pulmonary diseases. In vivo and in vitro studies have facilitated our understanding of disease pathogenesis and discovery of potential therapeutic targets. Oestrogen promoted disease progression in cell and animal models of lung adenocarcinoma, LAM and BML. Specifically, oestrogen enhanced tumour growth and metastasis in animal models of these diseases. Furthermore, 17β-estradiol (E2, the most abundant form of oestrogen in humans, increased the size and proliferation of cultured cells of lung adenocarcinoma and LAM. Coupled with the known mechanisms of oestrogen metabolism and signalling, these model systems may provide insights into the diverse effects of oestrogen and other hormones on lung diseases. Anti-oestrogen treatments that target key events of oestrogen synthesis or signalling, such as aromatase activity, oestrogen receptors and signalling pathways, may offer additional opportunities for clinical trials.

  20. Modeling the Effect of Traffic Calming on Local Animal Population Persistence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catharinus F. Jaarsma

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A steady growth in traffic volumes in industrialized countries with dense human populations is expected, especially on minor roads. As a consequence, the fragmentation of wildlife populations will increase dramatically. In human-dominated landscapes, typically minor roads occur in high densities, and animals encounter them frequently. Traffic calming is a new approach to mitigate negative impacts by reducing traffic volumes and speeds on minor roads at a regional scale. This leads to a distinction between roads with low volumes as being part of the traffic-calmed area, whereas roads with bundled traffic are located around this area. Within the traffic-calmed area, volumes and speeds can be decreased substantially; this is predicted to decrease the disturbance and mortality risk for animals. Thus far, data on the effects of traffic calming on wildlife population persistence remain scarce. Using metapopulation theory, we derived a model to estimate thresholds in the size of traffic-calmed areas and traffic volumes that may allow persistent populations. Our model suggests that traffic calming largely increases the persistence of roe deer in a landscape with a dense road network. Our modeling results show trade-offs between traffic volume on roads within the traffic-calmed area and both the area of habitat available for this species in the traffic-calmed area and the size of the traffic-calmed area. These results suggest ways to mitigate the fragmentation of wildlife habitat by road networks and their expected traffic volumes.

  1. Effects of forage type, animal characteristics and feed intake on faecal particle size in goat, sheep, llama and cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalali, Alireza; Weisbjerg, M. R.; Nadeau, E.;

    2015-01-01

    and cattle and feed characteristics established from Study I were tested on faeces samples from goat, sheep, llama and cattle fed other types of forages (Study II). Study I included 112 faeces samples from 5 trials, and Study II included 90 faeces samples from 3 trials. Animals were fed ad libitum......The effect of forage maturity stage at harvest, animal characteristics and neutral detergent fibre (NDF) intake on mean particle size and particle size distribution in faeces from sheep and cattle fed grass silages was studied (Study I). Models for prediction of faeces characteristics from sheep...... and this effect was amplified in larger animals. The prediction model established from Study I, on the effect of BW, ADL/NDF in forage, C:F and forage NDF intake on particle size in faeces of grass silage-fed animals in Study I appeared to be valid to predict the geometric mean particle size in faeces from goat...

  2. The effects of landscape modifications on the long-term persistence of animal populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Nabe-Nielsen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effects of landscape modifications on the long-term persistence of wild animal populations is of crucial importance to wildlife managers and conservation biologists, but obtaining experimental evidence using real landscapes is usually impossible. To circumvent this problem we used individual-based models (IBMs of interacting animals in experimental modifications of a real Danish landscape. The models incorporate as much as possible of the behaviour and ecology of four species with contrasting life-history characteristics: skylark (Alauda arvensis, vole (Microtus agrestis, a ground beetle (Bembidion lampros and a linyphiid spider (Erigone atra. This allows us to quantify the population implications of experimental modifications of landscape configuration and composition. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Starting with a real agricultural landscape, we progressively reduced landscape complexity by (i homogenizing habitat patch shapes, (ii randomizing the locations of the patches, and (iii randomizing the size of the patches. The first two steps increased landscape fragmentation. We assessed the effects of these manipulations on the long-term persistence of animal populations by measuring equilibrium population sizes and time to recovery after disturbance. Patch rearrangement and the presence of corridors had a large effect on the population dynamics of species whose local success depends on the surrounding terrain. Landscape modifications that reduced population sizes increased recovery times in the short-dispersing species, making small populations vulnerable to increasing disturbance. The species that were most strongly affected by large disturbances fluctuated little in population sizes in years when no perturbations took place. SIGNIFICANCE: Traditional approaches to the management and conservation of populations use either classical methods of population analysis, which fail to adequately account for the spatial configurations

  3. Evolution of Low-mass X-Ray Binaries: The Effect of Donor Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Kun; Li, Xiang-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are thought to originate from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The discovery of eclipsing radio MSPs, including redbacks and black widows, indicates that evaporation of the donor star by the MSP’s irradiation takes place during the LMXB evolution. In this work, we investigate the effect of donor evaporation on the secular evolution of LMXBs, considering different evaporation efficiencies and related angular momentum loss. We find that for widening LMXBs, the donor star leaves a less massive white dwarf than without evaporation; for contracting systems, evaporation can speed up the evolution, resulting in dynamically unstable mass transfer and possibly the formation of isolated MSPs.

  4. Evolution of Low-Mass X-ray Binaries: the Effect of Donor Evaporation

    CERN Document Server

    Jia, Kun

    2016-01-01

    Millisecond pulsars (MSPs) are thought to originate from low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs). The discovery of eclipsing radio MSPs including redbacks and black widows indicates that evaporation of the donor star by the MSP's irradiation takes place during the LMXB evolution. In this work, we investigate the effect of donor evaporation on the secular evolution of LMXBs, considering different evaporation efficiencies and related angular momentum loss. We find that for widening LMXBs, the donor star leaves a less massive white dwarf than without evaporation; for contracting systems, evaporation can speed up the evolution, resulting in dynamically unstable mass transfer and possibly the formation of isolated MSPs.

  5. A Catalog of Stellar Evolution Profiles and the Effects of Variable Composition on Habitable Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Truitt, Amanda; Young, Patrick A.; Spacek, Alexander; Probst, Luke; Dietrich, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    We present stellar evolution models for 0.5 - 1.2 \\Msol at scaled metallicities of 0.1 - 1.5 Z\\sol and O/Fe values of 0.44 - 2.28 O/Fe\\sol. The time dependent evolution of habitable zone boundaries are calculated for each stellar evolution track based on stellar mass, effective temperature, and luminosity parameterizations. The rate of change of stellar surface quantities and the surrounding habitable zone position are strong functions of all three quantities explored. The range of orbits tha...

  6. " Animal, trop animal "

    OpenAIRE

    Potestà, Andréa

    2010-01-01

    Dans la tradition philosophique, on trouve plusieurs définitions de l’homme. La célèbre définition aristotélicienne, zoon logon echon (animal doué du langage ou animal rationnel) fournit le paradigme ainsi que la méthode de toutes les définitions successives. Il s’agit d’ajouter au vivant, à l’animal, quelque chose d’autre, quelque chose de plus, qui permette de le caractériser et le fasse entendre comme différent des bêtes. Cette diversité peut être conçue différemment : en tant qu’élévation...

  7. Evolution and public health

    OpenAIRE

    Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2009-01-01

    Evolution and its elements of natural selection, population migration, genetic drift, and founder effects have shaped the world in which we practice public health. Human cultures and technologies have modified life on this planet and have coevolved with myriad other species, including microorganisms; plant and animal sources of food; invertebrate vectors of disease; and intermediate hosts among birds, mammals, and nonhuman primates. Molecular mechanisms of differential resistance or susceptib...

  8. Effects of demographic factors and information sources on United States consumer perceptions of animal welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKendree, M G S; Croney, C C; Widmar, N J O

    2014-07-01

    As consumers have become more interested in understanding how their food is produced, scrutiny and criticism have increased regarding intensified food animal production methods. Resolution of public concerns about animal agricultural practices depends on understanding the myriad factors that provide the basis for concerns. An online survey of 798 U.S. households was conducted to investigate relationships between household characteristics (demographics, geographic location, and experiences) and level of concern for animal welfare as well as sources used to obtain information on the subject. Because recent media attention has focused on animal care practices used in the U.S. swine industry, respondents were also asked specific questions pertaining to their perceptions of pig management practices and welfare issues and their corresponding pork purchasing behavior. Respondents reporting higher levels of concern about animal welfare were more frequently female, younger, and self-reported members of the Democratic Party. Fourteen percent of respondents reported reduction in pork consumption because of animal welfare concerns with an average reduction of 56%. Over half of the respondents (56%) did not have a primary source for animal welfare information; those who identified a primary information source most commonly used information provided by animal protection organizations, the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), and People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA). Midwest participants were significantly, at the 5% significance level, less concerned about domestic livestock animal welfare and more frequently reported not having a source for animal welfare information than those from other regions of the United States. Overall, the U.S. livestock and poultry industries and other organizations affiliated with animal agriculture appear to be less used public sources of information on animal welfare than popular animal protection organizations. Improved

  9. Animal-assisted therapy with farm animals for persons with psychiatric disorders: effects on self-efficacy, coping ability and quality of life, a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braastad Bjarne O

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The benefits of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT for humans with mental disorders have been well-documented using cats and dogs, but there is a complete lack of controlled studies using farm animals as therapeutic agents for psychiatric patients. The study was developed in the context of Green care, a concept that involves the use of farm animals, plants, gardens, or the landscape in recreational or work-related interventions for different target groups of clients in cooperation with health authorities. The present study aimed at examining effects of a 12-week intervention with farm animals on self-efficacy, coping ability and quality of life among adult psychiatric patients with a variety of psychiatric diagnoses. Methods The study was a randomized controlled trial and follow-up. Ninety patients (59 women and 31 men with schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety, and personality disorders completed questionnaires to assess self-efficacy (Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale; GSE, coping ability (Coping Strategies Scale, and quality of life (Quality of Life Scale; QOLS-N before, at the end of intervention, and at six months follow-up. Two-thirds of the patients (N = 60 were given interventions; the remaining served as controls. Results There was significant increase in self-efficacy in the treatment group but not in the control group from before intervention (SB to six months follow-up (SSMA, (SSMA-SB; F1,55 = 4.20, p= 0.05 and from end of intervention (SA to follow-up (SSMA-SA; F1,55 = 5.6, p= 0.02. There was significant increase in coping ability within the treatment group between before intervention and follow-up (SSMA-SB = 2.7, t = 2.31, p = 0.03, whereas no changes in quality of life was found. There were no significant changes in any of the variables during the intervention. Conclusion AAT with farm animals may have positive influences on self-efficacy and coping ability among psychiatric patients with long lasting psychiatric

  10. Effects of grain size evolution on mantle dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Falko; Tosi, Nicola; Plesa, Ana-Catalina; Breuer, Doris

    2016-04-01

    The rheology of planetary mantle materials is strongly dependent on temperature, pressure, strain-rate, and grain size. In particular, the rheology of olivine, the most abundant mineral of the Earth's upper mantle, has been extensively studied in the laboratory (e.g., Karato and Wu, 1993; Hirth and Kohlstedt, 2003). Two main mechanisms control olivine's deformation: dislocation and diffusion creep. While the former implies a power-law dependence of the viscosity on the strain-rate that leads to a non-Newtonian behaviour, the latter is sensitively dependent on the grain size. The dynamics of planetary interiors is locally controlled by the deformation mechanism that delivers the lowest viscosity. Models of the dynamics and evolution of planetary mantles should thus be capable to self-consistently distinguish which of the two mechanisms dominates at given conditions of temperature, pressure, strain-rate and grain size. As the grain size can affect the viscosity associated with diffusion creep by several orders of magnitude, it can strongly influence the dominant deformation mechanism. The vast majority of numerical, global-scale models of mantle convection, however, are based on the use of a linear diffusion-creep rheology with constant grain-size. Nevertheless, in recent studies, a new equation has been proposed to properly model the time-dependent evolution of the grain size (Austin and Evens, 2007; Rozel et al., 2010). We implemented this equation in our mantle convection code Gaia (Hüttig et al., 2013). In the framework of simple models of stagnant lid convection, we compared simulations based on the fully time-dependent equation of grain-size evolution with simulations based on its steady-state version. In addition, we tested a number of different parameters in order to identify those that affects the grain size to the first order and, in turn, control the conditions at which mantle deformation is dominated by diffusion or dislocation creep. References Austin

  11. The effect of disgust and fear modeling on children's disgust and fear for animals

    OpenAIRE

    Askew, Chris; Cakır, Kubra; Poldsam, Liine; Reynolds, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    Disgust is a protective emotion associated with certain types of animal fears. Given that a primary function of disgust is to protect against harm, increasing children’s disgust-related beliefs for animals may affect how threatening they think animals are and their avoidance of them. One way that children’s disgust beliefs for animals might change is via vicarious learning: by observing others responding to the animal with disgust. In Experiment 1, children (ages 7–10 years) were presented wi...

  12. The Effect of the Triple-α Reaction Rate on Stellar Evolution at Low-Metallicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Takuma; Hirschi, Raphael; Fujimoto, Masayuki Y.

    2010-06-01

    We investigate the effect of the triple-α reaction rates on the evolution of low-mass stars and massive stars. The former is compared with the observations of metal-poor stars known to date. For the latter, we discuss the impact of recent calculation of triple-α reaction rate by Ogata et al. (2009, PTP, 122, 1055) on the evolution until carbon burning.

  13. Heterogeneous Deployment Analysis for Cost-Effective Mobile Network Evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coletti, Claudio

    2013-01-01

    statistical models of deployment areas, the performance analysis is carried out in the form of operator case studies for large-scale deployment scenarios, including realistic macro network layouts and inhomogeneous spatial traffic distributions. Deployment of small cells is performed by means of proposed...... network coverage and boosting network capacity in traffic hot-spot areas. The thesis deals with the deployment of both outdoor small cells and indoor femto cells. Amongst the outdoor solution, particular emphasis is put on relay base stations as backhaul costs can be reduced by utilizing LTE spectrum......The plethora of connected devices, such as attractive smartphones, data dongles and 3G/4G built-in tablet computers, has brought mobile operators to face increasing demand in mobile broadband traffic and services. In addition to the roll-out of Long Term Evolution (LTE), the deployment of small low...

  14. Effects of Biases in Domain Wall Network Evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Correia, J R C C C; Martins, C J A P

    2014-01-01

    We study the evolution of various types of biased domain wall networks in the early universe. We carry out larger numerical simulations than currently available in the literature and provide a more detailed study of the decay of these networks, in particular by explicitly measuring velocities in the simulations. We also use the larger dynamic range of our simulations to test previously suggested decay laws for these networks, including an ad-hoc phenomenological fit to earlier simulations and a decay law obtained by Hindmarsh through analytic arguments. We find the latter to be in good agreement with simulations in the case of a biased potential, but not in the case of biased initial conditions.

  15. The effects of oxygen on the evolution of microbial membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, L. L.

    1991-01-01

    One prokaryote, Methylococcus capsulatus, synthesizes both hopanoids and sterols and, thus, provides a unique opportunity to study the evolution of membrane function. When M. capsulatus was grown at different temperatures, lipid analysis of the whole cells showed that both sterol and unsaturated fatty acid levels decreased at higher growth temperatures; sterol concentrations were 0.116 micro mole/micro mole phospholipid at 30 C and 0.025 micro mole/mirco mole phospholipid at 45 C, while the saturated to unsaturated fatty acid ratio increased from 0.397 to 1.475. Hopane polyol levels were constant over this range; however, methylation of the A-ring decreased markedly in cells grown at 30 C. These results imply that sterol and hopane molecules are required for enhancement of some specific membrane function, potentially by modulating membrane fluidity.

  16. Effects of dust grains on early galaxy evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Hirashita, H

    2002-01-01

    Stars form out of molecular gas and supply dust grains during their last evolutionary stages; in turn hydrogen molecules (H2) are produced more efficiently on dust grains. Therefore, dust can drastically accelerate H2 formation, leading to an enhancement of star formation activity. In order to examine the first formation of stars and dust in galaxies, we model the evolution of galaxies in the redshift range of 55) galaxies in sub-millimetre and near-infrared bands. We find that: i) ALMA can detect dust emission from several thousands of galaxies per square degree, and ii) NGST can detect the stellar emission from 10^6 galaxies per square degree. Further observational checks of our predictions include the integrated flux of metal (oxygen and carbon) lines. We finally discuss possible color selection strategies for high-redshift galaxy searches.

  17. Human pharmaceuticals in the marine environment: Focus on exposure and biological effects in animal species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Elena; Franzellitti, Silvia

    2016-04-01

    Marine waters have been poorly investigated for the occurrence of pharmaceutical contamination. Recent data confirm that pharmaceuticals occur widely in marine and coastal environments; therefore, assessment of potential risk to marine species needs further efforts. The present study represents the first extensive review of pharmaceutical contamination in marine environments addressing the effects on the marine biota analyzed at the molecular, cellular, and individual levels. Because pharmaceuticals differ from conventional pollutants, being designed to interact with specific physiological pathways at low doses, the most recent evidence on modes of action and physiological alterations on marine animal species are discussed. Data on spatial distributions of pharmaceuticals in waters and sediments, as well as bioaccumulation rates, are also presented. The present review also seeks to expand knowledge of how the quality of coastal and marine environments could be efficiently monitored to anticipate possible health and environmental risks.

  18. Real-time system for studies of the effects of acoustic feedback on animal vocalizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mike eSkocik

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of behavioral and neural responses to distorted auditory feedback can help shed light on the neural mechanisms of animal vocalizations. We describe an apparatus for generating real-time acoustic feedback. The system can very rapidly detect acoustic features in a song and output acoustic signals if the detected features match the desired acoustic template. The system uses spectrogram-based detection of acoustic elements. It is low-cost and can be programmed for a variety of behavioral experiments requiring acoustic feedback or neural stimulation. We use the system to study the effects of acoustic feedback on birds' vocalizations and demonstrate that such an acoustic feedback can cause both immediate and long-term changes to birds’ songs.

  19. Relieving Effect of Quercetin on Ischemia/Reperfusion-Induced Liver Damage in an Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Shizuma

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined the effect of quercetin in relieving ischemia/reperfusion-induced liver damage using an animal model. F344 rats were divided into a control group (n=8 and a group administered 100 mg/kg of quercetin (quercetin-treated group (n=8. Both groups underwent laparotomy, and the portal vein was ligated for 60 min to simulate ischemia. After 60 min of reperfusion, serum aspartate transaminase (AST/alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α levels, and blood nitrotyrosine yield were measured. The livers were also excised to examine histology. Our results showed that AST/ALT levels, TNF-α, and nitrotyrosine yield were all significantly lower in the quercetin-treated group than in the control group. Liver damage was also significantly reduced histologically. Based on these results, administration of quercetin relieves ischemia–reperfusion-induced liver damage.

  20. Flupirtine effectively prevents development of acute neonatal seizures in an animal model of global hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Dayalan; Shmueli, Doron; White, Andrew M; Raol, Yogendra H

    2015-10-21

    Current first-line drugs for the treatment of neonatal seizures have limited efficacy and are associated with side effects. Uncontrolled seizures may exacerbate brain injury and contribute to later-life neurological disability. Therefore, it is critical to develop a treatment for neonatal seizures that is effective and safe. In early-life, when the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory system is not fully developed, potassium channels play an important role in controlling excitability. An earlier study demonstrated that flupirtine, a KCNQ potassium channel opener, is more efficacious than diazepam and phenobarbital for the treatment of chemoconvulsant-induced neonatal seizures. In newborns, seizures are most commonly associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Thus, in the present study, we examined the efficacy of flupirtine to treat neonatal seizures in an animal model of global hypoxia. Our results showed that flupirtine dose dependently blocks the occurrence of behavioral seizures in pups during hypoxia. Additionally, flupirtine inhibits the development of hypoxia-induced clinical seizures and associated epileptiform discharges, as well as purely electrographic (subclinical) seizures. These results suggest that flupirtine is an effective anti-seizure drug, and that further studies should be conducted to determine the time window within which it's administration can effectively treat neonatal seizures. PMID:26365409

  1. Anxiolytic effects of GLYX-13 in animal models of posttraumatic stress disorder-like behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Zeng-Liang; Liu, Jin-Xu; Liu, Xu; Zhang, Li-Ming; Ran, Yu-Hua; Zheng, Yuan-Yuan; Tang, Yu; Li, Yun-Feng; Xiong, Jie

    2016-09-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effectiveness of GLYX-13, an NMDA receptor glycine site functional partial agonist, to alleviate the enhanced anxiety and fear response in both a mouse and rat model of stress-induced behavioral changes that might be relevant to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Studies over the last decades have suggested that the hyperactivity of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is one of the most consistent findings in stress-related disease. Herein, we used these animal models to further investigate the effect of GLYX-13 on the stress hormone levels and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) expression. We found that exposure to foot shock induced long-lasting behavioral deficiencies in mice, including freezing and anxiety-like behaviors, that were significantly ameliorated by the long-term administration of GLYX-13 (5 or 10 mg/kg). Our enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results showed that long-term administration of GLYX-13 at behaviorally effective doses (5 or 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the elevated serum levels of both corticosterone and its upstream stress hormone adrenocorticotropic hormone in rats subjected to the TDS procedure. These results suggest that GLYX-13 exerts a therapeutic effect on PTSD-like stress responding that is accompanied by (or associated with) modulation of the HPA axis, including inhibition of stress hormone levels and upregulation of hippocampal GR expression. PMID:27147594

  2. The effect of fragment shape and species' sensitivity to habitat edges on animal population size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Robert M; Didham, Raphael K

    2007-08-01

    Habitat fragmentation causes extinction of local animal populations by decreasing the amount of viable "core" habitat area and increasing edge effects. It is widely accepted that larger fragments make better nature reserves because core-dwelling species have a larger amount of suitable habitat. Nevertheless, fragments in real landscapes have complex, irregular shapes. We modeled the population sizes of species that have a representative range of preferences for or aversions to habitat edges at five spatial scales (within 10, 32, 100, 320, and 1000 m of an edge) in a nation-wide analysis of forest remnants in New Zealand. We hypothesized that the irregular shapes of fragments in real landscapes should generate statistically significant correlations between population density and fragment area, purely as a "geometric" effect of varying species responses to the distribution of edge habitat. Irregularly shaped fragments consistently reduced the population size of core-dwelling species by 10-100%, depending on the scale over which species responded to habitat edges. Moreover, core populations within individual fragments were spatially discontinuous, containing multiple, disjunct populations that inhabited small spatial areas and had reduced population size. The geometric effect was highly nonlinear and depended on the range of fragment sizes sampled and the scale at which species responded to habitat edges. Fragment shape played a strong role in determining population size in fragmented landscapes; thus, habitat restoration efforts may be more effective if they focus on connecting disjunct cores rather than isolated fragments. PMID:17650243

  3. Animal behaviour shapes the ecological effects of ocean acidification and warming: moving from individual to community-level responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagelkerken, Ivan; Munday, Philip L

    2016-03-01

    Biological communities are shaped by complex interactions between organisms and their environment as well as interactions with other species. Humans are rapidly changing the marine environment through increasing greenhouse gas emissions, resulting in ocean warming and acidification. The first response by animals to environmental change is predominantly through modification of their behaviour, which in turn affects species interactions and ecological processes. Yet, many climate change studies ignore animal behaviour. Furthermore, our current knowledge of how global change alters animal behaviour is mostly restricted to single species, life phases and stressors, leading to an incomplete view of how coinciding climate stressors can affect the ecological interactions that structure biological communities. Here, we first review studies on the effects of warming and acidification on the behaviour of marine animals. We demonstrate how pervasive the effects of global change are on a wide range of critical behaviours that determine the persistence of species and their success in ecological communities. We then evaluate several approaches to studying the ecological effects of warming and acidification, and identify knowledge gaps that need to be filled, to better understand how global change will affect marine populations and communities through altered animal behaviours. Our review provides a synthesis of the far-reaching consequences that behavioural changes could have for marine ecosystems in a rapidly changing environment. Without considering the pervasive effects of climate change on animal behaviour we will limit our ability to forecast the impacts of ocean change and provide insights that can aid management strategies.

  4. Life-span studies in 226Ra-injected animals: Effect of low doses, effect of a decorporative treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A life-span radiation effects study was performed in mice injected with several doses of 226Ra. The study included 788 male C57Bl mice. For the removal of the 226Ra, half the mice were treated daily with a diet 5% of which was sodium-alginate. The experiment revealed that mice that received the lowest dose of 226Ra lived significantly longer than controls, and, despite appreciable skeletal removal of 226Ra as a result of decorporative treatment, no biological benefit was observed in treated animals. 19 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs

  5. Positive effects of small doses of ionising radiation on plants and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although part of the favourable results is likely to be due to wrong methods there is still a big part which must be taken seriously. Positive effects occurred after irradiation with X-, β, and γ rays and fast electrons. In plants, positive effects occurred after acute irradiation of the seed in the range of 1 R-10000 R, after acute irradiation of the growing plants with 50 R-1000, and after chronic irradiation of growing plants in the range of 0.02 R/day-230 R/day. For insects, the radiation doses with stimulating effects were, for acute irradiation, between 50 R and 180.00O R, for chronic irradiation between 9.5 R/day-75.9 R/hour. For mammals, positive effects of acute irradiation were found in the range of 40 R-400 R, after chronic irradiation of 0.11 R/day-5 R/day. The lower limits of these dose ranges are mainly due to the fact that smaller doses have not been dealt with at all. Positive effects of ionising radiation were seen especially when the experimental animals or plants were kept under unfavourable conditions. The exact mechanism of the radiation stimulation has not been explained yet. The assumption is favoured that the radiation causes a stimulation of repair mechanisms, - similar to the enzyme induction, may be - which enables the organisms to face further damage better due to their improved repair capacity. The generation of heterocygotes or of polyploidy by radiation seems also a plausible explanation of the positive radiation effects. In some experiments which revealed an increased radiation resistance after pre-radiation the synchronisation of the cell cycle caused by a radiation-induced delay of unitosis is likely to play a role. (orig./MG)

  6. Effects of Low-Dose-Gamma Rays on the Immune System of Different Animal Models of Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shimura, Noriko; Kojima, Shuji

    2014-01-01

    We reviewed the beneficial or harmful effects of low-dose ionizing radiation on several diseases based on a search of the literature. The attenuation of autoimmune manifestations in animal disease models irradiated with low-dose γ-rays was previously reported by several research groups, whereas the exacerbation of allergic manifestations was described by others. Based on a detailed examination of the literature, we divided animal disease models into two groups: one group consisting of collage...

  7. An embodiment effect in computer-based learning with animated pedagogical agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Richard E; DaPra, C Scott

    2012-09-01

    How do social cues such as gesturing, facial expression, eye gaze, and human-like movement affect multimedia learning with onscreen agents? To help address this question, students were asked to twice view a 4-min narrated presentation on how solar cells work in which the screen showed an animated pedagogical agent standing to the left of 11 successive slides. Across three experiments, learners performed better on a transfer test when a human-voiced agent displayed human-like gestures, facial expression, eye gaze, and body movement than when the agent did not, yielding an embodiment effect. In Experiment 2 the embodiment effect was found when the agent spoke in a human voice but not in a machine voice. In Experiment 3, the embodiment effect was found both when students were told the onscreen agent was consistent with their choice of agent characteristics and when inconsistent. Students who viewed a highly embodied agent also rated the social attributes of the agent more positively than did students who viewed a nongesturing agent. The results are explained by social agency theory, in which social cues in a multimedia message prime a feeling of social partnership in the learner, which leads to deeper cognitive processing during learning, and results in a more meaningful learning outcome as reflected in transfer test performance.

  8. Effect of gamma-ray irradiation on the unloaded animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jong-Il; Yoon, Min-Chul; Sung, Nak-Yoon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Jong Lee, Yun; Lee, Ki-Soo; Choi, In-Ho; Nam, Gung Uk; Lee, Ju-Woon

    During the space flight, human beings encountered the extreme conditions such as the cosmic ray irradiation and microgravity. There have been developed the animal models to simulate the microgravity condition in laboratory, but no study was carried out to investigate the combined effect of microgravity and exposure to irradiation. In this study, it was examined the effect of gamma irradiation on the suspension model. Rats were divided into four groups, Group I was loaded and not exposed to gamma irradiation, Group 2 was unloaded and not exposed, Group 3 was loaded and exposed to gamma irradiation at the dose of 50 mSV, and Group 4 was unloaded and exposed to gamma irradiation at the same dose. It was measured body, muscles and tissues weights and the biological analysis and the hematological response in blood samples were conducted. Anti-gravity tissue weight was only changed between loading and un-loading condition. However, there was no difference between irradiation exposed and not exposed unloaded groups. To know the difference of protein expression in anti-gravity tissues, 2 dimensional electrophoresis was performed. It has been found that the expression levels of several proteins were different by unloading condition and by irradiation exposed condition, respectively. These results provided the information on the combined effect of irradiation and microgravity to simulate space flight, and could be useful to search the candidate material for the countermeasure against space environment.

  9. Antidiabetic Effect of Salvianolic Acid A on Diabetic Animal Models via AMPK Activation and Mitochondrial Regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guifen Qiang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Diabetes mellitus (DM characterized by hyperglycemia contributes to macrovascular and microvascular complications. Salvianolic acid A (SalA is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the root of Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, which is a traditional Chinese medicine widely used to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, little is known about its antidiabetic effect. Our study aimed to investigate the in vivo and in vitro antidiabetic effect of SalA and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: Alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic mice and high-fat diet (HFD and low-dose streptozotocin (STZ-induced type 2 diabetic rats received SalA treatment. Blood glucose, oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT, 24-h food and water intake were monitored. In vitro, glucose consumption and uptake were measured in HepG2 cells and L6 myotubes. Mitochondrial function was detected in hepatic and skeletal muscle mitochondria. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and Akt were analyzed by western blot. Results: In both type 1 and type 2 diabetic animals, SalA lowered fasting blood glucose (FBG and fed blood glucose in dose-dependent manner, as well as reduced 24-h food and water intake. In vitro, SalA caused dose-dependent increase in glucose consumption and enhanced glucose uptake. SalA significantly increased ATP production from 10 min to 12 h in HepG2 cells and L6 myotubes. Interestingly, SalA decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, SalA improved hepatic and skeletal muscle mitochondrial function, increased ATP production, and concurrently decreased MMP. In particularly, SalA activated AMPK phosphorylation through Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase β (CaMKKβ/AMPK signaling pathway, independent of liver kinase 1 (LKB1/AMPK pathway. However, SalA didn't show any effect on insulin secretagogue and activation of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway. Conclusion: SalA exhibits the antidiabetic effects in diabetic animal models through

  10. Scientists and the 3Rs: attitudes to animal use in biomedical research and the effect of mandatory training in laboratory animal science

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Nuno H.; Olsson, I Anna S

    2014-01-01

    The 3Rs principle of replacement, reduction, and refinement has increasingly been endorsed by legislators and regulatory bodies as the best approach to tackle the ethical dilemma presented by animal experimentation in which the potential benefits for humans stand against the costs borne by the animals. Even when animal use is tightly regulated and supervised, the individual researcher’s responsibility is still decisive in the implementation of the 3Rs. Training in laboratory animal science (L...

  11. Effectiveness of Land Use Structure Evolution to Industrial Structure Transformation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Scarcity of land resources and transformation of industrial structure is a pair of contradictory elements.We derive the characteristics of land use structure and industrial structure transformation in Xining City using Transformation Coefficient(TC):first,in the period 1999-2000,the land use structure coefficient(θ1) declined by 79.55%,but the overall evolution trend is gentle;second,the transformation coefficient of industrial structure(θ2) tended to decline ceaselessly on the whole,a decrease of 36.09%(overall,the transformation coefficient of industrial structure is slightly greater than the land use structure coefficient);third,the inter-annual variation of the two experienced ups and downs(in the period 1999-2007,the inter-annual variation was great and in the period 2008-2010,the inter-annual variation tended to be gentle).On the basis of autocorrelation and co-integration model,we draw the following conclusions through analysis:first,the land use structure in Xining City plays a role in promoting industrial structure transformation;second,there is a long-term equilibrium relationship between the two.Finally,relevant policy recommendations are put forward for the industrial development in Xining City.

  12. Ground Water Chemistry Changes before Major Earthquakes and Possible Effects on Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Rachel A.; Halliday, Tim; Balderer, Werner P.; Leuenberger, Fanny; Newcomer, Michelle; Cyr, Gary; Freund, Friedemann T.

    2011-01-01

    Prior to major earthquakes many changes in the environment have been documented. Though often subtle and fleeting, these changes are noticeable at the land surface, in water, in the air, and in the ionosphere. Key to understanding these diverse pre-earthquake phenomena has been the discovery that, when tectonic stresses build up in the Earth’s crust, highly mobile electronic charge carriers are activated. These charge carriers are defect electrons on the oxygen anion sublattice of silicate minerals, known as positive holes, chemically equivalent to O− in a matrix of O2−. They are remarkable inasmuch as they can flow out of the stressed rock volume and spread into the surrounding unstressed rocks. Travelling fast and far the positive holes cause a range of follow-on reactions when they arrive at the Earth’s surface, where they cause air ionization, injecting massive amounts of primarily positive air ions into the lower atmosphere. When they arrive at the rock-water interface, they act as •O radicals, oxidizing water to hydrogen peroxide. Other reactions at the rock-water interface include the oxidation or partial oxidation of dissolved organic compounds, leading to changes of their fluorescence spectra. Some compounds thus formed may be irritants or toxins to certain species of animals. Common toads, Bufo bufo, were observed to exhibit a highly unusual behavior prior to a M6.3 earthquake that hit L’Aquila, Italy, on April 06, 2009: a few days before the seismic event the toads suddenly disappeared from their breeding site in a small lake about 75 km from the epicenter and did not return until after the aftershock series. In this paper we discuss potential changes in groundwater chemistry prior to seismic events and their possible effects on animals. PMID:21776211

  13. Ground Water Chemistry Changes before Major Earthquakes and Possible Effects on Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedemann T. Freund

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Prior to major earthquakes many changes in the environment have been documented. Though often subtle and fleeting, these changes are noticeable at the land surface, in water, in the air, and in the ionosphere. Key to understanding these diverse pre-earthquake phenomena has been the discovery that, when tectonic stresses build up in the Earth’s crust, highly mobile electronic charge carriers are activated. These charge carriers are defect electrons on the oxygen anion sublattice of silicate minerals, known as positive holes, chemically equivalent to O– in a matrix of O2–. They are remarkable inasmuch as they can flow out of the stressed rock volume and spread into the surrounding unstressed rocks. Travelling fast and far the positive holes cause a range of follow-on reactions when they arrive at the Earth’s surface, where they cause air ionization, injecting massive amounts of primarily positive air ions into the lower atmosphere. When they arrive at the rock-water interface, they act as •O radicals, oxidizing water to hydrogen peroxide. Other reactions at the rock-water interface include the oxidation or partial oxidation of dissolved organic compounds, leading to changes of their fluorescence spectra. Some compounds thus formed may be irritants or toxins to certain species of animals. Common toads, Bufo bufo, were observed to exhibit a highly unusual behavior prior to a M6.3 earthquake that hit L’Aquila, Italy, on April 06, 2009: a few days before the seismic event the toads suddenly disappeared from their breeding site in a small lake about 75 km from the epicenter and did not return until after the aftershock series. In this paper we discuss potential changes in groundwater chemistry prior to seismic events and their possible effects on animals.

  14. Aerotaxis in the Closest Relatives of Animals

    CERN Document Server

    Kirkegaard, Julius B; Marron, Alan O; Leptos, Kyriacos C; Goldstein, Raymond E

    2016-01-01

    As the closest unicellular relatives of animals, choanoflagellates serve as useful model organisms for understanding the evolution of animal multicellularity. An important factor in animal evolution was the increasing ocean oxygen levels in the Precambrian, which are thought to have influenced the emergence of complex multicellular life. As a first step in addressing these conditions, we study here the response of the colony-forming choanoflagellate $Salpingoeca~rosetta$ to oxygen gradients. Using a microfluidic device that allows spatio-temporal variations in oxygen concentrations, we report the discovery that $S.~rosetta$ display positive aerotaxis. Analysis of the spatial population distributions provides evidence for logarithmic sensing of oxygen, which enhances sensing in low oxygen neighborhoods. Analysis of search strategy models on the experimental colony trajectories finds that choanoflagellate aerotaxis is consistent with stochastic navigation, the statistics of which are captured using an effective...

  15. 2PI Effective Action and Evolution Equations of N = 4 super Yang-Mills

    CERN Document Server

    Smolic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    We employ nPI effective action techniques to study N = 4 super Yang-Mills, and write down the 2PI effective action of the theory. We also supply the evolution equations of two-point correlators within the theory.

  16. Direct Simulation Monte Carlo exploration of charge effects on aerosol evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsmeier, John F.

    Aerosols are potentially generated both during normal operations in a gas cooled Generation IV nuclear reactor and in all nuclear reactors during accident scenarios. These aerosols can become charged due to aerosol generation processes, radioactive decay of associated fission products, and ionizing atmospheres. Thus the role of charge on aerosol evolution, and hence on the nuclear source term, has been an issue of interest. There is a need for both measurements and modeling to quantify this role as these effects are not currently accounted for in nuclear reactor modeling and simulation codes. In this study the role of charge effects on the evolution of a spatially homogenous aerosol was explored via the application of the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) technique. The primary mechanisms explored were those of coagulation and electrostatic dispersion. This technique was first benchmarked by comparing the results obtained from both monodisperse and polydisperse DSMC evolution of charged aerosols with the results obtained by respectively deterministic and sectional techniques. This was followed by simulation of several polydisperse charged aerosols. Additional comparisons were made between the evolutions of charged and uncharged aerosols. The results obtained using DSMC in simple cases were comparable to those obtained from other techniques, without the limitations associated with more complex cases. Multicomponent aerosols of different component densities were also evaluated to determine the charge effects on their evolution. Charge effects can be significant and further explorations are warranted.

  17. Effects of Phenibut and Citrocard on Non-Competitive and Competitive Behavior during Provoked Aggression in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagmetova, V V; Krivitskaya, A N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2015-05-01

    Anti-aggressive effects of phenibut (25 mg/kg) and its structural analogue citrocard (50 mg/kg) were revealed in rats under condition of provoked intraspecific aggression. These substances significantly decreased manifestations of aggression in animals: they increased the latency of attacks and reduced their number. Anti-aggressive effects of citrocard were more pronounced than effects of phenibut under conditions of non-competitive aggression induced by fear of inescapable painful exposure or under conditions of competitive aggression reflecting the ability of animals to reveal adaptive social communicative skills in aversive situation.

  18. Effects of Phenibut and Citrocard on Non-Competitive and Competitive Behavior during Provoked Aggression in Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagmetova, V V; Krivitskaya, A N; Tyurenkov, I N

    2015-05-01

    Anti-aggressive effects of phenibut (25 mg/kg) and its structural analogue citrocard (50 mg/kg) were revealed in rats under condition of provoked intraspecific aggression. These substances significantly decreased manifestations of aggression in animals: they increased the latency of attacks and reduced their number. Anti-aggressive effects of citrocard were more pronounced than effects of phenibut under conditions of non-competitive aggression induced by fear of inescapable painful exposure or under conditions of competitive aggression reflecting the ability of animals to reveal adaptive social communicative skills in aversive situation. PMID:26033589

  19. Special effects used in creating 3D animated scenes-part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avramescu, A. M.

    2015-11-01

    In present, with the help of computer, we can create special effects that look so real that we almost don't perceive them as being different. These special effects are somehow hard to differentiate from the real elements like those on the screen. With the increasingly accesible 3D field that has more and more areas of application, the 3D technology goes easily from architecture to product designing. Real like 3D animations are used as means of learning, for multimedia presentations of big global corporations, for special effects and even for virtual actors in movies. Technology, as part of the movie art, is considered a prerequisite but the cinematography is the first art that had to wait for the correct intersection of technological development, innovation and human vision in order to attain full achievement. Increasingly more often, the majority of industries is using 3D sequences (three dimensional). 3D represented graphics, commercials and special effects from movies are all designed in 3D. The key for attaining real visual effects is to successfully combine various distinct elements: characters, objects, images and video scenes; like all these elements represent a whole that works in perfect harmony. This article aims to exhibit a game design from these days. Considering the advanced technology and futuristic vision of designers, nowadays we have different and multifarious game models. Special effects are decisively contributing in the creation of a realistic three-dimensional scene. These effects are essential for transmitting the emotional state of the scene. Creating the special effects is a work of finesse in order to achieve high quality scenes. Special effects can be used to get the attention of the onlooker on an object from a scene. Out of the conducted study, the best-selling game of the year 2010 was Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2. This way, the article aims for the presented scene to be similar with many locations from this type of games, more

  20. Effects of Spaceflight on Bone: The Rat as an Animal Model for Human Bone Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, B.; Weider, T.; Morey-Holton, E.

    1999-01-01

    The loss of weight bearing during spaceflight results in osteopenia in humans. Decrements in bone mineral reach 3-10% after as little as 75-184 days in space. Loss of bone mineral during flight decreases bone strength and increases fracture risk. The mechanisms responsible for, and the factors contributing to, the changes in bone induced by spaceflight are poorly understood. The rat has been widely used as an animal model for human bone loss during spaceflight. Despite its potential usefulness, the results of bone studies performed in the rat in space have been inconsistent. In some flights bone formation is decreased and cancellous bone volume reduced, while in others no significant changes in bone occur. In June of 1996 Drs. T. Wronski, S. Miller and myself participated in a flight experiment (STS 78) to examine the effects of glucocorticoids on bone during weightlessness. Technically the 17 day flight experiment was flawless. The results, however, were surprising. Cancellous bone volume and osteoblast surface in the proximal tibial metaphysis were the same in flight and ground-based control rats. Normal levels of cancellous bone mass and bone formation were also detected in the lumbar vertebrae and femoral neck of flight rats. Furthermore, periosteal bone formation rate was found to be identical in flight and ground-based control rats. Spaceflight had little or no effect on bone metabolism! These results prompted us to carefully review the changes in bone observed in, and the flight conditions of previous spaceflight missions.

  1. Protective effects of cytokines on bone marrow suppression by radioimmurotherapy in animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Seiji [Ehime Univ., Shigenobu (Japan). School of Medicine

    1995-06-01

    In radioimmunotherapy, the dose limiting factor seems to be bone marrow suppression. Recombinant human granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (rhG-CSF), recombinant human erythropoietin (rhEPO), and recombinant human interleukin-6 (rhIL-6) are the hematopoietic growth factors which regulate the proliferation and differentiation of human bone marrow progenitor cell populations. We applied these cytokines to protect against bone marrow suppression induced by {sup 131}I-radioimmunotherapy in an animal model. Tumor (SCC-3: monocytic cell line)-bearing athymic mice were intraperitoneally injected with 13 MBq/35 {mu}g of {sup 131}I-labeled MoAb (YK-1: IgG1, Kappa). Three days after the injection, various cytokines were subcutaneously injected once a day for 15 days. In the control group, the peripheral blood cell counts decreased over the 20 days, but each cytokine shortened the period of cytopenia; rhG-CSF for granulocytes, rhEPO for erythrocytes, and rhIL-6 for platelets. The biodistribution of {sup 125}I-YK-1 was not changed by the various cytokines. Also, the growth of the tumor was not affected and the antitumor effect of {sup 131}I-YK-1 was not changed. Thus the application of cytokines for radioimmunotherapy was found to be effective in protecting against bone marrow suppression. (author).

  2. Effects of organic contaminants in sewage sludge on soil fertility, plants and animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewage sludge production in Europe will continue to rise as a result of higher environmental standards, making disposal increasingly difficult in the future. A considerable part of this sludge is spread beneficially on agricultural land as an organic fertilizer, however, this outlet is very sensitive to the problems associated with the inorganic and organic contaminants which sludge inevitably contains. Much research has been devoted to the problems of contaminants in sludge and their potential effects on soil, plants, animals and man in recent years, and the European Commission's Concerted Action COST 681 has provided a valuable forum for the exchange of views and progress of research on sludge treatment and disposal. This book contains 19 papers presented to a joint meeting of Working Party 4 (Agricultural Value) and Working Party 5 (Environmental Effects) of COST 681, held at the German Federal Research Centre of Agriculture (FAL), Braunschweig on 6-8 June 1990. The meeting addressed two areas of current concern; the occurrence, behaviour and transfer of sludge-derived organic contaminants (Session 1), and the influence of inorganic and organic contaminants on soil micro-organisms and their activities (Session 2)

  3. Thiopalmitoylation of altered peptide ligands enhances their protective effects in an animal model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloake, Nancy C; Beaino, Wissam; Trifilieff, Elisabeth; Greer, Judith M

    2014-03-01

    Previously, we have shown that conjugation of a palmitic chain via a thioester bond to a cysteine residue in weakly or nonencephalitogenic or neuritogenic peptides markedly enhances their ability to induce autoimmune disease in an MHC class II-restricted manner. From those studies, however, it was not clear whether thiopalmitoylation of the peptides was merely enhancing their disease-inducing potential or whether the lipid was itself playing a pathogenic role. To investigate this further, we have now tested the effects of thiopalmitoylation on MHC class II-restricted altered peptide ligands (APLs), which are normally protective in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, the animal model of multiple sclerosis. We hypothesized that if thiopalmitoylation of a peptide merely enhances its innate potential, then thiopalmitoylated APLs (S-palmAPLs) should show enhanced protective effects. Alternatively, if thiopalmitoylation itself can make a peptide pathogenic, then S-palmAPLs should have decreased therapeutic potential. We synthesized APLs and corresponding S-palmAPLs and showed that the S-palmAPLs were much more effective than the nonconjugated APL at inhibiting the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. This was due to several features of the S-palmAPL:S-palmAPL-primed cells show an enhanced ability to proliferate and produce the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10, in vitro. Furthermore, the bioavailability of S-palmAPL was greatly enhanced, compared with the nonpalmitoylated APL, and S-palm APL was taken up more rapidly into dendritic cells and channeled into the MHC class II processing pathway. These results show that thiopalmitoylation of MHC class II-restricted peptides is a simple way to enhance their effects in vivo and could have wide therapeutic application. PMID:24489099

  4. Chlorhexidine Digluconate Effects on Planktonic Growth and Biofilm Formation in Some Field Isolates of Animal Bacterial Pathogens

    OpenAIRE

    Ebrahimi, Azizollah; Hemati, Majid; Habibian Dehkordi, Saeed; Bahadoran, Shahab; Khoshnood, Sheida; Khubani, Shahin; Dokht Faraj, Mahdi; Hakimi Alni, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background: To study chlorhexidine digluconate disinfectant effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some bacterial field isolates from animals. Objectives: The current study investigated chlorhexidine digluconate effects on planktonic growth and biofilm formation in some field isolates of veterinary bacterial pathogens. Materials and Methods: Forty clinical isolates of Escherichia coli, Salmonella serotypes, Staphylococcus. aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae (10 isolates for ea...

  5. Can Animations Effectively Substitute for Traditional Teaching Methods? Part II: Potential for Differentiated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorius, Roberto Ma.; Santos, Rhodora; Dano, Judith B.; Gutierrez, Jose J.

    2010-01-01

    Animations were prepared using Adobe Flash MX and tested on elementary (3rd-5th grade) and secondary chemistry students. A pre- and post-test study was used to compare the learning gains of students who received the animations with those who received textbook reading time and discussion in class. The control and experimental groups were further…

  6. Animal Agriculture in a Changing Climate Online Course: An Effective Tool for Creating Extension Competency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitefield, Elizabeth; Schmidt, David; Witt-Swanson, Lindsay; Smith, David; Pronto, Jennifer; Knox, Pam; Powers, Crystal

    2016-01-01

    There is a need to create competency among Extension professionals on the topic of climate change adaptation and mitigation in animal agriculture. The Animal Agriculture in a Changing Climate online course provides an easily accessible, user-friendly, free, and interactive experience for learning science-based information on a national and…

  7. Proteome basis of animal effect on color stability of beef longissimus lumborum steaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our objective was to characterize the correlation between the sarcoplasmic proteome and the color stability in beef Longissimus lumborum to explain animal-to-animal variation. Longissimus lumborum (36 h post-mortem) were obtained from 73 beef carcasses demonstrating similar marbling scores, aged for...

  8. Amazing Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuwari, Najat Saad

    2007-01-01

    "Animals" is a three-part lesson plan for young learners with a zoo animal theme. The first lesson is full of activities to describe animals, with Simon Says, guessing games, and learning stations. The second lesson is about desert animals, but other types of animals could be chosen depending on student interest. This lesson teaches…

  9. Simulation of Spread of African Swine Fever, Including the Effects of Residues from Dead Animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq; Boklund, Anette; Bøtner, Anette;

    2016-01-01

    the subclinical stage and are fully infectious during the clinical stage. ASF virus (ASFV) infection through residues of dead animals in the slurries was also modeled in an exponentially fading-out pattern. Low and high transmission rates for ASFV were tested in the model. Robustness analysis was carried out......To study the spread of African swine fever (ASF) within a pig unit and the impact of unit size on ASF spread, a simulation model was created. In the model, an animal can be in one of the following stages: susceptible, latent, subclinical, clinical, or recovered. Animals can be infectious during...... in order to study the impact of uncertain parameters on model predictions. The results showed that the disease may fade out within the pig unit without a major outbreak. Furthermore, they showed that spread of ASFV is dependent on the infectiousness of subclinical animals and the residues of dead animals...

  10. Effects of an Alpha7 Nicotinic Receptor Agonist and Stress on Spatial Memory in an Animal Model of Alzheimer's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Vicens

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to test the effects of PNU-282987 on spatial learning and memory and hippocampal neurogenesis in both intact and chronically stressed transgenic mice. Transgenic mice with susceptibility to Alzheimer's disease (AD under immobilization stress and not-stressed animals receiving 0 and 1 mg/kg of PNU-282987 (PNU were evaluated in a water maze task. The effects of PNU and stress on proliferation of new cells in the hippocampus of these animals were also assessed. The latency to escape the platform was significantly higher in transgenic stressed mice compared to those in the wild stressed group, as well as in transgenic animals without PNU compared to control wild group. On retention of the task, differences emerged on stressed wild animals, PNU wild group, and stressed wild mice receiving PNU. However, no significant differences were detected on new cell proliferation. The results of the present study did not show any impact of stress in acquisition of a spatial task both in wild and transgenic mice. No clear effects of PNU on acquisition of a spatial task in transgenic mice with susceptibility to AD were detected. Although PNU and stress effects were detected on retention of the task in wild animals, no changes were noted in transgenic mice.

  11. Effects of in-cascade defect clustering on near-term defect evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinisch, H.L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The effects of in-cascade defect clustering on the nature of the subsequent defect population are being studied using stochastic annealing simulations applied to cascades generated in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The results of the simulations illustrates the strong influence of the defect configuration existing in the primary damage state on subsequent defect evolution. The large differences in mobility and stability of vacancy and interstitial defects and the rapid one-dimensional diffusion of small, glissile interstitial loops produced directly in cascades have been shown to be significant factors affecting the evolution of the defect distribution. In recent work, the effects of initial cluster sizes appear to be extremely important.

  12. The effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Belkus, H; Vanbeveren, D

    2004-01-01

    In the present paper we report on first results of a project in Brussels where we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using the 3 decades expertise in massive star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass loss formalism on the formation of intermediate mass black holes.

  13. The Effects of Stellar Dynamics on the Evolution of Young, Dense Stellar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkus, H.; van Bever, J.; Vanbeveren, D.

    In this paper, we report on first results of a project in Brussels in which we study the effects of stellar dynamics on the evolution of young dense stellar systems using 3 decades of expertise in massive-star evolution and our population (number and spectral) synthesis code. We highlight an unconventionally formed object scenario (UFO-scenario) for Wolf Rayet binaries and study the effects of a luminous blue variable-type instability wind mass-loss formalism on the formation of intermediate-mass black holes.

  14. Effects of Interaction Between Gravitation and Nonlinear Electrodynamics On Scalar Field Evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ju-Hua; WANG Yong-Jiu

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the scalar field evolution in the dyadosphere spacetime by using the third-order WKB approximation.We find that the coupling term between the gravitation and the nonlinear electrodynamics makes the scalar field decay more quickly and it also makes the scalar field oscillate more slowly.On the other words, this coupling term takes effect on the scalar field evolution as a damping factor.At the same time these effects become more obvious for the scalar field with higher angle quantum number.

  15. Hardening rate under reverse loading in 316 L: back stress and effective stress evolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaudin, C.; Guillemer-Neel, C.; Feaugas, X. [UTC, Compiegne (France). Lab. Roberval

    2001-09-01

    The Bauschinger effect has been investigated in a low stacking fault energy f.c.c. alloy. Reverse hardening rate is discussed in terms of internal stresses evolutions as a function of reverse straining. A distinction is made between short-range (effective stress) and long-range (back stresses) elastic interactions. Moreover the back stress is partitioned into intra-granular and inter-granular components. The evolutions of all stress components are directly related to the modification of dislocation densities and distributions in grains (over 50 grains). Back stress evolution is explained by heterogeneous dislocation patterns dissolution and formation of new ones with opposite polarization. This dissolution is promoted by both components of the back stress which enhance reverse slip and cross-slip under reverse straining. But only the cross-slip can induce plastic strain irreversibility and then permanent softening. The effective stress evolution results from a competition between latent hardening, dislocations emission at wall/channel interface and annihilation process. After stress reversal, the observed transient softening results from the evolution of dislocation distribution and density, in particular from the dissolution of the polarized structures (walls, cells) developed during pre-straining. The permanent softening occurs at reverse plastic strains higher than 2% when the initial heterogeneous dislocation structures are re-established by reverse loading. This permanent softening is mainly associated with the intra-granular back stress. (orig.)

  16. Hardening rate under reverse loading in 316 L: back stress and effective stress evolutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bauschinger effect has been investigated in a low stacking fault energy f.c.c. alloy. Reverse hardening rate is discussed in terms of internal stresses evolutions as a function of reverse straining. A distinction is made between short-range (effective stress) and long-range (back stresses) elastic interactions. Moreover the back stress is partitioned into intra-granular and inter-granular components. The evolutions of all stress components are directly related to the modification of dislocation densities and distributions in grains (over 50 grains). Back stress evolution is explained by heterogeneous dislocation patterns dissolution and formation of new ones with opposite polarization. This dissolution is promoted by both components of the back stress which enhance reverse slip and cross-slip under reverse straining. But only the cross-slip can induce plastic strain irreversibility and then permanent softening. The effective stress evolution results from a competition between latent hardening, dislocations emission at wall/channel interface and annihilation process. After stress reversal, the observed transient softening results from the evolution of dislocation distribution and density, in particular from the dissolution of the polarized structures (walls, cells) developed during pre-straining. The permanent softening occurs at reverse plastic strains higher than 2% when the initial heterogeneous dislocation structures are re-established by reverse loading. This permanent softening is mainly associated with the intra-granular back stress. (orig.)

  17. Experimental animal studies on effects of hyperthermia on the central nervous system: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: From the experimental studies reported in the literature it may be concluded that the maximum tolerable heat dose in CNS is 42oC to 42.5oC for 40 to 60 min or 43oC for 10 to 30 min. This in spite of diversity in animal species studied, as well as the different endpoints for assessment of effects, the different parts of CNS treated, differences in procedures used for anesthesia, thermometry and heating techniques applied. The effects of hyperthermia are expressed immediately or within a few days after treatment and heat injury to neural tissue apparently results in neurological abnormalities which, unless lethal, are transient in most cases. Histological studies show irreversible lesions after high heat dose, characterized by coagulation necrosis. Thermal injury to normal neural tissue is repaired by fibrotic or gliotic scarring. Surviving neuronal elements my be responsible for functional recovery from heat injury, which is, however, dependent on the injured volume and anatomical site of the lesion. Hence, the data indicate a correlation between the exposed volume and toxicity of the heat treatment. The relatively high heat dose tolerated in interstitial heating can be ascribed to this volume effect, since the heated volume of normal neural tissue generally was small and not responsible for vital functions. Late effects, many months after treatment have not been reported. The spinal cord data on maximum tolerable heat dose, point in the same direction as the data on the brain. All studies show that, as with brain, the spinal cord is sensitive to heat. The maximum tolerated heat dose of the cervical part after local hyperthermia lies in the range of 40-60 min at 42-42.5oC, or less than 30 min at 43oC. No late effects were reported. The observations on neurology and heat sensitivity of the spinal cord in mice are very similar to those of the rat. There is good evidence indicating that white matter is more heat resistant than grey matter as data on the rat

  18. Snow White Trench (Animation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for animation This animation shows the evolution of the trench called 'Snow White' that NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander began digging on the 22nd Martian day of the mission after the May 25, 2008, landing. The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  19. Modelling the effects of ionizing radiation on survival of animal population: acute versus chronic exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryshev, A I; Sazykina, T G

    2015-03-01

    The objective of the present paper was application of a model, which was originally developed to simulate chronic ionizing radiation effects in a generic isolated population, to the case of acute exposure, and comparison of the dynamic features of radiation effects on the population survival in cases of acute and chronic exposure. Two modes of exposure were considered: acute exposure (2-35 Gy) and chronic lifetime exposure with the same integrated dose. Calculations were made for a generic mice population; however, the model can be applied for other animals with proper selection of parameter values. In case of acute exposure, in the range 2-11 Gy, the population response was in two phases. During a first phase, there was a depletion in population survival; the second phase was a recovery period due to reparation of damage and biosynthesis of new biomass. Model predictions indicate that a generic mice population, living in ideal conditions, has the potential for recovery (within a mouse lifetime period) from acute exposure with dose up to 10-11 Gy, i.e., the population may recover from doses above an LD50 (6.2 Gy). Following acute doses above 14 Gy, however, the mice population went to extinction without recovery. In contrast, under chronic lifetime exposures (500 days), radiation had little effect on population survival up to integrated doses of 14-15 Gy, so the survival of a population subjected to chronic exposure was much better compared with that after an acute exposure with the same dose. Due to the effect of "wasted radiation", the integrated dose of chronic exposure could be about two times higher than acute dose, producing the same effect on survival. It is concluded that the developed generic population model including the repair of radiation damage can be applied both to acute and chronic modes of exposure; results of calculations for generic mice population are in qualitative agreement with published data on radiation effects in mice. PMID

  20. Finite element simulation of texture evolution and Swift effect in NiAl under torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhlke, Thomas; Glüge, Rainer; Klöden, Burghardt; Skrotzki, Werner; Bertram, Albrecht

    2007-09-01

    The texture evolution and the Swift effect in NiAl under torsion at 727 °C are studied by finite element simulations for two different initial textures. The material behaviour is modelled by an elastic-viscoplastic Taylor model. In order to overcome the well-known shortcomings of Taylor's approach, the texture evolution is also investigated by a representative volume element (RVE) with periodic boundary conditions and a compatible microstructure at the opposite faces of the RVE. Such a representative volume element takes into account the grain morphology and the grain interaction. The numerical results are compared with experimental data. It is shown that the modelling of a finite element based RVE leads to a better prediction of the final textures. However, the texture evolution path is not accounted for correctly. The simulated Swift effect depends much more on the initial orientation distribution than observed in experiment. Deviations between simulation and experiment may be due to continuous dynamic recrystallization.

  1. The Change Detection Advantage for Animals: An Effect of Ancestral Priorities or Progeny of Experimental Design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Hagen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The “animate monitoring” hypothesis proposes that humans are evolutionarily predisposed to recruit attention toward animals. Support for this has repeatedly been obtained through the change detection paradigm where animals are detected faster than artifacts. The present study shows that the advantage for animals does not stand up to more rigorous experimental controls. Experiment 1 used artificially generated change detection scenes and counterbalanced identical target objects across two sets of scenes. Results showed that detection performance is determined more by the surrounding scene than semantic category. Experiment 2 used photographs from the original studies and replaced the target animals with artifacts in the exact same locations, such that the surrounding scene was kept constant while manipulating the target category. Results replicated the original studies when photos were not manipulated but agreed with the findings of our first experiment in that the advantage shifted to the artifacts when object categories replaced each other in the original scenes. A third experiment used inverted and blurred images so as to disrupt high-level perception but failed to erase the advantage for animals. Hence, the present set of results questions whether the supposed attentional advantage for animals can be supported by evidence from the change detection paradigm.

  2. Biological effects of high strength electric fields on small laboratory animals. Interim progress report, March 9, 1976--September 8, 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, R.D.; Kaune, W.T.; Decker, J.R.; Hjeresen, D.L.

    1976-09-01

    Progress is reported on a broad and comprehensive series of biological experiments made under strictly controlled laboratory conditions to screen for possible effects of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields on small laboratory animals. Electric field strengths comparable to and exceeding those under existing and anticipated transmission line designs will be used. Dosimetry studies will complement the animal studies to establish the relationship between tissue dose and any observed biological effects. Information derived from this project will provide a better basis for evaluating potential hazards of exposure to 60-Hz electric fields and help define parameters to be studied in clinical evaluations on humans.

  3. Sensorineural hearing loss and ischemic injury: Development of animal models to assess vascular and oxidative effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivetto, E; Simoni, E; Guaran, V; Astolfi, L; Martini, A

    2015-09-01

    Hearing loss may be genetic, associated with aging or exposure to noise or ototoxic substances. Its aetiology can be attributed to vascular injury, trauma, tumours, infections or autoimmune response. All these factors could be related to alterations in cochlear microcirculation resulting in hypoxia, which in turn may damage cochlear hair cells and neurons, leading to deafness. Hypoxia could underlie the aetiology of deafness, but very few data about it are presently available. The aim of this work is to develop animal models of hypoxia and ischemia suitable for study of cochlear vascular damage, characterizing them by electrophysiology and gene/protein expression analyses. The effects of hypoxia in infarction were mimicked in rat by partial permanent occlusion of the left coronary artery, and those of ischemia in thrombosis by complete temporary carotid occlusion. In our models both hypoxia and ischemia caused a small but significant hearing loss, localized at the cochlear apex. A slight induction of the coagulation cascade and of oxidative stress pathways was detected as cell survival mechanism, and cell damages were found on the cuticular plate of outer hair cells only after carotid ischemia. Based on these data, the two developed models appear suitable for in vivo studies of cochlear vascular damage. PMID:25987500

  4. Biological effects of daily inhalation of radon and its short-lived daughters in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrian golden hamsters, C57BL mice, and specific-pathogen-free rats were exposed simultaneously in groups of 16 animals each for 90 hours per week to aerosols consisting of radon plus 3000--6000 Working Levels of radon-daughters with and without 18 mg/m3 carnotite uranium ore dust. Condensation nuclei concentrations ranged from 2000--4000 per ml and from 90,000--120,000 per ml in the chamber without and with uranium ore dust, respectively. At 4 months of exposure only one of the rodents remained alive. Histopathology of radon-daughter exposed mice includes acute interstitial pneumonitis, severe pulmonary congestion, and supperative rhinitis; mice inhaling radon-daughters with ore showed these lesions plus macrophage proliferation, alveolar septal cell hyperplasia, and bronchial epithelial hyperplasia. Hamsters inhaling radon-daughters showed proliferating lesions characterized by alveolar septal thickening, bronchiolar epithelial hyperplasia, septal fibrosis, and occasionally adenomatoid metaplasia and squamous metaplasia. Hamsters inhaling radon-daughters with ore dust showed similar effects plus granulomatous response and intense septal fibrosis. Rats inhaling radon-daughters showed lesions similar to those of hamsters but more focalized with classic radiation pneumonitis; rats exposed to radon-daughters with ore showed similar lesions, with greater consolidation and pneumoconiosis. These findings will be discussed in relation to pulmonary pathology in uranium miners

  5. Chemical residue interactions and effects in soil-plant-animal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A range of ongoing studies is reported. They deal with interactions between two chemical residues in soils, plants or animals and factors which indirectly affect the appearance and biological significance of the residues. The metabolic inhibitors (KCN or DNE) increased penetration of 14C-lindane into pea root cells but decreased translocation into green tissue. Lindane at low concentrations stimulated plant development. The effects of plant nutritional status on 14C-Dyfonate (a phosphonodithioate insecticide) behaviour in pea plants were studied. Potassium, calcium or magnesium deficiency reduced uptake by the root system. Triazine herbicides and 2,4-D apparently enhanced the toxicity of certain insecticides to insects. Experiments with perfused rat liver confirmed the important role of this organ in the degradation of organophosphorus insecticides. Conditions of application and the presence of microflora were shown to be imported factors in the persistence of insecticide residues in soil. Granular application of phorate provided for greater insecticidal persistence than application as an emulsifiable concentrate. (author)

  6. [Effects of forest ownership regime on landscape pattern and animal habitat: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue-Hui; Wu, Wen; Li, Na-Na; Bu, Ren-Cang; Hu, Yuan-Man

    2013-07-01

    In some European and North American countries where forestry is highly developed, both public and private forest ownership regimes have being existed for a long time. Currently, the researches about both the dynamics of forest landscape and habitat pattern and the relationship between habitat pattern and biological conservation in multi-ownership forest landscape are increasingly becoming important. This paper reviewed the effects of multi-ownership regime on forest landscape pattern and animal habitat and emphasized on the ecological consequences of forest parcelization and land divestiture, including the provision of diverse habitats and fragmentation of the existing large-area habitat. This paper also summarized two ways (changing the ownership pattern and integrating the multi-ownership management by cross boundary coordination) for handling the conflicts between small-scaled multi-ownership management and biological conservation at large scale in forestry-developed countries and analyzed the reasons that those countries prefer to adopt the latter one. Furthermore, the methodological limitations in simulating ownership pattern were pointed out. Finally, the present status, challenges and opportunities in the above-mentioned research issues in China were discussed, and the suggestions for further researches were provided. PMID:24175540

  7. The Effect of Camellia sinensis on Wound Healing Potential in an Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiaghaalipour, Fatemeh; Kanthimathi, M S; Abdulla, Mahmood Ameen; Sanusi, Junedah

    2013-01-01

    Camellia sinensis (tea) is reported to have health benefits, including the building of healthy skin. This study evaluated the effects of topical application of Camellia sinensis extract on the rate of wound closure and the histology of wound area. A uniform area of 2.00 cm in diameter was excised from the neck of adult male Sprague Dawley rats. The animals were topically treated with 0.2 mL of vehicle (CMC), Intrasite gel (positive control), or 200 and 400 mg/mL of extract. Wounds dressed with the extract and Intrasite gel healed significantly earlier than those with vehicle. Histological analysis of the wound area after 10 days showed that wounds dressed with the extract had less scar width when compared to the control. The tissue contained less inflammatory cells and more collagen and angiogenesis, compared to wounds dressed with vehicle. In this study, Camellia sinensis showed high potential in wound healing activity. PMID:23864889

  8. 32. Study the aneugenic effect of benzene on germ cell of animal and workers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To study the aneupoidy effect of benzene on germ cells of animal and humans. Method: The NIH adult female mice were treated with varies doses of benzene (942, 1881 and 3762mg/kg respectively) by single gavage and (706, 1922 and 4864mg/m3 respectively) by inhalation (2h/d, 15d), the ovulated oocytes were collected for conventional cytogenetic analyses, and the frequencies of aneuploidy were detected. The frequencies of aneuploidy in sperm of benzene exposed workers were detected by two color fluorescence in situ hybridization with digoxingenin labeled 9 chromosome probe(D9Z1) and biotin labeled 18 chromosome probe (D18Z1). Result: The frequencies of aneuploidy in MII oocytes were significantly increased over the control in three groups treated by inhalation (7.06%,7.50% and 7.76% respectively control 1.30%, P<0.05 ), a dose-dependent response was present, But in gavage groups only the high dose group was increased over that of control. P<0.05. The timeweight average air concentration (TWA) of benzene in the workplace was 86.49mg/m3, it was two fold higher than the national maximum allowable concentration. The concentration of urinary trans, trans-muconic acid (ttMA) in exposed group was significantly higher than that of control group. A total of 136 401 sperm nuclei in 14 exposed workers and 156 955 sperm nuclei in 16 control workers were counted. The results showed that the frequencies of disomic sperm for chromosome 9 and 18, and diploidy sperm in exposed-workers (0.168%, 0.055%, 0.073%, respectively) were statistically increased over that (0.050%、 0. 033% and 0.040%, respectively) of controls. P<0.05. The frequencies of nullisomic sperm for chromosome 9,18 in the exposed group (0.206%,0.068%) were statistically increased also over that (0.067%,0.048% respectively) of control. The frequency of overall numerical chromosome aberrations (0.570%) in tbe exposed group was increased over that of control(0.218%)P<0.05.Conclusion:An increased aneuploidy

  9. Animal-assisted therapy with farm animals for persons with psychiatric disorders: effects on self-efficacy, coping ability and quality of life, a randomized controlled trial

    OpenAIRE

    Braastad Bjarne O; Ekeberg Øivind; Berget Bente

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The benefits of Animal-Assisted Therapy (AAT) for humans with mental disorders have been well-documented using cats and dogs, but there is a complete lack of controlled studies using farm animals as therapeutic agents for psychiatric patients. The study was developed in the context of Green care, a concept that involves the use of farm animals, plants, gardens, or the landscape in recreational or work-related interventions for different target groups of clients in cooperat...

  10. EFFECTS OF A COMPANION STAR ON SLOW NOVA OUTBURSTS—TRANSITION FROM STATIC TO WIND EVOLUTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two types of nova evolutions can occur in low-mass white dwarfs of ∼0.5-0.7 M☉, i.e., an evolution with optically thick winds like in usual classical novae, or an another type of evolution without them like in the symbiotic nova PU Vul. The latter type is characterized by spectra with no indication of strong winds as well as a long-lasting flat optical peak in its light curve. We propose a transition from evolution with no optically thick wind to usual evolution with optically thick winds as a new outburst model for slow novae that show a relatively long-lasting multipeak phase followed by a wind phase like in the slow novae V723 Cas, HR Del, and V5558 Sgr. We calculated nova envelopes with one-dimensional approximation of the companion's effects and found that when the companion star is deeply embedded in the extended nova envelope, the structure of the static envelope approaches that of the optically thick wind solution. Thus, the transition from static to wind solution is triggered by the effect of the companion. The transition occurs in a close binary nova like V723 Cas, but is not triggered in a long-period binary like PU Vul. We reconfirm our previous results that the frictional energy deposition is negligibly small in almost all hydrogen/helium novae because of the low envelope density at the orbit.

  11. Effect of environmental variables on body size evolution of crinoids between periods of mass extinctions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jani, T.; Heim, N. A.; Payne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Body size plays a major role in determining whether or not an organism can sustain in its local environment. The ecosystem of an animal has a major effect on the fitness of organisms, and it would be interesting to note the degree to which various environmental factors alter body size. In my project, I identify three environmental factors that seem to affect body size of crinoids, marine invertebrates from phylum Echinodermata, and explore how these variables play out in the intervals between the five mass extinctions. The particular factors I study include atmospheric CO2 concentration (proxy for temperature), O2 concentration, and sea level. Although the r and p values for all of these factors were statistically insignificant to definitively make any correlation, there was a visual correlation. For O2, I noted a generally positive correlation with body size over time. CO2 trends suggested a negative correlation until the K-T boundary, but a positive correlation afterwards. Correlation with sea level was a little more complicated: correlation was positive from the start of the Phanerozoic to the Permian extinction; it turned negative until the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary; afterwards, it again became positive. However, for all three variables, statistical values are too low to say definitively mark any correlation. Out of all three factors, CO2 levels had the highest correlation and lowest p-values in the most time intervals: from the start of the Phanerozoic to Ordovician-Silurian Extinction, from the Late Devonian to the Permian Extinction, and from the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary to the present. When considering first differences, CO2 levels also had the highest correlation from the Permian Extinction to Triassic-Jurassic Extinction and from the Triassic-Jurassic Extinction to Cretaceous-Tertiary Extinction. Using PaleoTS, I found that body size evolution patterns either seemed to follow either an unbiased random walk (URW) or stasis in the intervals between

  12. Effectiveness of conditional punishment for the evolution of public cooperation

    CERN Document Server

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2013-01-01

    Collective actions, from city marathons to labor strikes, are often mass-driven and subject to the snowball effect. Motivated by this, we study evolutionary advantages of conditional punishment in the spatial public goods game. Unlike unconditional punishers who always impose the same fines on defectors, conditional punishers do so proportionally with the number of other punishers in the group. Phase diagrams in dependence on the punishment fine and cost reveal that the two types of punishers cannot coexist. Spontaneous coarsening of the two strategies leads to an indirect territorial competition with the defectors, which is won by unconditional punishers only if the sanctioning is inexpensive. Otherwise conditional punishers are the victors of the indirect competition, indicating that under more realistic conditions they are indeed the more effective strategy. Both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions as well as tricritical points characterize the complex evolutionary dynamics, which is due to mult...

  13. Effectiveness of conditional punishment for the evolution of public cooperation

    OpenAIRE

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaz

    2013-01-01

    Collective actions, from city marathons to labor strikes, are often mass-driven and subject to the snowball effect. Motivated by this, we study evolutionary advantages of conditional punishment in the spatial public goods game. Unlike unconditional punishers who always impose the same fines on defectors, conditional punishers do so proportionally with the number of other punishers in the group. Phase diagrams in dependence on the punishment fine and cost reveal that the two types of punishers...

  14. Allee effects and the evolution of polymorphism in cyclic parthenogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castel, Magda; Mailleret, Ludovic; Andrivon, Didier; Ravigné, Virginie; Hamelin, Frédéric M

    2014-03-01

    Cyclic parthenogens alternate asexual reproduction with periodic episodes of sexual reproduction. Sexually produced free-living forms are often their only way to survive unfavorable periods. When sexual reproduction requires the mating of two self-incompatible individuals, mating limitation may generate an Allee effect, which makes small populations particularly vulnerable to extinction; parthenogenetic reproduction can attenuate this effect. However, asexual reproduction likely trades off with sexual reproduction. To explore the evolutionary implications of such a trade-off, we included recurrent mating events associated with seasonal interruptions in a simple population dynamics model. Following an adaptive dynamics approach, we showed that positive density dependence associated with Allee effects in cyclic parthenogens promotes evolutionary divergence in the level of investment in asexual reproduction. Although polymorphism may be transient, morphs mostly investing into sexual reproduction may eventually exclude those predominantly reproducing in an asexual manner. Asexual morphs can be seen as making cooperative investments into the common pool of mates, while sexual morphs defect, survive better, and may eventually fix in the population. Our findings provide a novel hypothesis for the frequent coexistence of sexual and asexual lineages, notably in plant parasitic fungi.

  15. Anti-tumor effects of metformin in animal models of hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Li

    Full Text Available Several studies have reported that metformin can reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in diabetes patients. However, the direct anti-HCC effects of metformin have hardly been studied in patients, but have been extensively investigated in animal models of HCC. We therefore performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of animal studies evaluating the effects of metformin on HCC.We collected the relevant studies by searching EMBASE, Medline (OvidSP, Web of Science, Scopus, PubMed Publisher, and Google Scholar. Studies were included according to the following inclusion criteria: HCC, animal study, and metformin intervention. Study quality was assessed using SYRCLE's risk of bias tool. A meta-analysis was performed for the outcome measures: tumor growth (tumor volume, weight and size, tumor number and incidence.The search resulted in 573 references, of which 13 could be included in the review and 12 included in the meta-analysis. The study characteristics of the included studies varied considerably. Two studies used rats, while the others used mice. Only one study used female animals, nine used male, and three studies didn't mention the gender of animals in their experiments. The quality of the included studies was low to moderate based on the assessment of their risk of bias. The meta-analysis showed that metformin significantly inhibited the growth of HCC tumour (SMD -2.20[-2.96,-1.43]; n=16, but no significant effect on the number of tumors (SMD-1.05[-2.13,0.03]; n=5 or the incidence of HCC was observed (RR 0.62[0.33,1.16]; n=6. To investigate the potential sources of significant heterogeneities found in outcome of tumor growth (I2=81%, subgroup analyses of scales of growth measures and of types of animal models used were performed.Metformin appears to have a direct anti-HCC effect in animal models. Although the intrinsic limitations of animal studies, this systematic review could provide an important reference for future

  16. Effect of immobilization on the EEG of the baboon. Comparison with telemetry results from unrestricted animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, J.; Collomb, H.

    1980-01-01

    The EEG of the baboon was studied under two very different sets of conditions: 37 were totally immobolized while 12 were studied in their free movements with 4 channel telemetry. For the immobilzed, 3 stages were described: (1) activation, record desynchronized; (2) rest with 13-15 cm/sec rhythm, like the human alpha rhythm stage but with eyes open or closed; (3)relaxation with a decrease in 13-15 rhythm and the appearance of 5-7 cm/sec theta waves, eyelids closed, animal apparently sleeping. For the free animals the rest stage appeared when the animal's attention was not directed anywhere and there was no relaxation stage. It is concluded that the EEG pattern of the immobilized animal that was described as the "relaxation" stage really represents a special functional state which one must distinguish clearly from the physiological stages of sleep.

  17. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...... are faring. From the utilitarian perspective, the use of sentient animals in research that may harm them is an ethical issue, but harm done to animals can be balanced by benefit generated for humans and other animals. The animal rights view, when thoroughgoing, is abolitionist as regards the use of animals......This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...

  18. Validity of animal models for the cholesterol-raising effects of coffee diterpenes in human subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, de, B.; Sawyer, J K; Katan, M.B.; Rudel, L L

    1999-01-01

    Cafestol and kahweol, coffee lipids present in unfiltered coffee brews, potently increase LDL-cholesterol concentration in human subjects. We searched for an animal species in which cafestol similarly increases LDL-cholesterol. Such an animal model could be used subsequently as a model to study the mechanism of action of cafestol and kahweol. Cafestol and kahweol increased serum lipids in African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops), cebus (Cebus apella) and rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys,...

  19. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J.L.; Farmer, D.K.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-01-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the mod

  20. An Evolution Model of Trading Behavior Based on Peer Effect in Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue-Tang Bian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work concerns the modeling of evolvement of trading behavior in stock markets which can cause significant impact on the movements of prices and volatilities. Based on the assumption of the investors' limited rationality, the evolution mechanism of trading behavior is modeled according to peer effect in network, that investors are prone to imitate their neighbors' activity through comprehensive analysis on the neighboring preferred degree, self-psychological preference, and the network topology of the relationship among them. We investigate by mean-field analysis and extensive simulations the evolution of investors' trading behavior in various typical networks under different characteristics of peer effect. Our results indicate that the evolution of investors' behavior is affected by the network structure of stock market and the effect of neighboring preferred degree; the stability of equilibrium states of investors' behavior dynamics is directly related with the concavity and convexity of the peer effect function; connectivity and heterogeneity of the network play an important role in the evolution of the investment behavior in stock market.

  1. The incidence, management, and evolution of rapamycin-related side effects in kidney transplant recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhave, J.C.; Boucher, A.; Dandavino, R.; Collette, S.; Senecal, L.; Hebert, M.J.; Girardin, C.; Cardinal, H.

    2014-01-01

    Conversion from a calcineurin-inhibitor-based immunosuppression to a rapamycin-based immunosuppression may preserve kidney graft function. The side effects of rapamycin can limit its usefulness, but their management and evolution are rarely reported in clinical trials. We performed a retrospective c

  2. Evolution of the effective moduli of an anisotropic, dense, granular material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    La Ragione, L.; Magnanimo, V.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the behavior of a dense granular aggregate made by identical, elastic spheres, uni-axially compressed at constant pressure. Our goal is to predict the evolution of the effective moduli along the loading path when small perturbations are applied to stressed states. The analytical model is

  3. {sup 3}He retention and structural evolution in erbium tritides: Phase and aging effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, X.S., E-mail: zlxs77@163.com [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Thin Film Centre, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom); Zhang, L.; Wang, W.D.; Liu, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Peng, S.M., E-mail: pengshuming@caep.cn [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Ding, W.; Long, X.G.; Cheng, G.J.; Liang, J.H. [Institute of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Fu, Y.Q. [Thin Film Centre, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of West of Scotland, Paisley PA1 2BE, Scotland (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Effects of phase changes on {sup 3}He retention of Er tritide films were investigated. • The α phase in Er tritide films had no apparent effect on {sup 3}He release/retention. • Tritium content in the β phase showed significant effects on {sup 3}He retention. • Evolution of {sup 3}He in the β phase was apparently influenced by the γ phase. • Effects of phase changes on structure evolution of Er tritides were investigated. - Abstract: Effects of phase changes on {sup 3}He release/retention and crystal lattice evolution during aging of erbium (Er) tritide films were investigated using X-ray diffraction. The contents of α phase and γ phase in the Er tritide films showed significant different effects on {sup 3}He release/retention. The initial tritium stoichiometry or excess tritium atoms accommodated in the octahedral sites and the microstructure (i.e., the texture and Er{sub 2}O{sub 3} oxide inclusions) played an important role for the {sup 3}He release and the evolution of {sup 3}He bubbles in the β phase Er tritide films. In the β + γ region, evolution of {sup 3}He in the β phase was apparently influenced by the γ phase, which could result in a strongly anisotropic lattice dilation and an earlier inflection point of the expansion rate of (1 1 1) lattice parameter. A preferred occupation of {sup 3}He in basal plane of the hexagonal γ phase and the lattice expansion along the hexagonal direction were identified.

  4. Effectiveness of conditional punishment for the evolution of public cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Perc, Matjaž

    2013-05-21

    Collective actions, from city marathons to labor strikes, are often mass-driven and subject to the snowball effect. Motivated by this, we study evolutionary advantages of conditional punishment in the spatial public goods game. Unlike unconditional punishers who always impose the same fines on defectors, conditional punishers do so proportionally with the number of other punishers in the group. Phase diagrams in dependence on the punishment fine and cost reveal that the two types of punishers cannot coexist. Spontaneous coarsening of the two strategies leads to an indirect territorial competition with the defectors, which is won by unconditional punishers only if the sanctioning is inexpensive. Otherwise conditional punishers are the victors of the indirect competition, indicating that under more realistic conditions they are indeed the more effective strategy. Both continuous and discontinuous phase transitions as well as tricritical points characterize the complex evolutionary dynamics, which is due to multipoint interactions that are introduced by conditional punishment. We propose indirect territorial competition as a generally applicable mechanism relying on pattern formation, by means of which spatial structure can be utilized by seemingly subordinate strategies to avoid evolutionary extinction. PMID:23485452

  5. Complete Genome Sequence of the Animal Pathogen Listeria ivanovii, Which Provides Insights into Host Specificities and Evolution of the Genus Listeria

    OpenAIRE

    Buchrieser, C; Rusniok, C.; Garrido, P; HAIN, T; M. Scortti; Lampidis, R.; Kaerst, U.; Chakraborty, T; Cossart, P.; Kreft, J; Vazquez-Boland, J A; Goebel, W.; Glaser, P

    2011-01-01

    We report the complete and annotated genome sequence of the animal pathogenListeria ivanoviisubsp.ivanoviistrain PAM 55 (serotype 5), isolated in 1997 in Spain from an outbreak of abortion in sheep. The sequence and its analysis are available at an interactive genome browser at the Institut Pasteur (http://genolist.pasteur.fr/LivaList/).

  6. Life-span radiation effects studies in animals: What can they tell us: DOE symposium series 58

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Individual papers are processed separately for the data base. Authors describe research programs at several major research laboratories. Various aspects of numerous experiments are described. Data from the effects of low-dose irradiation experiments involving animals are extrapolated to man

  7. A method to evaluate relative ovicidal effects of soil microfungi on thick-shelled eggs of animal-parasitic nematodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thapa, Sundar; Meyling, Nicolai Vitt; Katakam, Kiran Kumar;

    2015-01-01

    Thick-shelled eggs of animal-parasitic ascarid nematodes can survive and remain infective in the environment for years. The present study evaluated a simple in vitro method and evaluation scheme to assess the relative effect of two species of soil microfungi, Pochonia chlamydosporia Biotype 10...

  8. Anti-tumor effects of metformin in animal models of hepatocellular carcinoma: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, J.; Hernanda, P.Y.; Bramer, W.M.; Peppelenbosch, M.P.; Luijk, J. van; Pan, Q.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several studies have reported that metformin can reduce the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in diabetes patients. However, the direct anti-HCC effects of metformin have hardly been studied in patients, but have been extensively investigated in animal models of HCC. We therefore pe

  9. Effects of a combination of feed additives on methane production, diet digestibility, and animal performance in lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijderveld, van S.M.; Fonken, B.C.J.; Dijkstra, J.; Gerrits, W.J.J.; Perdok, H.B.; Fokkink, W.B.; Newbold, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of a mixture of dietary additives on enteric methane production, rumen fermentation, diet digestibility, energy balance, and animal performance in lactating dairy cows. Identical diets were fed in both experiments. The mixture of feed additives in

  10. The Effects of Conceptual Change Texts Accompanied with Animations on Overcoming 11th Grade Students' Alternative Conceptions of Chemical Bonding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozmen, Haluk; Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims to determine the effect of conceptual change texts accompanied with computer animations on 11th grade students' understanding and alternative conceptions related to chemical bonding. One experimental group (EG; N = 28) and one comparison group (CG; N = 30) were used in the study. While the comparison group taught traditional…

  11. Critical soil concentrations of cadmium, lead and mercury in view of health effects on humans and animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de W.; Romkens, P.F.A.M.; Schutze, G.

    2007-01-01

    To assess the impact of elevated concentrations of metals in terrestrial ecosystems, a major distinction should be made in risks/effects of heavy metals related to (i) the soil ecosystem (soil organisms/processes and plants) and (ii) human health or animal health resulting from bioaccumulation. The

  12. A PHARMACOLOGICAL STUDY ON THE PREGNANCY TERMINATION EFFECT OF COMPLEX PRESCRIPTION OF ELM WHITE BARK IN ANIMALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NIUXi-Min; LIPci-Quan; ZHANGJian-Guo; YEXue-Min

    1989-01-01

    Complex prescription of elm white bark is made up of elm white bark and Olibanum, which has been used as a female contraceptive in China. Our animal experimental results showed that it had terminating effect of early, mid and fate pregnancies in

  13. Effectiveness of Computer Animation and Geometrical Instructional Model on Mathematics Achievement and Retention among Junior Secondary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambari, A. I.; Falode, C. O.; Adegbenro, D. A.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer animation and geometry instructional model on mathematics achievement and retention on Junior Secondary School Students in Minna, Nigeria. It also examined the influence of gender on students' achievement and retention. The research was a pre-test post-test experimental and control group…

  14. Observational Learning from Animated Models: Effects of Studying-Practicing Alternation and Illusion of Control on Transfer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouters, Pieter; Paas, Fred; Van Merriënboer, Jeroen

    2008-01-01

    Wouters, P. J. M., Paas, F., & Van Merriënboer, J. J. G. (2010). Observational learning from animated models: effects of studying-practicing alternation and illusion of control on transfer. Instructional Science, 38(1), 89-104. doi:10.1007/s11251-008-9079-0

  15. Genetic parameters for social effects on survival in cannibalistic layers: combining survival analysis and a linear animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ellen, E.D.; Ducrocq, V.P.; Ducro, B.J.; Veerkamp, R.F.; Bijma, P.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mortality due to cannibalism in laying hens is a difficult trait to improve genetically, because censoring is high (animals still alive at the end of the testing period) and it may depend on both the individual itself and the behaviour of its group members, so-called associative effects

  16. An Exploratory Study of the Effects of Time Compressed Animated Delivery Multimedia Technology on Student Learning in Reproductive Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisan, Michael S.; Oki, Angela C.; Senger, P. L.

    2010-01-01

    Two experiments examined the effects of a multimedia technology referred to as "Time Compressed Animated Delivery" (TCAD), on student learning in a junior-level reproductive physiology course. In experiment 1, participating students received one of two presentations of the same instructional material: TCAD and a lecture captured on video. At the…

  17. Effects of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music and Computer Animation on Senior Secondary School Students' Academic Achievement in Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpoghol, T. V.; Ezeudu, F. O.; Adzape, J. N.; Otor, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music (LMM) and Computer Animation (LMC) on senior secondary school students' academic achievement in electrochemistry in Makurdi metropolis. Six research questions and six hypotheses guided the study. The design of the study was quasi experimental, specifically the pre-test,…

  18. Effective Assessments of Integrated Animations--Exploring Dynamic Physics Instruction for College Students' Learning and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, King-Dow; Yeh, Shih-Chuan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to give effective assessments of three major physics animations to upgrade college students' learning achievements and attitudes. All college participants were taken from mechanical and civil engineering departments who joined this physics course during the 2011 academic year. Three prime objectives of physics…

  19. The effect of normal electric field on the evolution of immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Nima; Ozbulut, Murat; Feng, James J.; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-04-01

    Manipulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using an external electric field has been the subject of many studies. However, most of these studies are focused on early stages of the evolution. In this work, the long-term evolution of the instability is investigated, focusing on the forces acting on the interface between the two fluids. To this end, numerical simulations are carried out at various electric permittivity and conductivity ratios as well as electric field intensities using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The electric field is applied in parallel to gravity to maintain unstable evolution. The results show that increasing top-to-bottom permittivity ratio increases the rising velocity of the bubble while hindering the spike descent. The opposite trend is observed for increasing top-to-bottom conductivity ratio. These effects are amplified at larger electric field intensities, resulting in narrower structures as the response to the excitation is non-uniform along the interface.

  20. The effect of normal electric field on the evolution of immiscible Rayleigh-Taylor instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofighi, Nima; Ozbulut, Murat; Feng, James J.; Yildiz, Mehmet

    2016-10-01

    Manipulation of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability using an external electric field has been the subject of many studies. However, most of these studies are focused on early stages of the evolution. In this work, the long-term evolution of the instability is investigated, focusing on the forces acting on the interface between the two fluids. To this end, numerical simulations are carried out at various electric permittivity and conductivity ratios as well as electric field intensities using Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics method. The electric field is applied in parallel to gravity to maintain unstable evolution. The results show that increasing top-to-bottom permittivity ratio increases the rising velocity of the bubble while hindering the spike descent. The opposite trend is observed for increasing top-to-bottom conductivity ratio. These effects are amplified at larger electric field intensities, resulting in narrower structures as the response to the excitation is non-uniform along the interface.

  1. Streamflow forecast uncertainty evolution and its effect on real-time reservoir operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lu; Singh, Vijay P.; Lu, Weiwei; Zhang, Junhong; Zhou, Jianzhong; Guo, Shenglian

    2016-09-01

    When employing streamflow forecasting in practical applications, such as reservoir operation, one important issue is to deal with the uncertainty involved in forecasting. Traditional studies dealing with the uncertainty in streamflow forecasting have been limited in describing the evolution of forecast uncertainty. This paper proposes a copula-based uncertainty evolution (CUE) model to describe the evolution of streamflow forecast uncertainty. The generated forecast uncertainty series fits the observed series well in terms of observed mean, standard deviation and skewness. Daily flow with forecast uncertainty are simulated and used to determine the effect of forecast uncertainty on real-time reservoir operation of the Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR), China. Results show that using the forecast inflow coupled with the pre-release module for reservoir operation of TGR in flood season cannot increase the flood risk.

  2. Effects of allometry, productivity and lifestyle on rates and limits of body size evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okie, Jordan G.; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Evans, Alistair R.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Saarinen, Juha J.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica; Uhen, Mark D.; Sibly, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Body size affects nearly all aspects of organismal biology, so it is important to understand the constraints and dynamics of body size evolution. Despite empirical work on the macroevolution and macroecology of minimum and maximum size, there is little general quantitative theory on rates and limits of body size evolution. We present a general theory that integrates individual productivity, the lifestyle component of the slow–fast life-history continuum, and the allometric scaling of generation time to predict a clade's evolutionary rate and asymptotic maximum body size, and the shape of macroevolutionary trajectories during diversifying phases of size evolution. We evaluate this theory using data on the evolution of clade maximum body sizes in mammals during the Cenozoic. As predicted, clade evolutionary rates and asymptotic maximum sizes are larger in more productive clades (e.g. baleen whales), which represent the fast end of the slow–fast lifestyle continuum, and smaller in less productive clades (e.g. primates). The allometric scaling exponent for generation time fundamentally alters the shape of evolutionary trajectories, so allometric effects should be accounted for in models of phenotypic evolution and interpretations of macroevolutionary body size patterns. This work highlights the intimate interplay between the macroecological and macroevolutionary dynamics underlying the generation and maintenance of morphological diversity. PMID:23760865

  3. Effects of allometry, productivity and lifestyle on rates and limits of body size evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okie, Jordan G; Boyer, Alison G; Brown, James H; Costa, Daniel P; Ernest, S K Morgan; Evans, Alistair R; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L; Hamilton, Marcus J; Harding, Larisa E; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S Kathleen; Saarinen, Juha J; Smith, Felisa A; Stephens, Patrick R; Theodor, Jessica; Uhen, Mark D; Sibly, Richard M

    2013-08-01

    Body size affects nearly all aspects of organismal biology, so it is important to understand the constraints and dynamics of body size evolution. Despite empirical work on the macroevolution and macroecology of minimum and maximum size, there is little general quantitative theory on rates and limits of body size evolution. We present a general theory that integrates individual productivity, the lifestyle component of the slow-fast life-history continuum, and the allometric scaling of generation time to predict a clade's evolutionary rate and asymptotic maximum body size, and the shape of macroevolutionary trajectories during diversifying phases of size evolution. We evaluate this theory using data on the evolution of clade maximum body sizes in mammals during the Cenozoic. As predicted, clade evolutionary rates and asymptotic maximum sizes are larger in more productive clades (e.g. baleen whales), which represent the fast end of the slow-fast lifestyle continuum, and smaller in less productive clades (e.g. primates). The allometric scaling exponent for generation time fundamentally alters the shape of evolutionary trajectories, so allometric effects should be accounted for in models of phenotypic evolution and interpretations of macroevolutionary body size patterns. This work highlights the intimate interplay between the macroecological and macroevolutionary dynamics underlying the generation and maintenance of morphological diversity.

  4. Central and Metabolic Effects of High Fructose Consumption: Evidence from Animal and Human Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Stoianov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Fructose consumption has increased dramatically in the last 40 years, and its role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome has been implicated by many studies. It is most often encountered in the diet as sucrose (glucose and fructose or high-fructose corn syrup (55% fructose. At high levels, dietary exposure to fructose triggers a series of metabolic changes originating in the liver, leading to hepatic steatosis, hypertriglyceridemia, insulin resistance, and decreased leptin sensitivity. Fructose has been identified to alter biological pathways in other tissues including the central nervous system (CNS, adipose tissue, and the gastrointestinal system. Unlike glucose, consumption of fructose produces smaller increases in the circulating satiety hormone glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1, and does not attenuate levels of the appetite suppressing hormone ghrelin. In the brain, fructose contributes to increased food consumption by activating appetite and reward pathways, and stimulating hypothalamic AMPK activity, a nutrient-sensitive regulator of food intake. Recent studies investigating the neurophysiological factors linking fructose consumption and weight gain in humans have demonstrated differential activation of brain regions that govern appetite, motivation and reward processing. Compared to fructose, glucose ingestion produces a greater reduction of hypothalamic neuronal activity, and increases functional connectivity between the hypothalamus and other reward regions of the brain, indicating that these two sugars regulate feeding behavior through distinct neural circuits. This review article outlines the current findings in fructose-feeding studies in both human and animal models, and discusses the central effects on the CNS that may lead to increased appetite and food intake. Keywords: Fructose, Metabolic syndrome, Appetite, Central nervous system

  5. Effect of dexamethasone on emesis after morphine administration in animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Marjani

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available  Background & Objective: Morphine is commonly used to relieve moderate to severe pain, but some side effects include vomiting. The Objective of this study was to evaluate the anti-emetic properties of dexamethasone in animal models receiving morphine.   Materials & Methods: In a clinical study fourteen cross breed dogs that were 2 and 4 years old were assigned to two equals groups. The Treatment group received dexamethasone (1 mg/kg intra muscularly, 60 minutes prior to morphine administration. The Control group received 2 cc of saline intra muscularly (IM, 60 minutes prior to morphine administration. After 60 minutes all dogs received morphine (1 mg/kg intra muscularly. After morphine was administrated all dogs were observed for 1 hour to allow assessment of frequency of emesis and time until the onset of the first emetic episode and then they were compared accordingly.   Results: The Mean ± SD for the first emetic episode in the treatment group was 266 ± 49. The same number was  197.6 ± 31.84 in the control group. There was no statistically significant deference for the time of the first emetic episode between treatment and control group (P = 0.23. There was no statistically significant deference for the number of emetic episodes between the treatment and control group (P = 0.16. There was no statistically significant deference for the weight of the dogs between the treatment and control groups (P = 0.95.    Conclusion: in the current study, the administration of dexamethasone 1 hour before administrating morphine was not able to significantly affect the frequency of emetic episodes or the time period before the occurrence of the first emetic episode. 

  6. Effects of temporal resolution on an inferential model of animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postlethwaite, Claire M; Dennis, Todd E

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in describing the behaviour of animals by fitting various movement models to tracking data. Despite this interest, little is known about how the temporal 'grain' of movement trajectories affects the outputs of such models, and how behaviours classified at one timescale may differ from those classified at other scales. Here, we present a study in which random-walk state-space models were fit both to nightly geospatial lifelines of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) and synthetic trajectories parameterised from empirical observations. Observed trajectories recorded by GPS collars at 5-min intervals were sub-sampled at periods varying between 10 and 60 min, to approximate the effect of collecting data at lower sampling frequencies. Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo fitting techniques, using information about movement rates and turning angles between sequential fixes, were employed using a Bayesian framework to assign distinct behavioural states to individual location estimates. We found that in trajectories with higher temporal granularities behaviours could be clearly differentiated into 'slow-area-restricted' and 'fast-transiting' states, but for trajectories with longer inter-fix intervals this distinction was markedly less obvious. Specifically, turning-angle distributions varied from being highly peaked around either 0° or 180° at fine temporal scales, to being uniform across all angles at low sampling intervals. Our results highlight the difficulty of comparing model results amongst tracking-data sets that vary substantially in temporal grain, and demonstrate the importance of matching the observed temporal resolution of tracking devices to the timescales of behaviours of interest, otherwise inter-individual comparisons of inferred behaviours may be invalid, or important biological information may be obscured.

  7. Effects of temporal resolution on an inferential model of animal movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Postlethwaite

    Full Text Available Recently, there has been much interest in describing the behaviour of animals by fitting various movement models to tracking data. Despite this interest, little is known about how the temporal 'grain' of movement trajectories affects the outputs of such models, and how behaviours classified at one timescale may differ from those classified at other scales. Here, we present a study in which random-walk state-space models were fit both to nightly geospatial lifelines of common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula and synthetic trajectories parameterised from empirical observations. Observed trajectories recorded by GPS collars at 5-min intervals were sub-sampled at periods varying between 10 and 60 min, to approximate the effect of collecting data at lower sampling frequencies. Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo fitting techniques, using information about movement rates and turning angles between sequential fixes, were employed using a Bayesian framework to assign distinct behavioural states to individual location estimates. We found that in trajectories with higher temporal granularities behaviours could be clearly differentiated into 'slow-area-restricted' and 'fast-transiting' states, but for trajectories with longer inter-fix intervals this distinction was markedly less obvious. Specifically, turning-angle distributions varied from being highly peaked around either 0° or 180° at fine temporal scales, to being uniform across all angles at low sampling intervals. Our results highlight the difficulty of comparing model results amongst tracking-data sets that vary substantially in temporal grain, and demonstrate the importance of matching the observed temporal resolution of tracking devices to the timescales of behaviours of interest, otherwise inter-individual comparisons of inferred behaviours may be invalid, or important biological information may be obscured.

  8. Adaptation to Temporally Fluctuating Environments by the Evolution of Maternal Effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdhadip Dey

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available All organisms live in temporally fluctuating environments. Theory predicts that the evolution of deterministic maternal effects (i.e., anticipatory maternal effects or transgenerational phenotypic plasticity underlies adaptation to environments that fluctuate in a predictably alternating fashion over maternal-offspring generations. In contrast, randomizing maternal effects (i.e., diversifying and conservative bet-hedging, are expected to evolve in response to unpredictably fluctuating environments. Although maternal effects are common, evidence for their adaptive significance is equivocal since they can easily evolve as a correlated response to maternal selection and may or may not increase the future fitness of offspring. Using the hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we here show that the experimental evolution of maternal glycogen provisioning underlies adaptation to a fluctuating normoxia-anoxia hatching environment by increasing embryo survival under anoxia. In strictly alternating environments, we found that hermaphrodites evolved the ability to increase embryo glycogen provisioning when they experienced normoxia and to decrease embryo glycogen provisioning when they experienced anoxia. At odds with existing theory, however, populations facing irregularly fluctuating normoxia-anoxia hatching environments failed to evolve randomizing maternal effects. Instead, adaptation in these populations may have occurred through the evolution of fitness effects that percolate over multiple generations, as they maintained considerably high expected growth rates during experimental evolution despite evolving reduced fecundity and reduced embryo survival under one or two generations of anoxia. We develop theoretical models that explain why adaptation to a wide range of patterns of environmental fluctuations hinges on the existence of deterministic maternal effects, and that such deterministic maternal effects are more likely to contribute to

  9. Adaptation to Temporally Fluctuating Environments by the Evolution of Maternal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Snigdhadip; Proulx, Stephen R; Teotónio, Henrique

    2016-02-01

    All organisms live in temporally fluctuating environments. Theory predicts that the evolution of deterministic maternal effects (i.e., anticipatory maternal effects or transgenerational phenotypic plasticity) underlies adaptation to environments that fluctuate in a predictably alternating fashion over maternal-offspring generations. In contrast, randomizing maternal effects (i.e., diversifying and conservative bet-hedging), are expected to evolve in response to unpredictably fluctuating environments. Although maternal effects are common, evidence for their adaptive significance is equivocal since they can easily evolve as a correlated response to maternal selection and may or may not increase the future fitness of offspring. Using the hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we here show that the experimental evolution of maternal glycogen provisioning underlies adaptation to a fluctuating normoxia-anoxia hatching environment by increasing embryo survival under anoxia. In strictly alternating environments, we found that hermaphrodites evolved the ability to increase embryo glycogen provisioning when they experienced normoxia and to decrease embryo glycogen provisioning when they experienced anoxia. At odds with existing theory, however, populations facing irregularly fluctuating normoxia-anoxia hatching environments failed to evolve randomizing maternal effects. Instead, adaptation in these populations may have occurred through the evolution of fitness effects that percolate over multiple generations, as they maintained considerably high expected growth rates during experimental evolution despite evolving reduced fecundity and reduced embryo survival under one or two generations of anoxia. We develop theoretical models that explain why adaptation to a wide range of patterns of environmental fluctuations hinges on the existence of deterministic maternal effects, and that such deterministic maternal effects are more likely to contribute to adaptation than

  10. Adaptation to Temporally Fluctuating Environments by the Evolution of Maternal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Snigdhadip; Proulx, Stephen R; Teotónio, Henrique

    2016-02-01

    All organisms live in temporally fluctuating environments. Theory predicts that the evolution of deterministic maternal effects (i.e., anticipatory maternal effects or transgenerational phenotypic plasticity) underlies adaptation to environments that fluctuate in a predictably alternating fashion over maternal-offspring generations. In contrast, randomizing maternal effects (i.e., diversifying and conservative bet-hedging), are expected to evolve in response to unpredictably fluctuating environments. Although maternal effects are common, evidence for their adaptive significance is equivocal since they can easily evolve as a correlated response to maternal selection and may or may not increase the future fitness of offspring. Using the hermaphroditic nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we here show that the experimental evolution of maternal glycogen provisioning underlies adaptation to a fluctuating normoxia-anoxia hatching environment by increasing embryo survival under anoxia. In strictly alternating environments, we found that hermaphrodites evolved the ability to increase embryo glycogen provisioning when they experienced normoxia and to decrease embryo glycogen provisioning when they experienced anoxia. At odds with existing theory, however, populations facing irregularly fluctuating normoxia-anoxia hatching environments failed to evolve randomizing maternal effects. Instead, adaptation in these populations may have occurred through the evolution of fitness effects that percolate over multiple generations, as they maintained considerably high expected growth rates during experimental evolution despite evolving reduced fecundity and reduced embryo survival under one or two generations of anoxia. We develop theoretical models that explain why adaptation to a wide range of patterns of environmental fluctuations hinges on the existence of deterministic maternal effects, and that such deterministic maternal effects are more likely to contribute to adaptation than

  11. Resveratrol provoca efeitos antiaterogênicos em um modelo animal de aterosclerose Resveratrol causes antiatherogenic effects in an animal model of atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossane Serafim Matos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: O resveratrol protege o sistema cardiovascular por meio de uma série de mecanismos, incluindo atividades antioxidantes e antiplaquetárias. OBJETIVO: Avaliar os possíveis efeitos anti-inflamatórios e antiaterogênicos do resveratrol, utilizando coelhos alimentados com uma dieta hipercolesterolêmica (1% de colesterol. MÉTODOS: Vinte coelhos brancos adultos do sexo masculino foram selecionados e divididos em dois grupos: grupo controle (GC, 10 coelhos; e grupo resveratrol (GR, 10 coelhos. Os animais foram alimentados com uma dieta hipercolesterolêmica por 56 dias. Para a dieta do GR, o resveratrol (2mg/kg peso/dia foi adicionado do 33º ao 56º dia. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença significativa entre os grupos no colesterol sérico total, no colesterol HDL, no colesterol LDL e nos triglicerídeos. No GC, 70% apresentaram lesões ateroscleróticas avançadas da aorta (tipos III, IV, V ou VI. Todos os animais do GR apresentaram lesões ateroscleróticas leves da aorta (tipos I ou II ou não apresentaram lesões. A razão entre a área intimal e a área da camada intimal/medial mostrou-se significativamente menor no GR quando comparada ao GC (p BACKGROUND: Resveratrol protects the cardiovascular system by a number of mechanisms, including antioxidant and anti-platelet activities. OBJECTIVE: To assess the potential anti-inflammatory and antiatherogenic effects of resveratrol using rabbits fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (1% cholesterol. METHODS: Twenty white male rabbits were selected and divided into two groups: control group (CG, 10 rabbits; and resveratrol group (RG, 10 rabbits. The animals were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for 56 days. For the RG diet, resveratrol (2mg/kg weight/day was added from days 33 - 56. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in the total serum cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and triglycerides between the groups. Of the CG, 70% had advanced aortic atherosclerotic lesions (types

  12. Effects of anisotropic winds on massive stars evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Cyril, Georgy; André, Maeder

    2010-01-01

    Whenever stars are rotating very fast ($\\Omega/\\Omega_\\mathrm{crit} > 0.7$, with $\\Omega_\\mathrm{crit}$ the Keplerian angular velocity of the star accounting for its deformation) radiative stellar winds are enhanced in polar regions. This theoretical prediction is now confirmed by interferometric observations of fast rotating stars.} Polar winds remove less angular momentum than spherical winds and thus allow the star to keep more angular momentum. We quantitatively assess the importance of this effect. First we use a semi-analytical approach to estimate the variation of the angular momentum loss when the rotation parameter increases. Then we compute complete 9 M$_\\odot$ stellar models at very high angular velocities (starting on the ZAMS with $\\Omega/\\Omega_\\mathrm{crit} = 0.8$ and reaching the critical velocity during the Main Sequence) with and without radiative wind anisotropies. When wind anisotropies are accounted for, the angular momentum loss rate is reduced by less than $4%$ for $\\Omega/\\Omega_\\mathr...

  13. Effects of virtual human animation on emotion contagion in simulated inter-personal experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanxiang; Babu, Sabarish V; Armstrong, Rowan; Bertrand, Jeffrey W; Luo, Jun; Roy, Tania; Daily, Shaundra B; Dukes, Lauren Cairco; Hodges, Larry F; Fasolino, Tracy

    2014-04-01

    We empirically examined the impact of virtual human animation on the emotional responses of participants in a medical virtual reality system for education in the signs and symptoms of patient deterioration. Participants were presented with one of two virtual human conditions in a between-subjects experiment, static (non-animated) and dynamic (animated). Our objective measures included the use of psycho-physical Electro Dermal Activity (EDA) sensors, and subjective measures inspired by social psychology research included the Differential Emotions Survey (DES IV) and Positive and Negative Affect Survey (PANAS). We analyzed the quantitative and qualitative measures associated with participants’ emotional state at four distinct time-steps in the simulated interpersonal experience as the virtual patient’s medical condition deteriorated. Results suggest that participants in the dynamic condition with animations exhibited a higher sense of co-presence and greater emotional response as compared to participants in the static condition, corresponding to the deterioration in the medical condition of the virtual patient. Negative affect of participants in the dynamic condition increased at a higher rate than for participants in the static condition. The virtual human animations elicited a stronger response in negative emotions such as anguish, fear, and anger as the virtual patient’s medical condition worsened.

  14. Comparison of the effectiveness of some common animal data scaling techniques in estimating human radiation dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.B. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States); Aydogan, B. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1999-01-01

    In the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, animal studies are typically performed to get a first approximation of the expected radiation dose in humans. This study evaluates the performance of some commonly used data extrapolation techniques to predict residence times in humans using data collected from animals. Residence times were calculated using animal and human data, and distributions of ratios of the animal results to human results were constructed for each extrapolation method. Four methods using animal data to predict human residence times were examined: (1) using no extrapolation, (2) using relative organ mass extrapolation, (3) using physiological time extrapolation, and (4) using a combination of the mass and time methods. The residence time ratios were found to be log normally distributed for the nonextrapolated and extrapolated data sets. The use of relative organ mass extrapolation yielded no statistically significant change in the geometric mean or variance of the residence time ratios as compared to using no extrapolation. Physiologic time extrapolation yielded a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.01, paired t test) in the geometric mean of the residence time ratio from 0.5 to 0.8. Combining mass and time methods did not significantly improve the results of using time extrapolation alone. 63 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Evolution of the Ordos Plateau and environmental effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUE; LePing; LI; JianXing; ZHENG; GuoZhang; LI; ZhiPei

    2007-01-01

    Based on the analysis of temporary-spatial distribution, geomorphic position, contact relationship with underlying strata and grain size of red clay, we studied the formation and environmental background of red clay. During late Miocene-Pliocene, the Ordos Block finished the transformation from the basin to the plateau, which had an obvious environmental effect on the topography, indicated by the formation of highland undergoing wind erosion and lowland receiving red clay deposits. The red clay materials were sourced from dusts carried by wind energy and covered on the initial topography. Unlike Quaternary loess dust covering the overall the Loess Plateau, red clay deposited on the highland would be transported to the lowlands by wind and fluvial process. As a result, there was no continuous "Red Clay Plateau" in the Ordos region and red clay was only preserved in former lowlands. However, red clay was discontinuously distributed through the Loess Plateau and to some extent modified the initial topography. The differential uplift in interior plateau is indicated by the uplift of northern Baiyushan, central Ziwuling and southern Weibeibeishan. The Weibeibeishan Depression formed earlier and became the sedimentary center of red clay resulting in the thicker red clay deposits in Chaona, Lingtai and Xunyi. Since Quaternary the aridity in the northern plateau enhanced and accelerated loess accumulation caused the formation of the Loess Plateau. During the late Pleistocene the rapid uplift led to the enhancement of erosion. Especially after the cut-through of Sanme Lake by the Yellow River, the decline of base level caused the falling of ground water level and at the same time the increase of drainage density resulting in the enhancement of evaporation capacity, which enhanced the aridity tendency of aridity in the Loess Plateau region.

  16. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low

  17. Anticipating the Emerging of Some Strategical Infectious Animal Diseases in Indonesia Related to The Effect of Global Warming and Climate Change

    OpenAIRE

    Sjamsul Bahri; T Syafriati

    2011-01-01

    The effect of global warming and climate change is changing the season, included flooding in one area and very dry in other area, changing the temperature and humidity. These changes will trigger changing of the life of biological agent (virus, bacteria, parasites and so on), variety of animal species, variety of vectors as reservoir host of animal with the role of transmitting the disease to other animal species, This condition will trigger the new animal disease (emerging disease) or old di...

  18. Evolution and Development of Animal Medicine Varieties in China%我国药用动物品种沿革与发展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈天羽; 杨学连; 陆昕怡; 李月; 马维维; 金梦; 邵莹; 吴启南

    2015-01-01

    Animal medicine is an important part of traditional Chinese medicine with a long application history in China. Systematically understanding the history of the development of animal medicine is of great significance to scientific protection and rational use of animal medicine resources. It has certain guiding significance to protection of wild resources, exploitation of new substitutes, standardization and summary of artificial breeding, and artificial reproduction technology. Taking the development of bezoar as an example, this article expounded the following four aspects:the development history of animal medicine, national animal protection, technical development, and prospect forecast by summarizing the Chinese ancient medical books and consulting the relevant laws and regulations. The entire above are about to offer new ideas for the sustainable development, the development of new medicine resources, and the development of animal medicine related preparation product.%动物类中药是中药的重要组成部分,在我国的应用历史悠久。系统了解动物药发展的历史沿革,对动物药资源的科学保护和合理开发利用有重要意义,在加强野生资源保护、论证新代用品开发,以及规范和总结野生变家养、人工繁殖技术等方面有一定的指导意义。本文通过对我国本草古籍的整理归纳,查阅相关法律规定,以牛黄的发展为例,从动物药的发展简史、国家动物保护、科技发展及前景展望4个方面进行阐述,为动物类中药的可持续发展、新药用资源的开发,以及动物药相关制剂产品的开发提供新的思路。

  19. Effect of Xiaoke Granule(消渴冲剂)on Blood Sugar and Blood Rheological Property in Experimental Diabetic Animals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    季晓梅; 刘根尚; 齐昉; 郑虎占; 佘靖; 龚慕辛; 孙军; 章红英

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the pharmacological effect of Xiaoke Granule (XKG, 消渴冲剂) on blood sugar and blood rheological property in the diabetic animals.Methods: Alloxan induced diabetic mice or rats were grouped randomly. The effects of XKG on blood sugar, appetite, capacity of drinking, glucose tolerance, blood lipid and blood rheological property were observed and compared among groups.Results:XKG showed a trend in reducing the appetite and capacity of drinking, increasing the body weight, and significantly inhibiting the increase of blood sugar coused by ectogenic glucose in mice, and could improve the blood lipid and blood rheological property in rats.Conclusion:XKG is effective in reducing serum total cholesterol, lowering the blood viscosity, improving the blood rheological property of alloxan induced diabetic animals. Therefore, it might effective in treating and preventing the occurrence of diabetes mellitus and the complications of blood stasis.

  20. The pace of cultural evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Perreault

    Full Text Available Today, humans inhabit most of the world's terrestrial habitats. This observation has been explained by the fact that we possess a secondary inheritance mechanism, culture, in addition to a genetic system. Because it is assumed that cultural evolution occurs faster than biological evolution, humans can adapt to new ecosystems more rapidly than other animals. This assumption, however, has never been tested empirically. Here, I compare rates of change in human technologies to rates of change in animal morphologies. I find that rates of cultural evolution are inversely correlated with the time interval over which they are measured, which is similar to what is known for biological rates. This correlation explains why the pace of cultural evolution appears faster when measured over recent time periods, where time intervals are often shorter. Controlling for the correlation between rates and time intervals, I show that (1 cultural evolution is faster than biological evolution; (2 this effect holds true even when the generation time of species is controlled for; and (3 culture allows us to evolve over short time scales, which are normally accessible only to short-lived species, while at the same time allowing for us to enjoy the benefits of having a long life history.

  1. Ground and space flight experiments of the effects of light, sound and/or temperature on animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Daniel C.; Du, Vince; Erikson, Jill; Gott, Jack; Hinchcliffe, Heather; Mele, Gary; Moeller, Karen; Nguyen, Tam; Okumura, Sarah; Robbins, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Papers on the following topics are presented: (1) rat long term habitability and breeding under low light intensity (5 lux); (2) effects of low light intensity on the rat circadian system; (3) effects of sound/noise on the circadian system of rats; (4) temperature related problems involving the animal enclosure modules (AEM) lighting system; and (5) NASA AEM filter test 92/93 (Rats).

  2. Effect of Electroacupuncture on Visceral Hyperalgesia, Serotonin and Fos Expression in an Animal Model of Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Justin CY; Ziea, Eric TC; Lao, Lixing; Lam, Emma FC; Chan, Catherine SM; Liang, Angela YQ; Chu, Sunny LH; Yew, David TW; Berman, Brian M; Sung, Joseph JY

    2010-01-01

    Background/Aims While it is well established that acupuncture relieves somatic pain, its therapeutic effect on visceral pain such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unclear. We evaluated the effect of acupuncture in treating visceral hyperalgesia in an animal model. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats (n = 8 per group) with prior neonatal maternal separation stress were randomly allocated to receive 3-day treatment of either electroacupuncture (EA) or sham acupuncture at acupoint ST-36. Another gro...

  3. Innovative Drugs to Treat Depression: Did Animal Models Fail to Be Predictive or Did Clinical Trials Fail to Detect Effects?

    OpenAIRE

    Belzung, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Over recent decades, encouraging preclinical evidence using rodent models pointed to innovative pharmacological targets to treat major depressive disorder. However, subsequent clinical trials have failed to show convincing results. Two explanations for these rather disappointing results can be put forward, either animal models of psychiatric disorders have failed to predict the clinical effectiveness of treatments or clinical trials have failed to detect the effects of these new drugs. A care...

  4. Comparative meta-analysis of the effect of Lactobacillus species on weight gain in humans and animals

    OpenAIRE

    Million, M; Angelakis, E; Paul, M.; Armougom, Fabrice; Leibovici, L; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Background: Obesity is associated with alteration of the gut microbiota. In order to clarify the effect of Lactobacillus-containing probiotics (LCP) on weight we performed a meta-analysis of clinical studies and experimental models. We intended to assess effects by Lactobacillus species. Methods: A broad search with no date or language restriction was performed. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative clinical studies in humans and animals or experimental models assess...

  5. Radiation dose-fractionation effects in spinal cord: comparison of animal and human data

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Huang, Yimei; Brown, Stephen L.; Movsas, Benjamin; Kaminski, Joseph; Chetty, Indrin J.; Ryu, Samuel; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recognizing spinal cord dose limits in various fractionations is essential to ensure adequate dose for tumor control while minimizing the chance of radiation-induced myelopathy (RIM). This study aimed to determine the α/β ratio of the spinal cord and the cord dose limit in terms of BED50, the biological equivalent dose (BED) that induces 50 % chance of RIM, by fitting data collected from published animal and patient studies. Methods RIM data from five rat studies; three large animal s...

  6. Effects of MVA85A vaccine on tuberculosis challenge in animals: systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Kashangura, Rufaro; Sena, Emily S.; Young, Taryn; Garner, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Background: The existing Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) vaccination provides partial protection against tuberculosis (TB). The modified vaccinia ankara virus-expressing antigen 85A (MVA85A) aims to boost BCG immunity. We evaluated the animal evidence supporting the testing of MVA85A in humans. Methods: Our protocol included in vivo preclinical studies of the MVA85A booster with BCG compared with BCG alone, followed by a TB challenge. We used standard methods for systematic review of animal st...

  7. Animal experiment and clinical study of effect of gamma-interferon on hepatic fibrosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Lei Weng; Wei Min Cai; Rong Hua Liu

    2001-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the antifibrotic effect ofdifferent doses of recombinant human Gamma-Interferon (IFN-γ) intwo rat models of hepaticfibrosis, and to observe its effect on moderatechronic hepatitis B virus fibrosis.METNODS Hepatic fibrosis was successfullyinduced in 150 and 196 rats by subcutaneousinjection of carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) andintraperitoneal injection of dimethylnitrosamine(DMN), respectively. Each of the two modeldose IFN-γ group (15 MU/kg per day, i.m. for 8group (1.67 MU/kg daily, i.m. for 8 weeks).Another group of 10 rats without any treatmentwas used as normal controls. At the end of theexperiment, semi-quantitative histopathologicalscores of inflammation and fibrosis, liver (αsmooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression level,liver hydroxyl proline content and serumhyaluronic acid levels were compared. And 47medium chronic hepatitis B viral fibrosispatients were studied. They were given IFN-γtreatment, 100MU/day i.m. for the first threemonths and 100MU qod i.m. for the next sixmonths. Semi-quantitative pathological scoresof inflammation and fibrosis and serum hepaticfibrosis indices were compared within the 9months.RESULTS In animal experiment, thepathological fibrosis scores and liver hydroxylproline content were found to be significantlylower in rats treated with different doses of IFN-γ as compared with rats in fibrotic model groupinduced by either CCI4 or DMN, in a dose-dependent manner. For CCI4-induced model,pathological fibrosis scores in high, medium andIow doses IFN-γ groups were 5.10 ± 2.88, 7.70 ±3.53 and 8.00 ± 3.30, respectively, but the scorewas 14.60 ± 7.82 in fibrotic model group.Hydroxyl proline contents were 2.83 ± 1.18, 3.59± 1.22 and 4.80 ± 1.62, in the three IFN-γgroups, and 10.01 ± 3.23 in fibrotic model group.The difference was statistically significant(P<0.01). Similar results were found in DMN-induced model. Pathological fibrosis scoreswere 6.30±0.48, 8.10 ±2.72 and 8.30 ±2.58, inhigh, medium and Iow doses

  8. Ultrastructural observation of effect of moderate hypothermia on axonal damage in an animal model of diffuse axonal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙晓川; 唐文渊; 郑履平

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of moderate hypothermia on responses of axonal cytoskeleton to axonal injury in the acute stage of injury. Methods: Of fifteen adult guinea pigs, twelve animals were subjected to stretch injury to the right optic nerves and divided into the normothermic group (n=6) in which the animal's core temperature was maintained at 36.0-37.5℃ and the hypothermia group (n=6) in which the core temperature was reduced to 32.0-32.5℃ after stretch injury. Remaining three animals sustained no injury to the right optic nerves and served as control group. Half of injured animals (n=3) of either normothermic group or hypothermic group were killed at either 2 hours or 4 hours after injury. The ultrastructural changes of axonal cytoskeleton of the right optic nerve fibers from the animals were examined under a transmission electron microscope and analyzed by quantitative analysis with a computer image analysis system. Results: At 2 hours after stretch injury, there was a significant reduction in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.001), and a significant increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05 or P<0.01) in axons of all sizes in normothermic animals. The mean number of neurofilaments also decreased statistically (P<0.01) in large and medium subgroups of axons in the same experimental group at 2 hours. By 4 hours, the large subgroup of axons in normothermic animals still demonstrated a significant decline in the mean number of microtubules (P<0.01) and an increase in the mean intermicrotubule spacing (P<0.05), while the medium and small subgroups of axons displayed a significant increase in the mean number of neurofilaments (P<0.05) and reduction in the mean interneurofilament spacing (P<0.05). On the contrary, either the mean number of microtubules and the mean intermicrotubule spacing, or the mean number of neurofilaments and interneurofilament spacing in axons of all sizes in hypothermic stretch-injured animals was not

  9. The Socioemotional Effects of a Computer-Simulated Animal on Children's Empathy and Humane Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Yueh-Feng Lily; Kaufman, David M.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of using a computer-simulated animal in a handheld virtual pet videogame to improve children's empathy and humane attitudes. Also investigated was whether sex differences existed in children's development of empathy and humane attitudes resulting from play, as well as their feelings for a virtual pet. The…

  10. Phage isolated from animal feces effectively reduce foodborne pathogens in the gut of cattle and swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Food animals can harbour foodborne pathogens (e.g., enterohemorrhagic E. coli and Salmonella spp.) in their gut that can be spread to humans via contaminated meat products or water and crops contaminated with pathogens by farm run-off. If the pathogen load can be reduced on the farm, then the effec...

  11. The Effectiveness of Health Animations in Audiences With Different Health Literacy Levels : An Experimental Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meppelink, Corine S.; van Weert, Julia C. M.; Haven, Carola J.; Smit, Edith G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Processing Web-based health information can be difficult, especially for people with low health literacy. Presenting health information in an audiovisual format, such as animation, is expected to improve understanding among low health literate audiences. Objective: The aim of this paper

  12. The Effects of Exercise on Cognitive Recovery after Acquired Brain Injury in Animal Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wogensen, Elise; Rytter, Hana Malá; Mogensen, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present paper is to review the current status of exercise as a tool to promote cognitive rehabilitation after acquired brain injury (ABI) in animal model-based research. Searches were conducted on the PubMed, Scopus, and psycINFO databases in February 2014. Search strings used...

  13. Animated pedagogical agents effects on enhancing student motivation and learning in a science inquiry learning environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meij, van der H.; Meij, van der J.; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students’ perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science

  14. Animated Pedagogical Agents Effects on Enhancing Student Motivation and Learning in a Science Inquiry Learning Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meij, Hans; van der Meij, Jan; Harmsen, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    This study focuses on the design and testing of a motivational animated pedagogical agent (APA) in an inquiry learning environment on kinematics. The aim of including the APA was to enhance students' perceptions of task relevance and self-efficacy. Given the under-representation of girls in science classrooms, special attention was given to…

  15. The effects of a shear flow on nonlinear evolutions of double tearing mode in Hall magnetohydrodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a shear flow on nonlinear evolution of double tearing mode in Hall magnetohydrodynamics are investigated. The parallel shear flow displays a suppressing effect on the double tearing mode. Due to the effect of the shear flow, the relative displacements between the magnetic islands are changed, and therefore their mutual interactions become weak. Furthermore, the nonlinear impulsive growth phase of the double tearing mode is delayed with increasing the shear flow velocity. When the magnetic islands are pushing against each other, the width of current sheets decreases drastically, and therefore the Hall effects are dominant and the magnetic reconnection enhances greatly.

  16. Animal detection in natural images: effects of color and image database.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weina Zhu

    Full Text Available The visual system has a remarkable ability to extract categorical information from complex natural scenes. In order to elucidate the role of low-level image features for the recognition of objects in natural scenes, we recorded saccadic eye movements and event-related potentials (ERPs in two experiments, in which human subjects had to detect animals in previously unseen natural images. We used a new natural image database (ANID that is free of some of the potential artifacts that have plagued the widely used COREL images. Color and grayscale images picked from the ANID and COREL databases were used. In all experiments, color images induced a greater N1 EEG component at earlier time points than grayscale images. We suggest that this influence of color in animal detection may be masked by later processes when measuring reation times. The ERP results of go/nogo and forced choice tasks were similar to those reported earlier. The non-animal stimuli induced bigger N1 than animal stimuli both in the COREL and ANID databases. This result indicates ultra-fast processing of animal images is possible irrespective of the particular database. With the ANID images, the difference between color and grayscale images is more pronounced than with the COREL images. The earlier use of the COREL images might have led to an underestimation of the contribution of color. Therefore, we conclude that the ANID image database is better suited for the investigation of the processing of natural scenes than other databases commonly used.

  17. A generic formulation for emittance and lattice function evolution for non-Hamiltonian systems with stochastic effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, J. S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2015-05-03

    I describe a generic formulation for the evolution of emittances and lattice functions under arbitrary, possibly non-Hamiltonian, linear equations of motion. The average effect of stochastic processes, which would include ionization interactions and synchrotron radiation, is also included. I first compute the evolution of the covariance matrix, then the evolution of emittances and lattice functions from that. I examine the particular case of a cylindrically symmetric system, which is of particular interest for ionization cooling.

  18. Animal agriculture: symbiosis, culture or ethical conflict?

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Vonne; Olsson, I Anna S

    2006-01-01

    Several writers on animal ethics defend the abolition of most or all animal agriculture, which they consider an unethical exploitation of sentient non-human animals. However, animal agriculture can also be seen as a co-evolution over thousands of years, that has affected biology and behaviour on the one hand, and quality of life of humans and domestic animals on the other. Furthermore, animals are important in sustainable agriculture. They can increase efficiency by their ability to transform...

  19. Animal models of depression in dopamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine transporter knockout mice: prominent effects of dopamine transporter deletions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perona, Maria T G; Waters, Shonna; Hall, Frank Scott; Sora, Ichiro; Lesch, Klaus-Peter; Murphy, Dennis L; Caron, Marc; Uhl, George R

    2008-09-01

    Antidepressant drugs produce therapeutic actions and many of their side effects via blockade of the plasma membrane transporters for serotonin (SERT/SLC6A2), norepinephrine (NET/SLC6A1), and dopamine (DAT/SLC6A3). Many antidepressants block several of these transporters; some are more selective. Mouse gene knockouts of these transporters provide interesting models for possible effects of chronic antidepressant treatments. To examine the role of monoamine transporters in models of depression DAT, NET, and SERT knockout (KO) mice and wild-type littermates were studied in the forced swim test (FST), the tail suspension test, and for sucrose consumption. To dissociate general activity from potential antidepressant effects three types of behavior were assessed in the FST: immobility, climbing, and swimming. In confirmation of earlier reports, both DAT KO and NET KO mice exhibited less immobility than wild-type littermates whereas SERT KO mice did not. Effects of DAT deletion were not simply because of hyperactivity, as decreased immobility was observed in DAT+/- mice that were not hyperactive as well as in DAT-/- mice that displayed profound hyperactivity. Climbing was increased, whereas swimming was almost eliminated in DAT-/- mice, and a modest but similar effect was seen in NET KO mice, which showed a modest decrease in locomotor activity. Combined increases in climbing and decreases in immobility are characteristic of FST results in antidepressant animal models, whereas selective effects on swimming are associated with the effects of stimulant drugs. Therefore, an effect on climbing is thought to more specifically reflect antidepressant effects, as has been observed in several other proposed animal models of reduced depressive phenotypes. A similar profile was observed in the tail suspension test, where DAT, NET, and SERT knockouts were all found to reduce immobility, but much greater effects were observed in DAT KO mice. However, to further determine whether these

  20. Study regarding the quantitative evolution of the game animals populations from 66 Tolvadia, Forest Domain- Lunca Timisului, in 2008-2012 period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorel Dronca

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Integration of the Romania in the E.U., is imposing a special attention to game populations. The aim of the present paper was to study the quantitative evolution of the hunting population for the 13 species during 2008-2012, on the hunting terrain 66 Tolvadia, from Forest Domain – Lunca Timişului, with a total surface of 12,557 ha. The study shows that form the 13 species monitored, 3 were not identified on this hunting terrain Red Deer (Cervus elaphus L., Fallow Deer (Dama dama L, European Pine Marten (Martes martes L.. For the other species identified the population evolution in number demonstrated that there is a god correlation between the number of individuals and its biogenic capacity. Also the study shows that a special attention to natural selection and the efficient use of artificial selection is needed, especially for the following 3 species: Roe Deer (Capreolus Capreolus L., Wild hog (Sus scrofa L. and Common Pheasant (Phasianus colchicus L..

  1. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and complications from bites Never pet, handle, or feed unknown animals Leave snakes alone Watch your children closely around animals Vaccinate your cats, ferrets, and dogs against rabies Spay or neuter ...

  2. Animal Bites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild animals usually avoid people. They might attack, however, if they feel threatened, are sick, or are protecting their ... or territory. Attacks by pets are more common. Animal bites rarely are life-threatening, but if they ...

  3. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essay first introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  4. Animal Farm

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐蓉蓉

    2015-01-01

    This essayfirst introduce the background of Animal Farm and a brief introduction of the author.Then it discuss three thesis about this novel and briefly discussed about it.At last it give highly review on Animal Farm.

  5. Effect of Be disc evolution on global one-armed oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oktariani, F.; Okazaki, A. T.; Kunjaya, C.; Aprilia

    2016-07-01

    We study the effect of density distribution evolution on the global one-armed oscillation modes in low-viscosity discs around isolated and binary Be stars. Observations show that some Be stars exhibit evidence of formation and dissipation of the equatorial disc. In this paper, we first calculate the density evolution in discs around isolated Be stars. To model the formation stage of the disc, we inject mass at a radius just outside the star at a constant rate for 30-50 yr. As the disc develops, the density distribution approaches the form of the steady disc solution. Then, we turn-off the mass injection to model the disc dissipation stage. The innermost part of the disc starts accretion, and a gap forms between the star and the disc. Next, we calculate the one-armed modes at several epochs. We neglect the effect of viscosity because the time-scale of oscillations is much shorter than the disc evolution time-scale for low viscosity. In the disc formation stage, the eigenfrequency increases with time towards the value for the steady state disc. On the other hand, one-armed eigenmodes in dissipating Be discs have significantly higher eigenfrequencies and narrower propagation regions. Observationally, such a change of mode characteristics can be taken as an evidence for gap opening around the star. In binary Be stars, the characteristics of the disc evolution and the eigenmodes are qualitatively the same as in isolated Be stars, but quantitatively, they have shorter evolution time-scales and higher eigenfrequencies, which is in agreement with the observed trend.

  6. Animal ethics

    OpenAIRE

    Palmer, Clare; Sandøe, Peter

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes and discusses different views concerning our duties towards animals. First, we explain why it is necessary to engage in thinking about animal ethics and why it is not enough to rely on feelings alone. Secondly, we present and discuss five different kinds of views about the nature of our duties to animals. They are: contractarianism, utilitarianism, the animal rights view, contextual views, and a respect for nature view. Finally, we briefly consider whether it is possibl...

  7. Animal Deliberation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.P.G.

    2014-01-01

    While much has been written on environmental politics on the one hand, and animal ethics and welfare on the other, animal politics, as the interface of the two, is underexamined. There are key political implications in the increase of animal protection laws, the rights of nature, and political parti

  8. Animal models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtze, Jens Peter; Krentz, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    In this issue of Cardiovascular Endocrinology, we are proud to present a broad and dedicated spectrum of reviews on animal models in cardiovascular disease. The reviews cover most aspects of animal models in science from basic differences and similarities between small animals and the human...

  9. Effect of Growing Size of Interaction Neighbors on the Evolution of Cooperation in Spatial Snowdrift Game

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娟娟; 王娟; 孙世温; 王莉; 王震; 夏承遗

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the influence of the size of interaction neighbors(k) on the evolution of cooperation in the spatial snowdrift game.At first,we consider the effects of noise K and cost-to-benefit ratio r,the simulation results indicate that the evolution of cooperation depends on the combined action of noise and cost-to-benefit ratio.For a lower r,the cooperators are multitudinous and the cooperation frequency ultimately increases to 1 as the increase of noise.However,for a higher r,the defectors account for the majority of the game and dominate the game if the noise is large enough.Then we mainly investigate how k influences the evolution of cooperation by varying the noise in detail.We find that the frequency of cooperators is closely related to the size of neighborhood and cost-to-benefit ratio r.In the case of lower r,the augmentation of k plays no positive role in promoting the cooperation as compared with that of k = 4,while for higher r the cooperation is improved for a growing size of neighborhood.At last,based on the above discussions,we explore the cluster-forming mechanism among the cooperators.The current results are beneficial to further understand the evolution of cooperation in many natural,social and biological systems.

  10. Effect of Growing Size of Interaction Neighbors on the Evolution of Cooperation in Spatial Snowdrift Game

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study the influence of the size of interaction neighbors (k) on the evolution of cooperation in the spatial snowdrift game. At first, we consider the effects of noise K and cost-to-benefit ratio r, the simulation results indicate that the evolution of cooperation depends on the combined action of noise and cost-to-benefit ratio. For a lower r, the cooperators are multitudinous and the cooperation frequency ultimately increases to 1 as the increase of noise. However, for a higher r, the defectors account for the majority of the game and dominate the game if the noise is large enough. Then we mainly investigate how k influences the evolution of cooperation by varying the noise in detail. We find that the frequency of cooperators is closely related to the size of neighborhood and cost-to-benefit ratio r. In the case of lower r, the augmentation of k plays no positive role in promoting the cooperation as compared with that of k = 4, while for higher r the cooperation is improved for a growing size of neighborhood. At last, based on the above discussions, we explore the cluster-forming mechanism among the cooperators. The current results are beneficial to further understand the evolution of cooperation in many natural, social and biological systems. (general)

  11. Glucosamine Supplementation Demonstrates a Negative Effect On Intervertebral Disc Matrix in an Animal Model of Disc Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lloydine; Vo, Nam; Coehlo, J. Paulo; Dong, Qing; Bechara, Bernard; Woods, Barrett; Hempen, Eric; Hartman, Robert; Preuss, Harry; Balk, Judith; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Laboratory based controlled in vivo study Objective To determine the in vivo effects of oral glucosamine sulfate on intervertebral disc degeneration Summary of Background Data Although glucosamine has demonstrated beneficial effect in articular cartilage, clinical benefit is uncertain. A CDC report from 2009 reported that many patients are using glucosamine supplementation for low back pain (LBP), without significant evidence to support its use. Because disc degeneration is a major contributor of LBP, we explored the effects of glucosamine on disc matrix homeostasis in an animal model of disc degeneration. Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: control, annular puncture, glucosamine, and annular puncture+glucosamine. Glucosamine treated rabbits received daily oral supplementation with 107mg/day (weight based equivalent to human 1500mg/day). Annular puncture surgery involved puncturing the annulus fibrosus (AF) of 3 lumbar discs with a 16G needle to induce degeneration. Serial MRIs were obtained at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. Discs were harvested at 20 weeks for determination of glycosaminoglycan(GAG) content, relative gene expression measured by RT-PCR, and histological analyses. Results The MRI index and NP area of injured discs of glucosamine treated animals with annular puncture was found to be lower than that of degenerated discs from rabbits not supplemented with glucosamine. Consistent with this, decreased glycosaminoglycan was demonstrated in glucosamine fed animals, as determined by both histological and GAG content. Gene expression was consistent with a detrimental effect on matrix. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the net effect on matrix in an animal model in vivo, as measured by gene expression, MRI, histology, and total proteoglycan is anti-anabolic. This raises concern over this commonly used supplement, and future research is needed to establish the clinical relevance of these

  12. The co-evolution of brand effect and competitiveness in evolving networks

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Jin-Li

    2013-01-01

    The principle that "the brand effect is attractive" underlies preferential attachment. If new connections are made preferentially to more popular nodes, then the degree distribution of nodes follows power laws. Here we show that the brand effect is just one element of attractiveness; another element is the competitiveness. We develop a framework that allows us to investigate this competitive aspect of real networks, instead of simply preferring popular nodes. As opposed to preferential attachment, our model accurately describes the evolution of social and technological networks. We find that this competition for links allows more competitive nodes to obtain the more connected but less competitive ones. The phenomenon which more competitive nodes get richer links can help us understand the evolution of many competitive systems in nature and society. Through theoretical analysis and numerical simulations, we also find that our model has not only the universality for the homogeneous weighted network, but also th...

  13. Accounting for selection effects in the BH-bulge relations: No evidence for cosmological evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Schulze, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The redshift evolution of the black hole - bulge relations is an essential observational constraint for models of black hole - galaxy coevolution. In addition to the observational challenges for these studies, conclusions are complicated by the influence of selection effects. We demonstrate that there is presently no statistical significant evidence for cosmological evolution in the black hole-bulge relations, once these selection effects are taken into account and corrected for. We present a fitting method, based on the bivariate distribution of black hole mass and galaxy property, that accounts for the selection function in the fitting and is therefore able to recover the intrinsic black hole - bulge relation unbiased. While prior knowledge is restricted to a minimum, we at least require knowledge of either the sample selection function and the mass dependence of the active fraction, or the spheroid distribution function and the intrinsic scatter in the black hole - bulge relation. We employed our fitting r...

  14. Generation and characterization of a breast carcinoma model by PyMT overexpression in mammary epithelial cells of tree shrew, an animal close to primates in evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Guang-Zhe; Xia, Hou-Jun; He, Bao-Li; Zhang, Hai-Lin; Liu, Wen-Jing; Shao, Ming; Wang, Chun-Yan; Xiao, Ji; Ge, Fei; Li, Fu-Bing; Li, Yi; Chen, Ceshi

    2016-02-01

    The tree shrew is becoming an attractive experimental animal model for human breast cancer owing to a closer relationship to primates/humans than rodents. Tree shrews are superior to classical primates because tree shrew are easier to manipulate, maintain and propagate. It is required to establish a high-efficiency tree shrew breast cancer model for etiological research and drug assessment. Our previous studies suggest that 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) induce breast tumors in tree shrews with a low frequency (<50%) and long latency (∼ 7-month), making these methods less than ideal. We induced mammary tumors in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri chinensis) by injection of lentivirus expressing the PyMT oncogene into mammary ducts of 22 animals. Most tree shrews developed mammary tumors with a latency of about three weeks, and by 7 weeks all injected tree shrews had developed mammary tumors. Among these, papillary carcinoma is the predominant tumor type. One case showed lymph node and lung metastasis. Interestingly, the expression levels of phosphorylated AKT, ERK and STAT3 were elevated in 41-68% of PyMT-induced mammary tumors, but not all tumors. Finally, we observed that the growth of PyMT-induced tree shrew mammary tumors was significantly inhibited by Cisplatin and Epidoxorubicin. PyMT-induced tree shrew mammary tumor model may be suitable for further breast cancer research and drug development, due to its high efficiency and short latency. PMID:26296387

  15. Using public health surveillance data to monitor the effectiveness of brucellosis control measures in animals.

    OpenAIRE

    KUJTIM MERSINAJ; LULIETA ALLA; XHELIL KOLECI; SILVA BINO

    2014-01-01

    The current brucellosis control program in small ruminants consists in two major components the first is an intervention strategy through modification of host resistance by vaccinating the entire small ruminant’s population using live attenuated Rev-1 strain of B. melitensis. The second is a post vaccination monitoring and surveillance system (MOSS) to monitor the efficacy of the mass vaccination. The MOSS is based on sampling vaccinated animals between 20 to 40 days post-vaccination and tes...

  16. BIOFLAVONOID QUERCETIN-FOOD SOURCES, BIOAVAILABILITY, ABSORBTION AND EFFECT ON ANIMAL CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Baková

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioflavonoid quercetin is found in the edible portion of the majority of dietary plants. The absorption and metabolism of quercetin is still poorly understood. It is known that aglycone form of quercetin, which is absorbed better than quercetin administered in nonglucosidic forms Absorbed quercetin is probably extensively modified before being excreted by kidneys. It has a broad range of activities within animal cells and occurs to be able to prevent or reduce the development of different type of diseases.

  17. Chronic and acute effects of stress on energy balance: are there appropriate animal models?

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Ruth B. S.

    2014-01-01

    Stress activates multiple neural and endocrine systems to allow an animal to respond to and survive in a threatening environment. The corticotropin-releasing factor system is a primary initiator of this integrated response, which includes activation of the sympathetic nervous system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. The energetic response to acute stress is determined by the nature and severity of the stressor, but a typical response to an acute stressor is inhibition of food...

  18. Effects of chronic administration of drugs of abuse on impulsive choice (delay discounting) in animal models

    OpenAIRE

    Setlow, Barry; Mendez, Ian A.; Mitchell, Marci R; Simon, Nicholas W.

    2009-01-01

    Drug addicted individuals demonstrate high levels of impulsive choice, characterized by preference for small immediate over larger but delayed rewards. Although the causal relationship between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice in humans has been unclear, a small but growing body of literature over the past decade has shown that chronic drug administration in animal models can cause increases in impulsive choice, suggesting that a similar causal relationship may exist in human dru...

  19. Development of an animal experimental model to study the effects of levonorgestrel on the human endometrium

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez Gonzalez, Maria-Luz; Galant, C.; Frankenne, F.; Nisolle, Michelle; Labied, Soraya; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Marbaix, E; Beliard, Aude

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was designed to develop an animal model to test the response of endometrium to local progestin delivery. METHODS: Proliferative human endometrium was subcutaneously grafted in two groups of SCID mice that received, 2 days before, a subcutaneous estradiol (E2) pellet and, for half of them, an additional implant of levonorgestrel (LNG). Mice were sacrificed 1, 2, 3 or 4 weeks after endometrial implantation and grafts were histologically analysed. Proliferation, stero...

  20. Modeling the Effect of Traffic Calming on Local Animal Population Persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Catharinus F. Jaarsma; Frank van Langevelde

    2009-01-01

    A steady growth in traffic volumes in industrialized countries with dense human populations is expected, especially on minor roads. As a consequence, the fragmentation of wildlife populations will increase dramatically. In human-dominated landscapes, typically minor roads occur in high densities, and animals encounter them frequently. Traffic calming is a new approach to mitigate negative impacts by reducing traffic volumes and speeds on minor roads at a regional scale. This leads to a distin...